WorldWideScience

Sample records for emotion-based music rretrieval

  1. Emotion-based Music Rretrieval on a Well-reduced Audio Feature Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruxanda, Maria Magdalena; Chua, Bee Yong; Nanopoulos, Alexandros

    2009-01-01

    Music expresses emotion. A number of audio extracted features have influence on the perceived emotional expression of music. These audio features generate a high-dimensional space, on which music similarity retrieval can be performed effectively, with respect to human perception of the music-emotion...... on a number of dimensionality reduction algorithms, including both classic and novel approaches. The paper clearly envisages which dimensionality reduction techniques on the considered audio feature space, can preserve in average the accuracy of the emotion-based music retrieval....

  2. Emotion based segmentation of musical audio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aljanaki, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34570956X; Wiering, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/141928034; Veltkamp, R.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/084742984

    2015-01-01

    The dominant approach to musical emotion variation detection tracks emotion over time continuously and usually deals with time resolutions of one second. In this paper we discuss the problems associated with this approach and propose to move to bigger time resolutions when tracking emotion over

  3. Multimodal Detection of Music Performances for Intelligent Emotion Based Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxholm, Esben; Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    of what they play. In this paper it is investigated whether it is possible or not to develop an intelligent system that through a multimodal input detects the intended emotions of the played music and in realtime adjusts the lighting accordingly. A concept for such an intelligent lighting system...... on the incoming cues. The results suggest that the intelligent emotion-based lighting system has an advantage over a just beat synced lighting and it is concluded that there is reason to explore this idea further.......Playing music is about conveying emotions and the lighting at a concert can help do that. However, new and unknown bands that play at smaller venues and bands that don’t have the budget to hire a dedicated light technician have to miss out on lighting that will help them to convey the emotions...

  4. EMIR: A novel emotion-based music retrieval system

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lijuan Marissa; Lin, Hongfei; Gurrin, Cathal

    2012-01-01

    Music is inherently expressive of emotion meaning and affects the mood of people. In this paper, we present a novel EMIR (Emotional Music Information Retrieval) System that uses latent emotion elements both in music and non-descriptive queries (NDQs) to detect implicit emotional association between users and music to enhance Music Information Retrieval (MIR). We try to understand the latent emotional intent of queries via machine learning for emotion classification and compare the performance...

  5. Multimodal Detection of Music Performances for Intelligent Emotion Based Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Esben Oxholm Skjødt; Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Playing music is about conveying emotions and the lighting at a concert can help do that. However, new and unknown bands that play at smaller venues and bands that don’t have the budget to hire a dedicated light technician have to miss out on lighting that will help them to convey the emotions...... of what they play. In this paper it is investigated whether it is possible or not to develop an intelligent system that through a multimodal input detects the intended emotions of the played music and in realtime adjusts the lighting accordingly. A concept for such an intelligent lighting system...... is developed and described. Through existing research on music and emotion, as well as on musicians’ body movements related to the emotion they want to convey, a row of cues is defined. This includes amount, speed, fluency and regularity for the visual and level, tempo, articulation and timbre for the auditory...

  6. An Emotion-Based Method to Perform Algorithmic Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chih-Fang; Lin, En-Ju

    2013-01-01

    The generative music using algorithmic composition techniques has been developed in many years. However it usually lacks of emotion-based mechanism to generate music with specific affective features. In this article the automated music algorithm will be performed based on Prof. Phil Winosr’s “MusicSculptor” software with proper emotion parameter mapping to drive the music content with specific context using various music pa-rameters distribution with different probability control, in order to...

  7. Music

    OpenAIRE

    Deinert, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    The musical ending [of Goethe's Novelle] recalls the fascination with "music as metaphor", "the power of music", among recent and contemporary poets from Pope and Dryden and Collins to E.T.A. Hoffmann and Kleist and, of course to Goethe himself. Music saves Faust's life on Easter morning at the end of a dreadful night, and we'll encounter a similar role of music in his Trilogie der Leidenschaft which we'll read in this context.

  8. Studying emotion induced by music through a crowdsourcing game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aljanaki, A.; Wiering, F.; Veltkamp, R.C.

    One of the major reasons why people find music so enjoyable is its emotional impact. Creating emotion-based playlists is a natural way of organizing music. The usability of online music streaming services could be greatly improved by developing emotion-based access methods, and automatic music

  9. Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lech, Marcel Lysgaard

    2017-01-01

    Old Comedy was a musical experience of great variety. Accompanied by the piper, both choruses and actors sang frequently during the performance. Music in Old comedy reflects to some extend the importance of music in Athenian everyday life, but as Greek Comedy evolved and detached it self more...... and more from the everyday topics, music similarly lost part of its importance within the plays themselves....

  10. Studying emotion induced by music through a crowdsourcing game

    OpenAIRE

    Aljanaki, Anna; Wiering, Frans; Veltkamp, Remco C.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major reasons why people find music so enjoyable is its emotional impact. Creating emotion-based playlists is a natural way of organizing music. The usability of online music streaming services could be greatly improved by developing emotion-based access methods, and automatic music emotion recognition (MER) is the most quick and feasible way of achieving it. When resorting to music for emotional regulation purposes, users are interested in the MER method to predict their induced, ...

  11. Study of emotion-based neurocardiology through wearable systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Varadan, Vijay

    2016-04-01

    Neurocardiology is the exploration of neurophysiological, neurological and neuroanatomical facets of neuroscience's influence in cardiology. The paraphernalia of emotions on the heart and brain are premeditated because of the interaction between the central and peripheral nervous system. This is an investigative attempt to study emotion based neurocardiology and the factors that influence this phenomena. The factors include: interaction between sleep EEG (electroencephalogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram), relationship between emotion and music, psychophysiological coherence between the heart and brain, emotion recognition techniques, and biofeedback mechanisms. Emotions contribute vitally to the mundane life and are quintessential to a numerous biological and everyday-functional modalities of a human being. Emotions are best represented through EEG signals, and to a certain extent, can be observed through ECG and body temperature. Confluence of medical and engineering science has enabled the monitoring and discrimination of emotions influenced by happiness, anxiety, distress, excitement and several other factors that influence the thinking patterns and the electrical activity of the brain. Similarly, HRV (Heart Rate Variability) widely investigated for its provision and discerning characteristics towards EEG and the perception in neurocardiology.

  12. Emotion-based learning: Insights from the Iowa Gambling Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Hugh Turnbull

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the cognitive and/or emotional basis of complex decision-making, and the related phenomenon of emotion-based learning, has been heavily influenced by the Iowa Gambling Task. A number of psychological variables have been investigated as potentially important in understanding emotion-based learning. This paper reviews the extent to which humans are explicitly aware of how we make such decisions; the biasing influence of pre-existing emotional labels; and the extent to which emotion-based systems are anatomically and functionally independent of episodic memory. Systematic review suggests that (i an aspect of conscious awareness does appear to be readily achieved during the IGT, but as a relatively unfocused emotion-based ‘gut-feeling’, akin to intuition; (ii Several studies have manipulated the affective pre-loading of IGT tasks, and make it clear that such labelling has a substantial influence on performance, an experimental manipulation similar to the phenomenon of prejudice. (iii Finally, it appears that complex emotion-based learning can remain intact despite profound amnesia, at least in some neurological patients, a finding with a range of potentially important clinical implications: in the management of dementia; in explaining infantile amnesia; and in understanding of the possible mechanisms of psychotherapy.

  13. An emotion-based view of acquisition integration capability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q.N. Huy (Quy N.); T.H. Reus (Taco)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstractWe propose an emotion-based view of acquisition integration capability by developing an inter-firm model that focuses on dealing constructively with emotions during various organizational identification processes following mergers and acquisitions. The model describes diverse types

  14. Music Researchers' Musical Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollner, Clemens; Ginsborg, Jane; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the importance of reflexivity across various disciplines, which encourages researchers to scrutinize their research perspectives. In order to contextualize and reflect upon research in music, this study explores the musical background, current level of musical engagement and the listening habits of music…

  15. Musical agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle; McBurney, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The authors, a composer and a computer scientist, discuss their collaborative research on the use of multiagent systems and their applicability to music and musical composition. They describe the development of software and techniques for the composition of generative music.......The authors, a composer and a computer scientist, discuss their collaborative research on the use of multiagent systems and their applicability to music and musical composition. They describe the development of software and techniques for the composition of generative music....

  16. Sheet music

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Sheet music is a handwritten or printed form of music notation that uses modern musical symbols. Like its analogs – books, pamphlets, etc. – the medium of sheet music typically is paper (or, in earlier times, parchment), although the access to musical notation in recent years also includes presentation on computer screens. Use of the term "sheet" is intended to differentiate written music from an audio presentation, as in a sound recording, broadcast or live performance, which may involve vid...

  17. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  18. Umbanda, Music and Music Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira de Queiroz, Gregorio José

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of music in religious rites of Umbanda and the possible correlations among the role played by music in this rite and its role in music therapy process, especially in some of...

  19. Umbanda, Music and Music Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira de Queiroz, Gregorio José

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of music in religious rites of Umbanda and the possible correlations among the role played by music in this rite and its role in music therapy process, especially in some of its approaches...

  20. Definition of an emotion-based controller for dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Danilo Rairán Antolines

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An enormous number of solutions have been proposed from the field of artificial intelligence in order to endow machines with the ability to make plans without human guidance. In this paper, we suggest emulated emotions to endow machines with the skills to make human-like decisions. The model is described using dynamical systems. Emotional states are defined in terms of the difference between a reference model and the trajectories of the system. For example, calmness is defined as the ideal emotional state, where there is agreement between the state of the system and the reference model. Finally, a basic architecture for this kind of emotional-based controller is provided together with some experimental results that illustrate its use.

  1. Tuvan music and World Music

    OpenAIRE

    Maxim V. Chaposhnikov

    2017-01-01

    The essay presents the author’s observations about the ingression of Tuvan music into the World Music – a niche of world musical culture covering ethnical music traditions. The author has witnessed the rise of interest to traditional musical culture of Tuva and Russia as well as globalization of Tuvan music. He is endeavoring to interpret these changes and reveal their affect on traditional music and xöömei. In the late Soviet period, traditional music in Tuva, like in many republics of t...

  2. Why Music?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTamaney, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the importance of music education in a child's development, and how music experiences affect the development of students' intellect. Music education has long been anecdotally linked to increased intellectual ability. Research suggests, though, that music education is far more than an entertaining diversion.…

  3. Intuitive Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Handbook for people who wish to play or teach freely improvised music and improvisation pieces. With sections on how to start with different types of groups, training of musical awareness, parameters of the musical sound, the history of improvised music and some improvisational pieces....

  4. Opportunistic Music

    OpenAIRE

    Hachet, Martin; Kian, Arash; Berthaut, Florent; Franco, Jean-Sébastien; Desainte-Catherine, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    International audience; While mixed reality has inspired the development of many new musical instruments, few approaches explore the potential of mobile setups. We present a new musical interaction concept, called "opportunistic music". It allows musicians to recreate a hardware musical controller using any objects of their immediate environment. This approach benefits from the physical properties of real objects for controlling music. Our prototype is based on a stereo-vision tracking system...

  5. MUSIC THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Archana Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Music Therapy is an established health profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address to physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of individuals. After assessing the strength and needs of each client, the qualified music therapist provides the indicated treatment including creating, singing, moving to and/or listening to music. Through musical involvement in therapeutic context, clients, abilities are strengthened and transfer to other areas of their liv...

  6. Computer Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Perry R.

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and the study of perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.).

  7. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...... music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive...

  8. Brain structure correlates of emotion-based rash impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlert, N; Lawrence, A D

    2015-07-15

    Negative urgency (the tendency to engage in rash, ill-considered action in response to intense negative emotions), is a personality trait that has been linked to problematic involvement in several risky and impulsive behaviours, and to various forms of disinhibitory psychopathology, but its neurobiological correlates are poorly understood. Here, we explored whether inter-individual variation in levels of trait negative urgency was associated with inter-individual variation in regional grey matter volumes. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in a sample (n=152) of healthy participants, we found that smaller volumes of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and right temporal pole, regions previously linked to emotion appraisal, emotion regulation and emotion-based decision-making, were associated with higher levels of trait negative urgency. When controlling for other impulsivity linked personality traits (sensation seeking, lack of planning/perseverance) and negative emotionality per se (neuroticism), these associations remained, and an additional relationship was found between higher levels of trait negative urgency and smaller volumes of the left ventral striatum. This latter finding mirrors recent VBM findings in an animal model of impulsivity. Our findings offer novel insight into the brain structure correlates of one key source of inter-individual differences in impulsivity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Emotionally based strategic communications and societal stress-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosić, Krešimir; Srbljinović, Armano; Popović, Siniša; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Wiederhold, Mark D

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the potential of emotionally based strategic communications (EBSCs) as an extension of traditional strategic communications in prevention of societal stress-related disorders. The concept of EBSCs takes into consideration dominant emotional maps of a specific sociocultural environment in which communications take place. EBSCs may have a significant potential to transform mainly negative-dominant emotional maps of targeted social groups into more positive ones, as a precondition of building a more resilient and stress-resistant social environment. A better understanding of dominant emotional maps and their conditioning may facilitate restoration of more positive emotional maps by touching the right emotions of significant parts of the targeted social groups in the right way. Dominant emotional maps of societies afflicted by economic downturns, natural disasters, conflicts etc., are typically characterized by negatively valenced emotions. Persistent negatively valenced group-based dominant emotions may be used as a quantitative statistical measure of potential stress-related disorders and post-traumatic stress disorders among respected group members. The toxic power of extreme negative emotions, attitudes, actions, and behavior might be reduced by EBSCs as a communication method for transforming negative-dominant emotional maps into more positive ones. EBSCs are conceptualized as the positively valenced stimulation of a negatively emotionally affected group by an appropriate communication strategy to minimize dominant-negative emotional maps and behavior of the targeted group.

  10. Music Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    A.Manuel B. Simoes; J.Joao Dias De Almeida

    2003-01-01

    Current music publishing in the Internet is mainly concerned with sound publishing. We claim that music publishing is not only to make sound available but also to de ne relations between a set of music objects like music scores, guitar chords, lyrics and their meta-data. Wewant an easy way to publish music in the Internet, to make high quality paper booklets and even to create Audio CD's. In this document we present a workbench for music publishing based on open formats, using open-source too...

  11. Music Warehouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deliege, Francois; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2006-01-01

    Music Information Retrieval has received increasing attention from both the industrial and the research communities in recent years. Many audio extraction techniques providing content-based music information have been developed, sparking the need for intelligent storage and retrieval facilities....... This paper proposes to satisfy this need by extending technology from business-oriented data warehouses to so-called music warehouses that integrate a large variety of music-related information, including both low-level features and high-level musical information. Music warehouses thus help to close...... the “semantic gap” by supporting integrated querying of these two kinds of music data. This paper presents a number of new challenges for the database community that must be taken up to meet the particular demands of music warehouses....

  12. Music & Wellbeing

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido, Gemma; Camps, Laia; Herrera, Isabel Herrera; Guillamat, Roser; Vallés, Vicenç; Sanz, Maite; Martínez, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Scientific literature suggests that music may serve as therapeutic function among populations with different illnesses or disorders. Functional neuroimaging studies that incorporate music activity or music method shown an increase activation in several brain areas, with widespread bilateral hemodynamic responses in occipital lobe, bilateral cerebellum, temporal lobe, in the right lateral prefrontal cortex as well hemodynamic responses in the left middle frontal gyrus.Music activ...

  13. Music Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, music programs in K-12 schools have emphasized performance opportunities for children and young people. Until the release of the 1994 National Standards in Music, targeted instruction in composition was frequently overlooked due to the emphasis on performance as well as the expectations of what a school music program ought to produce…

  14. Musical Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  15. Musical Religiosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoondert, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this essay the author explores the thesis that music is by its nature religious, or rather, that it has qualities that correspond well with what religion, in a broad sense, aspires to be. Four musical qualities are explored: timbre, the tonal system of western music, the time relations within the

  16. Motor Music

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, John

    2014-01-01

    Motor Music II (2014) for small group and motors What happens when an AC or DC motor is plugged raw into a mixing desk or connected directly to a speaker? Motor Music II explores ‘low level’ instrument design and a reductionist approach. The piece also sets up a proposition concerning electronic music: ‘How can it be done simpler?’ The motor as ‘instrument’ encourages an objection-orientated approach to sound and music making: the motor itself has inherent musical qualities and po...

  17. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  18. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  19. Music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, M; Chlan, L

    1999-01-01

    Nurses have used music as an intervention for many years. A sizeable number of investigations to determine the efficacy of music in managing pain, in decreasing anxiety and aggressive behaviors, and in improving performance and well-being have been conducted by nurses and other health professionals. Nursing and non-nursing research reports published between the years 1980-1997 were reviewed. Great variation existed in the type of musical selection used, the dose of the intervention (number of sessions and length exposure), the populations studied, and the methodologies used. Overall, music was found to be effective in producing positive outcomes.

  20. Music Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderberg, Ene Alicia; Odgaard, Rasmus Emil; Bitsch, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the possibility of breaking the barrier between deaf and hearing people when it comes to the subject of making music. Suggestions on how deaf and hearing people can collaborate in creating music together, are presented. The conducted research will focus on deaf people...... with a general interest in music as well as hearing musicians as target groups. Through reviewing different related research areas, it is found that visualization of sound along with a haptic feedback can help deaf people interpret and interact with music. With this in mind, three variations of a collaborative...

  1. Ghost Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Geolocative AR concert for Arts Festival of North Norway (Festspillene i Nord-Norge), Harstad, Norge. In cooperation with The Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo.......Geolocative AR concert for Arts Festival of North Norway (Festspillene i Nord-Norge), Harstad, Norge. In cooperation with The Norwegian Academy of Music, Oslo....

  2. Tuvan music and World Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim V. Chaposhnikov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The essay presents the author’s observations about the ingression of Tuvan music into the World Music – a niche of world musical culture covering ethnical music traditions. The author has witnessed the rise of interest to traditional musical culture of Tuva and Russia as well as globalization of Tuvan music. He is endeavoring to interpret these changes and reveal their affect on traditional music and xöömei. In the late Soviet period, traditional music in Tuva, like in many republics of the Union, has been as if put on hold. During the Perestroika and national revival processes, traditionalism became of high demand. Symposia and festivals started off in Tuva where amateur participants took the same stage with professionals. Special honor was paid to old masters of xöömei. Scholars started engaging in  discussions about the origins and a role of xöömei and its genres. Хöömei attracted a good deal of market interest from outside Russia. In the late 1980s American scientist and producer T. Levin made first field records of xöömei to be released on a disk. Ethnographic ensemble “Tuva” was established. Later, members of “Tuva” started their own musical bands. Musical programs were compiled as an ethnographic variety show – a principle that the public has been seeking for both in Tuva and abroad. Disks were realeased and artists started active touring in foreign countries. Boosting interest in World Music was marked with hallmark attention to the phenomenon of throat-singing and overtone music, and further evolution of Tuvan music has since been tightly linked to Western musical market. The author traces the peculiarities of such bands as “Huun Huur Tu”, “Yat-Kha”, etc. and remarks that the value of Tuvan music is not only in star performers shining on the Western skies, but in the rise of a stable community of people inspired by Tuvan music and culture, and seeking new ways of aesthetic and spiritual perception of

  3. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  4. Music Listening as Music Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Charles D.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fundamental, ongoing debates in music education involves scholars who argue for a "performance-based" curriculum and those who promote a curriculum that is fundamentally "aesthetic-listening based." Rather than arguing for the primacy of either performance or listening as a basis for a music education curriculum, the paper attempts…

  5. Music, memory and emotion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music...

  6. Music Faculty Perceptions of Multicultural Music Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Katherine

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the perceptions of selected college music faculty on multicultural music education, focusing on such issues as a definition of multicultural music education, whether or not it would benefit from hiring minority faculty, and its benefits and problems. (CMK)

  7. Communicative Musicality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    plots of the interactions of mother infant dyads, the theory of communicative musicality found precise formulation in terms of the parameters: pulse, quality and narrative. This was first reported in Malloch (1999/2000), in the Special Issue of Musicae Scientiae, known to many of NJMT’s readers...... of the hearing and production of our musicality? If musicality is an intrinsic aspect of being human, how does it express itself in our living, feeling, thinking and being? What is the basis for this in our psyche and biology? The proposed answers come from different scientific areas: evolutionary theory...... of meaning for a sexually abused child (Robarts), and fostering communication in children with autistic spectrum disorders or with Rett Syndrome (Wigram & Elefant). Communicative Musicality is also shown in dance therapy with a group of children, born partially deaf and blind with disabilities (Bond...

  8. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  9. Nigerian Music Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Music Review is aimed at the scholarly review of the developments in various musical practices in Nigeria. It considers well researched articles in any of the following areas: Musicology, Ethnomusicology, African Music, Music Education, Performance, Composition, Music Technology, Music & Related Disciplines, ...

  10. Cognitive decision modelling of emotion-based learning impairment in schizophrenia: the role of awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, Matteo; Dymond, Simon; Cooper, Andrew; Turnbull, Oliver H

    2012-03-30

    Individuals with schizophrenia often lack insight or awareness. Resulting impairment has been observed in various cognitive domains and, recently, linked to problems in emotion-based learning. The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) has been used to assess emotion-based decision-making in patients with schizophrenia, but results have been inconclusive. The current study further investigates emotion-based decision-making in schizophrenia by elucidating the unique contribution of awareness. Twenty-five patients with schizophrenia and 24 healthy controls were assessed with a modified version of the IGT recording awareness at regular intervals. Symptom assessment, medication and medical history were recorded for the clinical group. Patients with schizophrenia underperformed on the IGT compared to controls. Subjective awareness levels were significantly lower in the schizophrenia group and were associated with hallucination severity. Cognitive decision modelling further indicated that patients with schizophrenia had impaired attention to losses, compared to controls. This parameter was positively correlated with awareness. We also found that positive symptoms altered awareness levels and suggest that this disruption may contribute to sub-optimal decision-making. Overall, a lack of awareness may be an important aspect in understanding impaired social cognitive functioning and emotion-based learning observed in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding of emotions based on counterfactual reasoning in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begeer, S.M.; De Rosnay, M.; Lunenburg, P.; Stegge, H.

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of emotions based on counterfactual reasoning was studied in children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (n = 71) and in typically developing children (n = 71), aged 6-12 years. Children were presented with eight stories about two protagonists who experienced the same

  12. Music, memory and emotion

    OpenAIRE

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory. Music has a prominent role in the everyday life of many people. Whether it is for recreation, distraction or mood enhancement, a lot of people listen to music from early in t...

  13. Music Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Music Club

    2011-01-01

    MUSIC ON THE LAWN 2011 As part of the Fete de la Musique 2011, the CERN MusiClub is organizing Music on the Lawn, an informal concert for Club musicians/bands. The event will take place from 14h00 to 20h00 on Saturday 25th June on the terrace of restaurant no 1. This year 8 MusiClub bands will be performing… WOT Home Cookin’ Picture Flame DANGLERZ The Nearlies RISE A Drop of Red The Groovy Gang So put the date in your diaries and spend a sunny afternoon listening to some great live music (and unlike Paleo and Montreux it’s FREE!!!!) For more information on the CERN MusiClub see http://muzipod.free.fr/  

  14. Hate Music

    OpenAIRE

    Chastagner, Claude

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, Wade Michael Page killed six Sikhs outside their temple in Wisconsin. Page was an avowed white supremacist and belonged to several bands playing openly racist music and connected to neo-Nazi organizations. This article explores the connection between “hate music” and racist organizations, and wonders about the potential power of music to generate violence. Le 5 août 2012, Wade Michael Page tue 6 membres de la communauté Sikh à l’entrée de leur temple, dans le Wisconsin, ...

  15. Glitch music

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Robert Anthony do Amaral

    2016-01-01

    Este trabalho traz questões relacionadas com a glitch music, gênero ligado à estética do erro que surgiu na década de 1990. Divido em dois pontos: no primeiro, a pesquisa parte de definições iniciais sobre o glitch e a glitch music, buscando delinear um contexto geral que o gênero se desenvolveu. Levantamos também questões conceituais sobre o “erro”, procurando apontar o uso do erro como estética na música. No segundo, mostramos três perspectivas de abordagens distintas do glitch em três comp...

  16. Style in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    Because music is not objectively descriptive or representational, the subjective qualities of music seem to be most important. Style is one of the most salient qualities of music, and in fact most descriptions of music refer to some aspect of musical style. Style in music can refer to historical periods, composers, performers, sonic texture, emotion, and genre. In recent years, many aspects of music style have been studied from the standpoint of automation: How can musical style be recognized and synthesized? An introduction to musical style describes ways in which style is characterized by composers and music theorists. Examples are then given where musical style is the focal point for computer models of music analysis and music generation.

  17. Influence of Musical Knowledge on Musical Preference

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Alejandra; Tena, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The psychology of music can be found within a conceptual and empirical framework that is useful as a reference to explain the human response to it. An important research line of this discipline is the one that studies the musical taste, on which is based this article. The comparison is between musical taste and preferences of musical genres among people with musical education and those without it. The sample was constituted by 104 participants that were divided into two groups: a) individuals...

  18. Music, memory and emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory. PMID:18710596

  19. Music, memory and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-08-08

    Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory.

  20. SEMINAR IN MUSIC EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PALISCA, CLAUDE V.

    A SEMINAR ON MUSIC EDUCATION WAS ORGANIZED TO BRING THE WIDEST POSSIBLE VARIETY OF MUSICAL COMPETENCE AND INTERESTS TO BEAR UPON PROBLEMS IN SCHOOL MUSIC. THE THREE CENTRAL PROBLEM AREAS PUT BEFORE THE SEMINAR WERE (1) DEVELOPMENT OF MUSICALITY THROUGH PLAYING, SINGING, AND CREATING MUSIC, AND THROUGH LISTENING AND EAR TRAINING, (2) CRITERIA FOR…

  1. Educating the Music User

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    To better serve students' evolving needs in music, music educators must connect classroom learning with how students use and interact with music in their daily lives. One way to accomplish this is by approaching classrooms with the music user in mind, which can open new possibilities for meaningful music making and remove students from the…

  2. Rethinking: What is an emotion? : Hierarchial Hypothesis of Emotions based on Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Masaji

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an evolutionary hierarchical hypothesis that feelings/emotions in humans consist of four sub-systems of emotion based on brain structure, brain functions, brain evolution and emotional evolution. Feelings/emotions in humans are composed of primitive emotions, core emotions, social emotions/feelings and intellectual feelings, with respect to evolution. Primitive emotions are composed of two emotions, well and unwell states, that are elicited by positive and negative reinfor...

  3. LHChamber Music

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    LHChamber Music, an experimental piece and an "experimental" ensemble for the 60th CERN Anniversary, based on the sonification of the data recorded by the 4 detectors during LHC run 2011-2013. Performed in the four experimental caverns and in the CCC by physicists and engineers working at CERN.

  4. How musical are music video game players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasinski, Amanda C; Hannon, Erin E; Snyder, Joel S

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown that formal musical training is associated with sensory, motor, and cognitive advantages in individuals of various ages. However, the nature of the observed differences between musicians and nonmusicians is poorly understood, and little is known about the listening skills of individuals who engage in alternative types of everyday musical activities. Here, we show that people who have frequently played music video games outperform nonmusicians controls on a battery of music perception tests. These findings reveal that enhanced musical aptitude can be found among individuals who play music video games, raising the possibility that music video games could potentially enhance music perception skills in individuals across a broad spectrum of society who are otherwise unable to invest the time and/or money required to learn a musical instrument.

  5. Music Is Sound Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Tommie; Rager, Brenda

    1980-01-01

    Presented are suggestions to help acquire increased community support for music education in general, and MIOSW (Music in Our Schools Week) in particular. MENC (Music Educators National Conference) has selected March 9-15, 1981 for MIOSW. (KC)

  6. Music therapy and depression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Assche, E; De Backer, J; Vermote, R

    2015-01-01

    .... This is the reason why music therapy is also used to treat depression. To examine the efficacy of music therapy and to report on the results of recent research into the value of music therapy as a treatment for depression...

  7. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  8. Symmetry in music

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero, O F, E-mail: o.f.herrero@hotmail.co [Conservatorio Superior de Musica ' Eduardo Martinez Torner' Corrada del Obispo s/n 33003 - Oviedo - Asturias (Spain)

    2010-06-01

    Music and Physics are very close because of the symmetry that appears in music. A periodic wave is what music really is, and there is a field of Physics devoted to waves researching. The different musical scales are the base of all kind of music. This article tries to show how this musical scales are made, how the consonance is the base of many of them and how symmetric they are.

  9. Music therapy in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šírová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the subject of music therapy in a special kindergarten for the children with combined disabilities. In the theoretical part it clarifies the concept and principle of music therapy and characterizes the types of disabilities that occur at researched clients. As a research method were used observation and interviews with three music therapists from the institution. KEYWORDS Music therapy, preschool education, special pedagogy, group music therapy,individual music therapy, p...

  10. Music and Music Intervention for Therapeutic Purposes in Patients with Ventilator Support; Gamelan Music Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Suhartini Suhartini

    2011-01-01

    Background: Gamelan music is one of folk music for Javanese people. Several research studies testing the effects of music were conducted in Western countries. The music studies for therapeutic purposes used classical music commonly. Even in Indonesia, some researchers may use that music for therapeutic purposes. This concern article explains the perspective music and music intervention as therapeutic purposes, view with Javanese classical music.Objectives: To explore the evidence of music and...

  11. Musics, Cultures and Meanings: Music as Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Cross

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary explores interpretations of concepts that lie at the focus of Richard Widdess's paper—"music", and "culture"—with the aim of specifying frameworks within which issues of musical meaning can fruitfully be addressed.

  12. The Influence of Music on Facial Emotion Recognition in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Neurotypical Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura S

    2017-03-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often struggle with social skills, including the ability to perceive emotions based on facial expressions. Research evidence suggests that many individuals with ASD can perceive emotion in music. Examining whether music can be used to enhance recognition of facial emotion by children with ASD would inform development of music therapy interventions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of music with a strong emotional valance (happy; sad) on children with ASD's ability to label emotions depicted in facial photographs, and their response time. Thirty neurotypical children and 20 children with high-functioning ASD rated expressions of happy, neutral, and sad in 30 photographs under two music listening conditions (sad music; happy music). During each music listening condition, participants rated the 30 images using a 7-point scale that ranged from very sad to very happy. Response time data were also collected across both conditions. A significant two-way interaction revealed that participants' ratings of happy and neutral faces were unaffected by music conditions, but sad faces were perceived to be sadder with sad music than with happy music. Across both conditions, neurotypical children rated the happy faces as happier and the sad faces as sadder than did participants with ASD. Response times of the neurotypical children were consistently shorter than response times of the children with ASD; both groups took longer to rate sad faces than happy faces. Response times of neurotypical children were generally unaffected by the valence of the music condition; however, children with ASD took longer to respond when listening to sad music. Music appears to affect perceptions of emotion in children with ASD, and perceptions of sad facial expressions seem to be more affected by emotionally congruent background music than are perceptions of happy or neutral faces.

  13. Is There Musical Meaning in the Musical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindall-Smith, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    The study of music contributes to transmitting cultural heritage, learning self-discipline and teamwork, developing creativity and self-expression, developing multiple intelligences, engaging in problem solving and abstract thinking, and influencing academic achievement. Whether a performance has "musical meaning" at the core of music education…

  14. School Music Goes Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Susan Hobson

    2012-01-01

    This article explores ways for music teachers to influence music making in the home. Often preschool music programs include parents in the music education process, but when children enter school, the parent connection is not usually continued with the same intensity. This article will serve as a catalyst for further conversations on ways to…

  15. Music You Can See

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Shannon Sweny

    2012-01-01

    Children of all ages love painting to music. Aside from discovering the natural correlation between music and art, the author's students learned about Mozart's life and work in music class. In this article, students discover the influence that music can have on their art. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  16. Music and Health Promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    Thematic analysis of 13 personal narratives on the meaning of music in the life of 13 contributing authors to the book "Musical Life Stories"......Thematic analysis of 13 personal narratives on the meaning of music in the life of 13 contributing authors to the book "Musical Life Stories"...

  17. The Nature of Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    Music, as language, is a universal human trait. Throughout human history and across all cultures, individuals have produced and enjoyed music. Despite its ubiquity, music is rarely studied as a basic and distinct cognitive faculty. However, recent evidence suggests that music might well be distinct from other cognitive functions, in being…

  18. National Stereotypes in Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lajosi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Music became a marker of national identity in nineteenth-century Europe. Western art music consists of tonal systems that are universally intelligible, but certain rhythms and musical idioms have been associated with national styles. How, when, and why does a musical phrase or piece become national?

  19. Conversation on African Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Leslie R.

    1985-01-01

    A voice and music education teacher at the University of Lagos, Nigeria, talks about African music in this interview. Topics discussed include differences between African and Western music, African melody, rules for composing African music, the theory of counterpoint, and the popularity of classical composers in Nigeria. (RM)

  20. Music in Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Anne E.

    This paper emphasizes the importance of music as an integral part of the education of the young child, and draws attention to a few ways in which parents and teachers can contribute to children's musical development. Sections of the paper focus on seven questions: (1) Is music really universal? (2) When should musical training begin? (3) When…

  1. Music in Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feierabend, John

    1990-01-01

    Argues that music activities in early childhood education foster a variety of developmental skills. Analyzes Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, contending that music intelligence is a separate intelligence. Provides ways to identify and promote musical intelligence. Suggests methods for encouraging musical development. Using songs…

  2. Embodied Music Listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2017-01-01

    The chapter presents the receptive music therapy model "Guided Imagery of Music (GIM)" as an embodied way of music listening with documented effects on a number of physiological and psychological symptoms and problems. Relaxation, guiding and (classical) music stimulates and supports the work...

  3. Music Listening Is Creative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratus, John

    2017-01-01

    Active music listening is a creative activity in that the listener constructs a uniquely personal musical experience. Most approaches to teaching music listening emphasize a conceptual approach in which students learn to identify various characteristics of musical sound. Unfortunately, this type of listening is rarely done outside of schools. This…

  4. The Musical Zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kristen S.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the experience a collegiate Music Educators National Conference (MENC) chapter had when running a musical petting zoo, which is an exhibit of musical instruments that passersby, under the guidance of "zookeepers" (the MENC students), are allowed to touch, handle, and attempt to play. Considers the success of the musical petting…

  5. Music across the Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Scott; Kautz-Sindberg, Laura

    1998-01-01

    Describes an example of community music making in which middle school students, their parents, and a senior adult band all participated in a concert. Indicates the concert intended to celebrate the participants' musical accomplishments, gain support for music education, and demonstrate that music can provide joy for performers of all ages. (CMK)

  6. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…

  7. Music, Mathematics and Bach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    musical scales, counterpoint and harmony was given. In this part these themes are developed further with reference to Bach's music and the emergence of the equally tempered scale. Bach's Music: Counterpoint, Canon, Fugue and other Patterns. Most readers of this journal may not be very familiar wi th Bach's music, and ...

  8. Persian music meets West

    OpenAIRE

    Ardalan, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    I have based my bachelor Thesis on the presentation of a completely different musical world, compared with the western musical world, which is Persian Music. As a Persian, I started to study music as a Persian Setar player; then I followed my musical experience through western classical music by playing classical guitar. As an ambition I have always thought about how to express Persian music in an understandable way for that of non-Persians. In this thesis I began with a short history of Pers...

  9. Music retrieval in ICOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterle, Lutz; Fischer, Stephan; Rimac, Ivica; Steinmetz, Ralf

    1999-08-01

    In this paper we describe music retrieval in ICOR, a project of Darmstadt TU. It is the goal of ICOR to find new interfaces to support applications of music video and music CDs. Although the project consists of audio and video analysis we concentrate on a description of the audio algorithms in this paper. We describe our MPEG-7 like data structure to store meta information for music pieces and explain which algorithms we use to analyze the content of music pieces automatically. We currently use an applause detection to distinguish live music from studio recordings, a genre classifier to distinguish pieces with beats form classical music, and a singer recognition.

  10. Psychiatry and music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry and music, neural processing underlying music, music's relation to classical psychology and psychopathology and scientific evidence base for music therapy in major psychiatric disorders. We highlight the role of Indian forms of music and Indian contribution to music therapy. PMID:24891698

  11. Music therapy improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Kuzma

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the technique of music therapy – music therapy improvisation is introduced. In this form of music therapy the improvising partners share meaning through the improvisation: the improvisation is not an end in itself: it portrays meaning that is personal, complex and can be shared with the partner. The therapeutic work, then, is meeting and matching the client's music in order to give the client an experience of "being known", being responded through sounds and being able to express things and communicate meaningfully. Rather than the client playing music, the therapy is about developing the engagement through sustained, joint improvisations. In music therapy, music and emotion share fundamental features: one may represent the other, i.e., we hear the music not as music but as dynamic emotional states. The concept of dynamic structure explains why music makes therapeutic sense.

  12. Music evolution and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, Charles T; Zimmermann, Elke; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    There have been many attempts to discuss the evolutionary origins of music. We review theories of music origins and take the perspective that music is originally derived from emotional signals. We show that music has adaptive value through emotional contagion, social cohesion, and improved well-being. We trace the roots of music through the emotional signals of other species suggesting that the emotional aspects of music have a long evolutionary history. We show how music and speech are closely interlinked with the musical aspects of speech conveying emotional information. We describe acoustic structures that communicate emotion in music and present evidence that these emotional features are widespread among humans and also function to induce emotions in animals. Similar acoustic structures are present in the emotional signals of nonhuman animals. We conclude with a discussion of music designed specifically to induce emotional states in animals. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychiatry and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-04-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry and music, neural processing underlying music, music's relation to classical psychology and psychopathology and scientific evidence base for music therapy in major psychiatric disorders. We highlight the role of Indian forms of music and Indian contribution to music therapy.

  14. Music and the Mind: Music's Healing Powers

    OpenAIRE

    Caroilyn S. Ticker

    2017-01-01

    Music makes you smarter: or at least that is what the "experts" are saying. CDs are sold of Mozart's Sonatas for babies, and parents are urged to give their children music lessons in the belief that music does something to our brains which in turn makes us more intelligent. But is this really true? Does music really affect the brain in the powerful way that scientists are suggesting, or is it hearsay? In this paper I investigate the effects of music on our brain's plasticity and cognition by ...

  15. Music and the heart

    OpenAIRE

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR...

  16. [Study of music electroacupuncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Yi-hong; Bai, Yan

    2005-08-01

    To explore characteristics and advantages of music electroacupuncture instrument. Investigate clinical therapeutic effect and action mechanisms of the music electroacupuncture instrument, the relation of music therapy with improving looks and genes, and the links of music therapy with theories on 14 channels to prove its characteristics and advantages. Music electroacupuncture can overcome the decline of late therapeutic effects of pulse electroacupuncture and its disadvantages, beat of the local tissue of electroacupuncture. It is a generation of electroacupuncture of a new type.

  17. Satire in Music

    OpenAIRE

    Leon Stefanija

    2011-01-01

    The article surveys the scope of satire and suggests its range. It is divided into six sections. The introductory comment (The semantics of music) briefly outlines the fact that music has always been a part of communicative endeavors. The historical background of the semantic issues in music is described (Historical surmises), which is necessary to define satire in music as a specific genre combining features from different musical forms. The third section discusses six areas as the most...

  18. Music and the Mind: Music's Healing Powers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroilyn S. Ticker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Music makes you smarter: or at least that is what the "experts" are saying. CDs are sold of Mozart's Sonatas for babies, and parents are urged to give their children music lessons in the belief that music does something to our brains which in turn makes us more intelligent. But is this really true? Does music really affect the brain in the powerful way that scientists are suggesting, or is it hearsay? In this paper I investigate the effects of music on our brain's plasticity and cognition by looking at several different experimental studies. Specifically I will address how music affects brain plasticity, emotion, physical health and linguistic processing, and how these effects in turn make music a beneficial tool for therapy, particularly in patients with Traumatic-Brain Injury (TBI and Autism-Spectrum Disorder.

  19. Music Education and Music Therapy. Introduction to Plenary Session 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2002-01-01

    Chairman's introduction to plenary session on the relationship between music therapy and music pedagogics......Chairman's introduction to plenary session on the relationship between music therapy and music pedagogics...

  20. Music Brings Us Together: Testimony to Music in Our Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music Educators Journal, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Well-known peoples' views concerning the intrinsic value of music and the importance of music education are presented. The statements represent a few entries from the Music Educators National Conference's new publication "Testimony to Music." (RM)

  1. MUSIC CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    MUSIC CLUB

    2010-01-01

    FESTIVAL HARDRONIC The CERN MusiClub is proud to announce that the 21st edition of the famous CERN Hardronic Festival will take place on   Friday 16th July from 17h30 and Saturday 17th July from 16h00   on the terrace beside restaurant N°3 on the CERN Prevessin site. The Festival will feature music by your favourite bands and artists from the Club. Food and drink will be on sale and there will be stuff for kids (organized by http://www.adventureart.org/) including face-painting and a bouncy castle. Entrance is free and the event is open to Club Members, CERN staff and Visitors, all those working on the CERN site, plus families and friends. For more information, either send an e-mail mailto:music.club@cern.ch or see http://musiclub.cern.ch/ The CERN MusiClub would like to thank the CERN Staff Association and the CERN Management for their continued support. Without this support this event could not take place.

  2. Identity in Music: Adolescents and the Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Music teachers may feel most comfortable teaching the music they know, in the way that they were taught and in the way that they were taught to teach it. Music and the teaching of music is a strong part of their professional musical identity. Adolescents have a passionate attachment to music but insist that this must be on their terms, which may…

  3. Universals, Relativism, and Music Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Wayne

    1998-01-01

    Argues that relativism has the potential to help music educators better understand themselves, other music educators, musical endeavors, and their profession. Defines musical relativism in detail comparing it with universalism and essentialism. Discusses musical value and focuses on the reasons for music education in the search for professional…

  4. Nigerian Music Review: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Nigerian Music Review is aimed at the scholarly review of the developments in various musical practices in Nigeria. It considers well researched articles in any of the following areas: Musicology, Ethnomusicology, African Music, Music Education, Performance, Composition, Music Technology, Music ...

  5. MUSIC IN ENGLISH LITERATURE

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Mangesh Rao Nehe

    2017-01-01

    Aristotle very aptly remarks that music is the very food of soul. It is undoubtedly true when all pervasive effect of music is taken into account in all realms of life and of nature as well. Without music, we cannot imagine the very existence of Nature. In each and every aspect of nature, there is the invisible and invincible impact of music. In almost all cultures of the world, where music is an integral part of life, music has always held its dominant niche and imparted multiple dimensions ...

  6. Musical Markov Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchenkov, Dima; Dawin, Jean René

    A system for using dice to compose music randomly is known as the musical dice game. The discrete time MIDI models of 804 pieces of classical music written by 29 composers have been encoded into the transition matrices and studied by Markov chains. Contrary to human languages, entropy dominates over redundancy, in the musical dice games based on the compositions of classical music. The maximum complexity is achieved on the blocks consisting of just a few notes (8 notes, for the musical dice games generated over Bach's compositions). First passage times to notes can be used to resolve tonality and feature a composer.

  7. Aura music art - Aristotle's philosophical aesthetics of music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Kalan

    2001-12-01

    in music. Referring to Damon, Plato and other philosophers of music Aristotle develops his own conception of musical imitation, which conveys the similarity between art and life. This affinity is the ground for different powers ofmusic: entertainment, education and civilised pursuits. The responsibility and care for the education of children and of citizens is conceived as care and diligence about art and music which becomes a real care for the soul, cultura animi. The article has following sections: 1. Poetry, music, education, 2. Ethos and musical mimesis, 3. Music and Education, 4. The purpose ofmusic and musical katharsis, 5. Musical katharsis, aesthetic pleasure and art experience, 6. Concluding remarks on music and katharsis.

  8. Instant Music & Messaging : Interconnecting music and messaging

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Mattias

    2009-01-01

    Communication is and has always been important for the human as we aredesigned by evolution to communicate as a way to survive and reproduce. Whatmany people do not think about is that music and communication are very closelyrelated due to the fact that music is a type of communication. In this thesis wehave focused on the field of music and communication to discuss the possibilityof combining these to areas to provide better information technology services.More specifically we have focused o...

  9. Towards Music Captioning: Generating Music Playlist Descriptions

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Keunwoo; Fazekas, George; McFee, Brian; Cho, Kyunghyun; Sandler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Descriptions are often provided along with recommendations to help users' discovery. Recommending automatically generated music playlists (e.g. personalised playlists) introduces the problem of generating descriptions. In this paper, we propose a method for generating music playlist descriptions, which is called as music captioning. In the proposed method, audio content analysis and natural language processing are adopted to utilise the information of each track.

  10. Popular Music Genres, Music Producers, and Song Creation in the General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Shane

    2018-01-01

    In secondary general music classes, music educators have the opportunity to bridge the gap between the music students' experiences in school and the music they engage with outside of school. According to Williams, nontraditional music students have musical lives outside of school but choose not to participate in traditional ensembles. In this…

  11. Loud music listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Nicolae

    2008-07-01

    Over the past four decades, there has been increasing interest in the effects of music listening on hearing. The purpose of this paper is to review published studies that detail the noise levels, the potential effects (e.g. noise-induced hearing loss), and the perceptions of those affected by music exposure in occupational and non-occupational settings. The review employed Medline, PubMed, PsychINFO, and the World Wide Web to find relevant studies in the scientific literature. Considered in this review are 43 studies concerning the currently most significant occupational sources of high-intensity music: rock and pop music playing and employment at music venues, as well as the most significant sources of non-occupational high-intensity music: concerts, dicotheques (clubs), and personal music players. Although all of the activities listed above have the potential for hearing damage, the most serious threat to hearing comes from prolonged exposures to amplified live music (concerts). The review concludes that more research is needed to clarify the hearing loss risks of music exposure from personal music players and that current scientific literature clearly recognizes an unmet hearing health need for more education regarding the risks of loud music exposure and the benefits of wearing hearing protection, for more hearing protection use by those at risk, and for more regulations limiting music intensity levels at music entertainment venues.

  12. Music and language: musical alexia and agraphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, J C

    1980-06-01

    Two aphasic right-handed professional musicians with left hemispheric lesions had disturbed musical function, especially musical alexia and agraphia. In Case 1 aphasia was of transcortical sensory type, with severe agraphia and decreased comprehension of written words, although she could match them with pictures. Except for reading and writing, musical ability was normal; she could sing in five languages. Musical alexia and agraphia affected pitch symbols more than rhythm. Case 2 had conduction aphasia and severe expressive amusia, especially for rhythm. Although his language alexia and agraphia were milder than Case 1's, his musical alexia and agraphia were more severe, affecting rhythm as much as pitch. In neither patient were those aspects of musical notation either closest to verbal language or most dependent upon temporal (sequential) processing maximally impaired. These cases are consistent with the literature in suggesting that the presence or absence of aphasia or of right or left hemispheric damage fails to predict the presence, type, or severity of amusia, including musical alexia and agraphia. The popular notion that receptive amusia follows lesions of the language-dominant temporal lobe, whereas expressive amusia follows non-dominant frontal lobe damage, is an over-simplification, as is the view that increasing musical sophistication causes a shift of musical processing from the right hemisphere to the left.

  13. Music as word: Film music - superlibretto?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirić Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of his paper is to prove that film music can be understood as authentic narrative force: film music as word / discourse and its superlibretto status. Superlibretto is the status of music in a film which is constructing its own (aural reality and is narrating, speaking its own text which creates a wholesome film meaning. The existence of superlibretto is substantiated by fundamental theoretic concepts of film music and practically proven by analyses of examples taken from the opus of Serbian film composer Zoran Simjanović.

  14. Using music during childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, C A

    2000-12-01

    The application of music in pain management has become popular in the past two decades. This article describes the responses of primiparas to the use of music therapy during the births of their children. Eleven women who attended childbirth education classes in Brantford, Ontario, Canada, volunteered to participate in a music therapy exercise. During pregnancy each participant selected preferred music, listened to it daily, and received instruction about focused listening. Within 72 hours after birth they were interviewed about their use of music as a coping strategy during labor. Women selected the combination of music and labor support as a helpful coping strategy during labor. All women used the music during labor to help distract them from the pain or their current situation. The planned use of music by mothers and caregivers can be an aid to prenatal preparation and an important adjunct in pain and stress management during labor and birth.

  15. Music, Meaning and Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Widdess

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper situates musical meaning in culture, addressing music as social symbol and as ongoing process of meaning creation. Three examples of non- Western musical practice are used to illustrate the embedding of musical meaning in cultural context. The performance of an Australian Aboriginal song is shown to exemplify the interdependence of song style and social structure as a matrix for the emergence of cultural meanings; an example of North Indian performance is adduced to demonstrate the multi-layered nature of meaning as embodied in musical performance; and an example of collective festival performance from Nepal illustrates ways in which the structure of musical performance can mirror local cultural forms. Each of the three examples lends weight to the idea that music's meanings are often non-linguistic and reflect foundational schemas that are specific to the cultures from the musics are drawn.

  16. Musical Students’ Concert Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr S. Plokhotnyuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available . The article presents detailed analysis of performance training of future teachers of music at higher educational establishments and offers ways to overcome the problem of musical students’ concert practice organization.

  17. Hearing loss and music

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and how often you are exposed to loud music Headphone use Family history of hearing loss Jobs or activities that increase your chance of hearing loss from music are: Being a musician, sound crew member, or ...

  18. Music, art & creative movement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sommersberger, Brian

    2017-01-01

      Sommerberger talks about developing a music-infused project. Fourth-grade students at Wilson Elementary School in Sheboygan WI recently joined to create short performances using art, dance, music, and composition...

  19. Music for Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KIDS' HEALTH NUTRITION PATIENT RESOURCES Search form Search Music for your Health By R. Mack Harrell, MD, ... creation of sound for sound’s sake is called “music.” In 2008, scientists digging up a huge granite ...

  20. Music preference as a factor of music distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, J A

    1976-08-01

    The present study is an experimental analysis of music preference as a factor of music distraction measured by the Stroop tests. Significant differences were found amoung groups given, most preferred music, least preferred music, and no music (quiet). Each group of 10 subjects were randomly chosen from 42 screened subjects. Performance was better without music and better with most preferred than with least preferred music. The results were not consistent with those previously found for the effects of noise upon Stroop test performance.

  1. Application of Digital Music Technology in Music Pedagogy

    OpenAIRE

    Peiwei Zhang; Xin Sui

    2017-01-01

    This paper expounds the concept and current development of digital music technology in modern times by exploration and analysis around the music technology, in order to better develop music pedagogy. In allusion to the contemporary music pedagogy, a new instruction idea is proposed by analyzing the digital music technologies such as MIDI, digital audio and other new music carriers, namely, an instruction model which integrates the digital music technology and the traditional teaching mode and...

  2. Embodied Music Listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2017-01-01

    The chapter presents the receptive music therapy model "Guided Imagery of Music (GIM)" as an embodied way of music listening with documented effects on a number of physiological and psychological symptoms and problems. Relaxation, guiding and (classical) music stimulates and supports the work......, underlying theories, selected research/evidence and illustrative clinical vignettes. Based on a study of cancer survivors’ GIM therapy, grounded theories of the therapeutic process and music’s role in the process are presented and discussed....

  3. Music and memory

    OpenAIRE

    Haefliger, Anna Berenika

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Music and its different forms of use seem to benefit people in a number of ways. Research has suggested that extensive musical practice and musical listening enhances mental functioning in healthy adults and patients with neurodegenerative disease. Yet, the findings presented have not yet examined the effects both musical training and stimuli enhancement have on episodic memory recognition. 20 musicians and 20 non-musicians took part in an episodic memory task which evaluated m...

  4. Music and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Computational Music Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    in this intensely interdisciplinary field. A broad range of approaches are presented, employing techniques originating in disciplines such as linguistics, information theory, information retrieval, pattern recognition, machine learning, topology, algebra and signal processing. Many of the methods described draw...... music analysis, the book provides an invaluable resource for researchers, teachers and students in music theory and analysis, computer science, music information retrieval and related disciplines. It also provides a state-of-the-art reference for practitioners in the music technology industry....

  6. Psychiatry and music

    OpenAIRE

    Nizamie, Shamsul Haque; Tikka, Sai Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Vocal and/or instrumental sounds combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony and expression of emotion is music. Brain, mind and music are remarkably related to each other and music has got a strong impact on psychiatry. With the advent of music therapy, as an efficient form of alternative therapy in treating major psychiatric conditions, this impact has been further strengthened. In this review, we deliberate upon the historical aspects of the relationship between psychiatry...

  7. Innovation In Music II

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Innovation in Music 2015 (InMusic’15) was an international conference organised by KES International and an multi-disciplinary International Programme Committee. Hosted by Conference Chair Dr Rob Toulson, Director of the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute at Anglia Ruskin University, the conference took place over the 7th to 9th June 2015 in Cambridge, UK. Innovation in Music broadly represents all aspects of innovation in the field of music, particularly encompassing music pe...

  8. Programme driven music radio

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Conor; Cunningham, Padraig; Clerkin, Patrick; Grimaldi, Marco

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the operation of and research behind a networked application for the delivery of personalised streams of music at Trinity College Dublin. Smart Radio is a web based client-server application that uses streaming audio technology and recommendation techniques to allow users build, manage and share music programmes. While it is generally acknowledged that music distribution over the web will dramatically change how the music industry operates, there are ...

  9. Creativity in Music Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eila M.

    2006-01-01

    Music education is not just about learning to perform with voices and instruments; it is about guiding students toward understanding music, what it is, how it works, and what it does to and for human beings. One of the goals often expressed for music education is the nurturing of students' creativity, and opportunities for students to express…

  10. A timeless music dictionary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R.B. Ruthven

    Abstract: A music dictionary for the Internet fulfils the same functions as printed music dic- tionaries. An earlier music dictionary is as useful as a new one if its information is correct. But the fact that an Internet dictionary can at any time be corrected according to modern practices makes it, if not timeless, at least more up to ...

  11. Music makes a difference?!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karolien Dons

    2013-01-01

    Music and culture play a significant role in the political and societal development of a peaceful and integrative Europe. Music and its diverse expressions are extremely relevant for social cohesion, wellbeing and economic growth. What kind of an impact can music have? And how can we combine

  12. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  13. Learning Science Using Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinski, Keith

    2011-01-01

    For thousands of years, people have used music to transfer information and narrate stories. The musical structure, consisting of words set to melodies in rhythmic patterns, made the content easier to remember. Researchers have investigated the long- and short-term effects of song on memory and found that music aided in the recall of information.…

  14. Music and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ben A.; Davidson, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses a study of the effects of music listening upon student achievement. Reports that seventh grade students listened to music while independently studying the earth-sun relationship. Concludes that there were no significant achievement differences among students who learned while listening to rock, classical, easy listening, or no music. (SG)

  15. Music Instruction Goes Digital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demski, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Faced with meager enrollment in band, orchestra, and choir programs, schools are using digital technology to excite students about creating music on today's terms. This article discusses how music educators reinvent their profession by acknowledging and incorporating the way students interact with music today--digitally. Bill Evans, a music…

  16. Music Education for All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Ryan N.

    2015-01-01

    School music programs are changing. For years the music education profession has emphasized large ensemble experiences for reasons that include quality of music making, sense of community, and individual and collective pride for many of the students involved. As a high school saxophonist, I valued that experience, but other high school…

  17. Concept Analysis: Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir K

    2016-01-01

    Down through the ages, music has been universally valued for its therapeutic properties based on the psychological and physiological responses in humans. However, the underlying mechanisms of the psychological and physiological responses to music have been poorly identified and defined. Without clarification, a concept can be misused, thereby diminishing its importance for application to nursing research and practice. The purpose of this article was for the clarification of the concept of music therapy based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy. A review of recent nursing and health-related literature covering the years 2007-2014 was performed on the concepts of music, music therapy, preferred music, and individualized music. As a result of the search, the attributes, antecedents, and consequences of music therapy were identified, defined, and used to develop a conceptual model of music therapy. The conceptual model of music therapy provides direction for developing music interventions for nursing research and practice to be tested in various settings to improve various patient outcomes. Based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy, model and contrary cases are included. Implications for future nursing research and practice to use the psychological and physiological responses to music therapy are discussed.

  18. [Music therapy and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, E; De Backer, J; Vermote, R

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is a predominantly non-verbal psychotherapy based on music improvisation, embedded in a therapeutic relationship. This is the reason why music therapy is also used to treat depression. To examine the efficacy of music therapy and to report on the results of recent research into the value of music therapy as a treatment for depression. We reviewed the literature on recent research into music therapy and depression, reporting on the methods used and the results achieved, and we assessed the current position of music therapy for depression in the context of evidence-based scientific research. A wide variety of research methods was used to investigate the effects of using music therapy as a psychotherapy. Most studies focused usually on the added value that music therapy brings to the standard form of psychiatric treatment, when administered with or without psychopharmacological support. Music therapy produced particularly significant and favourable results when used to treat patients with depression. Current research into music therapy and depression points to a significant and persistent reduction in patients' symptoms and to improvements in their quality of life. However, further research is needed with regard to the best methods of illustrating the effects of music therapy.

  19. Curriculum Writing in Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Colleen

    2002-01-01

    Explains the process for creating a curriculum in music education. Offers a definition of curriculum and address issues to be considered while designing the curriculum. Discusses how to incorporate the National Standards for Music Education, describes important music concepts, and offer guidelines for writing. (CMK)

  20. World Music Ensemble: Kulintang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    As instrumental world music ensembles such as steel pan, mariachi, gamelan and West African drums are becoming more the norm than the exception in North American school music programs, there are other world music ensembles just starting to gain popularity in particular parts of the United States. The kulintang ensemble, a drum and gong ensemble…

  1. Pop Music's Middle Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Peter

    1979-01-01

    Surveys important music styles that preceded the emergence of rock and roll in the 1950s. Included are swing, bebop, rhythm and blues, country-western, gospel, and urban folk music. Lists of selected readings and recordings are appended. Part of a theme issue on popular music. (Editor/SJL)

  2. Music, Emotions, and Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packalen, Elina

    2008-01-01

    In this article Elina Packalen considers the notion of truth in connection with music. Her starting-point is the question of how music can be expressive of emotions; therefore she first summarizes some recent philosophical ideas of this issue. These ideas naturally raise the question of whether describing music in emotive terms has an epistemic…

  3. Dyslexia and Musical Notation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granschow, Lenore; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Case studies are presented of musicians with dyslexia who experienced difficulties in the study of musical notation. The studies focus on their educational histories, musical weaknesses and strengths, and successful compensatory strategies. Suggestions are offered on using multisensory approaches to teach musical notation. (Author/JDD)

  4. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any

  5. Saving Malta's music memory

    OpenAIRE

    Sant, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Maltese music is being lost. Along with it Malta loses its culture, way of life, and memories. Dr Toni Sant is trying to change this trend through the Malta Music Memory Project (M3P) http://www.um.edu.mt/think/saving-maltas-music-memory-2/

  6. Selling digital music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the market for digital music. We claim that the combination of the MP3 format and peer-to-peer networks has made music non-excludable and this feature is essential for the understanding of the economics of the music market. We study optimal business models for selling non...

  7. Selling digital music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    This paper considers the market for digital music. We claim that the combination of the MP3 format and peer-to-peer networks has made music non-excludable and this feature is essential for the understanding of the economics of the music market. We study optimal business models for selling non...

  8. Music Education for All

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    This article argues that a systematic, developmental and comprehensive music education should be at the heart of every child's formal education within the state education system. The benefits of a music education are briefly explored before a presentation of recent research data that demonstrates a decline in music education as a result of poorly…

  9. AP Music Theory Applied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieker, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Some American high schools include Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory within their course offerings. Students who pass the AP exam can receive college credit either as a music or humanities credit. An AP class, however, offers music students more than future college credit; it ultimately improves musicianship skills and promotes deeper…

  10. South African Music Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAMUS: South African Music Studies is the official organ for the South African Society for Research in Music (SASRIM). It gives priority to the publication of research on South African music, but continues to represent the wider field of research interests in the country and in the rest of Africa. The journal invites work from any ...

  11. Constructivism in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, constructivism, as a theory of learning, has taken on an increasingly important role in music education. Efforts to shift music education toward a more constructivist practice have significant implications for policymaking at all levels of music education. In this article, I seek to recalibrate our thinking about what…

  12. Response efficacy: the key to minimizing rejection and maximizing acceptance of emotion-based anti-speeding messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, I M; Watson, B; White, K M

    2010-03-01

    This study sought to improve understanding of the persuasive process of emotion-based appeals not only in relation to negative, fear-based appeals but also for appeals based upon positive emotions. In particular, the study investigated whether response efficacy, as a cognitive construct, mediated outcome measures of message effectiveness in terms of both acceptance and rejection of negative and positive emotion-based messages. Licensed drivers (N=406) participated via the completion of an on-line survey. Within the survey, participants received either a negative (fear-based) appeal or one of the two possible positive appeals (pride or humor-based). Overall, the study's findings confirmed the importance of emotional and cognitive components of persuasive health messages and identified response efficacy as a key cognitive construct influencing the effectiveness of not only fear-based messages but also positive emotion-based messages. Interestingly, however, the results suggested that response efficacy's influence on message effectiveness may differ for positive and negative emotion-based appeals such that significant indirect (and mediational) effects were found with both acceptance and rejection of the positive appeals yet only with rejection of the fear-based appeal. As such, the study's findings provide an important extension to extant literature and may inform future advertising message design. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Music as Method: Musically Enhanced Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    While artist-researchers have been productive within the domains of the literary arts, visual arts, dance and drama, there is little musical arts-based educational research reported in the literature. This article introduces a research methodology to address this deficit: musically enhanced narrative inquiry (MENI). The article describes the…

  14. 'Rhythmic Music' in Danish Music Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder Kaj

    In Danish state schools from elementary to upper secondary school music is part of curricula at all levels. It is widely accepted that both individuals and culture benefit from art subjects, creative activities etc. This type of motivation was sufficient support for maintaining music as a subject...

  15. On music Therapy : Music and Healing

    OpenAIRE

    栗林, 文雄

    1996-01-01

    The theory of sound as energy is based on the relationship between music and positive humanfeelings. It was discussed the music therapy is effective in the care and cure of elderly with behavioral disorderssuch as senile dementia, and in patients in palliative medicine wards with cancer and in patientswith various kinds of mental disorders such as schizophrenia. alcohol. drug addiction and so on.

  16. Music-reading training alleviates crowding with musical notation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yetta Kwailing; Wong, Alan C-N

    2016-06-01

    Crowding refers to the disrupted recognition of an object by nearby distractors. Prior work has shown that real-world music-reading experts experience reduced crowding specifically for musical stimuli. However, it is unclear whether music-reading training reduced the magnitude of crowding or whether individuals showing less crowding are more likely to learn and excel in music reading later. To examine the first possibility, we tested whether crowding can be alleviated by music-reading training in the laboratory. Intermediate-level music readers completed 8 hr of music-reading training within 2 weeks. Their threshold duration for reading musical notes dropped by 44.1% after training to a level comparable with that of extant expert music readers. Importantly, crowding was reduced with musical stimuli but not with the nonmusical stimuli Landolt Cs. In sum, the reduced crowding for musical stimuli in expert music readers can be explained by music-reading training.

  17. Music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, Olivia Swedberg; Gooding, Lori

    2014-07-01

    This article summarizes the research on music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents with diagnoses commonly treated by psychiatrists. Music therapy and music medicine are defined, effects of music on the brain are described, and music therapy research in psychiatric treatment is discussed. Music therapy research with specific child/adolescent populations is summarized, including disorders usually diagnosed in childhood, substance abuse, mood/anxiety disorders, and eating disorders. Clinical implications are listed, including suggestions for health care professionals seeking to use music medicine techniques. Strengths and weaknesses of music therapy treatment are discussed, as well as areas for future research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Music Self-Concept of Non-Music Majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Paul D.; Browne, Lisa Ann

    1998-01-01

    Examines the relationship between academic, musical, and demographic variables; music self-concept; and enrollment in lecture or performance classes. Finds that students' enjoyment from making music is the strongest predictor of self-concept scores: satisfying musical experiences likely enhance music self-confidence, which, in turn, encourages…

  19. Social Theory, and Music and Music Education as Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regelski, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of praxis, and thus the idea of music as praxis, is not widely known in the fields of music and music education. Nonetheless, musicians and music teachers typically take for granted as sacrosanct the noble sounding, metaphysical, even spiritual profundity of music hypothesized by mainstream aesthetic philosophies. Thus accounts of music…

  20. From the Functions of Music to Music Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Thomas; Sedlmeier, Peter

    2009-01-01

    To date, not much is known about how the functions of music relate to music preference. This article examines the basic hypothesis that the strength of preference for a given kind of music depends on the degree to which that kind of music serves the needs of the listener; that is, how well the respective functions of music are fulfilled. Study 1,…

  1. Library Resources in Special Areas of Music: Film Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H. Stephen

    Intended as an orientation for music librarians unfamiliar with the film music field, this presentation addresses the most common film music questions received from library patrons, including queries about composers, soundtrack albums, the subject of the music, and scores, and describes the basic film music reference sources to consult for…

  2. Popular Music and Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    or the Russkii Rok-Klub v Amerike (Russian Rock Club of America).   This special edition of Popular Music and Society aims to present research on contemporary popular music (broadly defined) in the former Soviet republics and their diasporas.  A central issue will be how the musical landscape has changed since...... the collapse of the Soviet Union: What present trends can be observed?  How has the Soviet context influenced the popular music of today?  How is music performed and consumed?  How has the interrelationship between cultural industry and performers developed?  How are nationalist sensibilities affecting popular...

  3. Music Therapy for Seniors

    OpenAIRE

    SLUNEČKOVÁ, Petra

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the use of music therapy in the lives of seniors. The target of this thesis is to map the possibilities of using music therapy ways with seniors and to recommend a suitable music therapy resources on the basis of the research and evaluation of obtained dates. The theoretical part describes the term "the music therapy", e.g. concept, definition, types and forms, the development of music therapy, the history, methods and techniques. This age group is defined in t...

  4. Music and movement

    OpenAIRE

    Nasev, Lence

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is one of the fundamental elements without which music would not exist. In plays with singing, a child learns to synchronize its movements with the rhythm of music from a very early age. The skill of movement plays a major role in the learning of music and thus deserves an important place in the school curriculum. In this paper, an overview is made of the most important music pedagogues who introduced movement, and at the same time perceived its importance in learning musical conte...

  5. Music season coming soon

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin in collaboration with Julio Rosenfeld

    2012-01-01

    On 16 June, CERN’s music season will open with Music on the Lawn. The event is the CERN Music Club’s contribution to the Fete de la Musique and will take place on the terrace of Restaurant 1 from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Hardronic Festival, CERN’s long-running rock festival, will be held on the evenings of 20 and 21 July in Prévessin, on the terrace behind Restaurant 3. If you would like to help with the organisation, please contact the Music Club by e-mail: music.club@cern.ch.   The Canettes Blues Band during the 2011 Hardronic Festival. (© Christoph Balle, 2010). Summer is coming, and along with it comes the music season. CERN will be hosting its two annual rock music concerts: Music on the Lawn and the Hardronic Festival. The two events are organised by the CERN Music Club, which has been sharing the enjoyment of good music with its numerous fans for many years. “Music on the Lawn was originally created so that the members of the Mus...

  6. Nation and Classical Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Benedikte

    The last book Anthony D. Smith wrote before he died, and which will be published in Spring 2017, has the title Nation and Classical Music. Smith had for a long time been intrigued by the intimate relationship between the nation and classical music. At the most manifest level it involves...... them into their compositions thus challenging the romantic musical style searching for an authentic national musical expression. Against the backdrop of the extensive research carried out by Anthony Smith into the relationship between the nation and classical music, the present paper seeks to add...... cultural centers. In doing this, the paper seeks to unfold how composers channeled musical inspiration embedded in cultural environments that cut across national boundaries into national musical traditions thus catering to specific national audiences. The paper is written as a tribute to a great mentor...

  7. Music therapy in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avers, Laura; Mathur, Ambika; Kamat, Deepak

    2007-09-01

    The soothing effects of music have been well described over the centuries and across cultures. In more recent times, studies have shown the beneficial effects of music in alleviating symptoms in a wide variety of clinical and psychologic conditions. Music therapy has been primarily used as an intervention to control emotional states, in pain management, cognitive processing, and stress management. Stress is associated with increased production of the stress hormone cortisol, which is known to suppress immune responses. Several studies in the past few decades have demonstrated a positive effect of music therapy on reducing stress or increasing immune responses, or both. Music therapy should therefore be considered as a valuable addition to standard pharmacologic therapeutic modalities in enhancing the immune response and lowering stress levels in such conditions. This article reviews the role of music as a therapeutic modality and the future for music therapy, particularly in pediatrics.

  8. Listening to Musical Performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron Edidin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the philosophy of music and in musicology, apart from ethnomusicology, there is a long tradition of focus on musical compositions as objects of inquiry. But in both disciplines, a body of recent work focuses on the place of performance in the making of music. Most of this work, however, still takes for granted that compositions, at least in Western art music, are the primary objects of aesthetic attention. In this paper I focus on aesthetic attention to the performing activity itself. I begin by roughly characterizing what is involved in attending to the performing activity of musical performers. I then argue that such attention is essential to the full appreciation of the central compositions of the Western art music canon. Finally, I argue that, often enough, recordings provide a suitable vehicle for this sort of attention; listeners to recordings can use them to listen to musical performance.

  9. Aesthetic responses to music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Istok, Eva; Brattico, Elvira; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    , the adjective "touching" was often listed together with "beautiful". In addition, we found music-specific vocabulary as well as adjectives related to emotions and mood states indicating that affective processes are an essential part of aesthetic responses to music. Differences between music experts and laymen......We explored the content and structure of the cognitive, knowledge-based concept underlying aesthetic responses to music. To this aim, we asked 290 Finnish students to verbally associate the aesthetic value of music and to write down a list of appropriate adjectives within a given time limit....... No music was presented during the task. In addition, information about participants' musical background was collected. A variety of analysis techniques was used to determine the key results of our study. The adjective "beautiful" proved to be the core item of the concept under question. Interestingly...

  10. Popular music from Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, Andreas Roed

    Popular music from Greenland – Globalization, nationalism and performance of place. This thesis is based on fieldwork done within the popular music scene in Greenland from 2008 to 2014. It engages with the question of how music and conceptions of the nation (Greenland) affect each other in social...... spaces, and analyses on how popular music can be used to construct senses of place and situate individuals within these places. The thesis is centered on four articles that engage with Greenlandic popular music from different perspectives. The first article looks at the historical development in inducing...... scene. These topics are mainly discussed by use of globalization, nationalism and performance theory, while also looking towards human geography to explain how places can be experienced through music. It is concluded in this thesis, that Greenlandic popular music, to a large extent, gains social...

  11. Music and Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole; Juel, Knud; Ekholm, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Background: ‘Music and public health’ is a new field of study. Few scientific studies with small samples have documented health implications of musical participation. Research questions in this epidemiological study were: 1) Is there an association between self-rated health and active use of music...... in daily life? 2) What associations can be observed between musical background, uses and understanding of music as a health factor, and self-reported health? Method: Data came from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2013, based on a simple random sample of 25.000 adult Danes (16+ years). Response rate......: 57%. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate associations between musical background/activities and health-related indicators. Discussion: The study documents that a majority of informants use music to regulate physical and psychological states...

  12. Apathy and emotion-based decision-making in amnesic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, Sophie; Jacus, Jean-Pierre; Raffard, Stéphane; Gely-Nargeot, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Apathy and reduced emotion-based decision-making are two behavioral modifications independently described in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). The aims of this study were to investigate decision-making based on emotional feedback processing in AD and aMCI and to study the impact of reduced decision-making performances on apathy. We recruited 20 patients with AD, 20 participants with aMCI, and 20 healthy controls. All participants completed the Lille apathy rating scale (LARS) and the Iowa gambling task (IGT). Both aMCI and AD participants had reduced performances on the IGT and were more apathetic compared to controls without any difference between aMCI and AD groups. For the entire sample, LARS initiation dimension was related to IGT disadvantageous decision-making profile. We provide the first study showing that both aMCI and AD individuals make less profitable decisions than controls, whereas aMCI and AD did not differ. Disadvantageous decision-making profile on the IGT was associated with higher level of apathy on the action initiation dimension. The role of an abnormal IGT performance as a risk factor for the development of apathy needs to be investigated in other clinical populations and in normal aging.

  13. Enhancing emotion-based learning in decision-making under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, David; Amián, Josué G; Sánchez-Medina, José A

    2015-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is widely used to study decision-making differences between several clinical and healthy populations. Unlike the healthy participants, clinical participants have difficulty choosing between advantageous options, which yield long-term benefits, and disadvantageous options, which give high immediate rewards but lead to negative profits. However, recent studies have found that healthy participants avoid the options with a higher frequency of losses regardless of whether or not they are profitable in the long run. The aim of this study was to control for the confounding effect of the frequency of losses between options to improve the performance of healthy participants on the IGT. Eighty healthy participants were randomly assigned to the original IGT or a modified version of the IGT that diminished the gap in the frequency of losses between options. The participants who used the modified IGT version learned to make better decisions based on long-term profit, as indicated by an earlier ability to discriminate good from bad options, and took less time to make their choices. This research represents an advance in the study of decision making under uncertainty by showing that emotion-based learning is improved by controlling for the loss-frequency bias effect.

  14. Developing Emotion-Based Case Formulations: A Research-Informed Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Leone, Antonio; Kramer, Ueli

    2017-01-01

    New research-informed methods for case conceptualization that cut across traditional therapy approaches are increasingly popular. This paper presents a trans-theoretical approach to case formulation based on the research observations of emotion. The sequential model of emotional processing (Pascual-Leone & Greenberg, 2007) is a process research model that provides concrete markers for therapists to observe the emerging emotional development of their clients. We illustrate how this model can be used by clinicians to track change and provides a 'clinical map,' by which therapist may orient themselves in-session and plan treatment interventions. Emotional processing offers as a trans-theoretical framework for therapists who wish to conduct emotion-based case formulations. First, we present criteria for why this research model translates well into practice. Second, two contrasting case studies are presented to demonstrate the method. The model bridges research with practice by using client emotion as an axis of integration. Key Practitioner Message Process research on emotion can offer a template for therapists to make case formulations while using a range of treatment approaches. The sequential model of emotional processing provides a 'process map' of concrete markers for therapists to (1) observe the emerging emotional development of their clients, and (2) help therapists develop a treatment plan. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. African-American Sacred Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, A. Peter

    1991-01-01

    The history of African-American sacred music is traced from the time of slavery to the present interest in gospel music. The religious music of African Americans is geared toward liberation themes. It is important that this music does not dilute its power through cross-over with other music forms. (SLD)

  16. Other Directions for Music Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobialka, Nancy C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Illustrates the diversity possible in music-related careers by describing jobs of the music business attorney, music therapist, ethnomusicologist, music librarian, and electronic music snythesist. Educational requirements, personal qualifications, and the advantages and disadvantages of each job are discussed. (AM)

  17. The Historical Justification of Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Matti

    2008-01-01

    The article deals with various aspects of justifying music historically. In Matti Huttunen's opinion Western music culture has been strongly historical since the nineteenth century. The article attempts to elucidate the historical nature of music, as well as the canon of music, the selective nature of music history, and the influence of aesthetic…

  18. Musical Maps as Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Deborah V.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the metaphorical relationship between the process of narrative inquiry and the process of "musical mapping." The creation of musical maps was used as a classroom tool for enabling students' musical understanding while listening to music. As teacher-researcher, I studied my fifth-grade music students as they interacted with…

  19. Film Music. Factfile No. 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsas, Diana, Ed.; And Others

    Organizations listed here with descriptive information include film music clubs and music guilds and associations. These are followed by a representative list of schools offering film music and/or film sound courses. Sources are listed for soundtrack recordings, sound effects/production music, films on film music, and oral history programs. The…

  20. The Musical Self-Concept of Chinese Music Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petersen, Suse; Camp, Marc-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    .... In particular, there have been no enquiries yet in the Chinese music education environment. This study's goal was the characterization of musical self-concept types among music students at a University in Beijing, China...

  1. Application of Digital Music Technology in Music Pedagogy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiwei Zhang; Xin Sui

    2017-01-01

    This paper expounds the concept and current development of digital music technology in modern times by exploration and analysis around the music technology, in order to better develop music pedagogy...

  2. Redefining Music Appreciation: Exploring the Power of Music

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pierce, Deborah L

    2015-01-01

    How might we create a world empowered by music? How might we change our culture to accept music as an innate intelligence and assist others in discovering the joy, enchantment, mystery, and power of music in their daily lives...

  3. Nonlinearities and synchronization in musical acoustics and music psychology

    CERN Document Server

    Bader, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinearities are a crucial and founding principle in nearly all musical systems, may they be musical instruments, timbre or rhythm perception and production, or neural networks of music perception. This volume gives an overview about present and past research in these fields. In Musical Acoustics, on the one hand the nonlinearities in musical instruments often produce the musically interesting features. On the other, musical instruments are nonlinear by nature, and tone production is the result of synchronization and self-organization within the instruments. Furthermore, as nearly all musical instruments are driven by impulses an Impulse Pattern Formulation (IPF) is suggested, an iterative framework holding for all musical instruments. It appears that this framework is able to reproduce the complex and perceptionally most salient initial transients of musical instruments. In Music Psychology, nonlinearities are present in all areas of musical features, like pitch, timbre, or rhythm perception. In terms of r...

  4. Preservice Music Teachers' Attitudes toward Popular Music in the Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, D. Gregory; Gooding, Lori F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine preservice music educators' attitudes toward popular music in the music classroom. On a survey instrument designed by the investigators, participants ("N" = 82) rated (a) the effectiveness of popular music in addressing the National Standards for Music Education, (b) the appropriateness of popular…

  5. [Neuroarchitecture of musical emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sel, Alejandra; Calvo-Merino, Beatriz

    2013-03-01

    The emotional response to music, or musical emotion, is a universal response that draws on diverse psychological processes implemented in a large array of neural structures and mechanisms. Studies using electroencephalography, functional magnetic resonance, lesions and individuals with extent musical training have begun to elucidate some of these mechanisms. The objective of this article is reviewing the most relevant studies that have tried to identify the neural correlates of musical emotion from the more automatic to the more complex processes, and to understand how these correlates interact in the brain. The article describes how the presentation of music perceived as emotional is associated with a rapid autonomic response in thalamic and subthalamic structures, accompanied by changes in the electrodermal and endocrine responses. It also explains how musical emotion processing activates auditory cortex, as well as a series of limbic and paralimbic structures, such as the amygdala, the anterior cingulate cortex or the hippocampus, demonstrating the relevant contribution of the limbic system to musical emotion. Further, it is detailed how musical emotion depends to a great extent on semantic and syntactic process carried out in temporal and parietofrontal areas, respectively. Some of the recent works demonstrating that musical emotion highly relies on emotional simulation are also mentioned. Finally, a summary of these studies, their limitations, and suggestions for further research on the neuroarchitecture of musical emotion are given.

  6. Music, Cognition, Culture, and Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CROSS, IAN

    2001-01-01

    .... Music is different things and does different things in different cultures; the bundles of elements and functions that are music for any given culture may overlap minimally with those of another culture, even for those cultures where “music...

  7. Is memory for music special?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulkind, Matthew D

    2009-07-01

    Although psychologists since Hermann Ebbinghaus have studied memory, research in this area has focused on visual and verbal stimuli with little attention paid to music. This bias is surprising because of the ubiquity of music in human cultures across history as well as current cultural beliefs that memory for music is "special." This paper examines the question of whether memory for music is special by addressing two related questions: First, do cultural beliefs about the mnemonic power of music stand up to empirical test? Second, can theories designed to explain memory for non-musical stimuli be applied to musical stimuli? A review of the literature suggests that music is special in some circumstances but not others and that some theories designed to explain cognitive processing of linguistic stimuli apply reasonably well to musical stimuli. Thus, although the question of whether memory for music is special remains open, the unique structure of musical stimuli strongly suggests that memory for music is indeed special.

  8. Pain, music creativity and music therapy in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, C C

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the music therapy literature yields numerous reports to support the role of music in the alleviation of pain in palliative care. Four theoretical perspectives that support why many patients report reduced pain sensation after music therapy include: the psychological relationship between music and pain; the psychophysiological theory; spinal mechanisms involved in pain modulation; and the role of endorphins. Considerations significant to the use of music in pain relief include how music, used inappropriately, can aggravate pain sensation. Case studies, which include the use of creative music therapy techniques, point to the efficacy of music therapy in alleviating the pain experiences of both palliative care patients and their significant others.

  9. Chaotic Music Generation System Using Music Conductor Gesture

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shuai; MAEDA, Yoichiro; Takahashi, Yasutake

    2013-01-01

    In the research of interactive music generation,we propose a music generation method, that thecomputer generates the music, under the recognitionof human music conductor’s gestures.In this research,the generated music is tuned by the recognized gesturesfor the parameters of the network of chaotic elementsin real time. The music conductor’s hand motionsare detected by Microsoft Kinect in this system.Music theories are embedded in the algorithm, as a result,the generated music will be richer. F...

  10. Flexible emotion-based decision-making behavior varies in current and former smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Zoe; O'Connor, Martin; Jollans, Emily K; O'Halloran, Laura; Dymond, Simon; Whelan, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Suboptimal decision-making is a feature in the initiation and maintenance of substance use, often manifested in choosing for short-term benefits rather than long-term gain, and the failure to display cognitive flexibility, respectively. Studies of nicotine users typically focus on characterizing those who are already addicted; less is known about decision-making in former smokers. Non- (n=21), former daily- (n=23) and current daily smokers (n=24), completed the contingency-shifting variant Iowa Gambling Task (csIGT), in which the reward and punishment contingencies of the decks are systematically varied after 100 trials of the 'standard' IGT. Scores on the standard blocks of the csIGT provided an index of emotion-based decision-making, while the contingency-shifting blocks assessed flexible decision-making. Subjective ratings were also recorded at 20-trial intervals. Both current and former smokers showed significantly impaired performance relative to non-smokers when making decisions during the standard blocks of the csIGT. Both former and non-smokers' awareness of the reward/punishment contingencies was significantly higher than those of current smokers at the end of the standard IGT. Both former and non-smokers had significantly better performance on the contingency shifting blocks, relative to current smokers. The findings indicate that both current and former smokers display a suboptimal pattern of decision-making than non-smokers during the standard IGT. However, with respect to the ability to change behavior following reversed contingencies, former smokers are more similar to non-smokers than to current smokers. Former smokers were also more aware of the contingencies than current smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting Negative Emotions Based on Mobile Phone Usage Patterns: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Galen Chin-Lun; Yang, Pei-Ching; Chang, Chia-Chi; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Chen, Ying-Yeh

    2016-08-10

    Prompt recognition and intervention of negative emotions is crucial for patients with depression. Mobile phones and mobile apps are suitable technologies that can be used to recognize negative emotions and intervene if necessary. Mobile phone usage patterns can be associated with concurrent emotional states. The objective of this study is to adapt machine-learning methods to analyze such patterns for the prediction of negative emotion. We developed an Android-based app to capture emotional states and mobile phone usage patterns, which included call logs (and use of apps). Visual analog scales (VASs) were used to report negative emotions in dimensions of depression, anxiety, and stress. In the system-training phase, participants were requested to tag their emotions for 14 consecutive days. Five feature-selection methods were used to determine individual usage patterns and four machine-learning methods were tested. Finally, rank product scoring was used to select the best combination to construct the prediction model. In the system evaluation phase, participants were then requested to verify the predicted negative emotions for at least 5 days. Out of 40 enrolled healthy participants, we analyzed data from 28 participants, including 30% (9/28) women with a mean (SD) age of 29.2 (5.1) years with sufficient emotion tags. The combination of time slots of 2 hours, greedy forward selection, and Naïve Bayes method was chosen for the prediction model. We further validated the personalized models in 18 participants who performed at least 5 days of model evaluation. Overall, the predictive accuracy for negative emotions was 86.17%. We developed a system capable of predicting negative emotions based on mobile phone usage patterns. This system has potential for ecological momentary intervention (EMI) for depressive disorders by automatically recognizing negative emotions and providing people with preventive treatments before it escalates to clinical depression.

  12. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review......, five studies investigated hormonal and physiological changes, and five studies focused on social and relational aspects of music therapy. The musical interventions in the studies were diverse, but singing featured as an important medium for change. Conclusions Evidence for short-term improvement...... in mood and reduction in behavioural disturbance was consistent, but there were no high-quality longitudinal studies that demonstrated long-term benefits of music therapy. Future music therapy studies need to define a theoretical model, include better-focused outcome measures, and discuss how the findings...

  13. Neural underpinnings of music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuust, Peter; Gebauer, Line K; Witek, Maria A G

    2014-01-01

    Musical rhythm, consisting of apparently abstract intervals of accented temporal events, has the remarkable ability to move our minds and bodies. Why do certain rhythms make us want to tap our feet, bop our heads or even get up and dance? And how does the brain process rhythmically complex rhythms...... during our experiences of music? In this chapter, we describe some common forms of rhythmic complexity in music and propose that the theory of predictive coding can explain how rhythm and rhythmic complexity are processed in the brain. We also consider how this theory may reveal why we feel so compelled...... by rhythmic tension in music. First, musical-theoretical and neuroscientific frameworks of rhythm are presented, in which rhythm perception is conceptualized as an interaction between what is heard (‘rhythm’) and the brain’s anticipatory structuring of music (‘the meter’). Second, three different examples...

  14. Music as therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Danhauer, Suzanne C

    2005-03-01

    Music is widely used to enhance well-being, reduce stress, and distract patients from unpleasant symptoms. Although there are wide variations in individual preferences, music appears to exert direct physiologic effects through the autonomic nervous system. It also has indirect effects by modifying caregiver behavior. Music effectively reduces anxiety and improves mood for medical and surgical patients, for patients in intensive care units and patients undergoing procedures, and for children as well as adults. Music is a low-cost intervention that often reduces surgical, procedural, acute, and chronic pain. Music also improves the quality of life for patients receiving palliative care, enhancing a sense of comfort and relaxation. Providing music to caregivers may be a cost-effective and enjoyable strategy to improve empathy, compassion, and relationship-centered care while not increasing errors or interfering with technical aspects of care.

  15. Principles of musical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  16. Fingerprinting of music scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Jonathan; Schmucker, Martin

    2004-06-01

    Publishers of sheet music are generally reluctant in distributing their content via the Internet. Although online sheet music distribution's advantages are numerous the potential risk of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) infringement, e.g. illegal online distributions, disables any innovation propensity. While active protection techniques only deter external risk factors, additional technology is necessary to adequately treat further risk factors. For several media types including music scores watermarking technology has been developed, which ebeds information in data by suitable data modifications. Furthermore, fingerprinting or perceptual hasing methods have been developed and are being applied especially for audio. These methods allow the identification of content without prior modifications. In this article we motivate the development of watermarking and fingerprinting technologies for sheet music. Outgoing from potential limitations of watermarking methods we explain why fingerprinting methods are important for sheet music and address potential applications. Finally we introduce a condept for fingerprinting of sheet music.

  17. Music as design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of the sounds of the surrounding world in music is today a familiar phenomenon on the electronic music and audio art scenes, and to some extent also in contemporary music. It is rarer for a contemporary audio or visual artist to use music as the form-giving element for a semi......-realistic event or narrative. In a way the phenomenon can be compared to Puccini's operas, or to the ground-breaking dance performances for which the choreographer Pina Bauch became famous, where musicalization produced stylizations fo everyday events. Familiar, readable events were reinforced and relocated...... that are normally overlooked or taken for granted. In several of the Albanian video and installationsartist Anri Sala's works, which this article concerns, music can also be regarded as the structuring or thematic focus for what takes place before our eyes in the video projections....

  18. Sonification and Music, Music and Sonification

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Despite it being more than twenty years since the launch of an international conference series dedicated to its study, there is still much debate over what sonification really is, and especially as regards its relationship to music. A layman’s definition of sonification might be that it is the use of non-speech audio to communicate data, the aural counterpart to visualization. Many researchers have claimed musicality for their sonifications, generally when using data-to-pitch mappings. In 200...

  19. Music training, cognition, and personality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corrigall, Kathleen A; Schellenberg, E Glenn; Misura, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Although most studies that examined associations between music training and cognitive abilities had correlational designs, the prevailing bias is that music training causes improvements in cognition...

  20. Generating Music from Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Hannah; Mohammad, Saif M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a system, TransProse, that automatically generates musical pieces from text. TransProse uses known relations between elements of music such as tempo and scale, and the emotions they evoke. Further, it uses a novel mechanism to determine sequences of notes that capture the emotional activity in the text. The work has applications in information visualization, in creating audio-visual e-books, and in developing music apps.

  1. Music Mixing Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Gelineck, Steven; Büchert, Morten; Andersen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-touch based interface for mixing music. The goal of the interface is to provide users with a more intuitive control of the music mix by implementing the so-called stage metaphor control scheme, which is especially suitable for multi-touch surfaces. Specifically, we discuss functionality important for the professional music technician (main target user) - functionality, which is especially challenging to integrate when implementing the stage metaphor. Finally we pro...

  2. Music and emotion / mood

    OpenAIRE

    古賀, 弘之

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to create a new kind of problem in the area of "music and emotion" research. Before surveying and reviewing articles about mood responses for music, I redefined "feeling" and "mood" for the purpose of this article. From the reviewed articles. I inferred that mood induction studies were effective to induce positive or negative moods in subjects. Recent studies, however, suggest that negative music not only induces negative mood but positive mood as well. Thus, f...

  3. Evaluating music emotion recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do...... not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER system, and conclude with recommendations....

  4. The taste of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesz, Bruno; Trevisan, Marcos A; Sigman, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Zarlino, one of the most important music theorists of the XVI century, described the minor consonances as 'sweet' (dolci) and 'soft' (soavi) (Zarlino 1558/1983, in On the Modes New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1983). Hector Berlioz, in his Treatise on Modern Instrumentation and Orchestration (London: Novello, 1855), speaks about the 'small acid-sweet voice' of the oboe. In line with this tradition of describing musical concepts in terms of taste words, recent empirical studies have found reliable associations between taste perception and low-level sound and musical parameters, like pitch and phonetic features. Here we investigated whether taste words elicited consistent musical representations by asking trained musicians to improvise on the basis of the four canonical taste words: sweet, sour, bitter, and salty. Our results showed that, even in free improvisation, taste words elicited very reliable and consistent musical patterns:'bitter' improvisations are low-pitched and legato (without interruption between notes), 'salty' improvisations are staccato (notes sharply detached from each other), 'sour' improvisations are high-pitched and dissonant, and 'sweet' improvisations are consonant, slow, and soft. Interestingly, projections of the improvisations of taste words to musical space (a vector space defined by relevant musical parameters) revealed that, in musical space, improvisations based on different taste words were nearly orthogonal or opposite. Decoding methods could classify binary choices of improvisations (i.e., identify the improvisation word from the melody) at performance of around 80%--well above chance. In a second experiment we investigated the mapping from perception of music to taste words. Fifty-seven non-musical experts listened to a fraction of the improvisations. We found that listeners classified with high performance the taste word which had elicited the improvisation. Our results, furthermore, show that associations of taste and music

  5. Music in Galileo's Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrobelli, P.

    2011-06-01

    Claudio Monteverdi appears as the key personality of the music in Galileo's time. His revolution in format and function of the musical language-from an essentially edonistic creation of purely sonorous images to a musical language consciously "expressive" of the content of the words on which it is based-is similar in character to the influential innovations in scientific thinking operated by Galileo.

  6. Music and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, José A.; González Sánchez, S.; Caballero, I.

    What do Brian May (Queen's lead guitarist), William Herschel and the Jupiter Symphony have in common? And a white dwarf, a piano and Lagartija Nick? At first glance, there is no connection between them, nor between the Music and the Astronomy. However, there are many revealing examples of musical Astronomy and astronomical Music. This four-page proceeding describes the sonorous poster that we showed during the VIII Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society.

  7. Algorithmic Clustering of Music

    OpenAIRE

    Cilibrasi, Rudi; Vitanyi, Paul; de Wolf, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    We present a fully automatic method for music classification, based only on compression of strings that represent the music pieces. The method uses no background knowledge about music whatsoever: it is completely general and can, without change, be used in different areas like linguistic classification and genomics. It is based on an ideal theory of the information content in individual objects (Kolmogorov complexity), information distance, and a universal similarity metric. Experiments show ...

  8. Music and Combat Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    1   AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY MUSIC AND COMBAT MOTIVATION by Sally C. Maddocks, Major, USAF Master of...accordance with Air Force Instruction 51-303, it is not copyrighted, but is the property of the United States government.  3   Music has the power...are many historical examples from which to draw evidence of the impact of music on fielded forces. One must study not only the historical events, but

  9. Music Mixing Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Büchert, Morten; Andersen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-touch based interface for mixing music. The goal of the interface is to provide users with a more intuitive control of the music mix by implementing the so-called stage metaphor control scheme, which is especially suitable for multi-touch surfaces. Specifically, we...... discuss functionality important for the professional music technician (main target user) - functionality, which is especially challenging to integrate when implementing the stage metaphor. Finally we propose and evaluate solutions to these challenges....

  10. Musical and Verbal Interventions in Music Therapy: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir

    1999-01-01

    In clinical work, our main task as music therapists is to make interventions: we give our clients guidance, encouragement, and support; we offer interpretations; we play with and for them. Most of the interventions are either musical or verbal. As a music therapy clinician, supervisor, and educator, I wanted to explore the following questions: (a) How do music therapists define musical and verbal interventions? (b) When does a music therapist intervene musically and when does the therapist intervene verbally? (c) When and why do music therapists suggest to their clients exploring an issue musically or verbally? (d) Do musical and verbal interventions serve the same purpose or different purposes? (d) How is the decision about the type of intervention made? and, (e) is there a difference between the power and meaning of musical interventions versus verbal interventions for both the therapist and the client?

  11. Mood Dependent Music Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Music is one of the most expressive media to show and manipulate emotions, but there have been few studies on how to generate music connected to emotions. Such studies have always been shunned upon by musicians affirming that a machine cannot create expressive music, as it's the composer......'s and player's experiences and emotions that get poured into the piece. At the same time another problem is that music is highly complicated (and subjective) and finding out which elements transmit certain emotions is not an easy task. This demo wants to show how the manipulation of a set of features can...

  12. Amusia and musical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alossa, Nicoletta; Castelli, Lorys

    2009-01-01

    Music, as language, is a universal and specific trait to humans; it is a complex ability with characteristics that are unique compared to other cognitive abilities. Nevertheless, several issues are still open to debate, such as, for example, whether music is a faculty that is independent from the rest of the cognitive system, and whether musical skills are mediated by a single mechanism or by a combination of processes that are independent from one another. Moreover, the anatomical correlations of music have yet to be clarified. The goal of this review is to illustrate the current condition of the neuropsychology of music and to describe different approaches to the study of the musical functions. Hereby, we will describe the neuropsychological findings, suggesting that music is a special function carried out by different and dedicated processes that are probably subserved by different anatomical regions of the brain. Moreover, we will review the evidence obtained by working with brain-damaged patients suffering from music agnosia, a selective impairment in music recognition. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The Music Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    http://www.njmt.no/bookreview_2006071.html "The music effect is not about a particular composer, musical style, geographic location, language, or performance group. It is, at once, about all of these" (p. 249). This book is written by two people with very different educational backgrounds. Dr...... into music physiology. We have already seen them working together in 2001 in Berger’s book Music Therapy, Sensory Integration and the Autistic Child published by Jessica Kingsley, and this time their collaboration results in a book that is about the attributes of scientific reality (physics) as embedded...

  14. Let the Music Awaken

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chien-Yu

    2013-01-01

    There are two volumes to this dissertation: the first is a monograph, and the second is two music scores with the movies burned on one DVD, both of which are described below.Volume I Film score can be seen as one of the most prevailing music genres developing and popularizing since the first quarter of the 20th century. As a contemporary composer studying both classical music and film music, the interaction between a movie and its score is fascinating to me. However, a full, academic...

  15. [Music and Glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plange, N

    2017-02-01

    Music may have multiple influences on the human organism. A possible therapeutic effect for patients with glaucoma has been postulated, aside from the known impact of music on the cardiovascular system, psychogenic effects and a short-term improvement in mental performance (Mozart effect). The higher level of mental stress in patients with glaucoma and type-A personality behaviour may be related to higher intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma. Relaxing music may have a positive impact in these patients, related to a reduction in intraocular pressure or its fluctuations. However, only limited data exist on the effects of music on intraocular pressure. No clinical studies have yet been performed to investigate the effect of music or music therapy on glaucoma progression. The music of Mozart may influence visual field examinations, possibly due to a positive short term effect on mental performance. This factor needs to be addressed in studies dealing with the effect of music in glaucoma. The relevance of intraocular pressure increases in professional wind instrument players is controversial. An increased level of care might be advisable in patients with advanced glaucoma. The influences of music on humans, altered personality profiles in patients with glaucoma and the studies showing some effect of stress on intraocular pressure stress the relevance of psychological support for glaucoma patients, who are confronted with a disease with a high longterm risk of blindness. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...

  17. The Prefiltering Techniques in Emotion Based Place Recommendation Derived by User Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. A. Piumi Ishanka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context-aware recommendation systems attempt to address the challenge of identifying products or items that have the greatest chance of meeting user requirements by adapting to current contextual information. Many such systems have been developed in domains such as movies, books, and music, and emotion is a contextual parameter that has already been used in those fields. This paper focuses on the use of emotion as a contextual parameter in a tourist destination recommendation system. We developed a new corpus that incorporates the emotion parameter by employing semantic analysis techniques for destination recommendation. We review the effectiveness of incorporating emotion in a recommendation process using prefiltering techniques and show that the use of emotion as a contextual parameter for location recommendation in conjunction with collaborative filtering increases user satisfaction.

  18. Music and Music Intervention for Therapeutic Purposes in Patients with Ventilator Support; Gamelan Music Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhartini Suhartini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gamelan music is one of folk music for Javanese people. Several research studies testing the effects of music were conducted in Western countries. The music studies for therapeutic purposes used classical music commonly. Even in Indonesia, some researchers may use that music for therapeutic purposes. This concern article explains the perspective music and music intervention as therapeutic purposes, view with Javanese classical music.Objectives: To explore the evidence of music and music intervention for therapeutic purposes and to describe the perspective of gamelan music used in nursing interventionMethods: Using five bibliography databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Science Direct, Interscience, and Proquest were searched from 1999-2010 for original clinical reports or reviews that evaluated the use of complementary therapy for therapeutic intervention in patients with ventilator support. The term of complementary therapy, anxiety, and pain were used in a comprehensive search of electronic databases. Articles were screened and excluded based on the title and abstract information.Results: Music brings about helpful changes in the emotional and physical health of patients, and has the ability to provide an altered state of physical arousal and subsequent mood improvement by processing a progression of musical notes of varying tone, rhythm, and instrumentation for a pleasing effect.Conclusion: Music can be used for therapeutic purposes, for instance to reduce anxiety, to decrease pain sensation, and some effects of psychological impact. Include, the gamelan music can be offer for patients for Javanese people in Indonesia.Key words: Music, music intervention, therapeutic purposes

  19. Music feels like moods feel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris eGoffin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: (1 moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and (2 music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is correct to say that a listener's entire mood is not relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. However, the experience of mood consists of having different feelings. Music induces feelings that are intentionally directed at the music and clusters of these feelings can be recognized as typical of a specific mood. Therefore, mood-feelings are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music.

  20. Dyslexia and music: measuring musical timing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overy, Katie; Nicolson, Roderick I; Fawcett, Angela J; Clarke, Eric F

    2003-02-01

    Over the last few decades, a growing amount of research has suggested that dyslexics have particular difficulties with skills involving accurate or rapid timing, including musical timing skills. It has been hypothesised that music training may be able to remediate such timing difficulties, and have a positive effect on fundamental perceptual skills that are important in the development of language and literacy skills (Overy, 2000). In order to explore this hypothesis further, the nature and extent of dyslexics' musical difficulties need to be examined in more detail. In the present study, a collection of musical aptitude tests (MATs) were designed specifically for dyslexic children, in order to distinguish between a variety of musical skills and sub-skills. 15 dyslexic children (age 7-11, mean age 9.0) and 11 control children (age 7-10, mean age 8.9) were tested on the MATs, and their scores were compared. Results showed that the dyslexic group scored higher than the control group on 3 tests of pitch skills (possibly attributable to slightly greater musical experience), but lower than the control group on 7 out of 9 tests of timing skills. Particular difficulties were noted on one of the tests involving rapid temporal processing, in which a subgroup of 5 of the dyslexic children (33%) (mean age 8.4) was found to account for all the significant error. Also, an interesting correlation was found between spelling ability and the skill of tapping out the rhythm of a song, which both involve the skill of syllable segmentation. These results support suggestions that timing is a difficulty area for dyslexic children, and suggest that rhythm skills and rapid skills may need particular attention in any form of musical training with dyslexics.

  1. Towards a Music-based Understanding of Improvisation in Music ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attempts to make sense of improvisation in music therapy of ten rely on psychological, medical, psychoanalytic, musical or other discourses. These attempts seem to ignore the musical aspect of clinical improvisation and make an unsatisfactory leap of logic from the musical event to its extramusical meaning. This article ...

  2. A Matter of Comparative Music Education? Community Music in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz-Welzel, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    In German music education, the term "community music" is almost unknown. There could be various reasons for this fact such as a lack of community music activities in Germany, terminological problems concerning the German translation, or an appropriate explanation of the term "community music." This paper will discuss some of…

  3. Integrating Music, Language and the Voice in Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne Loewy

    2004-01-01

    Although there has been a fair amount of research and clinical practice related to neurological music therapy, speech production within a musical context and music psychotherapeutic voice work, we rarely find these practices intertwined. The following article provides history, rationale, definition of practice and theory that provides strong backing for the integration of the models and approaches currently available to music therapists.

  4. Music or Musics? An Important Matter at Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, J. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Philosophers of music education presently find themselves suspended between modernism's universalist convictions and post-modernism's cultural relativist insights. In "Music Matters: A New Philosophy of Music Education" (1995), David Elliott challenged longstanding conceptions of "music education as aesthetic education" to…

  5. Deploying music characteristics for an affective music player

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, Marjolein D.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; van den Broek, Egon; Cohn, Jeffrey; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes work toward an affective music player (AMP), which is able to direct affect to a goal state by selecting music. Repeatedly, music has been shown to modulate affect; however, precise guidelines for the use of music characteristics in an AMP have not been defined. To explore

  6. Infants' Attention to Synthesised Baby Music and Original Acoustic Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkow, Carla H.; Costa-Giomi, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    The distinct music genre known as baby music is based on the premise that infants benefit from music "re-orchestrated for their little ears" ("Baby Einstein Takealong Tunes". (2012). Retrieved December 11, 2012, from http://www.babyeinstein.com/en/products/product_explorer/theme/music/62350/Takealong_Tunes.html). We completed a…

  7. Music that Represents Culture: Selecting Music with Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Carlos R.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a framework for measuring the validity and appropriateness of multicultural materials for inclusion in the music curriculum. Music educators continually try to help students understand music within its cultural context. To meet this goal, music materials should approach some level of authenticity. The author…

  8. Teaching Popular Music: Investigating Music Educators' Perceptions and Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, D. Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in-service music teachers' perceptions of popular music in the classroom and to examine their own preparation to teach popular music. A sample of music teachers, drawn from two regional chapters of the American Orff-Schulwerk Association, completed a researcher-designed survey instrument. Results…

  9. Satire in Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Stefanija

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article surveys the scope of satire and suggests its range. It is divided into six sections. The introductory comment (The semantics of music briefly outlines the fact that music has always been a part of communicative endeavors. The historical background of the semantic issues in music is described (Historical surmises, which is necessary to define satire in music as a specific genre combining features from different musical forms. The third section discusses six areas as the most common contexts of musical satire: 1 satirical music theater works, such as the opera Il Girello by Jacopo Melani, the famous Coff ee Cantata (Schweigt Still, plaudert nicht, BWV 211 by Johann Sebastian Bach, Der Schulmeister by Georg Philipp Telemann, The Beggar’s Opera by John Gay, and so on; 2 musical genres associated with satire, either a within vocal-instrumental music; for instance, opera buffa, Singspiel, operetta, cabaret, vaudeville, and so on, or b in instrumental pieces, such as capriccios, grotesques, scherzos, burlesques, and so on; 3 individual features or compositional parts related to satire; for example, in a vocal music, the Satiro in Orfeo by Luigi Rossi, the range of the Orlando character in eighteenth-century opera, who “may be satire, a fool or hero, but never all together” (Harris, 1986, 106, the satirical antihero Matěj Brouček in Leoš Janáček’s work, and also Lady Macbeth, and in b instrumental music, such as the sermon of St. Anthony in Gustav Mahler’s Second Symphony, his marches, and “low-brow tunes,” a number of episodes in Dmitri Shostakovich’s works, and so on; 4 works variously related to criticism, such as the work of Eric Satie, Kurt Weill, Luigi Nono, Maurizio Kagel, and Vinko Globokar, as well as Fran Milčinski (a.k.a. Ježek, Laibach, or Bob Dylan; 5 music journalism, from Johann Beer and Louis-Abel Beffroy de Reigny and his popular pieces de circonstance, to nineteenth-century music journalism, George

  10. Music preference as a factor of music distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, J A

    1976-08-01

    The present study is an experimental analysis of music preference as a factor of music distraction measured by the Stroop tests. Significant differences were found among groups given, most preferred music, least preferred music, and no music(quiet). Each group of 10 subjects were randomly chosen from 42 screened subjects. Performance was better without music and better with most preferred than with least preferred music. The results were not consistent with those previously found for the effects of noise upon Stroop test performance.

  11. Musical creativity in Slovenian elementary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Črčinovič Rozman, Janja

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Slovenian music education curriculum for the first years of elementary school emphasises the following musical activities in the classroom: singing, playing instruments, listening to music, movement to music and musical creativity. In the field of musical creativity, there are two activities where students can be original and creative: making music and moving or drawing/painting activities stimulated by music. Purpose: This research investigated musical creativity in Slovenian...

  12. Topic theory and Brazilian musicality: Considerations on rhetoricity in music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acácio T. C. Piedade

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an application of the topic theory to the analyses of Brazilian music. It starts with a reflection on the concepts of musicality, friction of musicalities in Brazilian jazz, and the fusion of musicalities that emerges from the invention of tradition. The discussion follows with the question of the adaptability of topic theory to national musics. Then, some musical examples are used in order to present some of the universes of topics of Brazilian music. In this article I argue that the concept of rhetoricity brings good results to the study of musical signification, and that the theory of topics is useful for other contexts than classical music, being an interesting route to the investigation of sociocultural connections in musicalities.

  13. Exploring Music through Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Joanne B.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a high school music technology course that uses a project-oriented approach to teach students about hardware and software tools for sequencing, arranging, multitrack recording, and mixing. Course equipment is listed, and the MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is briefly described. Copyright guidelines for educational uses of…

  14. Music and Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesco, Paula J.

    2010-01-01

    We have likely all heard of the so-called "Mozart Effect," the claim that listening to music increases intelligence. While the often-cited 1993 study never actually claimed such a profound conclusion, the resultant publicity focused the nation's attention on the evidence of music's positive effect on various types of cognitive skills.…

  15. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  16. Music therapy for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, Sonja; Fusar-Poli, Laura; Freeman, Ruth E.; Spreen, Marinus; Ket, Johannes C.F.; Vink, Annemiek C.; Maratos, Anna; Crawford, Mike; Chen, Xi Jing; Gold, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depression is a highly prevalent mood disorder that is characterised by persistent low mood, diminished interest, and loss of pleasure. Music therapy may be helpful in modulating moods and emotions. An update of the 2008 Cochrane review was needed to improve knowledge on effects of music

  17. Soaking in the Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhoff, Howard M.

    2009-01-01

    Scientists admit that they do not understand yet how infants acquire their abilities and love of music. What they do know, however, is that much of the brain development in the first six years of a child's life is devoted to the learning and retaining of music and language. It appears that children have an open window, which allows them to…

  18. Wireless networked music performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in Networked Music Performance (NMP) and a historical survey of computer music networking. It introduces current technical trends in NMP and technical issues yet to be addressed. It also lists wireless communication protocols and compares these to the requirements of NMP. Practical use cases and advancements are also discussed.

  19. Vermittlungen - musically speaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weymann, Eckhard; Metzner, Susanne; Fitzthum, Elena

    2001-01-01

    Bilingual publication - mixed content in English and German. Articles were written by participants in the First European Symposium "Improvisation Training in Music Therapy education" which took place in Hamburg, 1998.......Bilingual publication - mixed content in English and German. Articles were written by participants in the First European Symposium "Improvisation Training in Music Therapy education" which took place in Hamburg, 1998....

  20. Music and Visual Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup

    2017-01-01

    The paper explores the potential of video ethnography concerning educational research on music as contributing to an inclusive learning environment in elementary school (research objective). In music education research, the use of visual data provided by video seems to be a relevant choice...

  1. The Story of Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    2016-01-01

    Udvalgte musikværker gennem historien, indspillet med digitale eller analoge instrumenter og udgivet i forbindelse med bogen "Music across Times & Fences"......Udvalgte musikværker gennem historien, indspillet med digitale eller analoge instrumenter og udgivet i forbindelse med bogen "Music across Times & Fences"...

  2. Shaker Oats: Fortifying Musicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmes, Laurie R.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how an experiment in a class she taught called Minority Musics of North America developed into a surprisingly successful and flexible teaching tool known as "Shaker Oats," created to encourage the concepts of ensemble and community. Most music educators in the United States today are familiar with…

  3. SMUG: Scientific Music Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco; A B Barros, Gabriella; Togelius, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Music is based on the real world. Composers use their day-to-day lives as inspiration to create rhythm and lyrics. Procedural music generators are capable of creating good quality pieces, and while some already use the world as inspiration, there is still much to be explored in this. We describe ...

  4. Lessons in American Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson Lindsay, Debra Kay

    2006-01-01

    "Lessons in American Music," by Debra Kay Robinson Lindsay, is a collection of lessons covering William Billings, Stephen Foster, Scott Joplin, and "The Star-Spangled Banner." This book is an all-in-one resource for teachers, offering lesson plans, activities, sheet music, and assessments. The set of lessons on William Billings will let your…

  5. Classifications in popular music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Venrooij, A.; Schmutz, V.; Wright, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    The categorical system of popular music, such as genre categories, is a highly differentiated and dynamic classification system. In this article we present work that studies different aspects of these categorical systems in popular music. Following the work of Paul DiMaggio, we focus on four

  6. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  7. Improvisation in Korean Musics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byong Won

    1980-01-01

    In this article, an ethnocentric view of the improvisatory music of Korea is presented in terms of what Korean musicians think of improvisation as opposed to fixed composition and how improvisation operates as a performance practice. Musical scores and selected recordings are listed. (Author/KC)

  8. What is musical genius?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Paul

    2008-04-01

    While musical genius must have neuro-biological basis it is defined and understood within prevailing cultural frameworks. In order to measure it historic and aesthetic traditions and assumptions need to be considered. Child prodigies and savants are discussed as well as traditional associations that suggest that depression and the melancholic personality have particular relevance in musical creativity and originality.

  9. Personalized affective music player

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Joris H.; van den Broek, Egon; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Cohn, J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    We introduce and test an affective music player (AMP) that selects music for mood enhancement. Through a concise overview of content, construct, and ecological validity, we elaborate five considerations that form the foundation of the AMP. Based on these considerations, computational models are

  10. Complexity measures of music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, April; Mahmoodi, Korosh; West, Bruce J.

    2018-03-01

    We present a technique to search for the presence of crucial events in music, based on the analysis of the music volume. Earlier work on this issue was based on the assumption that crucial events correspond to the change of music notes, with the interesting result that the complexity index of the crucial events is mu ~ 2, which is the same inverse power-law index of the dynamics of the brain. The search technique analyzes music volume and confirms the results of the earlier work, thereby contributing to the explanation as to why the brain is sensitive to music, through the phenomenon of complexity matching. Complexity matching has recently been interpreted as the transfer of multifractality from one complex network to another. For this reason we also examine the mulifractality of music, with the observation that the multifractal spectrum of a computer performance is significantly narrower than the multifractal spectrum of a human performance of the same musical score. We conjecture that although crucial events are demonstrably important for information transmission, they alone are not suficient to define musicality, which is more adequately measured by the multifractality spectrum.

  11. European Music Year 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanderson, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Articles concerning music are included in this newsletter dedicated to cultural venture to be jointly carried out by the Council of Europe and the European communities. Many events will mark Music Year 1985, including concerts, dance performances, operas, publications, recordings, festivals, exhibitions, competitions, and conferences on musical…

  12. Remote Music Tuition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Duffy; D. Williams; I. Kegel; T. Stevens; A.J. Jansen (Jack); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); P. Healey

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractIt is common to learn to play an orchestral musical instrument through one-to-one lessons with an experienced tutor. For musicians who choose to study performance at an undergraduate level and beyond, their tutor is an important part of their professional musical development. For many

  13. Does Music Make You Smarter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Steven M.; Morrison, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Asks whether music makes people smarter stating that music education makes people smarter in music. Reviews well-known studies on the "Mozart Effect," keyboard training, and music and academic achievement. Addresses where the studies are misinterpreted/overstated and identifies alternative points that teachers can emphasize. (CMK)

  14. Music, the Brain, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Warren Puffer

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on role of music education. If the society has changed how it values music, it is certainly worthwhile to reevaluate the role music should play in the education and development of a child. Children are not predisposed to be able to understand one style of music over another. Rather they learn traits of the style of their…

  15. When I Listen to Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Alan Russell

    2000-01-01

    Using music in the classroom enhances learning. Music and dance provide an opportunity for positive social interaction. Singing fosters understanding of the sound and rhythm of language. Exposing children to the patterns of different kinds of music helps them to recognize patterns in mathematics. Background music in the classroom reduces stress…

  16. MIST: A Music Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerheim, Rosalee

    The Music Information System for Theorists (MIST) allows musicians to find pedagogical music excerpts with ease and speed. Users may search for excerpts using as keys composer, date, and/or musical concept exhibited. The desired excerpts are printed in conventional music notation or output in MUSTRAN code via the Indiana University Computer Music…

  17. Music to teach astronomy by

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, Eberhard

    1999-03-01

    Author shares his technique of aligning music selections with his introductory astronomy syllabus. He begins class with a music selection as an introduction to the concepts covered in class. List of 40 music titles and composers used can be downloaded from http://www-ssg.sr.unh.edu/406/music.html.

  18. Does Music Make You Smarter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Frances

    1995-01-01

    Music stimulates thought processes and enhances spatial reasoning, which are essential for academic achievement. Research indicates the spatial reasoning performance of preschoolers who receive music lessons far exceeds that of comparison students. Even listening to music proves beneficial to spatial reasoning. Music training seems also to benefit…

  19. Celebrating the American Music Mosaic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Criticizes the U.S. tendency to emphasize the European musical tradition to the exclusion of other cultural influences. Notes the ease of learning about other musical traditions. Argues that music teachers and students alike can benefit from multicultural materials. Suggests that multicultural music education can heighten respect for the U.S.…

  20. The Charm of Community Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisen, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Music education in communities is a newly sprouted thing and is gradually catching people's attention. Music education seeks to promote community members' aesthetic senses. Music and the arts, the best tools for moving people's souls, link different hearts across various boundaries, affecting all aspects of social life. Music education can serve…

  1. Research and the music curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Swanwick

    2000-01-01

    In this paper I wish to demonstrate how research can illuminate practice and inform curriculum and teachingdecisions. I shall draw attention to three areas where I believe research contributes to the development of music education. These are: assessment of the musical work of students, the evaluation of curriculum activities, the relationship between music in schools and music beyond the school gate.

  2. Music as Co-Therapist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warja, Margareta; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2014-01-01

    The articles discusses criteria for the selection of music in Guided Imagery and Music sessions and presents a txonomy with three main catgeories and nine sub-categories.......The articles discusses criteria for the selection of music in Guided Imagery and Music sessions and presents a txonomy with three main catgeories and nine sub-categories....

  3. A Credo of Music Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Bengt

    2005-01-01

    More people are currently experiencing and performing music than at any previous time. New technology has made it possible to both create and distribute music all over the world. However, although it is of huge importance, the role of music education is often neglected. What then is the essence of music education? Traditionally people speak of…

  4. Visualizing Music in its Entirety using Acoustic Features: Music Flowgram

    OpenAIRE

    Dasaem Jeong; Juhan Nam

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method for visualizing a music audio file from its beginning to end, especially for classical music. Our goal is developing an easy-to-use visualization method that is helpful for listeners and can be used for various kinds of classical music, even for complex orchestral music. To represent musical characteristic, the method uses audio features like volume, onset density, and auditory roughness, which describe loudness, tempo, and dissonance, respectivel...

  5. Communicative Musicality:A cornerstone for Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Holck, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    Communicative Musicality – a cornerstone for music therapyMalloch, Stephen & Trevarthen, Colwyn (Eds.) (2009). Communicative Musicality. Exploring the Basis of Human Companionship. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Reviewed by Ulla Holck, PhD, Associated Professor, Head of the Music Therapy Programme, Aalborg University. Her Ph.D. thesis from 2002, ‘ComMusical’ Interplay in Music Therapy, relies heavily on infant research. In 1979, Colwyn Trevarthen did an acoustic analysis of video recordi...

  6. Deploying music characteristics for an affective music player

    OpenAIRE

    van der Zwaag, Marjolein D.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; van den Broek, Egon; Cohn, Jeffrey; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes work toward an affective music player (AMP), which is able to direct affect to a goal state by selecting music. Repeatedly, music has been shown to modulate affect; however, precise guidelines for the use of music characteristics in an AMP have not been defined. To explore these, we investigated the influence of music characteristics on 32 participants who listened to 16 songs, testing effects of tempo (slow/high), mode (minor/major), and percussiveness (low/high). Subjec...

  7. Music and nonmusical abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E G

    2001-06-01

    Reports that exposure to music causes benefits in nonmusical domains have received widespread attention in the mainstream media. Such reports have also influenced public policy. The so-called "Mozart effect" actually refers to two relatively distinct phenomena. One concerns short-term increases in spatial abilities that are said to occur from listening to music composed by Mozart. The other refers to the possibility that formal training in music yields nonmusical benefits. A review of the relevant findings indicates that the short-term effect is small and unreliable. Moreover, when it is evident, it can be explained by between-condition differences in the listener's mood or levels of cognitive arousal. By contrast, the effect of music lessons on nonmusical aspects of cognitive development is still an open question. Several studies have reported positive associations between formal music lessons and abilities in nonmusical (e.g., linguistic, mathematical, and spatial) domains. Nonetheless, compelling evidence for a causal link remains elusive.

  8. Virtual Reality Musical Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur; Kojs, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development and availability of low-cost technologies have created a wide interest in virtual reality. In the field of computer music, the term “virtual musical instruments” has been used for a long time to describe software simulations, extensions of existing musical instruments......, and ways to control them with new interfaces for musical expression. Virtual reality musical instruments (VRMIs) that include a simulated visual component delivered via a head-mounted display or other forms of immersive visualization have not yet received much attention. In this article, we present a field...... overview of VRMIs from the viewpoint of the performer. We propose nine design guidelines, describe evaluation methods, analyze case studies, and consider future challenges....

  9. Music and Alterity Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  10. Music for Hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gross, B; Ketema Wassie, F; Agnholt, Hanne

    by the Danish composer Niels Eje were used.   Results This study shows that patients undergoing their first dialysis can have a positive experience and lower level of discomfort from listening to music during dialysis. Analysis of the questionnaire showed that patients listening to music were unaffected...... is known from literature to influence and dampen anxiety and tension and has been used for millennia in the treatment of illness. Here we report a study on the influence of music on patients undergoing dialysis and whether music has a potential for lowering discomfort in patients during first-time dialysis.......   Purpose To investigate whether music can reduce feelings of anxiety, tension and restlessness in patients new to dialysis treatment and make them more relaxed during the treatment.   Method Twenty patients aged 42-84 were selected for participation in the study, which took place over two separate dialysis...

  11. The neurochemistry of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Mona Lisa; Levitin, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    Music is used to regulate mood and arousal in everyday life and to promote physical and psychological health and well-being in clinical settings. However, scientific inquiry into the neurochemical effects of music is still in its infancy. In this review, we evaluate the evidence that music improves health and well-being through the engagement of neurochemical systems for (i) reward, motivation, and pleasure; (ii) stress and arousal; (iii) immunity; and (iv) social affiliation. We discuss the limitations of these studies and outline novel approaches for integration of conceptual and technological advances from the fields of music cognition and social neuroscience into studies of the neurochemistry of music. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Aprendizaje musical significativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rusinek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the meaningfulness of music learning requires two complementary perspectives. On the one hand, I maintain that the declarative knowledge about music is meaningful when it is related in a non trivial manner to the musical event it denotes, and propose a way of evaluating that meaningfulness through tests that demand the use of different processes of the auditive cognition. On the other hand, given that it is the apprentice who decides to build that relation between musical concept and musical experience, I argue that we need to understand his or her motivations, and propose the use of qualitative research techniques to interpret the meanings attributed to the learning procedures lived in the classroom.

  13. The neuroaesthetics of music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brattico, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    The present chapter offers an overview on the state-of-the-art research under the agenda of the neuroaesthetics of music. This research agenda, inspired by the neuroaesthetics of visual art, represents a paradigm shift from neuroimaging studies focused exclusively on music perception, cognition...... and emotion to studies that consider aesthetic responses such as liking, preference, and aesthetic judgments. The existing models depicting information processing stages of the musical aesthetic experiences and their loci in the brain are summarized. The latest findings point at a synergy between neural...... systems, and particularly between superior temporal gyrus and limbic reward areas for issuing aesthetic responses to music. Future challenges for the field are the discovery of the neural mechanisms of inter-subject communication during musical performance leading to an efficacious aesthetic experience....

  14. Family Music Concerts: Bringing Families, Music Students, and Music Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Susan Hobson

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how conductors of the top performing groups and music education faculty at one university collaborated to create a Family Concert Series for parents and children of all ages, including infants in arms. Recognizing the conflict between "The first three years of life are the most important for educating a young child in…

  15. Music feels like moods feel

    OpenAIRE

    Kris eGoffin

    2014-01-01

    While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: (1) moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and (2) music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is cor...

  16. A Socratic Dialogue with Libby Larsen on Music, Musical Experience in American Culture, and Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Katherine; Larsen, Libby

    2011-01-01

    This article represents conversations with the American composer Libby Larsen in which she described her beliefs about music, music education, and the dilemmas that our current system faces as we seek to provide relevant and meaningful music education to our students. Our conversation explores such topics as cognitive psychology, music theory,…

  17. Playing Music, Playing with Music: A Proposal for Music Coding in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratè, Adriano; Ludovico, Luca Andrea; Mangione, Giuseppina Rita; Rosa, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    In this work we will introduce the concept of "music coding," namely a new discipline that employs basic music activities and simplified languages to teach the computational way of thinking to musically-untrained children who attend the primary school. In this context, music represents both a mean and a goal: in fact, from one side…

  18. On the Performance of Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Kure

    2007-12-01

    At the level of performance, Kivy’s critique of the representative method of understanding absolute music is confirmed, because such an understanding can lead to the neglect of esthetic criteria in the interpretation of music. This article defends the viewpoint that the performance of a musical work is not something that is destructive to the understanding and preservation of a musical work, but something that is authentically musical.

  19. Music, cognition, culture, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, I

    2001-06-01

    We seem able to define the biological foundations for our musicality within a clear and unitary framework, yet music itself does not appear so clearly definable. Music is different things and does different things in different cultures; the bundles of elements and functions that are music for any given culture may overlap minimally with those of another culture, even for those cultures where "music" constitutes a discrete and identifiable category of human activity in its own right. The dynamics of culture, of music as cultural praxis, are neither necessarily reducible, nor easily relatable, to the dynamics of our biologies. Yet music appears to be a universal human competence. Recent evolutionary theory, however, affords a means for exploring things biological and cultural within a framework in which they are at least commensurable. The adoption of this perspective shifts the focus of the search for the foundations of music away from the mature and particular expression of music within a specific culture or situation and on to the human capacity for musicality. This paper will survey recent research that examines that capacity and its evolutionary origins in the light of a definition of music that embraces music's multifariousness. It will be suggested that music, like speech, is a product of both our biologies and our social interactions; that music is a necessary and integral dimension of human development; and that music may have played a central role in the evolution of the modern human mind.

  20. Connecting Oceanography and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Capturing and retaining the interest of non-science majors in science classes can be difficult, no matter what type of science. At Berklee College of Music, this challenge is especially significant, as all students are music majors. In my Introductory Oceanography course, I use a final project as a way for the students to link class material with their own interests. The students may choose any format to present their projects to the class; however, many students write and perform original music. The performances of ocean-themed music have become a huge draw of the Introductory Oceanography course. In an effort to expand the reach of this music, several colleagues and I organized the first Earth Day event at Berklee, `Earthapalooza 2015.' This event included performances of music originally written for the final projects, as well as other musical performances, poetry readings, guest talks, and information booths. Although the idea of an Earth Day event is not new, this event is unique in that student performances really resonate with the student audience. Additionally, since many of these students will enter professional careers in the performance and recording industries, the potential exists for them to expose large audiences to the issues of oceanography through music. In this presentation, I will play examples of original student compositions and show video of the live student performances. I will also discuss the benefits and challenges of the final projects and the Earth Day event. Finally, I will highlight the future plans to continue ocean-themed music at Berklee.

  1. Music and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of dementia in our aging population, and consequently an urgent need to develop treatments and activities that may alleviate the symptoms of dementia. Accumulating evidence shows that persons with dementia enjoy music, and their ability to respond to music is potentially preserved even in the late or severe stages of dementia when verbal communication may have ceased. Media interest in this topic has contributed to the public perception that music abilities are an "island of preservation" in an otherwise cognitively impaired person with dementia. In this chapter, we review the current literature on music cognition in dementia and show that there has been very scarce rigorous scientific investigation of this issue, and that various types of music memory exist and are differentially impaired in the different types of dementia. Furthermore, we discuss the recent development of music activities as a nonpharmacological treatment for dementia and highlight the methodological limitations of the current literature on this topic. While it has been reported that music activities can improve behavior, (particularly agitation), mood, and cognition in persons with dementia, recent large-scale randomized control studies have questioned the specificity of the effect of music and found that it is no more beneficial than other pleasant activities. Nevertheless, music is unique in its powerful ability to elicit both memories and emotions. This can provide an important link to individual's past and a means of nonverbal communication with carers, which make it an ideal stimulus for persons with dementia. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Musical Self-Concept of Chinese Music Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suse ePetersen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between self-concept and societal settings has been widely investigated in several Western and Asian countries, with respect to the academic self-concept in an educational environment. Although the musical self-concept is highly relevant to musical development and performance, there is a lack of research exploring how the musical self-concept evolves in different cultural settings and societies. In particular, there have been no enquiries yet in the Chinese music education environment. This study’s goal was the characterization of musical self-concept types among music students at a University in Beijing, China. The Musical Self-Concept Inquiry (MUSCI—including ability, emotional, physical, cognitive, and social facets—was used to assess the students’ musical self-concepts (N=97. The data analysis led to three significantly distinct clusters and corresponding musical self-concept types. The types were especially distinct, in the students’ perception of their musical ambitions and abilities; their movement, rhythm and dancing affinity; and the spiritual and social aspects of music. The professional aims and perspectives, and the aspects of the students’ sociodemographic background also differed between the clusters. This study is one of the first research endeavors addressing musical self-concepts in China. The empirical identification of the self-concept types offers a basis for future research on the connections between education, the development of musical achievement, and the musical self-concept in societal settings with differing understandings of the self.

  3. The Musical Self-Concept of Chinese Music Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Suse; Camp, Marc-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between self-concept and societal settings has been widely investigated in several Western and Asian countries, with respect to the academic self-concept in an educational environment. Although the musical self-concept is highly relevant to musical development and performance, there is a lack of research exploring how the musical self-concept evolves in different cultural settings and societies. In particular, there have been no enquiries yet in the Chinese music education environment. This study's goal was the characterization of musical self-concept types among music students at a University in Beijing, China. The Musical Self-Concept Inquiry-including ability, emotional, physical, cognitive, and social facets-was used to assess the students' musical self-concepts (N = 97). The data analysis led to three significantly distinct clusters and corresponding musical self-concept types. The types were especially distinct, in the students' perception of their musical ambitions and abilities; their movement, rhythm and dancing affinity; and the spiritual and social aspects of music. The professional aims and perspectives, and the aspects of the students' sociodemographic background also differed between the clusters. This study is one of the first research endeavors addressing musical self-concepts in China. The empirical identification of the self-concept types offers a basis for future research on the connections between education, the development of musical achievement, and the musical self-concept in societal settings with differing understandings of the self.

  4. The Musical Self-Concept of Chinese Music Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Suse; Camp, Marc-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between self-concept and societal settings has been widely investigated in several Western and Asian countries, with respect to the academic self-concept in an educational environment. Although the musical self-concept is highly relevant to musical development and performance, there is a lack of research exploring how the musical self-concept evolves in different cultural settings and societies. In particular, there have been no enquiries yet in the Chinese music education environment. This study’s goal was the characterization of musical self-concept types among music students at a University in Beijing, China. The Musical Self-Concept Inquiry—including ability, emotional, physical, cognitive, and social facets—was used to assess the students’ musical self-concepts (N = 97). The data analysis led to three significantly distinct clusters and corresponding musical self-concept types. The types were especially distinct, in the students’ perception of their musical ambitions and abilities; their movement, rhythm and dancing affinity; and the spiritual and social aspects of music. The professional aims and perspectives, and the aspects of the students’ sociodemographic background also differed between the clusters. This study is one of the first research endeavors addressing musical self-concepts in China. The empirical identification of the self-concept types offers a basis for future research on the connections between education, the development of musical achievement, and the musical self-concept in societal settings with differing understandings of the self. PMID:27303337

  5. MusicFlow: an interactive music composition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sharon Yee Ping; Hu, Zhijia; Koh, Alan Yih Lun; Felicia; Zhao, Shengdong

    2010-07-01

    Music notation has evolved to the point in which music scores can be digitalized to give composers a different dimension of music composition. Traditional method of music notation using pen and paper requires much time and effort especially during reviewing and editing of hand written music scores. On the other hand of the spectrum, computerizing the entire music composition process can potentially reduce the workload; however, previous approaches in digitizing music notation suffer from the overwhelming functions and the lack of human touch. In this paper, we designed, implemented, and evaluated a multi-touch application called Musicflow, which allows for automatic transcription of composers' music into digital music scores through one's fingertips. To facilitate natural, efficient interaction, MusicFlow supports many multi-touch gestures such as music notation, editing and playing back for reviewing. In addition, Musicflow includes a collaborative teaching tool which further enhances music education by engaging both the teacher and students actively on a multi-touch table. Our initial evaluation indicates that MusicFlow is intuitive to use and effective for music composition.

  6. Modeling musical anticipation : from the time of music to the music of time

    OpenAIRE

    Cont, Arshia

    2008-01-01

    This thesis studies musical anticipation, both as a process and design principle for applications in music information retrieval and computer music. For this study, we reverse the problem of modeling anticipation addressed mostly in music cognition literature for the study of musical behavior, to anticipatory modeling, a cognitive design principle for modeling artificial systems. We propose anticipatory models and applications concerning three main preoccupations of expectation: "What to expe...

  7. Complexity, time and music

    OpenAIRE

    JEAN PIERRE BOON

    2009-01-01

    The concept of complexity as considered in terms of its algorithmic definition proposed by G.J. Chaitin and A.N. Kolmogorov is revisited for the dynamical complexity of music. When music pieces are cast in the form of time series of pitch variations, concepts of dynamical systems theory can be used to define new quantities such as the {\\em dimensionality} as a measure of the {\\em global temporal dynamics} of a music piece, and the Shanon {\\em entropy} as an evaluation of its {\\em local dynami...

  8. Music, memory and meaning

    OpenAIRE

    Fair, Laura

    2012-01-01

    I his paper examines the music and career of Siti binti Saadi, a famous taarab musician who performed in Zanzibar during the 1920s and 1930s. Relying on four distinctive types of evidence: her recorded music, written documentation produced in East Africa, interviews with men and women who heard her perform and records of company executives I compare perspectives regarding the source of power and authority attributed to her voice as well as the meaning of her music. Siti binti Saadi was the fi...

  9. Music and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Lippi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Donatella Lippi1, Paolo Roberti di Sarsina2, John Patrick D’Elios11History of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Histology, and Forensic Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Health Local Unit, Department of Mental Health, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Healing sounds have always been considered in the past an important aid in medical practice, and nowadays, medicine has confirmed the efficacy of music therapy in many diseases. The aim of this study is to assess the curative power of music, in the frame of the current clinical relationship.Keywords: history of medicine, medical humanities, healing music

  10. Music and elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leners, J C

    2013-01-01

    Since more than 3 decades now, music with seniors (or younger persons), either as an educational or recreational activity, but also as a therapeutically approach has progressed. Even nowadays, in the medical field, more and more studies prove its efficiency as complementary therapy with no known side-effects. The areas where music therapy has a positive outcome, reach from pulmonary disorders to a lot of neurological chronic diseases, including aphasia, dementia or Parkinson. And at the end of life, music therapy has found a remarkable place for expressing or supporting strong emotional feelings. Evidence-based results on physiological and hormonal changes will also be reviewed.

  11. Emotion in Music: representation and computational modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aljanaki, A.

    2016-01-01

    Music emotion recognition (MER) deals with music classification by emotion using signal processing and machine learning techniques. Emotion ontology for music is not well established yet. Musical emotion can be conceptualized through various emotional models: categorical, dimensional, or

  12. Mediated Interactions and Musical Expression - A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Radha, Mustafa; Nijholt, Antinus; Lee, Newton

    2014-01-01

    This chapter surveys the field of technologically mediated musical interaction and technologically enhanced musical expression. We look at several new technologies that enable new ways of musical expression and interaction, explore the micro-coordination that occurs in collaborative musical

  13. CONCEPT OF MUSIC AND LISTENED SOME GENRES OF MUSIC IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Eda Angi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the definition and development of music and music’s types from the first period to the present day is analysed briefly. According to the research, the music types which will be searched, are arabesque music, blues music/jazz music, hiphop/rap music, classical music, pop music, rock/metal music, sufi music, Turkish folk music, Turkish art music. The research is a descriptive workout due to its purpose and method used. This research is important by means of being a source for the researchers and explaining various music types.

  14. Music Technology and Musical Creativity: Making Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Douglas Earl

    2012-01-01

    This article is a preview of Scott Watson's new book, "Using Technology to Unlock Musical Creativity" (Oxford University Press, 2011). The book's main contents are summarized and one of the volume's 29 lessons is provided to assist readers in evaluating the book for their use. Particular attention is given to Watson's success in making the…

  15. Music: Anthropology | Coplan | South African Music Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Originally presented as a keynote address to the 2003 Congress of the Musicological Society of Southern Africa, this paper surveys the field of interactions between music and anthropology. The historical problematics of an institutional location for the discipline of ethnomusicology are linked to changing theoretical ...

  16. Musical Preference and Music Education: Musical Preferences of Turkish University Students and Their Levels in Genre Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürgen, Elif Tekin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if there is any relationship between musical preference, genre identification and frequency of listening to music genres, and whether musical training and gender played a role in these factors. A total of 205 college music and non-music majors recorded their preference for 13 music excerpts in popular,…

  17. Music-Making and Musical Comprehension with Robotic Building Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    creativity. This paper presents a project where modular robotics is used to create a platform for creative musical expression that allows users to experiment with musical genres without any prior musical knowledge or skills. The project is an example of how to create “intelligent learning material......Being able to express oneself musically and experiment with music composition is traditionally determined by one’s ability to play an actual instrument with a certain degree of craftsmanship. Lack of skills may cause difficulties for children and young people to experience the joy of musical...

  18. Ethnicity, music experience, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Paul D; Swope, Alan J; Heide, Frederick J

    2009-01-01

    The researchers studied differences in self-reported music experience and depression across ethnic groups, as well as differences in the relationship between music experience and depression across groups. College participants (78 African Americans, 111 Asian Americans, 218 Whites, and 87 in other ethnic groups) completed the Music Experience Questionnaire (MEQ) and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Statistically significant differences across groups were found on depression as well as on the MEQ factor for Subjective/Physical Reactions to music and on MEQ scales for Commitment to Music, Affective Reactions, Positive Psychotropic Effects, and Reactive Musical Behavior. A distinctive pattern of relationship was found between music variables and depression in the Asian American group, relative to the White and Other group. In particular, among Asian Americans there were negative correlations between depression and the MEQ Subjective/ Physical Reactions factor as well as the Affective Reactions scale. Implications were discussed for the literature on ethnicity and depression, music experience, and music therapy.

  19. Musical Formalism and Political Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A. Neufeld

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Musical formalism, which strictly limits the type of thing any description of the music can tell us, is ill-equipped to account for contemporary performance practice. If performative interpretations are in a position to tell us something about musical works—that is if performance is a kind of description, as Peter Kivy argues—then we have to loosen the restrictions on notions of musical relevance to make sense of performance. I argue that musical formalism, which strictly limits the type of thing any description of the music can tell us, is inconsistent with Kivy's quite compelling account of performance. This shows the difficulty that actual performances pose to overly rigid conceptions of music. Daniel Barenboim's unannounced performance of Wagner in Israel in 2001 shows that the problem of the boundaries of musical relevance is no mere philosophical puzzle. It is a pressing problem in the musical public sphere.

  20. Music technology in music therapy - A study of the possibilities, potential and problems around the use of music technologies in music therapy with youths and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Misje, René

    2013-01-01

    Music technology in music therapy - A study of the possibilities, potential and problems around the use of music technologies in music therapy with youths and adolescents. This qualitative study explores the usefulness of music technology in music therapeutic practice with youth and adolescents. Four music therapist`s reflections on their use of music technologies and on the possibilities, potential and problems of this use are explored through semi-structured intervi...

  1. Narratives about music and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddholm, Mats; Nilsson, Bo

    Narratives about music and health Dr Bo Nilsson, Kristianstad University, Sweden Dr Mats Uddholm, University College Nordjylland, Denmark Music is used in many professional contexts that are not associated with music therapy or music education in a traditional sense. How do professionals in diffe......Narratives about music and health Dr Bo Nilsson, Kristianstad University, Sweden Dr Mats Uddholm, University College Nordjylland, Denmark Music is used in many professional contexts that are not associated with music therapy or music education in a traditional sense. How do professionals...... in different contexts use music and how do they describe their thoughts about music in their professional work? Those are the main questions in our study focusing on narratives about music and health in professional relations. In a pilot study six strategically chosen participants from Sweden and Denmark...... involving music therapists or music educators, such as: with clients, students, children, elder people; among nurses, deacons, social workers, preschools teachers or care assistants. The field of Music and Health is not necessarily about illness or care, but can as well be understood as an aspect of quality...

  2. The effect of acute tyrosine phenylalanine depletion on emotion-based decision-making in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Wahlstrom, Dustin; White, Tonya; Luciana, Monica

    2013-04-01

    Despite interest in dopamine's role in emotion-based decision-making, few reports of the effects of dopamine manipulations are available in this area in humans. This study investigates dopamine's role in emotion-based decision-making through a common measure of this construct, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), using Acute Tyrosine Phenylalanine Depletion (ATPD). In a between-subjects design, 40 healthy adults were randomized to receive either an ATPD beverage or a balanced amino acid beverage (a control) prior to completing the IGT, as well as pre- and post-manipulation blood draws for the neurohormone prolactin. Together with conventional IGT performance metrics, choice selections and response latencies were examined separately for good and bad choices before and after several key punishment events. Changes in response latencies were also used to predict total task performance. Prolactin levels increased significantly in the ATPD group but not in the control group. However, no significant group differences in performance metrics were detected, nor were there sex differences in outcome measures. However, the balanced group's bad deck latencies speeded up across the task, while the ATPD group's latencies remained adaptively hesitant. Additionally, modulation of latencies to the bad decks predicted total score for the ATPD group only. One interpretation is that ATPD subtly attenuated reward salience and altered the approach by which individuals achieved successful performance, without resulting in frank group differences in task performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Music and the Brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ZATORRE, ROBERT J

    2003-01-01

    A bstract : The aim of this paper is to illustrate how studying music from a neuroscience perspective may be a valuable way to probe a variety of complex cognitive functions and their neural substrate...

  4. Music and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud Cabanac; Perlovsky, Leonid; Bonniot-Cabanac, Marie-Claude; Cabanac, Michel

    2013-11-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated that listening to a pleasant music while performing an academic test helped students to overcome stress, to devote more time to more stressful and more complicated task and the grades were higher. Yet, there remained ambiguities as for the causes of the higher test performance of these students: do they perform better because they hear music during their examinations, or would they perform better anyway because they are more gifted/motivated? This motivated the current study as a preliminary step toward that general question: Do students who like/perform music have better grades than the others? Our results confirmed this hypothesis: students studying music have better grades in all subjects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Music for Social Change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patricia Zarate; Danilo Pérez

    2016-01-01

    .... Pérez's thesis goes on to describe the problems ingrained in Panamanian public education and suggests that the inclusion of music-both as a subject in itself, and as a general method of teaching-can...

  6. Building Blueprints: Making Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Depicts how Cornell University renovated its civil engineering and architecture building to include space for musical performances, teaching, and rehearsals. The article highlights the facility's contemporary design, which also compliments the form and massing of the original building. (GR)

  7. Musical and film time

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kulezic-Wilson, Danijela

    2008-01-01

    Comparative analysis of linear, non-linear and multiple temporal dimensions in music and film reveals that the understanding and utilisation of time in these two arts reflect not only the aesthetic...

  8. Music critic Gustav Michel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Aleksandar N.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The writers whose real vocation was not music left significant traces in the history of Serbian music critics and essayism of the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. Numerous authors, literary historians theoreticians and critics, jurists and theatre historians, wrote successfully on music in Serbian daily newspapers, literary and other magazines, until the Second World War. This study is devoted to Gustav Michel (1868 - 1926, one of the music amateurs who ought to be remembered in the history of Serbian music critics. Gustav Michel was a pharmacist by vocation. He ran a private pharmacy in Belgrade all his life. But he was a musician as well. He played the viola in the second (in chronological order of foundation Serbian String Quartet. The ensemble mostly consisted of amateurs, and it performed standard pieces of chamber music (W. A. Mozart L. v. Beethoven, F. Schubert, F. Mendelsohn-Bartholdy, A. Dvořžak. These musicians had performed public concerts in Belgrade since 1900 up until Michel’s death. Belgrade music critics prised the performances of this string ensemble highly. Gustav Michel was also a music critic. Until now only seven articles, published by this author between 1894 and 1903, in Order (Red, Folk Newspaper (Narodne novine and Serbian Literary Magazine (Srpski književni glasnik have been found. Michel’s preserved articles unambiguously prove that their author had a solid knowledge of music theory and history, the knowledge that exceeded amateurism. Nevertheless, Michel did not burden his first critics with expert language of musicology. Later on, in Serbian Literary Magazine, the magazine which left enough room for music, Michel penetrated more into musical terminology, thus educating slowly forming Serbian concert-going public. The analysis of Michel’s texts showed that he was not, in contrast to the majority of professional music critics, an opponent of virtuosity. Gentle and liberal, he did not

  9. Music lessons enhance IQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2004-08-01

    The idea that music makes you smarter has received considerable attention from scholars and the media. The present report is the first to test this hypothesis directly with random assignment of a large sample of children (N = 144) to two different types of music lessons (keyboard or voice) or to control groups that received drama lessons or no lessons. IQ was measured before and after the lessons. Compared with children in the control groups, children in the music groups exhibited greater increases in full-scale IQ. The effect was relatively small, but it generalized across IQ subtests, index scores, and a standardized measure of academic achievement. Unexpectedly, children in the drama group exhibited substantial pre- to post-test improvements in adaptive social behavior that were not evident in the music groups.

  10. Music Created by Community

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Igari, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    The author, a therapist specializing in private therapeutic sessions, discusses his plan to bring disabled and non-disabled people together through music, which he called the Organization to Promote...

  11. Music Therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Professional development and recognition is an 'old' issue in music therapy but still a relevant, complex and crucial one. Burning questions regarding professionalisation are at the forefront of most music therapy associations’ agendas across Europe and beyond, and feed back directly to the work...... of the EMTC. Considering the wider political, socio-economic, cultural and disciplinary aspects of professionalisation, different development pathways impact directly on music therapy practice, training, ethics, professional collaboration and employment conditions. Although a number of endeavours have been...... implemented regarding music therapy’s professional development and recognition in different countries, documentation and sharing of such endeavours on international level has been limited and scattered. Drawing from the EMTC’s work since the early ‘90s, as well as from colleagues’ experiences (and struggles...

  12. Musical Creativity in Slovenian Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozman, Janja Crcinovic

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Slovenian music education curriculum for the first years of elementary school emphasises the following musical activities in the classroom: singing, playing instruments, listening to music, movement to music and musical creativity. In the field of musical creativity, there are two activities where students can be original and…

  13. Frequently Asked Questions about Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and Quotes ... m Having Trouble Logging In/Staying Logged In Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? What do music therapists ...

  14. Pop and World Music in Dutch Music Education: Two Cases of Authentic Learning in Music Teacher Education and Secondary Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelein, Frits

    2006-01-01

    Popular and world music play an important role in Dutch music education. This article examines two case studies that illustrate authentic music learning environments in which these types of music are prominently used. The first case follows a student during her training at the Rotterdam Academy for Music Education, in which her own musical and…

  15. Changing Paradigms in General Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgül, Ilhan

    2015-01-01

    In Turkey, part of general music education in primary schools is music lessons, which are taught by primary school teachers for grades 1-4 and music teachers for grades 5-8. In the 21st century, the music education approach in schools has shifted from "school music" to "music in the school." This orientation is directly related…

  16. Remote Music Tuition

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, S.; Williams, D; Kegel, I.; Stevens, T.; Jansen, Jack; Cesar Garcia, Pablo Santiago; Healey, P.

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractIt is common to learn to play an orchestral musical instrument through one-to-one lessons with an experienced tutor. For musicians who choose to study performance at an undergraduate level and beyond, their tutor is an important part of their professional musical development. For many musicians, travel is part of their professional lives due to touring, auditioning and teaching, often overseas. This makes temporary separation of students from their tu- tor inevitable. A solution u...

  17. Music of elementary particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternheimer, J.

    1983-12-12

    This note offers a new point of view on particle masses. It is shown that they are distributed following a musical scale, the chromatic tempered scale -for stable particles- subdivided into microintervals including unstable particles. A theoretical explanation, based on causality, allows one also to calculate their global distribution along the mass scale, in agreement with experiment, and indicating the existence of ''musical'' laws in the vibratory organisation of matter.

  18. Mobile Music Listening Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Detry, Lionel; Music, Digitisation, Mediation. Towards Interdisciplinary Music Studies

    2013-01-01

    This poster presents my PhD research about the appropriation of the practice of mobile music listening. Following an exploratory phase, I have described and interpreted some of the salient characteristics of that practice. It broadly shows that it is an automatic, background, unfocused listening used as an accompaniment to another activity. The music is therefore functional: it helps to relax, change mood, block unwanted sounds (or people), make non-places (Augé, 1992) more pleasant. This ban...

  19. Modeling of Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Rolf; Hansen, Uwe

    Signal processing techniques in acoustics address many concerns. Included are such things as wave propagation variables, amplitude considerations, spectral content, wavelength, and phase. Phase is primarily of concern when waves interact with each other, as well as with a medium, and the imposition of boundary conditions leads to normal mode vibrations. Such conditions are prevalent in all musical instruments, and thus relevant signal processing techniques are essential to both understanding and modeling the structure of musical instruments and the sound radiated.

  20. Popular Music Nostalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Dauncey, Hugh; Tinker, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This varied and diverse collection of articles focuses on the wide-ranging phenomenon of nostalgia in a number of national, international and transnational contexts. Engaging with and building on existing studies in disciplines as different yet as complementary as popular music studies, cultural studies, psychological studies and consumer/marketing research, it aims to contribute further towards defining the burgeoning field of popular-music-related nostalgia. It goes almost without saying t...

  1. Neuropsychology: music of the hemispheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Lauren; Walsh, Vincent

    2001-01-01

    Music may be the food of love but it is also good fodder for cognitive scientists. Here we highlight a recent study of a neuropsychological patient who has lost her ability to read music, but not text, in the absence of any other musical deficit.......Music may be the food of love but it is also good fodder for cognitive scientists. Here we highlight a recent study of a neuropsychological patient who has lost her ability to read music, but not text, in the absence of any other musical deficit....

  2. Generative electronic background music system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurowski, Lukasz [Faculty of Computer Science, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Zolnierska Street 49, Szczecin, PL (Poland)

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  3. Inclusion, children's groups, music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla; Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    2016-01-01

    a delightful build-up of tension or soothes us, and its narrative character gives rise to mental imagery or memories. Music brings people together and helps build communities across languages and common divides. And – not least – music captures children’s immediate attention, so when the music starts, so do...... the children! Initially by rocking in time to the rhythm, and then with dance moves or spontaneous singing. In this chapter, we demonstrate how music and music activities can be used as a means of including vulnerable children in school or preschool settings. Based on experiences from music therapy, we have...

  4. Mozart, Music and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ernest K.J.; Volterrani, Duccio; Mariani, Giuliano; Kostkiewics, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    According to the first publication in 1993 by Rauscher et al. [Nature 1993;365:611], the Mozart effect implies the enhancement of reasoning skills solving spatial problems in normal subjects after listening to Mozart's piano sonata K 448. A further evaluation of this effect has raised the question whether there is a link between music-generated emotions and a higher level of cognitive abilities by mere listening. Positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging have revealed that listening to pleasurable music activates cortical and subcortical cerebral areas where emotions are processed. These neurobiological effects of music suggest that auditory stimulation evokes emotions linked to heightened arousal and result in temporarily enhanced performance in many cognitive domains. Music therapy applies this arousal in a clinical setting as it may offer benefits to patients by diverting their attention from unpleasant experiences and future interventions. It has been applied in the context of various important clinical conditions such as cardiovascular disorders, cancer pain, epilepsy, depression and dementia. Furthermore, music may modulate the immune response, among other things, evidenced by increasing the activity of natural killer cells, lymphocytes and interferon-γ, which is an interesting feature as many diseases are related to a misbalanced immune system. Many of these clinical studies, however, suffer from methodological inadequacies. Nevertheless, at present, there is moderate but not altogether convincing evidence that listening to known and liked music helps to decrease the burden of a disease and enhances the immune system by modifying stress. PMID:25060169

  5. Mozart, music and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ernest K J; Volterrani, Duccio; Mariani, Giuliano; Kostkiewics, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    According to the first publication in 1993 by Rauscher et al. [Nature 1993;365:611], the Mozart effect implies the enhancement of reasoning skills solving spatial problems in normal subjects after listening to Mozart's piano sonata K 448. A further evaluation of this effect has raised the question whether there is a link between music-generated emotions and a higher level of cognitive abilities by mere listening. Positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging have revealed that listening to pleasurable music activates cortical and subcortical cerebral areas where emotions are processed. These neurobiological effects of music suggest that auditory stimulation evokes emotions linked to heightened arousal and result in temporarily enhanced performance in many cognitive domains. Music therapy applies this arousal in a clinical setting as it may offer benefits to patients by diverting their attention from unpleasant experiences and future interventions. It has been applied in the context of various important clinical conditions such as cardiovascular disorders, cancer pain, epilepsy, depression and dementia. Furthermore, music may modulate the immune response, among other things, evidenced by increasing the activity of natural killer cells, lymphocytes and interferon-γ, which is an interesting feature as many diseases are related to a misbalanced immune system. Many of these clinical studies, however, suffer from methodological inadequacies. Nevertheless, at present, there is moderate but not altogether convincing evidence that listening to known and liked music helps to decrease the burden of a disease and enhances the immune system by modifying stress. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Music and hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Sara M K; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-10-31

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Resentment Music: Popular Sentimentality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Albán Achinte

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article approaches the radical separation problem that the modern/colonial western project has established between “learned art” and “popular art”, referring the latter to the rural and/or the marginal sectors of the cities, and to the implications that the emergency of popular manifestations have for our societies. The so called “resentment music” in Colombia gives a visual account to big social sectors that find in this musical gender the re-presentation of their experiences, disillusions and frustrations but also of their yearnings and hopes, that is to say, of a social reality that filters by means of this music, and that in many occasions doesn’t have relevance in other mass media. These musics are interpellating a hegemonic system that determines the likes and aesthetics, by means of narratives that separates from the conventional to be interwoven with the fabric of a problematic social reality. These situations induce to ask in which ways this musical gender is contributing to the construction and/or invigoration of the urban and rural identities in Colombia, or in what ways the identity’s social construction processes have given rise to musical genres such as resentment music.

  8. Music and Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. PMID:25361601

  9. Music Therapy with Ethnic Music for Dementia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tanaka

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results revealed characteristic responses of dementia patients onto the Japanese music, and we expect our result provides an evidence for better music therapy for dementia patients with Japanese culture.

  10. Gender, Popular Music, and Music Learning in China's Shanghai

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, Wai-Chung

    2014-01-01

    ...) of these participants. Statistical and qualitative analyses indicated that gender and preferences for popular music can impact some aspects of individual experiences and attitudes toward learning popular music in school...

  11. Musical Ability and the Drake Music Memory Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Lawrence R.; Eisenman, Russell

    1972-01-01

    Results show that the Drake Music Memory Test should be able to discriminate between the poorest and strongest prospects for success in profiting from musical instruction, although it may not be particularly useful in individual counseling. (Authors)

  12. Music Education and Medicine: Music and the Neurology of Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frank R.

    1991-01-01

    Explores how the body's biological clock affects the way musicians practice and perform. Delineates questions concerning this phenomenon. Discusses the implications for music teaching and focuses on areas for collaborative research between neurology researchers and music educators. (NL)

  13. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2016-11-25

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Music Therapy with Ethnic Music for Dementia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Yuki; Nogawa, Hiroki; TANAKA, HIROSHI

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dementia is already critical issues in the world when the society experiences super-aging. This situation requires establishment of rehabilitation methods for relieving symptoms of the patients. We have done research based on our assumption that most effective music therapy differs from culture, because music is dependent on cultural context. Here, we propose a hypothesis that the Japanese music gives better effects to Japanese patients than Classical music. Methods: In this st...

  15. Autism, music, and the therapeutic potential of music in alexithymia

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Rory; Heaton, Pam F.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued, in view of the social evolutionary origins of music and the social deficits found in autism, that individuals with autism will be emotionally unresponsive to music. However, a recent study of high-functioning adults with autism has shown that they appear to have a range of responses to music similar to typically developing people, including the deliberate use of music for mood management. In examining why these responses appear unaffected in autism, we explore possible mec...

  16. CONCEPT OF MUSIC AND LISTENED SOME GENRES OF MUSIC IN TURKEY

    OpenAIRE

    Cigdem Eda Angi

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the definition and development of music and music’s types from the first period to the present day is analysed briefly. According to the research, the music types which will be searched, are arabesque music, blues music/jazz music, hiphop/rap music, classical music, pop music, rock/metal music, sufi music, Turkish folk music, Turkish art music. The research is a descriptive workout due to its purpose and method used. This research is important by means of being a source for ...

  17. The Inclusion of Music/the Music of Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubet, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to situate music within inclusive education. Intersections of music--widely regarded as a "talent" or hyperability--and disability provide unique perspectives on social organisation in general and human valuation in particular. Music is a ubiquitous and an essential component of learning beginning in infancy.…

  18. Cross-cultural perspectives on music and musicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E; Becker, Judith; Morley, Iain

    2015-03-19

    Musical behaviours are universal across human populations and, at the same time, highly diverse in their structures, roles and cultural interpretations. Although laboratory studies of isolated listeners and music-makers have yielded important insights into sensorimotor and cognitive skills and their neural underpinnings, they have revealed little about the broader significance of music for individuals, peer groups and communities. This review presents a sampling of musical forms and coordinated musical activity across cultures, with the aim of highlighting key similarities and differences. The focus is on scholarly and everyday ideas about music--what it is and where it originates--as well the antiquity of music and the contribution of musical behaviour to ritual activity, social organization, caregiving and group cohesion. Synchronous arousal, action synchrony and imitative behaviours are among the means by which music facilitates social bonding. The commonalities and differences in musical forms and functions across cultures suggest new directions for ethnomusicology, music cognition and neuroscience, and a pivot away from the predominant scientific focus on instrumental music in the Western European tradition. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Adult Music Engagement: Perspectives from Three Musically Engaged Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Darrin H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the phenomenon of adult music engagement from the perspectives of musically engaged adults not currently participating in activities that are direct extensions of the typical K-12 music curriculum. Three participants were purposefully chosen and include an avid listener, a church praise team member, and a…

  20. Integration of Informal Music Technologies in Secondary School Music Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Dan; Dixon, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Technologies such as YouTube, mobile phones and MP3 players are increasingly integrated into secondary school music in the UK. At the same time, the gap between formal and informal music learning is being bridged by the incorporation of students' preferred music into class activities. We conducted an ethnographic study in two secondary schools in…

  1. Undergraduate Non-Music Major Preferences for Western Art Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, Phillip M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine undergraduate non-music major (N = 95) preferences for Western art music. A survey of 15 musical examples was assembled consisting of five subtests, each with three excerpts from the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, or Twentieth Century. The mean preference rating of all excerpts combined was 4.68…

  2. Visualizing Music: The Archaeology of Music-Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Charles M.

    Music videos, with their characteristic visual energy and frenetic music-and-dance numbers, have caught on rapidly since their introduction in 1981, bringing prosperity to a slumping record industry. Creating images to accompany existing music is, however, hardly a new idea. The concept can be traced back to 1877 and Thomas Edison's invention of…

  3. Digitization And Music Distribution | Devroop | South African Music ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    second half of the twentieth century the invention of the microchip had transformed the music technology landscape still further into a digital universe, that now uses sampling, physical modelling, computer-generated music, and new modes of information access and distribution. South African Music Studies Vol. 26-27 ...

  4. Online Music Collaboration Project: Digitally Mediated, Deterritorialized Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremata, Radio; Powell, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates and interrogates notions of student-centered music learning through collaboration in digital spaces. By harnessing the power and potential of Internet networks, one music educator in Miami, FL challenged his students to an online music collaboration project (OMCP) where students were asked to engage in deterritorialized…

  5. Developing Musical and Educational Identities in University Music Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Patrick K.; Bennett, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    The musical and educational identities of music students are often at odds with one another, and yet teaching plays a role in the working lives of almost all musicians. Similar conflicts arise when music education majors view themselves as either musicians or educators, but not as both. This article reports results from parallel studies in two…

  6. #Music Students: College Music Students' Twitter Use and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Lori F.; Yinger, Olivia Swedberg; Gregory, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate music education and music therapy majors' use of Twitter and their perceptions and knowledge related to policies and practices. Music majors (N = 238) from five universities in the Southeastern and Midwestern United States participated in a 16-question researcher-designed survey. Results indicated that…

  7. Bridging the Gap: Popular Music and Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos Xavier, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This versatile and insightful book discusses trends and issues related to popular music in the classroom. Topics covered include the definition of popular music, the "us versus them" dilemma, teacher education, effective teaching methods, and choosing quality repertoire. Fourth in the Northwestern University Music Education Leadership…

  8. Moved by Music: A Typology of Music Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Bogt, Tom F. M.; Mulder, Juul; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Nic Gabhainn, Saoirse

    2011-01-01

    A typology of music listeners was constructed on the basis of importance attributed to music and four types of music use: mood enhancement; coping with problems; defining personal identity; and marking social identity. Three Listener Groups were identified through Latent Class Analysis of internet survey data of 997 Dutch respondents, aged 12-29.…

  9. Music and Education: A Composer Writes about Musical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabalevsky, Dimitrii Borisovich

    Music can play an important part in personality development. Music education for children encourages the capacity for creativity, improvisation, and understanding the beautiful and the good. This book traces the history of the music syllabus among teachers in the Soviet Union and discusses creative freedom and the instructor. It also presents a…

  10. Understanding Music's Therapeutic Efficacy with Implications for Why Music Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thram, Diane

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I focus on how attention to music's therapeutic efficacy is important to the praxial music education philosophy espoused by Elliott and Silverman. I note, despite the use of the term praxis from Aristotle's philosophy dating back to antiquity, there is no mention in Music Matters 2 of what historical evidence tells us about how…

  11. Nigerian Contemporary Music Practice: A New Musical Culture in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the 1960s, there were reports from post colonial West Africa of a somewhat unflinching loyalty to western standards and traditions by music educators and western-trained music composers who did not take kindly to reforms in certain directions in the practice of their music profession. Today‟s reality is that we have come ...

  12. The amphibology of musical arts in Nigerian contemporary music ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The term 'musical arts' is valid in African indigenous system but could be so ambiguous in application. In a sense, music as an art involves the arts of writing, reading, composing arranging and performing. This is already taught in the music curricula of higher institutions of learning. On the other hand, the term is used to ...

  13. Musical Parenting and Music Education: Integrating Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilari, Beatriz

    2018-01-01

    Although teachers work constantly with parents, discussions concerning parental roles in children's music learning are often left at the margins in music teacher training programs. The aim of this article is to offer a review of musical parenting research from an ecological perspective. Bronfenbrenner's bioecological theory of human development is…

  14. Music makes a difference?! : The values of music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karolien Dons

    2013-01-01

    Music and culture play a significant role in the political and societal development of a peaceful and integrative Europe. Music and its diverse expressions are extremely relevant for social cohesion, wellbeing and economic growth. What kind of an impact can music have? And how can we combine

  15. Music without a Music Specialist: A Primary School Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    This case study focuses on generalist primary (elementary) school teachers teaching music in an Australian school. With the onus for teaching music moving away from the specialist music teacher to the generalist classroom teacher, this case study adds to a growing body of literature focusing on generalist primary school teachers and music…

  16. Without it no music: Cognition, biology, and evolution of musicality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.; ten Cate, C.; Peretz, I.; Trehub, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Musicality can be defined as a natural, spontaneously developing trait based on and constrained by biology and cognition. Music, by contrast, can be defined as a social and cultural construct based on that very musicality. One critical challenge is to delineate the constituent elements of

  17. Perancangan Interior Music Lesson House Di Bali

    OpenAIRE

    Lomena, Eunike Tiffani

    2014-01-01

    Music Lesson House is a project where people can learn to play music regardless of age and free to express their own taste of music. Music Lesson House gives a comfortable and appropriate facility to fully develop their music creativity. Additionally, music can train and balance the brain to be able to do well. Beside the music facilities for normal people, one of the advantages of this House Music Lesson is music therapy facilities for people with special needs, aged 3 to 14 years. Music the...

  18. Music for pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M S; Carr, D B; Lau, J; Alvarez, H

    2006-04-19

    The efficacy of music for the treatment of pain has not been established. To evaluate the effect of music on acute, chronic or cancer pain intensity, pain relief, and analgesic requirements. We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, LILACS and the references in retrieved manuscripts. There was no language restriction. We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect of music on any type of pain in children or adults. We excluded trials that reported results of concurrent non-pharmacological therapies. Data was extracted by two independent review authors. We calculated the mean difference in pain intensity levels, percentage of patients with at least 50% pain relief, and opioid requirements. We converted opioid consumption to morphine equivalents. To explore heterogeneity, studies that evaluated adults, children, acute, chronic, malignant, labor, procedural, or experimental pain were evaluated separately, as well as those studies in which patients chose the type of music. Fifty-one studies involving 1867 subjects exposed to music and 1796 controls met inclusion criteria. In the 31 studies evaluating mean pain intensity there was a considerable variation in the effect of music, indicating statistical heterogeneity ( I(2) = 85.3%). After grouping the studies according to the pain model, this heterogeneity remained, with the exception of the studies that evaluated acute postoperative pain. In this last group, patients exposed to music had pain intensity that was 0.5 units lower on a zero to ten scale than unexposed subjects (95% CI: -0.9 to -0.2). Studies that permitted patients to select the music did not reveal a benefit from music; the decline in pain intensity was 0.2 units, 95% CI (-0.7 to 0.2). Four studies reported the proportion of subjects with at least 50% pain relief; subjects exposed to music had a 70% higher likelihood of having pain relief than unexposed subjects (95% CI: 1.21 to 2.37). NNT = 5 (95% CI: 4 to 13). Three

  19. Mathematics and Computation in Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    on contemporary mathematical approaches to creative systems), Emilia Gómez (who spoke on music technologies in classical orchestral music concerts), Gareth Loy (who spoke on steps toward a theory of musical interest), and Ge Wang (who spoke on the art of designing computer music), and a film (From Circles......The 5th Biennial International Conference for Mathematics and Computation in Music (MCM 2015) took place June 22–25, 2015, at Queen Mary University of London, UK, co-hosted by the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science (Centre for Digital Music) and the School of Mathematical...... Sciences. As the flagship conference of the Society for Mathematics and Computation in Music (SMCM), MCM 2015 provided a dedicated platform for the communication and exchange of ideas among researchers in mathematics, informatics, music theory, composition, musicology, and related disciplines. It brought...

  20. Music, body and Physical Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renato Izidoro da Silva; Fabio Zoboli

    2015-01-01

    ... Education, but close to the music and the body. The music in Physical Education always showed relation to the dance and gymnastics sphere, in its close relations to the rythm, besides having metodological affinity to games, play and singing...

  1. The Meaning of Black Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Donald

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the definition of black music in terms of the history and cultural background of black people, places it within the larger scope of western music, and suggests its survival value with respect to black people. (JM)

  2. Rap Music in the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Edward

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the background of rap music, its definition, its themes and messages, and rap as a blend of language and music. Offers ideas for its use in the classroom as a way to motivate and instruct students. (SR)

  3. [Music--poison and cure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, J

    1999-05-20

    There is no music in nature. Music is a purely human/psychologic phenomenon. Corresponding to the psyche it is bivalent, bipolar, dialectic, good and evil. A paradigm for this is the history of the organ.

  4. Music-Elicited Emotion Identification Using Optical Flow Analysis of Human Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniaz, V. V.; Smirnova, Z. N.

    2015-05-01

    Human emotion identification from image sequences is highly demanded nowadays. The range of possible applications can vary from an automatic smile shutter function of consumer grade digital cameras to Biofied Building technologies, which enables communication between building space and residents. The highly perceptual nature of human emotions leads to the complexity of their classification and identification. The main question arises from the subjective quality of emotional classification of events that elicit human emotions. A variety of methods for formal classification of emotions were developed in musical psychology. This work is focused on identification of human emotions evoked by musical pieces using human face tracking and optical flow analysis. Facial feature tracking algorithm used for facial feature speed and position estimation is presented. Facial features were extracted from each image sequence using human face tracking with local binary patterns (LBP) features. Accurate relative speeds of facial features were estimated using optical flow analysis. Obtained relative positions and speeds were used as the output facial emotion vector. The algorithm was tested using original software and recorded image sequences. The proposed technique proves to give a robust identification of human emotions elicited by musical pieces. The estimated models could be used for human emotion identification from image sequences in such fields as emotion based musical background or mood dependent radio.

  5. Music as Illness; Music as Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Maureen

    2015-09-01

    Throughout the Soviet Union, the arts became tied to ethnicity through the project of Socialist Realism. When, in 1991, the Kyrgyz Republic became independent from the Soviet Union, its national narrative continued to be built upon tropes of Kyrgyz ethnicity. Through their engagement with images of the ethno-national self, the arts provide a great source of beauty. Defining beauty as a representation of the self that is pure whole, and stable, Julia Kristeva asserts that beauty and suffering are part of the same phenomena. Arthur Kleinman argues that suffering is best understood as existing within the triangulated relationship of cultural representation, collective experience, and subjectivity. Music too is part of this triangulated relationship, and therefore, a part of suffering. Drawing upon ten months of ethnographic fieldwork in Kyrgyzstan, this article explores the illness experience of a single Kyrgyz musician. In doing so, it illustrates music's role in self-formation and the development of social, economic, and political ties and the shifts that occur in these during illness. In drawing forth the role of music in the construction of racialized ethnicities, this article demonstrates how the experience of transformative beauty can coexist with turmoil, marginalization, and violence.

  6. Music Therapy, Song and Communication

    OpenAIRE

    André Brandalise

    2009-01-01

    The therapeutic relationship between therapist, client and music can also be considered as part of a communication system. Illness can seriously affect the functioning of this system in the music therapy process. The musical form song is used very often in therapeutic processes. It can be very efficient in the treatment. This article intends to make a reflection about the links between Music Therapy, Song and Communication.

  7. Music Across Times and Fences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    that extended the framework of ideas for writing music, some in a small way, some with breathtaking novelty. You can listen to the music discussed while reading, through links to or playlists provided at streaming services (that are free if you accept occasional advertising). The book is eminently suitable...... for use in music teaching at high schools or as a reference tool in dedicated music schools....

  8. Music Training, Cognition, and Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Corrigall, Kathleen A.; E. Glenn eSchellenberg; Misura, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most studies that examined associations between music training and cognitive abilities had correlational designs, the prevailing bias is that music training causes improvements in cognition. It is also possible, however, that high-functioning children are more likely than other children to take music lessons, and that they also differ in personality. We asked whether individual differences in cognition and personality predict who takes music lessons and for how long. The participants...

  9. Edward Said on Popular Music

    OpenAIRE

    Capitain, W.H.P.

    2017-01-01

    Although Edward Said, generally known as one of the founders of postcolonial studies, has written extensively on music, he almost completely ignores popular music. However, the few moments in which he does reflect on popular music are highly revealing. In this article I provide a comprehensive overview and a critical analysis of Said’s public statements on popular music, and argue that these strongly create dissonance with his interventions in postcolonial theory and politics. More specifical...

  10. Differentiation in the Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standerfer, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiating music instruction can be done well with a bit of forethought and creativity. When strategically used, music educators can better meet students' needs and make great strides in individual and overall student achievement. A variety of K-12 choral, instrumental, and general music examples is included. (Contains 7 notes and 2 tables.)

  11. Music Therapy in Pediatric Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Sheri, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    Music therapy is an established health care and human services profession that is dedicated to the implementation of controlled research studies to determine the underlying mechanisms in music that are responsible for therapeutic change, as well as clinical research to direct and guide the work of the music therapist. This growing body of research…

  12. Music Therapy with Premature Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne

    2003-01-01

    Over 20 years of research and clinical practice in music therapy with premature infants has been compiled into this text designed for Board Certified Music Therapists specializing in Neonatal Intensive Care clinical services, for NICU medical staff incorporating research-based music therapy into developmental care plans, and for parents of…

  13. Perceiving Tonal Structure in Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, Carol L.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses research that may broaden understanding of how music of other styles and cultures is perceived and remembered. Experiments examined serve to isolate similarities and differences that exist across musical cultures and characterize their psychological effects and to study perception of compositional styles in Western music outside the…

  14. Dimensions in Expressed Music Mood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinker, A.C. den; Van Dinther, C.H.B.A.; Skowronek, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mood is an important aspect of music and knowledge on mood can be used as a basic ingredient in music recommender and retrieval systems.A music experiment was carried out establishing ratings for variousmoods and a number of attributes like valence and arousal. The analysis of these data is

  15. Phonological Awareness and Musical Aptitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peynircioglu, Zehra F.; Durgunoglu, Aydyn Y.; Oney-Kusefoglu, Banu

    2002-01-01

    Examines the relationship between phonological awareness and musical aptitude in pre-school Turkish and American children. Finds that children in the high musical aptitude group did much better on all tasks than those in the low musical aptitude group, showing that success in manipulating linguistic sounds was related to awareness of distinct…

  16. Improvisation: Thinking "and" Playing Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, David

    2013-01-01

    This article explores and contextualizes improvisation in music from an educational perspective. First, recent brain research that sees improvisation as a distinct cognitive activity is examined and used to illustrate the importance and uniqueness of this often ignored area of music learning. Next, the implications for the music classroom are…

  17. Why Market the Music Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Paul E.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the need to promote school music programs. Includes a checklist for testing a music program's promotional effectiveness. Suggests using public relations (PR) to reduce the risk of music program cuts before they occur. Recommends setting and determining the means of achieving PR goals. Identifies the benefits of effective PR. (SG)

  18. Questions for Music Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Estelle R.

    2008-01-01

    In addressing the question-set "What questions do music education researchers need to address?", an illustrative list of juxtaposed descriptive and normative questions is sketched as follows: What are and should be the dimensions of music education? What are and should be the institutional agencies of music education? What are and should be the…

  19. African Music in the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goines, Leonard

    1977-01-01

    Discusses African music, how it survived slavery, why it manifests itself in specific forms, why some of these forms are almost purely African today while others are very European, the specific characteristics of African music that permeate all African-American music, and why African derived religions are flourishing in the black communities of…

  20. Film Guide for Music Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetler, Donald J.

    The music oriented films and filmstrips in this catalog were produced for use on instructional, educational, or commercial television, or were designed to be used in a specific area and at a specific level of music teaching. Many of the listings should be of interest to teachers of general music at the secondary school level. Two indices are…

  1. Appreciating Music: An Active Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Andrew R.; Pargas, Roy P.

    2005-01-01

    A particularly innovative use of laptops is to enhance the music appreciation experience. Group listening and discussion, in combination with a new Web-based application, lead to deeper understanding of classical music. ["Appreciating Music: An Active Approach" was written with Joshua Austin.

  2. Careers in the Music Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes jobs in the music industry, including instrument designer, sales representative, instrument repair-person, retail music sales-person, recording engineer, and careers in the new video music industry. Educational requirements, personal qualifications, and the advantages and disadvantages of each job are discussed. (AM)

  3. What Is Effective Music Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues that affected the perspectives and roles of music education such as Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, a national interest in educational accountability, the National Standards for Music Education, and research focusing on the correlation between music skills and higher achievement. Recommends teaching strategies…

  4. The Music and Literacy Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dee; Bernstorf, Elaine; Stuber, Gayle M.

    2004-01-01

    A practical new text with ideas that can immediately be put to use in the classroom. This book goes beyond a thematic link between reading and music to an examination of those skills that are directly parallel in music learning and text reading. Including instructional examples, it provides specific strategies for music and reading teachers to…

  5. Edward Said on Popular Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capitain, W.H.P.

    2017-01-01

    Although Edward Said, generally known as one of the founders of postcolonial studies, has written extensively on music, he almost completely ignores popular music. However, the few moments in which he does reflect on popular music are highly revealing. In this article I provide a comprehensive

  6. Danish music education and the 'rhythmic music' concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder Kaj

    2014-01-01

    The article reflects on Danish music education and the concept of 'rhythmic music'. It highligths the so-called "jazz-oratorio", a unique genre, created by the composer Bernhard Christensen (1906-2004) and the librettist Sven Møller Kristensen (1909-91). The article shows that the term 'jazz......' was avoided and the Danish phrase 'rytmisk musik' (rhythmic music) was created to emphasize the educational and pedagogical content. The aim was also to prevent the prejudicious idea associated with jazz, especially by opponents. The article intends to evaluate the situation of 'rhythmic music' in the context...... of Danish music education....

  7. String quartet chamber music : the personal way of music development

    OpenAIRE

    Montant, Laure

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is about chamber music and more specifically string quartet. How and why chamber music should be a real part of a musician’s life. In the introduction, it is explained why it is important to play chamber music and what qualities a musician needs to be good at it. Then a description of what is chamber music litterally is exposed. The history recounts what was chamber music from its early beginings until our days and why it has so much evolves. About interpretation, t...

  8. Music therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalbers, Sonja; Fusar-Poli, Laura; Freeman, Ruth E; Spreen, Marinus; Ket, Johannes Cf; Vink, Annemiek C; Maratos, Anna; Crawford, Mike; Chen, Xi-Jing; Gold, Christian

    2017-11-16

    Depression is a highly prevalent mood disorder that is characterised by persistent low mood, diminished interest, and loss of pleasure. Music therapy may be helpful in modulating moods and emotions. An update of the 2008 Cochrane review was needed to improve knowledge on effects of music therapy for depression. 1. To assess effects of music therapy for depression in people of any age compared with treatment as usual (TAU) and psychological, pharmacological, and/or other therapies.2. To compare effects of different forms of music therapy for people of any age with a diagnosis of depression. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Controlled Trials Register (CCMD-CTR; from inception to 6 May 2016); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; to 17 June 2016); Thomson Reuters/Web of Science (to 21 June 2016); Ebsco/PsycInfo, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Embase, and PubMed (to 5 July 2016); the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), ClinicalTrials.gov, the National Guideline Clearing House, and OpenGrey (to 6 September 2016); and the Digital Access to Research Theses (DART)-Europe E-theses Portal, Open Access Theses and Dissertations, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Database (to 7 September 2016). We checked reference lists of retrieved articles and relevant systematic reviews and contacted trialists and subject experts for additional information when needed. We updated this search in August 2017 and placed potentially relevant studies in the "Awaiting classification" section; we will incorporate these into the next version of this review as appropriate. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing music therapy versus treatment as usual (TAU), psychological therapies, pharmacological therapies, other therapies, or different forms of music therapy for reducing depression. Two review

  9. Music: Specialized to Integrate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Estêvão Andrade

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In her paper Schaefer (2014 provides a relevant amount of behavioral and neuroimaging evidence within and outside the realm of music favoring the notion that predictive processing plays a prominent role in the coupling of perception, cognition and action, and further, that imagery and active perception are closely associated with each other. Central to this review is that research into music imagery is exceptionally suitable and informative since prediction has a prominent role in music processing. In this commentary we suggest that it could be useful to investigate the role of working memory in this context since imagery and memory are inextricably associated processes. In addition to neuroimaging we also highlight that anthropological and developmental evidence could be relevant in showing that music is possibly unique in the coupling of perception, cognition and action. However, we believe that greater caution is needed regarding the author’s assumption that perception and interpretation of music is uniquely determined by the listening biography of the listener.

  10. Inattentional deafness in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreimann, Sabrina; Gula, Bartosz; Vitouch, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    While inattentional blindness is a modern classic in attention and perception research, analogous phenomena of inattentional deafness have been widely neglected. We here present the first investigation of inattentional deafness in and with music under controlled experimental conditions. Inattentional deafness in music is defined as the inability to consciously perceive an unexpected musical stimulus when attention is focused on a certain facet of the piece. Participants listened to a modification of the first 1'50″ of Richard Strauss' Thus Spake Zarathustra; while the control group just listened, the experimental group had to count the number of timpani beats. An e-guitar solo served as the unexpected event. In Study 1, experimental data from n = 115 participants were analyzed. Non-musicians were compared with musicians to investigate the impact of expertise. In Study 2 (n = 47), the scope of the inattentional deafness effect was investigated with a more salient unexpected stimulus. Results demonstrate an inattentional deafness effect under dynamic musical conditions. Quite unexpectedly, the effect was structurally equivalent even for musicians. Our findings clearly show that sustained inattentional deafness exists in the musical realm, in close correspondence to inattentional blindness with dynamic visual stimuli.

  11. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings

    OpenAIRE

    Elżbieta Galińska

    2015-01-01

    The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic ...

  12. Professors's visions of music-teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    Ferm, Cecilia; Johansen, Geir; Juntunen, Marja-Leena

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments at the labour market for music teachers require a broader understanding of the music teacher profession than before and cause music teachers to establish themselves as versatile music workers at various levels and areas of music education. This requires music teacher education to not only offer a variety of relevant courses but also to ensure that the student music teachers profit from the potential synergies of relating to and reflecting on the learning outcomes of those ...

  13. Grand Challenges in Music Information Research

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses some grand challenges in which music information research will impact our daily lives and our society in the future. Here, some fundamental questions are how to provide the best music for each person, how to predict music trends, how to enrich human-music relationships, how to evolve new music, and how to address environmental, energy issues by using music technologies. Our goal is to increase both attractiveness and social impacts of music information research in the fut...

  14. Gambaran Music Engagement untuk Meregulasi Emosi

    OpenAIRE

    Harefa, Daniel Novriman

    2017-01-01

    One of functions of music for humans is to regulate emotions. Music engagement for emotional regulation use can be done through music listening activity. Music engagement is unique, that describes the benefits of music for such individuals (Rickard and Chin, 2012), so this study aims to describe music engagement for emotional regulation use. A total of 124 people from various backgrounds are willing to fill Engagement Music Style: Cognitive and Emotional Regulation Scale whi...

  15. [Music and health--what kind of music is helpful for whom? What music not?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, H-J

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that music not only may improve quality of life (QoL) but also have different effects on heart rate (HR) and its variability (HRV). Music emphasis and rhythmic phrases are tracked consistently by physiological variables. Autonomic responses are synchronized with music, which might therefore convey emotions through autonomic arousal during crescendos or rhythmic phrases. A greater modulation of HR, HRV and modulations in cardiac autonomic nerve activity was revealed with a greater effect for music performance than music perception. Reactions to music are considered subjective, but studies suggested that cardiorespiratory variables are influenced under different circumstances. It has been shown that relaxing music decreases significantly the level of anxiety in a preoperative setting to a greater extent than orally administered midazolam (p music a useful alternative to midazolam for premedication. In addition, there is sufficient practical evidence of stress reduction to suggest that a proposed regimen of listening to music while resting in bed after open heart surgery. Music intervention should be offered as an integral part of the multimodal regime administered to the patients that have undergone cardiovascular surgery. It is a supportive source that increases relaxation. Music is also effective in under conditions and music can be utilized as an effective intervention for patients with depressive symptoms, geriatrics and in pain, intensive care or palliative medicine. However, careful selected music that incorporates a patient's own preferences may offer an effective method to reduce anxiety and to improve quality of life. The most benefit on health is visible in classic music, meditation music whereas heavy metal music or technosounds are even ineffective or dangerous and will lead to stress and/or life threatening arrhythmias. There are many composers most effectively to improve QoL, particularly Bach, Mozart and Italian composers are "ideal

  16. Cross-cultural perspectives on music and musicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E.; Becker, Judith; Morley, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Musical behaviours are universal across human populations and, at the same time, highly diverse in their structures, roles and cultural interpretations. Although laboratory studies of isolated listeners and music-makers have yielded important insights into sensorimotor and cognitive skills and their neural underpinnings, they have revealed little about the broader significance of music for individuals, peer groups and communities. This review presents a sampling of musical forms and coordinated musical activity across cultures, with the aim of highlighting key similarities and differences. The focus is on scholarly and everyday ideas about music—what it is and where it originates—as well the antiquity of music and the contribution of musical behaviour to ritual activity, social organization, caregiving and group cohesion. Synchronous arousal, action synchrony and imitative behaviours are among the means by which music facilitates social bonding. The commonalities and differences in musical forms and functions across cultures suggest new directions for ethnomusicology, music cognition and neuroscience, and a pivot away from the predominant scientific focus on instrumental music in the Western European tradition. PMID:25646519

  17. The musical identities of Danish music therapy students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2013-01-01

    In the music therapy masters program at Aalborg University (Denmark) Music and Identity is a short, intensive course, based on a musical autobiography written by each participating student. Since 1999 almost 100 students have written a narrative of their musical life story. This article will focus...... on contributions from students participating from 2010-12 (n=21). Musical autobiographies have been analyzed (a) using the theoretical model of Even Ruud (1997, 1998), (b) as thematic analysis (Braun & Clark 2006), (c) using RepGrid, a qualitative research methodology based on George Kelly’s Personal Construct...... Theory (Abrams & Meadows 2005). Patterns of identity construction are presented, and the roles and functions of music in different stages of life discussed, including the self-reported influence of music on the students' health....

  18. Loja musical capital of Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Rodríguez Guerrero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the slang language of Lojanos, it is said that Loja is the musical capital of Ecuador. thesis or clich´e, which has led to write the present article to find the theoretical empirical support and practices that support it, constituting it in research object and recommend to the future the innovations that need to be introduced in order to sustain and strengthen this place of Loja. This first approach has as a problem What does Loja provides, that distinguish from the rest of the provinces of Ecuador in the musical field, to be considered its capital? This first delivery aims to build a framework of computer concepts that open up posterity to a field of research on music and that translate into policies, plans and programs that empower it. They develop three concepts derived from the thesis: the power to construct music that refers to the generic and specific competences in different instruments and genres, the amount of music that is produced and the human talent in musical formation that is developed in Loja. Empirical evidence is collected to corroborate or reject the hypothesis: Loja is the musical capital of Ecuador. Data are collected on musical skills and compared at the global level, as well as music production and music training scenarios. At the end the hypothesis is checked. The task of the Lojanos is to innovate the capital. Keywords: Music, musical competitions, musical talent in training, amount of music, musicalperformance, musical instrument, songs.

  19. Musical emotions: Functions, origins, evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2010-03-01

    Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in

  20. Sad music induces pleasant emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion. PMID:23785342

  1. Broadcasting Children’s Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Bignell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Broadcasting children’s music on television and radio is motivated by, and aims to serve, adults’ perceptions of children’s wants and needs. Children’s music in general is shaped by the understanding of what ‘childhood’ means and, in turn, supports adults’ assumptions about childhood. This article develops these ideas in an analysis of examples from the history of British radio and television, beginning in the 1920s and continuing until the growing penetration of online interactive media challenged the status of broadcasting in the early 21st century. The article discusses examples of different kinds of children’s music in a broadcast context, including the broadcast of commercial recordings of music for children, such as versions of traditional songs and nursery rhymes as well as pop music aimed at children. It also considers the significance of signature tunes and repeated musical sequences from long-lived and well-loved children’s programmes, because they play key roles in differentiating children’s programmes from each other and distinguishing children’s music from music aimed at adults. Broadcast programmes frequently include music that does not play a central role, when it is used as an accompaniment to drama, entertainment performance or animation. But such music contributes to programmes’ tone and shapes their mode of address to an imagined child audience. Entertainment shows or magazine programmes include music performances alongside non-musical sequences and can use music to, for example, mark an occasion for sing-along activities or accompany games. The social function of broadcasting for children watching or listening at home or at school, usually with an adult or other children, is constituted in part by these varied forms of children’s music. These forms of music shape conceptions of childhood through particular kinds of listening practices and ways of belonging to an audience.

  2. Sad music induces pleasant emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion.

  3. Musical emotions: functions, origins, evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2010-03-01

    Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in

  4. Furnishing Music: An Analysis of Mass Media in Terms of Music Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, David

    1975-01-01

    Author presented for consideration the position that the importance of mass media music (FM, AM, juke box, TV, film, etc.) might not be so much in its music as in the musical systems represented by that music. (Author/RK)

  5. Musics of "The Other": Creating Musical Identities and Overcoming Cultural Boundaries in Australian Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    The binary opposition between "own music" and "other's music" is the "result of deep conditioning" (Drummond, 2010, p. 118) and is almost impossible to overcome. By exploring the underlying constructs that influence students' and teachers' perceptions of minority cultures and their musics, this paper explores the…

  6. Music, Music Education, and Institutional Ideology: A Praxial Philosophy of Musical Sociality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regelski, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Music is a human action (praxis), guided by intentionality, that embodies sociality. The many significant "social" values of music, however, get lost in high-minded but faulty claims that music's essential value is to promote aesthetic experience. A survey of some basic aesthetic premises demonstrates that claims for "proper"…

  7. Music and the brain: the neuroscience of music and musical appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Michael; Hesdorffer, Dale

    2017-01-01

    Through music we can learn much about our human origins and the human brain. Music is a potential method of therapy and a means of accessing and stimulating specific cerebral circuits. There is also an association between musical creativity and psychopathology. This paper provides a brief review.

  8. Music and Health Promotion - In the Life of Music Therapy and Music Psychology Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2014-01-01

    In August 2013 Center for Music and Health published its first anthology in English on ‘Musical Life Stories’. 17 authors from 6 countries present their research on the influence of music in a lifelong health perspective. A unique feature in the book is a collection of “personal narratives...

  9. Expressiveness in musical emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieillard, Sandrine; Roy, Mathieu; Peretz, Isabelle

    2012-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate how emotion category, characterized by distinct musical structures (happiness, sadness, threat) and expressiveness (mechanical, expressive) may influence overt and covert behavioral judgments and physiological responses in musically trained and untrained listeners. Mechanical and expressive versions of happy, sad and scary excerpts were presented while physiological measures were recorded. Participants rated the intensity of the emotion they felt. In addition, they monitored excerpts for the presence of brief breaths. Results showed that the emotion categories were rated higher in the expressive than in the mechanical versions and that this effect was larger in musicians. Moreover, expressive excerpts were found to increase skin conductance level more than the mechanical ones, independently of their arousal value, and to slow down response times in the breath detection task relative to the mechanical versions, suggesting enhanced capture of attention by expressiveness. Altogether, the results support the key role of the performer's expression in the listener's emotional response to music.

  10. Music, culture and identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilir Ramadani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available At the time of globalization it is difficult to pretend avoiding music culture and identity from political, cultural and social developments. Thus, it is impossible for the music to be unshakable and to represent national identity by not taking and giving nothing to culture. The dynamics of life and the rapid development of technology make it impossible for the culture to remain unaffected in terms of sharing experiences social experiences. Culture represents our current course, both in terms of politics, also in the social and human aspects. Through the technology it is possible for our children to be equal with children of all other countries, to exchange information and to connect directly with all countries of the world. Musical education is one of the main factors of cultural development and preservation of national identity. Identity consists of everything we posses and reflect. We are those who distinguish from each other and have a common denominator compared to other nations.

  11. Ancient Greek new music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Žužek

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article I use a contextual approach to questions about the revolutionary »new music« in ancient Greece. This view is different from the nowadays most common formalistk view. Rather than analyze textual sources stylistically, I will try to present the available lata in the context of the structure and events of the Athenian society at a tirne when a wave of »new« poetics appeared. In the following discussion it is argued that the »new music« and the phenomena of the destruction of mousiké connected with it are not an esthetical novum, but more a consequence of the change of the discursive practice, where a musical poetry became less important and needless.

  12. Music, radio and mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Morten; Krogh, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Mediatization has become a key concept for understanding the relations between media and other cultural and social fields. Contributing to the discussions related to the concept of mediatization, this article discusses how practices of radio and music(al life) influence each other. We follow Deacon......’s and Stanyer’s advice to supplement the concept of mediatization with ‘a series of additional concepts at lower levels of abstraction’ and suggest, in this respect, the notion of heterogeneous milieus of music–radio. Hereby, we turn away from the all-encompassing perspectives related to the concept...... of mediatization where media as such seem to be ascribed agency. Instead, we consider historical accounts of music–radio in order to address the complex nonlinearity of concrete processes of mediatization as they take place in the multiple meetings between a decentred notion of radio and musical life....

  13. Seizures induced by music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyemi, A O; Breen, H

    1993-01-01

    Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  14. Physics of Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Jayanti

    2003-11-01

    Pythagoraas was the first one to think of musical scales. During earlier times, when people did not travel this much, the scale was all different. Bach composed his music with A= 420 Hz. Handel used A=460 Hz. Now that people are traveling all over and performing, all over in the western world, they use the 'equal tempered scale'. A is everywhere 440 Hz. The equal tempered scale means that the frequencies of consecutive notes are the twelfth root of two. When one has gone from the first note to the last, the ratio is 1:2, and the next scale begins. In the Indian classical music scale, there are twentytwo notes in the scale. They are called "Shruitis". Different notes are used in the different "Ragas". I would explain the different "Ragas" and also compare the Indian frequencies with the equal tempered frequencies.

  15. Engaging with mobile music retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Boland, Daniel; McLachlan, Ross; Murray-Smith, Roderick

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes novel measures of user engagement\\ud in mobile music retrieval, linking these to work in music\\ud psychology, and illustrating resulting design guidelines in a\\ud demonstrator system. The large music collections available\\ud to users today can be overwhelming in mobile settings, they\\ud offer ‘too-much-choice’ to users, who often resort to shufflebased\\ud playback. Work in music psychology has introduced\\ud the concept of music engagement – listeners vary in their\\ud de...

  16. Music cognition: a developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalinski, Stephanie M; Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2012-10-01

    Although music is universal, there is a great deal of cultural variability in music structures. Nevertheless, some aspects of music processing generalize across cultures, whereas others rely heavily on the listening environment. Here, we discuss the development of musical knowledge, focusing on four themes: (a) capabilities that are present early in development; (b) culture-general and culture-specific aspects of pitch and rhythm processing; (c) age-related changes in pitch perception; and (d) developmental changes in how listeners perceive emotion in music. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  17. Supportive Music and Imagery Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sumi Paik-Maier

    2010-01-01

    The Supportive Music and Imagery Method is derived from the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music (BMGIM). It uses one piece of pre-recorded music that is short and simple in all musical elements and non-classical music is often used.It aims at enhancing one’s ego by supporting one’s positive resource rather than exploring problems and issues. It is containing and highly structured compared to BMGIM and it focuses on the here-and-now.

    I will introduce how the SMI...

  18. Music, advertising and transmedia storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cande SÁNCHEZ-OLMOS

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of advertising in everyday life and the importance of music demand a critical study on how brands use music for commercial purposes. In a context of convergence and participatory culture, it is necessary to develop new strategies, codes and narratives that brands and artists are creating to connect with consumers. Music is the basis of the collective experience and, in addition, it connects intensely and emotionally with the identity of groups that are its potential target. Brands use music to generate memorable experiences for consumers who reject traditional advertising forms. In addition, music, as a product of the cultural industry, needs marketing strategies to connect with fans.

  19. Music Preferences with Regard to Music Education, Informal Infuences and Familiarity of Music Amongst Young People in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrota, Snježana; Ercegovac, Ina Reic

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between music preference and music education, informal influences (attending classical music concerts and musical theatre productions) and familiarity of music. The research included students of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Split (N = 341). The results…

  20. Becoming Music-Making Music Teachers: Connecting Music Making, Identity, Wellbeing, and Teaching for Four Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive case study was to examine the developing music teacher identity of four student music teachers by exploring the meanings of music making and the intersections of music making and teaching. Participants all had dual student teaching placements: elementary general music and secondary band. Data were generated through…

  1. The Music Festival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Johannes

    For the youth the music festivals are spaces for practical learning of the strength of networking, based on art, communication and contacting. Being part of the music gives the participants a possibility to be part of the place, the feeling and the art, with massive effects on their identity....... They learn about the importance of communicating, and to be open for others communication. And this is the fundament of an important community in democracies, distributing social trust and community, in a field of a tendency of individualizing. This presentation aims to map out examples of the new political...

  2. Neuroarchitecture of musical emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Sel, A.; Calvo-Merino, B.

    2013-01-01

    La respuesta emocional ante la música, o emoción musical, es una respuesta universal que depende de diferentes procesos psicológicos y recluta una extensa red de estructuras neuronales. Mediante el empleo de técnicas como la electroencefalografía, la resonancia magnética funcional y los estudios con población clínica e individuos con formación musical previa, se ha empezado a dilucidar estos mecanismos cerebrales. El objetivo de este artículo es hacer una revisión de los trabajos más relevant...

  3. Learning Classical Music Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Learning Classical Music Club

    2010-01-01

    There is a new CERN Club called “Learning Classical Music at CERN”. We are aiming to give classical music lessons for different instruments (see link) for students from 5 to 100 years old. We are now ready to start our activities in the CERN barracks. We are now in the enrollment phase and hope to start lessons very soon ! Club info can be found in the list of CERN Club: http://user.web.cern.ch/user/Communication/SocialLifeActivities/Clubs/Clubs.html Salvatore Buontempo Club President

  4. Broadcasting children's music

    OpenAIRE

    Bignell, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Broadcasting children’s music on television and radio is motivated by, and aims to serve, adults’ perceptions of children’s wants and needs. Children’s music in general is shaped by the understanding of what ‘childhood’ means and, in turn, supports adults’ assumptions about childhood. This article develops these ideas in an analysis of examples from the history of British radio and television, beginning in the 1920s and continuing until the growing penetration of online interactive media chal...

  5. Empirical Music Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    The toolbox for empirically exploring the ways that artistic endeavors convey and activate meaning on the part of performers and audiences continues to expand. Current work employing methods at the intersection of performance studies, philosophy, motion capture and neuroscience to better understand...... musical performance and reception is inspired by traditional approaches within aesthetics, but it also challenges some of the presuppositions inherent in them. As an example of such work I present a research project in empirical music aesthetics begun last year and of which I am a team member....

  6. Loud Music Listening

    OpenAIRE

    Petrescu, Nicolae

    2008-01-01

    Over the past four decades, there has been increasing interest in the effects of music listening on hearing. The purpose of this paper is to review published studies that detail the noise levels, the potential effects (e.g. noise-induced hearing loss), and the perceptions of those affected by music exposure in occupational and non-occupational settings. The review employed Medline, PubMed, PsychINFO, and the World Wide Web to find relevant studies in the scientific literature. Considered in t...

  7. The prenatal roots of music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ernest Teie

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the idea that pulse in music may be related to human pulse is ancient and has recently been promoted by researchers (Parncutt, 2006; Snowdon & Teie, 2010, there has been no ordered delineation of the characteristics of music that are based on the sounds of the womb. I describe features of music that are based on sounds that are present in the womb: tempo of pulse (pulse is understood as the regular, underlying beat that defines the meter, amplitude contour of pulse, meter, musical notes, melodic frequency range, continuity, syllabic contour, melodic rhythm, melodic accents, phrase length, and phrase contour. There are a number of features of prenatal development that allow for the formation of long-term memories of the sounds of the womb in the areas of the brain that are responsible for emotions. Taken together, these features and the similarities between the sounds of the womb and the elemental building blocks of music allow for a postulation that the fetal acoustic environment may provide the bases for the fundamental musical elements that are found in the music of all cultures. This hypothesis is supported by a one-to-one matching of the universal features of music with the sounds of the womb: 1 all of the regularly heard sounds that are present in the fetal environment are represented in the music of every culture, and 2 all of the features of music that are present in the music of all cultures can be traced to the fetal environment.

  8. Computational approach to multifractal music

    CERN Document Server

    Oświęcimka, Paweł; Celińska, Iwona; Drożdż, Stanisław; Rak, Rafał

    2011-01-01

    In this work we perform a fractal analysis of 160 pieces of music belonging to six different genres. We show that the majority of the pieces reveal characteristics that allow us to classify them as physical processes called the 1/f (pink) noise. However, this is not true for classical music represented here by Frederic Chopin's works and for some jazz pieces that are much more correlated than the pink noise. We also perform a multifractal (MFDFA) analysis of these music pieces. We show that all the pieces reveal multifractal properties. The richest multifractal structures are observed for pop and rock music. Also the viariably of multifractal features is best visible for popular music genres. This can suggest that, from the multifractal perspective, classical and jazz music is much more uniform than pieces of the most popular genres of music.

  9. Individual differences in musical taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Adrian C

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the relationship between (usually a narrow set of) personality dimensions and liking for a small number of individual musical styles. To date there has been no attempt to investigate, within a single methodology, the extent to which personality factors correlate with liking for a very wide range of musical styles. To address this, 36,518 participants rated their liking for 104 musical styles, completed a short form of the Big 5 personality inventory, and provided other data about their favorite musical styles. Personality factors were related to both liking for the musical styles and participants' reasons for listening to this music. However, on the whole these latter variables were related more closely to participants' age, sex, and income than to Big 5 scores. Thus, personality is related to musical taste, but other individual differences are arguably related more closely.

  10. Composing Music with Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofan; Tse, Chi K.; Small, Michael

    In this paper we study the network structure in music and attempt to compose music artificially. Networks are constructed with nodes and edges corresponding to musical notes and their co-occurrences. We analyze sample compositions from Bach, Mozart, Chopin, as well as other types of music including Chinese pop music. We observe remarkably similar properties in all networks constructed from the selected compositions. Power-law exponents of degree distributions, mean degrees, clustering coefficients, mean geodesic distances, etc. are reported. With the network constructed, music can be created by using a biased random walk algorithm, which begins with a randomly chosen note and selects the subsequent notes according to a simple set of rules that compares the weights of the edges, weights of the nodes, and/or the degrees of nodes. The newly created music from complex networks will be played in the presentation.

  11. A Mixed-Methods Investigation of Preservice Music Teaching Efficacy Beliefs and Commitment to Music Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the music teaching efficacy beliefs and commitment to teaching of preservice music teachers enrolled in an introductory music education course. Also explored was the impact of introductory music education course experiences on preservice music teachers' music teaching efficacy beliefs and commitment to…

  12. Exploring the Benefits of Music-Making as Professional Development for Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Although much has been written about professional development in general education and music education literature, little has addressed the benefits of music-making as meaningful professional development for music teachers. For music teachers, music-making and meanings of music-making have been connected with teachers' identity, well-being,…

  13. General Music Teachers' Attitudes and Practices Regarding Multicultural Music Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kwan Yie; Pan, Kok Chang; Shah, Shahanum Mohd

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the utilisation of multicultural music education by Malaysian music teachers, with an emphasis on the relationship between music teachers' attitudes and their subsequent degree of effort in developing and implementing multicultural music education in their music classes. Respondents for the study were 456 music teachers;…

  14. Educator Access and Application of Music Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paney, Andrew S.

    2011-01-01

    One role of music education research is to "enhance knowledge regarding the teaching and learning of music," however, despite the fact that music education research is published several times each year in multiple journals, a communication gap between music researchers and music teachers continues to exist. Three suggested reasons…

  15. Advances in Music-Reading Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsdottir, Helga Rut

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to construct a comprehensive review of the research literature in the reading of western staff notation. Studies in music perception, music cognition, music education and music neurology are cited. The aim is to establish current knowledge in music-reading acquisition and what is needed for further progress in this…

  16. Using Informal Education through Music Video Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayari, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Music video creation provides students a new way to express themselves and become better performers and consumers of media. This article provides a new perspective on Lucy Green's informal music pedagogy by enabling students to create music videos in music classrooms; thus, students are able to create music videos that informally develop…

  17. Integrating Technology into Your Elementary Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Amy M.

    2006-01-01

    The article discusses the inclusion of technology in elementary music education. The Technology Institute for Music Educators was an excellent place for learning music technology as they offer summer courses for teachers with novice to advanced skills in technology. Music technology differentiates instruction and challenge the musically gifted…

  18. Building Evidence for Music Education Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorner-Johnson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The economic challenges facing public schools and music education are immense. In this context, music teachers and supporters will need to engage in persuasive advocacy to protect resource allocations to music programs. It is worthwhile to consider the model of music education advocacy that allowed music to be adopted into the Boston Public…

  19. Music-Notation Searching and Digital Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Donald

    Almost all work on music information retrieval to date has concentrated on music in the audio and event (normally MIDI) domains. However, music in the form of notation, especially Conventional Music Notation (CMN), is of much interest to musically trained persons, both amateurs and professionals, and searching CMN has great value for digital music…

  20. Learning Novel Musical Pitch via Distributional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jia Hoong; Burnham, Denis; Stevens, Catherine J.

    2017-01-01

    Because different musical scales use different sets of intervals and, hence, different musical pitches, how do music listeners learn those that are in their native musical system? One possibility is that musical pitches are acquired in the same way as phonemes, that is, via distributional learning, in which learners infer knowledge from the…

  1. Music Copyright Law in Education. Fastback 368.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert Henley, III; Woody, Robert Henley, II

    This booklet focuses on how copyright law applies to music in education, but the information is not restricted to the music specialist. Instrumental and vocal music specialists must rely on copyrighted material. Without sheet music, an ensemble could not rehearse or perform. But classroom teachers also use music when they sing songs with or play…

  2. Dalcroze, the Body, Movement and Musicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Jay A.

    2005-01-01

    What forms the basis of musical expressivity? The Swiss composer and music educator, Emile Jaques-Dalcroze, believed that bodily processes, rhythm, and physical motion were the basis of musical expressivity and music pedagogy. We can rephrase his emphasis on the synergy between bodily and musical processes into a question: How does the body…

  3. Decolonizing Music Education: Moving beyond Tokenism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Juliet

    2015-01-01

    Current music education curricula across Canada designate Western classical music as the music most worthy of study through emphasis on elements of music that are decidedly Western. Despite the way the curriculum is constructed, many music teachers strive to create diverse programs for their students. In her examination of women's studies…

  4. Without it no music: cognition, biology and evolution of musicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honing, Henkjan; ten Cate, Carel; Peretz, Isabelle; Trehub, Sandra E

    2015-03-19

    Musicality can be defined as a natural, spontaneously developing trait based on and constrained by biology and cognition. Music, by contrast, can be defined as a social and cultural construct based on that very musicality. One critical challenge is to delineate the constituent elements of musicality. What biological and cognitive mechanisms are essential for perceiving, appreciating and making music? Progress in understanding the evolution of music cognition depends upon adequate characterization of the constituent mechanisms of musicality and the extent to which they are present in non-human species. We argue for the importance of identifying these mechanisms and delineating their functions and developmental course, as well as suggesting effective means of studying them in human and non-human animals. It is virtually impossible to underpin the evolutionary role of musicality as a whole, but a multicomponent perspective on musicality that emphasizes its constituent capacities, development and neural cognitive specificity is an excellent starting point for a research programme aimed at illuminating the origins and evolution of musical behaviour as an autonomous trait. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Without it no music: cognition, biology and evolution of musicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honing, Henkjan; ten Cate, Carel; Peretz, Isabelle; Trehub, Sandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Musicality can be defined as a natural, spontaneously developing trait based on and constrained by biology and cognition. Music, by contrast, can be defined as a social and cultural construct based on that very musicality. One critical challenge is to delineate the constituent elements of musicality. What biological and cognitive mechanisms are essential for perceiving, appreciating and making music? Progress in understanding the evolution of music cognition depends upon adequate characterization of the constituent mechanisms of musicality and the extent to which they are present in non-human species. We argue for the importance of identifying these mechanisms and delineating their functions and developmental course, as well as suggesting effective means of studying them in human and non-human animals. It is virtually impossible to underpin the evolutionary role of musicality as a whole, but a multicomponent perspective on musicality that emphasizes its constituent capacities, development and neural cognitive specificity is an excellent starting point for a research programme aimed at illuminating the origins and evolution of musical behaviour as an autonomous trait. PMID:25646511

  6. Music and Health Promotion In the Life of Music Therapy and Music Psychology Researchers: A Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2014-01-01

    .... This article describes a thematic analysis of the 13 narratives. I investigated the question "Do these music therapy/music psychology researchers use music for their own health in different ways than lay people...

  7. Music and Health Promotion - In the Life of Music Therapy and Music Psychology Researchers: A Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2014-01-01

    .... This article describes a thematic analysis of the 13 narratives. I investigated the question "Do these music therapy/music psychology researchers use music for their own health in different ways than lay people...

  8. Materiality for Musical Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Rikard; Tahiroğlu, Koray; Riis, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    technology and possible musical expression with a strong connection to culture and place. The emphasis on performance provided closure and motivated teams to move forward in their design and artistic processes. On the basis of the course we discuss an interdisciplinary NIME course syllabus, and we infer...

  9. Physics Mood Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrig, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Describes playing music between class periods in which the songs convey a message about science. Students walk into the classroom to the tune of various lyrics that can be related to physics topics. Songs about or mentioning scientific principles include: "Somewhere over the Rainbow" (color); "I sing the Body Electric" (electricity); and "Good…

  10. Rhythm Sticks without Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Rosemary

    2000-01-01

    Provides 11 specific rhythm stick activities for preschoolers and kindergartners to increase children's awareness of basic music theory. Lessons incorporated in these activities include tempo, dynamics, intensity, laterality, and directionality. Lessons also address children's awareness of personal space and improved listening skills. Instructions…

  11. The Paperless Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebelhausen, Robin

    2016-01-01

    In an age where the world is becoming ever more aware of paper consumption, educators are turning toward technology to cut back on paper waste. Besides the environmental reasons, a paperless music classroom helps students develop their musicianship in new and exciting ways. This article will look at the considerations for setting up a paperless…

  12. Valued Estonian Music CDs

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    2002. aastal välja antud eesti muusika heliplaatidest Artur Kapp "Symphonische Werke", Eduard Tubin "Symphonies No.9, No.10 and No.11", "Estonian Preludes", "Eesti heliloojad. Hortus Musicus", "Eesti Muusika Päevad", "Tallinn Saxophone Quartet. Estonian Contemporary Music", "Triskele. Kolga-Jaani vaimulikud rahvalaulud", "Helmekaala. Linnupuu Anne", "Modern Fox mängib Raimond Valgret",

  13. Measurement, Mathematics, and Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Katie; White, David

    The Greek mathematician, Pythagoras, was among the first to undertake a mathematical study of music. His work, resulted in a scale of notes which can produce beautiful melodies and which is easily reproduced in the elementary classroom. In an age when teachers look for an interdisciplinary connection between various aspects of the curriculum, in a…

  14. Music Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, J. Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Identifies MIR (Music Information Retrieval) computer system problems, historic influences, current state-of-the-art, and future MIR solutions through an examination of the multidisciplinary approach to MIR. Highlights include pitch; temporal factors; harmonics; tone; editorial, textual, and bibliographic facets; multicultural factors; locating…

  15. Aeroacoustics of Musical Instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabre, B.; Gilbert, J.; Hirschberg, Abraham; Pelorson, X.

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in the quality of sound produced by musical instruments and their playability. In wind instruments, a hydrodynamic source of sound is coupled to an acoustic resonator. Linear acoustics can predict the pitch of an instrument. This can significantly reduce the trial-and-error process

  16. [Music in the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy.

  17. Let's Start the Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankovic, Patricia; Gilpatrick, Ingrid

    1994-01-01

    A preschool/kindergarten program that serves 18 students with deafness/hearing impairments and 11 hearing children uses music activities to develop speech, audition, language, and movement and to further explore current classroom themes. A deaf teacher models body movements, signs, rhythm, and facial expressions while a hearing teacher models…

  18. Music education in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How has the lack of support for Music in schools and colleges affect- ed school going boys and girls in the country? ..... Malawi must educationally empower her African child to demonstrate human, cultur- al, and national identity as well as mental .... It helps them to develop the entire personal- ity, wisdom and emotions.

  19. Birds and music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Amini

    2009-03-01

    Through research in old mythological narrations, and literary texts, one could assume an intrinsic relationship between music and such sweet-singing mythological birds as phoenix, sphinx, Song-song, holy birds like Kership-tah, and other birds including swan and ring dove.

  20. Music Enhances Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campabello, Nicolette; De Carlo, Mary Jane; O'Neil, Jean; Vacek, Mary Jill

    An action research project implemented musical strategies to affect and enhance student recall and memory. The target population was three suburban elementary schools near a major midwestern city: (1) a kindergarten classroom contained 32-38 students; (2) a second grade classroom contained 23 students and five Individualized Education Program…

  1. Music after the rain

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The group Home Cooking (left to right: Jean-Marie Planche, Tony Arnold, Serge Waeffler, Django Manglunki) entertains the crowd with a humoristic blues/rock performance. The earth moved in Prévessin on 29 July. This was not an earthquake but an 'international' music event, the seventeenth CERN Hardronic Festival, which saw musicians from many different countries, including Russia, Britain, Spain, France, Belgium and the USA, take to the stage. The audience rocked to music from eight different groups until the early hours. About a thousand people flocked to CERN to hear what the best of its musical talents had to offer. The evening was very nearly a wash-out, though. After a week of scorching hot temperatures, the heavens suddenly opened and the rain didn't stop until a few minutes before the first act came on stage. Thanks to this narrow escape, the organisers can boast a 17-year run of rain-free Hardronic festivals. All the different musical styles were given a warm reception, from traditional Russian folk...

  2. Mathematics and Musical Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Cadeddu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author analyzes the links between sounds, music and mathematical algorithms that serve to transform analog signals into digital sequences of numbers. He also investigates the impact these techniques have on everyday life in terms of well-being and human productivity.

  3. Virtual reality musical instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur; Kojs, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development and availability of low cost technologies has created a wide interest in virtual reality (VR), but how to design and evaluate multisensory interactions in VR remains as a challenge. In this paper, we focus on virtual reality musical instruments, present an overview of our...

  4. Hearing speech in music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth-Reino Ekström

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The masking effect of a piano composition, played at different speeds and in different octaves, on speech-perception thresholds was investigated in 15 normal-hearing and 14 moderately-hearing-impaired subjects. Running speech (just follow conversation, JFC testing and use of hearing aids increased the everyday validity of the findings. A comparison was made with standard audiometric noises [International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA noise and speech spectrum-filtered noise (SPN]. All masking sounds, music or noise, were presented at the same equivalent sound level (50 dBA. The results showed a significant effect of piano performance speed and octave (P<.01. Low octave and fast tempo had the largest effect; and high octave and slow tempo, the smallest. Music had a lower masking effect than did ICRA noise with two or six speakers at normal vocal effort (P<.01 and SPN (P<.05. Subjects with hearing loss had higher masked thresholds than the normal-hearing subjects (P<.01, but there were smaller differences between masking conditions (P<.01. It is pointed out that music offers an interesting opportunity for studying masking under realistic conditions, where spectral and temporal features can be varied independently. The results have implications for composing music with vocal parts, designing acoustic environments and creating a balance between speech perception and privacy in social settings.

  5. Music, Mathematics and Bach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 3. Music, Mathematics and Bach - Layers of Melody. Rahul Siddharthan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 3 March 1999 pp 8-15. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/03/0008-0015 ...

  6. Music training, cognition, and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigall, Kathleen A; Schellenberg, E Glenn; Misura, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Although most studies that examined associations between music training and cognitive abilities had correlational designs, the prevailing bias is that music training causes improvements in cognition. It is also possible, however, that high-functioning children are more likely than other children to take music lessons, and that they also differ in personality. We asked whether individual differences in cognition and personality predict who takes music lessons and for how long. The participants were 118 adults (Study 1) and 167 10- to 12-year-old children (Study 2). We collected demographic information and measured cognitive ability and the Big Five personality dimensions. As in previous research, cognitive ability was associated with musical involvement even when demographic variables were controlled statistically. Novel findings indicated that personality was associated with musical involvement when demographics and cognitive ability were held constant, and that openness-to-experience was the personality dimension with the best predictive power. These findings reveal that: (1) individual differences influence who takes music lessons and for how long, (2) personality variables are at least as good as cognitive variables at predicting music training, and (3) future correlational studies of links between music training and non-musical ability should account for individual differences in personality.

  7. [Music, pulse, heart and sport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasenzer, E R; Leischik, R

    2018-02-01

    Music, with its various elements, such as rhythm, sound and melody had the unique ability even in prehistoric, ancient and medieval times to have a special fascination for humans. Nowadays, it is impossible to eliminate music from our daily lives. We are accompanied by music in shopping arcades, on the radio, during sport or leisure time activities and in wellness therapy. Ritualized drumming was used in the medical sense to drive away evil spirits or to undergo holy enlightenment. Today we experience the varied effects of music on all sensory organs and we utilize its impact on cardiovascular and neurological rehabilitation, during invasive cardiovascular procedures or during physical activities, such as training or work. The results of recent studies showed positive effects of music on heart rate and in therapeutic treatment (e. g. music therapy). This article pursues the impact of music on the body and the heart and takes sports medical aspects from the past and the present into consideration; however, not all forms of music and not all types of musical activity are equally suitable and are dependent on the type of intervention, the sports activity or form of movement and also on the underlying disease. This article discusses the influence of music on the body, pulse, on the heart and soul in the past and the present day.

  8. 'Lines of flight': digital musical instruments, inclusive music bands, meaningful engagement in music-making and learning

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, Gráinne

    2016-01-01

    In this study I examine the development of three inclusive music bands in Cork city. Derived from Jellison’s research on inclusive music education, inclusive music bands involve students with disabilities coming together with typically developing peers to make and learn music that is meaningful (Jellison, 2012). As part of this study, I established three inclusive music bands to address the lack of inclusive music making and learning experiences in Cork city. Each of these bands evolved and a...

  9. Emotional responses to music: towards scientific perspectives on music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Miyuki; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Obata, Akiko; Koizumi, Hideaki; Maki, Atsushi

    2008-01-08

    Neurocognitive research has the potential to identify the relevant effects of music therapy. In this study, we examined the effect of music mode (major vs. minor) on stress reduction using optical topography and an endocrinological stress marker. In salivary cortisol levels, we observed that stressful conditions such as mental fatigue (thinking and creating a response) was reduced more by major mode music than by minor mode music. We suggest that music specifically induces an emotional response similar to a pleasant experience or happiness. Moreover, we demonstrated the typical asymmetrical pattern of stress responses in upper temporal cortex areas, and suggested that happiness/sadness emotional processing might be related to stress reduction by music.

  10. Music Therapy and Special Music Education: Interdisciplinary Dialogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice-Ann Darrow

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Drawing from Professor Alice-Ann Darrow’s life-long work in the fields of music therapy and special music education, this interview brings to the fore the importance of interdisciplinary dialogue. A range of themes (including the notion of ‘musical rights’ and inclusion emerge and are discussed in relation to the development of interdisciplinary and collaborative work between different music practices. Darrow shares experiences from her personal and professional life that have shaped her work and way of thinking over the years. This interview can provide a framework within which readers can situate and further understand Darrow’s rich contribution within the fields of music therapy and special music education both nationally and internationally.

  11. The Future of Music Therapy for Persons with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2016-01-01

    A Biopsychosocial Perspective on Agitation in Dementia Person-Centered Care and Music for Decreasing Agitation Evidence-Based Research on Music and Music Therapy Clinical Music Therapy Practice and Theory Other Current Developments in Music Recommendations......A Biopsychosocial Perspective on Agitation in Dementia Person-Centered Care and Music for Decreasing Agitation Evidence-Based Research on Music and Music Therapy Clinical Music Therapy Practice and Theory Other Current Developments in Music Recommendations...

  12. Entries for "International Dictionary of Music Therapy"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2013-01-01

    Lars Ole Bondehar skrevet eller bidraget til følgende opslag: analogy, graphic notation, health musicking, intensity profile, metaphor, musical pragmatics, musical semantics, musical syntax, narrative, Even Ruud, self-inquiry, vitality affects (dynamics), Tony Wigram...

  13. A Nonverbal Technique for Studying Music Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Vance W.; Spradlin, Joseph E.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluates the preference among retarded children and adolescents for music as compared to silence, for music as compared to white noise (nonmusical auditory stimulus) and for two particular types of music. (Author/AJ)

  14. Mellonee Burnim on African American Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Patricia Shehan

    1995-01-01

    Describes the role and influence of Mellonee Burnim on U.S. music education. Discusses the origins and impact of African American gospel music. Includes a list of selected resources and two lesson plans featuring gospel music. (CFR)

  15. Focusing Internet Searches for World Music Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Discusses the importance of focusing Internet searches for world music resources. Importance of teaching about music from various cultures; Benefits of identifying a characteristic instrument by name or stylistic terms; Types of music web sites.

  16. Music Learning Based on Computer Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baihui Yan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to better develop and improve students’ music learning, the authors proposed the method of music learning based on computer software. It is still a new field to use computer music software to assist teaching. Hereby, we conducted an in-depth analysis on the computer-enabled music learning and the music learning status in secondary schools, obtaining the specific analytical data. Survey data shows that students have many cognitive problems in the current music classroom, and yet teachers have not found a reasonable countermeasure to them. Against this background, the introduction of computer music software to music learning is a new trial that can not only cultivate the students’ initiatives of music learning, but also enhance their abilities to learn music. Therefore, it is concluded that the computer software based music learning is of great significance to improving the current music learning modes and means.

  17. Music interventions for preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Dileo, Cheryl; Shim, Minjung

    2013-06-06

    Patients awaiting surgical procedures often experience significant anxiety. Such anxiety may result in negative physiological manifestations, slower wound healing, increased risk of infection, and may complicate the induction of anaesthesia and impede postoperative recovery. To reduce patient anxiety, sedatives and anti-anxiety drugs are regularly administered before surgery. However, these often have negative side effects and may prolong patient recovery. Therefore, increasing attention is being paid to a variety of non-pharmacological interventions for reduction of preoperative anxiety such as music therapy and music medicine interventions. Interventions are categorized as 'music medicine' when passive listening to pre-recorded music is offered by medical personnel. In contrast, music therapy requires the implementation of a music intervention by a trained music therapist, the presence of a therapeutic process, and the use of personally tailored music experiences. A systematic review was needed to gauge the efficacy of both music therapy and music medicine interventions for reduction of preoperative anxiety. To examine the effects of music interventions with standard care versus standard care alone on preoperative anxiety in surgical patients. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 7), MEDLINE (1950 to August 2012), CINAHL (1980 to August 2012), AMED (1985 to April 2011; we no longer had access to AMED after this date), EMBASE (1980 to August 2012), PsycINFO (1967 to August 2012), LILACS (1982 to August 2012), Science Citation Index (1980 to August 2012), the specialist music therapy research database (March 1 2008; database is no longer functional), CAIRSS for Music (to August 2012), Proquest Digital Dissertations (1980 to August 2012), ClinicalTrials.gov (2000 to August 2012), Current Controlled Trials (1998 to August 2012), and the National Research Register (2000 to September 2007). We

  18. The Role of Musical Instruments in the Globalization of Music

    OpenAIRE

    Mukuma wa, Kazadi

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the term «globalization» has become a catchword in many languages. It is an open-ended process that implies different levels of unification. In music, attempts have been made by individual and collectively by artists from different cultures in the world. In each case, the process has been focused on the unification of musical sounds that can be identified within the global community. Technology is successful with the duplication of sounds of musical instruments for computer g...

  19. Storytelling technique in Turkish rap music : a music video

    OpenAIRE

    Karakurluk, Bedirhan

    2012-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Graphic Design, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2012. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2012. Includes bibliographical references leaves 60-63. This thesis analyzes the storytelling technique in Turkish rap music in the context of hip-hop culture’s content and history, argues its narrative background, seeks answer to what are the mainstream components of Turkish rap music videos, and examines the music video created for this thesis as...

  20. How Musical is Woman?: Performing Gender in Mariachi Music

    OpenAIRE

    Soto Flores, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    In this dissertation, I engage in the ongoing discussion between popular music and gender scholarship through an ethnographic and archival investigation of women's performances in mariachi music, a musical expression originating in eighteenth-century Western Mexico. Historical evidence and ethnographic accounts referenced in this study reveal that women have indeed performed with mariachi ensembles since at least the turn of the twentieth century. While they were not encouraged to perform as ...

  1. Visual analysis of music in function of music video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antal Silard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wide-spread all over the planet, incorporating all music genres, the music video, the subject matter of this analysis, has become irreplaceable in promotions, song presentations, an artist's image, visual aesthetics of subculture; today, most of the countries in the world have a channel devoted to music only, i.e. to music video. The form started to develop rapidly in the 50s of the twentieth century, alongside television. As it developed, its purpose has changed: from a simple presentation of musicians to an independent video form.

  2. EVENT AND MUSIC FESTIVAL TOURISM IN FINLAND : Ostrobothnia Music Festivals

    OpenAIRE

    Maharjan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    This thesis will emphasize the importance of events and music event tourism. It illustrates music and event as a tool to attract and promote tourism in a specific destination. However, every place could not be developed as a tourism product, but a well-planned and successful music event plays a vital role in developing those places as a possible tourism product. Successful music events benefit both the organizer and the country’s economy and also the local community. If all the components...

  3. Augmented Interactive Scores for Music Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Fober, Dominique; Orlarey, Yann; Letz, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This article addresses music representation issues in the context of the contemporary music creation and performance. It exposes the main challenges in terms of music notation and representation, in regard of the new forms of music and with an emphasis on interactive music issues. It presents INScore, an environment for the design of augmented, interactive music scores that has been developed in response to current artistic evolutions. It gives an overview of the syste...

  4. Music, Knowledge and the Sociology of Sound

    OpenAIRE

    Martyn Hudson

    2014-01-01

    The sociology of music has often concentrated less on analysing and understanding the specificity and meanings of musical material culture as both an object and a process and more about ransacking music for insights into wider social relations like class, race and gender. The social constitution of music and the musical constitution of the social deserve a more sustained attempt at explicating relations and musical forms. This paper looks at the literature on what is specifically sociological...

  5. Preschool children with lower executive function may be more vulnerable to emotional-based eating in the absence of hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Joy Rickman; Laugero, Kevin D

    2013-03-01

    Decreased executive function (EF) has been linked to unhealthy eating behaviors and obesity in older children and adults, however little is known about this relationship in young children. One possible reason for this association is that individuals with degraded EF are more vulnerable to emotional-based overeating. Emotional eating may thus be more likely to occur in persons with lower self-control or ability to regulate emotions. A pilot project in a research-based preschool was conducted to examine the relationships between executive function, emotional arousal and eating in the absence of hunger (EAH) in 3-6year-old children. Executive function was measured through child-completed tasks, parent questionnaires, and standardized teacher reports. Emotional arousal was measured via skin conductance. Children who had lower cognitive development scores as indicated by teacher reports had higher EAH. Increased emotional arousal was associated with increased EAH, but only in a subgroup of children who had a lower capacity for emotional regulation as suggested by lower delay of gratification scores, lower effortful control (parent questionnaire), and overall lower teacher-reported cognitive development. Further studies are necessary to determine whether interventions to improve executive function and emotional regulation in young children may also have the benefit of improving eating behaviors and decreasing risk of obesity in the long run. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Influence of musical expertise and musical training on pitch processing in music and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Mireille; Schön, Daniele; Moreno, Sylvain; Santos, Andréia; Magne, Cyrille

    2007-01-01

    We review a series of experiments aimed at studying pitch processing in music and speech. These studies were conducted with musician and non musician adults and children. We found that musical expertise improved pitch processing not only in music but also in speech. Demonstrating transfer of training between music and language has interesting applications for second language learning. We also addressed the issue of whether the positive effects of musical expertise are linked with specific predispositions for music or with extensive musical practice. Results of longitudinal studies argue for the later. Finally, we also examined pitch processing in dyslexic children and found that they had difficulties discriminating strong pitch changes that are easily discriminate by normal readers. These results argue for a strong link between basic auditory perception abilities and reading abilities. We used conjointly the behavioral method (Reaction Times and error rates) and the electrophysiological method (recording of the changes in brain electrical activity time-locked to stimulus presentation, Event-Related brain Potentials or ERPs). A set of common processes may be responsible for pitch processing in music and in speech and these processes are shaped by musical practice. These data add evidence in favor of brain plasticity and open interesting perspectives for the remediation of dyslexia using musical training.

  7. Automatic Music Boundary Detection Using Short Segmental Acoustic Similarity in a Music Piece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Itoh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a new approach for detecting music boundaries, such as the boundary between music pieces or the boundary between a music piece and a speech section for automatic segmentation of musical video data and retrieval of a designated music piece. The proposed approach is able to capture each music piece using acoustic similarity defined for short-term segments in the music piece. The short segmental acoustic similarity is obtained by means of a new algorithm called segmental continuous dynamic programming, or segmental CDP. The location of each music piece and its music boundaries are then identified by referring to multiple similar segments and their location information, avoiding oversegmentation within a music piece. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated for music boundary detection using actual music datasets. The present paper demonstrates that the proposed method enables accurate detection of music boundaries for both the evaluation data and a real broadcasted music program.

  8. Automatic Music Boundary Detection Using Short Segmental Acoustic Similarity in a Music Piece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Kazuyo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a new approach for detecting music boundaries, such as the boundary between music pieces or the boundary between a music piece and a speech section for automatic segmentation of musical video data and retrieval of a designated music piece. The proposed approach is able to capture each music piece using acoustic similarity defined for short-term segments in the music piece. The short segmental acoustic similarity is obtained by means of a new algorithm called segmental continuous dynamic programming, or segmental CDP. The location of each music piece and its music boundaries are then identified by referring to multiple similar segments and their location information, avoiding oversegmentation within a music piece. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated for music boundary detection using actual music datasets. The present paper demonstrates that the proposed method enables accurate detection of music boundaries for both the evaluation data and a real broadcasted music program.

  9. Mathematics and Computation in Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 5th Biennial International Conference for Mathematics and Computation in Music (MCM 2015) took place June 22–25, 2015, at Queen Mary University of London, UK, co-hosted by the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science (Centre for Digital Music) and the School of Mathematical...... Sciences. As the flagship conference of the Society for Mathematics and Computation in Music (SMCM), MCM 2015 provided a dedicated platform for the communication and exchange of ideas among researchers in mathematics, informatics, music theory, composition, musicology, and related disciplines. It brought...... together researchers from around the world who combine mathematics or computation with music theory, music analysis, composition, and performance. This year’s program – full details at http://mcm2015.qmul.ac.uk – featured a number of distinguished keynote speakers, including Andrée Ehresmann (who spoke...

  10. Music and early language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Anthony; Gebrian, Molly; Slevc, L Robert

    2012-01-01

    Language is typically viewed as fundamental to human intelligence. Music, while recognized as a human universal, is often treated as an ancillary ability - one dependent on or derivative of language. In contrast, we argue that it is more productive from a developmental perspective to describe spoken language as a special type of music. A review of existing studies presents a compelling case that musical hearing and ability is essential to language acquisition. In addition, we challenge the prevailing view that music cognition matures more slowly than language and is more difficult; instead, we argue that music learning matches the speed and effort of language acquisition. We conclude that music merits a central place in our understanding of human development.

  11. Music and Early Language Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony K. Brandt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Language is typically viewed as fundamental to human intelligence. Music, while recognized as a human universal, is often treated as an ancillary ability—one dependent on or derivative of language. In contrast, we argue that it is more productive from a developmental perspective to describe spoken language as a special type of music. A review of existing studies presents a compelling case that musical hearing and ability is essential to language acquisition. In addition, the authors challenge the prevailing view that music cognition matures more slowly than language and is more difficult; instead, the authors present evidence that music learning matches the speed and effort of language acquisition. We conclude that music merits a central place in our understanding of human development.

  12. Songwriting in music-caring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Valgerdur

    2009-01-01

    a therapeutic relationship to address psychosocial, emotional, cognitive and communication needs of the client." (Baker and Wigram 2005:16).  Music-caring in this context is defined preliminary by the researcher as an empathetic and emotionally supportive relationship that an act of musicking brings......This paper introduces songwriting as a music therapeutic approach used in a research study in progress.  The title of the research is:  The lived experience of a group of mothers having young children with special-needs, participating ina music therapy group defined as music-caring within...... the framework of early intervention.  The paper discusses the rationale for choosing songwriting for providing music-caring, describes its progression, presents few songs, and some perspectives about its meaning. This paper presentation introduces songwriting as a central music therapeutic approach used...

  13. Music in Kamigata Rakugo Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hallett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rakugo is the Japanese tradition of staged comic storytelling presented by highly trained hanashika storytellers associated with small urban variety theatres called yose, found in the Kamigata and Edo regions. Although yose theatres are associated with spoken rather than musical events, music is an integral component of Kamigata rakugo performance. It is central both to the rendering of a storyteller’s performance and to creating the overall atmosphere in the yose theatre. This paper addresses the lack of detailed research on music in Kamigata rakugo performance, particularly in English. It demonstrates and documents the centrality of music in Kamigata rakugo performance, specifically the way that this music, which is rich in symbolism, aids a storyteller’s performance and is intrinsically bound up in the hierarchical structure of the storytellers and yose-bayashi ensemble musicians. It focuses on how the music functions in the performances, transmitting meanings and supporting the social structure of the ensemble.

  14. Music and Early Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Anthony; Gebrian, Molly; Slevc, L. Robert

    2012-01-01

    Language is typically viewed as fundamental to human intelligence. Music, while recognized as a human universal, is often treated as an ancillary ability – one dependent on or derivative of language. In contrast, we argue that it is more productive from a developmental perspective to describe spoken language as a special type of music. A review of existing studies presents a compelling case that musical hearing and ability is essential to language acquisition. In addition, we challenge the prevailing view that music cognition matures more slowly than language and is more difficult; instead, we argue that music learning matches the speed and effort of language acquisition. We conclude that music merits a central place in our understanding of human development. PMID:22973254

  15. [Science and music. Introductory remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Mitchell G

    2008-06-01

    The article presents a brief introduction to "Science and Music", theme of the 44th symposium of the "Society for History of Sciences" held in Munich in May 2007. The text begins with a brief reference to the numerous biographical connections between the two fields, but focuses primarily on topics that reveal music and the sciences to be results of shared cultural practices. Examples include: (1) shared objects in the material sense, meaning the use of particular instruments in both music and the sciences; (2) shared semantics, metaphors, and concepts, for example the use of the concepts like clang or tone color in acoustics and the psychology of audition, or talk of 'mood' and 'harmony' in both music and in literature; (3) direct interactions between mathematics, physics and music, for example in the electronic music of the twentieth century.

  16. Dynamic aspects of musical imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Andrea R

    2012-04-01

    Auditory imagery can represent many aspects of music, such as the starting pitches of a tune or the instrument that typically plays it. In this paper, I concentrate on more dynamic, or time-sensitive aspects of musical imagery, as demonstrated in two recently published studies. The first was a behavioral study that examined the ability to make emotional judgments about both heard and imagined music in real time. The second was a neuroimaging study on the neural correlates of anticipating an upcoming tune, after hearing a cue tune. That study found activation of several sequence-learning brain areas, some of which varied with the vividness of the anticipated musical memory. Both studies speak to the ways in which musical imagery allows us to judge temporally changing aspects of the represented musical experience. These judgments can be quite precise, despite the complexity of generating the rich internal representations of imagery. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Mathematics and Computation in Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    by Carlos Vaquero, and musical illustrations of chord geometries in Italian popular music per- formed by Moreno Andreatta (SMCM Vice President), and of hypergestures in free jazz improvisations by Guerino Mazzola (SMCM President). The chapters in this book correspond to the papers and posters presented......The 5th Biennial International Conference for Mathematics and Computation in Music (MCM 2015) took place June 22–25, 2015, at Queen Mary University of London, UK, co-hosted by the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science (Centre for Digital Music) and the School of Mathematical...... Sciences. As the flagship conference of the Society for Mathematics and Computation in Music (SMCM), MCM 2015 provided a dedicated platform for the communication and exchange of ideas among researchers in mathematics, informatics, music theory, composition, musicology, and related disciplines. It brought...

  18. The impact of depression on musical ability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reker, Paul; Domschke, Katharina; Zwanzger, Peter; Evers, Stefan

    While there is sustained effort to refine the models and to further decrypt the neuronal underpinnings of cerebral music perception, empirical investigations on the associations of music perception...

  19. Keywords in musical free improvisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2017-01-01

    This article presents some keywords and concepts concerning free improvised music and its recent developments drawing from ongoing bibliographical research. A radical pluralism stems from musicians' backgrounds and the mixtures and fusions of styles and idioms resulting from these mixtures....... Seemingly very different "performance-driven" and "playdriven" attitudes exist, even among musicians who share the practice of performing at concerts. New models of musical analysis aiming specifically at free improvised music provide strategical observations of interaction and structure....

  20. Keywords in musical free improvisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2016-01-01

    This article presents some keywords and concepts concerning free improvised music and its recent developments drawing from ongoing bibliographical research. A radical pluralism stems from musicians' backgrounds and the mixtures and fusions of styles and idioms resulting from these mixtures....... Seemingly very different "performance-driven" and "play-driven" attitudes exist, even among musicians who share the practice of performing at concerts. New models of musical analysis aiming specifically at free improvised music provide strategical observations of interaction and structure....