WorldWideScience

Sample records for emotional distress drinking

  1. Distress Response to the Failure to an Insoluble Anagrams Task: Maladaptive Emotion Regulation Strategies in Binge Drinking Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Poncin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotion regulation refers to the attempt to influence the latency, magnitude, and duration of an emotion, and to modify the experiential, behavioral, or physiological components of the emotional response. In situations of personal failure, individuals, and in particular those who present a tendency to self-focus, may experience intense emotional distress. Individuals who lack proper adaptive emotion regulation strategies may engage in activities leading to immediate pleasure, such as alcohol drinking, in order to escape the self-relevance of emotional experiences. This self-awareness theory of drinking has been shown explain relapses in self-focused alcohol-dependent individuals in situations of personal failure, after detoxification. Such relapses support the existence of maladaptive emotion regulation strategies in alcohol dependence. As binge drinking may be considered as an early stage of alcohol-use-disorder, the aim of this study was to explore the relationship between emotional distress, self-regulation and self-consciousness in binge drinkers (BD.Methods: Fifty-five students (32 BD and 23 controls completed different questionnaires related to the self (self-consciousness and self-regulation questionnaires and were exposed to a situation of self-failure (insoluble anagrams.Results: The distress induced by the anagrams task was more related to self-blame, ruminations and maladaptive emotion regulation strategies in BD than in controls. Emotional distress was related to less positive refocusing, refocusing on planning, and adaptive emotion regulation strategies among the control group with less public self-consciousness. Emotional distress was related to more positive refocusing, positive reappraisal, refocusing on planning, and adaptive emotion regulation strategies among control participants with higher public self-consciousness. Low self-conscious BD who experienced anagram distress used less acceptance and less refocusing on

  2. Emotional Distress May Increase Risk for Self-Medication and Lower Risk for Mood-related Drinking Consequences in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Laura Feagans; Hussong, Andrea M.; Hersh, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examines indicators of emotional distress and coping that may define sub-populations of adolescents at risk for two potential affect-related mechanisms underlying substance misuse: self-medication and mood-related drinking consequences. Although theory and empirical evidence point to the salience of affect-related drinking to current and future psychopathology, we have little knowledge of whether or for whom such mood-related processes exist in adolescents because few studies have used methods that optimally match the phenomenon to the level of analysis. Consequently, the current study uses multilevel modeling in which daily reports of negative mood and alcohol use are nested within individuals to examine whether adolescents with more emotional distress and poorer coping skills are more likely to evidence self-medication and mood-related drinking consequences. Seventy-five adolescents participated in a multi-method, multi-reporter study in which they completed a 21-day experience sampling protocol assessing thrice daily measures of mood and daily measures of alcohol use. Results indicate that adolescents reporting greater anger are more likely to evidence self-medication. Conversely, adolescents displaying lower emotional distress and more active coping are more likely to evidence mood-related drinking consequences. Implications for identifying vulnerable sub-populations of adolescents at risk for these mechanisms of problematic alcohol use are discussed. PMID:24358457

  3. Emotional Distress May Increase Risk for Self-Medication and Lower Risk for Mood-related Drinking Consequences in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Feagans

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study examines indicators of emotional distress and coping that may define sub-populations of adolescents at risk for two potential affect-related mechanisms underlying substance misuse: self-medication and mood-related drinking consequences. Although theory and empirical evidence point to the salience of affect-related drinking to current and future psychopathology, we have little knowledge of whether or for whom such mood-related processes exist in adolescents because few studies have used methods that optimally match the phenomenon to the level of analysis. Consequently, the current study uses multi-level modeling in which daily reports of negative mood and alcohol use are nested within individuals to examine whether adolescents with more emotional distress and poorer coping skills are more likely to evidence self-medication and mood-related drinking consequences. Seventy-five adolescents participated in a multi-method, multi-reporter study in which they completed a 21-day experience sampling protocol assessing thrice daily measures of mood and daily measures of alcohol use. Results indicate that adolescents reporting greater anger are more likely to evidence self-medication. Conversely, adolescents displaying lower emotional distress and more active coping are more likely to evidence mood-related drinking consequences. Implications for identifying vulnerable sub-populations of adolescents at risk for these mechanisms of problematic alcohol use are discussed.

  4. Emotional Distress, Alcohol Use, and Bidirectional Partner Violence Among Lesbian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin J; Padilla, Miguel A; Milletich, Robert J; Kelley, Michelle L; Winstead, Barbara A; Lau-Barraco, Cathy; Mason, Tyler B

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the relationship between emotional distress (defined as depression, brooding, and negative affect), alcohol outcomes, and bidirectional intimate partner violence among lesbian women. Results lend support to the self-medication hypothesis, which predicts that lesbian women who experience more emotional distress are more likely to drink to cope, and in turn report more alcohol use, problem drinking, and alcohol-related problems. These alcohol outcomes were, in turn, associated with bidirectional partner violence (BPV). These results offer preliminary evidence that, similar to findings for heterosexual women, emotional distress, alcohol use, and particularly, alcohol-related problems are risk factors for BPV among lesbian women. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Interpersonal Relationships and Emotional Distress in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Rachel; Dooley, Barbara; Fitzgerald, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine positive and negative qualities in adolescents' interpersonal relationships and their relative importance in predicting emotional distress. Participants were 260 students from three schools in the Dublin area (119 girls; 141 boys), aged 12-18 years (M = 15.32, SD = 1.91). Students completed questionnaires…

  6. Emotional Distress in College Students: Faculty Guide for Referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Carolina Univ., Cullowhee, NC. Counseling and Psychological Services.

    This guide presents advice for university faculty and professional staff members to help them understand and respond when students are in emotional distress. It includes a reference for signs of extreme stress and advice on how to intervene. Common causes of emotional distress are listed and warning signs of distress are given. Suggestions are…

  7. Psychological resilience contributes to low emotional distress in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jung-Ah; Yoon, Sujung; Lee, Chang-Uk; Chae, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Chul; Song, Kyo-Young; Kim, Tae-Suk

    2013-09-01

    Although a considerable number of cancer patients suffer from emotional distress which may have an impact on their quality of life, it still remains poorly understood which psychosocial factors contribute to individual vulnerabilities to emotional distress of cancer patients. Recently, resilience has been suggested as the capacity to cope with adversities like cancer. In this study, we investigated the relationships between resilience and emotional distress in cancer patients. One hundred fifty-two cancer patients who were consecutively hospitalized for their scheduled treatments at the Seoul St. Mary's Hospital were enrolled and completed the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale to measure resilience and emotional distress. The relationships between the levels of psychological resilience and emotional distress were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Psychological resilience levels were negatively associated with emotional distress after controlling for relevant covariates. The highest quartile of resilience level was associated with a 90% (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.03-0.34, P cancer patients, resilience was also found to be a significant protective factor for emotional distress (adjusted OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.02-0.79, P = 0.02). The present study suggests that psychological resilience may independently contribute to low emotional distress in cancer patients. The relationship between resilience and emotional distress was also significant in the subgroup of metastatic cancer patients. Psychosocial interventions to enhance resilience might provide useful approaches to overcome cancer-related emotional distress.

  8. Emotional distress in Angolan patients with several types of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aims to determine levels of anxiety, depression and emotional distress in ... gender, type and treatment of TB were related to higher levels of emotional disorder. ... pression Scale (HADS) in order to determine the levels.

  9. Negative Emotions and Behaviors are Markers of Breakup Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    Method: University students who experienced a recent romantic breakup were given several self-report measures and were then divided into high versus low breakup distress groups. Results: The high breakup distress versus the low breakup distress groups had higher scores on negative emotions scales including depression, anxiety and anger and…

  10. Emotional distress in Angolan patients with several types of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is growing evidence that emotional distress expressed in terms of anxiety and depression is very high among tuberculosis (TB) patients. Objectives: This study aims to determine levels of anxiety, depression and emotional distress in patients with several types of TB and to determine the association ...

  11. Hunger, inhibitory control and distress-induced emotional eating.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, T.; Ouwens, M.A.; Engel, C.G.; de Weerth, C.

    2014-01-01

    Self-reported emotional eating has been found to significantly moderate distress-induced food intake, with low emotional eaters eating less after a stress task than after a control task and high emotional eaters eating more. The aim of the present study was to explore possible underlying mechanisms

  12. Hunger, inhibitory control and distress-induced emotional eating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strien, T. van; Ouwens, M.A.; Engel, C.G.; Weerth, C. de

    2014-01-01

    Self-reported emotional eating has been found to significantly moderate distress-induced food intake, with low emotional eaters eating less after a stress task than after a control task and high emotional eaters eating more. The aim of the present study was to explore possible underlying mechanisms

  13. Partner relationship satisfaction and maternal emotional distress in early pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard-Gran Malin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of maternal emotional distress during pregnancy and the identification of risk factors for this distress are of considerable clinical- and public health importance. The mental health of the mother is important both for herself, and for the physical and psychological health of her children and the welfare of the family. The first aim of the present study was to identify risk factors for maternal emotional distress during pregnancy with special focus on partner relationship satisfaction. The second aim was to assess interaction effects between relationship satisfaction and the main predictors. Methods Pregnant women enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (n = 51,558 completed a questionnaire with questions about maternal emotional distress, relationship satisfaction, and other risk factors. Associations between 37 predictor variables and emotional distress were estimated by multiple linear regression analysis. Results Relationship dissatisfaction was the strongest predictor of maternal emotional distress (β = 0.25. Other predictors were dissatisfaction at work (β = 0.11, somatic disease (β = 0.11, work related stress (β = 0.10 and maternal alcohol problems in the preceding year (β = 0.09. Relationship satisfaction appeared to buffer the effects of frequent moving, somatic disease, maternal smoking, family income, irregular working hours, dissatisfaction at work, work stress, and mother's sick leave (P Conclusions Dissatisfaction with the partner relationship is a significant predictor of maternal emotional distress in pregnancy. A good partner relationship can have a protective effect against some stressors.

  14. In the Spirit of Full Disclosure: Maternal Distress, Emotion Validation, and Adolescent Disclosure of Distressing Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christina Gamache; Kim, Hyoun K; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2017-09-04

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the dynamic process of disclosure within the adolescent-mother relationship by examining how maternal personal distress and validation of adolescent negative affect would be related to adolescent disclosure of a distressing experience for the first time. A community sample of 66 mothers and their adolescent children (M = 14.31 years, 58% female) participated. The adolescents disclosed an emotionally distressing experience to their mothers for the first time. Mothers' validating behaviors and personal distress in response to their adolescents' expressions of negative emotion were predictive of adolescent disclosure. Adolescents made less detailed or substantive disclosures to their mothers when adolescents perceived their mothers as less validating of their negative emotions and when mothers were more likely to become distressed themselves. Neither adolescent-perceived maternal invalidation nor observed maternal validating or invalidating behaviors were related to adolescent disclosure. Maternal personal distress was further indirectly associated with less substantive disclosures through less maternal validation of negative emotion. These findings provide the foundation for future research evaluating clinical interventions targeted at increasing mothers' emotion regulation skills and validation of children's negative emotions. Such interventions may provide an effective way to promote better mother-adolescent communication, especially in regard to distressing experiences. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. ROLE OF PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL DISTRESSES IN CHILD ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Sidorenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the relation between vegetative and psycho emotional distresses in cases of child atopic dermatitis. The authors applied instrumental research methods to estimate the condition of vegetative nervous system (cardiointer valography together with anamnestic analysis and clinical psychopathological methods. Authors established the methods of correcting diagnosed distresses. Using psycho corrective therapy significantly increases the efficiency of complex treatment of atopic child dermatitis.Key words: atopic dermatitis, psycho emotional disorders, treatment, children.

  16. The Effect of Reappraising Social Exclusion on Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchens, Michael B.; Gohm, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine whether reappraisal, which is a strategy where the personal meaning of an event is reevaluated, would influence participants' emotional reactions to social exclusion feedback. It was expected that reappraising this event would reduce the emotional distress that accompanies social exclusion, but…

  17. Emotional distress among adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, S Cristina; Brinkman, Tara M; Ness, Kirsten K; Krull, Kevin R; Smith, Webb A; Srivastava, D Kumar; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Gurney, James G

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to estimate the prevalence of emotional distress in a large cohort of adult survivors of childhood cancer and to evaluate the interrelationship of risk factors including cancer-related late effects. Adult survivors of childhood cancer (N = 1,863), median age of 32 years at follow-up, completed comprehensive medical evaluations. Clinically relevant emotional distress was assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 and was defined as T-scores ≥63. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression models to identify risk factors for distress. Path analysis was used to examine associations among identified risk factors. Elevated global distress was reported by 15.1% of survivors. Cancer-related pain was associated with elevated distress (OR 8.72; 95% CI, 5.32-14.31). Survivors who reported moderate learning or memory problems were more likely to have elevated distress than survivors who reported no learning or memory problems (OR 3.27; 95% CI, 2.17-4.93). Path analysis implied that cancer-related pain has a direct effect on distress symptoms and an indirect effect through socioeconomic status and learning or memory problems. Similar results were observed for learning or memory problems. Childhood cancer-related morbidities including pain and learning or memory problems appear to be directly and indirectly associated with elevated distress symptoms decades after treatment. Understanding these associations may help inform intervention targets for survivors of childhood cancer experiencing symptoms of distress. A subset of long-term childhood cancer survivors experience significant emotional distress. Physical and cognitive late effects may contribute to these symptoms.

  18. Emotion Regulation and Emotional Distress in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Foundations and Considerations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazefsky, Carla A.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often associated with emotional distress and psychiatric comorbidities. Atypical emotion regulation (ER) may underlie these accompanying features. This special issue of the "Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders" presents a series of mechanistic and applied papers on ER and emotional experiences…

  19. Psychological Distress and Emotional Expression on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarova, Natalya N; Choi, Yoon Hyung; Whitlock, Janis; Cosley, Dan; Sosik, Victoria

    2017-03-01

    Social network sites (SNS) are a novel social environment for college students with psychological distress to connect with their peers, but the nature and effects of these interactions are not well understood. This study reports findings from a Facebook study among 238 college students reporting nonspecific psychological distress using the K-6 scale. Behavioral data included Facebook status updates containing affect words written by participants within the past 60 days and the number of responses (comments and likes) each update received. The updates were also coded for depression symptoms. Self-report data included participants' self-presentational concerns, the affective valence of each post, effects of responses on mood, and satisfaction with the responses to and outcome of each status update. Higher psychological distress was associated with displaying depression language on Facebook, with higher self-presentational concerns, and with less satisfaction with audiences' responses and less overall satisfaction with the outcome of the interaction. These results offer a unique glimpse into the social world of college students with psychological distress through their everyday use of Facebook, and how the interplay of this novel environment and students' mental health impacts their social behaviors and interaction meaning-making on Facebook.

  20. Hunger, inhibitory control and distress-induced emotional eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Strien, Tatjana; Ouwens, Machteld A; Engel, Carmen; de Weerth, Carolina

    2014-08-01

    Self-reported emotional eating has been found to significantly moderate distress-induced food intake, with low emotional eaters eating less after a stress task than after a control task and high emotional eaters eating more. The aim of the present study was to explore possible underlying mechanisms by assessing possible associations with (1) ability to experience the typical post-stress reduction of hunger and (2) inhibitory control. We studied these effects in 54 female students who were preselected on the basis of extremely high or low scores on an emotional eating questionnaire. Using a within subject design we measured the difference of actual food or snack intake after a control or a stress task (Trier Social Stress Test). As expected, the moderator effect of emotional eating on distress-induced food intake was found to be only present in females with a failure to report the typical reduction of hunger immediately after a stress task (an a-typical hunger stress response). Contrary to our expectations, this moderator effect of emotional eating was also found to be only present in females with high ability to stop motor impulses (high inhibitory control). These findings suggest that an a-typical hunger stress response but not poor inhibitory control may underlie the moderator effect of emotional eating on distress-induced food intake. However, inhibitory control may play a role whether or not there is a moderator effect of self-reported emotional eating on distress-induced food intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Adolescent Mental Health: Neighborhood Stress and Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snedker, Karen A.; Herting, Jerald R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the role of neighborhood characteristics, specifically economic disadvantage/advantage, residential instability, and racial/ethnic heterogeneity on emotional distress (depressed affect, anxiety, hopelessness) among youth. Using a regional sample of adolescents and matching their data to census tracts, we…

  2. Emotional distress among caregivers of patients with epilepsy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Caregivers of patients with epilepsy experience considerable emotional distress. The study aimed to assess the magnitude of the problem in a developing country. Method: A total 166 patients-caregivers were enrolled for the study. They were interviewed using a socio-demographic data collecting sheet and the ...

  3. Emotional distress among caregivers of patients with epilepsy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with stigma which is not only limited to the patient but also includes other family members.3,4 ... the disability or illness.5,6 Emotional distress among caregivers has been defined as mood disturbances like .... were relatively young and as such could not effectively cope with the role bestowed on them. Caregivers ...

  4. Emotional distress in Angolan patients with several types of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CESPU, Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde- Norte (SciencesDepartment). Gandra/ Portugal. Abstract. Background: There is growing evidence that emotional distress expressed in terms of anxiety and depression is very high among tuberculosis (TB) patients. Objectives: This study aims to determine levels of anxiety, ...

  5. Sex differences in mediating and moderating processes linking economic stressors, psychological distress, and drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Brown, Robyn; Richman, Judith A

    2012-09-01

    Given the recent downturn in the U.S. economy, we considered in this study the processes linking economic stressors, psychological distress, and two alcohol-related outcomes (past-month drinking and problematic drinking). Data were drawn from a mail survey of a national sample of 663 respondents. Structural equation modeling was used to assess whether psychological distress mediates the associations between economic stressors and the alcohol-related outcomes considered and whether these associations varied by gender. Controlling for correlations among the outcomes and the effects of the sociodemographic control variables, psychological distress was found to partly explain the association between economic stressors and problematic drinking. The mediating effects on problematic drinking were significantly greater for men than women. The findings demonstrate the utility of considering interrelationships among alcohol-related outcomes and, in this context, reveal the circumstances in which gender matters most for understanding the associations among economy-related stressors, psychological distress, and drinking.

  6. Emotional distress reported by women and husbands prior to a breast biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, L L; Jeffs, M; Cracchiolo-Caraway, A; Lampman, L; Dorris, G

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the emotional distress of women (N = 300) and husbands (N = 265) prior to the women's breast biopsy and to identify factors related to their levels of distress. Standardized instruments were used to measure social support, uncertainty, marital satisfaction, family functioning, concurrent stress, hopelessness, and emotional distress. Women reported moderately high levels of emotional distress and significantly more distress than their husbands. Forty-two percent of the variance in women's distress scores and 42% of the variance in husbands' distress scores were accounted for by the independent variables. Concurrent stress, lower education, hopelessness, and uncertainty explained the most variance in women's distress, while concurrent stress, hopelessness, and family functioning explained the most variance in husbands' distress.

  7. Cognitive Coping Strategies and Emotional Distress in Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena PREDESCU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mothers’ emotional distress,when having a child with diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD, isdifferent depending on depending on the thinking pattern (rational orirrational and cognitive coping strategies used. The aim of this study was to assess irrational beliefs, negativeautomatic thoughts, emotional distress, cognitive coping strategies and therelation between them, in mothers of children with ASD. Datawere collected from 65 mothers having a child with diagnosis of ASD. Several psychologicalinstruments were used to assess the irrational beliefs (ABSs, automatic negativethoughts (ATQ, emotional distress (PAD and cognitive coping strategies(CERQ. Mothers reported high levels of emotional distress, automatic negative thoughtsand irrational beliefs. The cognitive coping strategies that correlated positivelyand statistically significant with emotional distress were self-blame,catastrophizing and rumination. Self-blame and catastrophizing strategies correlatedpositively and statistically significant with the irrational beliefs. Theresults also suggest that the use of maladaptive coping strategies correlateswith a higher levels of irrational beliefs and emotional distress.

  8. Empathy and distress: two distinct but related emotions in response to infant crying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Chu; McFatter, Robert

    2012-12-01

    This study examined a largely overlooked, yet potentially important, association between empathy and distress in cry responding. The cry stimulus included a 1-min-long video clip of a 4-week-old, crying, male infant. Participants reported their dispositional empathy and distress, perceived aversiveness of the cry stimulus, response emotions, and intention to intervene with the crying infant. Empathy and distress covaried positively both in disposition and in cry responding. Response empathy and distress were related to their corresponding dispositional emotions, but response empathy was also related to dispositional distress. Perceived aversiveness interacted with response distress in predicting response empathy. Both response empathy and distress appeared to be important determinants of intention to intervene. Overall, empathy and distress in response to infant crying appeared more closely related than previously thought. Implications concerning the regulation of emotions in cry responding are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethnic aspects of emotional distress in patients with diabetes--the Amsterdam Health Monitor Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Wijnhoven, H A H; Ujcic-Voortman, J K

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Depression and anxiety are relatively common in patients with diabetes, but it is unclear whether migrant patients with diabetes are at increased risk for emotional distress. We determined levels of emotional distress in patients with diabetes with a Turkish, Moroccan or Dutch ethnic...... circumference were not. CONCLUSIONS: Emotional distress affects approximately one third of adult patients with diabetes living in Amsterdam. Having multiple co-morbid diseases seems related to more emotional distress among these patients, while ethnicity and diabetes-related characteristics are not....... background and compare distress levels with healthy control subjects. Among patients with diabetes, we examined demographic and clinical correlates of higher levels of emotional distress. METHODS: Cross-sectional data were collected within the framework of the population-based Amsterdam Health Monitor Survey...

  10. Drinking motives mediate emotion regulation difficulties and problem drinking in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurora, Pallavi; Klanecky, Alicia K

    2016-05-01

    Problem drinking in college places students at an increased risk for a wealth of negative consequences including alcohol use disorders. Most research has shown that greater emotion regulation difficulties are related to increased problem drinking, and studies generally assume that drinking is motivated by efforts to cope with or enhance affective experiences. However, there is a lack of research specifically testing this assumption. The current study sought to examine the mediating potential of drinking motives, specifically coping and enhancement, on the relationship between emotion regulation and problem drinking. College participants (N = 200) completed an online survey, consisting of a battery of measures assessing alcohol use behaviors and related variables. Coping drinking motives fully mediated the emotion regulation/problem drinking relationship, and enhancement motives partially mediated this relationship. Exploratory analyses indicated that all four drinking motives (i.e. coping, enhancement, social, and conformity) simultaneously mediated the relationship between emotion regulation and quantity/frequency of alcohol use. However, only coping and enhancement significantly mediated the relationship between emotion regulation and alcohol-related consequences (e.g. alcohol dependence symptoms, alcohol-related injuries). The current results offer direction for potentially modifying brief alcohol interventions in efforts to reduce students' engagement in problem drinking behaviors. For example, interventions might incorporate information on the risks of using alcohol as a means of emotion regulation and offer alternative emotion regulation strategies.

  11. Emotional Intelligence, Social Coping, and Psychological Distress among Chinese Gifted Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David W.

    2005-01-01

    The relationships among emotional intelligence, social coping, and psychological distress were investigated in a sample of 624 Chinese gifted students in Hong Kong. A mediation-effect model specifying that emotional intelligence had an effect on psychological distress mediated by social coping was hypothesized and tested using structural equation…

  12. Emotional Distress among LGBT Youth: The Influence of Perceived Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Joanna; Johnson, Renee M.; Corliss, Heather L.; Molnar, Beth E.; Azrael, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    The authors evaluated emotional distress among 9th-12th grade students, and examined whether the association between being lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgendered (i.e., "LGBT") and emotional distress was mediated by perceptions of having been treated badly or discriminated against because others thought they were gay or lesbian.…

  13. Associations between Intimate Partner Violence and Emotional Distress among Pregnant Women in Durban, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Allison K.; Kagee, Ashraf; Maman, Suzanne; Moodley, Dhayendre; Rouse, Petrica

    2012-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy has been associated with multiple negative health outcomes including emotional distress during pregnancy. However, little is known about IPV during pregnancy and its association with emotional distress among South African women. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of both…

  14. The Association of Age, Sense of Control, Optimism, and Self-Esteem with Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, M. Guadalupe; Montorio, Ignacio; Izal, María

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test a model of emotional distress, which incorporates the potential mediator role of positive resources (sense of control, self-esteem, and optimism) in the association of age with emotional distress. The study used a cross-sectional design with intentional sampling and the voluntary participation of 325 adults…

  15. Sexual assault related distress and drinking: the influence of daily reports of social support and coping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappenbeck, Cynthia A; Hassija, Christina M; Zimmerman, Lindsey; Kaysen, Debra

    2015-03-01

    Introduction. A history of sexual assault (SA) is often associated with increased distress and heavy drinking. One's ability to cope with the distress and seek social support has been associated with drinking more generally. However, SA-related distress, drinking, and the extent to which a woman engages in adaptive coping or seeks social support is known to vary day-to-day. The goal of the present investigation was to examine the moderating influence of perceived coping control and social support on the event-level association between SA-related distress and drinking. Methods. This study included 133 college women with a history of SA who reported recent heavy drinking. Participants provided daily reports of their SA-related distress, perceived coping control, perceived social support, and alcohol consumption every day for 30days. Results. Results of generalized estimating equation models suggest that coping control moderated the association between distress and drinking such that those with less perceived coping control drank more as their SA-related distress increased from their average. Although social support did not moderate between distress and drinking, decreases in perceived social support were associated with more drinking on that day. Conclusions. The results suggest that daily deviations in SA-related distress may influence alcohol consumption more than average levels of distress, especially among women with low coping control. Interventions for women with SA histories should help them build coping skills as well as adequate social support in order to reduce drinking. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Friendship and Social Emotions in Young Adult Finns' Drinking Diaries

    OpenAIRE

    Jukka Törrönen; Antti Maunu

    2011-01-01

    In the article we examine the management of social emotions and friendship bonds by analysing the young adults´ pub and drinking diaries. We assume that emotions that are embodied in the management of friendship ties can be reduced to the emotions of pride and shame. According to Scheff, as primary social emotions, they are present in all communication and action. They express for the participants of interaction the actual "temperature" of social relations. Pride refers to a strong and safe i...

  17. Survivors of breast cancer: illness uncertainty, positive reappraisal, and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, M E

    1998-04-01

    To explore variables associated with illness uncertainty and emotional distress for disease-free survivors of breast cancer. Cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational. Regional cancer center in the southeastern United States. 109 women one to six years post-treatment for stage I-III nonmetastatic breast cancer. Face-to-face data gathering using five questionnaires with established reliability. Symptom distress, concurrent illness, fear of recurrence, illness uncertainty, positive reappraisal, and emotional distress. The antecedent variables symptom distress, fear of recurrence, and concurrent illness problems were positively related to illness uncertainty. Illness uncertainty and the antecedent variables were positively related to emotional distress. The antecedent variables explained 40% of the variance in uncertainty. Uncertainty, its antecedents, and positive reappraisal collectively explained 51% of the variance in emotional distress. Illness uncertainty related to symptoms and fear of recurrence was linked with emotional distress for some women, even years after treatment. Positive reappraisal may help to reduce this distress. Nurses need to identify, monitor, and assist women who are at risk for illness uncertainty and emotional distress after breast cancer treatment. They also should explore with women positive, growth-promoting aspects of breast cancer, as well as aspects of the disease that are threatening.

  18. Violence against teachers in South Korea: negative consequences and factors leading to emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byongook; Morash, Merry; Jang, June Oh; Jeong, SeokJin

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies indicate that violence against teachers is a globally prevalent phenomenon and has damaging negative effects on victimized teachers' physical and emotional well-being and teaching effectiveness. Nevertheless, limited empirical research has been conducted to identify factors affecting emotional distress among victimized teachers. This research contributes to the literature by exploring negative consequence of victimization and factors associated with victimized teachers' emotional distress in a South Korean context. The results indicate that students' verbal and noncontact physical aggression are highly correlated with teachers' emotional distress. Teachers' gender, student-oriented approach, and several incident characteristics (number of offending students, direct settlement with offending students) are significant predictors of emotional distress caused by either students' verbal threat or noncontact aggressive behaviors. Directions for future research and policy implications are discussed.

  19. The Impact of Multiple Concussions on Emotional Distress, Post-Concussive Symptoms, and Neurocognitive Functioning in Active Duty United States Marines Independent of Combat Exposure or Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Bleiberg, Joseph; Tsao, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether the lingering effects of concussion on emotional, physical, and cognitive symptoms is because of the effects of brain trauma or purely to emotional factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression. This study examines the independent effects of concussion on persistent symptoms. The Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment, a clinical decision support tool, was used to assess neurobehavioral functioning in 646 United States Marines, all of whom were fit for duty. Marines were assessed for concussion history, post-concussive symptoms, emotional distress, neurocognitive functioning, and deployment history. Results showed that a recent concussion or ever having experienced a concussion was associated with an increase in emotional distress, but not with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) or neurocognitive functioning. Having had multiple lifetime concussions, however, was associated with greater emotional distress, PPCS, and reduced neurocognitive functioning that needs attention and rapid discrimination, but not for memory-based tasks. These results are independent of deployment history, combat exposure, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Results supported earlier findings that a previous concussion is not generally associated with post-concussive symptoms independent of covariates. In contrast with other studies that failed to find a unique contribution for concussion to PPCS, however, evidence of recent and multiple concussion was seen across a range of emotional distress, post-concussive symptoms, and neurocognitive functioning in this study population. Results are discussed in terms of implications for assessing concussion on return from combat. PMID:25003552

  20. The buffering effect of relationship satisfaction on emotional distress in couples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Røsand, Gun-Mette B; Slinning, Kari; Eberhard-Gran, Malin; Røysamb, Espen; Tambs, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    .... One aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of a set of risk factors for emotional distress among men and women in couples, with a special focus on satisfaction with partner relationship...

  1. Urban Teens: Trauma, Posttraumatic Growth, and Emotional Distress among Female Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickovics, Jeanette R.; Meade, Christina S.; Kershaw, Trace S.; Milan, Stephanie; Lewis, Jessica B.; Ethier, Kathleen A.

    2006-01-01

    Urban teens face many traumas, with implications for potential growth and distress. This study examined traumatic events, posttraumatic growth, and emotional distress over 18 months among urban adolescent girls (N = 328). Objectives were to (a) describe types of traumatic events, (b) determine how type and timing of events relate to profiles of…

  2. Predictors of children's emotional distress in a mother-absent situation: implications for caregiving research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Laughlin, E M; Meeker, E C; Bischoff, L G

    2000-06-01

    Although many factors have been found to be associated with caregiving behavior among preschool-age siblings, few studies have considered the older child's emotional responses to the distress of a younger sibling in the mother's absence. In this study, the authors considered both individual and family factors that predict older and younger sibling distress in a mother-absent situation designed to elicit caregiving behavior. For both older and younger siblings, the strongest predictor of distress following the mother's departure was distress in the other sibling, suggesting the importance of situational factors. Individual and family factors, however, were also found to predict child distress. Among older siblings, shy and sociable temperaments were associated with greater distress during the mother's absence. Higher levels of parenting stress were found to be associated with less distress among both older and younger siblings in the mother-absent situation. Results are discussed in terms of individual and family environment influences on the sibling relationship.

  3. Factors Associated with Emotional Distress in Children and Adolescents during Early Treatment for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, In Jung; Han, Jung Woo; Hahn, Seung Min; Song, Dong Ho; Lyu, Chuhl Joo; Cheon, Keun Ah

    2017-07-01

    Children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer experience emotional distress, such as sadness, worrying, and irritability. However, there is little information about the psychological well-being of parents at the time of their child's diagnosis. We sought to identify factors that were associated with emotional distress in cancer patients as a basis for developing innovative psychological interventions. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients newly diagnosed with cancer at a single center in Korea from 2014 to 2016. Eighty-five patients and their mothers completed psychological inventories. To determine factors associated with emotional distress in patients, we assessed the psychological inventory results using multiple linear regression after performing correlation analysis. The maternal Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) score was positively correlated with total problem scores and externalizing scores in patients aged less than 7 years. In patients aged 7-12 years, there was no significant association between the patient's emotional distress and other variables. In contrast, the maternal BDI-II score was the strongest factor associated with patient depression in adolescents. We suggest that the most important factor affecting emotional distress in children and adolescents with cancer is maternal depression, especially in patients aged 1-6 years and aged 13-17 years. Understanding the factors associated with emotional distress of cancer patients allows us to develop early psychiatric interventions for patients and their parents at the initial psychological crisis.

  4. The Role of Ineffective Emotion Regulation in Problem Drinking Varies by Emotional Disposition, Delinquency, and Gender of South Korean Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sunmi; Graham, Jennifer E.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Sohn, Young-Woo

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of emotion regulation (ER) strategies and emotional disposition in problem drinking of adolescent offenders (n = 303) and non-offending peers (n = 287) from South Korea. The participants completed a questionnaire assessing problem drinking, positive and negative emotion, emotional intensity, and use of problem solving,…

  5. The Predicting Role of Difficulties in Emotion Regulation and Distress Tolerance in Students’ Addiction Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Esmaeilinasab

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the predicting role of difficulties in emotion regulation and distress tolerance in addiction potential in university students. Method: The sample included 180 students of Allameh Tabatabaei University (82 males and 88 females who were selected randomly. For this correlational study, the Addiction Potential Scale, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, and Distress Tolerance Scale (Simons & Gaher, 2005 were administered among selected sample. Results: The results showed that difficulties in emotion regulation could predict 37.5 percent of addiction potential and between its subscales, lack of emotional clarity, had the most important role. Also, distress tolerance was not significantly related to addiction potential. Conclusion: By considering of results, it can be said students’ training in improving of emotion regulation is useful in preventing of addiction.

  6. Distress in response to emotional and sexual infidelity: evidence of evolved gender differences in Spanish students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ana Maria; Vera-Villarroel, Pablo; Sierra, Juan Carlos; Zubeidat, Ihab

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied gender differences in response to hypothetical infidelity in Spanish students. Using a forced-choice methodology, the authors asked a sample of 266 participants to indicate which kind of infidelity would be more distressing: emotional or sexual. Men were significantly more distressed by sexual infidelity than were women, and women were significantly more distressed by emotional infidelity than were men. Results supported the hypothesis that particular infidelity types, which resemble adaptive problems that human beings faced in the past, contribute to the psychology of jealousy. The results are consistent with previous cross-cultural research.

  7. Emotional distress and prenatal attachment in pregnancy after perinatal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Deborah Smith

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the association of previous perinatal loss with parents' levels of depressive symptoms, pregnancy-specific anxiety, and prenatal attachment in a subsequent pregnancy, and to determine whether higher levels of depressive symptoms and pregnancy-specific anxiety were associated with prenatal attachment. A three-group comparative design was used to collect cross-sectional survey data. The sample consisted of 103 couples who were in the second trimester of pregnancy: 40 couples who had a perinatal loss in a previous pregnancy, 33 couples were pregnant for the first time, and 30 couples had a history of prior successful pregnancies. Structured questionnaires via in-person or telephone interviews were used to measure depressive symptoms, pregnancy-specific anxiety, and prenatal attachment. Couples with a history of perinatal loss had higher levels of depressive symptoms and pregnancy-specific anxiety than did couples with past successful pregnancies and no losses; mothers had higher levels of symptoms than did fathers in all groups, Couples with and without a history of perinatal loss did not differ in their level of prenatal attachment in the current pregnancy. These findings do not support the theory that depressive symptoms and pregnancy-specific anxiety affect subsequent parent-infant attachment in a pregnancy after perinatal loss. However, they do provide insight into the continuing influence of parents' previous loss experience on their depressive symptoms and pregnancy-specific anxiety in subsequent pregnancies. Families should be assessed to examine the potential long-term influence of emotional distress as a result of prior perinatal loss.

  8. Emotional security in the family system and psychological distress in female survivors of child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantón-Cortés, David; Cantón, José; Cortés, María Rosario

    2016-01-01

    The Emotional Security Theory (EST) was originally developed to investigate the association between high levels of interparental conflict and child maladaptative outcome. The objective of the present study was to analyze the effects of emotional security in the family system on psychological distress among a sample of young female adult survivors of child sexual abuse (CSA). The role of emotional security was investigated through the interactive effects of a number of factors including the type of abuse, the continuity of abuse, the relationship with the perpetrator and the existence of disclosure for the abuse. Participants were 167 female survivors of CSA. Information about the abuse was obtained from a self-reported questionnaire. Emotional security was assessed with the Security in the Family System (SIFS) Scale, and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) was used to assess psychological distress. In the total sample, insecurity (preoccupation and disengagement) was correlated with high psychological distress scores, whereas no relationship was found between security and psychological distress. The relationship between emotional insecurity and psychological distress was stronger in cases of continued abuse and non-disclosure, while the relationship between emotional security and distress was stronger in cases of extrafamilial abuse and especially isolated or several incidents and when a disclosure had been made. No interactive effect was found between any of the three emotional variables and the type of abuse committed. The results of the current study suggest that characteristics of CSA such as relationship with the perpetrator and, especially, continuity of abuse and whether or not disclosure had been made, can affect the impact of emotional security on psychological distress of CSA survivors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between infertility-related stress and emotional distress and marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gana, Kamel; Jakubowska, Sylwia

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive effects of infertility-related stress on psychological distress and marital satisfaction. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate a nonrecursive model hypothesizing the impact of infertility-related stress on both emotional distress and marital dissatisfaction, which were supposed to have a reciprocal influence on each other. The model was estimated using data from a sample of 150 infertile patients (78 males and 72 females). Findings confirmed the predictive effects of infertility-related stress on both emotional and marital distress. However, infertility-related stress was found to have more impact on emotional distress than on marital satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Preserved Crossmodal Integration of Emotional Signals in Binge Drinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine Lannoy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Binge drinking is an alcohol consumption pattern with various psychological and cognitive consequences. As binge drinking showed qualitatively comparable cognitive impairments to those reported in alcohol-dependence, a continuum hypothesis suggests that this habit would be a first step toward alcohol-related disorders. Besides these cognitive impairments, alcohol-dependence is also characterized by large-scale deficits in emotional processing, particularly in crossmodal contexts, and these abilities have scarcely been explored in binge drinking. Emotional decoding, most often based on multiple modalities (e.g., facial expression, prosody or gesture, yet represents a crucial ability for efficient interpersonal communication and social integration. The present study is the first exploration of crossmodal emotional processing in binge drinking, in order to test whether binge drinkers already present the emotional impairments described among alcohol-dependent patients, in line with the continuum hypothesis. Twenty binge drinkers and 20 matched controls performed an experimental task requiring the identification of two emotions (happiness or anger presented in two modalities (visual or auditory within three conditions (unimodal, crossmodal congruent or crossmodal incongruent. In accordance with previous research in binge drinking and alcohol-dependence, this study was based on two main hypotheses. First, binge drinkers would present a reduced facilitation effect (i.e., classically indexed in healthy populations by faster reaction times when two congruent modalities are presented simultaneously. Second, binge drinkers would have higher difficulties to inhibit interference in incongruent modalities. Results showed no significant difference between groups in emotional decoding ability, whatever the modality or condition. Control participants, however, appeared slower than binge drinkers in recognizing facial expressions, also leading to a stronger

  11. Pain among institutionalized stroke patients and its relation to emotional distress and social engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Almenkerk, S.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Eefsting, J.A.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pain is a frequent long-term consequence of stroke, but its relation to emotional and social well-being is poorly studied in stroke populations. We aimed to identify the prevalence of substantial pain among institutionalized stroke patients and to explore its relation to emotional distress

  12. Tinnitus- related distress: evidence from fMRI of an emotional stroop task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Golm

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tinnitus affects 5 % of the population, 17 % suffer under the condition. This distress seems mainly to be dependent on negative cognitive-emotional evaluation of the tinnitus and selective attention to the tinnitus. A well-established paradigm to examine selective attention and emotional processing is the Emotional Stroop Task (EST. Recent models of tinnitus distress propose limbic, frontal and parietal regions to be more active in highly distressed tinnitus patients. Only a few studies have compared high and low distressed tinnitus patients. Thus, this study aimed to explore neural correlates of tinnitus-related distress. Methods Highly distressed tinnitus patients (HDT, n = 16, low distressed tinnitus patients (LDT, n = 16 and healthy controls (HC, n = 16 underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during an EST, that used tinnitus-related words and neutral words as stimuli. A random effects analysis of the fMRI data was conducted on the basis of the general linear model. Furthermore correlational analyses between the blood oxygen level dependent response and tinnitus distress, loudness, depression, anxiety, vocabulary and hypersensitivity to sound were performed. Results Contradictory to the hypothesis, highly distressed patients showed no Stroop effect in their reaction times. As hypothesized HDT and LDT differed in the activation of the right insula and the orbitofrontal cortex. There were no hypothesized differences between HDT and HC. Activation of the orbitofrontal cortex and the right insula were found to correlate with tinnitus distress. Conclusions The results are partially supported by earlier resting-state studies and corroborate the role of the insula and the orbitofrontal cortex in tinnitus distress.

  13. The Impact of Emotionally Focused Therapy on Emotional Distress in Infertile Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Soltani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study investigated the effect of emotionally focused therapy (EFT on factors contributing to emotional distress among infertile couples. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, the subjects consisted of 12 Iranian couples: six infertile men and six infertile women. They were assessed as depressed, anxious and stressful individuals using depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS. The subjects were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group with six couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women received EFT, while the control group with similar number of couples (i.e. three infertile men and three infertile women was deprived of the treatment. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding job, educational level, income, age, marriage and infertility duration. The pre- and post-test comparisons of DASS subscales showed that level of depression, anxiety and stress among couples with EFT instruction was significantly less than those without such instructions (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Emotionally focused therapy could reduce the rate of depression, anxiety and stress in infertile couples, regardless of the man or woman as the cause of infertility.

  14. [Multiple-Victimisation due to Armed Conflict and Emotional Distress in the State of Magdalena, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Sanabria, Adriana R; Ospino, Anyelly; Guerra, Valeria M; Caamaño, Beatriz H

    Emotional distress is common in Colombian armed conflict victims. Multiple-victimisation is associated with an increase in emotional distress than victimisation due a single event. However, the association between poly-victimisation and emotional distress among victims of the armed conflict in Colombia has not been documented. To study the association between multiple-victimisation and emotional distress in victims of armed conflict in the State of Magdalena, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was designed, with a secondary analysis of registration of the Psychosocial Care Program and Victim Integral Health (PAPSIVI) in the State of Magdalena, from 2013 to 2014. The profile formula grouped demographic variables, victimising events, and a set of symptoms of emotional distress (perceived discrimination, depressive and anxiety-stress). Odds ratio (OR, 95%CI) were established as measures of association. A total of 943 people were included, with 67.4% women, and ages between18 and 94 years (mean 47.9±14.2). A total of 109 (11.7%) suffered from multiple victimisation. Multiple victimisation events were associated with more emotional distress, depressive symptoms (OR=1.5; 95%CI, 1.3-1.8), perceived stigma (OR=1.3; 95%CI, 1.1-1.5), and anxiety-stress (OR=1.2; 95%CI 1.0-1.4) than a single event. There is more emotional distress in multiple victimisations than in a single victimisation event during armed conflict in this region of Colombia. Further studies are required on this topic. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. How Do Young People Accessing Mental Health Services Describe and Understand Emotional Distress?

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: There has been growing acknowledgement of the role of emotional distress in the development of mental health difficulties yet despite adolescence being a complex developmental stage, where individuals develop an increasingly sophisticated conceptual framework for their emotional experiences, research has focused on normative adult populations. Furthermore, a lack of shared concept and pragmatic research considerations has led to a diverse conceptualisation of emotional dis...

  16. Decision making, cognitive distortions and emotional distress: A comparison between pathological gamblers and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Maria; Griffiths, Mark D; Nigro, Giovanna; Cosenza, Marina

    2017-03-01

    The etiology of problem gambling is multifaceted and complex. Among others factors, poor decision making, cognitive distortions (i.e., irrational beliefs about gambling), and emotional factors (e.g., negative mood states) appear to be among the most important factors in the development and maintenance of problem gambling. Although empirical evidence has suggested that cognitive distortions facilitate gambling and negative emotions are associated with gambling, the interplay between cognitive distortions, emotional states, and decision making in gambling remains unexplored. Pathological gamblers (N = 54) and healthy controls (N = 54) completed the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS), the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), the Gambling Related Cognitions Scale (GRCS), and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21). Compared to healthy controls, pathological gamblers showed poorer decision making and reported higher scores on measures assessing cognitive distortions and emotional distress. All measures were positively associated with gambling severity. A significant negative correlation between decision making and cognitive distortions was also observed. No associations were found between poor decision making and emotional distress. Logistic regression analysis indicated that cognitive distortions, emotional distress, and poor decision making were significant predictors of problem gambling. The use of self-report measures and the absence of female participants limit the generalizability of the reported findings. The present study is the first to demonstrate the mutual influence between irrational beliefs and poor decision making, as well as the role of cognitive bias, emotional distress, and poor decision making in gambling disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring Sources of Emotional Distress among People Living with Scleroderma: A Focus Group Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie T Gumuchian

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis, or scleroderma, is a chronic and rare connective tissue disease with negative physical and psychological implications. Sources of emotional distress and the impact they have on the lives of people with scleroderma are not well understood.To gain an in-depth understanding of the emotional experiences and sources of emotional distress for women and men living with scleroderma through focus group discussions.Three semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted (two in English, one in French with a total of 22 people with scleroderma recruited through the Scleroderma Society of Ontario in Hamilton, Ontario and a scleroderma clinic in Montreal, Canada. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and then coded for emerging themes using thematic inductive analysis.Core themes representing sources of emotional distress were identified, including: (a facing a new reality; (b the daily struggle of living with scleroderma; (c handling work, employment and general financial burden; (d changing family roles; (e social interactions; and (f navigating the health care system. Collectively, these themes refer to the stressful journey of living with scleroderma including the obstacles faced and the emotional experiences beginning prior to receiving a diagnosis and continuing throughout the participants' lives.Scleroderma was portrayed as being an unpredictable and overwhelming disease, resulting in many individuals experiencing multiple sources of emotional distress. Interventions and supportive resources need to be developed to help individuals with scleroderma and people close to them manage and cope with the emotional aspects of the disease.

  18. The use of supportive communication when responding to older people's emotional distress in home care - An observational study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hafskjold, L; Sundling, V; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Responding to older people's distress by acknowledging or encouraging further discussion of emotions is central to supportive, person-centred communication, and may enhance home care outcomes...

  19. Emotional distress impacts quality of life evaluation: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I-Chan; Brinkman, Tara M; Armstrong, Gregory T; Leisenring, Wendy; Robison, Leslie L; Krull, Kevin R

    2017-06-01

    We compared health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between adult survivors of childhood cancer and siblings by investigating the mediating role of emotional distress on HRQOL assessment, and examining the extent to which emotional distress affected the item responses of HRQOL measures given the same underlying HRQOL (i.e., measurement non-invariance). Cancer survivors (7103) and siblings (390) enrolled in Childhood Cancer Survivor Study who completed the SF-36 measuring HRQOL and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 measuring anxiety, depression, and somatization were analyzed. Multiple Indicators & Multiple Causes modeling was performed to identify measurement non-invariance related to emotional distress on the responses to HRQOL items. Mediation analysis was performed to test the effects of cancer experience on HRQOL accounting for the mediating role of emotional distress. Twenty-nine percent, 40%, and 34% of the SF-36 items were identified with measurement non-invariance related to anxiety, depression, and somatization, respectively. Survivors reported poorer HRQOL than siblings in all domains (ps cancer experience influences the responses to HRQOL measures. Interventions to treat emotional distress may improve cancer survivors' HRQOL.

  20. Antecedents of mothers' emotional and cognitive responses to infant distress: The role of family, mother, and infant characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leerkes, Esther M; Crockenberg, Susan C

    2006-07-01

    The antecedents of mothers' emotional and cognitive responses to infant distress were examined. Participants were 67 mothers and their infants. Mothers completed questionnaires assessing their experiences in the family of origin and current marital relationships both pre- and postnatally and their coping strategies prenatally. Infant temperament was observed at 6 months, and mothers were interviewed about their emotional and cognitive responses to infant distress 2 years later to assess their emotional competencies (i.e., accurate identification of negative emotions, emotion efficacy, emotional responses to infant distress, and emotion goals). A childhood history of emotional rejection was negatively associated with empathy and efficacy and positively associated with negative emotions. The association between childhood history and some emotional competencies was moderated by current marital dysfunction, engaged coping, and positive intervening relationships. Maternal marital styles and coping strategies and infant temperament correlated with emotional competencies. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed from an attachment theory perspective. Copyright © 2006 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  1. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction: effect on emotional distress in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Laura A; Cappola, Anne R; Baime, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Psychological distress is common in patients with diabetes. Little is known about the impact of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), a non-traditional, cognitive behavioural intervention designed to improve stress management skills, in patients with diabetes. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the impact of MBSR training on mood states in 25 individuals with diabetes. All participants completed the Profile of Mood States Short Form (POMS-SF) at baseline and following eight weeks of MBSR. Overall psychological distress measured by the total mood score (TMS) and six subscales - including tension/anxiety, depression/dejection, anger/hostility, fatigue/inertia, confusion/bewilderment and vigour/activity - were assessed. Overall mood, measured by the TMS, as well as all subscale mood measurements improved significantly from baseline following MBSR training. Compared to population means, those with diabetes had higher distress at baseline and similar levels of distress following MBSR training. The primary reason participants reported for enrolling in the MBSR course was to improve stress management skills. It was concluded that MBSR training is a promising, group-based intervention that can be used to decrease psychological distress in individuals with diabetes who perceive a need for training in stress management.

  2. The Mediating Role of Well-Being and Self-Regulation of Emotions in Daily Executive Dysfunctions and Psychological Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Villamisar Domingo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An emerging literature has begun to document the emotional consequences of everyday executive functions on emotional distress. Little is known, however, about whether this relation is mediated by other variables.

  3. Emotional distress among LGBT youth: the influence of perceived discrimination based on sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Joanna; Johnson, Renee M; Corliss, Heather L; Molnar, Beth E; Azrael, Deborah

    2009-08-01

    The authors evaluated emotional distress among 9th-12th grade students, and examined whether the association between being lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgendered (i.e., "LGBT") and emotional distress was mediated by perceptions of having been treated badly or discriminated against because others thought they were gay or lesbian. Data come from a school-based survey in Boston, Massachusetts (n = 1,032); 10% were LGBT, 58% were female, and ages ranged from 13 to 19 years. About 45% were Black, 31% were Hispanic, and 14% were White. LGBT youth scored significantly higher on the scale of depressive symptomatology. They were also more likely than heterosexual, non-transgendered youth to report suicidal ideation (30% vs. 6%, p discrimination accounted for increased depressive symptomatology among LGBT males and females, and accounted for an elevated risk of self-harm and suicidal ideation among LGBT males. Perceived discrimination is a likely contributor to emotional distress among LGBT youth.

  4. Emotional complexity and its effect on psychological distress as a function of chronological age and subjective distance-to-death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrira, Amit; Bodner, Ehud; Palgi, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    In light of mixed evidence regarding the associations between age, emotional complexity, and psychological distress, this study examined emotional complexity and its effect on psychological distress as a function of age and subjective distance-to-death. A sample of 188 participants (age range = 29-100) rated their subjective distance-to-death and psychological distress, and reported their emotions across 14 days. Emotional complexity was unrelated to age, but negatively related to feeling closer to death. Moreover, emotional complexity was negatively related to psychological distress among those feeling closer to death. Results suggest that when death is perceived to be nearer, emotional complexity is hampered, yet becomes relevant in buffering psychological distress.

  5. The buffering effect of relationship satisfaction on emotional distress in couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Marital distress and depression frequently co-occur, and partnership quality is associated with depressive symptoms and mental disorders in both men and women. One aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of a set of risk factors for emotional distress among men and women in couples, with a special focus on satisfaction with partner relationship. The most important aim was to investigate the extent to which high relationship satisfaction in couples acts as a buffer against stressful events. Methods Pregnant women and their husbands (n = 62,956 couples) enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study completed a questionnaire with questions about emotional distress, relationship satisfaction, and other risk factors. Twelve potential risk factors were included in the analyses, including relationship satisfaction, demographic characteristics, and somatic diseases in men and women. Associations between the predictor variables and emotional distress were estimated by multiple linear regression analysis. Cross-spousal effects, in which data reported by one of the spouses predicted emotional distress in the other, were also investigated. Possible interaction effects between certain risk factors and self-reported and partner's relationship satisfaction were tested and further explored with regression analyses in subsamples stratified by relationship satisfaction scores. Results The unique effects of relationship satisfaction were of similar sizes for both men and women: substantial for self-reported (β = -0.23 and β = -0.28, respectively) and weak for partner-reported satisfaction (β = -0.04 and β = -0.02, respectively). Other relatively strong risk factors were somatic disease, first-time motherhood, and unemployment. Self-reported as well as partner-reported relationship satisfaction appeared to strongly buffer the effects of a number of stressors. Conclusions Partner relationship dissatisfaction is strongly associated with emotional

  6. The buffering effect of relationship satisfaction on emotional distress in couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Røsand Gun-Mette B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marital distress and depression frequently co-occur, and partnership quality is associated with depressive symptoms and mental disorders in both men and women. One aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of a set of risk factors for emotional distress among men and women in couples, with a special focus on satisfaction with partner relationship. The most important aim was to investigate the extent to which high relationship satisfaction in couples acts as a buffer against stressful events. Methods Pregnant women and their husbands (n = 62,956 couples enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study completed a questionnaire with questions about emotional distress, relationship satisfaction, and other risk factors. Twelve potential risk factors were included in the analyses, including relationship satisfaction, demographic characteristics, and somatic diseases in men and women. Associations between the predictor variables and emotional distress were estimated by multiple linear regression analysis. Cross-spousal effects, in which data reported by one of the spouses predicted emotional distress in the other, were also investigated. Possible interaction effects between certain risk factors and self-reported and partner's relationship satisfaction were tested and further explored with regression analyses in subsamples stratified by relationship satisfaction scores. Results The unique effects of relationship satisfaction were of similar sizes for both men and women: substantial for self-reported (β = -0.23 and β = -0.28, respectively and weak for partner-reported satisfaction (β = -0.04 and β = -0.02, respectively. Other relatively strong risk factors were somatic disease, first-time motherhood, and unemployment. Self-reported as well as partner-reported relationship satisfaction appeared to strongly buffer the effects of a number of stressors. Conclusions Partner relationship dissatisfaction is strongly

  7. Emotional Distress Among LGBT Youth: The Influence of Perceived Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Joanna; Johnson, Renee M.; Corliss, Heather L.; Molnar, Beth E.; Azrael, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    The authors evaluated emotional distress among 9th-12th grade students, and examined whether the association between LGBT status and emotional distress was mediated by perceptions of having been treated badly or discriminated against because others thought they were gay or lesbian. Data come from a school-based survey in Boston, MA (n=1,032); 10% were LGBT, 58% were female, and age ranged from 13-19 years. About 45% were Black, 31% were Hispanic, and 14% were White. LGBT youth scored signific...

  8. Post partum emotional distress in mothers of preterm infants: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate whether mothers of preterm infants experience more psychological distress than mothers of normal full term infants in the immediate postpartum period. Design: Cross sectional prospective study of postpartal women using the Beck Depression Inventory(BDI) and the GHQ-30. Setting: Neonatal ...

  9. Association of different forms of bullying victimisation with adolescents' psychological distress and reduced emotional wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hannah J; Chan, Gary C K; Scott, James G; Connor, Jason P; Kelly, Adrian B; Williams, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    The frequency and emotional response to bullying victimisation are known to be associated with adolescent mental ill health. A potentially important under-investigated factor is the form of bullying. Four common forms of bullying behaviours are name-calling, physical threats or harm, rumour spreading and social exclusion. To more comprehensively understand bullying victimisation in adolescence, we examined the association of all three factors (frequency, emotional response, form) to psychological distress and emotional wellbeing. A stratified, random sample of adolescents (n = 10, 273; mean age = 14.33 years, standard deviation = 1.68 years) completed validated measures of bullying victimisation (Gatehouse Bullying Questionnaire), psychological distress (K10) and emotional wellbeing (Mental Health Inventory) in classroom time. Associations between the form of bullying victimisation and mental health outcomes were examined. Adolescents reported a high prevalence of all four forms of bullying: teased or called names (30.6%), rumour spreading (17.9%), social exclusion (14.3%) and physical threats or harm (10.7%). Victimisation was independently associated with significantly higher levels of psychological distress and reduced levels of emotional wellbeing for all forms of bullying. In particular, social exclusion had a strong association with mental ill health. Adolescents who experienced frequent bullying that was upsetting reported higher psychological distress and reduced emotional wellbeing. Different forms of bullying victimisation were independently associated with psychological distress and reduced emotional wellbeing. In particular, frequent and upsetting social exclusion requires a targeted and measured response by school communities and health practitioners. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  10. The distressed (Type D) personality in both patients and partners enhances the risk of emotional distress in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Broek, Krista C; Versteeg, Henneke; Erdman, Ruud A M

    2011-01-01

    A subgroup of patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) experiences emotional distress. This may be related to partner factors. We examined the impact of the personality of the partner (i.e., the distressed (Type D) personality) in combination with that of the patient on anxie...

  11. The influence of coping styles and perceived control on emotional distress in persons at risk for a hereditary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaekers, Ehy; Jaspers, Jan P. C.; Van Tintelen, J. Peter

    2007-01-01

    This prospective study investigates the influence of two coping styles (monitoring and blunting) and perceived control (health loci-is of control and mastery) on emotional distress in persons at risk of a hereditary cardiac disease. Emotional distress in people at risk for a hereditary cardiac

  12. Explaining the Links between Workload, Distress, and Work-Family Conflict among School Employees: Physical, Cognitive, and Emotional Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilies, Remus; Huth, Megan; Ryan, Ann Marie; Dimotakis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the intraindividual relationships among workload and affective distress; cognitive, physical, and emotional fatigue; and work-family conflict among school employees. Using a repeated-measure, within-person research design, the authors found that work demands and affective distress, as well as cognitive, emotional, and physical…

  13. Mindfulness facets, trait emotional intelligence, emotional distress, and multiple health behaviors: A serial two-mediator model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ingo; Wollny, Anna; Sim, Chu-Won; Horsch, Antje

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we tested a serial mindfulness facets-trait emotional intelligence (TEI)-emotional distress-multiple health behaviors mediation model in a sample of N = 427 German-speaking occupational therapists. The mindfulness facets-TEI-emotional distress section of the mediation model revealed partial mediation for the mindfulness facets Act with awareness (Act/Aware) and Accept without judgment (Accept); inconsistent mediation was found for the Describe facet. The serial two-mediator model included three mediational pathways that may link each of the four mindfulness facets with multiple health behaviors. Eight out of 12 indirect effects reached significance and fully mediated the links between Act/Aware and Describe to multiple health behaviors; partial mediation was found for Accept. The mindfulness facet Observe was most relevant for multiple health behaviors, but its relation was not amenable to mediation. Implications of the findings will be discussed. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Linking emotional distress to unhealthy sleep duration: analysis of the 2009 National Health Interview Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seixas AA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Azizi A Seixas,1 Joao V Nunes,2 Collins O Airhihenbuwa,3 Natasha J Williams,1 Seithikurippu Ratnas Pandi-Perumal,1 Caryl C James,4 Girardin Jean-Louis11Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Population Health, Division of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, 2Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City College of New York, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Biobehavioral Health, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, USA; 4Department of Sociology, Psychology and Social Work, The University of the West Indies, Mona, JamaicaObjective: The objective of the study was to examine the independent association of emotional distress with unhealthy sleep duration (defined as <7 or >8 hours.Methods: Data from the 2009 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS, a cross-sectional household survey, were analyzed to investigate the associations of emotional distress with unhealthy sleep durations, adjusting for sociodemographic factors, health risks, and chronic diseases through hierarchical multiple logistic regression analysis.Participants: A total of 27,731 participants (age range 18–85 years from the NHIS 2009 dataset were interviewed.Measures: Unhealthy sleep duration is defined as sleep duration <7 or >8 hours, whereas healthy sleep is defined as sleep duration lasting for 7–8 hours. Emotional distress is based on the Kessler 6 Non-Specific Distress Battery, which assesses the frequency of feeling sad, nervous, restless, hopeless, worthless, and burdened, over a 30-day period.Results: Of the sample, 51.7% were female; 83.1% were white and 16.9% were black. Eleven percent experienced emotional distress and 37.6% reported unhealthy sleep. Adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed that individuals with emotional distress had 55% greater odds of reporting unhealthy sleep (odds ratio [OR] =1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.42, 1.68, P<0.001.Conclusion: Emotional distress, an important proxy for

  15. Metacognitions or distress intolerance: The mediating role in the relationship between emotional dysregulation and problematic internet use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mehdi

    2017-12-01

    Given the relevance of problematic Internet use (PIU) to everyday life, its relationship to emotional dysregulation and the importance of metacognitions and distress intolerance in process and intermediaries research, this study examined which of metacognitions and distress intolerance acts as an intermediary between emotional dysregulation and PIU. In the current study, 413 undergraduate students from the University of Tehran, Iran (202 females; mean age = 20.13) voluntarily completed a questionnaire package which included the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 (MCQ-30(, and Distress Tolerance Scale (DTS). The data were then analyzed using structural equation modeling by LISREL software. Significant correlations were found between PIU and emotional dysregulation and both distress intolerance and metacognitions ( P  intolerance. Also, these findings emphasize that distress intolerance has a more significant mediating role than metacognition in the relationship between emotional dysregulation and PIU.

  16. Emotional demands as a risk factor for mental distress among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, C; Avanzi, L; Fraccaroli, F

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely acknowledged that in certain occupations emotional demands may be a critical phenomenon for workers' health, this has been traditionally taken for granted and their role in the stress process has not often been directly assessed. To examine the relationship between emotional demands and mental distress, adjusting for the potential effect of common psychosocial factors (workload, job control, social support, role stressors, and poor relationships) and personal psychological factors (i.e. having been diagnosed with anxiety or depressive disorder). A cross-sectional study on a sample of nurses of the National Healthcare Service was carried out (N = 256, 81.3% women). The psychosocial factors considered were assessed by means of widely known and validated scales. The examined health outcome (i.e. mental distress) was operationalized by means of the General Health Questionnaire (12-item version). Covariates: gender, age, tenure and shiftwork. a series of logistic regressions. Exposure to emotional demands was a risk factor for mental distress. The resulting risk was not altered when adjusting for other psychosocial and personal factors. In the final model emotional demands, workload and role stressors, in addition to having been diagnosed with anxiety or depressive disorder, were significant risk factors for nurses' mental distress. Emotional demands may substantially impact on nurses mental distress. These results give rise to concern in relation to work-stress prevention in certain professions, given that emotional demands are not included in the most common psychosocial risk assessment tools currently available, which may then miss identifying an important precondition of work stress.

  17. Sunshine on my shoulders: Weather, pollution, and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, Mark E; Eggett, Dennis; Erekson, Davey; Rees, Lawrence B; Bingham, Jennie; Klundt, Jared; Bailey, Russell J; Ripplinger, Clark; Kirchhoefer, Jessica; Gibson, Robert; Griner, Derek; Cox, Jonathan C; Boardman, R D

    2016-11-15

    Researchers have examined the relationship between mental health and weather/pollution with mixed results. The current study aimed to examine a range of weather and atmospheric phenomena and their association with time-bound mental health data. Nineteen different weather/pollution variables were examined in connection with an archive of self-reported mental health data for university students participating in mental health treatment (n=16,452) using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ-45). Statistical approach involved randomly selecting 500 subjects from the sample 1000 different times and testing each variable of interest using mixed models analyses. Seasonal changes in sun time were found to best account for relationships between weather variables and variability in mental health distress. Increased mental health distress was found during periods of reduced sun time hours. A separate analysis examining subjects' endorsement of a suicidality item, though not statistically significant, demonstrated a similar pattern. Initial results showed a relationship between pollution and changes in mental health distress; however, this was mediated by sun time. This study examined a relatively homogenous, predominantly European American, and religious sample of college counseling clients from an area that is subject to inversions and is at a high altitude and a latitude where sun time vacillates significantly more than locations closer to the equator. Seasonal increases in sun time were associated with decreased mental health distress. This suggests the need for institutions and public health entities to plan for intervention and prevention resources and strategies during periods of reduced sun time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pain in patients attending a specialist cancer service: prevalence and association with emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mark; Weir, Jim; Butcher, Isabella; Kleiboer, Annet; Murray, Gordon; Sharma, Neelom; Thekkumpurath, Parvez; Walker, Jane; Fallon, Marie; Storey, Dawn J; Sharpe, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We know little about how many outpatients of a modern cancer center suffer from clinically significant unrelieved pain and the characteristics of these patients to guide better care. To determine the prevalence of clinically significant pain (CSP) in the outpatients of a regional cancer center and the association with distress and other variables. A secondary analysis of cross-sectional, self-reported and clinical data from 2768 patients reattending selected clinics of a regional National Health Service cancer center in the U.K. Pain was measured using the pain severity scale of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire, emotional distress was measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and demographic and clinical data were taken from medical records. Fifty-four percent (95% confidence interval [CI] 52-56) of patients reported pain at least "a little" in the previous week and 18% (95% CI 17-20) at least "quite a bit" (CSP). The strongest independent associations of CSP were active disease (odds ratio [OR] 1.95, 95% CI 1.5-2.5) and emotional distress (OR 4.8, 95% CI 4-6). CSP is surprisingly common in outpatients of specialist cancer services, and it is strongly and independently associated with emotional distress. Better symptom management should consider pain and distress together. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors associated with emotional distress in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orom, Heather; Nelson, Christian J; Underwood, Willie; Homish, D Lynn; Kapoor, Deepak A

    2015-11-01

    Early identification and intervention have been recommended for newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients who experience significant emotional distress; however, there is little empirical basis for designing or selecting interventions for these men. We sought to identify factors that are associated with distress in these men as a basis for identifying suitable intervention strategies. Using cross-sectional data and validated scales, we investigated the extent to which clinical, demographic, belief, and personality characteristics are associated with emotional distress assessed with the Distress Thermometer in 1425 men newly diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer (pretreatment). Beliefs potentially amenable to psychoeducational interventions [low self-efficacy for decision-making (B =-0.11, p = 0.02), low confidence in cancer control (B =-0.03, p resilience (B =-0.83, p cancer patients with elevated emotional distress. These may include improving provider communication about prostate cancer prognosis for those with low confidence in cancer control, providing decision-making support to increase decision-making self-efficacy, or referral to brief cognitive behavioral interventions to help patients reframe masculine identity threat or for those with low optimism or resilience reframe and adjust to the health threat. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A phenomenological understanding of residents' emotional distress of living in an environmental justice community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dory, Gabriela; Qiu, Zeyuan; Qiu, Christina M; Fu, Mei R; Ryan, Caitlin E

    2017-12-01

    Deteriorative environmental conditions in environmental justice (EJ) communities not only post direct health risks such as chronic illnesses, but also cause emotional distress such as anxiety, fear, and anger among residents, which may further exacerbate health risks. This study applies a descriptive phenomenological method to explore and describe the emotional experience of residents living in Ironbound, a known EJ community located in Newark, New Jersey. Twenty-three residents participated in the study. Four essential themes regarding the residents' emotional experiences were elicited from 43 interviews: (1) being worried about the harmful effects of the surrounding pollution; (2) being distressed by the known historical pollution sources; (3) being frustrated by the unheard voices and/or lack of responses; and (4) being angered by the ongoing pollution sources. Participants not only expressed their emotions of worry, distress, frustration, and anger in detail but also described reasons or situations that provoked such negative emotions. Such detailed depictions provide insights into potential meaningful strategies to improve residents' psychological wellbeing by alleviating negative emotions and meaningfully engaging residents in developing, implementing, and enforcing environmental laws, regulations, and policies to achieve EJ goals.

  1. Emotional distress affects attention and concentration: the difference between mountains and valleys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, John E; Grills, Chad E; Zellinger, Margaret M; Miller, Ronald Mellado

    2014-01-01

    The current study tests the hypothesis that the "mountains and valleys pattern" (MVP) observed within the Attention and Concentration domain of the Meyers Neuropsychological Battery reflects the interference of emotional distress/anxiety on the patient's cognitive test performance. First, the MVP was objectively quantified using a formula that took into account both increased and decreased scores, rather than canceling them out through averaging. Using a total sample of 787 subjects, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Second Edition Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) profile scores of cases with and without this pattern were then compared using an extensive database followed by a smaller, matched-groups design. The presence of the MVP was related to MMPI-2-RF test performance. In particular, this pattern was related to emotional distress/anxiety scales but was not related to scales reflecting neurological or cognitive complaints. The degree of emotional distress experienced may affect attention and concentration test performance in a way that sometimes heightens focus and at other times disrupts focus. The MVP may be used to assess the effects of emotional distress on the consistency of an individual patient's attention and concentration test performance.

  2. Classifying Prosocial Behavior: Children's Responses to Instrumental Need, Emotional Distress, and Material Desire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunfield, Kristen A.; Kuhlmeier, Valerie A.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the diversity of early prosocial behavior by examining the ability of ninety-five 2- to 4-year-olds to provide aid to an adult experimenter displaying instrumental need, emotional distress, and material desire. Children provided appropriate aid in response to each of these cues with high consistency over multiple trials. In…

  3. Past Victimizations and Dating Violence Perpetration in Adolescence: The Mediating Role of Emotional Distress and Hostility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Sophie; Lavoie, Francine; Hebert, Martine; Gagne, Marie-Helene

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the nature of the relationships between three forms of past victimizations (exposure to interparental violence in childhood, sexual harassment by peers since beginning high school, prior experience of dating violence), physical dating violence perpetration by adolescents, and anger-hostility and emotional distress.…

  4. Emotional distress impacts fear of the future among breast cancer survivors not the reverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Sophie; Rosberger, Zeev; Edgar, Linda; Devins, Gerald M

    2009-06-01

    Fear of the future is one of the most stressful aspects of having cancer. Research to date has conceptualized fear of the future as a precursor of distress or stress-response symptoms. Yet it is equally plausible that distress would predict increased fear of the future or that they would have a reciprocal influence on each other. The purpose of the present study was to examine the bidirectional relations between fear of the future and distress as well as intrusion and avoidance among breast cancer survivors at 3, 7, 11, and 15 months after diagnosis. We used a bivariate latent difference score model for dynamic change to examine these bidirectional relationships among 146 early-stage breast cancer survivors. Using Lisrel version 8.80, we examined four models testing different hypothesized relationships between fear of the future and distress and intrusion and avoidance. Based on model fit evaluation, our data shows that decreases in distress over time lead to a reduction of fear of the future but that changes in fear do not lead to changes in distress. On the other hand, there is no relationship between changes in fear of the future and intrusion and avoidance over time. Ongoing fear of the future does not appear to be a necessary condition for the development of stress-response symptoms. Future studies need to explore the role of distressing emotions in the development and exacerbation of fear of the future among cancer survivors.

  5. Emotion dysregulation explains associations between anxiety sensitivity and hazardous drinking and drinking motives among adult treatment-seeking smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Daniel J; Valadka, Jaclyn; Businelle, Michael S; Gallagher, Matthew W; Viana, Andres G; Schmidt, Norman B; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    Smoking and drinking frequently co-occur. For example, alcohol use is associated with smoking lapses during quit attempts. However, little is known regarding psychological factors explaining drinking among smokers. Anxiety sensitivity is a risk factor associated with hazardous drinking and drinking to cope and/or conform, although little is known about mechanisms underlying such associations. One potential explanatory factor is emotion dysregulation. The current study examined emotion dysregulation as an explanatory factor underlying Anxiety Sensitivity and 5 alcohol-related outcomes: hazardous drinking, alcohol consumption, alcohol problems, coping-oriented drinking, and drinking to conform. Participants for this study were 467 treatment-seeking adult, daily smokers (48.2% women; Mage = 36.7 years, SD = 13.6) who reported smoking an average of 16.5 cigarettes per day. Results indicate significant indirect effects of Anxiety Sensitivity on hazardous drinking via emotion dysregulation, alcohol consumption, alcohol problems, drinking to cope, and drinking to conform. Effects were medium in size. Alternative models testing indirect effects of emotion dysregulation through Anxiety Sensitivity on outcomes, and Anxiety Sensitivity through outcomes on emotion dysregulation were nonsignificant and all had small effect sizes. Follow-up tests examined the path of effects from Anxiety Sensitivity through specific emotion-dysregulation subfactors. Thus, among treatment-seeking smokers, emotion dysregulation may explain the associations of Anxiety Sensitivity with alcohol-related outcomes. This pattern of findings highlights the potential importance of interventions targeting emotion dysregulation among hazardous-drinking smokers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Moderation of distress-induced eating by emotional eating scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strien, T. van; Herman, C.P.; Anschutz, D.J.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Weerth, C. de

    2012-01-01

    Earlier studies assessing the possible moderator effect of self-reported emotional eating on the relation between stress and actual food intake have obtained mixed results. The null findings in some of these studies might be attributed to misclassification of participants due to the use of the

  7. Moderation of distress-induced eating by emotional eating scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, Tatjana; Herman, C Peter; Anschutz, Doeschka J; Engels, Rutger C M E; de Weerth, Carolina

    Earlier studies assessing the possible moderator effect of self-reported emotional eating on the relation between stress and actual food intake have obtained mixed results. The null findings in some of these studies might be attributed to misclassification of participants due to the use of the

  8. Cortisol reactivity and distress-induced emotional eating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strien, T. van; Roelofs, K.; Weerth, C. de

    2013-01-01

    Animal studies suggest a relationship between blunted HPA-axis stress reactivity and increased stress-induced food intake in chronically stressed animals. Such a relationship can potentially explain the underlying mechanisms of emotional eating in humans. However, no studies have experimentally

  9. Cortisol reactivity and distress-induced emotional eating.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, T.; Roelofs, K.; de Weerth, C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal studies suggest a relationship between blunted HPA-axis stress reactivity and increased stress-induced food intake in chronically stressed animals. Such a relationship can potentially explain the underlying mechanisms of emotional eating in humans. However, no studies have experimentally

  10. Does exercise habit strength moderate the relationship between emotional distress and short-term memory in Malaysian primary school children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainol, Nurul Ain; Hashim, Hairul Anuar

    2015-01-01

    We examined the moderating effects of exercise habit strength on the relationship between emotional distress and short-term memory in primary school children. The sample consisted of 165 primary school students (10-12 years old). Participants completed measures of emotional distress, exercise habit strength, and the Digit Span Test. Mid-year exam results were used as an indicator of academic performance. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to analyse the data. The results of SEM revealed an acceptable fit for the hypothesised model. Exercise habit was positively associated with short-term memory, and better short-term memory was associated with better academic performance. However, although an inverse relationship was found between emotional distress and short-term memory, a positive association was found between exercise habit strength and emotional distress. The findings indicate that exercise habit is positively associated with cognitive ability and mediates the negative effect of distress.

  11. Trait emotional intelligence and mental distress: the mediating role of positive and negative affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Feng; Zhao, Jingjing; You, Xuqun

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, emotional intelligence (EI) has received much attention in the literature. Previous studies indicated that higher trait or ability EI was associated with greater mental distress. The present study focused on mediating effects of positive and negative affect on the association between trait EI and mental distress in a sample of Chinese adults. The participants were 726 Chinese adults (384 females) with an age range of 18-60 years. Data were collected by using the Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that EI was a significant predictor of positive affect, negative affect and mental distress. Further mediation analysis showed that positive and negative affect acted as partial mediators of the relationship between EI and mental distress. Furthermore, effect contrasts showed that there was no significant difference between the specific indirect effects through positive affect and through negative affect. This result indicated that positive affect and negative affect played an equally important function in the association between EI and distress. The significance and limitations of the results are discussed.

  12. [Gender violence and other factors associated with emotional distress in female users of public health services in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Santiago, Rosario; Juárez-Ramírez, Clara; Salgado-de Snyder, V Nelly; Agoff, Carolina; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Híjar, Martha C

    2006-01-01

    To identify and describe the factors associated with emotional distress in a national sample of women users of public health services in Mexico, such a Secretaria de Salud (SSA), Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE). This research study was conducted using the database of the National Survey of Violence against Women that consisted of the responses of a total of 26 042 female users of health care services provided by the Mexican government health agencies. The Personal Health Scale (ESP per its initials in Spanish) was used to assess emotional distress. To measure violence a 19-item scale which explores different types of violence as well as severity was used. The relationship between emotional distress and gender violence was determined through a binary logistic regression model, as were economic status and demographic variables. One of the most important findings of this study is the high prevalence of emotional distress (15.3%) among women seeking health care services from the public sector and the relationship of such emotional distress with the experience of marital physical, psychological, and sexual violence. Factors associated with emotional distress among female users of health care services were age (26 and older); activity (laborer); working hours (71 hours a week or more); alcohol intake (greater intake); abuse during childhood (frequency and types of abuse); severity of marital violence (severe violence); socioeconomic status (very low SES); and type of dwelling (urban). The principal predictor of emotional distress was intimate partner abuse, especially in severe expression. The next predictor was violence in childhood. Taking into consideration these predictors it is recommended to use screening instruments to identify emotional distress and gender violence in health setting. It is important to design and implement attention and reference programs in public

  13. Emotional distress regulation takes precedence over impulse control: if you feel bad, do it!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, D M; Bratslavsky, E; Baumeister, R F

    2001-01-01

    Why do people's impulse controls break down during emotional distress? Some theories propose that distress impairs one's motivation or one's ability to exert self-control, and some postulate self-destructive intentions arising from the moods. Contrary to those theories, Three experiments found that believing that one's bad mood was frozen (unchangeable) eliminated the tendency to eat fattening snacks (Experiment 1), seek immediate gratification (Experiment 2), and engage in frivolous procrastination (Experiment 3). The implication is that when people are upset, they indulge immediate impulses to make themselves feel better, which amounts to giving short-term affect regulation priority over other self-regulatory goals.

  14. Use of preferred music to reduce emotional distress and symptom activity during radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael; Isaacks-Downton, Gloria; Wells, Nancy; Redlin-Frazier, Sheryl; Eck, Carol; Hepworth, Joseph T; Chakravarthy, Bapsi

    2006-01-01

    Music therapy has decreased anxiety levels in many medical settings. This randomized clinical trial examined the effectiveness of a music listening intervention, delivered by a board-certified music therapist, in patients undergoing curative radiation therapy (RT). Emotional distress (anxiety, depression, and treatment-related distress) and symptoms (fatigue and pain) were measured at baseline, mid-treatment, and end of treatment in 63 patients undergoing RT. Although patients who listened to self-selected music reported lower anxiety and treatment-related distress, there was a decline in these outcomes for patients in both groups over the course of RT. Depression, fatigue, and pain were not appreciably affected by music therapy. Within the music group, there was a significant correlation between number of times music was used/week and the change in treatment-related distress, suggesting that higher doses of music produced greater declines in distress. While these findings provided some support for the use of music in reducing distress during RT, further research demonstrating clear differences between intervention and control conditions is needed. Physical symptoms were not affected by the use of music over the course of RT.

  15. Emotional distress, alexithymia, and coping as predictors of cardiac rehabilitation outcomes and attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jamie L; Emery, Charles F

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine emotional distress, alexithymia, and coping styles as predictors of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) outcomes and attendance. Participants included 56 patients in an outpatient CR program (65% male, 59% white, M = 61.1 years) who completed self-report measures of emotional distress (ie, depressive and anxiety symptoms), alexithymia, and coping styles (ie, approach and avoidance coping). CR outcomes recorded at entry and completion of the program included blood cholesterol, oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)VO(2max)), knowledge about cardiac disease, and self-reported lipid consumption. Attendance was also recorded as a measure of adherence. Significant improvements were observed in oxygen uptake, high-density lipoprotein levels, disease knowledge, and self-reported lipid consumption. Older age was associated with less distress, and anxiety and higher education were associated with better attendance. Higher alexithymia (ie, greater difficulty processing emotion) was associated with increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and alexithymia predicted increased self-reported lipid consumption in the context of higher approach coping. CR is associated with physical and quality-of-life benefits, as well as increased knowledge about cardiac disease management. However, coping strategies that are generally beneficial (approach coping) may be associated with negative health behavior among individuals who have difficulty processing emotion. Anxiety and lower education were associated with poorer attendance, perhaps indicating the need for intervention to prevent dropout.

  16. Self-injury, converting emotional distress into physical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bo; Rubæk, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    Self-inflicted pain by cutting, hitting or burning oneself has become a common way to regulate emotions and to serve as coping strategy. 21.5-32% of adolescents in non-clinical populations have a history of non-suicidal self-injury. Non-suicidal self-injury has a momentarily relieving effect...... and is an important predictor of suicidal behaviour; even superficial self-injury should be taken seriously. There is an urgent need for organized treatment programmes for young people who self-harm....

  17. Relationship between emotional distress and quality of life on type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Meranti island regency hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridah, I. N.; Perwitasari, D. A.; Pusfita, M.; Jasman, H.

    2017-11-01

    Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM) always got treatment for a long time so that it can affect the emotional distress and the quality of life. This study aimed to find the relationship between emotional distress with quality of life. This study used cross sectional design. DDS was used to measure patients emotional distress. EQ-5D was used to measure patients quality of life. Subjects of this study were T2DM patients ICD X.E11 with aged over 18 years old. A total of 80 patients participated in the study. The result showed that the mean of score on emotional burden was 2.985±0.678, physician distress was 2.650±0.801, regiment distress was 3.222±0.75 and interpersonal distress was 2.529±0.859. The result of the analysis showed that there was relationship between employment and interpersonal distress with index and correlation showed weak negative (r-0.212, -0.306) and significant relationship (peducation and VAS showed weak positive correlation (r0.334) and significant relationship (pemotional burden with VAS showed weak negative correlation (r-0.215, -0.251) and significant relationship (peducation was factors that affected the quality of life. High emotional distress can degraded the quality of life.

  18. Metacognitions or distress intolerance: The mediating role in the relationship between emotional dysregulation and problematic internet use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Akbari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Given the relevance of problematic Internet use (PIU to everyday life, its relationship to emotional dysregulation and the importance of metacognitions and distress intolerance in process and intermediaries research, this study examined which of metacognitions and distress intolerance acts as an intermediary between emotional dysregulation and PIU. Methods: In the current study, 413 undergraduate students from the University of Tehran, Iran (202 females; mean age=20.13 voluntarily completed a questionnaire package which included the Internet Addiction Test (IAT, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS, Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 (MCQ-30(, and Distress Tolerance Scale (DTS. The data were then analyzed using structural equation modeling by LISREL software. Results: Significant correlations were found between PIU and emotional dysregulation and both distress intolerance and metacognitions (P<0.001. Structural equation modeling and path analysis results fit well to the data (χ2/df=1.73; p<0.001; RMSEA=0.05; SRMR=0.04; CFI=0.97; NFI=0.95. The results of the mediational model indicated that emotional dysregulation has an indirect impact via metacognition (β=0.31; SE=0.02 and distress tolerance (β=−0.60; SE=0.03 on PIU. The analysis also revealed a significant direct impact of emotional dysregulation on PIU, although this impact is much less than the indirect impact. The variables in this model accounted for 62% of the variance in participants' PIU levels. Conclusion: The results of this study provide evidence for the impact of emotional dysregulation on PIU through metacognitions and distress intolerance. Also, these findings emphasize that distress intolerance has a more significant mediating role than metacognition in the relationship between emotional dysregulation and PIU. Keywords: Metacognitions, Distress intolerance, Emotional dysregulation, Problematic internet use

  19. Should we screen for emotional distress in type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Emotional problems such as depression, anxiety and diabetes-specific distress are common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) but often remain unrecognized and thus untreated. The present Review focuses on the extent of this problem and discusses whether we should screen for depression......, anxiety and diabetes-specific distress in patients with this condition. Depression has received by far the greatest attention from researchers. Strong evidence exists that depression affects 10-20% of patients with T2DM, but it is often unrecognized. Several guidelines have therefore recommended periodic...... assessments of emotional well-being in patients with T2DM. However, this recommendation is not based on strong evidence, as the effects of screening (case-finding) on psychological outcomes and diabetes outcomes have not been tested in a randomized controlled study. Results from studies in patients without T2...

  20. Emotional contagion of distress in young pigs is potentiated by previous exposure to the same stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumon, Sébastien; Špinka, Marek

    2016-05-01

    This study tested whether emotional contagion occurs when piglets directly observe a penmate in distress (restraint) and whether there is an effect of previous experience on the response to subsequent restraint or exposure to conspecific distress. Piglets (49.7 ± 0.7 days) were exposed in pairs to two stress phases (SP1 and SP2) in an arena divided into two pens by a wire mesh wall. During SP1, one of the pigs of a pair was either restrained (Stress treatment) or sham-restrained (Control treatment), while the other pig was considered observer. During SP2, the previous observer was restrained, while its penmate took the observer role. Heart rate variability, locomotion, vocalizations, body/head/ear and tail postures were monitored. During SP1, observer pigs responded to conspecific distress with increased indicators of attention (looking at, proximity to and snout contacts with the distressed pigs) and increased indicators of fear (reduced locomotion, increased freezing). During SP2, the observer pigs that had been restrained previously reacted more strongly (through higher proximity, decreased locomotion, increased freezing) to observing the penmate in restraint than pigs without the previous negative experience. This study suggests that young pigs are susceptible to emotional contagion and that this contagion is potentiated by previous exposure to the same stressor. These findings have implications for pig welfare in practical animal husbandry systems.

  1. Social inhibition and emotional distress in patients with coronary artery disease: The Type D personality construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Ivy; Versteeg, Henneke; Duijndam, Stefanie; Graafmans, Corine; Polak, Peter; Denollet, Johan

    2017-05-01

    We examined the validity of the social inhibition component of Type D, its distinctiveness from negative affectivity, and value regarding emotional distress as measured with the DS14 in 173 coronary artery disease patients. In dimensional analysis, social inhibition and negative affectivity emerged as distinct traits. Analysis of continuous negative affectivity and social inhibition measures showed main effects for several emotional and inhibition markers and an interaction effect for social anxiety. Categorical analysis indicated that Type D patients reported more depression, negative mood, social anxiety, and less positive mood. Social inhibition is not a redundant trait, but has additional conceptual value.

  2. Vicarious pain responders and emotion: Evidence for distress rather than mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kurtis A; Gandevia, Simon C; Giummarra, Melita J

    2017-07-01

    Up to a third of the population experiences pain when seeing another in pain. The mechanisms underlying such vicarious sensory experiences are thought to reflect hyperactive mirror systems (threshold theory) or dysfunctional processing and representation of oneself versus others (self/other theory). This study investigated whether the tendency to experience vicarious pain corresponds to disinhibited physiological reactivity toward other's emotions, and/or greater empathic mimicry of other's physiological state (respiratory behavior) during fear, pain, and positive emotion. Fifty healthy individuals aged 18-55 years (23 vicarious pain responders) completed empathy- and anxiety-related questionnaires, and a film task. Respiration was measured noninvasively with piezoelectric respiration belts while participants viewed emotional film clips depicting three emotions (fear/pain/positive) interspersed with neutral clips. The emotional stimuli depicted scenes in which the characters showed increases or decreases in respiration. The results suggest that vicarious pain responders do not mimic emotional respiratory behavior. Rather, vicarious pain responders had a significantly slower respiration rate for all emotional stimuli (MDiff  = 1.40 respiratory cycles, SE = .68), compared to nonresponders. However, this was associated with heightened trait anxiety. The findings suggest vicarious pain is associated with acute distress, rather than empathic mimicry of the emotional states of another. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  3. Perceived stress in first year medical students - associations with personal resources and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Ines; Bullinger, Monika; Kocalevent, Rüya-Daniela

    2017-01-06

    Medical students have been found to report high levels of perceived stress, yet there is a lack of theoretical frameworks examining possible reasons. This cross-sectional study examines correlates of perceived stress in medical students on the basis of a conceptual stress model originally developed for and applied to the general population. The aim was to identify via structural equation modeling the associations between perceived stress and emotional distress (anxiety and depression), taking into account the activation of personal resources (optimism, self-efficacy and resilient coping). Within this cross-sectional study, 321 first year medical students (age 22 ± 4 years, 39.3% men) completed the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ-20), the Self-Efficacy Optimism Scale (SWOP) and the Brief Resilient Coping Scale (BRCS) as well as the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4). The statistical analyses used t-tests, ANOVA, Spearman Rho correlation and multiple regression analysis as well as structural equation modeling. Medical students reported higher levels of perceived stress and higher levels of anxiety and depression than reference samples. No statistically significant differences in stress levels were found within the sample according to gender, migration background or employment status. Students reported more self-efficacy, optimism, and resilient coping and higher emotional distress compared to validation samples and results in other studies. Structural equation analysis revealed a satisfactory fit between empirical data and the proposed stress model indicating that personal resources modulated perceived stress, which in turn had an impact on emotional distress. Medical students' perceived stress and emotional distress levels are generally high, with personal resources acting as a buffer, thus supporting the population-based general stress model. Results suggest providing individual interventions for those students, who need support in dealing with the

  4. Coping and emotional distress in relation to health-related quality of life in Slovene patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Žagar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Managing emotional distress triggers different coping strategies for coping with stress in cancer patients. Effective coping affects health – related quality of life and psychosocial adaptation. This study was performed to determine coping strategies, and their connectedness to emotional distress (anxiety and depression and health – related quality of life in cancer patients. Study was carried out on 70 cancer patients, in inpatient and outpatient setting. Depressive symptoms were measured with Beck Depression Inventory BDI-SH, anxiety with State Trait Anxiety Inventory STAI-1, coping strategies with Coping Response Inventory CRI and health – related quality of life with Quality of Life Questionnaire QOLQ- 30. A negative, statistically important relationship was found between active strategies, emotional distress and quality of life. Recognition of emotional distress and ways of coping in cancer patients are important for quality of health care.

  5. The use of supportive communication when responding to older people's emotional distress in home care - An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafskjold, L.; Sundling, V.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Responding to older people's distress by acknowledging or encouraging further discussion of emotions is central to supportive, person-centred communication, and may enhance home care outcomes and thereby promote healthy aging. This observational study describes nursing staff's responses

  6. Size, detail, and line heaviness in children's drawings as correlates of emotional distress: (more) negative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, T E; Schmidt, K L; Barnett, J

    1996-08-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of three commonly used indicators of emotional distress in children's projective drawings--size, detail, and line heaviness--and assessed their relation to established objective and projective measures of childhood depression and anxiety. Participants were 80 child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients (53 boys, 27 girls; ages 6 to 16; M = 10.69, SD = 2.94). Although the present results indicated that these drawing indices can be assessed with very high reliability, they were not significantly associated with self-report or thematic projective measures of depression and anxiety. Age and defensiveness did not moderate the relation between the drawing indices and the non-drawing measures of emotional distress. The patterning of the intercorrelations among and within the drawing indices, projective stories, and self-report measures indicated greater support for the self-report measures, in terms of convergent and discriminant validity. This study did not support the continued use of these three projective drawing indices of emotional distress.

  7. Neighborhood income inequality, social capital and emotional distress among adolescents: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhjalmsdottir, Arndis; Gardarsdottir, Ragna B; Bernburg, Jon Gunnar; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora

    2016-08-01

    Theory holds that income inequality may harm adolescent mental health by reducing social capital within neighborhood communities. However, research on this topic has been very limited. We use multilevel data on 102 public schools and 5958 adolescents in Iceland (15 and 16 years old) to examine whether income inequality within neighborhoods is associated with emotional distress in adolescents. Moreover, we test whether indicators of social capital, including social trust and embeddedness in neighborhood social networks, mediate this contextual effect. The findings show that neighborhood income inequality positively influences emotional distress of individual adolescents, net of their personal household situations and social relations. However, although the indicators of social capital negatively influence emotional distress, they do not mediate the contextual effect of neighborhood income inequality. The study illustrates the role of economic disparities in adolescent mental health, but calls for more research on the underlying social and social-psychological mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Child abuse exposure, emotion regulation, and drinking refusal self-efficacy: an analysis of problem drinking in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanecky, Alicia K; Woolman, Erin O; Becker, Madelyn M

    2015-03-01

    Problem drinking in college is a longstanding problem with potentially severe consequences. More recently, problem drinking has been linked to emotion regulation difficulties. However, these results are mixed and emphasize the need to examine moderating variables that may strengthen the problem drinking/emotion regulation relationship. Two such variables are child/adolescent sexual abuse (CASA) and drinking refusal self-efficacy (DRSE). The current study hypothesized that the relations between emotion regulation difficulties and problem drinking would be most salient for college students with increased CASA exposure and decreased DRSE. Secondary analyses examined the hypothesis taking into consideration cumulative child/adolescent trauma exposure. Undergraduate students (n = 200) completed a large survey battery for course credit. Three-way interactions across the CASA and cumulative trauma models were significant and in a similar direction. RESULTS indicated that for students without trauma exposure, problem drinking was the greatest for those with decreased DRSE and increased emotion regulation difficulties. As trauma exposure increased, problem drinking was the greatest for those with decreased DRSE and decreased emotion regulation difficulties (or superior perceived regulatory abilities). Discussion highlights the importance of considering DRSE and the possibility of reduced insight in trauma-exposed students, who may perceive alcohol use as an adaptive regulatory strategy.

  9. Metacognitions or distress intolerance: The mediating role in the relationship between emotional dysregulation and problematic internet use

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Akbari

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Given the relevance of problematic Internet use (PIU) to everyday life, its relationship to emotional dysregulation and the importance of metacognitions and distress intolerance in process and intermediaries research, this study examined which of metacognitions and distress intolerance acts as an intermediary between emotional dysregulation and PIU. Methods: In the current study, 413 undergraduate students from the University of Tehran, Iran (202 females; mean age=20.13) voluntaril...

  10. Bullying victimization and emotional distress: is there strength in numbers for vulnerable youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Marla E; McMorris, Barbara J; Gower, Amy L; Chatterjee, Debanjana

    2016-07-01

    The present study examines whether the prevalence of vulnerable peers in school protects the emotional health of youth who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ), overweight, or have a disability, and if the adverse emotional effects of bullying victimization are mitigated by the presence of these peers. Survey data come from a large school-based sample of adolescents attending 505 schools. The primary independent variable was the percent of students in school with each vulnerability characteristic. Multilevel logistic regression models estimated the odds of internalizing problems, self-harm, suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among students who were LGBQ, overweight or had a disability. Cross-level interaction terms were added to determine if the association between being victimized and emotional distress was moderated by the presence of vulnerable peers. Greater presence of similar students was, on average, protective against emotional distress for LGBQ girls and overweight boys. In contrast, greater presence of students with a disability was, on average, a risk factor among girls with a disability. Several tests of effect modification indicated that odds of emotional distress for those who had been victimized were lower in schools with a higher proportion of vulnerable youth. The presence of a similar peer group may increase the likelihood that a bystander or witness to bullying will react in a helpful way. School personnel, health care providers and other youth service professionals should inquire about social relationships at school, including experiences of harassment and perceptions of peer support, to buffer negative experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of Entropy-Based Metrics to Identify Emotional Distress from Electroencephalographic Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz García-Martínez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of emotions is still an unresolved challenge, which could be helpful to improve current human-machine interfaces. Recently, nonlinear analysis of some physiological signals has shown to play a more relevant role in this context than their traditional linear exploration. Thus, the present work introduces for the first time the application of three recent entropy-based metrics: sample entropy (SE, quadratic SE (QSE and distribution entropy (DE to discern between emotional states of calm and negative stress (also called distress. In the last few years, distress has received growing attention because it is a common negative factor in the modern lifestyle of people from developed countries and, moreover, it may lead to serious mental and physical health problems. Precisely, 279 segments of 32-channel electroencephalographic (EEG recordings from 32 subjects elicited to be calm or negatively stressed have been analyzed. Results provide that QSE is the first single metric presented to date with the ability to identify negative stress. Indeed, this metric has reported a discriminant ability of around 70%, which is only slightly lower than the one obtained by some previous works. Nonetheless, discriminant models from dozens or even hundreds of features have been previously obtained by using advanced classifiers to yield diagnostic accuracies about 80%. Moreover, in agreement with previous neuroanatomy findings, QSE has also revealed notable differences for all the brain regions in the neural activation triggered by the two considered emotions. Consequently, given these results, as well as easy interpretation of QSE, this work opens a new standpoint in the detection of emotional distress, which may gain new insights about the brain’s behavior under this negative emotion.

  12. A Variable-Centered and Person-Centered Evaluation of Emotion Regulation and Distress Tolerance: Links to Emotional and Behavioral Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eck, Kathryn; Warren, Pete; Flory, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Distress tolerance and emotion regulation deficits are associated with many emotional and behavioral concerns and may be important deficit areas for college students especially during the transition to college. However, little is known about how distress tolerance and emotion regulation relate to each other or what typical profiles of these deficit areas might be. We took a variable-centered (i.e., exploratory factor analysis) and a person-centered approach (i.e., latent profile analysis) to identify the overlap and distinctiveness of distress tolerance and emotion regulation deficits and then evaluated how the profiles related to several emotional and behavioral concerns. Participants were undergraduates (N = 627; age M = 20.23, SD = 1.40; 60 % female; 47 % European-American) who completed an online assessment. The exploratory factor analysis of distress tolerance and emotion regulation subscales demonstrated three factors with one factor corresponding to distress tolerance and two factors defined by emotion regulation. Subscales demonstrated significant multidimensionality across the factors. The latent profile analysis with distress tolerance and emotion regulation subscales produced three profiles corresponding to "Functional", "At Risk", and "Challenged" levels of distress tolerance and emotion regulation abilities. Internalizing symptoms (i.e., depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and suicidal ideation) had significantly higher symptom severity in the "At Risk", and "Challenged" profiles than in the "Functional" profile. ADHD symptoms and hostility showed a similar pattern. Conduct problems and substance use were much less related to the deficit profiles. Implications for the etiology of mental health, for prevention and treatment of college students are discussed.

  13. Maladaptive emotion regulation is related to distressed personalities in cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Barth, Jürgen; von Känel, Roland; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Saner, Hugo; Znoj, Hansjörg

    2012-10-01

    Cardiac patients with Type D ('distressed') personality perceive more stress. It is unclear to what extent Type D personality might represent deficits in emotion regulation that are known to play an important role in the development of mental disorders. This study evaluated the relationship between emotion regulation and Type D personality and assessed the influence of mood and stress on Type D. Emotion regulation, mood, perceived stress and Type D personality were assessed in 163 cardiac patients. Maladaptive emotional regulation was more pronounced in Type D patients. Depressed mood and perceived partner-related stress were higher in patients with Type D than in those with Non-Type D. Regression models revealed a stronger association between emotion regulation and Type D personality (odds ratio=3.16; 95% confidence interval=1.53, 6.54) than for depressed mood (odds ratio=1.19; 95% confidence interval=1.02, 1.38). Patients with deficits in emotion regulation are more likely to have Type D personality. Deficits in emotion regulation might be an agent for future intervention studies to change Type D and its prognostic effect. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Customized CBT via internet for adolescents with pain and emotional distress: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida K. Flink

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study was to explore the effects of an early and customized CBT intervention, mainly delivered via internet, for adolescents with coexisting recurrent pain and emotional distress (low mood, worry, and/or distress. The intervention was based on a transdiagnostic approach, to concurrently target pain and emotional distress. A single case experimental design (SCED was employed with six participants, 17–21 years old, who were recruited via school health care professionals at the student health care team at an upper secondary school in a small town in Sweden. The intervention consisted of 5–9 modules of CBT, delivered via internet in combination with personal contacts and face to face sessions. The content and length of the program was customized depending on needs. The effects of the program were evaluated based on self-report inventories, which the participants filled out before and after the intervention and at a six month follow-up. They did also fill out a diary where they rated symptoms on a daily basis. The results were promising, at least when considering changes during the intervention as well as pre- and posttest ratings. However, the results were more modest when calculating the reliable change index (RCI, and most of the treatment effects were not sustained at the follow-up assessment, which raises questions about the durability of the effects. Taken together, this study indicates that this type of program is promising as an early intervention for adolescents with pain and concurrent emotional distress, although the outcomes need to be explored further, especially in terms of long-term effects.

  15. Socio-economic status and emotional distress of female Turkish immigrants and native German women living in Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichberger, M C; Bromand, Z; Heredia Montesinos, A; Temur-Erman, S; Mundt, A; Heinz, A; Rapp, M A; Schouler-Ocak, M

    2012-06-01

    Many immigrants face more economic strains and hardship than non-immigrants. Income inequality and an increasing social gap between immigrants and non-immigrants in Europe warrant further studies on the impact of socioeconomic factors on health in immigrant groups. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of socioeconomic status (SES) and emotional distress in women of Turkish descent and in women of German descent. A total of 405 women of German or Turkish descent residing in Berlin were interviewed. Emotional distress was assessed by the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), and SES was examined by level of education, employment status, and income. The associations of emotional distress and SES were estimated in multivariate linear regression analyses. Unemployment was associated with increased levels of emotional distress in all women, with the highest level of distress in the group of unemployed Turkish women. The overall SES level was related to a greater level of emotional distress in Turkish women, but not in German women (-3.2, 95%CI -5.9 - -.5; p=.020 vs. -.8, 95%CI -2.7 - 1.2; p=.431). Further stratified analyses by relationship status revealed that the association of SES and emotional distress only remained significant among single women. The impact of socioeconomic hardship appears to be complicated by social roles and expectations related to these. Further in-depth study of the complex nature of the interaction of social roles and socioeconomic position in female Turkish immigrants in Germany is needed to better understand differing risk patterns for emotional distress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Coping and emotional distress during acute hospitalization in older persons with earlier trauma: the case of Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimron, Lee; Cohen, Miri

    2012-06-01

    Older persons with earlier trauma are often more vulnerable to stresses of old age. To examine the levels of emotional distress in relation to cognitive appraisal of acute hospitalization and coping strategies in Holocaust survivors compared with an age- and education-matched group of elderly persons without Holocaust experience. This is a cross-sectional study of 63 Holocaust survivors, 65 years and older, hospitalized for an acute illness, and 57 age-, education- and hospital unit-matched people without Holocaust experience. Participants completed appraisal and coping strategies (COPE) questionnaires, and the brief symptoms inventory (BSI-18). Holocaust survivors reported higher levels of emotional distress, appraised the hospitalization higher as a threat and lower as a challenge, and used more emotion-focused and less problem-focused or support-seeking coping strategies than the comparison group. Study variables explained 65% of the variance of emotional distress; significant predictors of emotional distress in the final regression model were not having a partner and more use of emotion-focused coping. The latter mediated the relation of group variable and challenge appraisal to emotional distress. Health professionals must be aware of the potential impact of the hospital environment on the survivors of Holocaust as well as survivors of other trauma. Being sensitive to their specific needs may reduce the negative impact of hospitalization.

  17. Diabetes-related emotional distress in adults: reliability and validity of the Norwegian versions of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID) and the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Marit; Haugstvedt, Anne; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Iversen, Marjolein M; Karlsen, Bjørg; Rokne, Berit

    2012-02-01

    Regular assessment of diabetes-related emotional distress is recommended to identify high-risk people with diabetes and to further prevent negative effects on self-management. Nevertheless, psychological problems are greatly under diagnosed. Translating and testing instruments for psychosocial assessment across languages, countries and cultures allow for further research collaboration and enhance the prospect of improving treatment and care. To examine the psychometric properties of the Norwegian versions of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale and the Diabetes Distress Scale. Cross-sectional survey design. A sample comprising adults with diabetes (response rate 71%) completed the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale and the Diabetes Distress Scale, which were translated into Norwegian with standard forward-backwards translation. The study included 292 participants with type 1 (80%) and type 2 diabetes (20%) aged 18-69 years, 58% males, mean diabetes duration 17.3 years (11.6), mean HbA(1c) 8.2% (1.6). We used exploratory factor analysis with principal axis factoring and varimax rotation to investigate the factor structure and performed confirmatory factor analysis to test the best fit of a priori-defined models. Convergent and discriminate validity were examined using the Short Form-36 Health Survey, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and demographic and disease-related clinical variables. We explored reliability by internal consistency and test-retest analysis. Exploratory factor analysis supported a four-factor model for the Diabetes Distress Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the data and the hypothesized model for the Diabetes Distress Scale fit acceptably but not for the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale. Greater distress assessed with both instruments correlated moderately with lower health-related quality of life and greater anxiety and depression. The instruments discriminated between those having additional health conditions or disabilities

  18. Relationship between emotional processing, drinking severity and relapse in adults treated for alcohol dependence in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopera, Maciej; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Suszek, Hubert; Glass, Jennifer M; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Wnorowska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2015-03-01

    Growing data reveals deficits in perception, understanding and regulation of emotions in alcohol dependence (AD). The study objective was to explore the relationships between emotional processing, drinking history and relapse in a clinical sample of alcohol-dependent patients. A group of 80 inpatients entering an alcohol treatment program in Warsaw, Poland was recruited and assessed at baseline and follow-up after 12 months. Baseline information about demographics, psychopathological symptoms, personality and severity of alcohol problems was obtained. The Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence (EI) Test and Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS) were utilized for emotional processing assessment. Follow-up information contained data on drinking alcohol during the last month. At baseline assessment, the duration of alcohol drinking was associated with lower ability to utilize emotions. Patients reporting more difficulties with describing feelings drank more during their last episode of heavy drinking, and had a longer duration of intensive alcohol use. A longer duration of the last episode of heavy drinking was associated with more problems identifying and regulating emotions. Poor utilization of emotions and high severity of depressive symptoms contributed to higher rates of drinking at follow-up. These results underline the importance of systematic identification of discrete emotional problems and dynamics related to AD. This knowledge has implications for treatment. Psychotherapeutic interventions to improve emotional skills could be utilized in treatment of alcohol-dependent patients. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship Between Emotional Processing, Drinking Severity and Relapse in Adults Treated for Alcohol Dependence in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopera, Maciej; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Suszek, Hubert; Glass, Jennifer M.; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Wnorowska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Growing data reveals deficits in perception, understanding and regulation of emotions in alcohol dependence (AD). The study objective was to explore the relationships between emotional processing, drinking history and relapse in a clinical sample of alcohol-dependent patients. Methods: A group of 80 inpatients entering an alcohol treatment program in Warsaw, Poland was recruited and assessed at baseline and follow-up after 12 months. Baseline information about demographics, psychopathological symptoms, personality and severity of alcohol problems was obtained. The Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence (EI) Test and Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS) were utilized for emotional processing assessment. Follow-up information contained data on drinking alcohol during the last month. Results: At baseline assessment, the duration of alcohol drinking was associated with lower ability to utilize emotions. Patients reporting more difficulties with describing feelings drank more during their last episode of heavy drinking, and had a longer duration of intensive alcohol use. A longer duration of the last episode of heavy drinking was associated with more problems identifying and regulating emotions. Poor utilization of emotions and high severity of depressive symptoms contributed to higher rates of drinking at follow-up. Conclusions: These results underline the importance of systematic identification of discrete emotional problems and dynamics related to AD. This knowledge has implications for treatment. Psychotherapeutic interventions to improve emotional skills could be utilized in treatment of alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:25543129

  20. Relationships between Adolescents' Preferred Sources of Help and Emotional Distress, Ambivalence over Emotional Expression, and Causal Attribution of Symptoms: A Singapore Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boon-Ooi

    2009-01-01

    Past research has shown that many adolescents with depression and anxiety disorders do not consult mental health professionals. This study examines how emotional distress, ambivalence over emotional expression, and causal attribution of depressive and anxious symptoms are related to adolescents' preferred sources of help for these symptoms. 300…

  1. Perceived family burden and emotional distress: similarities and differences between mothers and fathers of children with type 1 diabetes in a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, Anne; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Rokne, Berit; Graue, Marit

    2011-03-01

    Parenting children with diabetes entail an extra burden for the families. More information is needed about associations between perceived family burden and emotional distress in both mothers and fathers. To analyze (i) perceived burden and emotional distress in mothers and fathers of children with type 1 diabetes and (ii) associations between parental burden and distress and factors related to the child. Mothers (n = 103) and fathers (n = 97) of 115 children (1-15 yr) with type 1 diabetes participated in this population-based survey. The parents completed the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 items (HSCL-25), measuring emotional distress, and the Family Burden Scale, which includes five questions measuring perceived family burden related to the child's diabetes. Both mothers and fathers reported that the greatest burden was related to long-term health concerns. The mothers reported a significantly greater burden related to medical treatment and significantly more emotional distress than the fathers. The mothers' perceived burden was significantly correlated with emotional distress. Nighttime blood glucose measurements were significantly associated with perceived parental burden, and experienced nocturnal hypoglycemia was significantly associated with parental emotional distress. The higher perceived burden related to medical treatment, the more emotional distress, and the correlations between burdens and emotional distress in mothers vs. fathers emphasize the importance of discussing both parents' roles and responsibilities in relation to the child's diabetes in follow-up. In the consultations, emphasizing nighttime caregiving and nocturnal hypoglycemia might also be important to prevent emotional distress. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Effects of sex, sexual orientation, infidelity expectations, and love on distress related to emotional and sexual infidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeker, Olivia; Carlozzi, Al

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of participant sex, sexual orientation, infidelity expectations, and love on emotional responses to emotional and sexual infidelity. Participants (72 lesbian women, 114 heterosexual women, 53 gay men, and 57 heterosexual men) completed a demographic form, continuous emotion ratings in response to hypothetical infidelity scenarios, the Infidelity Expectations Questionnaire (IEQ), and the Triangular Love Scale. Sex, sexual orientation, and commitment and intimacy among partners were significant predictors of various emotional responses to sexual and emotional infidelity. Alternatively, passion among partners and expectations about a partner's likelihood of committing infidelity were not significant predictors of emotional reactions to infidelity. Across participants, sexual infidelity elicited more distressing feelings than emotional infidelity. Group differences were also found, with women responding with stronger emotions to emotional and sexual infidelity than men, and heterosexuals rating emotional and sexual infidelity as more emotionally distressing than lesbian and gay individuals. Sex and sexual orientation differences emerged regarding the degree to which specific emotions were reported in response to sexual and emotional infidelity. Clinical implications are offered, including how mental health professionals might use these findings to help clients cope with the negative effects of infidelity on romantic relationships. © 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  3. Parental problem drinking, marital aggression, and child emotional insecurity: a longitudinal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peggy S; Gilbert, Lauren R; Koss, Kalsea J; Cummings, E Mark; Davies, Patrick T

    2011-09-01

    Marital aggression plays an important role in relations between parental problem drinking and child maladjustment. The purpose of the current study was to apply emotional security theory as a framework for understanding the role of marital aggression. A community sample of 235 children in kindergarten participated once a year for 3 years. Parents completed measures of parental problem drinking and marital aggression, and children were interviewed about their emotional security reactions to marital conflict vignettes. Greater parental problem drinking was directly associated with children's more negative emotional reactions to conflict. Maternal problem drinking predicted increased sad reactions and negative expectations for the future. Paternal problem drinking predicted increases in child anger reactions and negative expectations for the future. Parental problem drinking was also indirectly associated with child reactions via marital aggression. Results confirmed hypotheses that parental problem drinking would be related to child emotional insecurity and that associations would be indirect via greater marital conflict. Findings are interpreted in terms of emotional security theory as a framework for understanding the effects of parental problem drinking on marital aggression and child development.

  4. Emotion dysregulation and peer drinking norms uniquely predict alcohol-related problems via motives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Raluca M; Hahn, Austin M; Simons, Jeffrey S; Murase, Hanako

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the relationships between emotion dysregulation, peer drinking norms, drinking motives, and alcohol-related outcomes among 435 college students. We examined the mediating roles of drinking motives when predicting alcohol consumption and related problems from the subscales of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS; Gratz and Roemer, 2004) via negative and positive reinforcement models. First, we hypothesized that individuals who lack in emotion regulation strategies or have difficulties in accepting negative emotions are more likely to drink to cope. Additionally, we hypothesized that individuals who act impulsively or become distracted when upset as well as those with higher peer drinking norms are more likely to drink for social and enhancement motives. The results of the path model indicated that limited access to emotion regulation strategies significantly predicted alcohol-related problems via both depression and anxiety coping motives, but did not predict alcohol consumption. Nonacceptance of emotional responses was not significantly associated with coping motives. Impulsivity had a significant direct relationship with alcohol problems. Difficulty in engaging in goal-directed behaviors predicted both enhancement and social motives, but only enhancement motives in turn predicted consumption. Norms indirectly predicted problems via enhancement motives and consumption. The results indicated that using alcohol to reduce negative or to increase positive emotions increases alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems. Overall, results advance our understanding of the mechanisms of increased alcohol use and problems among college students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Time for a Change: College Students' Preference for Technology-Mediated Versus Face-to-Face Help for Emotional Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, Anita; Sun, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Even with recent advances in psychological treatments and mobile technology, online computerized therapy is not yet popular. College students, with ubiquitous access to technology, experiencing high distress, and often nontreatment seekers, could be an important area for online treatment dissemination. Finding ways to reach out to college students by offering psychological interventions through technology, devices, and applications they often use, might increase their engagement in treatment. This study evaluates college students' reported willingness to seek help for emotional distress through novel delivery mediums, to play computer games for learning emotional coping skills, and to disclose personal information online. We also evaluated the role of ethnicity and level of emotional distress in help-seeking patterns. A survey exploring our domains of interest and the Mental Health Inventory ([MHI] as mental health index) were completed by 572 students (mean age 18.7 years, predominantly Asian American, female, and freshmen in college). More participants expressed preference for online versus face-to-face professional help. We found no relationship between MHI and help-seeking preference. A third of participants were likely to disclose at least as much information online as face-to-face. Ownership of mobile technology was pervasive. Asian Americans were more likely to be nontreatment seekers than Caucasians. Most participants were interested in serious games for emotional distress. Our results suggest that college students are very open to creative ways of receiving emotional help such as playing games and seeking emotional help online, suggesting a need for online evidence-based treatments.

  6. Metacognitive Therapy for Emotional Distress in Adult Cancer Survivors: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Peter L; Byrne, Angela; Salmon, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Many adult cancer survivors experience persistent emotional distress after completing cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to test the potential of a brief transdiagnostic psychological intervention-metacognitive therapy (MCT)-in reducing emotional distress in adult cancer survivors. A non-concurrent multiple baseline design with 3- and 6-months follow-up was used to evaluate the effects of MCT in four patients consecutively referred to a psycho-oncology service. Each patient received six 1-h sessions of MCT. Anxiety, depression, worry/rumination, fear of cancer recurrence and metacognitive beliefs were assessed using self-report questionnaires. MCT was associated with clinically significant reductions in anxiety, depression, fear of cancer recurrence, worry/rumination and metacognitive beliefs at the end of treatment, and gains were maintained in all patients to 3-months follow-up and in three out of four patients to 6-months follow-up. MCT is a promising brief transdiagnostic approach to psychological morbidity in adult survivors of cancer. Larger scale controlled trials are now required.

  7. Predisposition to emotional distress and psychiatric illness amongst doctors: the role of unconscious and experiential factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W D

    1991-12-01

    This paper explores the contribution of unconscious and experiential factors in accounting for the high rates of depression, alcohol and drug abuse and suicide within the medical profession. The first part of the paper reviews the literature on motivations to study medicine and proposes that, for some doctors, a component of their decision is a response to unconscious drives to compensate for childhood experiences of parental impotence, or emotional neglect. The second part of the paper utilizes the theoretical framework of Kohut to argue that these childhood experiences may also result in the development of a narcissistic disturbance, and a vulnerable self-esteem. A model is outlined of how this may contribute to the development of emotional distress and psychiatric illness through the creation of a state of dependence on patients, emotional detachment and the denial of personal vulnerability. It is proposed that preventative strategies will need to include changing the emotionally 'abusive' nature of medical education, which tends to exacerbate this process.

  8. Psychological distress and emotional pain among adult attendees of a dental clinic: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo Rasheed Erinfolami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We set out to carry out a case-control evaluation of psychological distress and emotional pain among adult attendees of a Nigerian dental clinic. A total of 201 subjects, made up of 101 dental patients (test group matched with age and sex with 100 normal subjects (controls, was recruited into the study. All participants completed a designed socio-demographic questionnaire. General Health Question naire and Psyche ache Assessment Schedule were also administered to assess psychological distress based on cut-off scores ≥3 and emotional pain based on cut-off scores ≥28 respectively. The mean ages of study and control group were 33 (±12 and 36 (±13 years respectively, and both study and control groups were not significantly different in all the assessed socio-demographic parameters. Overall, 21.8% (n=22 of the subjects had psychological distress, while only 7% of the control group had psychological distress. This difference was statistically significant (P=0.003. Similarly, there was significant difference in the experience of psyche ache (unbearable psychological pain as over a third of the dental patients (37.6%, n=38 had emotional pain, while only 13% of the controls experienced psych ache (P<0.001. In this study, the burden of psychological distress and emotional pain was many-fold in dental patients when compared with the controls.

  9. Unemployment, Parental Distress and Youth Emotional Well-Being: The Moderation Roles of Parent-Youth Relationship and Financial Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasquilho, Diana; de Matos, Margarida Gaspar; Marques, Adilson; Neville, Fergus G; Gaspar, Tânia; Caldas-de-Almeida, J M

    2016-10-01

    We investigated, in a sample of 112 unemployed parents of adolescents aged 10-19 years, the links between parental distress and change in youth emotional problems related to parental unemployment, and the moderation roles of parent-youth relationship and financial deprivation. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlations. Further, simple moderation, additive moderation, and moderated moderation models of regression were performed to analyze the effects of parental distress, parent-youth relationship and financial deprivation in predicting change in youth emotional problems related to parental unemployment. Results show that parental distress moderated by parent-youth relationship predicted levels of change in youth emotional problems related to parental unemployment. This study provides evidence that during job loss, parental distress is linked to youth emotional well-being and that parent-youth relationships play an important moderation role. This raises the importance of further researching parental distress impacts on youth well-being, especially during periods of high unemployment rates.

  10. Glutamatergic modulation of separation distress: profound emotional effects of excitatory amino acids in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normansell, Larry; Panksepp, Jaak

    2011-10-01

    Pre-clinical models of brain affective circuits provide relevant evidence for understanding the brain systems that figure heavily in psychiatric disorders. Social isolation and the resulting separation distress contribute to the onset of depression. In this work, the effects of excitatory amino acids (EAA) on isolation-induced distress vocalization (DV) were assessed in young domestic chicks. Both glutamate and quisqualate (QA) produced dose-dependent reductions in DVs, while N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate (KA) increased DVs. Such a differential pattern of responsiveness may indicate the presence of reciprocal or interacting EAA systems in the brain control of separation distress. Administration of either the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) or the broad-spectrum antagonist gamma-d-glutamylglycine (DGG) greatly reduced DVs, as did the antagonist 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (APB). APV did not attenuate the increase in vocalizations seen after NMDA or KA administration. DGG, however, was able to block the increase in calling produced by either of these agonists, suggesting a KA receptor mechanism. KA treatment inhibited the ability of other chicks, or auditory and somatosensory information, to suppress DVs. KA-treated animals exhibited a hyperemotional behavior pattern during which a variety of motivated behaviors were disrupted including reactions to novel objects, approaching the flock, and foraging. They could not sustain a coherent flock-like social cohesion, but exhibited strong fixed-action patterns of flight interspersed with hiding and crouching behaviors. The evident behavioral changes suggest that glutamatergic synapses directly influence sensory, motor and emotional processes in the brain and may be especially important in the integration of environmental stimuli with emotional central state processes of animals. Considering that unresolved social loss and grief have been deemed to be among the main precipitating causes

  11. The Relationship Between Psychological Distress, Negative Cognitions, and Expectancies on Problem Drinking: Exploring a Growing Problem Among University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obasi, Ezemenari M; Brooks, Jessica J; Cavanagh, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have sought to understand the concurrent relationship between cognitive and affective processes on alcohol use and negative alcohol-related consequences, despite both being identified as predictive risk factors in the college population. More research is needed to understand the relationships between identified factors of problem drinking among this at-risk population. The purpose of this study was to test if the relationship between psychological distress and problem drinking among university students (N = 284; M-age = 19.77) was mediated by negative affect regulation strategies and positive alcohol-related expectancies. Two latent mediation models of problem drinking were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM). The parsimonious three-path mediated latent model was supported by the data, as evidenced by several model fit indices. Furthermore, the alternate saturated model provided similar fit to the data, but contained several direct relationships that were not statistically significant. The relationship between psychological distress and problem drinking was mediated by an extended contributory chain, including negative affect regulation and positive alcohol-related expectancies. Implications for prevention and treatment, as well as future directions, are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. The mediating role of emotional intelligence between negative life events and psychological distress among nursing students: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Li, Chang-Zai; Zhao, Ya-Ning; Xing, Feng-Mei; Chen, Chang-Xiang; Tian, Xi-Feng; Tang, Qi-Qun

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have highlighted that negative life events and emotional intelligence are significant predictors of mental health. However, whether emotional intelligence mediates the relationship between negative life events and psychological distress among nursing students have not been given adequate attention. To explore the relationship among negative life events, emotional intelligence and psychological distress and to examine the mediating role of emotional intelligence in psychological distress among Chinese nursing students. A cross-sectional survey using convenience sampling. A total of 467 nursing students who were enrolled in a university in mainland of China. A structured questionnaire was administered from September-November in 2013 to participants who consented to participate in the study. Independent variables were personal variables, emotional intelligence and negative life events. Outcome variable was psychological health. The means and standard deviations were computed. Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were performed, to test the differences among the demographic characteristics on the psychological distress scores. Pearson correlation analyses and hierarchical regression analyses were performed. Negative life events were positively associated with psychological distress. Emotional intelligence was negatively associated with psychological distress and negative life events. Emotional intelligence mediated the relationship between negative life events and psychological distress. The findings support the theory of Salovey and his colleagues, and provide evidence for emotional intelligence as a factor that buffers effects of negative life events on psychological distress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of emotional clarity and distress tolerance in deliberate self-harm in a sample of trauma-exposed inpatient adolescents at risk for suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Andres G; Woodward, Emma C; Raines, Elizabeth M; Hanna, Abigail E; Zvolensky, Michael J

    The purpose of this study was to examine distress tolerance as a moderator of the relationship between emotional clarity and deliberate self-harm (DSH) in a diverse sample of trauma-exposed adolescents in acute psychiatric care at high risk of suicidal behavior. It was hypothesized that distress tolerance would emerge as a significant moderator, such that the association between emotional clarity and DSH would be significant among youth with high, but not low, distress tolerance. Participants (N=50; 52.0% female; M=15.1years, SD=0.51; 44% White) completed measures of emotion dysregulation, DSH, history of suicide attempts, as well as a behavioral measure of distress tolerance. Controlling for history of suicide attempts, results revealed a significant interaction between distress tolerance and emotional clarity in relation to DSH. Specifically, emotional clarity difficulties were related to DSH at high, but not low, levels of distress tolerance. Findings suggest that DSH among trauma-exposed youth with high rates of past suicide attempts is most likely when low emotion clarity is coupled with a high tolerance for emotional distress. Given that DSH significantly increases risk for suicide among youth with psychiatric needs, assessment of emotional clarity and distress tolerance deficits is apt to be warranted to facilitate identification of these youth for targeted intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Difficulties in emotion regulation and personal distress in young adults with social anxiety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contardi, Anna; Farina, Benedetto; Fabbricatore, Mariantonietta; Tamburello, Stella; Scapellato, Paolo; Penzo, Ilaria; Tamburello, Antonino; Innamorati, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between social anxiety and difficulties in emotion regulation in a sample of Italian young adults. Our convenience sample was composed of 298 Italian young adults (184 women and 114 men) aged 18-34 years. Participants were administered the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS), the Audience Anxiousness Scale (AAS), the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). A Two Step cluster analysis was used to group subjects according to their level of social anxiety. The cluster analysis indicated a two-cluster solution. The first cluster included 163 young adults with higher scores on the AAS and the IAS than those included in cluster 2 (n=135). A generalized linear model with groups as dependent variable indicated that people with higher social anxiety (compared to those with lower social anxiety) have higher scores on the dimension personal distress of the IRI (pemotions (pemotional clarity (ppeople who cannot deal effectively with their emotions may develop depressive and anxious disorders.

  15. Classifying prosocial behavior: children's responses to instrumental need, emotional distress, and material desire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunfield, Kristen A; Kuhlmeier, Valerie A

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the diversity of early prosocial behavior by examining the ability of ninety-five 2- to 4-year-olds to provide aid to an adult experimenter displaying instrumental need, emotional distress, and material desire. Children provided appropriate aid in response to each of these cues with high consistency over multiple trials. In contrast to the consistency with which the children provided aid within each task, there were no cross-task correlations, and the tendency to respond to each of the cues revealed unique developmental trajectories. Taken together, these results provide preliminary support for the importance of examining the cues to which children are responding and of differentiating between varieties of aid when considering the development of prosocial behavior. © 2013 The Authors. Child Development © 2013 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  16. Community Violence and Psychological Distress: The Protective Effects of Emotional Social Support and Sense of Personal Control among Older Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Beth Spenciner; Wilson, W. Cody

    2008-01-01

    This empirical study investigated three mechanisms of protection (preventive, compensatory, buffering) for two factors (emotional social support, sense of personal control) in the relationship between exposure to community violence and psychological distress among 947 diverse, older adolescents. Findings indicate that social support and sense of…

  17. The use of supportive communication when responding to older people’s emotional distress in home care: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafskjold, L.; Sundling, V.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Responding to older people’s distress by acknowledging or encouraging further discussion of emotions is central to supportive, person-centred communication, and may enhance home care outcomes and thereby promote healthy aging. This observational study describes nursing staff’s responses

  18. On the Effectiveness of Group Dialectical Behavior Therapy in the Enhancement of Distress Tolerance and Emotional Regulation in Substance Abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohsen nadimi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of group dialectical behavior therapy in the improvement of distress tolerance and emotion regulation among substance abusers. Method: A quasi-experimental study along with pretest-posttest and control group was used for the conduct of this study. The population of the study consisted of all addicts referring to addiction treatment center of Zahedshahr (Omid Center in summer 2012. From among this population, the number of 28 addicts was selected via convenience sampling as the participants of the study and was randomly assigned to two experimental and control groups. The participants responded to Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale and Distress Tolerance Scale as pretest, posttest, and follow-up test. The experimental group received group dialectical behavior therapy for 20 one-hour sessions whereas the control group received only Naltrexone drug. Results: The results showed that dialectical behavior therapy was effective in increasing distress tolerance and emotion regulation in substance abusers. Conclusion: Dialectical behavior therapy training can improve distress tolerance and emotion regulation, which could be the main reason for the continued use of drugs.

  19. Mediators of a Brief Hypnosis Intervention to Control Side Effects in Breast Surgery Patients: Response Expectancies and Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Guy H.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Schnur, Julie B.; David, Daniel; Silverstein, Jeffrey H.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to test the hypotheses that response expectancies and emotional distress mediate the effects of an empirically validated presurgical hypnosis intervention on postsurgical side effects (i.e., pain, nausea, and fatigue). Method: Women (n = 200) undergoing breast-conserving surgery (mean age = 48.50 years;…

  20. Emotional distress and sense of coherence in women completing a motivational program in five countries. A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höjdahl, Torunn; Magnus, Jeanette H; Mdala, Ibrahimu; Hagen, Roger; Langeland, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate changes in, and associations between, sense of coherence (SOC) and emotional distress in women who participated in an accredited motivational program (VINN) in correctional institutions in five countries. A prospective study with a pre- and post-test design included 316 participants from Sweden, Estonia, Denmark, Russia and Norway. Global emotional distress was measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. SOC was measured using the 13-item Orientation to Life Questionnaire. One-way analysis of variance and multilevel regression models were used in the statistical analyses. An increase in SOC was associated with a decrease in emotional distress. Emotional distress decreased significantly -3.80 points (95 percent CI (-4.61, -2.97)), and SOC significantly improved from pre- to post-measurement by 1.82 points (95 percent CI (0.72, 2.92)), regardless of country and correctional institution. Practical implications - The results add new knowledge regarding a coherent theoretical foundation of a motivational program for women. The ability of a program promoting health is important for researchers, health-care workers and facilitators delivering programs for women in correctional facilities. An increase in SOC can act as a protective factor in order to manage stressors and risk factors among women serving in correctional facilities. The present study indicates that enhancing women's coping resources and providing income alternatives to crime is fundamental to their capacity to desist from criminal behavior.

  1. Type D personality, suboptimal health behaviors and emotional distress in adults with diabetes : Results from Diabetes MILES–The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nefs, G.M.; Speight, J.; Pouwer, F.; Pop, V.J.M.; Bot, M.; Denollet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Type D personality – defined as high negative affectivity (NA) and high social inhibition (SI) – has been associated with adverse cardiovascular prognosis. We explored the differential associations of Type D personality and its constituent components with health behaviors, emotional distress

  2. How head and neck consultants manage patients' emotional distress during cancer follow-up consultations: a multilevel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuefang; Humphris, Gerry; Ghazali, Naseem; Friderichs, Simon; Grosset, David; Rogers, Simon N

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients suffer substantial emotional problems. This study aimed to explore how utterance-level variables (source, type and timing of emotional cues) and patient-level variables (e.g. age, gender and emotional well-being) relate to consultants' responses (i.e. reducing or providing space) to patient expressions of emotional distress. Forty-three HNC outpatient follow-up consultations were audio recorded and coded, for patients' expressions of emotional distress and consultants' responses, using the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequence. Multilevel logistic regression modelled the probability of the occurrence of consultant-reduced space response as a function of patient distress cue expression, controlling for consultation and patient-related variables. An average of 3.5 cues/concerns (range 1-20) was identified per consultation where 84 out of 152 total cues/concerns were responded by reducing space. Cue type did not impact on response; likewise for the quality of patient emotional well-being. However, consultants were more likely to reduce space to cues elicited by patients, as opposed to those initiated by themselves. This reduced space response was more pronounced as the consultation continued. However, about 6 min into the consultation, this effect (i.e. tendency to block patients) started to weaken. Head and neck consultants' responses to negative emotions depended on source and timing of patient emotional expressions. The findings are useful for training programme development to encourage consultants to be more flexible and open in the early stages of the consultation.

  3. Relationships of diabetes-specific emotional distress, depression, anxiety, and overall well-being with HbA1c in adult persons with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Ragnhild Bjarkøy; Graue, Marit; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Peyrot, Mark; Rokne, Berit

    2014-09-01

    Emotional problems are common in adults with diabetes, and knowledge about how different indicators of emotional problems are related with glycemic control is required. The aim was to examine the relationships of diabetes-specific emotional distress, depression, anxiety, and overall well-being with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Of the 319 adults with type 1 diabetes attending the endocrinology outpatient clinic at a university hospital in Norway, 235 (74%) completed the Diabetes Distress Scale, the Problem Areas in Diabetes Survey, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the World Health Organization-Five Well-Being Index. Blood samples were taken at the time of data collection to determine HbA1c. Regression analyses examined associations of diabetes-specific emotional distress, anxiety, depression, and overall well-being with HbA1c. The relationship between diabetes-specific emotional distress and HbA1c was tested for nonlinearity. Diabetes-specific emotional distress was related to glycemic control (DDS total: unstandardized coefficient=0.038, P<.001; PAID total: coefficient=0.021, P=.007), but depression, anxiety, and overall well-being were not. On the DDS, only regimen-related distress was independently related to HbA1c (coefficient=0.056, P<.001). A difference of 0.5 standard deviation of baseline regimen distress is associated with a difference of 0.6 in HbA1c. No significant nonlinearity was detected in the relationship between diabetes-specific distress and HbA1c. To stimulate adequate care strategies, health personnel should acknowledge depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress as different conditions in clinical consultations. Addressing diabetes-specific emotional distress, in particular regimen distress, in clinical consultation might improve glycemic control. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Self-esteem, emotional distress and sexual behavior among adolescent females: inter-relationships and temporal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Kathleen A; Kershaw, Trace S; Lewis, Jessica B; Milan, Stephanie; Niccolai, Linda M; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2006-03-01

    The current analyses attempt to clarify the relationship between psychological factors and sexual behavior. We test a model examining relationships between sexual history (e.g., age at initiation, partner history) and self-esteem and emotional distress (e.g., depression, anxiety, stress, hostility) and their impact on future sexual risk behavior (e.g., unprotected sex, multiple sexual partners). The current analyses included 155 sexually active adolescent females, aged 14-19 years, who participated in the first two waves of a longitudinal study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted disease (STD) and pregnancy risk. The Rosenberg Self-esteem scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and three subscales of the Brief Symptom Inventory (depression, anxiety, hostility) and a variety of self-report measures of sexual history and sexual behavior were administered. Structural equation modeling using LISREL 8.51 was used to assess the proposed model. Our model exhibited adequate fit and demonstrated that sexual history reported retrospectively at baseline was related to self-esteem and emotional distress also measured at baseline. These variables predicted sexual risk behavior measured 6 months later. Adolescents who had lower self-esteem at baseline reported initiating sex earlier and having had risky partners. Alternatively, adolescents with more emotional distress at baseline were less likely to have had a previous STD, had more partners per year of sexual activity and a history of risky partners. Self-esteem influenced subsequent unprotected sex and emotional distress influenced subsequent multiple partners. This model suggests that self-esteem and emotional distress have contrasting relationships with sexual behavior and demonstrates the importance of the temporal nature of these variables. Implications for intervention are discussed.

  5. Diabetes-specific emotional distress mediates the association between depressive symptoms and glycaemic control in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Bastelaar, Kim M P; Pouwer, F; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P H L M

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether diabetes-specific emotional distress mediates the relationship between depression and glycaemic control in patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were derived from the baseline assessment of a depression in diabetes screening...... and diabetes-specific emotional distress respectively. Linear regression was performed to examine the mediating effect of diabetes-distress. RESULTS: Complete data were available for 627 outpatients with Type 1 (n = 280) and Type 2 (n = 347) diabetes. Analyses showed that diabetes-distress mediated...... and glycaemic control, diabetes-specific emotional distress appears to be an important mediator. Addressing diabetes-specific emotional problems as part of depression treatment in diabetes patients may help improve glycaemic outcomes....

  6. The Relationship between Starting to Drink and Psychological Distress, Sleep Disturbance after the Great East Japan Earthquake and Nuclear Disaster: The Fukushima Health Management Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatsugu Orui

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal study aimed to investigate the prevalence of newly-started drinkers and their continuing drinking behaviors after the Great East Japan earthquake. Moreover, the relationships between newly-started drinking and psychological factor, disaster-related experience, and perceived radiation risk were examined. We used data from 37,687 pre-disaster non-drinkers who participated in the 2012 and 2013 surveys conducted in Fukushima. We defined newly-started drinkers as those who did not drink before the disaster but who began drinking after the disaster, based on information collected retrospectively. In 2012, 9.6% of non-drinkers began drinking, of which the prevalence of heavy drinkers was 18.4%. The prevalence of continued drinking among newly-started drinkers in 2013 was 53.8%. Logistic regression analyses revealed post-disaster newly-started drinking was significantly associated with being male, less than 65 years old, sleep dissatisfaction and psychological distress (Kessler 6 ≤ 13 when this model was adjusted for disaster-related experience and perceived radiation risk. Moreover, psychological distress and heavy drinking were significant risk factors for continued drinking among newly-started drinkers. Newly-started drinkers might use alcohol to cope with disaster-related stress. Thus, they may be targeted for disaster-related health services. Moreover, early intervention should encourage responsible drinking, since post-disaster heavy drinkers were likely to continue heavy drinking.

  7. Setbacks in diet adherence and emotional distress: a study of older patients with type 2 diabetes and their spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Melissa M; Hemphill, Rachel C; Seidel, Amber J; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Rook, Karen S; Salem, James K

    2012-01-01

    We investigated patients' difficulties in managing their diet (i.e. diet setbacks) and associations with change in disease-specific and general emotional distress (diabetes distress and depressive symptoms) among patients with type 2 diabetes and their spouses. Data for this study were collected in couples' homes (N=115 couples) using structured interviews and self-administered questionnaires at three time points: baseline (T1), six months after baseline (T2) and 12 months after baseline (T3). Patients' diet setbacks were associated with an increase in their diabetes distress in the shorter-term (over six months). Patients' diet setbacks were not associated with longer-term change in diabetes distress or with change in depressive symptoms at either time point (six months or one year). In contrast, spouses' perceptions of patients' diet setbacks were associated with increases in their own diabetes distress at both time points (over six months and one year), and also with an increase in their depressive symptoms in the longer-term (over one year). Findings reveal detrimental consequences of patients' diet nonadherence for emotional well-being that extend to the well-being of their spouses.

  8. Difficulties in emotion regulation and problem drinking in young women: the mediating effect of metacognitions about alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine, in a sample of women aged 18 25, the association between difficulties in emotion regulation, metacognitions about alcohol use and problem drinking. According to metacognitive model of problem drinking, it was assumed that metacognitions are potential mediators in the relationship between emotional dysregulation and problem drinking. A total sample of 502 women was recruited. They were administered a questionnaire identifying problem drinking (AUDIT), the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) and two scales measuring metacognitions about alcohol use: the Positive Alcohol Metacognitions Scale (PAMS) and the Negative Alcohol Metacognitions Scale (NAMS). A structural equation model of the relationships between emotional dysregulation and problem drinking - including a mediating role of metacognitions concerning alcohol use - was tested. No direct association between emotional dysregulation and problem drinking was observed. A relationship between those variables became apparent once metacognitions were considered as a mediator; however, only positive metacognitions about alcohol use emerged as a significant predictor of drinking behavior, and as a full mediator of the relationship between emotion dysregulation and problem drinking. The results provide evidence for a metacognitive conceptualization of problem drinking. They emphasize the role of positive metacognitions about alcohol use. However, this result could be age-specific; it confirms previous findings that, in samples of young people, drinking is primarily related to positive metacognitions concerning cognitive emotional self-regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emotional distress and positive and negative memories from military deployment: The influence of PTSD symptoms and time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niziurski, Julie Ann; Johannessen, Kim Berg; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    During military deployment, soldiers are confronted with both negative and positive events. What is remembered and how it affects an individual is influenced by not only the perceived emotion of the event, but also the emotional state of the individual. Here we examined the most negative and most...... positive deployment memories from a company of 337 soldiers who were deployed together to Afghanistan. We examined how the level of emotional distress of the soldiers and the valence of the memory were related to the emotional intensity, experience of reliving, rehearsal and coherence of the memories......, and how the perceived impact of these memories changed over time. We found that soldiers with higher levels of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were more affected by both their negative and positive memories, compared with soldiers with lower levels of PTSD symptoms. Emotional intensity...

  10. Holding back sharing concerns, dispositional emotional expressivity, perceived unsupportive responses and distress among women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon; Myers, Shannon; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Kashy, Debby; Rubin, Stephen; Heckman, Carolyn; Rosenblum, Norm

    2014-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the role of holding back sharing concerns in the psychological adaptation of women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancers. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of holding back concerns in psychosocial adjustment and quality of life, as well as a possible moderating role for emotional expressivity and perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends. Two hundred forty-four women diagnosed with gynecological cancer in the past 8 months completed measures of holding back, dispositional emotional expressivity, perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends, cancer-specific distress, depressive symptoms and quality of life. Emotional expressivity moderated the association between holding back and cancer-specific distress and quality of life, but not depressive symptoms. Greater holding back was more strongly associated with higher levels of cancer-related distress among women who were more emotionally expressive than among women who were less expressive. Perceived unsupportive responses did not moderate the associations between holding back and psychosocial outcomes. Holding back sharing concerns was more common in this patient population than other cancer populations. Dispositional expressivity played a role in how harmful holding back concerns was for women, while unsupportive responses from family and friends did not. © 2014.

  11. Holding Back Sharing Concerns, Dispositional Emotional Expressivity, Perceived Unsupportive Responses, and Distress Among Women Newly-Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon; Myers, Shannon; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Kashy, Debby; Rubin, Stephen; Heckman, Carolyn; Rosenblum, Norm

    2013-01-01

    Objective Little attention has been paid to the role of holding back sharing concerns in the psychological adaptation of women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancers. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of holding back concerns in psychosocial adjustment and quality of life, as well as a possible moderating role for emotional expressivity and perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends. Method Two hundred forty four women diagnosed with gynecological cancer in the past eight months completed measures of holding back, dispositional emotional expressivity, perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends, cancer-specific distress, depressive symptoms, and quality of life. Results Emotional expressivity moderated the association between holding back and cancer- specific distress and quality of life, but not depressive symptoms. Greater holding back was more strongly associated with higher levels of cancer-related distress among women who were more emotionally expressive than among women who were less expressive. Perceived unsupportive responses did not moderate the associations between holding back and psychosocial outcomes. Conclusion Holding back sharing concerns was more common in this patient population than other cancer populations. Dispositional expressivity played a role in how harmful holding back concerns was for women, while unsupportive responses from family and friends did not. PMID:24211156

  12. A CROSS-CULTURAL STUDY OF THE EXPERIENTIAL STRUCTURE OF EMOTIONS OF DISTRESS: PRELIMINARY FINDINGS IN A SAMPLE OF FEMALE JAPANESE AND AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARNAULT, Denise SAINT; SAKAMOTO, Shinji; MORIWAKI, Aiko

    2013-01-01

    Negative emotions such as anger, sadness and fear are universal; however, there is cultural variability in the ways that specific emotions cluster together. This Experience Sampling Method study collected daily life emotions of distress for 44 American and 50 Japanese college students. These women reported their experiences of 37 distresses once a day for seven days. Cluster Analysis revealed that Americans had upset, depression, hostility and dependency clusters. The Japanese had depression, sad/angry, gloomy, hate and interpersonal clusters. Cultural analysis of idioms of distress and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:24465087

  13. Differences in Drinking Expectancies and Motives for Regular Education and Special Education High School Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Jeff; Harbke, Colin R.; Blake, Dawn; Catanzaro, Salvatore J.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol expectancies and drinking motives were compared for regular education students (n = 159) and students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) receiving special education services (n = 51). Differences existed between groups with respect to expected negative social consequences and emotional and physical outcomes associated with drinking.…

  14. Relationship Between Emotional Processing, Drinking Severity and Relapse in Adults Treated for Alcohol Dependence in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Kopera, Maciej; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Suszek, Hubert; Glass, Jennifer M.; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Wnorowska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J.; Wojnar, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Growing data reveals deficits in perception, understanding and regulation of emotions in alcohol dependence (AD). The study objective was to explore the relationships between emotional processing, drinking history and relapse in a clinical sample of alcohol-dependent patients. Methods: A group of 80 inpatients entering an alcohol treatment program in Warsaw, Poland was recruited and assessed at baseline and follow-up after 12 months. Baseline information about demographics, psychopathol...

  15. The frequency of involuntary autobiographical memories and future thoughts in relation to daydreaming, emotional distress, and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David C; Salgado, Sinue

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new scale, the Involuntary Autobiographical Memory Inventory (IAMI), for measuring the frequency of involuntary autobiographical memories and involuntary future thoughts. Using the scale in relation to other psychometric and demographic measures provided three important, novel findings. First, the frequency of involuntary and voluntary memories and future thoughts are similarly related to general measures of emotional distress. This challenges the idea that the involuntary mode is uniquely associated with emotional distress. Second, the frequency of involuntary autobiographical remembering does not decline with age, whereas measures of daydreaming, suppression of unwanted thoughts and dissociative experiences all do. Thus, involuntary autobiographical remembering relates differently to aging than daydreaming and other forms of spontaneous and uncontrollable thoughts. Third, unlike involuntary autobiographical remembering, the frequency of future thoughts does decrease with age. This finding underscores the need for examining past and future mental time travel in relation to aging and life span development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in emotionally distressed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasckow, John; Morse, Jennifer; Begley, Amy; Anderson, Stewart; Bensasi, Salem; Thomas, Stephen; Quinn, Sandra C; Reynolds, Charles F

    2014-12-15

    Older individuals with emotional distress and a history of psychologic trauma are at risk for post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression. This study was an exploratory, secondary analysis of data from the study "Prevention of Depression in Older African Americans". It examined whether Problem Solving Therapy-Primary Care (PST-PC) would lead to improvement in PTSD symptoms in patients with subsyndromal depression and a history of psychologic trauma. The control condition was dietary education (DIET). Participants (n=60) were age 50 or older with scores on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale of 11 or greater and history of psychologic trauma. Exclusions stipulated no major depression and substance dependence within a year. Participants were randomized to 6-8 sessions of either PST-PC or DIET and followed 2 years with booster sessions every 6 months; 29 participants were in the PST-PC group and 31 were in the DIET group. Mixed effects models showed that improvement of PTSD Check List scores was significantly greater in the DIET group over two years than in the PST-PC group (based on a group time interaction). We observed no intervention⁎time interactions in Beck Depression Inventory or Brief Symptom Inventory-Anxiety subscale scores. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Care and caring in the intensive care unit: Family members' distress and perceptions about staff skills, communication, and emotional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Eve B; Spain, David A; Muhtadie, Luma; McDade-Montez, Liz; Macia, Kathryn S

    2015-06-01

    Family members of intensive care unit (ICU) patients are sometimes highly distressed and report lower satisfaction with communication and emotional support from staff. Within a study of emotional responses to traumatic stress, associations between family distress and satisfaction with aspects of ICU care were investigated. In 29 family members of trauma patients who stayed in an ICU, we assessed symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during ICU care. Later, family members rated staff communication, support, and skills and their overall satisfaction with ICU care. Ratings of staff competence and skills were significantly higher than ratings of frequency of communication, information needs being met, and support. Frequency of communication and information needs being met were strongly related to ratings of support (rs = .75-.77) and staff skills (rs = .77-.85), and aspects of satisfaction and communication showed negative relationships with symptoms of depression (rs = -.31 to -.55) and PTSD (rs = -.17 to -.43). Although satisfaction was fairly high, family member distress was negatively associated with several satisfaction variables. Increased understanding of the effects of traumatic stress on family members may help staff improve communication and increase satisfaction of highly distressed family members. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. College Binge Drinking Associated with Decreased Frontal Activation to Negative Emotional Distractors during Inhibitory Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia E. Cohen-Gilbert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The transition to college is associated with an increase in heavy episodic alcohol use, or binge drinking, during a time when the prefrontal cortex and prefrontal-limbic circuitry continue to mature. Traits associated with this immaturity, including impulsivity in emotional contexts, may contribute to risky and heavy episodic alcohol consumption. The current study used blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD multiband functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to assess brain activation during a task that required participants to ignore background images with positive, negative, or neutral emotional valence while performing an inhibitory control task (Go-NoGo. Subjects were 23 college freshmen (seven male, 18–20 years who engaged in a range of drinking behavior (past 3 months’ binge episodes range = 0–19, mean = 4.6, total drinks consumed range = 0–104, mean = 32.0. Brain activation on inhibitory trials (NoGo was contrasted between negative and neutral conditions and between positive and neutral conditions using non-parametric testing (5000 permutations and cluster-based thresholding (z = 2.3, p ≤ 0.05 corrected. Results showed that a higher recent incidence of binge drinking was significantly associated with decreased activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, brain regions strongly implicated in executive functioning, during negative relative to neutral inhibitory trials. No significant associations between binge drinking and brain activation were observed for positive relative to neutral images. While task performance was not significantly associated with binge drinking in this sample, subjects with heavier recent binge drinking showed decreased recruitment of executive control regions under negative versus neutral distractor conditions. These findings suggest that in young adults with heavier recent binge drinking, processing of negative emotional

  19. INFLUENCE OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AS THE MEDIATOR BETWEEN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND MENTAL HEALTH (DISTRESS) AMONG MALAYSIAN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Dev, Roxana; Abdul Rahman, Amir Rifaat

    2017-01-01

    University students typically enter a dynamic transitional period of new independence from their parents that are characterized by many factors. These factors such as social, financial, and environment can be a burden and puts them at risk of mental health distress. Engaging in physical activity has proved to give benefits to mental health. However, not many university students are active during their years at the university. Few psychosocial factors such as emotional intelligence were seen t...

  20. Unemployment, parental distress and youth emotional well-being : the moderation roles of parent–youth relationship and financial deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Frasquilho, Diana; Matos, Margarida Gaspar; Marques, Adilson; Neville, Fergus G.; Gaspar, Tânia; Almeida, J. M. Caldas de

    2015-01-01

    © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015 We investigated, in a sample of 112 unemployed parents of adolescents aged 10-19 years, the links between parental distress and change in youth emotional problems related to parental unemployment, and the moderation roles of parent-youth relationship and financial deprivation. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlations. Further, simple moderation, additive moderation, and moderated moderation models of regression were pe...

  1. What's so special about eating? Examining unhealthy diet of adolescents in the context of other health-related behaviours and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten, Maartje; de Ridder, Denise; Vollebergh, Wilma; van Dorsselaer, Saskia

    2007-05-01

    This study examines to what extent unhealthy diet in adolescents is related to other types of health-risk behaviours (e.g., smoking and alcohol intake). Whereas previous studies have emphasised that adolescents engage in health-risk behaviour because of a tendency to break the rules, the present study hypothesises that unhealthy diet may differ from this general pattern because emotional distress is involved. Data from the cross-sectional Dutch Health Behaviour in School aged Children study (N=5730) were employed to examine this issue. Participants completed questionnaires on eating habits, health-related behaviours, and emotional distress. Factor analysis confirmed the hypothesis that unhealthy diet is only weakly related to other health-risk behaviours. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, emotional distress was not a significant predictor of unhealthy diet. Further research is required to examine which factors other than emotional distress are responsible for engaging in unhealthy diets in adolescence.

  2. The prevalence of diabetes-specific emotional distress in people with Type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrin, N. E.; Davies, M. J.; Robertson, N.; Snoek, F. J.; Khunti, K.

    2017-01-01

    Psychological comorbidity, such as depression and/or diabetes-specific emotional distress (diabetes distress), is widespread in people with Type 2 diabetes and is associated with poorer treatment outcomes. Although extensive research into the prevalence of depression has been conducted, the same

  3. Emotional distress as a predictor of statin non-adherence among Swedish first-time myocardial infarction patients, 2006-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissåker, C T; Wallert, J; Held, C; Olsson, E

    2017-06-01

    Emotional distress (depression and anxiety) has been known to affect mortality after a myocardial infarction (MI). One possible mechanism is through medication non-adherence. Few studies have investigated the link between statin adherence and emotional distress, and results are not consistent. We aimed to explore whether emotional distress affects adherence among first-time MI patients younger than 75years old receiving a prescription for the first time. We identified first-MI individuals younger than 75years from the SWEDEHEART national quality registers discharged with a statin prescription. The main exposure was the anxiety/depression portion of the EQ-5D from Interview 1 (6-10weeks post-MI) and Interview 2 (12-14months post-MI). We calculated adherence from the Swedish Prescribed Drugs Register during three observation periods (OP): [1] Interview 1 to Interview 2, [2] one year post Interview 2, and [3] two years post Interview 1. Emotional distress at Interview 1 was not associated with statin adherence for OP1 (RR: 0.99, 95% CI: 0.98, 1.01). Emotional distress at Interview 2 was associated with lower adherence one year later (RR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93, 0.98). Emotional distress at Interview 1 was associated with a small decrease in adherence in the complete OP for adherence (RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.96, 0.99). Emotional distress was marginally, but independently, associated with lower adherence to statin two years after the MI. Our study suggests that emotional distress may be an important factor for long-term statin adherence, and, thus, may play a clinically important role in long-term outcome. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cancer patients' emotional distress, coping styles and perception of doctor-patient interaction in European cancer settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggiolaro, Elena; Berardi, Maria Alejandra; Andritsch, Elisabeth; Nanni, Maria Giulia; Sirgo, Agustina; Samorì, Elena; Farkas, Clemens; Ruffilli, Federica; Caruso, Rosangela; Bellé, Marta; Juan Linares, Eva; de Padova, Silvia; Grassi, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    As a part of a European study, we cross-culturally examined the rate of emotional distress and maladaptive coping and their association with cancer patients' satisfaction with their interactions with the physician responsible for their care. Cancer patients (n = 302) from one Middle European (Austria) and two Southern European (Italy, Spain) countries completed the NCCN Distress Thermometer (DT), the Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer (Mini-MAC) Anxious Preoccupation (AP) and Hopelessness (H) sub-scales, and the Physician Patient Satisfaction with Doctors Questionnaire (PSQ). The prevalence of emotional distress (DT caseness) was 60% (26.1% mild, 18.8% moderate, and 14.9% severe distress). Maladaptive coping (Mini-MAC cases) was found in 22.8% (hopeless cases), and 22.5% (anxious preoccupation cases). PSQ-MD was significantly correlated with Mini-MAC/H and Mini-Mac/AP, while PSQ-PS was negatively correlated with Mini-MAC/H. DT cases and those with higher levels of hopelessness reported higher scores on PSQ-MD and lower on PSQ-PS than non-cases. Some differences were found between countries both as far as patients' coping and perception of the interaction with doctors. In hierarchical multiple regression analysis, after adjusting for socio-demographic and medical variables, Mini-MAC/H significantly predicted the scores on PSQ-MD (positive direction) and PSQ-PS (negative direction). The study confirms that about one out of three cancer patients have moderate to high level of emotional distress and about one out of four, clinically significant maladaptive coping. Also, patients showing hopelessness and distress tended to perceive their doctors as both disengaged and less supportive. These results highlights the need for physicians to monitor their patient's level of distress and coping mechanisms and to adjust their own relational and communication style according to patients' psychological condition. Also, cross-cultural issues should be taken into account when

  5. Sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks in association to restrained, external and emotional eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfhag, K; Tynelius, P; Rasmussen, F

    2007-06-08

    We studied sugar-sweetened soft drinks and light soft drinks in their associations to psychological constructs of eating behavior and demographic data for adults and children. Soft drink intakes were assessed by consumption of soft drinks in number of days the last week, and eating behavior was measured by the Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ). The sample included 3265 men and women, and their 12-year old children, originating from Swedish national databases. Associations to younger age and lower education in adults were in particular apparent for sugar-sweetened soft drinks. Consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks was further associated to less restrained and more external eating in adults. In contrast, light soft drinks were associated with higher BMI, more restrained eating and also more emotional eating in adults. For the children these associations were generally weaker. Sugar-sweetened soft drinks are consumed by persons with a lower education, who furthermore are less prone to attempt to restrict their calorie intake, and by some of those who are sensitive to external stimuli of foods. Light soft drinks are rather chosen by the more heavy persons who try to restrict their energy intake perhaps in order to control the body weight, and more unexpectedly, by adults who eat for comfort. Being more sensitive to an external stimulus of food such as taste seems to imply proneness to consume sugar-sweetened soft drinks instead of the light versions. Light soft drinks may be perceived as an adequate substitute in the use of foods for comfort, meaning the sweet taste may be sufficient for this purpose.

  6. Fathers' postnatal distress, parenting self-efficacy, later parenting behavior, and children's emotional-behavioral functioning: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominov, Holly; Giallo, Rebecca; Whelan, Thomas A

    2016-12-01

    Fathers' postnatal distress has been associated with subsequent emotional and behavioral problems for children; however, the mechanisms by which this occurs have received less attention. One potential pathway could be via the negative effects that father mental health problems and parenting self-efficacy (PSE) in the postnatal period have on later parenting behaviors. Using a nationally representative cohort of Australian father-child dyads (N = 3,741), the long-term relationships between fathers' psychological distress and PSE in the postnatal period, parenting behavior when children were aged 4-5 years, and emotional-behavioral outcomes for children aged 8-9 years were explored. Path analysis indicated that high distress and low PSE in the postnatal period was associated with higher levels of hostile parenting and lower parenting consistency when children were aged 4-5 years; in turn, these were associated with poorer child outcomes at 8-9 years. These results remained significant after controlling for socioeconomic position, couple relationship quality, mothers' and fathers' mental health, and fathers' concurrent parenting behavior. The pathways among PSE, parenting hostility, parenting consistency, and children's outcomes at age 8-9 years differed for fathers of boys compared with fathers of girls. Results highlight the importance of father-inclusive assessments of postnatal mental health. Support programs targeting new fathers' perceptions of parenting competence may be particularly important for fathers experiencing postnatal distress. For fathers, building a stronger sense of parenting competence in the postnatal period is important for later parenting behavior, which relates to children's emotional and behavioral outcomes during middle childhood. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Associations Between Internet-Based Professional Social Networking and Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jacquelynn R.; Colditz, Jason B.; Shensa, Ariel; Sidani, Jaime E.; Lin, Liu Yi; Terry, Martha Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Professional social networking websites are commonly used among young professionals. In light of emerging concerns regarding social networking use and emotional distress, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between frequency of use of LinkedIn, the most commonly used professional social networking website, and depression and anxiety among young adults. In October 2014, we assessed a nationally representative sample of 1,780 U.S. young adults between the ages of 19–32 regarding frequency of LinkedIn use, depression and anxiety, and sociodemographic covariates. We measured depression and anxiety using validated Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System measures. We used bivariable and multivariable logistic regression to assess the association between LinkedIn use and depression and anxiety, while controlling for age, sex, race, relationship status, living situation, household income, education level, and overall social media use. In weighted analyses, 72% of participants did not report use of LinkedIn, 16% reported at least some use, but less than once each week, and 12% reported use at least once per week. In multivariable analyses controlling for all covariates, compared with those who did not use LinkedIn, participants using LinkedIn at least once per week had significantly greater odds of increased depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31–3.38) and increased anxiety (AOR = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.72–4.53). LinkedIn use was significantly related to both outcomes in a dose–response manner. Future research should investigate directionality of this association and possible reasons for it. PMID:27732077

  8. Associations Between Internet-Based Professional Social Networking and Emotional Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jacquelynn R; Colditz, Jason B; Shensa, Ariel; Sidani, Jaime E; Lin, Liu Yi; Terry, Martha Ann; Primack, Brian A

    2016-10-01

    Professional social networking websites are commonly used among young professionals. In light of emerging concerns regarding social networking use and emotional distress, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between frequency of use of LinkedIn, the most commonly used professional social networking website, and depression and anxiety among young adults. In October 2014, we assessed a nationally representative sample of 1,780 U.S. young adults between the ages of 19-32 regarding frequency of LinkedIn use, depression and anxiety, and sociodemographic covariates. We measured depression and anxiety using validated Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System measures. We used bivariable and multivariable logistic regression to assess the association between LinkedIn use and depression and anxiety, while controlling for age, sex, race, relationship status, living situation, household income, education level, and overall social media use. In weighted analyses, 72% of participants did not report use of LinkedIn, 16% reported at least some use, but less than once each week, and 12% reported use at least once per week. In multivariable analyses controlling for all covariates, compared with those who did not use LinkedIn, participants using LinkedIn at least once per week had significantly greater odds of increased depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31-3.38) and increased anxiety (AOR = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.72-4.53). LinkedIn use was significantly related to both outcomes in a dose-response manner. Future research should investigate directionality of this association and possible reasons for it.

  9. Impact of chronic disease on emotional distress in adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuotto, Stefanie C; Krull, Kevin R; Li, Chenghong; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Green, Daniel M; Patel, Sunita K; Srivastava, Deokumar; Stovall, Marilyn; Ness, Kirsten K; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Brinkman, Tara M

    2017-02-01

    The current study was performed to examine associations between childhood cancer therapies, chronic health conditions, and symptoms of emotional distress in adult survivors of childhood cancer. Participants included 5021 adult survivors of childhood cancer (mean age, 32.0 years [standard deviation, 7.6 years] with a time since diagnosis of 23.2 years [standard deviation, 4.5 years]) who completed measures assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress. Cardiac, pulmonary, and endocrine conditions were graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4.03; grades 1-4). Structural equation modeling was used to examine hypothesized pathways between cancer treatment exposures, chronic health conditions, and symptoms of emotional distress. Multivariable models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) for associations between chronic health conditions and distress. Survivors with cardiovascular, endocrine, or pulmonary conditions were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of emotional distress symptoms. In path analyses and multivariable models, significant effects were observed between endocrine (β = .12 [P = .002] and RR, 1.3 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.1-1.6]) and pulmonary (β = .13 [Pcancer therapies contribute to emotional distress in adult survivors. Targeted mental health screening efforts in this at-risk population appear warranted. Therapeutic approaches should consider the complex interplay between chronic health conditions and symptoms of emotional distress. Cancer 2017;123:521-528. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  10. Longitudinal relationship between diabetes-specific emotional distress and follow-up HbA1c in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, R B; Graue, M; Wentzel-Larsen, T; Peyrot, M; Thordarson, H B; Rokne, B

    2015-10-01

    To examine whether diabetes-specific emotional distress was related to follow-up glycaemic control in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus completed the Diabetes Distress Scale and reported sociodemographic information when attending a clinical consultation at a university endocrinology unit. Blood samples to determine baseline HbA1c were taken during consultations. All respondents' HbA1c measurements registered from January 2009 to December 2011 were collected from medical records. The relationship between baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress and HbA1c was examined with linear mixed-effects models in 175 patients with complete data. After controlling for confounders, baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress and glycaemic control were significantly associated (fixed-effect coefficient 0.40, P < 0.001) and the regimen-related distress subscale had the strongest association with glycaemic control (fixed-effect coefficient 0.47, P < 0.001). The two-item measure of diabetes-specific distress had a weaker but still significant association with glycaemic control (fixed-effect coefficient 0.31, P < 0.001). None of these relationships was significant after adjusting for the baseline HbA1c . People with elevated baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress are at risk of prolonged suboptimum glycaemic control; therefore, elevated diabetes-specific emotional distress, especially regimen-related distress, might be an important marker for prolonged suboptimum glycaemic control, and might indicate a need for special attention regarding patient self-management. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  11. Comparison of Arab breast cancer survivors and healthy controls for spousal relationship, body image, and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Miri; Mabjish, Ahlam Abdallah; Zidan, Jamal

    2011-03-01

    Cultural perceptions and norms affect individuals' psychological reactions to cancer and quality of life, but very few studies have assessed reactions to breast cancer in specific cultural groups. Such assessments are especially rare for Arab women with breast cancer. To assess the effect of spousal support, sharing household tasks, and body image in relation to emotional distress in Arab breast cancer survivors compared with matched healthy controls. Fifty-six Israeli Arab breast cancer survivors (stages I-III), and 66 age- and education-matched women answered Brief Symptoms Inventory-18, Perceived Body Image, Perceived Spousal Support and Division of Household Labor scale questionnaires. Breast cancer patients experienced higher psychological distress, especially anxiety and somatization. They reported receiving more support from their spouses and higher sharing of household tasks than did matched healthy controls, but were not different regarding body image. Twenty-eight percent of the variance of psychological distress was explained, with group, perceived support, and group × body image interaction. Thus, higher psychological distress was more likely to occur in participants receiving lower support and in breast cancer survivors with lower body image. The study described the effects of breast cancer on Arab women compared to healthy women. It highlights the need for culture-sensitive care for Arab breast cancer patients, as well as other patients from minority groups residing in other Western countries.

  12. Young Adults' Information Seeking Following Celebrity Suicide: Considering Involvement With the Celebrity and Emotional Distress in Health Communication Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman Carpentier, Francesca R; Parrott, M Scott

    2016-11-01

    Young adults (N = 357) were surveyed following the suicide of celebrity Robin Williams to better understand how involvement with the actor and emotional responses to his death influenced searches for information concerning depression, suicide, and mental health. Emotional distress following the actor's death mediated the relationship between involvement and certain types of information searches. Most respondents sought information about the celebrity's career, suicide, and depression using portable devices such as smartphones and laptop computers to access news websites for information. Those respondents who sought information about the suicide reported changes in their thoughts about suicide, most often dealing with the difficulty in spotting warning signs and the idea that "it can happen to anyone." Findings suggest placement of health messages within existing material about celebrity announcements on online websites and social media to drive more traffic toward general informational outlets. Messages that acknowledge emotional distress might be best placed within content specific to the celebrity's tragedy, rather than specific to the celebrity's career or performances.

  13. The contribution of internal resources, external resources, and emotional distress to use of drugs and alcohol among Israeli Jewish urban adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschitz-Elhawi, Racheli; Itzhaky, Haya

    2014-03-01

    The contribution of selected background variables (age, gender), internal resources (mastery, emotional maturity), external resources (parental and peer support), and emotional distress to alcohol and drug use among 160 Israeli Jewish urban high school students were examined. Analyzing the variables with hierarchical regression, emotional distress contributed most significantly to both alcohol and drug use, and the contribution of age was somewhat less significant for both of them. Emotional distress also contributed indirectly to drug use through an interaction with one's sense of mastery. Gender, internal resources, and external resources contributed differentially to alcohol and drug use. Whereas gender and internal resources contributed only to drug use, external resources contributed only to alcohol use. Specifically, peer support contributed positively to alcohol use whereas parental support contributed negatively. The discussion provides explanations for these research findings and their implications, and the research's limitations are noted.

  14. Emotionally Up and Down, Behaviorally to and fro: Drinking Motives Mediate the Synergistic Effects of Urgency and Emotional Instability on Alcohol Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Robert D.; Kuvaas, Nicholas J.; Lamis, Dorian A.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Stevenson, Brittany L.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional and behavioral regulation has been linked to coping and enhancement motives and associated with different patterns of alcohol use and problems. The current studies examined emotional instability, urgency, and internal drinking motives as predictors of alcohol dependence symptoms as well as the likelihood and severity of "Diagnostic…

  15. Psychometric evaluation of the PainCAS Interference with Daily Activities, Psychological/Emotional Distress, and Pain scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Stacey A; Black, Ryan A; Butler, Stephen F

    2017-12-22

    The PainCAS is a web-based clinical tool for assessing and tracking pain and opioid risk in chronic pain patients. Despite evidence for its utility within the clinical setting, the PainCAS scales have never been subject to psychometric evaluation. The current study is the first to evaluate the psychometric properties of the PainCAS Interference with Daily Activities, Psychological/Emotional Distress, and Pain scales. Patients (N = 4797) from treatment centers and hospitals in 16 different states completed the PainCAS as part of routine clinical assessment. A subsample (n = 73) from two hospital-based treatment centers also completed comparator measures. Rasch Rating Scale Models were employed to evaluate the Interference with Daily Activities and Psychological/Emotional Distress scales, and empirical evaluation included assessment of dimensionality, discrimination, item fit, reliability, information, and person-to-item targeting. Additionally, convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated through classical test theory approaches. Convergent validity of the Pain scales was evaluated through correlations with corresponding comparator items. One Interference with Daily Activities item was removed due to poor functioning and discrimination. The retained items from the Interference with Daily Activities and Psychological/Emotional Distress scales conformed to unidimensional Rasch measurement models, yielding satisfactory item fit, reliability, precision, and coverage. Further, results provided support for the convergent and discriminant validity of these two scales. Convergent validity between the PainCAS Pain and BPI Pain items was also strong. Taken together, results provide strong psychometric support for these PainCAS Pain scales. Strengths and limitations of the current study are discussed.

  16. Physical and/or Sexual Abuse Is Associated with Increased Psychological and Emotional Distress Among Transgender Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussin-Shoptaw, Alexandra L; Fletcher, Jesse B; Reback, Cathy J

    2017-08-01

    Transgender women have consistently reported elevated rates of lifetime physical and sexual abuse. This study examined the associations between reported physical and/or sexual abuse and symptoms of psychological and emotional distress among a sample of urban, high-risk transgender women. From June 2005 through July 2012, 99 transgender women enrolled in a Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services program in Hollywood, CA. Seemingly unrelated regression equations (SURE) were used to simultaneously regress psychiatric symptom reports on participant sociodemographic characteristics and self-reported history of physical/sexual abuse. Participants were African American/Black (33.3%), Caucasian/White (28.3%), or Hispanic/Latina (24.2%). Average age was 35 years (standard deviation [SD] = 9), and 37.4% of participants self-reported an HIV-positive status. Most (84.9%) participants reported experiencing physical or sexual abuse at some point in their lifetime, and symptoms of psychological and emotional distress (as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory) among those who reported abuse were more severe than those observed in cisgender psychiatric in-patient populations. After controlling for participant sociodemographics, prior experience of physical and/or sexual abuse was associated with significantly increased psychological and emotional distress across all measured symptom domains except psychoticism [χ 2 (9)  = 17.56; p < 0.05]. Given these associations as well as the high prevalence of physical and/or sexual abuse among transgender women, mental health professionals and social service providers working with this population should be sensitive to the abuse history and mental health needs of the transgender women with whom they work.

  17. Emotion Regulation Difficulties Moderate the Association Between Heavy Episodic Drinking and Dating Violence Perpetration Among College Men

    OpenAIRE

    Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Davis, Kelly Cue; Cherf, Nicholas; Gulati, Natasha K.; Kajumulo, Kelly F.

    2016-01-01

    Because of high rates of heavy drinking and dating violence (psychological or physical aggression toward a dating partner) among college men, we examined whether emotion regulation difficulties moderated the association between heavy drinking and dating violence perpetration. One hundred and fifty-eight men were recruited from a large northwestern US university between April 2014 and August 2014. Participants completed an online survey that assessed their emotion regulation difficulties as we...

  18. Review. Cognitive and emotional consequences of binge drinking: role of amygdala and prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David N; Duka, Theodora

    2008-10-12

    Binge drinking is an increasingly recognized problem within the UK. We have studied the relationship of binge drinking to cognitive and emotional functioning in young adults, and have found evidence for increased impulsivity, impairments in spatial working memory and impaired emotional learning. Since in human studies it is difficult to understand whether such behavioural changes pre-date or are a consequence of binge drinking, we have also studied parallel behaviours in a rodent model, in which rats are exposed to intermittent episodes of alcohol consumption and withdrawal. In this model, and in parallel with our findings in human binge drinkers, and alcoholic patients who have undergone multiple episodes of detoxification, we have found evidence for impairments in aversive conditioning as well as increased impulsivity. These behavioural changes are accompanied by facilitated excitatory neurotransmission and reduced plasticity (long-term potentiation (LTP)) in amygdala and hippocampus. The impaired LTP is accompanied by both impaired associative learning and inappropriate generalization of previously learned associations to irrelevant stimuli. We propose that repeated episodes of withdrawal from alcohol induce aberrant neuronal plasticity that results in altered cognitive and emotional competences.

  19. Reasons for induced abortion and their relation to women's emotional distress: a prospective, two-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broen, Anne Nordal; Moum, Torbjörn; Bödtker, Anne Sejersted; Ekeberg, Oivind

    2005-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the most important reasons for induced abortion and to examine their relationship to emotional distress at follow-up. Eighty women were included in the study. The women were interviewed 10 days, 6 months (T2) and 2 years (T3) after they underwent an abortion. At all time points, the participants completed the Impact of Event Scale and a questionnaire about feelings connected to the abortion. Reasons related to education, job and finances were highly rated. Also, "a child should be wished for," "male partner does not favour having a child at the moment," "tired, worn out" and "have enough children" were important reasons. "Pressure from male partner" was listed as the 11th most important reason. When the reasons for abortion and background variables were included in multiple regression analyses, the strongest predictor of emotional distress at T2 and T3 was "pressure from male partner." Male pressure on women to have an induced abortion has a significant, negative influence on women's psychological responses in the 2 years following the event. Women who gave the reason "have enough children" for choosing abortion reported slightly better psychological outcomes at T3.

  20. Exploring the ambiguities of masculinity in accounts of emotional distress in the military among young ex-servicemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gill; Emslie, Carol; O'Neill, Dan; Hunt, Kate; Walker, Steven

    2010-10-01

    This paper examines the experiences and perspectives of ex-military servicemen in the UK. It focuses specifically on the complex links between emotional distress and various constructions of 'masculinity' in a military context. Aspects of military culture that exacerbate vulnerability and also those that are protective to mental health are identified and discussed with reference to the theoretical constructs relating to hegemonic masculinity. A qualitative research design using semi-structured interviews provided in-depth accounts of the experiences of 20 ex-servicemen aged 23-44, all but one of whom were in the Army. We found that in a military setting hegemonic masculinity is embedded in the construction of a soldier identity and expression of emotion may be seen as inappropriate. As a result soldiers often lack a language with which to express distress (in a context in which they may witness extremely distressing events), which may result in delays in recognising and treating mental health problems. However, constructions of masculinity in this setting to some degree also promote a caring, sharing ethos based on strong inter-dependent bonds. A young soldier who can cope with the stresses of military life 'becomes a man', adopts a masculine/soldier identity and is well-placed to benefit from these protective factors, notably the camaraderie that is part of service life. In this manner a caring ethos in which some admissions of weakness may be permissible is situated within hegemonic masculinity. This seeming paradox between hyper masculinity and caring masculinities appears to be embedded within military culture, perhaps reflecting the flexibility and ambiguity inherent in constructions of hegemonic masculinity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SCL-90-R emotional distress ratings in substance use and impulse control disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arrindell, Willem A; Urbán, Róbert; Carrozzino, Danilo

    2017-01-01

    .F. Krueger's empirical model of psychopathology which distinguishes between fear, distress, and externalizing factors (Krueger, 1999). The higher-order model (3), which combines externalizing and distress factors (Irritable-hostile depression), fit the data numerically equally well. Overall, findings were......-dimensional model advanced by Derogatis (1977); and on an 8-dimensional model proposed by Arrindell and Ettema (2003)-Agoraphobia, Anxiety, Depression, Somatization, Cognitive-performance deficits, Interpersonal sensitivity and mistrust, Acting-out hostility, and Sleep difficulties. Taking individual symptoms...... as input, three higher-order models were tested with at the second-order levels either (1) General psychological distress; (2) 'Panic with agoraphobia', 'Depression' and 'Extra-punitive behavior'; or (3) 'Irritable-hostile depression' and 'Panic with agoraphobia'. In line with previous studies, no support...

  2. Emotional distress in partners of patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Broek, Krista C; Habibović, Mirela; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2010-01-01

    Both patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and their partners face challenges when adapting to the ICD. Distress is a burden on its own for partners but may also affect well being and health of patients. This review provides a systematic overview of the literature on psych......Both patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and their partners face challenges when adapting to the ICD. Distress is a burden on its own for partners but may also affect well being and health of patients. This review provides a systematic overview of the literature...

  3. Parent-child interactions and children with cerebral palsy: An exploratory study investigating emotional availability, functional ability, and parent distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfoot, J; Meredith, P; Ziviani, J; Whittingham, K

    2017-11-01

    Emotionally available parent-child relationships are supportive of child health and development. When a child has cerebral palsy, a range of child and parent factors can potentially impact the parent-child relationship; however, little research has specifically addressed this question. The aim of this study is to investigate links between parent-child emotional availability and both child functional abilities and parent distress in a sample of parents and children with cerebral palsy. Twenty-three mothers (mean age 37.3+/-5.7 years) and their children (mean age 4.9+/-3.3 years) with cerebral palsy completed a 20 min videoed parent-child interaction, scored using the Emotional Availability Scales. Parents also completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, the Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Correlational analyses were conducted, and qualitative observations were made. Parent-child dyads in which the parent reported depressive symptoms scored poorer on all aspects of parent-child emotional availability. Where parents reported experiencing anxiety or stress, increased parent hostility and decreased child responsiveness was found. There was no relationship between child functional abilities and either parent distress or parent-child emotional availability. Parent sensitivity, structuring, and nonintrusiveness were negatively associated with child peer problems. Both child responsiveness and child involvement were negatively associated with hyperactivity/inattention. Observations of video footage suggested that parent implementation of therapy strategies impacted negatively on parent-child emotional availability for some dyads. Findings from this study are consistent with the wider literature showing a link between parental depression and the parent-child relationship and extend this link to the cerebral palsy population. The importance of routine screening for parental mental health problems in early

  4. Emotional states as mediators between tinnitus loudness and tinnitus distress in daily life: Results from the “TrackYourTinnitus” application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Thomas; Pryss, Rüdiger; Langguth, Berthold; Schlee, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    The psychological process how tinnitus loudness leads to tinnitus distress remains unclear. This cross-sectional study investigated the mediating role of the emotional state “stress level” and of the two components of the emotional state “arousal” and “valence” with N = 658 users of the “TrackYourTinnitus” smartphone application. Stress mediated the relationship between tinnitus loudness and tinnitus distress in a simple mediation model and even in a multiple mediation model when arousal and valence were held constant. Arousal mediated the loudness-distress relationship when holding valence constant, but not anymore when controlling for valence as well as for stress. Valence functioned as a mediator when controlling for arousal and even when holding arousal and stress constant. The direct effect of tinnitus loudness on tinnitus distress remained significant in all models. This study demonstrates that emotional states affect the process how tinnitus loudness leads to tinnitus distress. We thereby could show that the mediating influence of emotional valence is at least equally strong as the influence of stress. Implications of the findings for future research, assessment, and clinical management of tinnitus are discussed. PMID:26853815

  5. Diabetes-specific emotional distress in people with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoop, C H; Nefs, Giesje; Pop, V J M

    2014-01-01

    care. The difference in diabetes distress between care settings can be largely, but not fully, explained by specific demographic and clinical characteristics. These results need to be interpreted with caution as they are based on two separate studies, but do call into question the need to screen...

  6. Childhood Emotional Maltreatment and Later Psychological Distress among College Students: The Mediating Role of Maladaptive Schemas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Margaret O'Dougherty; Crawford, Emily; Del Castillo, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Theoretically, exposure to experiences of emotional abuse (EA) and emotional neglect (EN) in childhood may threaten the security of attachment relationships and result in maladaptive models of self and self-in-relation to others. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which EA and EN treatment by parents contributed…

  7. Dispositional emotional expressivity, cancer-specific coping, and distress in socioeconomically-disadvantaged Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Patricia I; Bauer, Margaret R; Yanez, Betina; Jorge, Alexandra; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda; Stanton, Annette L

    2016-06-01

    Coping processes directed toward avoiding and approaching stressor-related thoughts and emotions predict psychological adjustment. However, few studies have examined how the relationship between dispositional emotional tendencies and stressor-specific coping affects outcomes. The aim of the current study was to examine the association of dispositional emotional expressivity (i.e., the propensity to experience and express emotions strongly) with cancer-specific coping through avoidance and emotional approach to predict intrusive thoughts and depressive symptoms in Latinas with breast cancer. Recently diagnosed Latina breast cancer patients receiving treatment completed standardized assessments via interview at 2 time points: within 18 months of diagnosis (Time 1; N = 95) and 3 months later (Time 2; N = 79). Most women were immigrants (93%), reported a combined household income of $20,000 or less (75%), did not graduate from high school (59%), and primarily spoke Spanish (88%). In path analyses, more recent immigration was associated with greater dispositional expressivity, which in turn was associated with coping with the cancer experience using both greater avoidance and emotional approach strategies. Only avoidance-oriented strategies predicted an increase in intrusive thoughts at 3 months. No significant effects on depressive symptoms were observed. Findings suggest that Latina breast cancer patients who have a propensity to experience and express emotions strongly may be initially overwhelmed by their cancer-related emotions and consequently turn to avoidance-oriented and emotional approach strategies to cope with their diagnosis. Avoidance-oriented coping in turn may uniquely predict an increase in cancer-related intrusive thoughts 3 months later. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Linking family cohesion and flexibility with expressed emotion, family burden and psychological distress in caregivers of patients with psychosis: A path analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutra, Katerina; Simos, Panagiotis; Triliva, Sofia; Lionis, Christos; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2016-06-30

    The present study aimed to evaluate a path analytic model accounting for caregivers' psychological distress that takes into account perceived family cohesion and flexibility, expressed emotion and caregiver's burden associated with the presence of mental illness in the family. 50 first-episode and 50 chronic patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (most recent episode manic severe with psychotic features) recruited from the Inpatient Psychiatric Unit of the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece, and their family caregivers participated in the study. Family functioning was assessed in terms of cohesion and flexibility (FACES-IV), expressed emotion (FQ), family burden (FBS) and caregivers' psychological distress (GHQ-28). Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of family dynamics on caregivers' psychological distress. The results showed that neither family cohesion nor family flexibility exerted significant direct effects on caregivers' psychological distress. Instead, the effect of flexibility was mediated by caregivers' criticism and family burden indicating an indirect effect on caregivers' psychological distress. These results apply equally to caregivers of first episode and chronic patients. Family interventions aiming to improve dysfunctional family interactions by promoting awareness of family dynamics could reduce the burden and improve the emotional well-being of family caregivers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. When knowing is not enough: Emotional distress and depression reduce the positive effects of health literacy on diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinckus, Louise; Dangoisse, Florence; Van den Broucke, Stephan; Mikolajczak, Moïra

    2017-08-12

    Adequate self-management activities are important predictors of diabetes outcomes. As diabetes literacy and self-efficacy are strong predictors of diabetes self-care, self-management education programs focus essentially on these factors. This study investigated whether emotional distress or depression moderates the relation between health literacy, self-efficacy and diabetes self-care behaviors. 128 people with type 2 diabetes were recruited in hospitals, through general practitioners and via a diabetes website, and completed a questionnaire assessing health literacy, self-efficacy, diabetes-related distress, depression and self-care behaviors. Multiple regression analysis confirms that health literacy and self-efficacy significantly predict reported self-care behaviors. Additional regression analyses reveal that distress or depression do not predict self-care behaviors directly, but moderate the effect of health literacy, which has a weaker impact in patients experiencing distress or depression. In contrast, distress and depression do not moderate the effect of self-efficacy on diabetes self-care behaviors. Emotional distress, whether related to diabetes or not, prevents patients from acting on their competence to perform adequate self-management behaviors. Diabetes Professionals should pay more attention to the patients' affective state and its influence on self-care. Psychological support should be integrated in the care for people suffering from type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. What Patterns of Postpartum Psychological Distress Are Associated with Maternal Concerns about Their Children's Emotional and Behavioural Problems at the Age of Three Years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzies, Karen; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Tough, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Mothers experiencing psychological distress in the postpartum period may have difficulties parenting their children. Inconsistent and unresponsive parenting may increase the risk of later emotional and behavioural problems in children. The purpose of this study was to identify how maternal psychological characteristics cluster at eight weeks…

  11. Is the effect of coping styles disease specific? : relationships with emotional distress and quality of life in acquired brain injury and multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, Ingrid; Bol, Yvonne; Stapert, Sven; Köhler, Sebastian; van Heugten, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the use of coping styles and the relationships linking coping to emotional distress and quality of life in patients with acquired brain injury and multiple sclerosis. METHOD: Cross-sectional cohort study of 143 patients with acquired brain injury and 310 patients with

  12. The Role of Self-Compassion and Emotional Approach Coping in the Relationship between Maladaptive Perfectionism and Psychological Distress among East Asian International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Heweon

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the mediating and moderating roles of self-compassion and emotional approach coping in the relationship between maladaptive perfectionism and psychological distress among East Asian international students. Data were collected through an online survey completed by 255 East Asian international students in a large public…

  13. Effectiveness of an intervention to reduce sickness absence in patients with emotional distress or minor mental disorders: a randomized controlled effectiveness trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, E.P.M.; Tiemens, B.G.; Terluin, B.; Verhaak, P.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an activating intervention designed to reduce sick leave duration in patients with emotional distress or minor mental disorders. METHOD: In a 1.5-year randomized controlled trial, 194 patients with minor mental disorders

  14. Communication and interpretation of emotional distress within the friendships of young Irish men prior to suicide: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lorna; Owens, Christabel; Malone, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    The potential for young men in crisis to be supported by their lay networks is an important issue for suicide prevention, due to the under-utilisation of healthcare services by this population. Central to the provision of lay support is the capability of social networks to recognise and respond effectively to young men's psychological distress and suicide risk. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore young men's narratives of peer suicide, in order to identify how they interpreted and responded to behavioural changes and indications of distress from their friend before suicide. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted during 2009/10 with 15 Irish males (aged 19-30 years) who had experienced the death by suicide of a male friend in the preceding 5 years. The data were analysed using a thematic approach. Through the analysis of the participants' stories and experiences, we identified several features of young male friendships and social interactions that could be addressed to strengthen the support available to young men in crisis. These included the reluctance of young men to discuss emotional or personal issues within male friendships; the tendency to reveal worries and emotion only within the context of alcohol consumption; the tendency of friends to respond in a dismissive or disapproving way to communication of suicidal thoughts; the difficulty of knowing how to interpret a friend's inconsistent or ambiguous behaviour prior to suicide; and beliefs about the sort of person who takes their own life. Community-based suicide prevention initiatives must enhance the potential of young male social networks to support young men in crisis, through specific provisions for developing openness in communication and responsiveness, and improved education about suicide risk. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Diabetes fatalism and its emotional distress subscale are independent predictors of glycemic control among Lebanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Egede, Leonard E; Abi Kharma, Joelle; Bassil, Maya

    2017-09-04

    Achieving and sustaining optimal glycemic control in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is difficult because of socio-cultural and psychosocial factors including diabetes fatalism. Diabetes fatalism is 'a complex psychological cycle characterized by perceptions of despair, hopelessness, and powerlessness'. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether diabetes fatalism and other psychosocial and socio-cultural variables are correlates of glycemic control in Lebanese population with T2DM. A convenience sample of 280 adult participants with T2DM were recruited from a major hospital in greater Beirut-Lebanon area and from the community. Diabetes fatalism was assessed using the Arabic version of 12-item Diabetes Fatalism Scale. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess the relationship between HbA1c and psychosocial and socio-cultural characteristics including diabetes fatalism. Four models were run to examine the independent association between HbA1c and diabetes fatalism and to identify which of the 3 subscales (emotional distress, spiritual coping and perceived self-efficacy) were associated with HbA1c. The mean age of the participants was 58.24(SD = 13.48) and the majority were females (53.76%), while 32.73% of the sample had diabetes for more than 10 years. Fully adjusted multiple linear regression models showed that higher scores on diabetes fatalism and the emotional distress subscale (P = 0.018) were significantly associated with higher HbA1c values. In addition, having diabetes for more than 11 years (P = 0.05) and a higher number of diabetes complications (P fatalism as an independent predictor of glycemic control among Lebanese. Future studies should further investigate this construct to guide interventions that can address it for better diabetes outcomes.

  16. Communication and interpretation of emotional distress within the friendships of young Irish men prior to suicide: a qualitative study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Lorna

    2014-10-16

    The potential for young men in crisis to be supported by their lay networks is an important issue for suicide prevention, due to the under-utilisation of healthcare services by this population. Central to the provision of lay support is the capability of social networks to recognise and respond effectively to young men\\'s psychological distress and suicide risk. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore young men\\'s narratives of peer suicide, in order to identify how they interpreted and responded to behavioural changes and indications of distress from their friend before suicide. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted during 2009\\/10 with 15 Irish males (aged 19-30 years) who had experienced the death by suicide of a male friend in the preceding 5 years. The data were analysed using a thematic approach. Through the analysis of the participants\\' stories and experiences, we identified several features of young male friendships and social interactions that could be addressed to strengthen the support available to young men in crisis. These included the reluctance of young men to discuss emotional or personal issues within male friendships; the tendency to reveal worries and emotion only within the context of alcohol consumption; the tendency of friends to respond in a dismissive or disapproving way to communication of suicidal thoughts; the difficulty of knowing how to interpret a friend\\'s inconsistent or ambiguous behaviour prior to suicide; and beliefs about the sort of person who takes their own life. Community-based suicide prevention initiatives must enhance the potential of young male social networks to support young men in crisis, through specific provisions for developing openness in communication and responsiveness, and improved education about suicide risk.

  17. Are emotionally driven and addictive-like eating behaviors the missing links between psychological distress and greater body weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdier, L; Orri, M; Carre, A; Gearhardt, A N; Romo, L; Dantzer, C; Berthoz, S

    2018-01-01

    There is now a large body of evidence suggesting a significant association between emotional discomfort management, disordered eating behaviors and weight status. In the field of overweight and obesity, emotionally driven eating habits that resemble addictive behaviors are considered as a risk factor. This study aimed to investigate in a large sample of French university students 1) the associations between self-reported levels of psychological distress (PD), emotional eating (EE), food addiction (FA) and Body Mass Index (BMI); and 2) the potential mediation effect of eating behaviors (EE and FA) between PD and BMI. The responses of 1051 students (76.3% females) to self-reports assessing PD (Perceived Stress Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), EE (Intuitive Eating Scale-2) and FA (modified Yale Food Addiction Scale) were analysed. Associations between variables (Spearman correlation) and group comparisons by sex and BMI categories (Student's t tests/ANOVA) were tested, followed by Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) by sex. Among females and males, EE and FA scores were positively inter-related and correlated with PD scores and BMI. Moreover, among females and males, SEM showed that both EE and FA acts as mediators between PD and BMI. Hence, among educated young adults, using food consumption for down-regulating negative mood places the individual at risk for overweight and obesity. This study further emphasizes the necessity to take into account emotionally driven and addictive-like eating behaviors in interventions for promoting healthy eating and weight management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Emotion Regulation Difficulties Moderate the Association Between Heavy Episodic Drinking and Dating Violence Perpetration Among College Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappenbeck, Cynthia A; Davis, Kelly Cue; Cherf, Nicholas; Gulati, Natasha K; Kajumulo, Kelly F

    2016-01-01

    Because of high rates of heavy drinking and dating violence (psychological or physical aggression toward a dating partner) among college men, we examined whether emotion regulation difficulties moderated the association between heavy drinking and dating violence perpetration. One hundred and fifty-eight men were recruited from a large northwestern US university between April 2014 and August 2014. Participants completed an online survey that assessed their emotion regulation difficulties as well as their past year history of heavy episodic drinking (HED; consuming 5+ drinks in 2 hours) and dating violence perpetration. Generalized linear models revealed that the positive association between HED and dating violence perpetration was stronger for men with greater impulse control difficulties and for those who reported limited access to emotion regulation strategies. In addition to continued efforts to reduce heavy drinking among college men, interventions targeting emotion regulation difficulties should be incorporated into standard dating violence intervention and prevention efforts to further reduce the likelihood of dating violence perpetration in this population.

  19. Behavioral and physiological responses of guide dogs to a situation of emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallani, Gaia; Prato Previde, Emanuela; Valsecchi, Paola

    2007-03-16

    The aim of this study was to analyze the behavioral and physiological reactions of guide dogs in a distressing situation which promotes attachment behaviors towards their blind owners, and to compare such reactions with those of untrained or trainee dogs. The subjects were 57 adult Labrador and Golden retriever dogs (14 males, 43 females) belonging to four different groups: 19 Custody dogs, 13 Apprentice dogs, 10 Guide dogs and 15 Pet dogs. Dogs were tested using the Strange Situation Test, consisting in seven 3-minute episodes in which the dogs were placed in an unfamiliar environment, introduced to an unfamiliar woman and subjected to separation from their human companion. Tests were video-recorded and behaviors were scored using a 5-second point sampling method. Polar Vantage telemetric system was used to record cardiac activity. ANOVAs for repeated measures with groups and breeds as independent variables, showed a more anxious reaction in pet dogs, which revealed a high degree of proximity seeking behavior. Cardiac activity increased during episodes characterized by the exclusive presence of the stranger, but this increase was more conspicuous in guide dogs than in custody and apprentice dogs. Golden retrievers showed more behaviors suggesting distress compared to Labrador retrievers. This study showed that guide dogs, when separated from their blind owner, reveal a controlled behavioral reaction that is however accompanied by a stronger cardiac activation.

  20. Emotional distress and self-reported quality of life among primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate emotional symptoms and domain quality of life (QOL) among primary caregivers of stroke survivors and to determine survivor-related and caregiver-related predictors of these variables. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Medical units of the two major hospitals of the Obafemi Awolowo ...

  1. Sexual Victimization, Alcohol Intoxication, Sexual-Emotional Responding, and Sexual Risk in Heavy Episodic Drinking Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, William H.; Davis, Kelly Cue; Masters, N. Tatiana; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Heiman, Julia R.; Norris, Jeanette; Gilmore, Amanda K.; Nguyen, Hong V.; Kajumulo, Kelly F.; Otto, Jacqueline M.; Andrasik, Michele P.

    2013-01-01

    This study used an experimental paradigm to investigate the roles of sexual victimization history and alcohol intoxication in young women’s sexual-emotional responding and sexual risk taking. A nonclinical community sample of 436 young women, with both an instance of heavy episodic drinking and some HIV/STI risk exposure in the past year, completed childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and adolescent/adult sexual assault (ASA) measures. A majority of them reported CSA and/or ASA, including rape and attempted rape. After random assignment to a high alcohol dose (.10%) or control condition, participants read and projected themselves into an eroticized scenario of a sexual encounter involving a new partner. As the story protagonist, each participant rated her positive mood and her sexual arousal, sensation, and desire, and then indicated her likelihood of engaging in unprotected sex. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that ASA and alcohol were directly associated with heightened risk taking, and alcohol’s effects were partially mediated by positive mood and sexual desire. ASA was associated with attenuated sexual-emotional responding and resulted in diminished risk taking via this suppression. These are the first findings indicating that, compared to non-victimized counterparts, sexually victimized women respond differently in alcohol-involved sexual encounters in terms of sexual-emotional responding and risk-taking intentions. Implications include assessing victimization history and drinking among women seeking treatment for either concern, particularly women at risk for HIV, and alerting them to ways their histories and behavior may combine to exacerbate their sexual risks. PMID:23857517

  2. Impact of parental emotional support and coercive control on adolescents' self-esteem and psychological distress: results of a four-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault-Bouchard, Anne-Marie; Dion, Jacinthe; Hains, Jennifer; Vandermeerschen, Jill; Laberge, Luc; Perron, Michel

    2013-08-01

    This study aims at investigating the impact of parental practices on youths' adjustment. In all, 605 adolescents completed questionnaires at ages 14, 16 and 18. Self-esteem, psychological distress as well as parental emotional support and coercive control were measured. Analyses based on individual growth models revealed that self-esteem increased with age, but psychological distress remained stable over time. Boys reported higher levels of self-esteem and lower levels of psychological distress than girls. Maternal and paternal emotional support reinforced self-esteem over time. Maternal coercive control undermined self-esteem, but only at ages 16 and 18. Psychological distress decreased with parental emotional support but increased with parental coercive control at ages 14, 16 and 18. Overall, these results indicate that positive parental practices are related to youths' well-being. These findings support the importance of establishing intervention strategies designed to promote best practices among parents of teenagers to help them develop into well-adjusted adults. Copyright © 2013 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Emotional Distress Following Childbirth: An Intervention to Buffer Depressive and PTSD Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Di Blasio; Sarah Miragoli; Elena Camisasca; Angela Maria Di Vita; Rosalia Pizzo; Laura Pipitone

    2015-01-01

    Childbirth for some women is a negative experience associated with depressive and post-traumatic symptoms. The preventive actions focusing on helping mothers to cope with negative emotions experienced after childbirth are strongly recommended. It is also recommended both to intervene early and on all women to avoid the risk that these symptoms can worsen in the months after childbirth. The intervention described in the current study is focalized on the elaboration of post-partum negative thou...

  4. An experimental study on the effectiveness of disclosing stressful life events and support messages: when cognitive reappraisal support decreases emotional distress, and emotional support is like saying nothing at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, Anika; Das, Enny

    2014-01-01

    How can we best support others in difficult times? Studies testing the effects of supportive communication revealed mixed findings. The current study focuses on the effects of supportive communication following different disclosure styles, and includes outcome measures to assess emotional well-being. Hypotheses were tested in a 2 (disclosure style: cognitive reappraisal disclosure vs. emotional disclosure) × 3 (support message: cognitive reappraisal response vs. socio-affective response vs. no response) between subjects factorial design. Receiving a cognitive reappraisal response, rather than a socio-affective response or no response, decreased emotional distress in the emotional disclosure group. Support messages showed no effects in the cognitive reappraisal disclosure group. Although socio-affective responses were positively evaluated, cognitive reappraisal responses may be more effective during emotional upheaval because they provide a positive way out of negative emotions.

  5. To thine own self be true? Clarifying the effects of identity discrepancies on psychological distress and emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkhoff, Will; Marcussen, Kristen; Serpe, Richard T

    2016-07-01

    After many years of research across disciplines, it remains unclear whether people are more motivated to seek appraisals that accurately match self-views (self-verification) or are as favorable as possible (self-enhancement). Within sociology, mixed findings in identity theory have fueled the debate. A problem here is that a commonly employed statistical approach does not take into account the direction of a discrepancy between how we see ourselves and how we think others see us in terms of a given identity, yet doing so is critical for determining which self-motive is at play. We offer a test of three competing models of identity processes, including a new "mixed motivations" model where self-verification and self-enhancement operate simultaneously. We compare the models using the conventional statistical approach versus response surface analysis. The latter method allows us to determine whether identity discrepancies involving over-evaluation are as distressing as those involving under-evaluation. We use nationally representative data and compare results across four different identities and multiple outcomes. The two statistical approaches lead to the same conclusions more often than not and mostly support identity theory and its assumption that people seek self-verification. However, response surface tests reveal patterns that are mistaken as evidence of self-verification by conventional procedures, especially for the spouse identity. We also find that identity discrepancies have different effects on distress and self-conscious emotions (guilt and shame). Our findings have implications not only for research on self and identity across disciplines, but also for many other areas of research that incorporate these concepts and/or use difference scores as explanatory variables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A new model of the role of psychological and emotional distress in promoting obesity: conceptual review with implications for treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsson, E

    2014-09-01

    The lack of significant treatment and prevention progress highlights the need for a more expanded strategy. Given the robust association between socioeconomic factors and obesity, combined with new insights into how socioeconomic disadvantage affects both behaviour and biology, a new causal model is proposed. The model posits that psychological and emotional distress is a fundamental link between socioeconomic disadvantage and weight gain. At particular risk are children growing up in a disharmonious family environment, mainly caused by parental socioeconomic disadvantage, where they are exposed to parental frustrations, relationship discord, a lack of support and cohesion, negative belief systems, unmet emotional needs and general insecurity. Without adequate resilience, such experiences increase the risk of psychological and emotional distress, including low self-esteem and self-worth, negative emotions, negative self-belief, powerlessness, depression, anxiety, insecurity and a heightened sensitivity to stress. These inner disturbances eventually cause a psycho-emotional overload, triggering a cascade of weight gain-inducing effects including maladaptive coping strategies such as eating to suppress negative emotions, chronic stress, appetite up-regulation, low-grade inflammation and possibly reduced basal metabolism. Over time, this causes obesity, circular causality and further weight gain. Tackling these proposed root causes of weight gain could potentially improve both treatment and prevention outcomes. © 2014 The Author. obesity reviews © 2014 World Obesity.

  7. Do emotions related to alcohol consumption differ by alcohol type? An international cross-sectional survey of emotions associated with alcohol consumption and influence on drink choice in different settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Kathryn; Bellis, Mark A; Davies, Alisha R; Hughes, Karen; Winstock, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the emotions associated with drinking different types of alcohol, explore whether these emotions differ by sociodemographics and alcohol dependency and whether the emotions associated with different drink types influence people’s choice of drinks in different settings. Design International cross-sectional opportunistic survey (Global Drug Survey) using an online anonymous questionnaire in 11 languages promoted through newspapers, magazines and social media from November 2015 to January 2016. Study population Individuals aged 18–34 years who reported consumption of beer, spirits, red and white wine in the previous 12 months and were resident in countries with more than 200 respondents (n=21 countries; 29 836 respondents). Main outcome measures Positive and negative emotions associated with consumption of different alcoholic beverages (energised, relaxed, sexy, confident, tired, aggressive, ill, restless and tearful) over the past 12 months in different settings. Results Alcoholic beverages vary in the types of emotions individuals report they elicit, with spirits more frequently eliciting emotional changes of all types. Overall 29.8% of respondents reported feeling aggressive when drinking spirits, compared with only 7.1% when drinking red wine (p<0.001). Women more frequently reported feeling all emotions when drinking alcohol, apart from feelings of aggression. Respondents’ level of alcohol dependency was strongly associated with feeling all emotions, with the likelihood of aggression being significantly higher in possible dependent versus low risk drinkers (adjusted OR 6.4; 95% CI 5.79 to 7.09; p<0.001). The odds of feeling the majority of positive and negative emotions also remained highest among dependent drinkers irrespective of setting. Conclusion Understanding emotions associated with alcohol consumption is imperative to addressing alcohol misuse, providing insight into what emotions influence drink choice between different groups

  8. Family Burden, Emotional Distress and Service Satisfaction in First Episode Psychosis. Data from the GET UP Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Mirella; Lasalvia, Antonio; Santonastaso, Paolo; Pileggi, Francesca; Leuci, Emanuela; Miceli, Maurizio; Scarone, Silvio; Torresani, Stefano; Tosato, Sarah; De Santi, Katia; Cristofalo, Doriana; Comacchio, Carla; Tomassi, Simona; Cremonese, Carla; Fioritti, Angelo; Patelli, Giovanni; Bonetto, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Background: Literature has documented the role of family in the outcome of chronic schizophrenia. In the light of this, family interventions (FIs) are becoming an integral component of treatment for psychosis. The First Episode of Psychosis (FEP) is the period when most of the changes in family atmosphere are observed; unfortunately, few studies on the relatives are available. Objective: To explore burden of care and emotional distress at baseline and at 9-month follow-up and the levels of service satisfaction at follow-up in the two groups of relatives (experimental treatment EXP vs. treatment as usual TAU) recruited in the cluster-randomized controlled GET UP PIANO trial. Methods: The experimental treatment was provided by routine public Community Mental Health Centers (Italian National Health Service) and consisted of Treatment as Usual plus evidence-based additional treatment (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for psychosis for patients, Family Intervention for psychosis, and Case Management). TAU consisted of personalized outpatient psychopharmacological treatment, combined with non-specific supportive clinical management and informal support/educational sessions for families. The outcomes on relatives were assessed by the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ-EU), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and the Verona Service Satisfaction Scale (VSSS-EU). Differences within and between groups were evaluated. Results: At baseline, 75 TAU and 185 EXP caregivers were assessed. In the experimental group 92% of relatives participated in at least 1 family session. At follow-up both groups experienced improvement in all IEQ and GHQ items, but caregivers belonging to the EXP arm experienced a significantly greater change in 10 IEQ items (mainly pertaining to the "Tension" dimension) and in GHQ items. Due to the low sample size, a significant effectiveness was only observed for 2 IEQ items and 1 GHQ-12 item. With respect to VSSS data at follow-up, caregivers in the

  9. Family Burden, Emotional Distress and Service Satisfaction in First Episode Psychosis. Data from the GET UP Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Ruggeri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Literature has documented the role of family in the outcome of chronic schizophrenia. In the light of this, family interventions (FIs are becoming an integral component of treatment for psychosis. The First Episode of Psychosis (FEP is the period when most of the changes in family atmosphere are observed; unfortunately, few studies on the relatives are available.Objective: To explore burden of care and emotional distress at baseline and at 9-month follow-up and the levels of service satisfaction at follow-up in the two groups of relatives (experimental treatment EXP vs. treatment as usual TAU recruited in the cluster-randomized controlled GET UP PIANO trial.Methods: The experimental treatment was provided by routine public Community Mental Health Centers (Italian National Health Service and consisted of Treatment as Usual plus evidence-based additional treatment (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for psychosis for patients, Family Intervention for psychosis, and Case Management. TAU consisted of personalized outpatient psychopharmacological treatment, combined with non-specific supportive clinical management and informal support/educational sessions for families. The outcomes on relatives were assessed by the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ-EU, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, and the Verona Service Satisfaction Scale (VSSS-EU. Differences within and between groups were evaluated.Results: At baseline, 75 TAU and 185 EXP caregivers were assessed. In the experimental group 92% of relatives participated in at least 1 family session. At follow-up both groups experienced improvement in all IEQ and GHQ items, but caregivers belonging to the EXP arm experienced a significantly greater change in 10 IEQ items (mainly pertaining to the “Tension” dimension and in GHQ items. Due to the low sample size, a significant effectiveness was only observed for 2 IEQ items and 1 GHQ-12 item. With respect to VSSS data at follow

  10. Diabetes-related emotional distress in Dutch and U.S. diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, Frank J; Pouwer, F; Welch, G W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the cross-cultural validity of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID) in Dutch and U.S. diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 1,472 Dutch people with diabetes completed the PAID along with other self-report measures of affect. Statistics covered...... Cronbach's alpha, exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), Pearson's product-moment correlation, and t tests. Psychometric properties of PAID were compared for Dutch and U.S. diabetic patients. RESULTS: Internal consistency of the Dutch PAID was high and stable across sex...... and type of diabetes. Test-retest reliability was high. Principal component analyses confirmed 1 general 20-item factor, whereas EFA identified 4 new subdimensions: negative emotions, treatment problems, food-related problems, and lack of social support. These dimensions were confirmed with CFA and were...

  11. [The use of expressive writing in the course of care for cancer patients to reduce emotional distress: analysis of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Isabella; Garrino, Lorenza; Di Monte, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    The emotional distress represents one of the symptoms most frequently reported in the cancer patient in therapy, increasing the risk of developing a disease depressive. Through the analysis of the literature we want to assess whether the use of expressive writing on cancer patients in their care pathway compared to the use of writing neutral reduces emotional distress. The bibliographic search was conducted using the databases CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane Library and PsycInfo. The results of research conducted on 7 randomized controlled trials, including 3 pilot studies have shown after expressive writing sessions (experimental group) versus neutral writing (control group) a significant reduction in distress in the experimental group early stages of cancer (p = 0,0183); in patients with a diagnosis of metastatic assigned to the group expressive writing there was a statistically significant relevance in the reduction of mood disorders (p = 0,03).Were determined statistically significant group differences also with respect to some measure on the quality of sleep (p = 0,04). The expressive writing did not produce significant reductions in psychological distress and improvements in physical health (p > 0,20) in patients diagnosed with metastatic disease of long duration and, in the palliative care there have been results of feasibility for poor adherence at follow-up. From the results it is evident that the strategies of expressive writing improves the management of the disease, reduce the physical and psychological symptoms related to the tumor while reducing the emotional distress in patients at an early stage of the disease.

  12. Confirmatory factor analysis of Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-OM) used as a measure of emotional distress in people with tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handscomb, L; Hall, D A; Hoare, D J; Shorter, G W

    2016-09-06

    People with troublesome tinnitus often experience emotional distress. Therefore a psychometrically sound instrument which can evaluate levels of distress and change over time is necessary to understand this experience. Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-OM) is a measure of emotional distress which has been widely used in mental health research. Although originally designed as a 4-factor questionnaire, factor analyses have not supported this structure and a number of alternative factor structures have been proposed in different samples. The aims of this study were to test the factor structure of the CORE-OM using a large representative tinnitus sample and to use it to investigate levels of emotional distress amongst people with a range of tinnitus experience. The CORE-OM was completed by 342 people experiencing tinnitus who self-rated their tinnitus on a 5-point scale from 'not a problem' to 'a very big problem'. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test all ten factor models which have been previously derived across a range of population samples. Model fit was assessed using fit criterion and theoretical considerations. Mean scores on the full questionnaire and its subscales were compared between tinnitus problem categories using one-way ANOVA. The best fitting model included 33 of the 34 original items and was divided into three factors: negatively worded items, positively worded items and risk. The full questionnaire and each factor were found to have good internal consistency and factor loadings were high. There was a statistically significant difference in total CORE-OM scores across the five tinnitus problem categories. However there was no significant difference between those who rated their tinnitus 'not a problem', and 'a small problem' or 'a moderate problem.' This study found a 3-factor structure for the CORE-OM to be a good fit for a tinnitus population. It also found evidence of a relationship between emotional distress as measured by

  13. The effects of a mindfulness-based intervention on emotional distress, quality of life, and HbA(1c) in outpatients with diabetes (DiaMind)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VAN Son, Jenny; Nyklicek, Ivan; Pop, Victor J M

    2013-01-01

    -Item Short-Form Health Survey), and glycemic control (HbA(1c)). Assessments were conducted at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks of follow-up. RESULTS: Compared with control, MBCT was more effective in reducing stress (P anxiety (P = 0...... to reducing emotional distress and improving health-related quality of life and glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In the present randomized controlled trial, 139 outpatients with diabetes (type 1 or type 2) and low levels of emotional well-being were randomized to MBCT (n = 70) or a waiting list...... group (n = 69). Primary outcomes were perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), anxiety and depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), mood (Profiles of Mood States), and diabetes-specific distress (Problem Areas In Diabetes). Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life (12...

  14. Psychometric Properties of 7- and 30-Day Versions of the PROMIS Emotional Distress Item Banks in an Australian Adult Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, Philip J; Sunderland, Matthew; Carragher, Natacha; Calear, Alison L

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of the PROMIS depression, anxiety, and anger item banks in a large Australian population-based sample. The study tested for unidimensionality; evaluated invariance across age, gender, and education; assessed local independence; and tested item bank scores as an indicator for clinical criteria. In addition, equivalence of the 7-day time frame against an alternative 30-day time frame was assessed. A sample of 3,175 Australian adults were recruited into the study through online advertising. All three item banks showed strong evidence of unidimensionality and parsimony, with no items showing local dependence. All items were invariant across age, gender, and education. The item banks were accurate in detecting clinical criteria for major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and panic disorder, although legacy measures designed for this purpose sometimes performed marginally better. Responses to the 30-day time frame were highly consistent with the original 7-day time frame. The study provided support for the validity of the PROMIS emotional distress item banks as measures of depression, anxiety, and anger in the Australian population, supporting the generalizability of the measures. The time frame chosen for assessing mental health outcomes using these item banks should be based on pragmatic considerations.

  15. Effectiveness of an occupational therapy intervention in reducing emotional distress in informal caregivers of hip fracture patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martín, Lydia M; Valenza-Demet, Gerald; Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Valenza, Carmen; Castellote-Caballero, Yolanda; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan

    2014-08-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an occupational therapy intervention program in reducing emotional distress in informal caregivers of hip fracture patients. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. A public Trauma and Rehabilitation Hospital in Granada, Spain. A total of 186 caregivers and their care recipients with hip fracture (93 in each group) were allocated to an intervention group or a control group using a block system. An occupational therapy intervention during patient hospitalization focused on patient handling by caregivers and ergonomic treatment for both. The Goldberg General Health Questionnaire was used to measure emotional distress and psychological well-being. The Goldberg Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to measure caregiver affective illness. Among informal caregivers, emotional distress decreased to a greater extent in the intervention group than in the control group from the first assessment to the six-month follow-up (intervention group: 4.16 (SD 4.57) to 2.81 (SD 2.93); control group: 4.61 (SD 4.57) to 4.24 (SD 4.30)), showing significant differences at the first, third and sixth month. As regards anxiety levels, significant differences were only found at the third month (1.54 (SD 2.09) vs. 2.35 (SD 2.53) in the intervention and control groups, respectively (p depression levels decreased in both groups, the decrease was also greater in the intervention group. Occupational therapy training for caregivers of hip fracture patients helps to significantly reduce emotional distress, anxiety and depression in caregivers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. The Effects of a Mindfulness-Based Intervention on Emotional Distress, Quality of Life, and HbA^sub 1c^ in Outpatients With Diabetes (DiaMind): A randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jenny van Son; Ivan Nyklícek; Victor J Pop; Marion C Blonk; Ronald J Erdtsieck; Pieter F Spooren; Arno W Toorians; François Pouwer

    2013-01-01

      Emotional distress is common in outpatients with diabetes, affecting ~20-40% of the patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of group therapy with Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy...

  17. Exploration of the association between professional interactions and emotional distress of intensive care unit nursing personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikola, Maria N K; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D E; Kalafati, Maria; Stathopoulou, Hariklia

    2012-01-01

    : Several studies provide evidence for the association between the quality of collaboration among intensive care unit (ICU) professionals and patients' outcomes, as well as nurses' moral distress and professional satisfaction. However, potential associations between collaboration and nurses' mental health indices have not been explored. The aim of this descriptive correlational study was to investigate the degree of satisfaction from interaction among ICU nursing personnel, as well as between ICU nursing personnel and physicians, and potential associations with ICU nursing personnel's anxiety symptoms. The sample consisted of ICU nursing personnel from 11 adult general hospitals in Greece (n = 229). Hamilton's Anxiety scale was applied for the quantitative assessment of anxiety symptoms and Stamps' Index of Work Satisfaction for the appraisal of nursing personnel's satisfaction from professional interactions. Demographic, vocational, and educational data were also recorded. Descriptive statistics were explored, and group comparisons, correlation, and regression analysis were used. The average satisfaction score from interaction among nursing personnel was moderate to high (5.3 [SD, 1.0]) and from nurse-to-physician interaction was moderate (4.0 [SD, 1.4]) (scale range, 1-7). The score of satisfaction from nurse-to-physician interaction was negatively mildly correlated with participants' (a) total anxiety score (τ = -0.160, P = .001), (b) tension (τ = -0.125, P = .015), and (c) depressive symptoms (τ = -0.148, P = .005). Weak negative correlations were detected between satisfaction from interaction among nursing personnel and participants' (a) total anxiety state (τ = -0.139, P = .003), (b) tension (τ = -0.137, P = .008), and (c) sleep disturbances (τ = -0.150, P = .003). Overall, female respondents had higher levels of anxiety symptoms than male respondents (Mann-Whitney U, P = .007). Satisfaction from professional interaction was not a strong predictor of

  18. Problem video game playing is related to emotional distress in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzálvez, María T; Espada, José P; Tejeiro, Ricardo

    2017-06-28

    Problem use of video games is an increasing risk behaviour. High exposure of adolescents to video games has been linked to a variety of disorders, but the relationship between problem video game playing and emotional welfare is unknown. The aim of the study is to analyse problem video game playing in a sample of adolescents and to determine whether there are differences between online and offline players, in addition to examining its relationship with anxiety and depressive symptomatology. A sample of adolescents (N = 380) completed self-reports measuring video game use and symptoms of anxiety and depression. We found that 7.4% of females and 30% of males can be considered as playing at problem levels. Online players were almost 12 times more likely to play at high frequency than offline players (χ2 (1, 267) = 72.72, p < .001, OR = 11.63, 95% CI [6.31, 21.43]). Males play more frequently, and play more online (χ2 (1, 267) = 50.85, p < .001, OR = 6.74, 95% CI [3.90, 11.64]), with a clear relationship between problem video game playing and anxiety (r = .24; p < .001). In females, there is a relationship between problem video game playing and depression (r = .19; p < .05). Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the psychological variables involved in problem video game playing. The implementation of strategies is suggested in order to prevent pathological gaming and associated problems.

  19. The Blurred Future of Adolescent Gamblers: Impulsivity, Time Horizon, and Emotional Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Giovanna; Cosenza, Marina; Ciccarelli, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the interplay of functional and dysfunctional impulsivity, delay discounting, time perspective, and emotional negative states on gambling severity in Italian adolescents. A second aim of the study was to analyze the developmental trajectories of gambling involvement, functional and dysfunctional impulsivity, delay discounting, consideration of future consequences, and negative affectivity in a cross-sectional perspective. One thousand and ten Italian adolescents aging between 12 and 19 years were administered the South Oaks Gambling Screen Revised for Adolescents (SOGS-RA), the Functional and Dysfunctional Impulsivity Scale (FDIS), the Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ), the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale (CFC-14), and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21). Data analyses were conducted using correlational analysis, Chi-square test, analysis of variance, and hierarchical regression analysis. Results indicated that, relative to non-gamblers and non-problem gamblers, at-risk and problem gamblers showed higher levels of impulsivity, steeper delay discounting, shorter time horizon, and reported experiencing significantly higher levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. Results of hierarchical regression analysis, with SOGS-RA scores as the dependent variable, and gender, age, FDIS, MCQ, CFC-14, and DASS-21 scores as independent variables, indicated that, along with gender and age, low scores of future orientation and high scores of dysfunctional impulsivity, depression, anxiety, present orientation, and delay discounting significantly predicted gambling severity. These findings provide further evidence that the higher the gambling involvement, the greater the tendency to devalue delayed rewards and to focus on the immediate consequences of one's behavior. Interestingly, for the first time these results reveal an association between gambling severity and both dysfunctional impulsivity and

  20. The efficacy of problem solving therapy to reduce post stroke emotional distress in younger (18-65) stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Charlotte; Leathem, Janet; Bennett, Simon; McNaughton, Harry; Mahawish, Karim

    2017-11-26

    To investigate the efficacy of problem solving therapy for reducing the emotional distress experienced by younger stroke survivors. A non-randomized waitlist controlled design was used to compare outcome measures for the treatment group and a waitlist control group at baseline and post-waitlist/post-therapy. After the waitlist group received problem solving therapy an analysis was completed on the pooled outcome measures at baseline, post-treatment, and three-month follow-up. Changes on outcome measures between baseline and post-treatment (n = 13) were not significantly different between the two groups, treatment (n = 13), and the waitlist control group (n = 16) (between-subject design). The pooled data (n = 28) indicated that receiving problem solving therapy significantly reduced participants levels of depression and anxiety and increased quality of life levels from baseline to follow up (within-subject design), however, methodological limitations, such as the lack of a control group reduce the validity of this finding. The between-subject results suggest that there was no significant difference between those that received problem solving therapy and a waitlist control group between baseline and post-waitlist/post-therapy. The within-subject design suggests that problem solving therapy may be beneficial for younger stroke survivors when they are given some time to learn and implement the skills into their day to day life. However, additional research with a control group is required to investigate this further. This study provides limited evidence for the provision of support groups for younger stroke survivors post stroke, however, it remains unclear about what type of support this should be. Implications for Rehabilitation Problem solving therapy is no more effective for reducing post stroke distress than a wait-list control group. Problem solving therapy may be perceived as helpful and enjoyable by younger stroke survivors. Younger stroke

  1. The impact of coping and emotional intelligence on the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder from past trauma, adjustment difficulty, and psychological distress following divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanbekova, Gulnara; Chung, Man Cheung; Abildina, Saltanat; Sabirova, Raikhan; Kapbasova, Gulzada; Karipbaev, Baizhol

    2017-08-01

    Focusing on a group of Kazakh divorcees, this study examined the inter-relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from past trauma, coping strategies, emotional intelligence, adjustment difficulties, and psychiatric symptom severity following divorce. One hundred and twenty divorcees participated in the research and completed the Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire, Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, General Health Questionnaire-28, Brief COPE, and Fisher's Divorce Adjustment Scale Results: About 29% reported no trauma; 53%, 21%, and 26% met the criteria for no-PTSD, partial-PTSD, and full-PTSD respectively. Emotion-focused coping and managing emotions predicted adjustment difficulties. Controlling for gender, PTSD, problem-focused coping, and managing emotions predicted psychiatric symptom severity. Problem-focused coping mediated the direct effect of the path between PTSD and psychiatric symptom severity with its mediational effect being moderated by the effect of managing emotions. Following divorce, people can experience psychological distress which is influenced by the effects of PTSD from past trauma, and whether they used problem-focused coping and were able to manage their emotions.

  2. Is alcohol binge drinking in early and late pregnancy associated with behavioural and emotional development at age 7 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclasen, Janni; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate associations of maternal binge drinking in early and late pregnancy with child behavioural and emotional development at age seven. It was hypothesised that late exposure is associated with more negative outcomes than early exposure. Differences were expected on the continuous outcome measures, but not on above cutoff scale scores. Data were derived from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Three exposure groups were defined according to binge drinking from three interviews regarding binge episodes in early, middle and late pregnancy. A 'no binge' group included women with no binge episodes reported in any of the interviews, the 'early bingers' reported episodes in the first interview only, and the 'late bingers' in the last part of pregnancy only. The outcome measure was the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) used as continuous externalising/internalising scores and above cutoff hyperactivity/inattention, conduct, emotional and peer problems scores. Only women with full information concerning binge drinking from the three interviews, together with full-scale SDQ information on their children at age seven and being term-born, were included in the study (N = 37,315). After adjustment for maternal education, psychiatric diagnoses, age and smoking, children exposed to binge drinking in early and late pregnancy had significantly higher mean externalizing scores at age seven than unexposed children, an effect albeit much less for early binge drinking (relative change in mean 1.02, CI 1.00-1.05) than for late binge drinking (relative change in mean 1.21, CI 1.04-1.42). No associations were observed for any of the above cutoff outcomes. Exposure to binge drinking in early and late pregnancy is associated with elevated externalising scores, particularly so in late pregnancy. No increased risk for any of the above cutoff scale scores was observed.

  3. Randomised controlled trial of school-based humanistic counselling for emotional distress in young people: Feasibility study and preliminary indications of efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial comparing six weeks of humanistic school-based counselling versus waiting list in the reduction of emotional distress in young people, and to obtain initial indications of efficacy. Methods Following a screening procedure, young people (13 - 15 years old) who experienced emotional distress were randomised to either humanistic counselling or waiting list in this multi-site study. Outcomes were assessed using a range of self-report mental health measures, with the emotional symptoms subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) acting as the primary outcome indicator. Results Recruitment procedures were successful, with 32 young people consenting to participate in the trial and 27 completing endpoint measures. Trial procedures were acceptable to all involved in the research. No significant differences were found between the counselling and waiting list groups in reductions in levels of emotional symptoms (Hedges' g = 0.03), but clients allocated to counselling showed significantly greater improvement in prosocial behaviour (g = 0.89) with an average effect size (g) across the nine outcome measures of 0.25. Participants with higher levels of depressive symptoms showed significantly greater change. Conclusion This study suggested that a randomised controlled trial of counselling in schools is acceptable and feasible, although initial indications of efficacy are mixed. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68290510. PMID:20412578

  4. Racial and sexual identity-related maltreatment among minority YMSM: prevalence, perceptions, and the association with emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Phillips, Gregory; Jones, Karen C; Outlaw, Angulique Y; Fields, Sheldon D; Smith, Justin C

    2011-08-01

    Bullying is a form of violence characterized as an aggressive behavior that is unprovoked and intended to cause harm. Prior studies have found that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth experience high levels of bullying related to their sexuality and this harassment can lead to engagement in risk behaviors, depression, and suicide. Ethnic/racial minority young men who have sex with men (YMSM) may experience dual levels of stigma and maltreatment due to both their sexuality and their race. The aim of the current study was to assess the prevalence and perceptions of racial and sexual identity-based abuse among a sample of minority YMSM, and whether this maltreatment plays a role in the emotional distress of these youth. We found that overall 36% and 85% of participants experienced racial and sexuality-related bullying, respectively. There was a significant association between experiencing a high level of sexuality-related bullying and depressive symptomatology (p=0.03), having attempted suicide (p=0.03), and reporting parental abuse (p=0.05). We found no association between racial bullying and suicide attempts. In a multivariable logistic regression model, experiencing any racial bullying and high sexuality-related bullying were significant predictors of having a CES-D score ≥16; adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.83 and 2.29, respectively. These findings contribute to the existing literature regarding the negative experiences and daily stressors facing LGBT youth with regard to both their minority status and LGBT identities. Future interventions for racial/ethnic minority YMSM should provide assistance to achieve a positive view of self that encompasses both their racial and sexual identities.

  5. Hearing-impaired adults are at increased risk of experiencing emotional distress and social engagement restrictions five years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Hickson, Louise; Schneider, Julie; McMahon, Catherine M; Burlutsky, George; Leeder, Stephen R; Mitchell, Paul

    2012-09-01

    we aimed to assess both cross-sectional and temporal links between measured hearing impairment and self-perceived hearing handicap, and health outcomes. in total, 811 Blue Mountains Hearing Study participants (Sydney, Australia) aged ≥55 years were examined twice (1997-99 and 2002-04). Hearing levels were measured with pure-tone audiometry. The shortened version of the hearing handicap inventory (HHIE-S) was administered, scores ≥8 defined hearing handicap. baseline hearing impairment was strongly associated with 7 of the 10 HHIE-S questions, 5 years later. Individuals with and without hearing impairment at baseline reported that they felt embarrassed and/or frustrated by their hearing problem, and that it hampered their personal/social life, multivariable-adjusted OR: 11.5 (CI: 3.5-38.1), OR: 6.3 (CI: 2.5-15.7) and OR: 6.0 (CI: 2.1-17.5), respectively, 5 years later. Hearing-impaired, compared with non-hearing-impaired adults had a significantly higher risk of developing moderate or severe hearing handicap, OR: 3.35 (CI: 1.91-5.90) and OR: 6.60 (CI: 1.45-30.00), respectively. Cross-sectionally (at wave 2), hearing handicap increased the odds of depressive symptoms and low self-rated health by 80 and 46%, respectively. older, hearing-impaired adults were significantly more likely to experience emotional distress and social engagement restrictions (self-perceived hearing handicap) directly due to their hearing impairment.

  6. Assessing Suicide Risk and Emotional Distress in Chinese Social Media: A Text Mining and Machine Learning Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qijin; Li, Tim Mh; Kwok, Chi-Leung; Zhu, Tingshao; Yip, Paul Sf

    2017-07-10

    Early identification and intervention are imperative for suicide prevention. However, at-risk people often neither seek help nor take professional assessment. A tool to automatically assess their risk levels in natural settings can increase the opportunity for early intervention. The aim of this study was to explore whether computerized language analysis methods can be utilized to assess one's suicide risk and emotional distress in Chinese social media. A Web-based survey of Chinese social media (ie, Weibo) users was conducted to measure their suicide risk factors including suicide probability, Weibo suicide communication (WSC), depression, anxiety, and stress levels. Participants' Weibo posts published in the public domain were also downloaded with their consent. The Weibo posts were parsed and fitted into Simplified Chinese-Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (SC-LIWC) categories. The associations between SC-LIWC features and the 5 suicide risk factors were examined by logistic regression. Furthermore, the support vector machine (SVM) model was applied based on the language features to automatically classify whether a Weibo user exhibited any of the 5 risk factors. A total of 974 Weibo users participated in the survey. Those with high suicide probability were marked by a higher usage of pronoun (odds ratio, OR=1.18, P=.001), prepend words (OR=1.49, P=.02), multifunction words (OR=1.12, P=.04), a lower usage of verb (OR=0.78, Psocial media and can identify characteristics different from previous findings in the English literature. Some findings are leading to new hypotheses for future verification. Machine classifiers based on SC-LIWC features are promising but still require further optimization for application in real life.

  7. Is the effect of coping styles disease specific? Relationships with emotional distress and quality of life in acquired brain injury and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Ingrid; Bol, Yvonne; Stapert, Sven; Köhler, Sebastian; van Heugten, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the use of coping styles and the relationships linking coping to emotional distress and quality of life in patients with acquired brain injury and multiple sclerosis. Cross-sectional cohort study of 143 patients with acquired brain injury and 310 patients with multiple sclerosis in the chronic stage. Quality of life was measured with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-9), coping styles with the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS-T, task-oriented; CISS-E, emotion-oriented; CISS-A, avoidance), emotional distress with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Coping styles did not differ between types of multiple sclerosis and varied only little with regard to severity of disease. In both patient groups, task-oriented coping was most used followed by avoidance and emotion-oriented coping. Patients with multiple sclerosis used all styles to a greater extent. In acquired brain injury, lower CISS-E and lower HADS scores were associated with higher LiSat-9 scores. CISS-E had a direct effect on LiSat-9 and an indirect effect via HADS. In multiple sclerosis, next to lower CISS-E and lower HADS scores, higher CISS-A scores were also associated with higher LiSat-9 scores. CISS-E had an indirect effect and CISS-A had a direct and indirect effect on LiSat-9. In both patient groups, coping patterns are similar, and emotion-oriented coping negatively influences quality of life. Additionally, in multiple sclerosis, seeking emotional support and distraction (CISS-A) was positively associated with quality of life. Interventions to improve adaptive coping could be organized within a neurorehabilitation setting for both patient groups together.

  8. Alcohol and Emotional Contagion: An Examination of the Spreading of Smiles in Male and Female Drinking Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, Catharine E; Sayette, Michael A; Aalen, Odd O; Frigessi, Arnoldo

    2015-09-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that men gain greater reward from alcohol than women. However, alcohol-administration studies testing participants drinking alone have offered weak support for this hypothesis. Research suggests that social processes may be implicated in gender differences in drinking patterns. We examined the impact of gender and alcohol on "emotional contagion"-a social mechanism central to bonding and cohesion. Social drinkers (360 male, 360 female) consumed alcohol, placebo, or control beverages in groups of three. Social interactions were video recorded, and both Duchenne and non-Duchenne smiling were continuously coded using the Facial Action Coding System. Results revealed that Duchenne smiling (but not non-Duchenne smiling) contagion correlated with self-reported reward and typical drinking patterns. Importantly, Duchenne smiles were significantly less "infectious" among sober male versus female groups, and alcohol eliminated these gender differences in smiling contagion. Findings identify new directions for research exploring social-reward processes in the etiology of alcohol problems.

  9. Diabetes-specific emotional distress in people with Type 2 diabetes : A comparison between primary and secondary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, C.H.; Nefs, G.M.; Pop, V.J.M.; Wijnands-van Gent, C.J.; Tack, C.J.; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P.H.; Diamant, M.; Snoek, F.J.; Pouwer, F.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare levels of diabetes distress in people with Type 2 diabetes treated in primary and secondary care and to examine demographic and clinical correlates that may explain potential differences in levels of distress between care settings. Methods People with Type 2 diabetes from 24 primary

  10. Diabetes-specific emotional distress in people with Type 2 diabetes: A comparison between primary and secondary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, C. H.; Nefs, G.; Pop, V. J.; Wijnands-van Gent, C. J. M.; Tack, C. J.; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P. H. L. M.; Diamant, M.; Snoek, F. J.; Pouwer, F.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare levels of diabetes distress in people with Type 2 diabetes treated in primary and secondary care and to examine demographic and clinical correlates that may explain potential differences in levels of distress between care settings. Methods People with Type 2 diabetes from 24 primary

  11. Diabetes-specific emotional distress in people with Type 2 diabetes: a comparison between primary and secondary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, C.H.; Nefs, G.M.; Pop, V.J.M.; Gent, C.J.M.; Tack, C.J.J.; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P.H.; Diamant, M.; Snoek, F.J.; Pouwer, F.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To compare levels of diabetes distress in people with Type 2 diabetes treated in primary and secondary care and to examine demographic and clinical correlates that may explain potential differences in levels of distress between care settings. METHODS: People with Type 2 diabetes from 24

  12. Diabetes-specific emotional distress in people with Type 2 diabetes: a comparison between primary and secondary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, C.H.; Nefs, G.; Pop, V.J.; Wijnands-van Gent, C.J.M.; Tack, C.J.; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P.H.L.M.; Diamant, M.; Snoek, F.J.; Pouwer, F.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To compare levels of diabetes distress in people with Type 2 diabetes treated in primary and secondary care and to examine demographic and clinical correlates that may explain potential differences in levels of distress between care settings. Methods: People with Type 2 diabetes from 24

  13. Sexual Harassment, Psychological Distress, and Problematic Drinking Behavior Among College Students: An Examination of Reciprocal Causal Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jennifer M; Rospenda, Kathleen M; Colaneri, Anthony S

    2017-01-01

    Sexual harassment on college campuses is a frequent occurrence and serious public health concern. Victims of sexual harassment are at risk for many possible negative health consequences. In addition, certain psychological distress symptoms and/or alcohol use may put individuals at increased risk of being victims of sexual harassment. Data from more than 2,000 college students in the Midwestern United States were used to examine reciprocal causal effects of the relations between (a) experiencing sexual harassment and alcohol use and (b) experiencing sexual harassment and psychological distress symptoms, specifically depression and anger/hostility. Analyses were conducted separately for sexual harassment which occurs at school and which occurs in college students' workplaces, and also separately for men and women. Results of cross-lagged panel models showed that there were reciprocal causal effects between sexual harassment and alcohol problems, depression, and anger. Discussion focuses on the overall patterns of results as well as the nuances within these findings.

  14. e-Therapy to reduce emotional distress in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART): a feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Angelique J C M; Nelen, Willianne L D M; IntHout, Joanna; Kremer, Jan A M; Verhaak, Christianne M

    2016-05-01

    Is it feasible to evaluate a personalized e-therapy program (Internet based) for women during fertility treatment aimed to reduce the chance of having clinically relevant symptoms of anxiety and/or depression after unsuccessful assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment within a randomized controlled trial (RCT)? The evaluation of a personalized e-therapy program is feasible, reflected by good acceptability and integration within current guidelines, but adjustments to the e-therapy program and study design of the RCT have to be made to enhance demand, practicality and efficacy. Internet-based interventions are promising in reducing psychological distress, especially when treatment is personalized to specific risk profiles of patients. However in fertility care, the beneficial effects of personalized e-therapy on psychological distress and its implementation in daily clinical care still have to be evaluated. To evaluate the feasibility of a personalized e-therapy program, we conducted a two-arm, parallel group, single-blind feasibility randomized controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation. Feasibility was assessed in terms of demand, acceptability, practicality, implementation, integration and limited efficacy. Women were included between 1 February 2011 and 1 June 2013. Women in the control group received care as usual, whereas women in the intervention group received in addition to their usual care access to a personalized e-therapy program. Women were monitored until 3 months after the start of their first ART cycle. In a university hospital in the Netherlands women who were screened as at risk for emotional adjustment problems and intended to start their first ART cycle were invited, and of them 120 were randomized. Of these women, 48% in the intervention group were compliant to the intervention. Outcome measures associated with the feasibility to analyse this e-therapy program within an RCT were assessed. It is feasible to evaluate a personalized e

  15. Fear of hypoglycaemia in mothers and fathers of children with Type 1 diabetes is associated with poor glycaemic control and parental emotional distress: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, A; Wentzel-Larsen, T; Graue, M; Søvik, O; Rokne, B

    2010-01-01

    To analyse, in a population-based study, the association between parental fear of hypoglycaemia and (i) the prevalence of hypoglycaemia and diabetes treatment factors in children with Type 1 diabetes and (ii) emotional distress in mothers and fathers. Mothers (n = 103) and fathers (n = 97) of 115 children with Type 1 diabetes (1-15 years old) participated in the study. In addition to demographic and disease-specific data, the participants completed the Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey-Parent version (HFS-P) (worry and behaviour subscales) and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 items (HSCL-25) to measure emotional distress. A higher HFS-P worry score was associated with higher glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)), a higher frequency (>or= 7) of what parents experienced as problematic hypoglycaemic events during the past year and co-morbid disease in the child. A higher HFS-P behaviour score was associated with children receiving insulin injections compared with using an insulin pump and a higher frequency (>or= 7 per day) of blood glucose measurements. The mothers had higher scores than the fathers in both the worry and behaviour subscales. The mothers' and the fathers' HFS-P worry scores correlated significantly with their HSCL-25 scores. The association between a higher level of hypoglycaemic-related fear and parental emotional distress and poorer glycaemic control in the child emphasizes the need for programmes to support and guide parents. The results suggest that future interventions should target both the parents' fear and appropriate ways to prevent hypoglycaemia in children with Type 1 diabetes.

  16. Predicting changes in quality of life and emotional distress in Chinese patients with lung, gastric, and colon-rectal cancer diagnoses: the role of psychological resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zeng Jie; Qiu, Hong Zhong; Li, Peng Fei; Liang, Mu Zi; Zhu, Yun Fei; Zeng, Zhen; Hu, Guang Yun; Wang, Shu Ni; Quan, Xiao Ming

    2017-06-01

    Patients with cancer often experience considerable emotional distress, which decreases their quality of life (QOL). Resilience is defined as the psychological characteristics that promote positive adaptation in the face of stress and adversity; however, the relationships among QOL, resilience, and emotional distress in patients with cancer, especially Chinese patients with cancer, are under-researched in the literature. Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 items, Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale were applied in this study. Univariate correlated analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to test the associations among resilience, emotional distress, and QOL with a sample of 276 participants. A Sobel test was conducted to determine whether the indirect effect of resilience was significant. The mean ratings of QOL (59.2), resilience (20.8), anxiety (43.1), and depression (47.7) were reported. The correlations between resilience and QOL in patients with lung cancer were significantly increased compared with patients with gastric or colorectal cancer (Spearman coefficient squares of 0.284, 0.189, and 0.227, respectively). The highest quartile of the resilience level was associated with a 64% (odds ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.17-0.75, P = .006), 70% (odds ratio = 0.30, 95% confidence interval = 0.14-0.63), and 90% (odds ratio = 0.10, 95% confidence interval = 0.04-0.26, P resilience that was significant for depression (Sobel value = 2.002, P = .045) but not anxiety (Sobel value = 1.336, P = .182). The present study suggests that psychological resilience is positively associated with QOL and may comprise a robust buffer between depression and QOL in Chinese patients with cancer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Emotions and support needs following a distressing birth: Scoping study with pregnant multigravida women in North-West England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Gill; Downe, Soo

    2016-09-01

    to identify the emotional and support needs of pregnant multigravida women who have experienced adverse responses associated with a previous childbirth experience. four maternity hospitals in North-West England. 100 surveys were distributed at an anomaly scan clinic in each of four maternity hospitals (total n=400). The survey included an adapted version of a Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Scale to explore trauma responses at two broad time points: (a) following a previous birth and (b) during the current pregnancy. Participants were also asked about the optimal time to receive support post-birth, and the type and provider of support they had accessed/would have liked to access. Descriptive and inferential statistics were undertaken on the quantitative data. The qualitative data were analysed using a basic thematic approach. multigravida pregnant women aged 18+ years. the overall response rate was 28% (n=112); 43% (n=46) of the women had experienced negative/trauma responses associated with a previous birth, 74% of whom (n=34) continued/re-experienced adverse responses in their current pregnancy. Most commonly reported trauma responses were difficulties in recalling the previous birth(s), avoiding memories associated with it, and the distress associated with these memories when they were recalled. Approximately 54% (n=25) had received some form of support post-birth, and variations in preferred timing of postnatal support provision were reported. Information on available support and opportunities to discuss the birth with a maternity professional were identified most frequently as preferred support options. women's views about what might work should form the basis for effectiveness studies in this area. Among the participants in this study there was evidence of unmet support needs relating to negative or traumatic responses to a previous birth. The range of preferred timing and types of support indicate that flexible needs-based support options should be

  18. Do emotions related to alcohol consumption differ by alcohol type? An international cross-sectional survey of emotions associated with alcohol consumption and influence on drink choice in different settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Kathryn; Bellis, Mark A; Davies, Alisha R; Hughes, Karen; Winstock, Adam

    2017-11-20

    To examine the emotions associated with drinking different types of alcohol, explore whether these emotions differ by sociodemographics and alcohol dependency and whether the emotions associated with different drink types influence people's choice of drinks in different settings. International cross-sectional opportunistic survey (Global Drug Survey) using an online anonymous questionnaire in 11 languages promoted through newspapers, magazines and social media from November 2015 to January 2016. Individuals aged 18-34 years who reported consumption of beer, spirits, red and white wine in the previous 12 months and were resident in countries with more than 200 respondents (n=21 countries; 29 836 respondents). Positive and negative emotions associated with consumption of different alcoholic beverages (energised, relaxed, sexy, confident, tired, aggressive, ill, restless and tearful) over the past 12 months in different settings. Alcoholic beverages vary in the types of emotions individuals report they elicit, with spirits more frequently eliciting emotional changes of all types. Overall 29.8% of respondents reported feeling aggressive when drinking spirits, compared with only 7.1% when drinking red wine (pfeeling all emotions when drinking alcohol, apart from feelings of aggression. Respondents' level of alcohol dependency was strongly associated with feeling all emotions, with the likelihood of aggression being significantly higher in possible dependent versus low risk drinkers (adjusted OR 6.4; 95% CI 5.79 to 7.09; pfeeling the majority of positive and negative emotions also remained highest among dependent drinkers irrespective of setting. Understanding emotions associated with alcohol consumption is imperative to addressing alcohol misuse, providing insight into what emotions influence drink choice between different groups in the population. The differences identified between sociodemographic groups and influences on drink choice within different settings will

  19. Brain responses to erotic and other emotional stimuli in breast cancer survivors with and without distress about low sexual desire: a preliminary fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versace, Francesco; Engelmann, Jeffrey M; Jackson, Edward F; Slapin, Aurelija; Cortese, Kristin M; Bevers, Therese B; Schover, Leslie R

    2013-12-01

    Many breast cancer survivors report a loss of sexual desire and arousability, consonant with the new DSM-V category of female sexual interest/arousal disorder. The cause of decreased sexual desire and pleasure after treatment for cancer is unknown. One possibility is that cancer, or treatment for cancer, damages brain circuits that are involved in reward-seeking. To test the hypothesis that brain reward systems are involved in decreased sexual desire in breast cancer survivors, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare brain responses to erotica and other emotional stimuli in two groups of women previously treated for breast cancer with chemotherapy: those who were distressed about a perceived loss of sexual desire and those who may have had low desire, but were not distressed about it. Women distressed about their desire had reduced brain responses to erotica in the anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which are part of the brain reward system. This study is the first to demonstrate, in cancer survivors, that problems with sexual desire/arousability are associated with blunted brain responses to erotica in reward systems. Future research is necessary to determine whether brain responses differ as a result of chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and menopausal status. This may contribute to the development of new, evidence-based interventions for one of the most prevalent and enduring side effects of cancer treatment.

  20. Financial Distress and Its Associations With Physical and Emotional Symptoms and Quality of Life Among Advanced Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Guay, Marvin; Ferrer, Jeanette; Rieber, Alyssa G; Rhondali, Wadih; Tayjasanant, Supakarn; Ochoa, Jewel; Cantu, Hilda; Chisholm, Gary; Williams, Janet; Frisbee-Hume, Susan; Bruera, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    There are limited data on the effects of financial distress (FD) on overall suffering and quality of life (QOL) of patients with advanced cancer (AdCa). In this cross-sectional study, we examined the frequency of FD and its correlates in AdCa. We interviewed 149 patients, 77 at a comprehensive cancer center (CCC) and 72 at a general public hospital (GPH). AdCa completed a self-rated FD (subjective experience of distress attributed to financial problems) numeric rating scale (0 = best, 10 = worst) and validated questionnaires assessing symptoms (Edmonton Symptom Assessment System [ESAS]), psychosocial distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), and QOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General [FACT-G]). The patients' median age was 60 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 58.6-61.5 years); 74 (50%) were female; 48 of 77 at CCC (62%) versus 13 of 72 at GPH (18%) were white; 21 of 77 (27%) versus 32 of 72 (38%) at CCC and GPH, respectively, were black; and 7 of 77 (9%) versus 27 of 72 (38%) at CCC and GPH, respectively, were Hispanic (p Financial distress is an important and common factor contributing to the suffering of advanced cancer patients and their caregivers. It should be suspected in patients with persistent, refractory symptom expression. Early identification, measurement, and documentation will allow clinical teams to develop interventions to improve financial distress and its impact on quality of life of advanced cancer patients. ©AlphaMed Press.

  1. Associations between recent gay-related stressful events, emotional distress, social support and unprotected anal intercourse behavior among Chinese men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunyong, Liu; Zhe, Wang; Junting, Xu; Yan, Zhou; Xiaoxia, An; Li, Zhao; Yuan, Gu; Chao, Jiang

    2016-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the levels of and associations between gay-related stressful events, social support, emotional distress and the number of unprotected anal intercourse partners among Chinese men who have sex with men. Using a respondent-driven sampling method, 807 men who have sex with men were recruited in urban areas of northeast China and data were collected via face-to-face interviews. Gay-related stressful events were measured using the Gay-Related Stressful Life Events Scale; levels of depression, anxiety symptoms and social support were measured using the Self-Rating Depression Scale, the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and the Social Support Rating Scale, respectively. Over a quarter of study participants experienced gay-related stressful events during the preceding 3 months. Their average Self-Rating Depression Scale, Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and Social Support scores differed significantly from the national norm. Gay-related stressful events significantly correlated with anxiety (r = 0.167, p Gay-related stressful events are common and are significantly associated with emotional distress, lack of social support and high-risk sexual behaviors among Chinese men who have sex with men. Multifaceted approaches are warranted to increase social support and reduce intolerance toward homosexual behaviors and to reduce risky sexual behaviors related to the rapid HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men population in China. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  2. Associations of Emotional Distress and Perceived Health in Persons With Atrial Fibrillation and Their Partners Using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalteg, Tomas; Benzein, Eva; Sandgren, Anna; Malm, Dan; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2016-08-01

    Individual behavior affects and is affected by other people. The aim of this study was to examine if emotional distress in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and their spouses was associated with their own and their partner's perceived health. Participants included 91 dyads of patients and their spouses. Emotional distress was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and perceived health was measured with the Short Form 36 Health Survey. The Actor-Partner Interdependence Model was used for dyad-level analyses of associations, using structural equation modeling. Higher levels of anxiety and depression were associated with lower levels of perceived health in patients and spouses. Higher levels of depression in patients were associated with lower levels of vitality in spouses and vice versa. As AF patients and their spouses influence each other, health-care interventions should consider the dyad to address dyadic dynamics. This may benefit the health of the individual patient and of the couple. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. The development and validation of Huaxi emotional-distress index (HEI): A Chinese questionnaire for screening depression and anxiety in non-psychiatric clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Guo, Wan-Jun; Zhang, Lan; Deng, Wei; Wang, Hui-Yao; Yu, Jian-Ying; Luo, Shan-Xia; Huang, Ming-Jin; Dong, Zai-Quan; Li, Da-Jiang; Song, Jin-Ping; Jiang, Yu; Cheng, Nan-Sheng; Liu, Xie-He; Li, Tao

    2017-07-01

    Depression and anxiety among general hospital patients are common and under-recognized in China. This study aimed toward developing a short questionnaire for screening depression and anxiety in non-psychiatric clinical settings, and to test its reliability and validity. The item pool which included 35 questions about emotional distress was drafted through a comprehensive literature review. An expert panel review and the first clinical test with 288 general hospital patients were conducted for the primary item selection. The second clinical test was performed to select the final item in 637 non-psychiatric patients. The reliability and validity of the final questionnaire were tested in 763 non-psychiatric patients, in which 211 subjects were interviewed by psychiatrists using Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Multiple data analysis methods including principal components analysis (PCA), item response theory (IRT), and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to select items and validate the final questionnaire. The series selection of items resulted in a 9-item questionnaire, namely Huaxi Emotional-distress Index (HEI). The Cronbach's α coefficient of HEI was 0.90. The PCA results showed a unidimensional construct. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.88 when compared with MINI interview. Using the optimal cut-off score of HEI (11/12), the sensitivity and specificity were 0.880 and 0.766, respectively. The HEI is considered as a reliable and valid instrument for screening depression and anxiety, which may have substantial clinical value to detect patients' emotional disturbances especially in the busy non-psychiatric clinical settings in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of suspected food allergy on emotional distress and family life of parents prior to allergy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibb, Rebecca C; Semper, Heather

    2013-12-01

    Food allergy is associated with psychological distress in both child and parent. It is unknown whether parental distress is present prior to clinical diagnosis or whether experiences at clinic can reduce any distress present. This study aimed to assess anxiety and depression in parents and the impact of suspected food allergy on the lives of families before and after a visit to an allergy clinic. One hundred and twenty-four parents visiting an allergy clinic for the first time to have their child assessed for food allergy completed a study-specific questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; 50 parents completed these 4-6 wk later in their own home. Most parents (86.4%) reported suspected food allergy had an impact on their family life prior to clinic attendance; 76% had made changes to their child's diet. 32.5% of parents had mild-to-severe anxiety before their clinic visit; 17.5% had mild-to-moderate depression. Post-clinic, 40% had mild-to-severe anxiety; 13.1% had mild-to-moderate depression. There were no significant differences in anxiety (p = 0.34) or depression scores (p = 0.09) before and after the clinic visit. Anxiety and depression is present in a small proportion of parents prior to diagnosis of food allergy in their child and this does not reduce in the short term after the clinic visit. Identification of parents at risk of suffering from distress is needed and ways in which we communicate allergy information before and at clinic should be investigated to see if we can reduce distress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Children's exposure to violent political conflict stimulates aggression at peers by increasing emotional distress, aggressive script rehearsal, and normative beliefs favoring aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesmann, L Rowell; Dubow, Eric F; Boxer, Paul; Landau, Simha F; Gvirsman, Shira Dvir; Shikaki, Khalil

    2017-02-01

    We examine the hypothesis that children's exposure to ethnic-political conflict and violence over the course of a year stimulates their increased aggression toward their own in-group peers in subsequent years. In addition, we examine what social cognitive and emotional processes mediate these effects and how these effects are moderated by gender, age, and ethnic group. To accomplish these aims, we collected three waves of data from 901 Israeli and 600 Palestinian youths (three age cohorts: 8, 11, and 14 years old) and their parents at 1-year intervals. Exposure to ethnic-political violence was correlated with aggression at in-group peers among all age cohorts. Using a cross-lagged structural equation model from Year 1 to Year 3, we found that the relation between exposure and aggression is more plausibly due to exposure to ethnic-political violence stimulating later aggression at peers than vice versa, and this effect was not moderated significantly by gender, age cohort, or ethnic group. Using three-wave structural equation models, we then showed that this effect was significantly mediated by changes in normative beliefs about aggression, aggressive script rehearsal, and emotional distress produced by the exposure. Again the best fitting model did not allow for moderation by gender, age cohort, or ethnic group. The findings are consistent with recent theorizing that exposure to violence leads to changes both in emotional processes promoting aggression and in the acquisition through observational learning of social cognitions promoting aggression.

  6. Is alcohol binge drinking in early and late pregnancy associated with behavioural and emotional development at age 7 years?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niclasen, Janni; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate associations of maternal binge drinking in early and late pregnancy with child behavioural and emotional development at age seven. It was hypothesised that late exposure is associated with more negative outcomes than early exposure. Differences were...... = 37,315). After adjustment for maternal education, psychiatric diagnoses, age and smoking, children exposed to binge drinking in early and late pregnancy had significantly higher mean externalizing scores at age seven than unexposed children, an effect albeit much less for early binge drinking...

  7. Yoga to Reduce Trauma-Related Distress and Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties Among Children Living in Orphanages in Haiti: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Kathryn A; Whetten, Kathryn; Boyd, David L; O'Donnell, Karen

    2015-09-01

    To measure trauma-related distress and evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an 8-week yoga intervention (YI) in reducing trauma-related symptoms and emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD) among children living in orphanages in Haiti. Case comparison with random assignment to YI or aerobic dance control (DC) plus a nonrandomized wait-list control (WLC) group. Two orphanages for children in Haiti. 76 children age 7 to 17 years. The YI included yoga postures, breathing exercises, and meditation. The DC group learned a series of dance routines. The WLC group received services as usual in the institutional setting. After completion of data collection, the WLC group received both yoga and dance classes for 8 weeks. The UCLA PTSD Reaction Index and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire were used to indicate trauma-related symptoms and EBD, respectively. A within-subject analysis was conducted to compare pre- and post-treatment scores. A post-treatment yoga experience questionnaire evaluated acceptability of the YI. Analyses of variance revealed a significant effect (F[2,28]=3.30; p=0.05) of the YI on the trauma-related symptom scores. Regression analyses showed that participation in either 8 weeks of yoga or dance classes suggested a reduction in trauma-related symptoms and EBD, although this finding was not statistically significant (p>0.05). Respondents reported satisfaction with the yoga program and improved well-being. Children with trauma-related distress showed improvements in symptoms after participation in an 8-week yoga program compared to controls. Yoga is a feasible and acceptable activity with self-reported benefits to child mental and physical health. Additional research is needed to further evaluate the effect of yoga to relieve trauma-related distress and promote well-being among children.

  8. Effects of Rational-Emotive Hospice Care Therapy on Problematic Assumptions, Death Anxiety, and Psychological Distress in a Sample of Cancer Patients and Their Family Caregivers in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Chinonyelum Nwamaka Onyechi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was a preliminary investigation that aimed to examine the effects of rational emotive hospice care therapy (REHCT on problematic assumptions, death anxiety, and psychological distress in a sample of cancer patients and their family caregivers in Nigeria. The study adopted a pre-posttest randomized control group design. Participants were community-dwelling cancer patients (n = 32 and their family caregivers (n = 52. The treatment process consisted of 10 weeks of full intervention and 4 weeks of follow-up meetings that marked the end of intervention. The study used repeated-measures analysis of variance for data analysis. The findings revealed significant effects of a REHCT intervention program on problematic assumptions, death anxiety, and psychological distress reduction among the cancer patients and their family caregivers at the end of the intervention. The improvements were also maintained at follow-up meetings in the treatment group compared with the control group who received the usual care and conventional counseling. The researchers have been able to show that REHCT intervention is more effective than a control therapy for cancer patients’ care, education, and counseling in the Nigerian context.

  9. Effects of Rational-Emotive Hospice Care Therapy on Problematic Assumptions, Death Anxiety, and Psychological Distress in a Sample of Cancer Patients and Their Family Caregivers in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyechi, Kay Chinonyelum Nwamaka; Onuigbo, Liziana N; Eseadi, Chiedu; Ikechukwu-Ilomuanya, Amaka B; Nwaubani, Okechukwu Onyinye; Umoke, Prince C I; Agu, Fedinand U; Otu, Mkpoikanke Sunday; Utoh-Ofong, Anthonia N

    2016-09-20

    This study was a preliminary investigation that aimed to examine the effects of rational emotive hospice care therapy (REHCT) on problematic assumptions, death anxiety, and psychological distress in a sample of cancer patients and their family caregivers in Nigeria. The study adopted a pre-posttest randomized control group design. Participants were community-dwelling cancer patients ( n = 32) and their family caregivers ( n = 52). The treatment process consisted of 10 weeks of full intervention and 4 weeks of follow-up meetings that marked the end of intervention. The study used repeated-measures analysis of variance for data analysis. The findings revealed significant effects of a REHCT intervention program on problematic assumptions, death anxiety, and psychological distress reduction among the cancer patients and their family caregivers at the end of the intervention. The improvements were also maintained at follow-up meetings in the treatment group compared with the control group who received the usual care and conventional counseling. The researchers have been able to show that REHCT intervention is more effective than a control therapy for cancer patients' care, education, and counseling in the Nigerian context.

  10. The effectiveness of a value-based EMOtion-cognition-Focused educatIonal programme to reduce diabetes-related distress in Malay adults with Type 2 diabetes (VEMOFIT) : Study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, BH; Vos, Rimke C.; Shariff Ghazali, Sazlina; Shamsuddin, Nurainul Hana; Fernandez, Aaron; Mukhtar, Firdaus; Ismail, Mastura; Mohd Ahad, Azainorsuzila; Sundram, Narayanan N.; Ali, Siti Zubaidah Mohd; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2017-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients experience many psychosocial problems related to their diabetes. These often lead to emotional disorders such as distress, stress, anxiety and depression, resulting in decreased self-care, quality of life and disease control. The purpose of the

  11. Emotion-Oriented Coping, Avoidance Coping, and Fear of Pain as Mediators of the Relationship between Positive Affect, Negative Affect, and Pain-Related Distress among African American and Caucasian College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Wells, Anita G.; Wang, Mei-Chuan; Pietruszka, Todd; Ciftci, Ayse; Stancil, Brett

    2009-01-01

    The authors tested whether coping styles and fear of pain mediate the relationship between positive affect and negative affect on one hand and pain-related distress (PD) on the other. Among African American and Caucasian female college students, negative affect, fear of pain, and emotion-oriented coping together accounted for 34% of the variance…

  12. Navigating moral distress using the moral distress map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinski, Denise Marie

    2016-05-01

    The plethora of literature on moral distress has substantiated and refined the concept, provided data about clinicians' (especially nurses') experiences, and offered advice for coping. Fewer scholars have explored what makes moral distress moral If we acknowledge that patient care can be distressing in the best of ethical circumstances, then differentiating distress and moral distress may refine the array of actions that are likely to ameliorate it. This article builds upon scholarship exploring the normative and conceptual dimensions of moral distress and introduces a new tool to map moral distress from emotional source to corrective actions. The Moral Distress Map has proven useful in clinical teaching and ethics-related debriefings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Researching Distressing Topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Jackson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative researchers who explore sensitive topics may expose themselves to emotional distress. Consequently, researchers are often faced with the challenge of maintaining emotional equilibrium during the research process. However, discussion on the management of difficult emotions has occupied a peripheral place within accounts of research practice. With rare exceptions, the focus of published accounts is concentrated on the analysis of the emotional phenomena that emerge during the collection of primary research data. Hence, there is a comparative absence of a dialogue around the emotional dimensions of working with secondary data sources. This article highlights some of the complex ways in which emotions enter the research process during secondary analysis, and the ways in which we engaged with and managed emotional states such as anger, sadness, and horror. The concepts of emotional labor and emotional reflexivity are used to consider the ways in which we “worked with” and “worked on” emotion. In doing so, we draw on our collective experiences of working on two collaborative projects with ChildLine Scotland in which a secondary analysis was conducted on children’s narratives of distress, worry, abuse, and neglect.

  14. Adolescent vulnerability and the distress of rejection: Associations of adjustment problems and gender with control, emotions, and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Skinner, Ellen A

    2015-12-01

    We examined adjustment problems as risks for patterns of emotions, appraisals, and coping with rejection, and explored whether these processes could account for sex (boy/girl) differences in coping. Young adolescents (N = 669, grades 6-8) completed questionnaires, which assessed responses to peer rejection threat with two short scenarios. Using structural equation modeling to test a multivariate process model, adolescents with heightened social anxiety had the most maladaptive responses to rejection threat, including elevated emotional reactions, more self-blame, and coping using more social isolation, rumination and opposition. Adolescents reporting more depressive symptoms felt less control and anticipated using less adaptive coping (less support seeking, distraction, and negotiation), whereas aggressive adolescents responded with more anger and coped via opposition. Moreover, as anticipated, sex differences in coping, symptoms, emotions, and appraisals were found. However, coping differences between boys and girls were mostly nonsignificant after accounting for symptoms, aggression, emotional reactions, and appraisals. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Emotional distress and positive and negative memories from military deployment: The influence of PTSD symptoms and time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niziurski, Julie Ann; Johannessen, Kim Berg; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    , and how the perceived impact of these memories changed over time. We found that soldiers with higher levels of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were more affected by both their negative and positive memories, compared with soldiers with lower levels of PTSD symptoms. Emotional intensity...

  16. The impact of stigma on emotional distress and recovery from psychosis: The mediatory role of internalised shame and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lisa; Byrne, Rory; Burke, Eilish; Enache, Gabriela; Morrison, Anthony P

    2017-09-01

    Internalised shame and self-esteem have both been proposed to play an integral role in the relationship between stigma and its negative psychological sequelae in people who experience psychosis, but there has been little quantitative exploration to examine their roles further. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of stigma (experienced and perceived) with emotional distress and recovery in psychosis, and to examine internalised shame and self-esteem as potential mediators. A total of 79 participants were included for the purposes of this study. Participants were administered a battery of assessment measures examining experienced and perceived stigma, internalised shame, self-esteem, depression, hopelessness, and personal recovery. Results illustrated that stigma (experienced and perceived) was significantly associated with internalised shame, low self-esteem, depression, hopelessness and poor personal recovery. Stigma (experienced and perceived) and its relationship with depression, hopelessness and personal recovery was mediated by both internalised shame and low self-esteem. In conclusion, stigma can have significant negative emotional consequences and impede recovery in people with psychosis. This may indicate that stigma needs to be addressed therapeutically for people with psychosis with a particular emphasis on addressing internalised shame and low self-esteem. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. A preliminary study on the emotional distress of patients with terminal-stage cancer: a questionnaire survey of 1380 bereaved families over a 12-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Y

    1997-04-01

    To clarify the emotional distress of terminal cancer patients, questionnaires were sent to 2826 families of patients who died at the National Kyushu Cancer Center; 1380 replies were obtained. Among the 1380 patients, 37.7% had been aware of the disease name and 19.8% had been unaware. Of the 1380 patients, 43.5% had prepared for and calmly accepted death, but 12.4% had greatly feared and 11.7% rejected death. Patients aware of the disease name had tended to prepare better for death but also had a stronger fear compared with those who were unaware. Patients informed of the exact nature of their disease by their physicians tended to value their remaining life more than those informed by others. Those who had desired notification of the disease name also tended to value their remaining life more than those who had not. They also spent their remaining life more usefully, and were less discouraged after being informed than those who had not expressed a wish to be informed. Thus: 1. The emotional state of the cancer patient should be clearly established before deciding to inform the patient of the true diagnosis. 2. The patient should be notified of the disease by the doctor, even if he/she is already aware of the diagnosis through others. 3. The ability to share bad news with the patient is of crucial importance for physicians when caring for terminal- stage cancer patients.

  18. Nonsuicidal Self-injury as a Risk Factor for Purging Onset: Negatively Reinforced Behaviours that Reduce Emotional Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Elizabeth N; Davis, Heather A; Combs, Jessica L; Jordan, Carol E; Smith, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    Both nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and purging behaviour are thought to involve harm to the self. The acquired capability for self-harm model holds that engaging in one self-harming behaviour increases the capability to tolerate harm to the self, thus increasing risk for engaging on other such behaviours. In addition, both behaviours are thought to serve the similar function of relief from distress. We thus tested whether engagement in one of these behaviours predicts the subsequent onset of the other. In a longitudinal design, 1158 first-year college women were assessed for purging and NSSI at two time points. Engagement in NSSI at time 1 predicted the college onset of purging behaviour 9 months later (OR = 2.20, p < .04, CI = 1.07-4.19) beyond prediction from time 1 binge behaviour, and purging behaviour at time 1 predicted the subsequent onset of NSSI (OR = 6.54, p < .01, CI = 1.71-25.04). These findings are consistent with the acquired capability for harm model and with the possibility that the two behaviours serve a similar function. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  19. Storytelling in the Early Bereavement Period to Reduce Emotional Distress Among Surrogates Involved in a Decision to Limit Life Support in the ICU: A Pilot Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnato, Amber E; Schenker, Yael; Tiver, Greer; Dew, Mary Amanda; Arnold, Robert M; Nunez, Eduardo R; Reynolds, Charles F

    2017-01-01

    Surrogate decision makers involved in decisions to limit life support for an incapacitated patient in the ICU have high rates of adverse emotional health outcomes distinct from normal processes of grief and bereavement. Narrative self-disclosure (storytelling) reduces emotional distress after other traumatic experiences. We sought to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and tolerability of storytelling among bereaved surrogates involved in a decision to limit life support in the ICU. Pilot single-blind trial. Five ICUs across three hospitals within a single health system between June 2013 and November 2014. Bereaved surrogates of ICU patients. Storytelling and control conditions involved printed bereavement materials and follow-up assessments. Storytelling involved a single 1- to 2-hour home or telephone visit by a trained interventionist who elicited the surrogate's story. The primary outcomes were feasibility (rates of enrollment, intervention receipt, 3- and 6-mo follow-up), acceptability (closed and open-ended end-of-study feedback at 6 mo), and tolerability (acute mental health services referral). Of 53 eligible surrogates, 32 (60%) consented to treatment allocation. Surrogates' mean age was 55.5 (SD, 11.8), and they were making decisions for their parent (47%), spouse (28%), sibling (13%), child (3%), or other relation (8%). We allocated 14 to control and 18 to storytelling, 17 of 18 (94%) received storytelling, 14 of 14 (100%) and 13 of 14 (94%) control subjects and 16 of 18 (89%) and 17 of 18 (94%) storytelling subjects completed their 3- and 6-month telephone assessments. At 6 months, nine of 13 control participants (69%) and 16 of 17 storytelling subjects (94%) reported feeling "better" or "much better," and none felt "much worse." One control subject (8%) and one storytelling subject (6%) said that the study was burdensome, and one control subject (8%) wished they had not participated. No subjects required acute mental health services referral. A

  20. Emotional distress and quality of life in relatives of patients with severe brain injury: the first month after injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Siert, Lars; Lykke Mortensen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    31 primary relatives of patients with severe brain injury. The participants were recruited at admission to Traumatic Brain Injury Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup. All relatives completed the depression and anxiety scales from SCL-90-R (Symptom Checklist) and the Role Emotional, Social...... of life and symptoms of anxiety and depression at the time of admission. Future research should focus on developing and evaluating interventions in the acute phase....... Function, Mental Health and Vitality scale of the SF-36 approximately 36 days after injury. Data concerning severity of injury, the patients' level of consciousness and function was also collected. MAIN OUTCOME AND RESULTS: The participants had significantly lower scores on all quality of life scales (p...

  1. Testing the effectiveness of a mindfulness-based intervention to reduce emotional distress in outpatients with diabetes (DiaMind)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VAN Son, Jenny; Nyklíček, Ivan; Pop, Victor J M

    2011-01-01

    , with respect to improving quality of life, dispositional mindfulness, and self-esteem of patients with diabetes; third, with regard to self-care and clinical outcomes; finally, a potential effect modification by clinical and personality characteristics will be explored. METHODS/DESIGN: The Diabetes......-report data will be collected on quality of life, dispositional mindfulness, self-esteem, self-care, and personality, while complications and glycemic control will be assessed from medical files and blood pressure will be measured. Group differences will be analyzed with repeated measures analysis...... of covariance.The study is supported by grants from the Dutch Diabetes Research Foundation and Tilburg University and has been approved by a medical ethics committee. DISCUSSION: It is hypothesized that emotional well-being, quality of life, dispositional mindfulness, self-esteem, self-care, and blood pressure...

  2. Drinking to cope with negative emotions moderates alcohol use disorder treatment response in patients with co-occurring anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, J J; Kushner, M G; Thuras, P; Menk, J; Unruh, A S

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies and theory implicate drinking to cope (DTC) with anxiety as a potent moderator of the association between anxiety disorder (AnxD) and problematic alcohol use. However, the relevance of DTC to the treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD) in those with a co-occurring AnxD has not been well studied. To address this, we examined whether DTC moderates the impact of two therapies: (1) a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) designed to reduce DTC and anxiety symptoms; (2) a progressive muscle relaxation training (PMRT) program designed to reduce anxiety symptoms only. Patients undergoing a standard AUD residential treatment with a co-occurring AnxD (N=218) were randomly assigned to also receive either the CBT or PMRT. DTC in the 30 days prior to treatment was measured using the Unpleasant Emotions subscale of the Inventory of Drinking Situations. Confirming the predicted moderator model, the results indicated a significant interaction between treatment group and level of pre-treatment DTC behavior. Probing this interaction revealed that for those reporting more pre-treatment DTC behavior, 4-month alcohol outcomes were superior in the CBT group relative to the PMRT group. For those reporting less pre-treatment DTC behavior, however, 4-month alcohol outcomes were similar and relatively good in both treatment groups. These findings establish a meaningful clinical distinction among those with co-occurring AUD-AnxD based on the degree to which the symptoms of the two disorders are functionally linked through DTC. Those whose co-occurring AUD-AnxD is more versus less strongly linked via DTC are especially likely to benefit from standard AUD treatment that is augmented by a brief CBT designed to disrupt this functional link. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Is social isolation/alienation confounded with, and non-independent of, emotional distress in its association with early onset of coronary artery disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterer, Mark; Rose, Benjamin; Knysz, Walter; Farha, Amjad; Deveshwar, Sangita; Schairer, John; Keteyian, Steven J

    2011-03-01

    Both emotional distress (ED) and social isolation/alienation (SI/A) have been found to prospectively predict adverse cardiac events, but few studies have tested the confounding/redundancy of these measures as correlates/predictors of outcomes. In this study, 163 patients with documented coronary artery disease (CAD) were interviewed for multiple indices of SI/A and administered the Symptom Checklist 90 - Revised (SCL90R). A spouse or friend provided an independent rating of ED using the spouse/friend version of the Ketterer Stress Symptom Frequency Checklist (KSSFC). The measures of ED and SI/A covaried. All three scales from the KSSFC (depression, anxiety, and "AIAI" - aggravation, irritation, anger, and impatience), and three scales from the SCL90R (anxiety, depression, and psychoticism), were associated with early Age at Initial Diagnosis (AAID) of CAD. Neither three scales derived from the SCL90R (shyness, feeling abused, and feeling lonely) nor the interview indices of SI/A (married, living alone, having a confidant, self description as a lone wolf, and self-description as lonely) were associated with early AAID. Thus, it is concluded that the present results indicate that ED and SI/A are confounded and that, even when tested head-to-head in a multivariate analysis, only ED is associated with AAID.

  4. Emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Liv Kondrup; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Observing science classroom activities presents an opportunity to observe the emotional aspect of interactions, and this chapter presents how this can be done and why. Drawing on ideas proposed by French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, emotions are theorized as publicly embodied enactments......, where differences in behavior between people shape emotional responses. Merleau-Ponty’s theorization of the body and feelings is connected to embodiment while examining central concepts such as consciousness and perception. Merleau-Ponty describes what he calls the emotional atmosphere and how it shapes...... the ways we experience events and activities. We use our interpretation of his understanding of emotions to examine an example of a group of year 8 science students who were engaged in a physics activity. Using the analytical framework of analyzing bodily stance by Goodwin, Cekaite, and Goodwin...

  5. Proposed pathways to problematic drinking via post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, emotion dysregulation, and dissociative tendencies following child/adolescent sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanecky, Alicia K; McChargue, Dennis E; Tuliao, Antover P

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between early sexual abuse and college problem drinking was examined using an integration of the self-medication and vulnerability-stress models. Baseline survey data from parti-cipants (N = 213; 135 men and 78 college women) completing a mandated, brief alcohol intervention were utilized. Representative of the self-medication model, post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms mediated the early sexual abuse/problem drinking relationship. Two psychological vulnerability factors-emotion dysregulation and dissociative tendencies-were incorporated into self-medication findings via more advanced mediational models. Results highlighted that problem drinking increased as dissociative tendencies increased, and relations between the vulnerability factors and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms were in an unexpected direction.

  6. Emotional distress and self-reported quality of life among primary caregivers of stroke survivors in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatoye, F O; Komolafe, M A; Adewuya, A O; Fatoye, G K

    2006-05-01

    To investigate emotional symptoms and domain quality of life (QOL) among primary caregivers of stroke survivors and to determine survivor-related and caregiver-related predictors of these variables. A cross-sectional study. Medical units of the two major hospitals of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, ile-Ife, Nigeria. One hundred and three matched-pairs of caregivers of stroke survivors and caregivers of mild hypertensive patients, and 103 stroke survivors. Twenty three (22.3%) and 25(24.3%) stroke caregivers were observed with clinically significant anxiety and depressive symptoms respectively compared with 12(11.7%) and 14(13.6%) subjects in the control group. Stroke caregivers were observed with significantly higher mean anxiety and depressions scores, and also, with significantly lower mean scores on the four QOL domains (physical health, psychological health, social relationships and environment). By multiple linear regression analysis, anxiety symptoms in stroke caregivers were predicted by high socioeconomic status of survivors and paresis in them. Depressive symptoms were predicted by high caregivers' age and depression in the patients. Higher QOL on one or more WHOQOL-Bref domains was predicted by intimate relationship with survivor, female gender of caregiver, longer duration of caring, higher education of survivor and higher age of survivor. Low QOL on one or more domain(s) was predicted by higher caregivers' age, carers' perception of survivor as cooperative, female gender of survivor, depression in survivor, paresis and cognitive impairment in survivor. Caregiving imposes high burden on stroke carers. Attention should be paid to their psychological needs and services should be designed for them to ameliorate the burden.

  7. A Virtual Hope Box: Randomized Controlled Trial of a Smartphone App for Emotional Regulation and Coping With Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nigel E; Smolenski, Derek J; Denneson, Lauren M; Williams, Holly B; Thomas, Elissa K; Dobscha, Steven K

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the Virtual Hope Box (VHB), a smartphone app to improve stress coping skills, suicidal ideation, and perceived reasons for living among patients at elevated risk of suicide and self-harm. The authors conducted a parallel-group randomized controlled trial with two groups of U.S. service veterans in active mental health treatment who had recently expressed suicidal ideation. Between March 2014 and April 2015, 118 patients were enrolled in the study. Participants were assigned to use the VHB (N=58) or to a control group that received printed materials about coping with suicidality (N=60) to supplement treatment as usual over a 12-week period. Three measures-the Coping Self-Efficacy Scale, Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation, and Brief Reasons for Living Inventory-were collected at baseline (before randomization) and three, six, and 12 weeks. Secondary measures-the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, and Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale-were collected at baseline and 12 weeks. VHB users reported significantly greater ability to cope with unpleasant emotions and thoughts (Coping Self-Efficacy Scale) at three (b=2.41, 95% confidence interval [CI]=.29-4.55) and 12 weeks (b=2.99, 95% CI=.08-5.90) compared with the control group. No significant advantage was found on other outcome measures for treatment augmented by the VHB. The VHB is a demonstrably useful accessory to treatment-an easily accessible tool that can increase stress coping skills. Because the app is easily disseminated across a large population, it is likely to have broad, positive utility in behavioral health care.

  8. Effectiveness of psycho-educational interventions with telecommunication technologies on emotional distress and quality of life of adult cancer patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártolo, Ana; Pacheco, Emelda; Rodrigues, Fabiana; Pereira, Anabela; Monteiro, Sara; Santos, Isabel M

    2017-12-07

    To provide a comprehensive review of psycho-educational interventions using telecommunication technologies developed for adult cancer patients, assessing their effectiveness in reducing emotional distress and improving quality of life (QoL). A narrative approach was used for extraction and synthesis of the data. Relevant studies were identified through the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest, Psychology & Behavioral Sciences Collection (through EBSCOhost), and CENTRAL. Eight studies involving 1016 participants met inclusion criteria. The majority of the studies included (n = 6) used a randomized design and were published between 2007 and 2016. Interventions used a variety of delivery resources, such as telephone, e-mail and websites, but all were aiming to respond to information needs and develop stress control skills. A trend toward reducing distress and improving QoL was found, but estimated effect sizes were typically small (d < 0.5). Telephonically delivered psycho-educational interventions presented the highest between-group effects on these outcomes during survival, but were limited by sample size. The efficacy of interventions using distance approaches in the cancer setting is still not well-established. Further research should be conducted through well-designed studies with more interactive features that minimize the lack of face-to-face interaction. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation professionals working in the field of oncology should invest in the development of psycho-educational interventions responding the patients' educational needs and promoting their stress control skills. Programs using telecommunications technologies may reduce disparities in service delivery within this setting, minimizing geographic and socio-economic barriers to engagement in the interventions. With the current technological development, it is possible to perform more interactive interventions that stimulate therapist

  9. A longitudinal study on anxiety, depressive and adjustment disorder, suicide ideation and symptoms of emotional distress in patients with cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Blázquez, Manuel; Cruzado, Juan Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the presence of anxiety, depressive and adjustment disorders, suicide ideation, and symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with cancer before (T1), and after radiotherapy (T2) and at the 1-month follow-up (T3). A longitudinal study on 103 patients with cancer treated as outpatients undergoing radiotherapy was carried out, evaluating them three times (T1-T2-T3) according to DSM-IV criteria with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Prevalence of the depressive disorders was: T1=6.8%, T2=3.9% and T3=3.9%; for anxiety disorders: T1=16.5%, T2=18.4% and T3=16.5%; for adjustment disorder: 10.7%, 5.8% and 7.8%; and for suicide ideation: T1=11.7%, T2=7.8% and T3=7.8%. In all, the presence of disorders was: T1=35%, T2=26.2%0.4% and T3=29.1%. At least one mental disorder was diagnosed in 46.6% of patients in one of the three times of the study. In relation to the symptoms, the prevalence of the possible cases of clinical anxiety was: T1=35.9%, T2=18.4% and T3=22.3%; the prevalence of possible cases of clinical depression was 19.4%, 16.5% and 10.7%, respectively; and the prevalence of emotional distress was 27.2%, 17.5% and 18.4%, respectively. All symptoms decreased significantly from T1 to T2 and from T1 to T3, with moderate effect sizes. No changes were observed between the end of the radiotherapy and the follow-up period. High prevalence of mental disorders and symptoms of anxiety, depression and distress were observed in the patients with cancer before finishing radiotherapy treatment and during the follow-up. Basurto University Hospital and Basque Foundation for Innovation and Research in Health-BIOEF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sukwoo

    It was widely accepted that emotion such as fear, anger and pleasure could not be studied using a modern scientific tools. During the very early periods of emotion researches, psychologists, but not biologist, dominated in studying emotion and its disorders. Intuitively, one may think that emotion arises from brain first and then bodily responses follow. For example, we are sad first, and then cry. However, groups of psychologists suggested a proposal that our feeling follows bodily responses; that is, we feel sad because we cry! This proposal seems counterintuitive but became a popular hypothesis for emotion. Another example for this hypothesis is as follows. When you accidentally confront a large bear in a mountain, what would be your responses?; you may feel terrified first, and then run, or you may run first, and then feel terrified later on. In fact, the latter explanation is correct! You feel fear after you run (even because you run?). Or, you can imagine that you date with your girl friend who you love so much. Your heart must be beating fast and your body temperature must be elevated! In this situation, if you take a very cold bath, what would you expect? Your hot feeling is usually calmed down after this cold bath; that is, you feel hot because your heart and bodily temperature change. While some evidence supported this hypothesis, others do not. In the case of patients whose cervical vertebrae were severed with an accident, they still retained significant amount of emotion (feelings!) in some cases (but other patients lost most of emotional experience). In addition, one can imagine that there would be a specific set of physical responses for specific emotion if the original hypothesis is correct (e.g. fasten heart beating and redden face for anger etc.). However, some psychologists failed to find any specific set of physical responses for specific emotion, though others insisted that there existed such specific responses. Based on these controversial

  11. Emotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian; Vetner, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    En emotion er en evaluerende respons på en betydningsfuld hændelse, som har affektiv valens og motiverer organismen i forhold til objektverdenen (omverden). Emotioner fører til affekt: til smerte (negativ) eller glæde (positiv affekt). Både positive og negative emotioner påvirker organismens...

  12. Coping strategies, drinking motives, and stressful life events among middle adolescents: associations with emotional and behavioral problems and with academic functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windle, M; Windle, R C

    1996-11-01

    A sample of 733 middle adolescents was used to study interrelations among coping strategies, drinking motives, stressful life events (major, daily positive, and daily negative), emotional and behavioral problems, and academic functioning. A main-effects (vs. stress-buffering) model was supported. Some predictors (e.g., task-oriented coping, major stressful events) were general in their predictive relations to the outcome variables, whereas others were highly specific (e.g., emotion-focused coping predicting depressed affect). Overall, the predictors accounted for 22-53% of the variance in regression equations. Positive daily events predicted higher levels of alcohol use, alcohol problems, and delinquent activity; as well as higher academic performance and lower levels of depressed affect.

  13. Three-year trend survey of psychological distress, post-traumatic stress, and problem drinking among residents in the evacuation zone after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident [The Fukushima Health Management Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oe, Misari; Fujii, Senta; Maeda, Masaharu; Nagai, Masato; Harigane, Mayumi; Miura, Itaru; Yabe, Hirooki; Ohira, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hideto; Suzuki, Yuriko; Yasumura, Seiji; Abe, Masafumi

    2016-06-01

    Prolonged periods of instability in terms of living environment can lead to a serious increase in mental health issues among disaster-affected individuals. The aim of this study was to assess long-term trends in mental health among adult residents in a nuclear-disaster-affected area. Mail-based, self-administered questionnaire surveys were conducted three times (T1-T3), targeting all residents registered with the municipalities in the evacuation zone in Fukushima prefecture at the time of the disaster. Age-adjusted prevalences of the following were analyzed by sex: risk of psychological distress by the Kessler 6-item Scale, post-traumatic stress by the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, and problem drinking by CAGE. The numbers of respondents and response rates were: 73 568, 40.7% (T1); 55 076, 29.9% (T2); and 46 386, 25.0% (T3). Compared with normal Japanese levels in non-disaster settings (4.7%), the prevalence of general psychological distress by Kessler 6-item Scale ≥ 13 was still high 3 years after the event in both men (11.4%) and women (15.8%). Although the age-adjusted prevalence of psychological distress and post-traumatic stress (Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist ≥ 44) had decreased over time (from 19.0% [T1] to 17.8% [T3] for men, and from 25.3% [T1] to 23.3% [T3] for women), the age-adjusted prevalence of problem drinking (CAGE ≥ 2) remained steady in both men (20.7% [T2] and 20.4% [T3]; P = 0.18) and women (10.5% [T2] and 10.5% [T3]; P = 0.91). Our results suggest that long-term interventions focused on post-traumatic stress as well as other mental health problems are strongly needed for disaster-affected individuals. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  14. Distress During the Menopause Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcianna Nosek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, nearly 400 million women worldwide were of menopause age (45-54. Although many women transition through menopause with ease, some experience distress and a subsequent decrease in quality of life. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the experiences of distress in women during the menopause transition. A narrative analysis methodology was used maintaining participants’ complete narratives when possible. In-person interviews of 15 midlife women were digitally audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Women shared narratives of distress related to menstrual changes, emotional instability, vaginal dryness, and decreased libido affected by their relationships with self, partners, work, and family. Some experiences were presented against a backdrop of the past and influenced by concerns for the future. Detailed stories illuminated the effect that distressful symptoms had on quality of life and captured how intricately woven symptoms were with the women’s interpersonal and social lives.

  15. Associations between depression, distress tolerance, delay discounting, and alcohol-related problems in European American and African American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennhardt, Ashley A; Murphy, James G

    2011-12-01

    Although levels of heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems are high in college students, there is significant variability in the number and type of problems experienced, even among students who drink heavily. African American students drink less and experience fewer alcohol-related problems than European American students, but are still at risk, and little research has investigated the potentially unique patterns and predictors of problems among these students. Depression, distress tolerance, and delay discounting have been implicated in adult substance abuse and may be important predictors of alcohol problem severity among college students. We examined the relationship between these variables and alcohol-related problems among African American and European American students (N = 206; 53% female; 68% European American; 28% African American) who reported recent heavy drinking. In regression models that controlled for drinking level, depression, distress tolerance, and delay discounting were associated with alcohol problems among African American students, but only depression was associated with alcohol problems among European American students. These results suggest that negative affect is a key risk factor for alcohol problems among college student drinkers. For African American students, the inability to tolerate negative emotions and to organize their behavior around future outcomes may also be especially relevant risk factors.

  16. Changes in emotional distress, short term memory, and sustained attention following 6 and 12 sessions of progressive muscle relaxation training in 10-11 years old primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Zainol, Nurul Ain

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of 6 and 12 sessions of relaxation training on emotional distress, short-term memory, and sustained attention in primary school children. Participants (N = 132) aged 10 and 11 years old participated in this study. All participants and their parents provided written informed consent. Participants completed the measurement instruments before and after the completion of relaxation training. Nearly half (49%) of all respondents reported moderate to extremely severe stress, and 80 and 61% reported moderate to extremely severe anxiety and depression, respectively. The results of a one-way analysis of variance revealed a significant difference among the groups in mean changes in short-term memory. A greater memory increase was observed in the 12-session than in the six-session and no-training group. It can be conceived that 12-session of training should be considered when prescribing relaxation regimens as a nonspecific clinical treatment (i.e. for healthy students).

  17. Test and Study Worry and Emotionality in the Prediction of College Students' Reasons for Drinking: An Exploratory Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Kevin M.; Cronin, Christopher; Gawet, Debra L.

    2006-01-01

    Educational environments can place an exorbitant strain on the psychological well-being of students, and oftentimes students resort to substance use as a means to escape the stress of performance expectations. This study explored the influence of test and study worry and emotionality on students' reported reasons for consuming alcohol. The Reasons…

  18. To say or not to say: Dyadic ambivalence over emotional expression and its associations with pain, sexuality, and distress in couples coping with provoked vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, Nayla; Bergeron, Sophie; Steben, Marc; Hainault, Victoria-Ann; McDuff, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a highly prevalent and taxing female genital pain condition. Despite the intimate nature of this pain and the fact that affective factors such as anxiety have been shown to modulate its manifestations, no study has yet explored the emotional regulation of couples in which the woman suffers from PVD. Ambivalence over emotional expression (AEE) is an emotional regulation variable that quantifies the extent to which a person is comfortable with the way she or he expresses emotions. We examined whether the dyadic AEE of couples in which the woman suffers from PVD was differentially associated with women's pain and couples' psychological, sexual, and relational functioning. Couples (N = 254), in which the woman suffered from PVD, completed the AEE questionnaire. A couple typology of dyadic AEE was created. Dependent measures for both members of the couple were the global measure of sexual satisfaction scale, the Beck depression inventory II, and the revised dyadic adjustment scale. The female sexual function index and the sexual history form were used to assess the sexual function of women and men, respectively. Women also completed the pain rating index of the McGill pain questionnaire. Couples, in which both partners were considered low on AEE, had the highest scores on sexual satisfaction (P = 0.02) and function (P sexual, and relational outcomes. Results indicate that emotional regulation may be important to consider in the assessment and treatment of couples coping with PVD. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  19. An experimental study on the effectiveness of disclosing stressful life events and support messages: When cognitive reappraisal support decreases emotional distress, and emotional support is like saying nothing at all

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, A.E.; Das, E.

    2014-01-01

    How can we best support others in difficult times? Studies testing the effects of supportive communication revealed mixed findings. The current study focuses on the effects of supportive communication following different disclosure styles, and includes outcome measures to assess emotional

  20. Women Support Providers Are More Susceptible than Men to Emotional Contagion Following Brief Supportive Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Eran; Konasewich, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    People in distress often turn to friends for emotional support. Ironically, although receiving emotional support contributes to emotional and physical health, providing emotional support may be distressing as a result of emotional contagion. Women have been found to be more susceptible than men to emotional contagion in certain contexts, but no…

  1. Staff distress among haemophilia nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J H; Ulrich, C; Feeley, M; Pollack, S

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the severity, sources, and means used to cope with the distress experienced by haemophilia nurses as a result of the widespread infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus among haemophiliacs, we collected anonymous questionnaire data from all nurses in the Haemophilia Nursing Network Directory, compiled by the National Haemophilia Foundation in June, 1990. Questionnaires were returned by 136 of the 181 (75%) nurses in the sample. Over 50% of the sample gave distress responses to 15 of 44 statements. Areas associated with the greatest distress were: (1) Failure of patients to take steps to prevent transmission of HIV; (2) Fear of getting infected, and (3) the repeated loss experienced as patients died from infection. Nurses working with haemophiliacs for 11-15 years were particularly vulnerable to feelings of guilt for having participated in the treatment that resulted in HIV infection. Fear of contagion and distress from patient deaths were mutually exclusive ways of reacting to HIV in haemophiliacs. Looking for a new job was related to all major sources of distress. Interaction with peers was perceived as being the most useful source of emotional support.

  2. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  3. Moral distress in medical education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jeffrey T

    2014-02-01

    Moral distress is the experience of cognitive-emotional dissonance that arises when one feels compelled to act contrary to one's moral requirements. Moral distress is common, but under-recognized in medical education and training, and this relative inattention may undermine educators' efforts to promote empathy, ethical practice, and professionalism. Moral distress should be recognized as a feature of the clinical landscape, and addressed in conjunction with the related concerns of negative role modeling and the goals and efficacy of medical ethics curricula.

  4. Walking the "Emotional Tightrope" From Pregnancy to Parenthood: Understanding Parental Motivation to Manage Health Care and Distress After a Fetal Diagnosis of Complex Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Anne Chevalier; Pridham, Karen; Tluczek, Audrey

    2015-12-23

    Advances in medical technology account for increasingly more couples receiving fetal diagnoses of complex congenital heart disease. Theory on internal working models of caregiving during parenting transitions informed this prospective, exploratory study. Data included conjoint interviews and measures of anxiety, trauma, and depression collected from six couples after diagnosis and after birth. Severity of illness was described using infant health records. Directed content analysis furthered understanding of the caregiving motivation to manage health care that included three categories of parental efforts: (a) to determine expectations of health care providers, (b) to reconcile illness- and non-illness-related care, and (c) to express agency as a parent. Synthesis of qualitative findings transformed into categorical ratings with parents' levels of distress resulted in two profiles characterizing types of internal working models. Findings extend theory on internal working models of caregiving and offer direction for future research regarding parental management of health care for their chronically ill offspring. Implications for practice with families are offered. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Adjustment to Cancer: Anxiety and Distress (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the difficult emotional responses many cancer patients experience. This summary focuses on normal adjustment issues, psychosocial distress, and adjustment disorders.

  6. EXPRESSING DISTRESS IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Gabriela FELEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative emotions (distress are recognized as part of the psychological profile of patients diagnosed with advanced stage cancer. However, most patients are not accustomed to verbalize feelings towards their physician, and generally towards family and medical care personnel. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the expression of emotions by patients in advanced stages of cancer, respectively the means by which they get to express emotions. To this respect, we identified the most common types of emotions expressed, or metaphors used by patients to describe their emotions and topics that trigger emotions. Words and phrases most commonly used are in relation to: fear, anxiety, depression, guilt, negligence, concern. They are uttered in order to depict the network created between disclosed emotions and topics on health status, symptoms, adverse effects and therapeutic choice, patient privacy, and social and family issues.

  7. Distress screening using distress thermometer in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and evaluation of causal factors predicting occurrence of distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Distress is commonly seen in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Causal factors of distress are multifactorial; which encompasses physical, psychological, spiritual, and existential factors with complex interrelationship among the factors. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy were included in the study. Patients were screened for pain scores, distress scores, physical and psychological symptoms, and spiritual and emotional distress. Results: Significant increasing trend seen for pain score, distress score, and total number of symptoms during 2 nd week, 4 th week, and on completion of radiotherapy treatment (all P′s < 0.001 compared to pretreatment. Those who had chemotherapy (CT along with radiation had significantly greater pain score (t = 5.54, P = 0.03 and distress score (t = 3.9, P = 0.05 at 2 weeks into radiotherapy compared to those who did not receive CT. There was significantly higher grade of skin toxicity in those with spiritual distress (Somers′ d = 0.36, P = 0.02 and higher grade of mucositis in those with existential distress (d = 0.34, P = 0.02 at 4 weeks into radiotherapy. Conclusion: Positive correlation between distress score and pain score and occurrence of physical symptoms. Increasing trend seen for pain score, distress score, and total number of symptoms during 2 nd week, 4 th week, and completion of radiotherapy treatment compared to pretreatment. Increase in distress score in those with existential and spiritual distress.

  8. The Protective Role of Resilience in Attenuating Emotional Distress and Aggression Associated with Early-life Stress in Young Enlisted Military Service Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joohan; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Choi, Kang; Jon, Duk-In; Hong, Hyun Ju; Hong, Narei; Lee, Eunjeong

    2015-11-01

    Early life stress (ELS) may induce long-lasting psychological complications in adulthood. The protective role of resilience against the development of psychopathology is also important. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among ELS, resilience, depression, anxiety, and aggression in young adults. Four hundred sixty-one army inductees gave written informed consent and participated in this study. We assessed psychopathology using the Korea Military Personality Test, ELS using the Childhood Abuse Experience Scale, and resilience with the resilience scale. Analyses of variance, correlation analyses, and hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were conducted for statistical analyses. The regression model explained 35.8%, 41.0%, and 23.3% of the total variance in the depression, anxiety, and aggression indices, respectively. We can find that even though ELS experience is positively associated with depression, anxiety, and aggression, resilience may have significant attenuating effect against the ELS effect on severity of these psychopathologies. Emotion regulation showed the most beneficial effect among resilience factors on reducing severity of psychopathologies. To improve mental health for young adults, ELS assessment and resilience enhancement program should be considered.

  9. Psychopathic traits, victim distress and aggression in children

    OpenAIRE

    van Baardewijk, Y.; Stegge, G.T.M.; Bushman, B.J.; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The relationship between psychopathic traits and aggression in children may be explained by their reduced sensitivity to signs of distress in others. Emotional cues such as fear and sadness function to make the perpetrator aware of the victim's distress and supposedly inhibit aggression. As children high in psychopathic traits show a reduced sensitivity to others' distress, these important interpersonal signals cannot perform their aggression inhibiting function. The present exper...

  10. Impact of Relational Proximity on Distress from Infidelity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, Maryanne; Geher, Glenn; Cox, Anthony; Tran, Ulrich S.; Hoben, Ashley; Arrabaca, Andrew; Chaize, Corinna; Dietrich, Robert; Voracek, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Men are generally more distressed by a partner's sexual infidelity whereas women are generally more distressed by a partner's emotional infidelity. The importance of the identity of the interloper, however, has been neglected. We explored the influence of relational proximity (i.e., the degree of

  11. Child Rearing and Children's Prosocial Initiations toward Victims of Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the relation between maternal rearing behavior and the ways children aged 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 years cope with emotions of distress in others. Specifically examined children's reparation for transgression when they were the cause of distress and their altruism when they were bystanders. (JMB)

  12. Psychopathic traits, victim distress and aggression in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baardewijk, Y.; Stegge, G.T.M.; Bushman, B.J.; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The relationship between psychopathic traits and aggression in children may be explained by their reduced sensitivity to signs of distress in others. Emotional cues such as fear and sadness function to make the perpetrator aware of the victim's distress and supposedly inhibit aggression.

  13. Psychopathic Traits, Victim Distress and Aggression in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baardewijk, Yoast; Stegge, Hedy; Bushman, Brad J.; Vermeiren, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background: The relationship between psychopathic traits and aggression in children may be explained by their reduced sensitivity to signs of distress in others. Emotional cues such as fear and sadness function to make the perpetrator aware of the victim's distress and supposedly inhibit aggression. As children high in psychopathic traits show a…

  14. Psychological distress and mortality in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Schiffer, Angélique A

    2010-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, and type D ("distressed") personality (tendency to experience negative emotions paired with social inhibition) have been associated with poor prognosis in coronary heart disease, but little is known about their role in chronic heart failure. Therefore, we investigated whether...... these indicators of psychological distress are associated with mortality in chronic heart failure....

  15. The Effects of a Hatha Yoga Intervention on Facets of Distress Tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medina, J.L.; Hopkins, L.B.; Powers, M.B.; Baird, S.O.; Smits, J.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with low distress tolerance (DT) experience negative emotion as particularly threatening and are highly motivated to reduce or avoid such affective experiences. Consequently, these individuals have difficulty regulating emotions and tend to engage in maladaptive strategies, such as

  16. Gender differences in psychological distress in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matud, M Pilar; Bethencourt, Juan M; Ibáñez, Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological and community-based surveys consistently report gender differences in mental health. This study examines gender differences in psychological distress by analyzing the relevance of stress, coping styles, social support and the time use. Psychological tests were administered to a convenience sample of 1,337 men and 1,251 women from the Spanish general population, aged between 18 and 65 and with different socio-demographic characteristics, although both the women and men groups had similar age and educational levels. Women had more psychological distress than men. Although psychological distress in the women and men groups have some common correlates such as more stress, more emotional and less rational coping and less social support, we find some gender differences. Work role dissatisfaction was more associated with distress in the men than in the women group. In addition, women's distress was associated with more daily time devoted to childcare and less to activities they enjoy, and men's distress was associated with more time devoted to housework and less to physical exercise. Social roles traditionally attributed to women and men - and the differences in the use of time that such roles entail - are relevant in gender differences in psychological distress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Successful application of adaptive emotion regulation skills predicts the subsequent reduction of depressive symptom severity but neither the reduction of anxiety nor the reduction of general distress during the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Carolin M; Radkovsky, Anna; Ebert, David D; Berking, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in general emotion regulation (ER) skills have been linked to symptoms of depression and are thus considered a promising target in the treatment of Major depressive disorder (MDD). However, at this point, the extent to which such skills are relevant for coping with depression and whether they should instead be considered a transdiagnostic factor remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether successful ER skills application is associated with changes in depressive symptom severity (DSS), anxiety symptom severity (ASS), and general distress severity (GDS) over the course of treatment for MDD. Successful ER skills application, DSS, ASS, and GDS were assessed four times during the first three weeks of treatment in 175 inpatients who met the criteria for MDD. We computed Pearson correlations to test whether successful ER skills application and the three indicators of psychopathology are cross-sectionally associated. We then performed latent growth curve modelling to test whether changes in successful ER skills application are negatively associated with a reduction of DSS, ASS, or GDS. Finally, we utilized latent change score models to examine whether successful ER skills application predicts subsequent reduction of DSS, ASS, or GDS. Successful ER skills application was cross-sectionally associated with lower levels of DSS, ASS, and GDS at all points of assessment. An increase in successful skills application during treatment was associated with a decrease in DSS and GDS but not ASS. Finally, successful ER skills application predicted changes in subsequent DSS but neither changes in ASS nor changes in GDS. Although general ER skills might be relevant for a broad range of psychopathological symptoms, they might be particularly important for the maintenance and treatment of depressive symptoms.

  18. Successful application of adaptive emotion regulation skills predicts the subsequent reduction of depressive symptom severity but neither the reduction of anxiety nor the reduction of general distress during the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin M Wirtz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Deficits in general emotion regulation (ER skills have been linked to symptoms of depression and are thus considered a promising target in the treatment of Major depressive disorder (MDD. However, at this point, the extent to which such skills are relevant for coping with depression and whether they should instead be considered a transdiagnostic factor remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether successful ER skills application is associated with changes in depressive symptom severity (DSS, anxiety symptom severity (ASS, and general distress severity (GDS over the course of treatment for MDD. METHODS: Successful ER skills application, DSS, ASS, and GDS were assessed four times during the first three weeks of treatment in 175 inpatients who met the criteria for MDD. We computed Pearson correlations to test whether successful ER skills application and the three indicators of psychopathology are cross-sectionally associated. We then performed latent growth curve modelling to test whether changes in successful ER skills application are negatively associated with a reduction of DSS, ASS, or GDS. Finally, we utilized latent change score models to examine whether successful ER skills application predicts subsequent reduction of DSS, ASS, or GDS. RESULTS: Successful ER skills application was cross-sectionally associated with lower levels of DSS, ASS, and GDS at all points of assessment. An increase in successful skills application during treatment was associated with a decrease in DSS and GDS but not ASS. Finally, successful ER skills application predicted changes in subsequent DSS but neither changes in ASS nor changes in GDS. CONCLUSIONS: Although general ER skills might be relevant for a broad range of psychopathological symptoms, they might be particularly important for the maintenance and treatment of depressive symptoms.

  19. Binge drinking and health-related quality of life: do popular perceptions match reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Catherine A; Brewer, Robert D; Naimi, Timothy S; Moriarty, David G; Giles, Wayne H; Mokdad, Ali H

    2004-04-01

    Popular culture (movies, television shows, advertising) often portrays drinking to the point of intoxication as either humorous or associated with enjoyable social activities that enhance quality of life. This study examined the association between binge drinking (consuming five or more alcoholic drinks on one occasion) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among U.S. adults. Data are from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a continuous random-digit-dial telephone survey of adults aged >/=18 years conducted in all states. This survey included questions about alcohol consumption and HRQOL. In 2001, 52% of U.S. adults were current drinkers (one or more drinks in the past 30 days). Of current drinkers, 11% were frequent binge drinkers (three or more episodes in past month) and 14% were infrequent binge drinkers (one to two episodes in past month). After adjusting for confounding factors, frequent binge drinkers were more likely than non-binge drinkers to experience >/=14 unhealthy days (physical or mental) in the past month (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.24-1.56), primarily because they had more mentally unhealthy days than non-binge drinkers (AOR=1.52, 95% CI=1.32-1.75). Frequent binge drinking is associated with significantly worse HRQOL and mental distress, including stress, depression, and emotional problems. Effective interventions to prevent binge drinking should be widely adopted and may help improve quality of life.

  20. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  1. Diabetes Distress, Depression and Glycemic Control in a Canadian-Based Specialty Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Evelyn M; Afshar, Rowshanak; Qian, Hong; Zhang, Mira; Elliott, Thomas G; Tang, Tricia S

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine rates of diabetes distress and depression in patients with type 2 diabetes in a tertiary care setting, to examine the relationship among glycemic control, diabetes distress and depression, and to identify predictors of diabetes distress and depression on the basis of demographic and clinical characteristics. We recruited 148 adults with type 2 diabetes who were presenting to a specialty diabetes clinic in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Participants completed a questionnaire measuring diabetes distress, depressive symptoms and demographic backgrounds. The Diabetes Distress Scale was used to assess overall distress as well as 4 distinct distress dimensions, including emotional burden, physician-related, regimen-related and interpersonal distress. The Personal Health Questionnaire-9 was used to assess depressive symptoms. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) data were also collected. The prevalence of diabetes distress and depression was 39% and 12% in our population, respectively. A1C levels emerged as a significant predictor of emotional burden (p=0.03) and regimen-related distress (p=0.01); higher A1C levels were associated with increased distress regarding emotional functioning and regimen adherence. A1C levels (p=0.02) and education levels (p=0.03) emerged as predictors of physician-related distress, with higher A1C levels associated with decreased distress regarding confidence in physicians. Our findings reveal that the rate of diabetes distress for patients in a tertiary care setting is high. Furthermore, diabetes distress, particularly emotion- and self-care-related distress, plays a significant role in glycemic control, whereas depression does not. Routine screening for diabetes distress as part of an initial specialty clinic evaluation should be explored. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. What Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  3. Who is at risk of emotional problems and how do you know? Screening of women going for IVF treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, C.M.; Lintsen, A.M.E.; Evers, A.W.M.; Braat, D.D.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fertility problems are accompanied by a lot of emotional distress, resulting in a considerable proportion of female patients showing severe maladjustment after assisted reproductive technology. Although this interferes with their daily life, emotional distress has also shown to be

  4. Drinking Coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2015-01-01

    The chapter explores how coffee is an integral part of our daily life. Focusing on coffee drinking at home, at work, and on the go I show that coffee consumption is a social practice. The chapter illustrates through everyday examples that coffee is more than a caffeine drug. Coffee, with or without...... caffeine, is a social lubricant. We talk to each other and share emotions with one another as we share a cup of coffee. Coffee makes conversation and we embrace coffee, to stay or to go, in the daily rhythm of our busy and global social existence. The practice and sociality of coffee consumption provide...... the coffee industry with the opportunity to make money on our coffee preferences – indeed, also for those of us who actually dislike the taste of coffee. Would you prefer coffee mixed and stirred with non-coffee products such as salt, caramel and licorice? Then you are one of us in the modern age of coffee...

  5. Subjective experience of emotions and emotional empathy in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Anja; Bahçesular, Katja; Brockmann, Eva-Maria; Biederbick, Sarah-Elisabeth; Dziobek, Isabel; Gallinat, Jürgen; Montag, Christiane

    2014-12-30

    Unlike the cognitive dimensions, alterations of the affective components of empathy in schizophrenia are less well understood. This study explored cognitive and affective dimensions of empathy in the context of the subjective experience of aspects of emotion processing, including emotion regulation, emotional contagion, and interpersonal distress, in individuals with schizophrenia and healthy controls. In addition, the predictive value of these parameters on psychosocial function was investigated. Fifty-five patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 55 healthy controls were investigated using the Multifaceted Empathy Test and Interpersonal Reactivity Index, as well as the Subjective Experience of Emotions and Emotional Contagion Scales. Individuals with schizophrenia showed impairments of cognitive empathy, but maintained emotional empathy. They reported significantly more negative emotional contagion, overwhelming emotions, lack of emotions, and symbolization of emotions by imagination, but less self-control of emotional expression than healthy persons. Besides cognitive empathy, the experience of a higher extent of overwhelming emotions and of less interpersonal distress predicted psychosocial function in patients. People with schizophrenia and healthy controls showed diverging patterns of how cognitive and emotional empathy related to the subjective aspects of emotion processing. It can be assumed that variables of emotion processing are important moderators of empathic abilities in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychological distress: concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridner, Sheila H

    2004-03-01

    The term 'distress' is frequently used in nursing literature to describe patient discomfort related to signs and symptoms of acute or chronic illness, pre- or post-treatment anxiety or compromised status of fetuses or the respiratory system. 'Psychological distress' may more accurately describe the patient condition to which nurses respond than does the term 'distress'. Psychological distress is seldom defined as a distinct concept and is often embedded in the context of strain, stress and distress. This creates confusion for nurses attempting to manage the care of people experiencing psychological distress. This paper is a concept analysis of psychological distress based on Walker and Avant's (1995) criteria that identifies the attributes, antecedents, and consequences of psychological distress based upon the findings of the literature review. In addition, empirical references are identified and constructed cases presented. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Ovid, PsychINFO, and Cancer Lit databases over the last 50 years. The purposes of this concept analysis were: (1) to establish the concept of psychological distress as a clear and distinct concept, separate from strain, stress and distress, and (2) to provide nurses with a base of knowledge from which to plan effective clinical interventions. Content analysis of the literature revealed that, although used frequently in health care literature, the origin of the concept of psychological distress has not been clearly articulated and is ill-defined. Psychological distress is a serious problem faced by many of the people whom nurses encounter on a daily basis. An understanding of the concept of psychological distress will help nurses ameliorate this problem in patients. Nursing research related to the exploration of psychological distress is also needed.

  7. Drinking motives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacob Rosendahl; Lenka van Riemsdijk; Klaus Grunert; Johan van Berkel

    2013-01-01

    Chapter 8 in Comsumption Culture in Europe. This chapter presents an analysis of what consumer in Europe drink and why they drink what they drink. The concept of drinking motives is developed and defined, and analysis of data on drinking motives shows that these can be grouped into two major

  8. Emotional distress in junior house officers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Firth-Cozens, J

    1987-01-01

    In a study of 170 junior house officers who were followed up from their fourth year in medical school mean levels of stress were higher than in other reported occupational groups, and the estimated...

  9. Brain Aneurysm: Dealing with Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... survivor and the process. You will learn that personality and behavior changes after an aneurysm are generally ... Outcome Patient Resources Patient Resource Directory Assistive Devices Disability Resources Government Assistance Programs Health Services and Handling ...

  10. Violencia de género y otros factores asociados a la salud emocional de las usuarias del sector salud en México Gender violence and other factors associated with emotional distress in female users of public health services in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Valdez-Santiago

    2006-01-01

    , tanto de malestar emocional como de violencia intrafamiliar. Además, se propone diseñar y poner en marcha programas de atención y referencia de casos de malestar emocional femenino y de violencia intrafamiliar.OBJECTIVE: To identify and describe the factors associated with emotional distress in a national sample of women users of public health services in Mexico, such a Secretaria de Salud (SSA, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This research study was conducted using the database of the National Survey of Violence against Women that consisted of the responses of a total of 26 042 female users of health care services provided by the Mexican government health agencies. The Personal Health Scale (ESP per its initials in Spanish was used to assess emotional distress. To measure violence a 19-item scale which explores different types of violence as well as severity was used. The relationship between emotional distress and gender violence was determined through a binary logistic regression model, as were economic status and demographic variables. RESULTS: One of the most important findings of this study is the high prevalence of emotional distress (15.3% among women seeking health care services from the public sector and the relationship of such emotional distress with the experience of marital physical, psychological, and sexual violence. Factors associated with emotional distress among female users of health care services were age (26 and older; activity (laborer; working hours (71 hours a week or more; alcohol intake (greater intake; abuse during childhood (frequency and types of abuse; severity of marital violence (severe violence; socioeconomic status (very low SES; and type of dwelling (urban. CONCLUSIONS: The principal predictor of emotional distress was intimate partner abuse, especially in severe expression. The next predictor was violence in

  11. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... professionals. More > Binge Drinking (4:23) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Binge Drinking Binge Drinking Transcript ... Page maintained by: Office of Associate Director of Communication, Division of Public Affairs Email Recommend Tweet YouTube ...

  12. Energy Drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Energy Drinks Share: © Thinkstock Energy drinks are widely promoted as products that increase ... people has been quite effective. Next to multivitamins, energy drinks are the most popular dietary supplement consumed ...

  13. Underage Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of binge drinks. 4 On average, underage drinkers consume more drinks per drinking occasion than adult drinkers. ... Disease Control and Prevention Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding ...

  14. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Binge Drinking (4:23) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Binge Drinking Binge Drinking Transcript [23 KB, 2 pages] High resolution [27. ...

  15. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Binge Drinking (4:23) Recommend on ... More Information Vital Signs Binge Drinking Information Alcohol & Public Health Binge Drinking Factsheet Effective Prevention Strategies Send Us ...

  16. Psychological distress among Plains Indian mothers with children referred to screening for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Tassy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological distress (PD includes symptoms of depression and anxiety and is associated with considerable emotional suffering, social dysfunction and, often, with problematic alcohol use. The rate of current PD among American Indian women is approximately 2.5 times higher than that of U.S. women in general. Our study aims to fill the current knowledge gap about the prevalence and characteristics of PD and its association with self-reported current drinking problems among American Indian mothers whose children were referred to screening for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD. Methods Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data was conducted from maternal interviews of referred American Indian mothers (n = 152 and a comparison group of mothers (n = 33 from the same Plains culture tribes who participated in an NIAAA-funded epidemiology study of FASD. Referred women were from one of six Plains Indian reservation communities and one urban area who bore children suspected of having an FASD. A 6-item PD scale (PD-6, Cronbach's alpha = .86 was constructed with a summed score range of 0-12 and a cut-point of 7 indicating serious PD. Multiple statistical tests were used to examine the characteristics of PD and its association with self-reported current drinking problems. Results Referred and comparison mothers had an average age of 31.3 years but differed (respectively on: education ( Conclusions Psychological distress among referred mothers is significantly associated with having a self-reported drinking problem. FASD prevention requires multi-level prevention efforts that provide real opportunities for educational attainment and screening and monitoring of PD and alcohol use during the childbearing years. Mixed methods studies are needed to illuminate the social and cultural determinants at the base of the experience of PD and to identify the strengths and protective factors of unaffected peers who reside within the same

  17. Workplace Environment towards Emotional Health

    OpenAIRE

    Zafir Mohd Makhbul

    2013-01-01

    Workplace ergonomics, such as air quality, lighting, furniture and tools, acoustics and building’s general environment, have a significant relationship between worker’s satisfaction and performance. Poor workplace ergonomics or organization comfort level has significant economic implications for the organizations through employee dissatisfaction, lowered productivity and lowered emotional and physical health of the employees. Lower emotional health leads to psychological distress, depression ...

  18. Evaluación de las propiedades psicométricas del cuestionario de Detección de Malestar Emocional (DME en pacientes oncológicos Assessment of the psychometric properties of the Detection of Emotional Distress Scale in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín T. Limonero

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Con el fin de valorar y aliviar el malestar emocional al final de la vida, se necesitan instrumentos de cribado sencillos, de fácil uso por los sanitarios y comprensibles por los enfermos. En el presente estudio multicéntrico se analiza la utilidad clínica del cuestionario de Detección del Malestar Emocional (DME en enfermos hospitalizados con cáncer avanzado. Métodos: Para determinar las propiedades psicométricas de la escala se administró, a la vez que otros instrumentos y procedimientos, a 105 pacientes con enfermedad oncológica avanzada ingresados en unidades de cuidados paliativos de cinco hospitales de Cataluña. Resultados: Se observó que el 58,3% presentaba malestar emocional moderado o muy intenso, similar al objetivado con otras escalas, como el termómetro emocional. El análisis estadístico de las curvas ROC sugiere que el punto de corte para la detección de malestar emocional que muestra el DME equivale a una puntuación > 9 puntos, con una sensibilidad y una especificidad superiores al 75%. Conclusiones: El DME es útil y de fácil manejo para la identificación del malestar emocional en los enfermos oncológicos avanzados ingresados en unidades de cuidados paliativos. Se sugiere que esta escala también se podría aplicar a otros enfermos y ámbitos de la atención sanitaria, por ejemplo la atención domiciliaria o la atención primaria en enfermos crónicos.Objective: To evaluate and alleviate the emotional distress suffered by advanced cancer patients, simple screening methods that can be easily used by health staff and easily understood by patients are required. The objective of this multicenter study was to analyze the psychometric properties and clinical utility of the Detection of Emotional Distress (DED scale in advanced cancer patients attending a palliative care unit. Methods: The DED scale was administered to 105 advanced cancer patients attended in five palliative care units in Catalonia (Spain

  19. Drinking Motives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Rosendahl, Jacob; Andronikidis, Andreas I.

    2013-01-01

    , and quenching one’s thirst. The non-alcoholic products scoring low on functionality are coffee, tea, soft drinks, and energy drinks. Analysis of socio-demographic differences resulted in only a few effects. Men, lower education groups, and lower income groups are more likely to drink alcohol for reasons other......This chapter presents an analysis of what consumer in Europe drink and why they drink what they drink. The concept of drinking motives is developed and defined, and analysis of data on drinking motives shows that these can be grouped into two major classes: self-expressive and functional....... This distinction is universal and henceapplies across Europe. However, the importance of self-expressive as compared to functional motives, as well as the way in which these relate to different beverages, does differ across Europe. Both dimensions are relevant for the motives for drinking non-alcoholic drinks...

  20. Illness perception clusters and relationship quality are associated with diabetes distress in adults with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Emma; Davies, Mark; Dempster, Martin

    2017-10-01

    This report aims to augment what is already known about emotional distress in Type 2 diabetes, by assessing the predictive value of illness perception clusters and relationship quality on four subcategories of Diabetes Distress.162 individuals with Type 2 diabetes responded to a postal questionnaire assessing demographics, depression, diabetes distress, illness perceptions and relationship quality. Long-term blood glucose was retrieved from participants' General Practitioner. Three illness perception clusters emerged from the data, capturing three subgroups of participants sharing similar illness perception schemas. Regression analyses were performed across each diabetes distress subscale, with demographics, illness perception clusters, and relationship variables entered into three blocks. Covariates explained 51.1% of the variance in emotional burden, 41% of the variance in regimen-related distress, 20% of the variance in interpersonal distress, and 8.6% of the variance in physician-related distress. Cluster membership was strongly associated with emotional burden, regimen-related distress, and to a lesser degree interpersonal distress, but was not associated with physician-related distress. Relationship quality most strongly predicted regimen-related distress. Illness perception schemas and interpersonal issues influence emotional adjustment in diabetes. This study provides direction for the content of a novel approach to identifying and reducing diabetes distress in people with Type 2 diabetes.

  1. Distress respiratorio neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor Durán, Xavier

    1985-01-01

    PROTOCOLOS TERAPÉUTICOS. Distress respiratorio neonatal. El distress respiratorio neonatal puede ser una situación grave que llegue a poner en peligro la vida del recién nacido. 1) Diagnóstico. Es fundamentalmente clínico y se establece cuando el test de Silverman es superior a 2...

  2. The career distress scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creed, Peter; Hood, Michelle; Praskova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Career distress is a common and painful outcome of many negative career experiences, such as career indecision, career compromise, and discovering career barriers. However, there are very few scales devised to assess career distress, and the two existing scales identified have psychometric weakne...

  3. Spirituality and distress in palliative care consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Judith; Paice, Judith A; Cameron, Jacqueline R; Shott, Susan

    2005-08-01

    One's spirituality or religious beliefs and practices may have a profound impact on how the individual copes with the suffering that so often accompanies advanced disease. Several previous studies suggest that negative religious coping can significantly affect health outcomes. The primary aim of this study was to explore the relationship between spirituality, religious coping, and symptoms of distress among a group of inpatients referred to the palliative care consult service. Pilot study. The study was conducted in a large academic medical center with a comprehensive Palliative Care and Home Hospice Program. (1) National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Management Assessment Tool; (2) Pargament Brief Religious Coping Scale (Brief RCOPE); (3) Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp); (4) Puchalski's FICA; and (5) Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF). The 31 subjects surveyed experienced moderate distress (5.8 +/- 2.7), major physical and psychosocial symptom burden, along with reduced function and significant caregiving needs. The majority (87.2%) perceived themselves to be at least somewhat spiritual, with 77.4% admitting to being at least somewhat religious. Negative religious coping (i.e., statements regarding punishment or abandonment by God) was positively associated with distress, confusion, depression, and negatively associated with physical and emotional well-being, as well as quality of life. Palliative care clinicians should be alert to symptoms of spiritual distress and intervene accordingly. Future research is needed to identify optimal techniques to address negative religious coping.

  4. Understanding Associations among Family Support, Friend Support, and Psychological Distress

    OpenAIRE

    Horwitz, Briana N.; Reynolds, Chandra A.; Charles, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    Emotional support from family and friends is associated with lower psychological distress. This study examined whether genetic and environmental influences explain associations among family support, friend support, and psychological distress. Data were drawn from the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) study and included 947 pairs of MZ, same-sex DZ, and opposite-sex DZ twins. Results showed that a genetic factor explains the relationship between friend support and psychological ...

  5. Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) reassure others in distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Frans B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Contact directed by uninvolved bystanders toward others in distress, often termed consolation, is uncommon in the animal kingdom, thus far only demonstrated in the great apes, canines, and corvids. Whereas the typical agonistic context of such contact is relatively rare within natural elephant families, other causes of distress may trigger similar, other-regarding responses. In a study carried out at an elephant camp in Thailand, we found that elephants affiliated significantly more with other individuals through directed, physical contact and vocal communication following a distress event than in control periods. In addition, bystanders affiliated with each other, and matched the behavior and emotional state of the first distressed individual, suggesting emotional contagion. The initial distress responses were overwhelmingly directed toward ambiguous stimuli, thus making it difficult to determine if bystanders reacted to the distressed individual or showed a delayed response to the same stimulus. Nonetheless, the directionality of the contacts and their nature strongly suggest attention toward the emotional states of conspecifics. The elephants’ behavior is therefore best classified with similar consolation responses by apes, possibly based on convergent evolution of empathic capacities. PMID:24688856

  6. Asian elephants (Elephas maximus reassure others in distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Plotnik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Contact directed by uninvolved bystanders toward others in distress, often termed consolation, is uncommon in the animal kingdom, thus far only demonstrated in the great apes, canines, and corvids. Whereas the typical agonistic context of such contact is relatively rare within natural elephant families, other causes of distress may trigger similar, other-regarding responses. In a study carried out at an elephant camp in Thailand, we found that elephants affiliated significantly more with other individuals through directed, physical contact and vocal communication following a distress event than in control periods. In addition, bystanders affiliated with each other, and matched the behavior and emotional state of the first distressed individual, suggesting emotional contagion. The initial distress responses were overwhelmingly directed toward ambiguous stimuli, thus making it difficult to determine if bystanders reacted to the distressed individual or showed a delayed response to the same stimulus. Nonetheless, the directionality of the contacts and their nature strongly suggest attention toward the emotional states of conspecifics. The elephants’ behavior is therefore best classified with similar consolation responses by apes, possibly based on convergent evolution of empathic capacities.

  7. Paver Asphalt Distress Manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shahin, M

    1997-01-01

    .... Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) in June 1989. It comprises an illustrated asphalt pavement distress manual suitable for use by pavement inspection personnel in the field or in pavement inspection training courses...

  8. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) Injury, Violence & Safety Featured Videos Binge Drinking A Time To ... Safe Teen Drivers Break the Silence: Stop the Violence More Information Vital Signs Binge Drinking Information Alcohol & ...

  9. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... car crashes, violence and HIV/AIDS – and discusses effective community prevention strategies such as increasing alcohol excise ... Drinking Information Alcohol & Public Health Binge Drinking Factsheet Effective Prevention Strategies Send Us Feedback What do you ...

  10. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... future Preconception Health (Full) Injury, Violence & Safety A Time To Act Binge Drinking Break the Silence: Stop ... Injury, Violence & Safety Featured Videos Binge Drinking A Time To Act Injury Prevention Research In the Swim ...

  11. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... discusses effective community prevention strategies such as increasing alcohol excise taxes. The video also features experts who ... Violence More Information Vital Signs Binge Drinking Information Alcohol & Public Health Binge Drinking Factsheet Effective Prevention Strategies ...

  12. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living in Philadelphia, PA Injury, Violence & Safety A Time To Act Binge Drinking Break the Silence: Stop ... Injury, Violence & Safety Featured Videos Binge Drinking A Time To Act Injury Prevention Research In the Swim ...

  13. Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the safest water supplies in the world, but drinking water quality can vary from place to place. It ... water supplier must give you annual reports on drinking water. The reports include where your water came from ...

  14. Underage Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 10/17. Drinking patterns vary by age and gender As adolescents get older, they tend to drink ... at some point in their lives. Interferes with brain development Research shows that young people’s brains keep ...

  15. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that binge drinking is only a problem among youth. Release Date: 4/13/2010 Source: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion ... More Information Vital Signs Binge Drinking Information Alcohol & Public Health ...

  16. Persistence of psychological distress and correlated factors among patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikura, Kanako; Yamashita, Aya; Sugimoto, Taro; Kishimoto, Seiji; Matsushima, Eisuke

    2016-02-01

    Many patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) suffer from psychological distress associated with dysfunction and/or disfigurement. Our aim was to evaluate the ratio of patients with persistence of psychological distress during hospitalization and identify the predictors of persistence or change in psychological distress among HNC patients. We conducted a single-center longitudinal study with self-completed questionnaires. We evaluated psychological distress (the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; HADS) and functional level (the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck Scale; FACT-H&N) among patients during hospitalization at the Medical Hospital of Tokyo Medical and Dental University. Of 160 patients, 117 (73.1%) completed the questionnaire at both admission and discharge. Some 42 (52.5%) patients reported persistent psychological distress. The physical well-being of patients with continued distress was significantly lower than that of other patients (21.7 ± 4.7, 19.4 ± 6.1, 19.5 ± 5.4; p < 0.01), and the emotional well-being of patients with continued distress was significantly lower than that in patients with no distress and reduced distress (22.3 ± 3.5, 20.5 ± 2.5; p < 0.01). Significant of results: Impaired physical and emotional function appears to be associated with persistent psychological distress among HNC patients. Psychological interventions focused on relaxation, cognition, or behavior may be efficacious in preventing such persistent distress.

  17. Diabetes Distress and Depression in South Asian Canadians with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Rawel; Tang, Tricia S

    2017-02-01

    South Asians are disproportionately affected by diabetes compared to some other ethnic groups in Canada. Although depression and diabetes distress are psychological issues well studied in the general population of those with diabetes, they have not been investigated in South Asian Canadians with type 2 diabetes. We sought to identify the rates of depression and diabetes distress in South Asian adults with type 2 diabetes and to explore the relationship among glycemic control, depression and diabetes distress. We recruited 41 South Asian adults with type 2 diabetes for this study. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels were collected via venous puncture. We utilized the Diabetes Distress Scale to assess total diabetes distress and its subscales (emotional distress, interpersonal distress, regimen-related distress and physician distress) and the Personal Health Questionnaire-9 to assess depressive symptoms. The rate of depression was 15%, and the rate of total diabetes distress was 52.5%. Although neither measure was found to be correlated with A1C levels, depression had a moderate positive correlation with total diabetes distress (r=0.696; pdiabetes distress is a serious concern for South Asian Canadians with type 2 diabetes. Given that depression and diabetes distress are linked, studies recruiting a larger and more diverse sample of South Asian Canadians should be conducted to better understand the psychological issues that may impact diabetes self-management in this community. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Moral distress in neonatal intensive care unit RNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Terri A; Daly, Barbara; Dowling, Donna; Montgomery, Kathleen

    2010-06-01

    Moral distress is a significant problem for nurses (RNs). It has physical, emotional, and psychological sequelae and a negative impact on the quality, quantity, and cost of patient care. Moral distress leads to loss of moral integrity and job dissatisfaction and is a major cause of burnout and RNs leaving the profession. The majority of research has been carried out with RNs working in acute care, adult inpatient settings, especially critical care areas. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) RNs confront ethically and morally challenging situations on a regular basis. There are limited data clarifying their moral distress. The purpose of this study was to describe the moral distress of RNs working in NICUs and to identify the situations that are associated with their moral distress. What are the intensity and frequency of moral distress in NICU RNs, what situations are associated with moral distress in NICU RNs, and what personal characteristics are correlated with moral distress in NICU RNs? This descriptive, correlational study was conducted with RNs in the level III NICUs of a healthcare system in the northeastern United States. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. A convenience sample of RNs completed a demographic data sheet and the Moral Distress Scale Neonatal-Pediatric Version. Data were collected during October 2008. Ninety-four of 196 eligible RNs (48%) participated in the study. As a whole, the subjects did not perceive that the situations described in the instrument occurred frequently and did not cause great distress. Subjects' individual scores displayed wide variations for all dimensions of moral distress ranging from low to high, indicating that individual RNs may be experiencing moral distress.The situations receiving the highest scores are comparable with the areas that are problematic for other critical care nurses as described in the literature. In this study, 4 RN characteristics were significantly related to moral distress: the desire to

  19. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... De Las Manos Salva Vidas Mi Salud, Mi Decisión, Mi Futuro Salud Pregestacional ¿Yo? ¿Tener un Bebé? ¿ ... professionals. More > Binge Drinking (4:23) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Binge Drinking Binge Drinking Transcript [ ...

  20. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Featured Videos Binge Drinking A Time To Act Injury Prevention Research In the Swim of Things Safe Teen Drivers Break the Silence: Stop the Violence More Information Vital Signs Binge Drinking Information Alcohol & Public Health Binge Drinking Factsheet Effective Prevention Strategies Send ...

  1. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Binge Drinking A Time To Act Injury Prevention Research In the Swim of Things Safe Teen Drivers Break the Silence: Stop the Violence More Information Vital Signs Binge Drinking Information Alcohol & Public Health Binge Drinking Factsheet Effective Prevention Strategies ...

  2. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 10:09) Systems Mapping: The Basics (11:00) Visual Tools to Improve Systemic Analysis (10:45) Take ... professionals. More > Binge Drinking (4:23) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Binge Drinking Binge Drinking Transcript ...

  3. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Binge Drinking Binge Drinking Transcript [23 KB, 2 pages] High resolution [27.9 ... risks of binge drinking – including unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, injury, car crashes, violence and HIV/AIDS – ...

  4. A framework for understanding moral distress among palliative care clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Cynda H; Kaszniak, Alfred W; Halifax, Joan S

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care clinicians confront suffering as they care for people living with life-limiting conditions. When the degree of suffering becomes unjustified, moral distress can ensue. Promising work from neuroscience and social psychology has yet to be applied to clinical practice. Our objective was to expand a social psychology model focusing on empathy and compassion in response to suffering to include an ethical dimension and to examine how the interrelationships of its proposed components can assist clinicians in understanding their responses to morally distressing situations. In the clinical context, responses to distressing events are thought to include four dimensions: empathy (emotional attunement), perspective taking (cognitive attunement), memory (personal experience), and moral sensitivity (ethical attunement). These dynamically intertwined dimensions create the preconditions for how clinicians respond to a triggering event instigated by an ethical conflict or dilemma. We postulate that if the four dimensions are highly aligned, the intensity and valence of emotional arousal will influence ethical appraisal and discernment by engaging a robust view of the ethical issues, conflicts, and possible solutions and cultivating compassionate action and resilience. In contrast, if they are not, ethical appraisal and discernment will be deficient, creating emotional disregulation and potentially leading to personal and moral distress, self-focused behaviors, unregulated moral outrage, burnout, and secondary stress. The adaptation and expansion of a conceptual framework offers a promising approach to designing interventions that help clinicians mitigate the detrimental consequences of unregulated moral distress and to build the resilience necessary to sustain themselves in clinical service.

  5. Tinnitus-Related Distress and the Personality Characteristic Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Wallhäusser-Franke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that personality traits may be prognostic for the severity of suffering from tinnitus. Resilience as measured with the Wagnild and Young resilience scale represents a positive personality characteristic that promotes adaptation to adverse life conditions including chronic health conditions. Aim of the study was to explore the relation between resilience and tinnitus severity. In a cross-sectional study with a self-report questionnaire, information on tinnitus-related distress and subjective tinnitus loudness was recorded together with the personality characteristic resilience and emotional health, a measure generated from depression, anxiety, and somatic symptom severity scales. Data from 4705 individuals with tinnitus indicate that tinnitus-related distress and to a lesser extent the experienced loudness of the tinnitus show an inverse correlation with resilience. A mediation analysis revealed that the relationship between resilience and tinnitus-related distress is mediated by emotional health. This indirect effect indicates that high resilience is associated with better emotional health or less depression, anxiety, and somatic symptom severity, which in turn is associated with a less distressing tinnitus. Validity of resilience as a predictor for tinnitus-related distress is supported but needs to be explored further in longitudinal studies including acute tinnitus patients.

  6. The Effects of a Hatha Yoga Intervention on Facets of Distress Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Johnna; Hopkins, Lindsey; Powers, Mark; Baird, Scarlett O.; Smits, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with low distress tolerance (DT) experience negative emotion as particularly threatening and are highly motivated to reduce or avoid such affective experiences. Consequently, these individuals have difficulty regulating emotions and tend to engage in maladaptive strategies, such as overeating, as a means to reduce or avoid distress. Hatha yoga encourages one to implement present-centered awareness and non-reaction in the face of physical and psychological discomfort and, thus, eme...

  7. EL ESTRÉS CRÓNICO Y LA MEDICIÓN PSICOMÉTRICA DEL DISTRÉS EMOCIONAL PERCIBIDO EN MEDICINA Y PSICOLOGÍA CLINICA DE LA SALUD/ CHRONIC STRESS AND THE MEASUREMENT OF PERCEIVED EMOTIONAL DISTRESS IN MEDICINE & HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolete S. Moscoso*

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEl propósito central de este artículo es presentar el Inventario de Distrés Emocional Percibido (IDEP e indicar su utilidaden el área de la psicología clínica de la salud. Se presenta un marco conceptual coherente y multidimensional acerca deldistrés emocional percibido. Los resultados del análisis factorial de componentes principales con rotaciones promaxclaramente indican que el IDEP es un instrumento psicométrico que presenta una descripción válida y confiable del distrésemocional percibido en pacientes con diagnóstico de cáncer. Dichas observaciones sugieren que el IDEP provee informaciónsignificativa acerca de los diferentes factores multidimensionales del distrés emocional percibido. Nuestra intención es queeste reporte empírico estimule la investigación psicométrica en Latinoamérica con la intención de replicar los resultadosobservados en el presente estudio de investigación.ABSTRACTThe central purpose of this study is to describe the Perceived Emotional Distress Inventory (PEDI and point out itsusefulness in the field of health psychology. The conceptual framework that guided the development of the PEDI, factorstructure, internal consistency, and construct validity are reported. Item responses were examined by Factor Analyses ofPrincipal Components with promax rotations. The PEDI presents three subscales that assesses Anxiety/Depression,Hopelessness, and Anger Expression as components of perceived emotional distress in cancer patients. We also discussthe important implications of replicating these results in the different regions of Latin America.

  8. Emotional disclosure and victim blaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, Kent D; Podolski, Peter; Williams, Christian H

    2015-10-01

    Victim blaming occurs when people are unfairly held responsible for their misfortunes. According to just world theory, witnessing another's victimization threatens just world beliefs, which arouses distress. Victim blaming redeems just world beliefs, thereby reducing distress. However, negative emotions can also be resolved through emotional disclosure, suggesting that disclosure can prevent victim blaming. Two experiments confirmed this prediction. In Study 1 participants viewed a woman being victimized or a woman in a nonvictimizing conflict. Participants then disclosed or suppressed the emotions aroused by these scenes and 1 week later evaluated the woman they had viewed. Disclosure reduced blaming of the victim but did not affect blaming of the nonvictim. Further, the more distress participants disclosed, the less they blamed the victim. Study 2 replicated the primary results of Study 1 and also showed that (a) disclosure exclusively reduces blaming of victims; it does not moderate judgments of victimizers, and (b) the effects of disclosure on blaming applies across genders. These 2 studies confirm that victim blaming is a form of emotion management (per just world theory), and that emotional disclosure prevents blaming by supplying an alternative mode of emotion management. This research also suggests that emotional disclosure moderates social perception, in general. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Truth About Energy Drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drinks?Energy drinks differ from soft drinks and sports drinks. Soft drinks have a lower amount of caffeine. They also contain sugar or fake sweeteners. Sports drinks can have vitamins, carbs, and sugar. You should ...

  10. Drinking Levels Defined

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up to 2 drinks per day for men. Binge Drinking: NIAAA defines binge drinking as a pattern of drinking that brings blood ... Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), defines binge drinking as 5 or more alcoholic drinks for males ...

  11. Development of the Tilburg Pregnancy Distress Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Victor J M; Pommer, Antoinette M; Pop-Purceleanu, Monica

    2011-01-01

    all significantly correlated. CONCLUSIONS: The TPDS constitutes a valid and user friendly instrument to assess pregnancy distress. In addition to its proven ability to pick up pregnancy specific negative affect it also includes an important sub-scale measuring perceived partner involvement.......BACKGROUND: Pregnant women with high levels of stress, depression and/or anxiety are at increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes and impaired neurologic and emotional development of the offspring. Pregnancy specific instruments to measure psychological functioning during gestation are scarce...... distress; 22 candidate items were derived for pilot testing (study I, n = 419) its psychometric properties by means of explorative factor analyses (EFA). This resulted in a 17-item TPDS which was further explored by confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) and concurrent and construct validity assessment (study...

  12. Personality, negative affect coping, and drinking alone: a structural equation modeling approach to examine correlates of adolescent solitary drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Kasey G; Chung, Tammy; Wright, Aidan G C; Clark, Duncan B; Black, Jessica J; Martin, Christopher S

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the personality traits of negative emotionality and constraint and the ability to resist drinking during negative affective states as correlates of solitary drinking in adolescence. We hypothesized that higher levels of negative emotionality and lower levels of constraint would predict solitary drinking and that these relationships would be mediated by the ability to resist drinking in response to negative emotions. Structural equation modeling was used to fit a path model from the personality traits of negative emotionality and constraint to solitary drinking status through intermediate effects on the ability to resist drinking during negative emotions using cross-sectional data. Clinical and community settings in Pennsylvania, USA. The sample included 761 adolescent drinkers (mean age = 17.1). Adolescents completed the Lifetime Drinking History, the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire, the Constructive Thinking Inventory and the Situational Confidence Questionnaire. The path model provided a good fit to the data. The association between trait negative emotionality and solitary drinking was fully mediated by adolescents' ability to resist drinking during negative affective states (b = 0.05, P = 0.01). In contrast, constraint had a direct effect on solitary drinking (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, b = -0.23, P<0.01), as well as an indirect effect through the ability to resist drinking during negative affective states (b = -0.03, P = 0.02). The ability to resist drinking while experiencing negative feelings or emotions may be an important underlying mechanism linking trait negative emotionality (a tendency toward depression, anxiety and poor reaction to stress) and constraint (lack of impulsiveness) to adolescent solitary drinking. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. Flashbulb Memories of Menarche and Adult Menstrual Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillemer, David B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Female college students (N=99) recounted memories of menarche, described menarcheal circumstances, and completed the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). Found inadequate emotional preparation for menstruation to be associated with negative feelings at menarche. Menarcheal circumstances were not strongly predictive of adult MDQ scores. (Author)

  14. Burnout and psychological distress among nurses in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 210 nurses working in this health institution for symptoms of burnout and psychological distress. Results: High levels of burnout were identified in 42.9% of the respondents in the area of emotional exhaustion, 47.6% in the area of depersonalization and 53.8% in the area of reduced personal accomplishment, while 44.1% ...

  15. The confusing tale of depression and distress in patients with diabetes: a call for greater clarity and precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, L.; Gonzalez, J. S.; Polonsky, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Studies have identified significant linkages between depression and diabetes, with depression associated with poor self-management behaviour, poor clinical outcomes and high rates of mortality. However, findings are not consistent across studies, yielding confusing and contradictory results about these relationships. We suggest that there has been a failure to define and measure ‘depression’ in a consistent manner. Because the diagnosis of depression is symptom-based only, without reference to source or content, the context that diabetes is not considered when addressing the emotional distress experienced by individuals struggling with diabetes. To reduce this confusion, we suggest that an underlying construct of ‘emotional distress’ be considered as a core construct to link diabetes-related distress, subclinical depression, elevated depression symptoms and major depressive disorder. We view emotional distress as a single, continuous dimension that has two primary characteristics: content and severity; that the primary content of emotional distress among these individuals include diabetes and its management, other life stresses and other contributors; and that both the content and severity of distress be addressed directly in clinical care. We suggest further that all patients, even those whose emotional distress rises to the level of major depressive disorder or anxiety disorders, can benefit from consideration of the content of distress to direct care effectively, and we suggest strategies for integrating the emotional side of diabetes into regular diabetes care. This approach can reduce confusion between depression and distress so that appropriate and targeted patient-centred interventions can occur. PMID:24606397

  16. Loneliness and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J; Cochran, S D

    1991-05-01

    Research on relationships between loneliness and psychological symptoms has generally shown significant positive associations across a wide spectrum of psychopathologies. However, such results may be artificial, to some extent, given the high intercorrelations of typical psychopathology measures. In the current study, we examined associations between psychological symptoms, assessed by the Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90; Derogatis, Lipman, & Covi, 1973) and loneliness, as measured by the UCLA-R Loneliness Scale (Russell, Peplau, & Cutrona, 1980), in college students. Using partial correlations to control for the confounding influence of generalized distress, relationships between loneliness and individual dimensions of distress were examined. Results indicate a significant association between loneliness and interpersonal sensitivity (low self-esteem) and depression. Other dimensions of distress were not significantly related to loneliness. In addition, no sex differences in patterns of association were observed. Results support the notion that self-blame and self-devaluation are strong correlates of loneliness.

  17. Understanding persons with psychological distress in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsdotter, Tina; Marklund, Bertil; Kylén, Sven; Taft, Charles; Ekman, Inger

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain more knowledge and a deeper understanding of experiences of persons living with psychological distress who seek help in primary care. Psychological distress is a state of emotional suffering associated with stressors and demands that are difficult to cope with in daily life. The lack of effective care for and difficulty in identifying psychological distress is frustrating for patients and health professionals alike. The aim was therefore to gain more knowledge about the experience of living with psychological distress. Twelve persons (nine women and three men) aged 23-51 years were interviewed. Analyses were based on a phenomenological hermeneutic method and indicated that psychological distress may be seen as an imbalance (incongruence) between the self and the ideal self, which slowly breaks down a person's self-esteem. This imbalance was described in three dimensions: Struggling to cope with everyday life, Feeling inferior to others and Losing one's grip on life. It seems to be associated with a gradual depletion of existential capacities and lead to dissatisfaction, suffering, poor self-esteem and lack of control. As psychological distress may be a forerunner to mental, physical and emotional exhaustion, there is a need to initiate preventive or early interventions to avoid mental, physical and emotional chaos in such patients. Patients' with psychological distress need to be involved in a person-centred salutogenic dialogue with health professionals to become aware of and strengthen their own capacities to regain health and well-being. © 2015 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. Impact of Relational Proximity on Distress from Infidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryanne Fisher

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Men are generally more distressed by a partner's sexual infidelity whereas women are generally more distressed by a partner's emotional infidelity. The importance of the identity of the interloper, however, has been neglected. We explored the influence of relational proximity (i.e., the degree of genetic relatedness on distress about infidelity. In Study 1, participants were most distressed when the imagined infidelity occurred between their current mate and close kin. In Study 2, relational proximity mattered more than the type of sexual behavior, the likelihood of contracting a sexually transmitted disease, and the likelihood of the infidelity leading to a damaged reputation. Together, the results indicate that identity matters, especially if the interloper is someone with whom we have familial bonds.

  19. Binge drinking and anxiety at the end of the nocturnal period in alcohol-preferring sP rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Giancarlo; Lobina, Carla; Lorrai, Irene; Acciaro, Carla; Maccioni, Paola; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that exposure of Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats to daily drinking sessions of 1 h, during the dark phase of the light/dark cycle, with multiple alcohol concentrations, and unpredictable access to alcohol, resulted in exceptionally high intakes of alcohol when the drinking session occurred over the last hours of the dark phase. Additionally, higher levels of anxiety-related behaviors were observed at the 12th, rather than 1st, hour of the dark phase, suggesting that uncertainty of time of alcohol access and expectation of alcohol availability produced an emotional "distress". The present study was designed to provide pharmacological support to the hypothesis that high alcohol intake under this drinking procedure is secondary to exacerbation of the anxiety-like state of sP rats. To this end, sP rats were initially exposed to daily 1-h drinking sessions during the dark phase and with multiple alcohol concentrations (0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%; v/v); time of alcohol exposure was changed each day and was unpredictable to rats. Rats were then treated acutely with non-sedative doses of diazepam (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg; intraperitoneally [i.p.]) before two drinking sessions occurring at the 1st and 12th hour of the dark phase, respectively. Treatment with diazepam was ineffective at the 1st hour; conversely, it selectively reduced alcohol intake (up to 50% at the dose of 3 mg/kg) at the 12th hour. The preferential effectiveness of diazepam in reducing alcohol intake when the drinking session occurred at the 12th hour of the dark phase is consistent with the hypothesis that uncertainty of time of alcohol access and expectation of alcohol availability generated an emotional "distress" that rats counterbalanced with high alcohol drinking; the results of the present study are interpreted as the anxiolytic effects of diazepam substituting for those of alcohol, resulting in the observed reduction in alcohol intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  20. Legal status, emotional well-being and subjective health status of Latino immigrants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Zayas, Luis H; Spitznagel, Edward L

    2007-01-01

    Among the many stresses that undocumented Latino immigrants experience, worries about their legal status and preoccupation with disclosure and deportation can heighten the risk for emotional distress...

  1. Disaster Distress Helpline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Misuse and Abuse Prevention of Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Recovery and Recovery Support School and Campus Health Specific Populations State and Local Government Partnerships Suicide Prevention Trauma and Violence Tribal Affairs Underage Drinking ...

  2. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / ARDS ARDS What Is ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads ... treat ARDS. Other Names Acute lung injury Adult respiratory distress syndrome Increased-permeability pulmonary edema Noncardiac pulmonary ...

  3. Targeting distress in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriezekolk, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Psychological distress is highly prevalent in patients with rheumatic diseases. It is associated with a variety of negative outcomes, including pain, fatigue, disability, and maladaptive cognitive behavioural coping strategies. In this thesis, psychological distress was studied both as an outcome

  4. Distress about mating rivals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buss, DM; Shackelford, TK; Choe, J; Buunk, BP; Dijkstra, P

    This research tested the evolutionary psychological hypothesis that men and women would be most distressed about threats from rivals who surpass them on sex-linked components of mate value. Six predictions were tested in samples from three cultures, the United States (N = 208), the Netherlands (N =

  5. Bodily Distress Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Lilly, Anna; Vestergaard, Mogens; Moth, Grete

    2011-01-01

    AIM: Medically unexplained or functional symptoms and disorders are common in primary care. Empirical research has proposed specific criteria for a new unifying diagnosis for functional disorders and syndromes: Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS). This new diagnosis is expected to be integrated...

  6. How Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  7. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Source: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) Injury, Violence & Safety Featured Videos Binge Drinking A Time To Act Injury Prevention Research In the Swim of Things Safe ... & Public Health Binge Drinking Factsheet Effective Prevention Strategies Send Us ...

  8. Binge Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... binge drinking carries more serious and longer-lasting risks as well. Alcohol Poisoning Alcohol poisoning is the most life-threatening ... or pale skin If you think someone has alcohol poisoning, call 911 ... drinking impairs judgment, so drinkers are more likely to take risks they might not take when they're sober. ...

  9. College Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drinking (40 percent vs. 7 percent) and 5 times more likely to have missed a class (64 percent vs. 12 percent). 6 Alcohol Use ... 6 weeks of freshman year are a vulnerable time for heavy drinking and ... social pressures at the start of the academic year. How much is a ...

  10. Screening for distress in routine oncological care-a survey in 520 melanoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Loquai

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Despite the increasing incidence of melanoma little is known about patients' emotional distress associated with this disease. Supplemented by the problem list (PL, the distress thermometer (DT is a recommended screening instrument to measure psychosocial distress in cancer patients. Our objective was to explore the acceptance and the feasibility of the DT and PL as a concise screening tool in an ambulatory setting for routine care and to elucidate determinants of distress in melanoma patients with regard to sociodemographic and clinical variables. METHODS: Consecutive melanoma outpatients were asked to complete the DT with the PL prior to their scheduled consultation. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the patients' charts. Clinical data included melanoma stage, time since diagnosis, previous treatment, current treatment, and other cancer disease. RESULTS: Out of 734 patients recruited into the study, 520 patients (71% completed both the DT and the PL. Forty-seven percent met the ≥5 cut-off score for distress. Younger and employed patients reported higher distress than older and retired patients. A cut-off score of ≥5 was closely associated with self-reported emotional sources of distress, with practical problems, especially at work, family problems (dealing with the partner, and physical problems like pain, appearance, getting around, and nausea. Apart from higher distress under current systemic treatment, no associations were found between distress and clinical data. CONCLUSION: The DT together with the PL seems to be an economically reasonable screening tool to measure psychosocial distress in melanoma patients. In particular, younger melanoma patients who are currently employed are prone to experience distress at some point after diagnosis, but there appears to be almost no association between clinical data and the extent of distress. To characterize the impact of distress on disease outcome and quality of

  11. Reducing the negative valence of stressful memories through emotionally valenced, modality-specific tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadmor, Avia; McNally, Richard J; Engelhard, Iris M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: People who perform a cognitively demanding secondary task while recalling a distressing memory often experience the memory as less emotional, vivid, or accurate during subsequent recollections. In this experiment, we tested whether the emotional valence (positive versus

  12. Cortisol response mediates the effect of post-reactivation stress exposure on contextualization of emotional memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.G.N.; Jacobs van Goethem, T.H.; Beckers, T.; Kindt, M.

    2014-01-01

    Retrieval of traumatic experiences is often accompanied by strong feelings of distress. Here, we examined in healthy participants whether post-reactivation stress experience affects the context-dependency of emotional memory. First, participants studied words from two distinctive emotional

  13. A longitudinal study of psychosocial distress in breast cancer: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Yolanda; Galdón, María José; Durá, Estrella; Martínez, Paula; Pérez, Sandra; Murgui, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study was conducted among 102 women with non-metastasic breast cancer to identify the time evolution and prevalence of distress at specific times through diagnosis and treatment of disease: preliminary diagnosis, surgery, definitive diagnosis and chemotherapy. Additionally, the study aimed to examine the role of demographic, medical and psychosocial factors on distress. The results indicated that prevalence of distress was higher at initial diagnosis (25%) than the following time points (approximately 17%). The differences inter-individuals in the levels of distress were observed over the four assessments. No relation between distress and demographic and medical factors was found. However, psychosocial aspects were significant risk factors. Patterns of emotional suppression and specific coping responses like helplessness/hopelessness, anxious preoccupation, cognitive avoidance and fatalism were positively related to distress, whereas fighting spirit and perceived social support showed a protective role. Moreover, helplessness/hopelessness and anxious preoccupation jointly predicted 75% of cases and 98% non-cases of distress. Finally, a mediational model between emotional suppression and distress through helplessness/hopelessness was tested. Results support the necessity of routine distress screening all through the illness. Implications of data for psychosocial interventions with breast cancer patients are highlighted.

  14. Detrimental effects of workplace bullying: impediment of self-management competence via psychological distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eGiorgi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence has been linked to various positive outcomes, such as organizational effectiveness, commitment, morale and health. In addition, longitudinal studies demonstrate that the competencies of emotional intelligence may change and be developed over time. Researchers have argued that work relationships are important for the development of emotional competence, but their usefulness depends on the quality of the relationship. Workplace bullying is considered to be one of the most stressful phenomena in the workplace and an example of a dysfunctional and toxic relationship that has detrimental effects on an individual’s physical and psychological health. Hence, the objective of the present study was to analyze the relationship linking workplace bullying, psychological distress and the self-management competence of emotional intelligence. More specifically, we tested part of the model presented by Cherniss and Goleman (2001 in which researchers argued that individual emotional intelligence is a result of relationships at work. In addition, we extended the model by proposing that the relationship between exposure to workplace bullying and the competence of self-management is explained by psychological distress. Data analysis of 326 participants from two private sector organizations in Italy demonstrated that psychological distress fully mediated the relationship between workplace bullying and the emotional intelligence ability of self-management. The present study’s findings point to the idea that, not only may emotional intelligence assist in handling exposure to workplace bullying, but exposure to workplace bullying may impede emotional intelligence via psychological distress.

  15. Detrimental Effects of Workplace Bullying: Impediment of Self-Management Competence via Psychological Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Gabriele; Perminienė, Milda; Montani, Francesco; Fiz-Perez, Javier; Mucci, Nicola; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence has been linked to various positive outcomes, such as organizational effectiveness, commitment, morale, and health. In addition, longitudinal studies demonstrate that the competencies of emotional intelligence may change and be developed over time. Researchers have argued that work relationships are important for the development of emotional competence, but their usefulness depends on the quality of the relationship. Workplace bullying is considered to be one of the most stressful phenomena in the workplace and an example of a dysfunctional and toxic relationship that has detrimental effects on an individual's physical and psychological health. Hence, the objective of the present study was to analyze the relationship linking workplace bullying, psychological distress and the self-management competence of emotional intelligence. More specifically, we tested part of the model presented by Cherniss and Goleman (2001) in which researchers argued that individual emotional intelligence is a result of relationships at work. In addition, we extended the model by proposing that the relationship between exposure to workplace bullying and the competence of self-management is explained by psychological distress. Data analysis of 326 participants from two private sector organizations in Italy demonstrated that psychological distress fully mediated the relationship between workplace bullying and the emotional intelligence ability of self-management. The present study's findings point to the idea that, not only may emotional intelligence assist in handling exposure to workplace bullying, but exposure to workplace bullying may impede emotional intelligence via psychological distress.

  16. Healthy Drinks for Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When kids drink too much juice, juice drinks, sports drinks, and soda, these beverages can crowd out the ... this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Caffeine Calcium Sports and Energy Drinks: Should Your Child Drink Them? What Should Preschoolers ...

  17. Moral distress in emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Parsons, Robin; Rodriguez, Lori; Goyal, Deepika

    2013-11-01

    For nurses, moral distress leads to burnout, attrition, compassion fatigue, and patient avoidance. Using a quantitative, cross-sectional, and descriptive design, we assessed the frequency, intensity, and type of moral distress in 51 emergency nurses in 1 community hospital using a 21-item, self-report, Likert-type questionnaire. Results showed a total mean moral distress level of 3.18, indicative of overall low moral distress. Situations with the highest levels of moral distress were related to the competency of health care providers and following family wishes to continue life support, also known as futile care. Moral distress was the reason given by 6.6% of registered nurses for leaving a previous position, 20% said that they had considered leaving a position but did not, and 13.3% stated that they are currently considering leaving their position because of moral distress. Copyright © 2013 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 'Isn't it ironic?' Beliefs about the unacceptability of emotions and emotional suppression relate to worse outcomes in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Hannah; Wroe, Abigail L; Pincus, Tamar

    2017-05-01

    Beliefs about the unacceptability of experiencing and expressing emotions have been found to be related to worse outcomes in people with persistent physical symptoms. The current study tested mediation models regarding emotional suppression, beliefs about emotions, support-seeking and global impact in fibromyalgia. One hundred eighty-two participants took part in an online questionnaire testing potential mechanisms of this relationship using mediation analysis. The model tested emotional suppression and affective distress as serial mediators of the relationship between beliefs about emotions and global impact. In parallel paths, two forms of support-seeking were tested (personal/emotional and symptom-related support-seeking) as mediators. Emotional suppression and affective distress significantly serially mediated the relationship between beliefs about emotions and global impact. Neither support-seeking variable significantly mediated this relationship. Results indicate a potential mechanism through which beliefs about emotions and global impact might relate which might provide a theoretical basis for future research on treatments for fibromyalgia.

  19. College drinking problems and social anxiety: The importance of drinking context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlecki, Meredith A; Ecker, Anthony H; Buckner, Julia D

    2014-06-01

    Social anxiety more than quadruples the risk of developing an alcohol use disorder, yet it is inconsistently linked to heavy alcohol use. Elucidation of the relation between social anxiety and alcohol use is an important next step in treating and preventing risky drinking. College students routinely face potentially anxiety-provoking social situations (e.g., meeting new people) and socially anxious undergraduates are especially vulnerable to alcohol-related impairment. Drinking to cope with social anxiety is thought to reinforce alcohol use, yet research on coping-motivated drinking among socially anxious students has yielded inconsistent findings. Further, undergraduate drinking varies by drinking context, yet the role of context in drinking behaviors among socially anxious individuals remains unclear. The current study sought to examine the relationship of social anxiety and drinking quantity in specific drinking contexts among undergraduates (N = 611). We also evaluated whether relevant drinking contexts mediated the relationship between social anxiety and alcohol-related problems. Clinically elevated social anxiety was related to heavier consumption in negative emotion (e.g., feeling sad or angry) and personal/intimate (e.g., before sexual intercourse) contexts, but not social/convivial contexts (e.g., parties, bars). Quantity of alcohol consumed in negative emotion and personal/intimate contexts mediated the relationship between social anxiety and drinking problem severity. Drinking in personal/intimate contexts demonstrated a unique mediational role. Findings suggest that heavy drinking in particular contexts (especially personal/intimate and negative emotion) may play an important role in drinking problems among socially anxious individuals.

  20. Reactions to Dating Violence Research: Do Difficulties with Distress Tolerance Increase Negative Reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C; Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Zucosky, Heather; Cornelius, Tara L; Stuart, Gregory L

    2013-07-01

    Recent research has begun to examine whether participants in dating violence studies perceive any benefit from the research and/or experience emotional distress as a result of having participated. Such information is important for Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and researchers in determining ethical and appropriate protections for participants. In the current study, we examined participants' reactions to answering questions on dating violence victimization and perpetration utilizing a sample of female college students (N = 282). We also examined whether distress tolerance was associated with research reactions and moderated the relation between reports of victimization/perpetration and negative emotional reactions to the research. Findings demonstrated that negative emotional reactions to the research did not differ between individuals with or without previous dating violence. Further, distress tolerance had a main effect, but not a moderating effect, on negative emotional reactions to research participation. Implications of these findings for future research and IRBs are discussed.

  1. Mining emotional profiles using e-mail messages for earlier warnings of potential terrorist activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galitsky, Boris; Kovalerchuk, Boris

    2006-04-01

    We develop a software system Text Scanner for Emotional Distress (TSED) for helping to detect email messages which are suspicious of coming from people under strong emotional distress. It has been confirmed by multiple studies that terrorist attackers have experienced a substantial emotional distress at some points before committing a terrorist attack. Therefore, if an individual in emotional distress can be detected on the basis of email texts, some preventive measures can be taken. The proposed detection machinery is based on extraction and classification of emotional profiles from emails. An emotional profile is a formal representation of a sequence of emotional states through a textual discourse where communicative actions are attached to these emotional states. The issues of extraction of emotional profiles from text and reasoning about it are discussed and illustrated. We then develop an inductive machine learning and reasoning framework to relate an emotional profile to the class "Emotional distress" or "No emotional distress", given a training dataset where the class is assigned by an expert. TSED's machine learning is evaluated using the database of structured customer complaints.

  2. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> The video explores the health risks of binge drinking – including unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, injury, car crashes, violence and HIV/AIDS – and ...

  3. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Healthy Swimming Is No Accident No Antibiotics Please Parents Want To Do What′s Best The Obesity Epidemic ... Videos are prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Binge Drinking (4: ...

  4. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laboratory Science: Mission Critical Saving Lives, Protecting People Environmental Health CDC Tracking Network Health Begins at Home ... the belief that binge drinking is only a problem among youth. Release Date: 4/13/2010 Source: ...

  5. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... captioning. Videos are prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Binge Drinking ( ... captioning. Videos are prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > File Formats ...

  6. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and HIV/AIDS – and discusses effective community prevention strategies such as increasing alcohol excise taxes. The video ... Alcohol & Public Health Binge Drinking Factsheet Effective Prevention Strategies Send Us Feedback What do you think of ...

  7. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Our Source of Health (:30) Systems Thinking The Value of Systems Thinking (10:09) Systems Mapping: The ... allowfullscreen> The video explores the health risks of binge drinking – including unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted ...

  8. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the health risks of binge drinking – including unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, injury, car crashes, violence and HIV/AIDS – and discusses effective community prevention strategies such ...

  9. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Philadelphia, PA Injury, Violence & Safety A Time To Act Binge Drinking Break the Silence: Stop the Violence ... in Indian Country Baby Steps: Learn the Signs. Act Early. Dangerous Creatures Healthy Changes Start in Preschool ...

  10. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC-TV videos cover a variety of health, safety and preparedness topics and include closed-captioning. Videos are prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Binge Drinking ( ...

  11. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) Injury, Violence & Safety Featured Videos Binge Drinking A Time To Act Injury Prevention Research In the Swim of Things Safe ...

  12. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) Injury, Violence & Safety Featured Videos Binge Drinking A Time To Act ... CDC-TV videos cover a variety of health, safety and preparedness topics and include closed-captioning. Videos ...

  13. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) Injury, Violence & Safety Featured Videos Binge Drinking A Time To Act Injury Prevention ... Us Feedback What do you think of our videos? Your feedback about CDC-TV and our videos ...

  14. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Improve Systemic Analysis (10:45) Take 3 Teen Pregnancy The Immunization Baby Book The Story of Folic ... the health risks of binge drinking – including unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, injury, car crashes, violence and ...

  15. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Violence & Safety A Time To Act Binge Drinking Break the Silence: Stop the Violence Injury Prevention Research ... In the Swim of Things Safe Teen Drivers Break the Silence: Stop the Violence More Information Vital ...

  16. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Please Parents Want To Do What′s Best The Obesity Epidemic Outbreaks CDC: Protecting Americans through Global Health ... captioning. Videos are prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Binge Drinking ( ...

  17. Underage Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... goals: Foster changes in society that facilitate healthy adolescent development and that help prevent and reduce underage drinking. ... cultural, and gender differences. Conduct additional research on adolescent ... to development. Work to improve public health surveillance on underage ...

  18. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Break the Silence: Stop the Violence Injury Prevention Research In the Swim of Things Safe Teen Drivers ... Binge Drinking A Time To Act Injury Prevention Research In the Swim of Things Safe Teen Drivers ...

  19. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 35) Fighting Flu (:60) Fighting Flu (:30) H1N1 (Swine Flu) I Never Get The Flu Influenza Round ... Binge Drinking Factsheet Effective Prevention Strategies Send Us Feedback What do you think of our videos? Your ...

  20. Pathways to Hazardous Drinking Among Racially and Socioeconomically Diverse Lesbian Women: Sexual Minority Stress, Rumination, Social Isolation, and Drinking to Cope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin J.; Mason, Tyler B.; Winstead, Barbara A.; Gaskins, Melissa; Irons, Lance B.

    2016-01-01

    Lesbian women engage in more hazardous drinking than heterosexual women yet we know relatively little about what explains this disparity. In the present study, race, socioeconomic status, minority stress, general psychological processes and distress were examined as pathways to hazardous drinking among young (18-35 years) Black and non-Hispanic White lesbian women. We used the psychological mediation framework adaptation of minority stress theory and the reserve capacity model as theoretical underpinnings of the conceptual model in the current study. Self-identified lesbian participants (N= 867) completed a one-time online survey that assessed race, socioeconomic status, perceived sexual minority discrimination, proximal minority stress (concealment, internalized homophobia, lack of connection to lesbian community), rumination, social isolation, psychological distress, drinking to cope, and hazardous drinking. Cross-sectional results demonstrated that being Black was associated with hazardous drinking via sequential mediators of rumination, psychological distress, and drinking to cope. Socioeconomic status was associated with hazardous drinking via sequential mediators of sexual minority discrimination, proximal minority stress, rumination, social isolation, psychological distress, and drinking to cope. Understanding these pathways can aid researchers and clinicians studying and working with lesbians who are at risk for hazardous drinking. PMID:28138208

  1. Pathways to Hazardous Drinking Among Racially and Socioeconomically Diverse Lesbian Women: Sexual Minority Stress, Rumination, Social Isolation, and Drinking to Cope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robin J; Mason, Tyler B; Winstead, Barbara A; Gaskins, Melissa; Irons, Lance B

    2016-01-01

    Lesbian women engage in more hazardous drinking than heterosexual women yet we know relatively little about what explains this disparity. In the present study, race, socioeconomic status, minority stress, general psychological processes and distress were examined as pathways to hazardous drinking among young (18-35 years) Black and non-Hispanic White lesbian women. We used the psychological mediation framework adaptation of minority stress theory and the reserve capacity model as theoretical underpinnings of the conceptual model in the current study. Self-identified lesbian participants (N= 867) completed a one-time online survey that assessed race, socioeconomic status, perceived sexual minority discrimination, proximal minority stress (concealment, internalized homophobia, lack of connection to lesbian community), rumination, social isolation, psychological distress, drinking to cope, and hazardous drinking. Cross-sectional results demonstrated that being Black was associated with hazardous drinking via sequential mediators of rumination, psychological distress, and drinking to cope. Socioeconomic status was associated with hazardous drinking via sequential mediators of sexual minority discrimination, proximal minority stress, rumination, social isolation, psychological distress, and drinking to cope. Understanding these pathways can aid researchers and clinicians studying and working with lesbians who are at risk for hazardous drinking.

  2. Binge Drinking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-05

    This podcast is based on the October, 2010 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates that drinking too much, including binge drinking, causes more than 79,000 deaths in the U.S. each year and is the third leading preventable cause of death.  Created: 10/5/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/5/2010.

  3. Indicators of positive and negative emotions and emotional contagion in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimert, I.; Bolhuis, J.E.; Kemp, B.; Rodenburg, T.B.

    2013-01-01

    For the welfare of group-housed animals, such as pigs, the emotional state of an individual pig is relevant, but also the extent to which pen mates are affected by the distress or pleasure of other individuals, i.e. emotional contagion, a simple form of empathy. Therefore, indicators of positive and

  4. The ethics of distress: toward a framework for determining the ethical acceptability of distressing health promotion advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen L; Whiting, Demian

    2014-04-01

    Distressing health promotion advertising involves the elicitation of negative emotion to increase the likelihood that health messages will stimulate audience members to adopt healthier behaviors. Irrespective of its effectiveness, distressing advertising risks harming audience members who do not consent to the intervention and are unable to withdraw from it. Further, the use of these approaches may increase the potential for unfairness or stigmatization toward those targeted, or be considered unacceptable by some sections of the public. We acknowledge and discuss these concerns, but, using the public health ethics literature as a guide, argue that distressing advertising can be ethically defensible if conditions of effectiveness, proportionality necessity, least infringement, and public accountability are satisfied. We do not take a broad view as to whether distressing advertising is ethical or unethical, because we see the evidence for both the effectiveness of distressing approaches and their potential to generate iatrogenic effects to be inconclusive. However, we believe it possible to use the current evidence base to make informed estimates of the likely consequences of specific message presentations. Messages can be pre-tested and monitored to identify and deal with potential problems. We discuss how advertisers can approach the problems of deciding on the appropriate intensity of ethical review, and evaluating prospective distressing advertising campaigns against the conditions outlined. © 2013 International Union of Psychological Science.

  5. STRATEGIES FOR COPING WITH PAIN AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS ASSOCIATED WITH TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND INTERNAL DERANGEMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JASPERS, JPC; HEUVEL, F; STEGENGA, B; DEBONT, LGM

    Objective: To analyse the relationship among a variety of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral coping strategies and pain/suffering and psychological distress in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Design: Cross-sectional, correlational study. Setting: Department of Oral and

  6. Size and quality information in acoustic signals of Rhinolophus ferrumequinum in distress situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tinglei; Huang, Xiaobin; Wu, Hui; Feng, Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Many animals produce alarm or distress calls when they encounter predators. Previous studies have shown that the distress calls of some birds can also signal the quality of the bird as prey to predators. In this case, both predator and prey may benefit from sharing information about prey's ability to escape. However, little is known about whether echolocation pulses and distress calls in bats convey size and quality information in distress situations. This study investigates the relationship between echolocation, distress calls, and the health of the callers to determine whether these signals are reliable indicators of sender's attributes and quality. The spectro-temporal structure of echolocation pulses and distress calls from captured greater horseshoe bats, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, were found to be correlated to their body size, body condition, and T-cell-mediated immunocompetence. The peak frequency of echolocation pulses was found to be positively correlated with the bats' forearm length. However, regression analysis has shown that no significant relationship exists between distress calls and overall body size, or between distress calls and overall health. These results suggest that the peak frequency of echolocation pulses may be a reliable index signal to attract conspecifics, but distress calls of bats may not convey information about their size or overall quality as conspecifics or prey. These results indicate that distress calls in bats may only convey their emotional state, to attract conspecifics and facilitate estimation of predation risk. © 2016.

  7. Maternal Attachment Style and Responses to Adolescents’ Negative Emotions: The Mediating Role of Maternal Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jason D.; Brett, Bonnie E.; Ehrlich, Katherine B.; Lejuez, Carl W.; Cassidy, Jude

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objective Previous research has examined the developmental consequences, particularly in early childhood, of parents’ supportive and unsupportive responses to children’s negative emotions. Much less is known about factors that explain why parents respond in ways that may support or undermine their children’s emotions, and even less is known about how these parenting processes unfold with adolescents. We examined the associations between mothers’ attachment styles and their distress, harsh, and supportive responses to their adolescents’ negative emotions two years later and whether these links were mediated by maternal emotion regulation difficulties. Design Mothers in a longitudinal study (n = 230) reported on their attachment style, difficulties regulating their emotions, and their hypothetical responses to their adolescents’ negative emotions, respectively, at consecutive laboratory visits one year apart. Results Mothers who reported greater attachment-related avoidance and anxiety reported having greater difficulties with emotion regulation one year later. Emotion dysregulation, in turn, predicted more distressed, harsher, and less supportive maternal responses to adolescents’ negative emotions the following year. In addition, greater avoidance directly predicted harsher maternal responses two years later. Conclusions These findings extend previous research by identifying maternal attachment style as a predictor of responses to adolescent distress and by documenting the underlying role of emotion dysregulation in the link between adult attachment style and parenting. PMID:25568638

  8. Distress, quality of life, neuroticism and psychological coping are related in head and neck cancer patients during follow-up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aarstad, Anne K. H; Beisland, Elisabeth; Osthus, Arild André; Aarstad, Hans J

    2011-01-01

    ... more in psychological rather than medical research. Distress is defined as "an unpleasant emotional experience of a psychological, social, or spiritual nature. Distress extends along a continuum, ranging from common normal feelings of vulnerability, sadness, and fear to problems that can become disabling, such as depression, anxiety, panic, social isolation, and ...

  9. Psychological distress, perceived stigma, and coping among caregivers of patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong HC

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hui Chien Ong,¹ Norhayati Ibrahim,² Suzaily Wahab³ ¹Biomedical Science Programme, ²Health Psychology Programme, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, ³Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Pusat Perubatan Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: Nowadays, family members are gradually taking on the role of full-time caregivers for patients suffering from schizophrenia. The increasing burden and tasks of caretaking can cause them psychological distress such as depression or anxiety. The aim of this study was to measure the correlation between perceived stigma and coping, and psychological distress as well as determine the predictors of psychological distress among the caregivers. Results showed that 31.5% of the caregivers experienced psychological distress. “Community rejection” was found to be positively associated with psychological distress. In case of coping subscales, psychological distress had a positive correlation with substance use, use of emotional support, behavioral disengagement, venting, and self-blame, while it was negatively correlated with “positive reframing”. Behavioral disengagement was the best predictor of psychological distress among caregivers of patients with schizophrenia, followed by positive reframing, use of emotional support, self-blame, and venting. Health practitioners can use adaptive coping strategies instead of maladaptive for caregivers to help ease their distress and prevent further deterioration of psychological disorders. Keywords: family caregivers, social stigma, coping skills, psychological stress, schizophrenia

  10. Symptom incidence, distress, cancer-related distress, and adherence to chemotherapy among African American women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Melissa K; Sereika, Susan M; Bender, Catherine M; Brufsky, Adam M; Connolly, Mary C; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q

    2017-06-01

    There is a persistent racial survival disparity between African American (AA) and white women with breast cancer. There is evidence that symptom incidence, associated distress, and overall cancer-related distress may be unexplored, important contributing factors. The purpose of the current study was to: 1) describe and compare the number of chemotherapy-related symptoms and associated distress among AA women with breast cancer over the course of chemotherapy at 3 time points (at baseline before initiating chemotherapy, midpoint, and at the completion of chemotherapy); and 2) to describe the relationship between the number of chemotherapy-related symptoms and overall cancer distress compared with the ability to receive at least 85% of the prescribed chemotherapy within the prescribed timeframe. Descriptive, comparative, and correlational analyses of symptom incidence, symptom distress, cancer-related distress, and prescribed chemotherapy dose received among a cohort of AA women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer were performed. AA women (121 women) experienced worsening symptoms from baseline to midpoint in chemotherapy and then stabilized for the duration of therapy. The inability to receive 85% of the prescribed chemotherapy within a prescribed time point was found to be significantly correlated with midpoint symptom distress. The main findings of the current study were that AA women experience a deterioration in symptom distress over the course of chemotherapy from baseline (before chemotherapy) to the midpoint, which was found to be associated with less adherence to chemotherapy overall. Thus, the incidence and management of physical and emotional symptoms, as measured through a multidimensional symptom measurement tool, may be contributing to breast cancer dose disparity and should be explored further. Cancer 2017;123:2061-2069. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  11. Targeting distress in rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Vriezekolk, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Psychological distress is highly prevalent in patients with rheumatic diseases. It is associated with a variety of negative outcomes, including pain, fatigue, disability, and maladaptive cognitive behavioural coping strategies. In this thesis, psychological distress was studied both as an outcome measure and as a therapeutic target in the context of multidisciplinary rehabilitation. The longitudinal role of coping in psychological distress was systematically reviewed, a questionnaire to asses...

  12. A comparison of the behavioral and emotional disorders of primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOMCS2

    psychiatric disorders such as psychotic, major affective or organic mental syndromes. Psychological distress ... emotional problems of school going children in Uganda. ... view procedure was used consisting of a screening inter- view and a ...

  13. Symptoms of depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress are associated with a negative appraisal of insulin therapy in insulin-naïve patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. A study from the European Depression in Diabetes [EDID] Research Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makine, Ceylan; Karşidağ, C; Kadioğlu, P

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: A meta-analysis concluded that depression is associated with poor glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes (DM2). In DM2 patients with deteriorating glycaemic control, the initiation of insulin therapy is often postponed. The aim of the present study was to determine whether symptoms of depress......AIMS: A meta-analysis concluded that depression is associated with poor glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes (DM2). In DM2 patients with deteriorating glycaemic control, the initiation of insulin therapy is often postponed. The aim of the present study was to determine whether symptoms...... of depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress are associated with a more negative appraisal of insulin therapy. METHODS: We collected cross-sectional data in two outpatient university clinics in Istanbul, Turkey. The study sample consisted of 154 insulin-naïve patients with DM2. A self...... depression score rated insulin therapy significantly more negative then patients with lower depression scores. Moreover, 47% of patients with a high depression score had a negative appraisal of insulin therapy on 7 or more of the 20 ITAS-items, compared to 25 to 29% of those with low-moderate depression...

  14. Heavy drinking in early adulthood and outcomes at mid life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, F A; Costanzo, P R; Belsky, D; Holmberg, E; Malone, P S; Wang, Y; Kertesz, S

    2011-07-01

    Heavy drinking in early adulthood among Blacks, but not Whites, has been found to be associated with more deleterious health outcomes, lower labor market success and lower educational attainment at mid-life. This study analysed psychosocial pathways underlying racial differences in the impact of early heavy alcohol use on occupational and educational attainment at mid-life. Outcomes in labor market participation, occupational prestige and educational attainment were measured in early and mid-adulthood. A mixture model was used to identify psychosocial classes that explain how race-specific differences in the relationship between drinking in early adulthood and occupational outcomes in mid-life operate. Data came from Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults, a longitudinal epidemiologic study. Especially for Blacks, heavy drinking in early adulthood was associated with a lower probability of being employed in mid-life. Among employed persons, there was a link between heavy drinking for both Whites and Blacks and decreased occupational attainment at mid-life. We grouped individuals into three distinct distress classes based on external stressors and indicators of internally generated stress. Blacks were more likely to belong to the higher distressed classes as were heavy drinkers in early adulthood. Stratifying the data by distress class, relationships between heavy drinking, race and heavy drinking-race interactions were overall weaker than in the pooled analysis. Disproportionate intensification of life stresses in Blacks renders them more vulnerable to long-term effects of heavy drinking.

  15. Parenting Behavior and Emotional Status of Physically Abusive Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahey, Benjamin B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared eight lower socioeconomic status abusive mothers with eight matched controls and eight middle class controls on three measures of emotional and somatic distress. Abusive mothers showed far greater depression and physical distress than controls and used more physical punishment. (BH)

  16. Exploring Emotional Intelligence among Master's-Level Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Mullen, Patrick R.; Fox, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    The authors explored the relationship between counseling trainees' emotional intelligence (EI), empathy, stress, distress, and demographics. Results indicated that higher levels of EI were associated with lower stress and distress, higher affective and cognitive empathy, and age. These findings suggest curricular integration of EI and potential…

  17. Psychological distress and coping in military cadre candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakkas C

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Can Nakkas,1 Hubert Annen,1 Serge Brand2,3 1Department of Military Psychology Studies, Military Academy at ETH Zurich, Zurich, 2Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Center for Affective, Stress and Sleep Disorders, 3Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, Sport Science Section, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: Soldiers must cope with stressors during both military operations and training if they are to accomplish their missions successfully and stay mentally stable. This holds true particularly for military superiors, as they bear greater responsibilities and must meet greater demands during both deployment and training. Accordingly, in the present study, we investigated whether recruits chosen for further promotion at the end of basic training differed with regard to psychological distress and coping strategies from those not chosen for promotion, and whether recruits’ coping styles and distress levels were associated. Methods: A total of 675 Swiss recruits took part in the study. At the beginning of basic training, recruits filled out self-rating questionnaires covering demographic data, psychological distress (depression, somatization, anxiety, interpersonal sensitivity, and hostility, and coping styles. Results were compared between those recruits who received a recommendation for further promotion at the end of basic training and those who did not. Results: Recruits selected for promotion had lower scores for depressive symptoms and hostility, engaged more in active coping, and considered their coping to be more effective. Dysfunctional and functional coping were associated with higher and lower distress levels, respectively. Conclusion: Recruits recommended for promotion exhibited less psychological distress during basic training and exhibited a socially more conducive profile of distress. They also endorsed more efficient and more prosocial coping strategies than those recruits not recommended for

  18. A pilot study of routine screening for distress by a nurse and psychologist in an outpatient haematological oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiello, Toni; Dixon, Glenys; O'Connor, Moira; Cook, Deb; Miller, Lisa; Petterson, Anna; Saunders, Christobel; Joske, David; Johnson, Claire

    2017-02-01

    To explore the: 1) prevalence of distress, type of problems experienced by haematological patients, and referrals for supportive care; 2) effect of demographic and clinical variables on distress, and 3) effect on the time of health professionals conducting the screening in the ambulatory chemotherapy setting. Participants completed the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Thermometer and Problem List and had a follow-up screening discussion with a health professional. Of 68 participants, 40% reported significant distress (≥4) on the Distress Thermometer (mean 3.2, SD 2.4). All patients reported physical problems and 72% reported emotional problems-the major contributors to distress and to time spent with the health professional. Distress was unrelated to age, gender or cancer type. Patients were less likely to have significant distress at the end of treatment than at the beginning (OR=0.15, 95% CI: 0.03; 0.72,). Forty patients (59%) were referred to supportive services. The psychologist spent less time with patients compared to the nurse (18 vs 48min, p<0.001). The more emotional problems reported, the greater the time spent with the patient (rs=0.34, p=0.009). Nurses can appropriately screen for distress and address significant distress reported by haematology patients undergoing chemotherapy without over burdening the nurse or patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Potential predictors of psychological distress and well-being in medical students: a cross-sectional pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bore M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Miles Bore,1 Brian Kelly,2 Balakrishnan Nair2 1School of Psychology, 2School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia Purpose: Research has consistently found that the proportion of medical students who experience high levels of psychological distress is significantly greater than that found in the general population. The aim of our research was to assess the levels of psychological distress more extensively than has been done before, and to determine likely predictors of distress and well-being. Subjects and methods: In 2013, students from an Australian undergraduate medical school (n=127 completed a questionnaire that recorded general demographics, hours per week spent studying, in paid work, volunteer work, and physical exercise; past and current physical and mental health, social support, substance use, measures of psychological distress (Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, depression, anxiety, stress, burnout; and personality traits. Results: Females were found to have higher levels of psychological distress than males. However, in regression analysis, the effect of sex was reduced to nonsignificance when other variables were included as predictors of psychological distress. The most consistent significant predictors of our 20 indicators of psychological distress were social support and the personality traits of emotional resilience and self-control. Conclusion: The findings suggest that emotional resilience skills training embedded into the medical school curriculum could reduce psychological distress among medical students. Keywords: medical student, well-being, psychological distress, personality

  20. Listening as a method of addressing psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alun Charles; Cutcliffe, John R

    2009-04-01

    This paper discusses the values of therapeutic listening and ways that emotional difficulties can impact palliative nurses' abilities to provide psychological care. Recent literature indicates that providing psychological care can burden some healthcare professionals including nurses; who may lack the necessary competencies or organizational resources to carry out their roles. References drawn from the databases: all EBM reviews, British Nursing INDEX, CINAHL, PSYCH INFO and MEDLINE and EMBASE are discussed. Psychological care is considered critical to providing holistic care. Yet the literature suggests engaging in such work makes emotional demands on the professionals attempting to carry it out and is associated with psychological difficulties including burnout. Clinical supervision can help reduce the distress caused by emotionally charged situations. Thoughtful clinical supervision can also contribute to safe and effective health care. Nursing would benefit from understanding more about the effects on healthcare professionals of repeated exposure to emotionally charged situations and benefits that clinical supervision can offer to health care.

  1. Diabetes, Distress, and Depression

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-10

    This webinar is a discussion on incorporating the emotional side of diabetes into clinical care.  Created: 7/10/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention’s Division of Diabetes Translation (NCCDP/DDT).   Date Released: 7/10/2014.

  2. Secondary distress in violence researchers: a randomised trial of the effectiveness of group debriefings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundlingh, Heidi; Knight, Louise; Naker, Dipak; Devries, Karen

    2017-06-02

    Secondary distress including emotional distress, vicarious trauma (VT) and secondary traumatic stress (STS) due to exposure to primary trauma victims have been described in helping professionals and in violence researchers. To our knowledge, there are few prevalence studies, and no tailored interventions have been tested to reduce secondary distress in violence researchers. The study aims to (1) describe the epidemiology of secondary distress experienced by violence researchers; to (2) assess the effectiveness of group debriefings in mitigating secondary distress; to (3) assess risk and protective factors. We conducted an un-blinded, individually randomised trial with parallel assignment. Eligible participants were 59 Ugandan researchers employed by the Good Schools Study to interview children who experienced violence in a district of Uganda. Fifty-three researchers agreed to participate and were randomly allocated. The intervention group (n = 26) participated in three group debriefings and the control group (n = 27) in three leisure sessions (film viewings). The primary outcome was change in levels of emotional distress (SRQ-20); secondary outcomes were levels of VT and STS at end-line. A paired t-test assessed the difference in mean baseline and end-line emotional distress. Un-paired t-tests compared the change in mean emotional distress (baseline vs. end-line), and compared levels of VT and STS at end-line. Separate logistic regression models tested the association between end-line emotional distress and a-priori risk or protective factors. Baseline and end-line levels of emotional distress were similar in control (p = 0.47) and intervention (p = 0.59) groups. The superiority of group debriefing over leisure activities in lowering levels of emotional distress in the intervention group (n = 26; difference in SRQ-20 = 0.23 [SD = 2.18]) compared to the control group (n = 26; difference in SRQ-20 = 0.23 [SD = 1.63]) could not be detected (p = 1

  3. Low Mood Leads to Increased Empathic Distress at Seeing Others’ Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan; Dingle, Genevieve; Chan, Gary C. K.; Cunnington, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown changes in empathy in patients with depression, including an elevated level of trait personal distress. This study examined if low mood causes changes in self-reported empathic distress when seeing others in pain. To test this, we conducted an initial (n = 26) and close replication study (n = 46) in which sad mood was induced in healthy participants (overall mean age M = 21, SD = 5, range = 18–41 years). Participants viewed and rated video stimuli inferring pain experienced by other people. Results showed that participants perceived the videos depicting others’ pain (versus no-pain) to be more distressing under a sad mood compared to a neutral mood condition, implying that sadness enhances one’s emotional reactivity toward others’ distress. This supports previous depression literature suggesting an impaired emotional processing ability, and could contribute to some of the unhelpful behaviors seen in depression such as social withdrawal and avoidance.

  4. Low Mood Leads to Increased Empathic Distress at Seeing Others' Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan; Dingle, Genevieve; Chan, Gary C K; Cunnington, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown changes in empathy in patients with depression, including an elevated level of trait personal distress. This study examined if low mood causes changes in self-reported empathic distress when seeing others in pain. To test this, we conducted an initial (n = 26) and close replication study (n = 46) in which sad mood was induced in healthy participants (overall mean age M = 21, SD = 5, range = 18-41 years). Participants viewed and rated video stimuli inferring pain experienced by other people. Results showed that participants perceived the videos depicting others' pain (versus no-pain) to be more distressing under a sad mood compared to a neutral mood condition, implying that sadness enhances one's emotional reactivity toward others' distress. This supports previous depression literature suggesting an impaired emotional processing ability, and could contribute to some of the unhelpful behaviors seen in depression such as social withdrawal and avoidance.

  5. Low Mood Leads to Increased Empathic Distress at Seeing Others’ Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Cao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown changes in empathy in patients with depression, including an elevated level of trait personal distress. This study examined if low mood causes changes in self-reported empathic distress when seeing others in pain. To test this, we conducted an initial (n = 26 and close replication study (n = 46 in which sad mood was induced in healthy participants (overall mean age M = 21, SD = 5, range = 18–41 years. Participants viewed and rated video stimuli inferring pain experienced by other people. Results showed that participants perceived the videos depicting others’ pain (versus no-pain to be more distressing under a sad mood compared to a neutral mood condition, implying that sadness enhances one’s emotional reactivity toward others’ distress. This supports previous depression literature suggesting an impaired emotional processing ability, and could contribute to some of the unhelpful behaviors seen in depression such as social withdrawal and avoidance.

  6. Motivation to change and posttreatment temptation to drink: a multicenter study among alcohol-dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiabane E

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Elena Fiabane,1,2 Marcella Ottonello,1,3 Valeria Zavan,4 Caterina Pistarini,1 Ines Giorgi5 1Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, ICS Maugeri Spa SB, Institute of Genoa Nervi, Genoa, 2Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, 3Department of Medicine, PhD Program in Advance Sciences and Technologies in Rehabilitation Medicine and Sport, Università di Tor Vergata, Rome, 4Alcohol Unit, Addiction Department, Alessandria, 5Psychology Unit, ICS Maugeri Spa SB, Scientific Institute of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Background: An inpatient 28-day rehabilitation program for alcohol dependence is focused on detoxification, enhancing motivation to change, and coping strategies for the management of emotional distress and temptation to drink. The aims of the present study were to investigate 1 changes over time in motivation to change, anxiety, and depression in individuals undergoing residential rehabilitation treatment for alcohol addiction, and 2 which pretreatment factors are associated with posttreatment temptation to drink.Methods: We assessed 432 patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition, Text Revision consecutively recruited from seven residential rehabilitation centers in Northern Italy. Patients were assessed by means of self-report questionnaires at the beginning of rehabilitation (pretreatment and before their hospital discharge (posttreatment regarding motivation to change and self-efficacy (motivation assessment of change – alcoholism version, readiness to change and temptation to drink (visual analog scales, and depression and anxiety (cognitive behavioral assessment – outcome evaluation.Results: Results showed an overall improvement in motivation to change and a significant reduction over time in depression and anxiety levels for the total sample, particularly patients with low baseline level of temptation to drink

  7. Partner personality in distressed relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, D.P.H.; Barelds-Dijkstra, P.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the personality characteristics of partners receiving marital therapy. On the basis of previous research, we expected partners in distressed relationships to be more neurotic and more introverted and to have lower self-esteem than partners in non-distressed relationships.

  8. Distressing events for children and adolescents with cancer: child, parent, and nurse perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedström, Mariann; Haglund, Kristina; Skolin, Inger; von Essen, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Distressing events for children with cancer (N = 121), 0 to 19 years of age, were investigated. Data were gathered through interviews with 50 children, 65 parents, and 118 nurses. Each participant was asked: "Has there been any especially distressing event for you/your child/the child with regard to disease and treatment?" Data were analyzed by content analysis. The categories that emerged from the analysis were grouped into a physical and an emotional dimension. The most frequently mentioned aspects of distress referred to the physical dimension: pain resulting from diagnostic procedures and treatments, nausea, and fatigue. The most frequently mentioned physical aspect of distress was, for children 0 to 3, 4 to 7, and 8 to 12 years of age, pain resulting from diagnostic procedures and treatments, and for children > or =13 years of age, nausea. The most frequently mentioned aspects of distress referred to the emotional dimension were categorized as confinement, feeling of alienation, and worry before medical procedures. The most frequently mentioned emotional aspect of distress was, for children 0 to 3 years of age, confinement; 4 to 7 years of age, feeling of alienation; 8 to 12 years of age, worry about death; and > or =13 years of age, changed appearance. For children 0 to 3, 4 to 7, and > or =13 years of age, aspects of distress of a physical character were mentioned most frequently. For children 8 to 12 years of age, aspects of distress of an emotional character were mentioned most frequently. Copyright 2003 by Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses

  9. The relationship of age, function and psychological distress in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Salene M.W.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Age is related to less distress in several populations including people with multiple sclerosis (MS). One theory posits this is due to decreased emotional reactivity and better coping as people age and we attempted to test this theory in MS. We used a cross-sectional survey of 429 people with MS. Participants completed measures of physical and cognitive function, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Age moderated the relationship of physical function to distress such that decreased physical funct...

  10. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Go: Passport To Health (4:17) Vital Signs High Blood Pressure Spanish Diseases & Conditions Hablemos de la Influenza Influenza Influenza (:30) Influenza (:60) No Hay Excusas Prevención del virus del Zika para ... Drinking Transcript High resolution [27.9 MB] Open Captioned [12.6 ...

  11. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... discusses effective community prevention strategies such as increasing alcohol excise taxes. The video also features experts who debunk common myths including the belief that binge drinking is only a problem among youth. Release Date: 4/13/2010 Source: ...

  12. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drinking" width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/I9hdkDTaQWU?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>

  13. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Please Parents Want To Do What′s Best The Obesity Epidemic Outbreaks CDC: Protecting Americans through Global Health ... allowfullscreen> The video explores the health risks of binge drinking – including unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted ...

  14. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics (11:00) Visual Tools to Improve Systemic Analysis (10:45) Take 3 Teen Pregnancy The Immunization ... allowfullscreen> The video explores the health risks of binge drinking – including unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted ...

  15. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E F G H I J K L M ... d’Opération d’Urgence (COU) Portuguese Vacine-se e proteja-se contra o sarampo Somali Halagu Tallaalo ... Drinking Factsheet Effective Prevention Strategies Send Us Feedback What do you think of our videos? Your feedback ...

  16. Binge Drinking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-13

    This podcast explores the health risks of binge drinking and discusses effective community strategies to prevent it.  Created: 4/13/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/13/2010.

  17. Emergent emotion

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Elaine Finbarr

    2016-01-01

    I argue that emotion is an ontologically emergent and sui generis. I argue that emotion meets both of two individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for ontological emergence. These are, (i) that emotion necessarily has constituent parts to which it cannot be reduced, and (ii) that emotion has a causal effect on its constituent parts (i.e. emotion demonstrates downward causation).\\ud \\ud I argue that emotion is partly cognitive, partly constituted by feelings and partly perceptu...

  18. Alexithymia and psychological distress in fibromyalgia: prevalence and relation with quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Lorys; Tesio, Valentina; Colonna, Fabrizio; Molinaro, Stefania; Leombruni, Paolo; Bruzzone, Maria; Fusaro, Enrico; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Torta, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic syndrome characterised by widespread musculoskeletal pain associated with other symptoms like fatigue, stiffness, non-restorative sleep and psychological distress that strongly affects the quality of life in FM patients. While the psychological distress has been widely explored in FM, only a few studies investigated alexithymia, an emotional dysregulation trait. Evaluate the prevalence of alexithymia and psychological distress and their impact on patients quality of life. A battery of tests assessing alexithymia, depression, anxiety, emotional distress symptoms and the health related quality of life (HRQoL) was filled out by 55 female FM patients. After having analysed their prevalence, two regression analyses were performed in order to evaluate the role that alexithymia, depression, anxiety, emotional distress and pain characteristics have on quality of life of FM patients. Results showed that a clinically relevant level of psychological distress was present in more than half of our sample, whereas alexithymic traits were present in 20% of the patients. Regression analyses showed that pain intensity, depression and current pain were the variables that best contribute to explain the physical component of the HRQoL while anxiety, depression and pain intensity were the variables that mainly contributed to explain the mental component of quality of life. These results underline the high prevalence of alexithymia in FM patients and the great impact of psychological symptoms on FM patients HRQoL. Wholistic care of FM patients which addresses both physical and psychological symptoms is needed.

  19. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle R Dalenberg

    Full Text Available In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively. After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  20. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R; Gutjar, Swetlana; Ter Horst, Gert J; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  1. Marital conflict and parental responses to infant negative emotions: Relations with toddler emotional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Leslie A; Umemura, Tomo; Jacobvitz, Deborah; Hazen, Nancy

    2015-08-01

    According to family systems theory, children's emotional development is likely to be influenced by family interactions at multiple levels, including marital, mother-child, and father-child interactions, as well as by interrelations between these levels. The purpose of the present study was to examine parents' marital conflict and mothers' and fathers' distressed responses to their infant's negative emotions, assessed when their child was 8 and 24 months old, in addition to interactions between parents' marital conflict and their distressed responses, as predictors of their toddler's negative and flat/withdrawn affect at 24 months. Higher marital conflict during infancy and toddlerhood predicted both increased negative and increased flat/withdrawn affect during toddlerhood. In addition, toddlers' negative (but not flat) affect was related to mothers' distressed responses, but was only related to father's distressed responses when martial conflict was high. Implications of this study for parent education and family intervention were discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychological distress following crime victimization: An exploratory study from an agency perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, M J J; Koster, N N

    2017-10-01

    Deficits in recognition of suffering play a significant role in the etiology of psychological distress in crime victims. However, given the preliminary status of the literature, it seems necessary to take other factors into account as well. Starting from an agency perspective, this study explored three such factors: negative self-attributions, peritraumatic distress, and early posttraumatic emotions. More specifically, this study explored whether the association between recognition deficits and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms observed in other studies could be replicated and, if so, whether this association was mediated by negative self-attributions and would decrease in strength when taking into account the adverse roles of peritraumatic distress and early posttraumatic emotions. To address these questions, we used prospective data from 201 victims who had reported a crime to the Dutch police. Recognition deficits, negative self-attributions, peritraumatic distress, and early posttraumatic emotions were assessed within 1 month after the crime report and PTSD symptoms 1 month later. Results indicated that the association between recognition deficits and PTSD symptoms was partly mediated by negative self-attributions and that the strength of this association decreased when controlling for peritraumatic distress and early posttraumatic emotions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Neural correlates of social exclusion during adolescence: understanding the distress of peer rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masten, Carrie L; Eisenberger, Naomi I; Borofsky, Larissa A; Pfeifer, Jennifer H; McNealy, Kristin; Mazziotta, John C; Dapretto, Mirella

    2009-06-01

    Developmental research has demonstrated the harmful effects of peer rejection during adolescence; however, the neural mechanisms responsible for this salience remain unexplored. In this study, 23 adolescents were excluded during a ball-tossing game in which they believed they were playing with two other adolescents during an fMRI scan; in reality, participants played with a preset computer program. Afterwards, participants reported their exclusion-related distress and rejection sensitivity, and parents reported participants' interpersonal competence. Similar to findings in adults, during social exclusion adolescents displayed insular activity that was positively related to self-reported distress, and right ventrolateral prefrontal activity that was negatively related to self-reported distress. Findings unique to adolescents indicated that activity in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (subACC) related to greater distress, and that activity in the ventral striatum related to less distress and appeared to play a role in regulating activity in the subACC and other regions involved in emotional distress. Finally, adolescents with higher rejection sensitivity and interpersonal competence scores displayed greater neural evidence of emotional distress, and adolescents with higher interpersonal competence scores also displayed greater neural evidence of regulation, perhaps suggesting that adolescents who are vigilant regarding peer acceptance may be most sensitive to rejection experiences.

  4. Regulation of emotions in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Monika; Harvey, Martin; McGowan, John; Agrawal, Niruj

    2014-08-01

    Despite the long history of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), relatively little is known about the mechanisms that cause and maintain this condition. Emerging research evidence suggests that patients with PNES might have difficulties in regulating their emotions. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of these difficulties and the emotional responses of individuals with PNES. This study aimed to gain a detailed understanding of emotion regulation processes in patients with PNES by examining differences between patients with PNES and a healthy control group with regard to intensity of emotional reactions, understanding of one's emotional experience, beliefs about emotions, and managing emotions by controlling emotional expression. A cross-sectional design was used to compare the group with PNES (n=56) and the healthy control group (n=88) on a range of self-report measures. Participants with a diagnosis of PNES reported significantly poorer understanding of their emotions, more negative beliefs about emotions, and a greater tendency to control emotional expression compared to the control group. While intensity of emotions did not discriminate between the groups, poor understanding and negative beliefs about emotions were found to be significant predictors of PNES, even after controlling for age, education level, and emotional distress. Furthermore, the presence of some emotion regulation difficulties was associated with self-reported seizure severity. The results of this study are largely consistent with previous literature and provide evidence for difficulties in emotion regulation in patients with PNES. However, this research goes further in bringing together different aspects of emotion regulation, including beliefs about emotions, which have not been examined before. As far as it is known, this is the first study to suggest that levels of alexithymia in a population with PNES are positively associated with self-reported seizure severity. The

  5. Drinking cholera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Stephen Lawrence; Tamason, Charlotte Crim; Hoque, Bilqis Amin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To measure the salinity levels of common water sources in coastal Bangladesh andexplore perceptions of water palatability among the local population to investigate the plausibility oflinking cholera outbreaks in Bangladesh with ingestion of saline-rich cholera-infected river water...... beconducive to V. cholerae survival. Furthermore, salinity levels of participant’s drinking water sourceswere all well below the levels required for optimal survival of V. cholerae. Respondents explainedthat they preferred less salty and more aesthetically pleasing drinking water. Conclusion: Theoretically, V....... cholerae can survive in the river systems in Bangladesh; however,water sources which have been contaminated with river water are avoided as potential drinkingwater sources. Furthermore, there are no physical connecting points between the river system anddrinking water sources among the study population...

  6. Impact of maternal negative affectivity on light alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stene-Larsen, Kim; Torgersen, Leila; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether maternal negative affectivity, a tendency to frequent negative emotions and views, is associated with light alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy.......To investigate whether maternal negative affectivity, a tendency to frequent negative emotions and views, is associated with light alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy....

  7. Binge Drinking

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vital Signs Vital Signs – Presión Arterial Alta Other Languages Arabic احصل على التطعيم لتجنب الحصبة French Faites- ... of binge drinking – including unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, injury, car crashes, violence and HIV/AIDS – and ...

  8. Social and Emotional Learning in the Classroom: Evaluation of "Strong Kids" and "Strong Teens" on Students' Social-Emotional Knowledge and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Kenneth W.; Juskelis, Michael P.; Tran, Oanh K.; Buchanan, Rohanna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the results of three pilot studies that were conducted to evaluate the recently developed "Strong Kids" and "Strong Teens" social-emotional learning programs in increasing students' knowledge of healthy social-emotional behavior and decreasing their symptoms of negative affect and emotional distress. The first study included…

  9. The relationship between behavioural problems in preschool children and parental distress after a paediatric burn event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Anne; van der Heijden, Peter G M; van Son, Maarten J M; van de Schoot, Rens; Vandermeulen, Els; Helsen, Ann; Van Loey, Nancy E E

    2014-09-01

    This study examines mother- and father-rated emotional and behaviour problems in and worries about 0- to 5-year-old children at 3 and 12 months after a burn event and the relation with parental distress. Mothers (n = 150) and fathers (n = 125) representing 155 children participated in this study. Child emotional and behaviour problems and parental worries about the child were assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist at both time points. Parents' level of acute subjective distress was assessed within the first month after the burn event with the Impact of Event Scale. Mothers and fathers held comparable views of their child's emotional and behaviour problems, which were generally within the normal limits. Parents' own acute stress reactions were significantly related to parent-rated child behaviour problems at 3 and 12 months postburn. A substantial part of mothers' and fathers' worries about the child concerned physical and emotional aspects of the burn trauma, and potential future social problems. Parents with high acute stress scores more often reported burn-related concerns about their child at 3 and 12 months postburn. Health-care professionals should be informed that parents' distress in the subacute phase of their child's burn event may be related to subsequent worries about their child and to (parent-observed) child emotional and behaviour problems. The authors recommend a family perspective, with particular attention for the interplay between parents' distress and parent-reported child behaviour problems and worries, in each phase of paediatric burn care.

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  11. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  12. Maternal depressive symptoms, toddler emotion regulation, and subsequent emotion socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premo, Julie E; Kiel, Elizabeth J

    2016-03-01

    Although many studies have examined how maternal depressive symptoms relate to parenting outcomes, less work has examined how symptoms affect emotion socialization, a parenting construct linked to a myriad of socioemotional outcomes in early childhood. In line with a transactional perspective on the family, it is also important to understand how children contribute to these emotional processes. The current study examined how toddler emotion regulation strategies moderated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and emotion socialization responses, including nonsupportive responses (e.g., minimizing, responding punitively to children's negative emotions) and wish-granting, or the degree to which mothers give in to their children's demands in order to decrease their children's and their own distress. Mothers (n = 91) and their 24-month-old toddlers participated in laboratory tasks from which toddler emotion regulation behaviors were observed. Mothers reported depressive symptoms and use of maladaptive emotion socialization strategies concurrently and at a 1-year follow-up. The predictive relation between maternal depressive symptoms and emotion socialization was then examined in the context of toddlers' emotion regulation. Toddlers' increased use of caregiver-focused regulation interacted with depressive symptoms in predicting increased wish-granting socialization responses at 36 months. At high levels of toddlers' caregiver-focused regulation, depressive symptoms related to increased wish-granting socialization at 36 months. There was no relation for nonsupportive socialization responses. Results suggest that toddler emotional characteristics influence how depressive symptoms may put mothers at risk for maladaptive parenting. Family psychologists must strive to understand the role of both parent and toddler characteristics within problematic emotional interactions. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Migration, distress and cultural identity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhugra, Dinesh

    2004-01-01

    ...; they also attempt to settle down by either assimilation or biculturalism. In this paper, various hypotheses explaining the act of migration and its relationship with mental distress are described...

  14. Hypertension awareness and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Mark; Batty, G David; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kivimaki, Mika

    2010-09-01

    There is conflicting evidence regarding the association of hypertension with psychological distress, such as anxiety and depressive symptoms. The association may be because of a direct effect of the raised blood pressure, adverse effects of treatment, or the consequences of labeling. In a representative study of 33 105 adults (aged 51.7+/-12.1 years; 45.8% men), we measured levels of psychological distress using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and collected blood pressure, data on history of hypertension diagnosis, and medication usage. Awareness of hypertension was confirmed through a physician diagnosis or the use of antihypertensive medication, and unaware hypertension was defined by elevated clinic blood pressure (systolic/diastolic > or =140/90 mm Hg) without previous treatment or diagnosis. In comparison with normotensive participants, an elevated risk of distress (General Health Questionnaire score > or =4) was observed in aware hypertensive participants (multivariable adjusted odds ratio: 1.57 [95% CI: 1.41 to 1.74]) but not in unaware hypertensives (odds ratio: 0.91 [95% CI: 0.78 to 1.07]). Antihypertensive medication and comorbidity were also associated with psychological distress, although this did not explain the greater risk of distress in aware hypertensives. We observed a weak curvilinear association between systolic blood pressure and distress, which suggested that distressed participants were more likely to have low or highly elevated blood pressure. These findings suggest that labeling individuals as hypertensive, rather than having elevated blood pressure, per se, may partially explain the greater levels of distress in patients treated for hypertension.

  15. Emotional Responses to Service Learning: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesmeyer, H. Richard; Mudge, Suzanne D.; Ward, Stephanie G.

    2016-01-01

    This study measured the emotional responses of students to common service learning activities. Two hypotheses focused on (1) expected changes in the mean emotion scores and (2) expected differences in individual responses. Results showed significant increases in Surprise, Anxiety and Distress and individual differences in Contempt, Disgust and…

  16. Ambivalence over Expressing Emotion: Psychological and Physical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Robert A.; King, Laura

    Ambivalence about expressing emotion has been suggested as mediating the relationship between inhibition and psychological and psychosomatic distress. A study was conducted to examine the relationship of ambivalence over emotional expression to psychological and physical well-being through the "personal striving" framework. Measures of…

  17. Moral distress in nurses providing direct care on inpatient oncology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirilla, Janet

    2014-10-01

    Moral distress is defined as knowing the right thing to do when policy constraints do not allow for appropriate choices. The purpose of the current study was to explore the existence of moral distress in oncology nurses with a cross-sectional survey completed by nurses working on inpatient units at a midwestern cancer hospital. Investigators distributed the Moral Distress Scale-Revised to all direct care staff nurses. The main research variables were moral distress, level of education, age, and type of unit. Most of the 73 nurses had low to moderate scores, and two had high scores. No significant correlations were observed among age or years of experience. Type of unit and level of moral distress were correlated, and an inverse relationship between level of education and moral distress was found. Moral distress exists in nurses who work on oncology units irrespective of experience in oncology or the specific unit. Nurses must be aware of the existence of moral distress and finds ways to reduce potential emotional problems.

  18. Interpersonal reactivity and the attribution of emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Brian W; Anderson, Ian W; Filkowski, Megan M

    2015-06-01

    The ability to identify the cause of another person's emotional reaction is an important component associated with improved success of social relationships and survival. Although many studies have investigated the mechanisms involved in emotion recognition, very little is currently known regarding the processes involved during emotion attribution decisions. Research on complementary "emotion understanding" mechanisms, including empathy and theory of mind, has demonstrated that emotion understanding decisions are often made through relatively emotion- or cognitive-based processing streams. The current study was designed to investigate the behavioral and brain mechanisms involved in emotion attribution decisions. We predicted that dual processes, emotional and cognitive, are engaged during emotion attribution decisions. Sixteen healthy adults completed the Interpersonal Reactivity Index to characterize individual differences in tendency to make emotion- versus cognitive-based interpersonal decisions. Participants then underwent functional MRI while making emotion attribution decisions. We found neuroimaging evidence that emotion attribution decisions engage a similar brain network as other forms of emotion understanding. Further, we found evidence in support of a dual processes model involved during emotion attribution decisions. Higher scores of personal distress were associated with quicker emotion attribution decisions and increased anterior insula activity. Conversely, higher scores in perspective taking were associated with delayed emotion attribution decisions and increased prefrontal cortex and premotor activity. These findings indicate that the making of emotion attribution decisions relies on dissociable emotional and cognitive processing streams within the brain. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. In search of salience: phenomenological analysis of moral distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Duilio F; Villa, Giulia; Moranda, Dina

    2014-07-01

    The nurse's moral competences in the management of situations which present ethical implications are less investigated in literature than other ethical problems related to clinical nursing. Phenomenology affirms that emotional warmth is the first fundamental attitude as well as the premise of any ethical reasoning. Nevertheless, it is not clear how and when this could be confirmed in situations where the effect of emotions on the nurse's decisional process is undiscovered. To explore the processes through which situations of moral distress are determined for the nurses involved in nursing situations, a phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis of a nurse's report of an experience lived by her as a moral distress situation has been conducted. Nursing emerges as a relational doctrine that requires the nurse to have different degrees of personal involvement, the integration between logical-formal thinking and narrative thinking, the perception of the salience of the given situation also through the interpretation and management of one's own emotions, and the capacity to undergo a process of co-construction of shared meanings that the others might consider adequate for the resolution of her problem. Moral action requires the nurse to think constantly about the important things that are happening in a nursing situation. Commitment towards practical situations is directed to training in order to promote the nurse's reflective ability towards finding salience in nursing situations, but it is also directed to the management of nursing assistance and human resources for the initial impact that this reflexive ability has on patients' and their families' lives and on their need to be heard and assisted. The only case analysed does not allow generalizations. Further research is needed to investigate how feelings generated by emotional acceptance influence ethical decision making and moral distress in nursing situations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Emotions and Emotion Regulation in Breast Cancer Survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire C. Conley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Emotional distress in cancer patients is an important outcome; however, emotional experience does not begin and end with emotion generation. Attempts to regulate emotions may lessen their potentially negative effects on physical and psychological well-being. Researchers have called for the study of emotion regulation (ER in health psychology and psycho-oncology. Thus, this review has three aims. First, we discuss current understandings of emotion and ER across the cancer trajectory, including the principles of ER and methods for its assessment. Second, we present a model for examining the mediating effects of ER on psychosocial outcomes. Third, we “round out” the discussion with an example: new data on the role of ER in recurrent breast cancer. Taken together, these aims illustrate the impact of affective regulatory processes on cancer patients’ long-term outcomes. As survival rates increase, long-term follow-up studies are needed to characterize the dynamic, reciprocal effects of emotion and ER for cancer survivors. Further research on ER may help women with breast cancer better manage the challenges associated with diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Emotions and Emotion Regulation in Breast Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Claire C.; Bishop, Brenden T.; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    Emotional distress in cancer patients is an important outcome; however, emotional experience does not begin and end with emotion generation. Attempts to regulate emotions may lessen their potentially negative effects on physical and psychological well-being. Researchers have called for the study of emotion regulation (ER) in health psychology and psycho-oncology. Thus, this review has three aims. First, we discuss current understandings of emotion and ER across the cancer trajectory, including the principles of ER and methods for its assessment. Second, we present a model for examining the mediating effects of ER on psychosocial outcomes. Third, we “round out” the discussion with an example: new data on the role of ER in recurrent breast cancer. Taken together, these aims illustrate the impact of affective regulatory processes on cancer patients’ long-term outcomes. As survival rates increase, long-term follow-up studies are needed to characterize the dynamic, reciprocal effects of emotion and ER for cancer survivors. Further research on ER may help women with breast cancer better manage the challenges associated with diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27517969

  2. Development and psychometric properties of the family distress in advanced dementia scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Jane L; Jones, Richard N; Mazor, Kathleen M; Prigerson, Holly G; Mitchell, Susan L

    2015-09-01

    The majority of scales to measure family member distress in dementia are designed for community settings and do not capture the unique burdens of the nursing home (NH) environment. We report the psychometric properties of a new Family Distress in Advanced Dementia Scale for use in the NH setting. Cross-sectional questionnaire of 130 family member health care proxies of NH residents with advanced dementia in 31 Boston-area NHs. Thirty-one initial items were evaluated, measuring the frequency over the past 3 months of sources of distress. Exploratory factor analysis identified domains of distress; Cronbach's alpha was computed for each domain. Associations between the domains and other measures were evaluated using Pearson correlation coefficients, including measures of depression (PHQ-9), satisfaction with care (Satisfaction with Care at the End-of-Life in Dementia [SWC-EOLD]), and caregiver burden (Zarit Burden Interview short version). Factor analysis suggested 3 domains: emotional distress (9 items), dementia preparedness (5 items), and NH relations (7 items). Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.82, 0.75, and 0.83 respectively. The PHQ-9 correlated most strongly with the emotional distress factor (r = 0.34), the SWC-EOWD correlated most strongly with the NH relations factor (r = 0.35), as did the Zarit Burden Scale (r = 0.50). The Family Distress in Advanced Dementia Scale encompasses 3 domains of distress. This scale represents a much needed tool to assess distress among family members of NH residents with advanced dementia and provides a metric to evaluate interventions in the population. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A reinforcement learning model of joy, distress, hope and fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekens, Joost; Jacobs, Elmer; Jonker, Catholijn M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we computationally study the relation between adaptive behaviour and emotion. Using the reinforcement learning framework, we propose that learned state utility, ?, models fear (negative) and hope (positive) based on the fact that both signals are about anticipation of loss or gain. Further, we propose that joy/distress is a signal similar to the error signal. We present agent-based simulation experiments that show that this model replicates psychological and behavioural dynamics of emotion. This work distinguishes itself by assessing the dynamics of emotion in an adaptive agent framework - coupling it to the literature on habituation, development, extinction and hope theory. Our results support the idea that the function of emotion is to provide a complex feedback signal for an organism to adapt its behaviour. Our work is relevant for understanding the relation between emotion and adaptation in animals, as well as for human-robot interaction, in particular how emotional signals can be used to communicate between adaptive agents and humans.

  4. Distress disclosure and psychological functioning among Taiwanese nationals and European Americans: The moderating roles of mindfulness and nationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeffrey H; Wei, Meifen; Su, Jenny C; Han, Suejung; Strojewska, Agnes

    2017-04-01

    Research using Western samples shows that talking about unpleasant emotions-distress disclosure-is associated with fewer psychological symptoms and higher well-being. These benefits of distress disclosure may or may not be observed in East Asia where emotional control is valued. Instead, mindfulness may be more relevant to emotion regulation in East Asia (e.g., Taiwan). In the present study, cultural context (Taiwanese nationals vs. European Americans) and mindfulness were examined as moderators of the relation between distress disclosure and both depression symptoms and life satisfaction. A sample of 256 Taiwanese college students and a sample of 209 European American college students completed self-report measures in their native language. Moderated multiple regression analyses revealed significant interaction effects of mindfulness and distress disclosure on both depression symptoms and life satisfaction for Taiwanese participants but not for European Americans. Specifically, distress disclosure was negatively associated with depression symptoms and positively associated with life satisfaction for Taiwanese low in mindfulness but not for Taiwanese high in mindfulness. For European Americans, distress disclosure was not associated with depression symptoms but was associated with higher life satisfaction, regardless of one's level of mindfulness. These findings suggest that the potential benefits of disclosing distress are a function of one's cultural context as well as, for those from Taiwan, one's mindfulness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Daily mood-drinking slopes as predictors: a new take on drinking motives and related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Cynthia D; Brannan, Debi; Wendt, Staci; Jacobs, Laurie; Wright, Robert; Wang, Mo

    2013-12-01

    Motivational models of alcohol consumption have articulated the manner in which positive and negative experiences motivate drinking in unique social contexts (e.g., M. L. Cooper, M. R. Frone, M. Russell & P. Mudar, 1995, Drinking to regulate positive and negative emotions: A motivational model of alcohol use, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 69, pp. 990-1005). Daily process methodology, in which daily events, moods, and drinking behaviors are reported daily or multiple times per day, has been used to examine behavioral patterns that are consistent with discrete motivations. We advance the notion that repeated patterns of drinking in various social contexts as a function of positive or negative mood increases can provide evidence of individual-level if-then drinking signatures, which in turn can predict drinking-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of slopes to predict longer term drinking motivations and alcohol problems by employing a daily-process study of nonclinical moderate alcohol drinkers (N = 47; 49% women). Participants responded to thrice daily interviews administered via handheld computer for 30 days, followed by a longitudinal telephone survey for 12 months. Participants' daily mood-drinking relationships were extracted from hierarchical linear modeling and employed as predictors of 12-month outcomes in multiple regression analyses. Daily mood-drinking patterns demonstrated significant variability across persons, such that moderate drinkers could be reliably differentiated based on those patterns in terms of distinct drinking-related outcomes. Among the results, negative-mood-solitary-drinking slopes were associated with lower subsequent coping motives but positive-mood-solitary-drinking slopes were predictive of higher coping and lower social motives. Conversely, positive-mood-social-drinking associations were predictive of higher enhancement motives and brief Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test scores

  6. Social anxiety, reasons for drinking, and college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Melissa M; Norton, Alice R; Olivier, Jake; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2010-12-01

    Recent research suggests that social anxiety may be associated with higher rates of alcohol problems in women, yet may be associated with lower levels of drinking in men. The current study investigated putative mechanisms that may underlie potential gender differences in the social anxiety-alcohol relationship. One hundred and eighteen college students (61.0% women) completed an interview assessing drinking behaviors and questionnaires measuring social anxiety, drinking motives, and drinking situations. Although college men and women both reported similar frequencies of drinking in positive situations and to enhance positive emotions, women reported drinking more often in negative situations and to cope with aversive emotions than men. Mediated moderation analyses suggested that women with social anxiety may be at greater risk of encountering adverse consequences because of their likelihood to drink to conform or to cope with the aversive affect they experience in negative situations. Conversely, when men experience high rates of adverse consequences, it may be due to drinking greater quantities of alcohol in positive situations. Highly socially anxious college men may drink less alcohol and experience fewer adverse consequences than their nonanxious or mildly anxious counterparts because they may find themselves in positive situations and drinking to enhance positive feelings less often, potentially due to avoidant behavior. These findings may help to explain why social anxiety serves as a potential risk factor for alcohol-related problems for college women, but a protective factor for college men. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Psychosocial aspects of diabetes management: dilemma of diabetes distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareen, Ruqiya Shama; Tareen, Kinza

    2017-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a debilitating chronic illness with complex pathophysiological, psychological, and quality of life (QoL) implications creating a constant state of turbulence. Some of these interconnections are apparent to healthcare providers and are easily addressed in a routine diabetic clinical care. However, a large number of these hidden factors that interplay with each other and impact on the physical outcomes of DM goes unnoticed by health care providers. This is a frustrating and lonely predicament for DM patients making it very difficult for them to manage their illness well. At times these patients are mislabeled as "difficult patients". In other cases they are considered to have and unnecessarily treated for psychiatric illness like depression, other mood or anxiety spectrum disorders which they may not need. In recent years clinical researcher are making strides in understanding the emotional distress a DM patient may feel and the factors contributing or perpetuating diabetes distress. This article focuses on understanding the diabetes distress and how it impacts our patients, how to screen, assess, treat and eventually prevent it from happening. The paper also attempt to bring out the major differences between diabetes distress and common psychiatric comorbidities of DM including but not limiting to major depressive disorder and other depression spectrum disorders.

  8. The Co-Regulation of Emotions between Mothers and Their Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsrud, Amanda C.; Jahromi, Laudan B.; Kasari, Connie

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-four toddlers with autism and their mothers participated in an early intervention targeting joint engagement. Across the 24 intervention sessions, any significant distress episode in the child was coded for emotion regulation outcomes including child negativity, child emotion self-regulation, and mother emotion co-regulation. Results…

  9. The Effects of a Hatha Yoga Intervention on Facets of Distress Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Johnna; Hopkins, Lindsey; Powers, Mark; Baird, Scarlett O; Smits, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with low distress tolerance (DT) experience negative emotion as particularly threatening and are highly motivated to reduce or avoid such affective experiences. Consequently, these individuals have difficulty regulating emotions and tend to engage in maladaptive strategies, such as overeating, as a means to reduce or avoid distress. Hatha yoga encourages one to implement present-centered awareness and non-reaction in the face of physical and psychological discomfort and, thus, emerges as a potential strategy for increasing DT. To test whether a hatha yoga intervention can enhance DT, a transdiagnostic risk and maintenance factor, this study randomly assigned females high in emotional eating in response to stress (N = 52) either to an 8-week, twice-weekly hatha (Bikram) yoga intervention or to a waitlist control condition. Self-reported DT and emotional eating were measured at baseline, weekly during treatment, and 1-week post-treatment. Consistent with prediction, participants in the yoga condition reported greater increases in DT over the course of the intervention relative to waitlist participants (Cohen's d = .82). Also consistent with prediction, the reduction in emotional eating was greater for the yoga condition than the waitlist condition (Cohen's d = .92). Importantly, reductions distress absorption, a specific sub-facet of DT, accounted for 15% of the variance in emotional eating, a hallmark behavior of eating pathology and risk factor for obesity.

  10. How caregivers manage pain and distress in second-stage labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Linda; Richards, Lori; Morse, Janice M; Roberts, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Innovative care interactions are needed when helping a woman who exhibits severe pain or distress during the second stage of labor. We describe how caregivers and laboring women interacted during second-stage labor, with particular attention to how caregivers managed pain and distress. We used observational methods to perform a microanalysis of behaviors from video-recorded data. Pain occurred during labor contractions, and distress (an emotional response to pain) manifested primarily between contractions. Four patterns of women's behavior were identified: 1) no pain or distress, 2) low-level pain and/or distress, 3) focused working, and 4) severe pain and/or distress. Successful care was identified as enabling the woman to maintain herself in any state other than severe pain and/or distress. Particular modes of speech used by the caregiver enabled the attainment of successful care when the woman was not in severe pain or distress. When severe pain or distress existed, innovative caregiving transitioned the woman to another state. Successful intervention strategies included 1) giving innovative directions and 2) "talking down." Ordinary modes of "birth talk" can be used when severe pain or distress is not manifested and when the primary care problem is to assist women with bearing down. Innovative care interactions are needed when faced with severe pain or distress. Managing labor pain is an ongoing focus of clinicians who provide care to women in labor. In addition to pain, women might also experience distress, an emotional response to the labor experience. Whether from choice or necessity, caregivers for laboring women need nonpharmacologic interventions and interpersonal skills that can help women endure labor and give birth. Labor is hard work, and even in precipitous labors most women require assistance. Care given to a laboring woman consists of employing comforting strategies that help her cope with the pain of uterine contractions. The purpose of these

  11. Challenging assumptions from emotion dysregulation psychological treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neacsiu, Andrada D; Smith, Megan; Fang, Caitlin M

    2017-09-01

    Contemporary treatments assume that the inability to downregulate negative emotional arousal is a key problem in the development and maintenance of psychopathology and that lack of effective regulation efforts and a preference to use maladaptive regulation strategies is a primary mechanism. Though ubiquitous, there is limited empirical evidence to support this assumption. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to examine whether self-reported emotion dysregulation equated to difficulties reducing emotional arousal during a behavioral task and to primary use of maladaptive strategies to manage negative emotions. 44 anxious and depressed adults with high emotion dysregulation induced negative distress using autobiographic memory recall. After induction, participants were instructed to downregulate but were not provided any specific instructions in strategies to use. Self-reported emotional arousal was assessed before and after induction and after regulation. Qualitative descriptions of regulation efforts were collected and codedinto effective and maladaptive strategies. The task was successful in inducing emotional arousal and participants were successful in their efforts to down regulate negative emotions. Additionally, effective regulation strategies were used more frequently than maladaptive strategies. Data collected was exclusively self-report and the sample size was small. Adults who report high emotion dysregulation may still have effective emotion regulation strategies in their behavioral repertoire and are more likely to engage in these effective strategies when given an unspecific prompt to regulate negative emotional arousal. Despite reporting problems with emotion regulation, adults with anxiety and depression can successfully downregulate distress when prompted to do so. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Emotion Words Shape Emotion Percepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Maria; Lindquist, Kristen A.; Barsalou, Lawrence; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2015-01-01

    People believe they see emotion written on the faces of other people. In an instant, simple facial actions are transformed into information about another's emotional state. The present research examined whether a perceiver unknowingly contributes to emotion perception with emotion word knowledge. We present 2 studies that together support a role for emotion concepts in the formation of visual percepts of emotion. As predicted, we found that perceptual priming of emotional faces (e.g., a scowling face) was disrupted when the accessibility of a relevant emotion word (e.g., anger) was temporarily reduced, demonstrating that the exact same face was encoded differently when a word was accessible versus when it was not. The implications of these findings for a linguistically relative view of emotion perception are discussed. PMID:22309717

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Drinking Behaviors of Previously Deployed Military Personnel and Matched Civilian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchand, Rajeev; Miles, Jeremy; Schell, Terry; Jaycox, Lisa; Marshall, Grant N.; Tanielian, Terri

    2011-01-01

    We examined drinking behaviors (frequency of use, quantity of use, and frequency of binge drinking) and correlates of frequency of use and binge drinking in a representative sample of previously deployed personnel from the US military (n = 1887). Drinking behaviors were compared with a matched sample of adults in U.S. households (n = 17,533). Comparable patterns of alcohol consumption were reported in both samples: 70% of previously deployed personnel and 69% of US adults reported drinking alcohol in the past 30 days though, civilians drank on average more drinks on the days that they drank than did previously deployed military personnel. Regression analyses indicated that among previously deployed military personnel, deployment-related experiences (e.g., combat-related traumas) and psychological distress (e.g., symptoms associated with posttraumatic stress disorder) were associated with frequency of drinking behaviors. We discuss the implication of our findings for developing interventions to modify drinking behaviors for military personnel. PMID:25324594

  14. Drinking Over the Lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Merrill, Jennifer E.; Carey, Kate B.

    2016-01-01

    Many college students drink heavily and experience myriad associated negative consequences. This review suggests that a developmental perspective can facilitate a better understanding of college drinking. Specifically, using an emerging adulthood framework that considers the ongoing role of parents and neurodevelopmental processes can provide insight into why students drink. Most college students drink and tend to drink more and more heavily than their non?college-attending peers. These drink...

  15. Emotion malleability beliefs, emotion regulation, and psychopathology: Integrating affective and clinical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneeland, Elizabeth T; Dovidio, John F; Joormann, Jutta; Clark, Margaret S

    2016-04-01

    Beliefs that individuals hold about whether emotions are malleable or fixed, also referred to as emotion malleability beliefs, may play a crucial role in individuals' emotional experiences and their engagement in changing their emotions. The current review integrates affective science and clinical science perspectives to provide a comprehensive review of how emotion malleability beliefs relate to emotionality, emotion regulation, and specific clinical disorders and treatment. Specifically, we discuss how holding more malleable views of emotion could be associated with more active emotion regulation efforts, greater motivation to engage in active regulatory efforts, more effort expended regulating emotions, and lower levels of pathological distress. In addition, we explain how extending emotion malleability beliefs into the clinical domain can complement and extend current conceptualizations of major depressive disorder, social anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. This may prove important given the increasingly central role emotion dysregulation has been given in conceptualization and intervention for these psychiatric conditions. Additionally, discussion focuses on how emotion beliefs could be more explicitly addressed in existing cognitive therapies. Promising future directions for research are identified throughout the review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Perfectionism, procrastination, and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kenneth G; Richardson, Clarissa M E; Clark, Dustin

    2012-04-01

    Using a cross-panel design and data from 2 successive cohorts of college students (N = 357), we examined the stability of maladaptive perfectionism, procrastination, and psychological distress across 3 time points within a college semester. Each construct was substantially stable over time, with procrastination being especially stable. We also tested, but failed to support, a mediational model with Time 2 (mid-semester) procrastination as a hypothesized mechanism through which Time 1 (early-semester) perfectionism would affect Time 3 (end-semester) psychological distress. An alternative model with Time 2 perfectionism as a mediator of the procrastination-distress association also was not supported. Within-time analyses revealed generally consistent strength of effects in the correlations between the 3 constructs over the course of the semester. A significant interaction effect also emerged. Time 1 procrastination had no effect on otherwise high levels of psychological distress at the end of the semester for highly perfectionistic students, but at low levels of Time 1 perfectionism, the most distressed students by the end of the term were those who were more likely to have procrastinated earlier in the semester. Implications of the stability of the constructs and their association over time, as well as the moderating effects of procrastination, are discussed in the context of maladaptive perfectionism and problematic procrastination.

  17. Extended Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Krueger, Joel; Szanto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, philosophers and psychologists conceived of emotions as brain- and body-bound affairs. But researchers have started to challenge this internalist and individualist orthodoxy. A rapidly growing body of work suggests that some emotions incorporate external resources and thus extend beyond the neurophysiological confines of organisms; some even argue that emotions can be socially extended and shared by multiple agents. Call this the extended emotions thesis (ExE). In this article...

  18. The relationship between behavioural problems in preschool children and parental distress after a paediatric burn event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Anne; van der Heijden, Peter G M; van Son, Maarten J M; van de Schoot, Rens; Vandermeulen, Els; Helsen, Ann; Van Loey, Nancy E E

    2014-01-01

    This study examines mother- and father-rated emotional and behaviour problems in and worries about 0- to 5-year-old children at 3 and 12 months after a burn event and the relation with parental distress. Mothers (n = 150) and fathers (n = 125) representing 155 children participated in this study.

  19. Psychological distress and cognitive coping in pregnant women diagnosed with cancer and their partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenbroucke, Tineke; Han, Sileny N; Van Calsteren, Kristel; Wilderjans, Tom F; Van den Bergh, B.R.H.; Claes, Laurence; Amant, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Objective: A cancer diagnosis during pregnancy may be considered as an emotional challenge for pregnant women and their partners. We aimed to identify women and partners at risk for high levels of distress based on their coping profile. Methods: Sixty-one pregnant women diagnosed with cancer and

  20. Reactions to Participating in Dating Violence Research: Are Our Questions Distressing Participants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Cornelius, Tara L.; Bell, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased research focus on dating violence, producing important information for reducing these violent relationships. Yet Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are often hesitant to approve research on dating violence, citing emotional distress of participants as a possible risk of participation. However, no known…

  1. Sympathy, Distress, and Prosocial Behavior of Preschool Children in Four Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommsdorff, Gisela; Friedlmeier, Wolfgang; Mayer, Boris

    2007-01-01

    This study examined emotional responding (sympathy and distress) and prosocial behavior as well as their relations across four cultures in a specific context. Preschool children (N = 212) from two Western cultures, Germany and Israel, and two South-East Asian cultures, Indonesia and Malaysia, participated in this study. Children's emotional…

  2. Measuring Emotional Intelligence Enhances the Psychological Evaluation of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Eva M; Walsh, Rosemary; Andrews, Leanne; McPherson, Susan

    2017-12-01

    The assessment of emotional factors, in addition to other psychosocial factors, has been recommended as a means of identifying individuals with chronic pain who may not respond to certain pain treatments. Systematic reviews of the evidence regarding the prediction of responsiveness to a treatment called the spinal cord stimulator (SCS) have yielded inconclusive results. Emotional intelligence is a term which refers to the ability to identify and manage emotions in oneself and others and has been shown to be inversely associated with emotional distress and acute pain. This study aims to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence, chronic pain, and the more established psychosocial factors usually used for SCS evaluations by clinical psychologists in medical settings. A sample of 112 patients with chronic pain on an acute hospital waiting list for SCS procedures in a pain medicine service were recruited. Psychological measures were completed including: a novel measure of emotional intelligence; usual measures of emotional distress and catastrophizing; and a numerical rating scale designed to assess pain intensity, pain-related distress, and interference. As predicted, findings revealed significant associations between most of the measures analyzed and current pain intensity. When entered into a simultaneous regression analysis, emotional intelligence scores remained the only significant predictor of current pain intensity. There are potential clinical, ethical, and organizational implications of emotional intelligence processes partially predicting pain in patients on a waiting list for a medical procedure. These results may offer new insight, understanding, and evaluation targets for clinical psychologists in the field of pain management.

  3. Emotional distress and strain in relatives of patients with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les niveau de la douleur et de l'entorse emotionnelle ont été étudiées chez deux groupes des parentés des patients psychiatriques avec l'utilisation des instruments de niveau normal. Le groupe de la démence avait plus de GHa–30 cas plus que du groupe de la schizophrénie. Bien que les parentés de la schizophrénie ...

  4. Handling emotional distress in Malaysian adults with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, B.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413641651

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has negative impacts on many aspects of life and living of people suffering from it, a challenge in good self-care, a continuous struggle to be adherent to medical treatments and demands regular readjustment in life routines according to clinical outcomes. It is

  5. Japan's hidden youths: mainstreaming the emotionally distressed in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovoy, Amy

    2008-12-01

    One of the most talked-about social issues in Japan in recent years has been the problem of the nation's purportedly one million "hidden" youths, known as hikikomori (literally, "the withdrawn"). Most observers agree that the category of hikikomori encompasses a wide range of problems and provocations. The fact that these various dilemmas lead to the shared outcome of shutting oneself away at home is the point of departure here. The article explores the spheres of mental health care, education and family, focusing on the reluctance to highlight underlying psychological dimensions of hikikomori and the desire on the part of schools and families to "mainstream" Japanese children, accommodating as many as possible within standardized public education. Hikikomori can perhaps be seen as a manifestation of Japanese democracy, in which the good society is imagined as cohesive, protective and secure, rather than one in which the individual can freely exercise the right to be different. Schools, families and the sphere of mental health care have focused on producing social inclusion but have discouraged citizens from being labeled as "different" -- even when such a distinction might help them. The dearth of facilities and discourse for caring for the mentally ill or learning disabled is, in many respects, the darker side of Japan's successes. Those who cannot adjust are cared for through the institutions of families, companies and various other spheres that offer spaces to rest and to temporarily "drop out"; however, the expectation is that rest will eventually lead to a re-entry into mainstream society. Often the psychological problem or disability that led to the problem goes unnamed and untreated (hikikomori, psychiatry, special education, youth, family, Japan).

  6. post partum emotional distress in mothers of preterm infants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-06-01

    Jun 1, 2003 ... The items of the questionnaire were translated into Yoruba, the language of the indigenes of Osun State. and then back- translated in order to confirm the translation. Literate subjects completed the screening instruments in. English or Yoruba. One of us read out the questions and marked the responses of ...

  7. Psychological Distress and the Use of Clinical Preventive Services by Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Szu-Hsuan; Adepoju, Omolola E; Kash, Bita A; DeSalvo, Bethany; McMaughan, Darcy K

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we explored whether psychological distress plays a role in the use of recommended clinical preventive services among community-dwelling older adults. The sample is drawn from respondents 65 years and older who participated in the 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Logistic regressions with selected covariates were entered in the model to estimate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for the independent effect of psychological distress on the utilization of each of five preventive services. With the exception of breast cancer screening where the uptake of preventive services was significantly lower for older adults with psychological distress (OR = 0.57, p < .001), uptake of other key preventive measures revealed no significant utilization differences between older adults with and without psychological distress. The results suggest that adherence to breast cancer screening guidelines may be increased by improving recognition and treatment of emotional health problems in older women.

  8. Assessment of Distress Among Chemotherapy Patients: A Comparative Study of Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Decat Bergerot

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate, analyze and understand distress levels experienced during chemotherapy treatment, comparing men and women. The sample was composed of 328 patients recruited from an Oncology center. Data collection included the application of the Distress Thermometer at three stages of chemotherapy: beginning, middle and end. Incidence of distress decreased in both genders over the course of assessments. Comparatively, the incidence was higher among women, who also reported the highest number of problems in the practical, family, emotional, spiritual and physical domains. The results corroborate the international literature on the subject. Clinical interest of systematic assessment of distress was confirmed to develop routines of therapeutic monitoring adapted to the specific needs of cancer patients.

  9. Do cancer patients with high levels of distress benefit more than less distressed patients from outpatient art therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, Kristina; Rieckhof, Sophia; Buttstaedt, Marianne; Singer, Susanne

    2017-10-01

    Several studies have evaluated the effectiveness of art therapy for cancer patients. Our aim was to determine the effects of outpatient art therapy on the quality of life (QoL) of highly vs. less distressed cancer patients. Participants completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 to measure QoL and the HADS to measure distress level before the intervention (t1), after completing the intervention (t2), and 6-months after t2 (t3). We performed analyses of covariance with repeated measures to test for group differences (highly vs. less distressed). We determined clinically relevant change scores and effect sizes in QoL domains (t1-t2; t1-t3) in patients with low vs. high levels of distress. 53 patient's participated at all three measuring points. Less (N = 22) vs. highly distressed patients (N = 31) differed at baseline and follow-up in their global QoL (mean t1:64.0 > 44.6; t2:65.5 > 55.6; t3:66.0 > 51.6; p = 0.01), emotional functioning (t1:65.2 > 37.4; t2:69.3 > 44.6; t3:57.8 > 48.5; p = 0.01), social functioning (t1:65.2 > 41.9; t2:77.3 > 52.7; t3:73.5 > 54.3; p = 0.01), cognitive functioning (t1:76.5 > 57.5; t2:74.4 > 62.4; t3:77.3 > 62.9; p = 0.02). There was no evidence of changes in physical functioning, role functioning, fatigue, pain, or insomnia. Interactions between distress, QoL, and time were not found. Effect sizes for clinical changes in QoL were medium regarding role functioning (Diff t1-t3  = -14.4), fatigue (Diff t1-t3  = -12.6) in the total group as well as in highly and less distressed patients. No evidence of outpatient art therapy having an effect on QoL in cancer patients over time was found, in patients with either high or low levels of distress at baseline. Consequently, it remains unclear which patients benefit the most from art therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Trait Aggression and Problematic Alcohol Use among College Students: The Moderating Effect of Distress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Bina; Ryan, Jonathan S.; Beck, Kenneth H.; Daughters, Stacey B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Trait aggression has been linked to alcohol-related problems among college students. However, the individual conditions underlying this association are unknown. Empirical evidence and theory suggest the importance of distress tolerance, defined as an individual’s ability to withstand negative affective states, in the relationship between trait aggression and alcohol use. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine whether distress tolerance moderates the relationship between trait aggression and problematic alcohol use. Methods Participants were 646 undergraduate students in a large university, who reported any lifetime alcohol use. The dependent variable, problematic alcohol use, was measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) total score. The main independent variable, trait aggression, was assessed on the negative emotionality scale of the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ-NE), and the moderator, distress tolerance, was determined using the Distress Tolerance Scale (DTS). Results Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated a significant interaction between trait aggression and distress tolerance in predicting problematic alcohol use, adjusting for demographic variables, regular substance use, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms. Specifically, a significant positive relationship between trait aggression and problematic alcohol use was present among those with low, but not high, distress tolerance. Conclusions Results provide evidence that college students with high levels of trait aggression are more likely to engage in problematic alcohol use if they also evidence an inability to tolerate negative affective states. Study implications are discussed, including the development of prevention and intervention programs that target distress tolerance skills. PMID:23889266

  11. Trait aggression and problematic alcohol use among college students: the moderating effect of distress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Bina; Ryan, Jonathan S; Beck, Kenneth H; Daughters, Stacey B

    2013-12-01

    Trait aggression has been linked to alcohol-related problems among college students. However, the individual conditions underlying this association are unknown. Empirical evidence and theory suggest the importance of distress tolerance, defined as an individual's ability to withstand negative affective states, in the relationship between trait aggression and alcohol use. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine whether distress tolerance moderates the relationship between trait aggression and problematic alcohol use. Participants were 646 undergraduate students in a large university, who reported any lifetime alcohol use. The dependent variable, problematic alcohol use, was measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test total score. The main independent variable, trait aggression, was assessed on the negative emotionality scale of the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire, and the moderator, distress tolerance, was determined using the Distress Tolerance Scale. Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated a significant interaction between trait aggression and distress tolerance in predicting problematic alcohol use, adjusting for demographic variables, regular substance use, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms. Specifically, a significant positive relationship between trait aggression and problematic alcohol use was present among those with low, but not high, distress tolerance. Results provide evidence that college students with high levels of trait aggression are more likely to engage in problematic alcohol use if they also evidence an inability to tolerate negative affective states. Study implications are discussed, including the development of prevention and intervention programs that target distress tolerance skills. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  12. Psychological factors predicting the distress to female persistent genital arousal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Joana; Veríssimo, Ana; Nobre, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of persistent genital arousal are expected to negatively affect women's sexual and emotional well-being. However, not all women who experience persistent genital arousal complain about their genital condition. Against this background, this study aimed to evaluate psychological predictors of the distress associated with persistent genital arousal symptoms, as well as psychological moderators influencing the conditions under which persistent genital arousal causes distress. A total of 117 women reporting symptoms of persistent genital arousal answered to online questionnaires measuring personality traits, sexual beliefs, and dyadic adjustment. Women have also completed a checklist measuring the frequency/severity of persistent genital arousal symptoms and the distress/impairment caused by these symptoms. Results showed that neuroticism, (low) openness, sexual conservatism, and (low) dyadic adjustment significantly predicted distress associated with genital symptoms. Furthermore, sexual conservatism was found to moderate the relation between the symptoms' severity and the distress associated with those symptoms. Overall, sexual conservatism seems to be a key differentiator factor, influencing the psychological conditions under which women may report higher levels of distress caused by persistent genital arousal. Because such findings focus on the distress to genital arousal symptoms rather than on persistent genital arousal disorder as a clinical entity, the results under consideration may or may not characterize women formally assigned to the persistent genital arousal disorder label.

  13. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for people with diabetes and emotional problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VAN Son, Jenny; Nyklíček, Ivan; Pop, Victor J M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The DiaMind trial showed beneficial immediate effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on emotional distress, but not on diabetes distress and HbA1c. The aim of the present report was to examine if the effects would be sustained after six month follow-up. METHODS: In the Dia......Mind trial, 139 outpatients with diabetes (type-I or type-II) and a lowered level of emotional well-being were randomized into MBCT (n=70) or a waiting list with treatment as usual (TAU: n=69). Primary outcomes were perceived stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and diabetes distress. Secondary outcomes...... depressive symptoms when using Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p=.016, d=.48). No significant between-group effect was found on diabetes distress and HbA1c. CONCLUSION: This study showed sustained benefits of MBCT six months after the intervention on emotional distress in people with diabetes...

  14. Moral Distress, Workplace Health, and Intrinsic Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Elijah

    2016-05-01

    Moral distress is now being recognized as a frequent experience for many health care providers, and there's good evidence that it has a negative impact on the health care work environment. However, contemporary discussions of moral distress have several problems. First, they tend to rely on inadequate characterizations of moral distress. As a result, subsequent investigations regarding the frequency and consequences of moral distress often proceed without a clear understanding of the phenomenon being discussed, and thereby risk substantially misrepresenting the nature, frequency, and possible consequences of moral distress. These discussions also minimize the intrinsically harmful aspects of moral distress. This is a serious omission. Moral distress doesn't just have a negative impact on the health care work environment; it also directly harms the one who experiences it. In this paper, I claim that these problems can be addressed by first clarifying our understanding of moral distress, and then identifying what makes moral distress intrinsically harmful. I begin by identifying three common mistakes that characterizations of moral distress tend to make, and explaining why these mistakes are problematic. Next, I offer an account of moral distress that avoids these mistakes. Then, I defend the claim that moral distress is intrinsically harmful to the subject who experiences it. I conclude by explaining how acknowledging this aspect of moral distress should reshape our discussions about how best to deal with this phenomenon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Diabetes Distress Among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Hendrieckx, Christel; Sturt, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    with type 1 diabetes: the prevalence of DD; demographic, clinical, behavioral and psychosocial correlates of DD and interventions that reduce DD. Consistent with adult studies, around one third of adolescents experience elevated DD and this is frequently associated with suboptimal glycemic control, low self......Diabetes distress (DD) refers to the negative emotions arising from living with diabetes and the burden of self-management. Among adults, the prevalence and significance of DD are well established, but this is not the case among adolescents. This systematic review investigated among adolescents...

  16. The Interactive Effects of Affect Lability, Negative Urgency, and Sensation Seeking on Young Adult Problematic Drinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Karyadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies have suggested that affect lability might reduce the risk for problematic drinking among sensation seekers by compensating for their deficiencies in emotional reactivity and among individuals high on negative urgency by disrupting stable negative emotions. Due to the high prevalence of college drinking, this study examined whether affect lability interacted with sensation seeking and negative urgency to influence college student problematic drinking. 414 college drinkers (mean age: 20, 77% female, and 74% Caucasian from a US Midwestern University completed self-administered questionnaires online. Consistent with our hypotheses, our results indicated that the effects of sensation seeking and negative urgency on problematic drinking weakened at higher levels of affect lability. These findings emphasize the importance of considering specific emotional contexts in understanding how negative urgency and sensation seeking create risk for problematic drinking among college students. These findings might also help us better understand how to reduce problematic drinking among sensation seekers and individuals high on negative urgency.

  17. Psychological Distress during Ovarian Cancer Treatment: Improving Quality by Examining Patient Problems and Advanced Practice Nursing Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Kline O'Sullivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Significance. Ovarian cancer patients are prone to psychological distress. The clinical significance and best practices for distress among this population are poorly understood. Method. Secondary analysis of research records from a six month randomized control trial included 32 women with primary ovarian cancer. All received 18 advanced practice nurse (APN visits over six months. Three sub-samples were determined by distress level (high/low and mental health service consent for high distress. Demographic, clinical factors, patient problems and APN interventions obtained through content analysis and categorized via the Omaha System were compared. Results. Clinically-significant psychiatric conditions were identified in 8/18 (44% high distress subjects consenting to mental health intervention. High distress subjects who refused mental health intervention had more income and housing problems than the other subjects, received the fewest interventions at baseline, and progressively more throughout the study, exceeding the other sub-samples by study completion. Conclusions. Highly-distressed women not psychologically ready to work through emotional consequences of cancer at treatment onset may obtain support from APNs to manage cancer problems as they arise. Additional studies may identify best practices for all highly-distressed women with cancer, particularly those who do not accept mental health services for distress, but suffer from its effects.

  18. Evaluation of a family nursing intervention for distressed pregnant women and their partners: a single group before and after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, Marga; Arnardottir, Stefanía B

    2013-04-01

    To report a study of the effects of an antenatal family nursing intervention for emotionally distressed women and their partners. High levels of depressive symptoms and anxiety are common in pregnant women, and their partners are likely to suffer from a higher degree of these symptoms than those of non-distressed women. Maternal anxiety and depressive symptoms influence the development of the foetus and child negatively. Distress-reducing interventions for couples are scarce. The design was a pre- and post-test single group quasi-experiment. All women distressed during the last two trimesters of pregnancy were referred by midwives to a family nursing home-visiting service in a primary care setting in Iceland. They were invited to participate in the study from November 2007-September 2009. The final sample was 39 couples. Assessment of distress was through self-reporting of depressive symptoms and anxiety, self-esteem, and dyadic adjustment. The couple received four home visits that were guided by the Calgary Family Nursing Model. Women experienced a higher degree of distress than men before the intervention. Couple's distress was interrelated, and improvement was significant on all indicators after the intervention. Healthcare professionals who care for distressed expectant women should attend to their partners' mental health status. The Calgary Family Nursing Model is an appropriate guide for nursing care of distressed prospective couples in a primary care setting. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Drinking Game Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debus, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines research on drinking game participation from a game studies ontological perspective, covering definition, classification and problems with the, in the studies implied, underlying ontology of drinking games.......The paper examines research on drinking game participation from a game studies ontological perspective, covering definition, classification and problems with the, in the studies implied, underlying ontology of drinking games....

  20. Maternal postpartum distress and childhood overweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Teresa A; Andersen, Camilla S; Ingstrup, Katja G

    2010-01-01

    We investigated associations between maternal postpartum distress covering anxiety, depression and stress and childhood overweight.......We investigated associations between maternal postpartum distress covering anxiety, depression and stress and childhood overweight....