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Sample records for emitter hollow cathode

  1. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  2. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  3. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  4. Compact High Current Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode for Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Goebel, Dan M. (Inventor); Watkins, Ronnie M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for achieving an efficient central cathode in a Hall effect thruster is disclosed. A hollow insert disposed inside the end of a hollow conductive cathode comprises a rare-earth element and energized to emit electrons from an inner surface. The cathode employs an end opening having an area at least as large as the internal cross sectional area of the rare earth insert to enhance throughput from the cathode end. In addition, the cathode employs a high aspect ratio geometry based on the cathode length to width which mitigates heat transfer from the end. A gas flow through the cathode and insert may be impinged by the emitted electrons to yield a plasma. One or more optional auxiliary gas feeds may also be employed between the cathode and keeper wall and external to the keeper near the outlet.

  5. Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

  6. Advanced Cathodes for Next Generation Electric Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    28 Boride Cathodes...45 Figure 15. Molybdenum Hollow Cathode Tube .............................................................. 46...CeB6 as a hollow cathode electron emitter. Additionally, all work in the US published on boride hollow cathodes are for high-current applications

  7. Plasma characteristics in the discharge region of a 20 A emission current hollow cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingming, SUN; Tianping, ZHANG; Xiaodong, WEN; Weilong, GUO; Jiayao, SONG

    2018-02-01

    Numerical calculation and fluid simulation methods were used to obtain the plasma characteristics in the discharge region of the LIPS-300 ion thruster’s 20 A emission current hollow cathode and to verify the structural design of the emitter. The results of the two methods indicated that the highest plasma density and electron temperature, which improved significantly in the orifice region, were located in the discharge region of the hollow cathode. The magnitude of plasma density was about 1021 m‑3 in the emitter and orifice regions, as obtained by numerical calculations, but decreased exponentially in the plume region with the distance from the orifice exit. Meanwhile, compared to the emitter region, the electron temperature and current improved by about 36% in the orifice region. The hollow cathode performance test results were in good agreement with the numerical calculation results, which proved that that the structural design of the emitter and the orifice met the requirements of a 20 A emission current. The numerical calculation method can be used to estimate plasma characteristics in the preliminary design stage of hollow cathodes.

  8. Plasma-Surface Interactions in Hollow Cathode Discharges for Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela Maria

    Electric thrusters generate high exhaust velocities and can achieve specific impulses in excess of 1000 s. The low thrust generation and high specific impulse make electric propulsion ideal for interplanetary missions, spacecraft station keeping, and orbit raising maneuvers. Consequently, these devices have been used on a variety of space missions including Deep Space 1, Dawn, and hundreds of commercial spacecraft in Earth orbit. In order to provide the required total impulses, thruster burn time can often exceed 10,000 hours, making thruster lifetime essential. One of the main life-limiting components on ion engines is the hollow cathode, which serves as the electron source for ionization of the xenon propellant gas. Reactive contaminants such as oxygen can modify the cathode surface morphology and degrade the electron emission properties. Hollow cathodes that operate with reactive impurities in the propellant will experience higher operating temperatures, which increase evaporation of the emission materials and reduce cathode life. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms initiating cathode failure will improve thruster operation, increase lifetime, and ultimately reduce cost. A significant amount of work has been done previously to understand the effects of oxygen poisoning on vacuum cathodes; however, the xenon plasma adds complexity, and its role during cathode poisoning is not completely understood. The work presented here represents the first attempt at understanding how oxygen impurities in the xenon discharge plasma alter the emitter surface and affect operation of a 4:1:1 BaO-CaO-Al2O3 hollow cathode. A combination of experimentation and modeling was used to investigate how oxygen impurities in the discharge plasma alter the emitter surface and reduce the electron emission capability. The experimental effort involved operating a 4:1:1 hollow cathode at various conditions with oxygen impurities in the xenon flow. Since direct measurements of the emitter

  9. Measured cathode fall characteristics depending on the diameter of a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, V.; Grützmacher, K.; Steiger, A.; Pérez, C.; de la Rosa, M. I.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, Doppler-free two photon optogalvanic spectroscopy is used to measure the electric field strength in the cathode fall region of a hollow cathode discharge, operated in pure hydrogen, via the Stark splitting of the 2S level of atomic hydrogen. The cathode fall characteristics are analysed for various pressures and in a wide range of discharge currents. Tungsten is used as the cathode material, because it allows for reliable measurements in a fairly wide range of discharge conditions and because of its minimal sputtering. Two cathode diameters (10 mm and 15 mm) are used to study the dependence of the cathode fall on discharge geometry. The measurements reveal that the cathode fall characteristics are quite independent on the cathode diameter for equal cathode current density; hence the measurements can be used to test one dimensional modelling of the cathode fall region for low pressure hydrogen discharges using e.g. plane parallel electrodes.

  10. Hollow cathode heater development for the Space Station plasma contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.

    1993-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been selected for use on the Space Station. During the operation of the plasma contactor, the hollow cathode heater will endure approximately 12000 thermal cycles. Since a hollow cathode heater failure would result in a plasma contactor failure, a hollow cathode heater development program was established to produce a reliable heater design. The development program includes the heater design, process documents for both heater fabrication and assembly, and heater testing. The heater design was a modification of a sheathed ion thruster cathode heater. Three heaters have been tested to date using direct current power supplies. Performance testing was conducted to determine input current and power requirements for achieving activation and ignition temperatures, single unit operational repeatability, and unit-to-unit operational repeatability. Comparisons of performance testing data at the ignition input current level for the three heaters show the unit-to-unit repeatability of input power and tube temperature near the cathode tip to be within 3.5 W and 44 degrees C, respectively. Cyclic testing was then conducted to evaluate reliability under thermal cycling. The first heater, although damaged during assembly, completed 5985 ignition cycles before failing. Two additional heaters were subsequently fabricated and have completed 3178 cycles to date in an on-going test.

  11. Continuing life test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of a hollow cathode plasma contactor for charge control on the Space Station has required validation of long-life hollow cathodes. A test series of hollow cathodes and hollow cathode plasma contactors was initiated as part of the plasma contactor development program. An on-going wear-test of a hollow cathode has demonstrated cathode operation in excess of 10,000 hours with small changes in operating parameters. The discharge has experienced 10 shutdowns during the test, all of which were due to test facility failures or expellant replenishment. In all cases, the cathode was re-ignited at approximately 42 volts and resumed typical operation. This test represents the longest demonstrated stable operation of a high current (greater than 1 A) xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  12. Extended test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of a hollow cathode plasma contactor for charge control on the Space Station has required validation of long-life hollow cathodes. A test series of hollow cathodes and hollow cathode plasma contactors was initiated as part of the plasma contactor development program. An on-going wear-test of a hollow cathode has demonstrated cathode operation in excess of 4700 hours with small changes in operating parameters. The discharge experienced 4 shutdowns during the test, all of which were due to test facility failures or expellant replenishment. In all cases, the cathode was reignited at approximately 42 volts and resumed typical operation. This test represents the longest demonstrated stable operation of a high current (greater than 1A) xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  13. Modification of W surfaces by exposure to hollow cathode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancu, C.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Moldovan, A.; Dinescu, M.; Grisolia, C.; Dinescu, G.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we assess the surface modifications induced on W samples following exposure to He and He/H2 radiofrequency plasmas in hollow cathode discharge configuration. Our study addresses issues that relate to the use of W in next-generation fusion reactors and, therefore, the investigation of W surface degradation following exposure and heating by plasmas to temperatures above 1000 °C is of practical importance. For these experiments, we used commercially available tungsten samples having areas of 30 × 15 mm and 0.1 mm thickness. The hollow cathode plasma was produced using a radiofrequency (RF) generator (13.56 MHz) between parallel plate electrodes. The W samples were mounted as one of the electrodes. The He and He/H2 plasma discharges had a combined effect of heating and bombardment of the W surfaces. The surface modifications were studied for discharge powers between 200 and 300 W, which resulted in the heating of the samples to temperatures between 950 and 1230 °C, respectively. The samples were weighed prior and after plasma exposure, and loss of mass was measured following plasma exposure times up to 90 min. The analysis of changes in surface morphology was carried out by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Additionally, optical emission spectra of the respective plasmas were recorded from the region localized inside the hollow cathode gap. We discuss the influence of experimental parameters on the changes in surface morphology.

  14. A 13000-hour test of a mercury hollow cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1973-01-01

    A mercury-fed hollow cathode was tested for 12,979 hours in a bell jar at SERT 2 neutralizer operating conditions. The net electron current drawn to a collector was 0.25 ampere at average collector voltages between 21.8 and 36.7 volts. The mercury flow rate was varied from 5.6 to 30.8 equivalent milliamperes to give stable operation at the desired electrode voltages and currents. Variations with time in the neutralizer discharge characteristics were observed and hypothesized to be related to changes in the cathode orifice dimensions and the availability of electron emissive material. A facility failure caused abnormal test conditions for the last 876 hours and led to the cathode heater failure which concluded the test.

  15. Electron and ion kinetics in a micro hollow cathode discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G J; Iza, F; Lee, J K [Electronics and Electrical Engineering Department, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-21

    Electron and ion kinetics in a micro hollow cathode discharge are investigated by means of two-dimensional axisymmetric particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision simulations. Argon discharges at 10 and 300 Torr are studied for various driving currents. Electron and ion energy probability functions (IEPF) are shown at various times and locations to study the spatio-temporal behaviour of the discharge. The electron energy probability function (EEPF) evolves from the Druyvesteyn type in the early stages of the discharge into a two (or three) temperature distribution when steady state is reached. In steady state, secondary electrons accelerated across the cathode fall populate the high energy tail of the EEPF while the low energy region is populated by trapped electrons. The IEPF evolves from a Maxwellian in the negative glow (bulk) to a two temperature distribution on the cathode surface. The overpopulation of low energy ions near the cathode surface is attributed to a larger collision cross section for low energy ions and ionization within the cathode fall.

  16. Polarization spectroscopy of atomic erbium in a hollow cathode lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang’ong’a, Jackson; Gadway, Bryce

    2018-02-01

    In this work we perform polarization spectroscopy of erbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp (HCL). We review the theory behind Doppler-free polarization spectroscopy, theoretically model the expected erbium polarization spectra, and compare the numerically calculated spectra to our experimental data. We further analyze the dependence of the measured spectra on the HCL current and the peak intensities of our pump and probe lasers to determine conditions. Applications include wavelength stabilization of diode laser radiation to the 400.91 nm erbium transition.

  17. The use of hollow cathodes in deposition processes: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhl, Stephen, E-mail: muhl@unam.mx; Pérez, Argelia

    2015-03-31

    The first report of a discharge in a hollow cathode was by F. Paschen in 1916. That study showed that such a system was capable of producing a high electron flux and relatively low ion and neutral temperatures. About 40 years later, the work of Lidsky and others showed that hollow cathode arc discharges were one of the best plasma sources available at that time. The term “hollow cathode discharges” has commonly been used in reference to almost any discharge in a cathode with a cavity-like geometry, such that the plasma was enclosed or partially bound by the electrode walls that were at the cathode potential. Just as the magnetic field trapping of the electrons in a magnetron cathode results in an increase in the plasma density, in the hollow cathode, the reduced electron loss due to the geometry of the cathode also results in a higher plasma density. At least three types of discharge can be established in a hollow cathode. At low power and/or at relatively low gas pressures, the plasma is a “conventional” discharge characterized by low currents and medium to high voltages (we will call this a discharge in a hollow cathode or D-HC). Even this type of plasma has a higher density than a normal planar parallel-plate or magnetron system because the hollow geometry strongly reduces the loss of electrons. Using an adequate combination of gas pressure and applied power with a given hollow cathode diameter, or separation of the cathode surface, the negative glow of the plasma can expand to occupy the majority of the interior volume of the cathode. Under this condition the plasma current can, for the same voltage, be 100 to 1000 times the value of the “simple” D-HC discharge, and the plasma density is correspondingly larger (we call this a hollow cathode discharge or HCD). If the cathode is not cooled, the discharge can transform into a dispersed arc as the electrode temperature increases and thermal-field electron emission becomes an important additional source

  18. Emission characteristics of laser ablation-hollow cathode glow discharge spectral source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatodorov Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of a scheme combining laser ablation as sample introduction source and hollow cathode discharge as excitation source are presented. The spatial separation of the sample material introduction by laser ablation and hollow cathode excitation is achieved by optimizing the gas pressure and the sample-cathode gap length. At these conditions the discharge current is maximized to enhance the analytical lines intensity.

  19. Atlas of uranium emission intensities in a hollow cathode discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, B.A.; Keller, R.A.; Engleman, R. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The uranium emission spectrum from a hollow cathode discharge is displayed from 11,000 to 26,000 cm/sup -1/. This atlas lists 4928 spectral lines of uranium; 3949 are classified to the neutral spectrum and 431 are classified to the singly ionized spectrum. Listed wavenumbers are accurate to +-0.003 cm/sup -1/ and the listed relative intensities to +-8%. The richness of the spectrum makes this atlas useful for wavenumber calibration of lasers, spectrographs, and monochromators to an accuracy of 1 part in 10/sup 7/. This atlas is also useful as a guide to the uranium spectrum, and relative oscillator strengths (gf values) can be calculated from the intensities to a precision of +-20%.

  20. Tungsten and Barium Transport in the Internal Plasma of Hollow Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushedback to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. Thisbarium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream endgreater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length,so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollowcathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  1. Life Cycle Tests on a Hollow Cathode Based Plasma Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schneider, Todd A.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster with a mission duration of 12 days. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta II second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma, and a Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor (HCPC) emits the collected electrons from the Delta II, completing the electrical circuit to the ambient plasma. The HCPC for the ProSEDS mission have made it necessary to turn off the HCPC once a minute throughout the entire mission. Because of the unusual operating requirements by the ProSEDS mission, an engineering development unit of the HCPC was built to demonstrate the HCPC design would start reliably for the life of the ProSEDS mission. During the life test the engineering unit cycled for over 10,000 on/off cycles without missing a single start, and during that same test the HCPC unit demonstrated the capability to emit 0 to 5 A electron emission current. The performance of the HCPC unit during this life test will be discussed.

  2. Ignition and extinction phenomena in helium micro hollow cathode discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Kulsreshath, M K; Schwaederle, L; Dufour, T; Overzet, L J; Lefaucheux, P; Dussart, R

    2016-01-01

    Micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) were produced using 250 m thick dielectric layer of alumina sandwiched between two nickel electrodes of 8 m thickness. A through cavity at the center of the chip was formed by laser drilling technique. MHCD with a diameter of few hundreds of micrometers allowed us to generate direct current discharges in helium at up to atmospheric pressure. A slowly varying ramped voltage generator was used to study the ignition and the extinction periods of the microdischarges. The analysis was performed by using electrical characterisation of the V-I behaviour and the measurement of He*(3S1) metastable atoms density by tunable diode laser spectroscopy. At the ignition of the microdischarges, 2 s long current peak as high as 24 mA was observed, sometimes followed by low amplitude damped oscillations. At helium pressure above 400 Torr, an oscillatory behaviour of the discharge current was observed just before the extinction of the microdischarges. The same type of instability in the ext...

  3. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-07-15

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the (88)Sr (5s(2))(1)S0 - (5s5p)(1)P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization.

  4. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities of employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Andrews, Heather L.; Herman, Matthew J.; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Weis, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Demonstration of a stand-alone practical dielectric laser accelerator (DLA) requires innovation in two major critical components: high-current ultra-low-emittance cathodes and efficient laser accelerator structures. LANL develops two technologies that in our opinion are applicable to the novel DLA architectures: diamond field emitter array (DFEA) cathodes and additive manufacturing of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. This paper discusses the results of testing of DFEA cathodes in the field-emission regime and the possibilities for their operation in the photoemission regime, and compares their emission characteristics to the specific needs of DLAs. We also describe recent advances in additive manufacturing of dielectric woodpile structures using a Nanoscribe direct laser-writing device capable of maskless lithography and additive manufacturing, and the development of novel infrared dielectric materials compatible with additive manufacturing.

  5. Status of Hollow Cathode Heater Development for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been selected for use on the Space Station. During the operation of the plasma contactor, the hollow cathode heater will endure approximately 12000 thermal cycles. Since a hollow cathode heater failure would result in a plasma contactor failure, a hollow cathode heater development program was established to produce a reliable heater. The development program includes the heater design, process documents for both heater fabrication and assembly, and heater testing. The heater design was a modification of a sheathed ion thruster cathode heater. Heater tests included testing of the heater unit alone and plasma contactor and ion thruster testing. To date, eight heaters have been or are being processed through heater unit testing, two through plasma contactor testing and three through ion thruster testing, all using direct current power supplies. Comparisons of data from heater unit performance tests before cyclic testing, plasma contactor tests, and ion thruster tests at the ignition input current level show the average deviation of input power and tube temperature near the cathode tip to be +/-0.9 W and +/- 21 C, respectively. Heater unit testing included cyclic testing to evaluate reliability under thermal cycling. The first heater, although damaged during assembly, completed 5985 ignition cycles before failing. Four additional heaters successfully completed 6300, 6300, 700, and 700 cycles. Heater unit testing is currently ongoing for three heaters which have to date accumulated greater than 7250, greater than 5500, and greater than 5500 cycles, respectively.

  6. Determination of absolute population densities of eroded tungsten in hollow cathode lamps and fluorescent lamps by laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadrath, S [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Ehlbeck, J [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Lieder, G [Research Light Sources, Osram GmbH, Hellabrunner Str. 1, D 81536 Muenchen (Germany); Sigeneger, F [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2005-09-07

    The high energy ion bombardment during instant start of a fluorescent lamp (FL) leads to intense sputtering of the electrode material including tungsten and emitter. Thus, a cold started FL often suffers from early failures due to coil fracture. The main goal of this paper is to investigate tungsten erosion. We have employed the ultra-sensitive method of laser-induced fluorescence. This technique is particularly well-suited to determining absolute population densities of neutral and singly ionized atoms of liberated electrode material. In addition to FL, our investigations have been performed also on hollow cathode lamps (HCLs). These are useful because they provide a variable source of sputtered tungsten atoms and can serve as tuning tools for precise adjustment of the laser radiation. We will present absolute atomic tungsten population densities in a commercial FL and in an HCL. Furthermore, the results of a theoretical investigation of the argon plasma and the tungsten density in the HCL are represented.

  7. Plasma Emission Characteristics from a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  8. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities for employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andrews, Heather Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Herman, Matthew Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hubbard, Kevin Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weis, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    These are slides for a presentation at Stanford University. The outline is as follows: Motivation: customers for compact accelerators, LANL's technologies for laser acceleration, DFEA cathodes, and additive manufacturing of micron-size structures. Among the stated conclusions are the following: preliminary study identified DFEA cathodes as promising sources for DLAs--high beam current and small emittance; additive manufacturing with Nanoscribe Professional GT can produce structures with the right scale features for a DLA operating at micron wavelengths (fabrication tolerances need to be studied, DLAs require new materials). Future plans include DLA experiment with a beam produced by the DFEA cathode with field emission, demonstration of photoemission from DFEAs, and new structures to print and test.

  9. Optimization of hollow cathode discharge electrode for damage free remote plasma removal process for semiconductor manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Tae S.; Han, Qing; Yang, Dongqing; Park, Soonam; Lubomirsky, Dima; Venkataraman, Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Cone-shaped hollow cathode electrode configuration for a damage free remote plasma removal process has been optimized for given pressures based on Paschen characteristic curves, voltage-current characteristics and time-resolved discharge observations as well as oxide film removal performances. Remote plasmas have been generated in two types of cone-shaped electrodes with mixtures of He, NF3, and NH3 for pressure range of 1-30 Torr. Paschen characteristic curves and voltage-current (V-I) characteristics define an operating pressure for low breakdown voltage and the hollow cathode effect to minimize the particles. Sinusoidal voltage waveform and asymmetry electrode configuration alternate the glow discharge and hollow cathode discharge modes in a cycle. The current and infrared emission intensity from the glow discharge increases together for both cone-shaped electrodes with increasing pressure, whereas the hollow cathode discharge plasma emits strong infrared only when pD condition is satisfied. For the wide cone electrode configuration, high voltage operation at higher pressure results in particle contamination on the processed wafer by high energy ion bombardment. Operating at optimum pressure for a given electrode configuration shows faster oxide etch rate with better uniformity over a whole 300 mm wafer.

  10. Field emitter array RF amplifier development project. Cathode technology development. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, W. Devereux; McGuire, Gary E.

    1994-06-01

    This document presents the results of Phase I of the Field Emitter Array RF Amplifier Development Project. The primary goal of the Phase I performance period was the development of field emission cathodes with the following characteristics: 5 mA total emission current, 5 A/sq cm current density, operation at an applied voltage of less than 250 V, greater than 1 hour lifetime, and emission current modulation at 1 GHz or greater. The basic fabrication process for silicon field emitter arrays was defined during the first 18 months of the contract performance period. During the final 12 months of the contract, the process was refined using statistical process control, with the goal of maximizing electrical yield on large arrays. The resulting devices met each of the program performance criteria. Arrays of up to 232,630 emitters, the largest field emitter arrays in any material to date, were successfully fabricated and electrically tested. The emission currents measured from these devices were the highest reported in the literature for silicon field emitter arrays. Techniques for further enhancing performance through the deposition of low work function and metal coatings were developed. Recommended directions for further research were defined for implementation under ARPA leadership.

  11. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A wear test of four hollow cathodes was conducted to resolve issues associated with the Space Station plasma contactor. The objectives of this test were to evaluate unit-to-unit dispersions, verify the transportability of contamination control protocols developed by the project, and to evaluate cathode contamination control and activation procedures to enable simplification of the gas feed system and heater power processor. These objectives were achieved by wear testing four cathodes concurrently to 2000 hours. Test results showed maximum unit-to-unit deviations for discharge voltages and cathode tip temperatures to be +/-3 percent and +/-2 percent, respectively, of the nominal values. Cathodes utilizing contamination control procedures known to increase cathode lifetime showed no trends in their monitored parameters that would indicate a possible failure, demonstrating that contamination control procedures had been successfully transferred. Comparisons of cathodes utilizing and not utilizing a purifier or simplified activation procedure showed similar behavior during wear testing and pre- and post-test performance characterizations. This behavior indicates that use of simplified cathode systems and procedures is consistent with long cathode lifetimes.

  12. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies July 2001 to May 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the on-orbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  13. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies from July 2011 to May 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the onorbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  14. Hollow Carbon Nanofiber-Encapsulated Sulfur Cathodes for High Specific Capacity Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Guangyuan

    2011-10-12

    Sulfur has a high specific capacity of 1673 mAh/g as lithium battery cathodes, but its rapid capacity fading due to polysulfides dissolution presents a significant challenge for practical applications. Here we report a hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur cathode for effective trapping of polysulfides and demonstrate experimentally high specific capacity and excellent electrochemical cycling of the cells. The hollow carbon nanofiber arrays were fabricated using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, through thermal carbonization of polystyrene. The AAO template also facilitates sulfur infusion into the hollow fibers and prevents sulfur from coating onto the exterior carbon wall. The high aspect ratio of the carbon nanofibers provides an ideal structure for trapping polysulfides, and the thin carbon wall allows rapid transport of lithium ions. The small dimension of these nanofibers provides a large surface area per unit mass for Li2S deposition during cycling and reduces pulverization of electrode materials due to volumetric expansion. A high specific capacity of about 730 mAh/g was observed at C/5 rate after 150 cycles of charge/discharge. The introduction of LiNO3 additive to the electrolyte was shown to improve the Coulombic efficiency to over 99% at C/5. The results show that the hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur structure could be a promising cathode design for rechargeable Li/S batteries with high specific energy. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Facile Synthesis of V2O5 Hollow Spheres as Advanced Cathodes for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyuan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional V2O5 hollow structures have been prepared through a simple synthesis strategy combining solvothermal treatment and a subsequent thermal annealing. The V2O5 materials are composed of microspheres 2–3 μm in diameter and with a distinct hollow interior. The as-synthesized V2O5 hollow microspheres, when evaluated as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, can deliver a specific capacity as high as 273 mAh·g−1 at 0.2 C. Benefiting from the hollow structures that afford fast electrolyte transport and volume accommodation, the V2O5 cathode also exhibits a superior rate capability and excellent cycling stability. The good Li-ion storage performance demonstrates the great potential of this unique V2O5 hollow material as a high-performance cathode for lithium-ion batteries.

  16. Auxiliary glow discharge in the trigger unit of a hollow-cathode thyratron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Landl, N. V., E-mail: landl@lnp.hcei.tsc.ru; Geyman, V. G.; Frants, O. B.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Nekhoroshev, V. O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Results from studies of a low-current glow discharge with a hollow cathode are presented. A specific feature of the discharge conditions was that a highly emissive tablet containing cesium carbonate was placed in the cathode cavity. In the absence of a tablet, the discharge ignition voltage was typically ≥3.5 kV, while the burning voltage was in the range of 500–600 V. The use of the tablet made it possible to decrease the ignition voltage to 280 V and maintain the discharge burning voltage at a level of about 130 V. A model of the current sustainment in a hollow-cathode discharge is proposed. Instead of the conventional secondary emission yield, the model uses a generalized emission yield that takes into account not only ion bombardment of the cathode, but also the emission current from an external source. The model is used to interpret the observed current−voltage characteristics. The results of calculations agree well with the experimental data. It is shown that, in some discharge modes, the external emission current from the cathode can reach 25% of the total discharge current.

  17. Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 112 Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å (Web, free access)   Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å contains wavelengths and intensities for about 5600 lines in the region 4330 Å. An atlas plot of the spectrum is given, with the spectral lines marked and their intensities, wavelengths, and classifications listed.

  18. Platinum-Coated Hollow Graphene Nanocages as Cathode Used in Lithium-Oxygen Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Feng [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Material Science & Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 P. R. China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles in Beijing, Beijing 100081 P. R. China; Xing, Yi [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Material Science & Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 P. R. China; Zeng, Xiaoqiao [Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Yuan, Yifei [Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive Houghton MI 49931 USA; Zhang, Xiaoyi [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive Houghton MI 49931 USA; Wen, Jianguo [Electron Microscopy Center, Material Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Miller, Dean J. [Electron Microscopy Center, Material Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Li, Li [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Material Science & Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 P. R. China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles in Beijing, Beijing 100081 P. R. China; Chen, Renjie [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Material Science & Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 P. R. China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles in Beijing, Beijing 100081 P. R. China; Lu, Jun [Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Science and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA

    2016-08-31

    One of the formidable challenges facing aprotic lithium-oxygen (Li-O-2) batteries is the high charge overpotential, which induces the formation of byproducts, loss in efficiency, and poor cycling performance. Herein, the synthesis of the ultrasmall Pt-coated hollow graphene nano cages as cathode in Li-O-2 batteries is reported. The charge voltage plateau can reduce to 3.2 V at the current density of 100 mA g(-1), even maintain below 3.5 V when the current density increased to 500 mA g(-1). The unique hollow graphene nanocages matrix can not only provide numerous nanoscale tri-phase regions as active sites for efficient oxygen reduction, but also offer sufficient amount of mesoscale pores for rapid oxygen diffusion. Furthermore, with strong atomic-level oxygen absorption into its subsurface, ultrasmall Pt catalytically serves as the nucleation site for Li2O2 growth. The Li2O2 is subsequently induced into a favorable form with small size and amorphous state, decomposed more easily during recharge. Meanwhile, the conductive hollow graphene substrate can enhance the catalytic activity of noble metal Pt catalysts due to the graphene-metal interfacial interaction. Benefiting from the above synergistic effects between the hollow graphene nanocages and the nanosized Pt catalysts, the ultrasmall Pt-decorated graphene nanocage cathode exhibits enhanced electrochemical performances.

  19. A Review of Testing of Hollow Cathodes for the International Space Station Plasma Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Patterson, M. J.; Soulas, G. C.; Sarver-Verhey, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Since October 2000, two plasma contactors have been providing charge control on the International Space Station (ISS). At the heart of each of the two plasma contactors is a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) that produces the contacting xenon plasma. The HCA is the result of 9 years of design and testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This paper summarizes HCA testing that has been performed to date. As of this time, one cathode has demonstrated approximately 28,000 hr of lifetime during constant, high current use. Another cathode, HCA.014. has demonstrated 42,000 ignitions before cathode heater failure. In addition to these cathodes, four cathodes. HCA.006, HCA.003, HCA.010, and HCA.013 have undergone cyclic testing to simulate the variable current demand expected on the ISS. HCA.006 accumulated 8,000 hr of life test operation prior to being voluntarily stopped for analysis before the flight units were fabricated. HCA.010 has accumulated 15,876 hr of life testing, and 4,424 ignitions during ignition testing. HCA.003 and HCA.0 13 have accumulated 12,415 and 18,823 hr of life testing respectively.

  20. Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: a modular vacuum ultraviolet source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, F Sloan; Anderson, Scott L

    2013-12-01

    The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a "soft" photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

  1. Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: A modular vacuum ultraviolet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan Roberts, F.; Anderson, Scott L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 S. 1400 E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a “soft” photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

  2. Characterization of the NEXT Hollow Cathode Inserts After Long-Duration Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, J.; Shastry, R.; Soulas, G.

    2017-01-01

    Hollow dispenser cathode inserts are a critical element of electric propulsion systems, and should therefore be well understood during long term operation to ensure reliable system performance. This work destructively investigated cathode inserts from the NEXT long-duration test which demonstrated 51,184 hours of high-voltage operation, 918 kg of propellant throughput, and 35.5 MN-s of total impulse. The characterization methods used include scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Microscopy analysis has been performed on fractured surfaces, emission surfaces, and metallographically polished cross-sections of post-test inserts and unused inserts. Impregnate distribution, etch region thickness, impregnate chemical content, emission surface topography, and emission surface phase identification are the primary factors investigated.

  3. Surface Charging Controlling of the Chinese Space Station with Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Wang, Xianrong; Qin, Xiaogang; Yang, Shengsheng; Yang, Wei; Zhao, Chengxuan; Chen, Yifeng; Shi, Liang; Tang, Daotan; Xie, Kan

    2016-07-01

    A highly charged manned spacecraft threatens the life of an astronaut and extravehicular activity, which can be effectively reduced by controlling the spacecraft surface charging. In this article, the controlling of surface charging on Chinese Space Station (CSS) is investigated, and a method to reduce the negative potential to the CSS is the emission electron with a hollow cathode plasma contactor. The analysis is obtained that the high voltage (HV) solar array of the CSS collecting electron current can reach 4.5 A, which can be eliminated by emitting an adequate electron current on the CSS. The theoretical analysis and experimental results are addressed, when the minimum xenon flow rate of the hollow cathode is 4.0 sccm, the emission electron current can neutralize the collected electron current, which ensures that the potential of the CSS can be controlled in a range of less than 21 V, satisfied with safety voltage. The results can provide a significant reference value to define a flow rate to the potential controlling programme for CSS.

  4. Towards a reduced chemistry module of a He-Ar-Cu hollow cathode discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailova, D.; van Dijk, J.; Grozeva, M.; Degrez, G.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2011-05-01

    This study is aimed at finding a reduced chemistry module for a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) excited in a He-Ar-Cu mixture. This enables us to construct lean and reliable models that can be used as a part of the design tool of HCDs. To this end estimative calculations and numerical simulations are performed under optimal conditions for lasing. An analysis of the species behaviour and reactions is made and as a result the model is simplified by means of reducing the number of species and reactions. The consequences of these reductions are justified by comparing the results of the simplified models with those of a more complete one. This study delivers a model that is chemically lean and thus, much less time consuming. It can be used in optimization studies to find the optimum in the plasma control parameter set of HCDs. The technique developed in this study for HCDs can be applied to glow discharges in general.

  5. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  6. Towards a reduced chemistry module of a He-Ar-Cu hollow cathode discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailova, D; Van Dijk, J; Van der Mullen, J J A M [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Grozeva, M [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Bulgaria (Bulgaria); Degrez, G, E-mail: diana@epgmod.phys.tue.nl [Service de Mecanique des Fluides, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 50 avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2011-05-18

    This study is aimed at finding a reduced chemistry module for a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) excited in a He-Ar-Cu mixture. This enables us to construct lean and reliable models that can be used as a part of the design tool of HCDs. To this end estimative calculations and numerical simulations are performed under optimal conditions for lasing. An analysis of the species behaviour and reactions is made and as a result the model is simplified by means of reducing the number of species and reactions. The consequences of these reductions are justified by comparing the results of the simplified models with those of a more complete one. This study delivers a model that is chemically lean and thus, much less time consuming. It can be used in optimization studies to find the optimum in the plasma control parameter set of HCDs. The technique developed in this study for HCDs can be applied to glow discharges in general.

  7. Low-frequency flute instabilities of a hollow cathode arc discharge - Theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, D. B.; Rognlien, T. D.; Self, S. A.; Crawford, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of two low-frequency electrostatic flute instabilities of a low-pressure hollow cathode arc discharge are reported. Mode I has azimuthal mode number m = 1, and occurs when the radial electric field is negative (directed inward), while mode II has m = - 1 and occurs when the field is positive. The radial electric field is controlled by varying the potential of a secondary anode cylinder located close to the outer discharge radius. A linear perturbation analysis, based on the two-fluid equations, is given for a low-beta, collisionless, cylindrical plasma column, immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field, having a Gaussian density profile and an arbitrary radial electric field profile. Reasonable correlation between theory and experiment is demonstrated for both modes.

  8. Development of a see-through hollow cathode discharge lamp for (Li/Ne) optogalvanic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V. K.; Kumar, P.; Sarangpani, K. K.; Dixit, S. K.; Nakhe, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    Development of a demountable and see-through hollow cathode (HC) discharge lamp suitable for optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy is described. The design of the HC lamp is simple, compact, and inexpensive. Lithium, investigated rarely by the OG method, is selected for cathode material as its isotopes are important for nuclear industry. The HC lamp is characterized electrically and optically for discharge oscillations free OG effect. Strong OG signals of lithium as well as neon (as buffer gas) are produced precisely upon copper vapor laser pumped tunable dye laser irradiation. The HC lamp is capable of generating a clean OG resonance spectrum in the available dye laser wavelength scanning range (627.5-676 nm) obtained with 4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran dye. About 28 resonant OG lines are explicitly observed. Majority of them have been identified using j-l coupling scheme and assigned to the well-known neon transitions. One line that corresponds to wavelength near about 670.80 nm is assigned to lithium and resolved for its fine (2S1/2 → 2P1/2, 3/2) transitions. These OG transitions allow 0.33 cm-1 accuracy and can be used to supplement the OG transition data available from other sources to calibrate the wavelength of a scanning dye laser with precision at atomic levels.

  9. Development of a see-through hollow cathode discharge lamp for (Li/Ne) optogalvanic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V K; Kumar, P; Sarangpani, K K; Dixit, S K; Nakhe, S V

    2017-09-01

    Development of a demountable and see-through hollow cathode (HC) discharge lamp suitable for optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy is described. The design of the HC lamp is simple, compact, and inexpensive. Lithium, investigated rarely by the OG method, is selected for cathode material as its isotopes are important for nuclear industry. The HC lamp is characterized electrically and optically for discharge oscillations free OG effect. Strong OG signals of lithium as well as neon (as buffer gas) are produced precisely upon copper vapor laser pumped tunable dye laser irradiation. The HC lamp is capable of generating a clean OG resonance spectrum in the available dye laser wavelength scanning range (627.5-676 nm) obtained with 4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran dye. About 28 resonant OG lines are explicitly observed. Majority of them have been identified using j-l coupling scheme and assigned to the well-known neon transitions. One line that corresponds to wavelength near about 670.80 nm is assigned to lithium and resolved for its fine (2S1/2 → 2P1/2, 3/2) transitions. These OG transitions allow 0.33 cm-1 accuracy and can be used to supplement the OG transition data available from other sources to calibrate the wavelength of a scanning dye laser with precision at atomic levels.

  10. X-ray spots emitted in a hollow cathode ns-discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, M.; Ikhlef, A.; Louvet, G.; Roméas, P.; Mittal, K. C.

    1996-02-01

    A hollow cathode discharge using a tungsten pointed anode is fed by a low power Marx generator (1 J, 70 kV, 50 ns). The x-ray emission duration varies from 20 to 10 ns in the pressure range 0963-0252/5/1/009/img8 mbar, in air. The spatial distribution of the emitting sites has been determined, using a sensitive imaging device with a 5 ns exposure time, in the same range of pressures. This emission is strongly influenced by the occurrence of the `pseudo-spark' regime. X-rays are emitted by different mechanisms: (a) electron bremsstrahlung and by Auger cascade associated with particle emission from the Teflon insulator and also tungsten (0963-0252/5/1/009/img9 and 0963-0252/5/1/009/img10) characteristic lines; (b) pinching and collapse of the hot plasma surrounding the anode and the insulator. X-ray spots are observed. Their number is about 200 per shot, their radius is less than 40 0963-0252/5/1/009/img11m and their emission intensity is compatible with that of a dense plasma: 0963-0252/5/1/009/img12 with a temperature in the range 100 eV to 1 keV. Some of them are seen to follow linear trajectories, suggesting a 1 ns period wave propagation at 300 km 0963-0252/5/1/009/img13 which triggers the collapse.

  11. An investigation of conducted and radiated emissions from a hollow-cathode plasma contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholtz, Brett W.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation conducted on the electrical interference induced by the operation of a hollow-cathode plasma contractor in a ground-based facility is described. The types of electrical interference, or noise, which are important to Space Station Freedom designers are classified as either conducted or radiated emissions. The procedures required to perform conducted and radiated emission measurements on a plasma contactor are examined. The experimental data obtained are typically examined in the frequency domain (i.e. amplitudes of the noise fluctuations versus frequency). Results presented indicate the conducted emissions, which are the current fluctuations from the contactor into the space station wiring, are affected by operating parameters such as expellant flow rate and discharge current. The radiated emissions, which are the electromagnetic waves induced and emitted by the contactor, appear to be influenced by the contactor emission current. Other experimental results suggest possible sources which are responsible for the observed noise. For example, the influence of the plasma environment downstream from the contactor on noise emission levels is described. In addition, a brief discussion is given on the correlation between conducted and radiated emissions and the mechanisms through which both are influenced by the plasma downstream of the contactor.

  12. Studies on pulsed optogalvanic effect in Eu/Ne hollow cathode discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V K; Kumar, P; Dixit, S K; Nakhe, S V

    2014-07-01

    The optogalvanic (OG) effect has been observed in a Eu/Ne hollow cathode discharge lamp using pulsed laser irradiation. An OG spectrum is recorded in dye laser wavelength region 574–602 nm using a boxcar-averager. In total 41 atomic lines are observed. Of these, 38 lines are assigned to neon transitions. Two lines observed corresponding to wavelengths 576.519 and 601.815 nm are assigned to europium transitions; (4f 7 6s 2 , S 8 7/2 →4f 7 6s6p , zP 6 7/2 ) and (4f 7 6s 2 , S 8 7/2 →4f 7 6s6p , zP 8 9/2 ), respectively, and the remaining line at 582.475 nm could not be assigned. The effect of the discharge current on europium as well as neon OG signals is also studied. At moderate discharge current values, an extra positive peak is observed in neon OG signal for the transition (1s 5 →2p 2 ) at 588.189 nm, which is explained by Penning-ionization process using the quasi-resonant energy transfer interactions between excited neon and europium atoms lying in 2p 2 and D 10 9/2 states, respectively.

  13. First results on Ge resonant laser photoionization in hollow cathode lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpa, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.scarpa@lnl.infn.it; Andrighetto, Alberto [INFN-LNL, Viale Universita’ 2, Legnaro, 35020 Padova (Italy); Barzakh, Anatoly; Fedorov, Dmitry [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Mariotti, Emilio [CNISM, University of Siena DSFTA, 53100 Siena (Italy); Nicolosi, Piergiorgio [Department Information Engineering, University of Padova, IFN-CNR UOF Padova, 35122 Padova (Italy); Tomaselli, Alessandra [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In the framework of the research and development activities of the SPES project regarding the optimization of the radioactive beam production, a dedicated experimental study has been recently started in order to investigate the possibility of in-source ionization of germanium using a set of tunable dye lasers. Germanium is one of the beams to be accelerated by the SPES ISOL facility, which is under construction at Legnaro INFN Laboratories. The three-step, two color ionization schemes have been tested using a Ge hollow cathode lamp. The slow and the fast optogalvanic signals were detected and averaged by an oscilloscope as a proof of the laser ionization inside the lamp. As a result, several wavelength scans across the resonances of ionization schemes were collected with the fast optogalvanic signal. Some comparisons of ionization efficiency for different ionization schemes were made. Furthermore, saturation curves of the first excitation transitions have been obtained. This investigation method and the setup built in the laser laboratory of the SPES project can be applied for the photo-ionization scheme studies also for the other possible radioactive elements.

  14. Three-dimensional interconnected cobalt oxide-carbon hollow spheres arrays as cathode materials for hybrid batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiye Zhan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical porous metal oxides arrays is critical for development of advanced energy storage devices. Herein, we report a facile template-assisted electro-deposition plus glucose decomposition method for synthesis of multilayer CoO/C hollow spheres arrays. The CoO/C arrays consist of multilayer interconnected hollow composite spheres with diameters of ∼350 nm as well as thin walls of ∼20 nm. Hierarchical hollow spheres architecture with 3D porous networks are achieved. As cathode of high-rate hybrid batteries, the multilayer CoO/C hollow sphere arrays exhibit impressive enhanced performances with a high capacity (73.5 mAh g−1 at 2 A g−1, and stable high-rate cycling life (70 mAh g−1 after 12,500 cycles at 2 A g−1. The improved electrochemical performance is owing to the composite hollow-sphere architecture with high contact area between the active materials and electrolyte as well as fast ion/electron transportation path.

  15. Simple template fabrication of porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages as high-performance cathode catalysts for rechargeable Li-O2 batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y. L.; Lv, F. C.; Yu, S. C.; Xu, J.; Yang, X.; Lu, Z. G.

    2016-04-01

    Porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages have been fabricated via a simple template method using carbon spheres as a template. The hydrophilic surface of carbon spheres can adsorb Mn2+ and Co2+ ions simultaneously to form Mn,Co-adsorbed carbon spheres. The calcination of Mn,Co-adsorbed carbon spheres can result in porous hollow nanocages of MnCo2O4. The MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages are built by nanoscale MnCo2O4 crystals. Because of the unique porous hollow nanostructures, the resulting MnCo2O4/KB cathode shows an efficient electrocatalytic performance in LiTFSI/TEGDME electrolyte-based Li-O2 batteries. The MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages as the cathode catalysts can deliver better performance during the discharge/charge processes and good cycle stability compared with that of the pure KB carbon. The preliminary results manifest that porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages are promising high-performance cathode catalysts for Li-O2 batteries. This template technique is a simple, general, low-cost and controllable method and can be extended to prepare other transition metal oxide hollow nanostructures.

  16. Viability of Using Diamond Field Emitter Array Cathodes in Free Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    by passing through the accelerator out of phase, the resulting 11 material interaction that occurs in the beam dump does not produce neutron ...forces, which are accounted for in the Spiffe program. Figure 32 is a series of time “ snap shots” of the beam as it travels through the cathode

  17. Assessments of Hollow Cathode Wear in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPs(c)) by Numerical Analyses and Wear Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The standard approach presently followed by NASA to qualify electric propulsion for the required mission throughput has been based largely on life tests, which can be costly and time consuming. Revised electric propulsion lifequalification approaches are being formulated that combine analytical and/or computational methods with (shorter-duration) wear tests. As a model case, a wear test is being performed at JPL to assess the lifetime of the discharge hollow cathode in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPS(c)), a 25-cm ion engine developed by L-3 Communications Electron Technologies, Inc. for commercial applications. Wear and plasma data accumulated throughout this life-assessment program are being used to validate the existing 2-D hollow cathode code OrCa2D. We find that the OrCa2D steady-state solution predicts very well the time-averaged plasma data and the keeper voltage after 5500 hrs of operation in high-power mode. When the wave motion that occurs naturally in these devices is accounted for, based on an estimate of the maximum wave amplitude, the molybdenum-keeper erosion profile observed in the XIPS(c) discharge cathode is also reproduced within a factor of two of the observation. When the same model is applied to predict the erosion of a tantalum keeper we find that erosion is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the molybdenum keeper due the significantly lower sputtering yield of tantalum. A tantalum keeper would therefore allow keeper lifetimes that greatly exceed the present requirements for deep-space robotic missions considered by NASA. Moreover, such large reduction of the erosion renders the largest uncertainties in the models, which are associated with the wave amplitude estimates and the electron transport model, negligible.

  18. Thermal regime of self-heated hollow cathode in a low-pressure high-current pulsed-periodic discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, N. V.; Emlin, D. R.

    2017-11-01

    We have studied the thermal regime of a self-heated hollow cathode in combined low-current (1-5 A) dc discharge and high-current (up to 100 A) pulsed-periodic discharge and the influence of the pulsed parameters on the current-voltage characteristic of the high-current discharge. It has been shown that, after the application of a voltage pulse (200-500 V), the discharge current attains its peak value and is stabilized over a time of 100 μs. The discharge voltage in the quasi-stationary discharge stage exceeds the continuous discharge voltage at the same current by many times and depends on the mean value of the current in the discharge gap. The interpretation of the form of the I-V characteristics of the pulsed discharge is based on the dynamics of heating and cooling of the cathode surface layer and on the variations in the integral temperature of the cathode.

  19. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, James, E-mail: alessi@bnl.gov; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  20. Scalable synthesis of Na3V2(PO4)(3)/C porous hollow spheres as a cathode for Na-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, JF; Luo, C; Gao, T; Fan, XL; Wang, CS

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2(PO4)(3) (NVP) has been considered as a very promising cathode material for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) due to its typical NASICON structure, which provides an open and three dimensional (3D) framework for Na+ migration. However, the low electronic conductivity of NVP limits its rate capability and cycling ability. In this study, carbon coated hollow structured NVP/C composites are synthesized via a template-free and scalable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process, where the carbon coated NVP particles are uniformly decorated on the inner and outer surfaces of the porous hollow carbon spheres. When evaluated as a cathode material for SIBs, the unique NVP/C porous hollow sphere cathode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 99.2 mA h g(-1) and retains 89.3 mA h g(-1) after 300 charge/discharge cycles with a very low degradation rate of 0.035% per cycle. For comparison, the NVP/C composite, prepared by the traditional sol-gel method, delivers a lower initial discharge capacity of 97.4 mA h g(-1) and decreases significantly to 71.5 mA h g(-1) after 300 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance of NVP/C porous hollow spheres is attributed to their unique porous, hollow and spherical structures, as well as the carbon-coating layer, which provides a high contact area between electrode/electrolyte, high electronic conductivity, and high mechanical strength.

  1. Influence of the applied power on the barrier performance of silicon-containing plasma polymer coatings using a hollow cathode-activated PECVD process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Top, Michiel; Fahlteich, John; De Hosson, Jeff T. M.

    A hollow cathode arc discharge is used for the roll-to-roll deposition of silicon-containing plasma polymer thin films on a polymer substrate. It is found that the fragmentation of the used monomer hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) increases with increasing plasma power. The higher fragmentation was

  2. Ion sources with arc-discharge plasma box driven by directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter or cold cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander A; Davydenko, Vladimir I; Deichuli, Petr P; Shulzhenko, Grigori I; Stupishin, Nikolay V

    2008-02-01

    In the Budker Institute, Novosibirsk, an ion source with arc-discharge plasma box has been developed in the recent years for application in thermonuclear devices for plasma diagnostics. Several modifications of the ion source were provided with extracted current ranging from 1 to 7 A and pulse duration of up to 4 s. Initially, the arc-discharge plasma box with cold cathode was used, with which pulse duration is limited to 2 s by the cathode overheating and sputtering in local arc spots. Recently, a directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter was employed instead, which has extended lifetime compared to the cold cathode. In the paper, characteristics of the beam produced with both arrangements of the plasma box are presented.

  3. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-01

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed ``bottom-up'' approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical ``bottom'' bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the ``top'' product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a ``bottom-up'' mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of

  4. Time-resolved Langmuir Probing of a New Lanthanum Hexaboride (LaB6) Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    unlike refractory metals such as tungsten and molybdenum , it is not susceptible to boron diffusion from the LaB6 insert or the boron nitride heater...2 Lafferty, J. M., “ Boride Cathodes,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 22, no. 3, 1951, pp. 299-309. 3 Kim, V., Popov, G., Arkhipov, B., Murashko

  5. Production of High Energy Ions Near an Ion Thruster Discharge Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, I. G.; Goebel, D. M.; Jameson, K. K.; Wirz, R.; Polk, James E.

    2006-01-01

    Several researchers have measured ions leaving ion thruster discharge chambers with energies far greater than measured discharge chamber potentials. Presented in this paper is a new mechanism for the generation of high energy ions and a comparison with measured ion spectra. The source of high energy ions has been a puzzle because they not only have energies in excess of measured steady state potentials, but as reported by Goebel et. al. [1], their flux is independent of the amplitude of time dependent plasma fluctuations. The mechanism relies on the charge exchange neutralization of xenon ions accelerated radially into the potential trough in front of the discharge cathode. Previous researchers [2] have identified the importance of charge exchange in this region as a mechanism for protecting discharge cathode surfaces from ion bombardment. This paper is the first to identify how charge exchange in this region can lead to ion energy enhancement.

  6. A contribution to spectroscopic diagnostics and cathode sheath modeling of micro-hollow gas discharge in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvejic, M.; Spasojevic, Dj.; Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia)

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen Balmer beta line shape from a micro-hollow gas discharge (MHGD) in argon with traces of hydrogen is used for simultaneous diagnostics of plasma and cathode sheath (CS) parameters. For this purpose, a simple model of relevant processes responsible for the line broadening is introduced and applied to the Balmer beta profile recorded from a MHGD generated in the microhole (diameter 100 {mu}m at narrow side and 130 {mu}m at wider side) of a gold-alumina-gold sandwich in the pressure range (100-900 mbar). The electron number density N{sub e} in the range (0.4-4.5) x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} is determined from the width of the central part of the Balmer beta line profile, while, from the extended wings of the Balmer beta profile, induced by dc Stark effect, the next three parameters are determined: the average value E{sub a} of electric field strength in the CS in the range (16-95 kV/cm), the electric field strength E{sub 0} at the cathode surface in the range (32-190 kV/cm), and the CS thickness z{sub g} in the range (18-70 {mu}m). All four MHGD parameters, N{sub e}, E{sub a}, E{sub 0}, and z{sub g}, compare reasonably well with results of the modeling experiment by M. J. Kushner [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38, 1633 (2005)]. The results for N{sub e} are compared with other emission experiments.

  7. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of nitrogen-rich surface layers on AISI 304 stainless steel by rapid nitriding in a hollow cathode discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; He, Yongyong; Zhang, Shangzhou; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yijie

    2018-01-01

    Nitriding treatments have been successfully applied to austenitic stainless steels to improve their hardness and tribological properties. However, at temperatures above 450 °C, conventional plasma nitriding processes decrease the corrosion resistance due to the formation of CrN phases within the modified layer. In this work, AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were efficiently treated by rapid plasma nitriding at a high temperature of 530 °C in a hollow cathode discharge. The enhanced ionization obtained in the hollow cathode configuration provided a high current density and, consequently, a high temperature could be attained in a short time. The nitrided layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the dual-layer structure of the nitrided layer consists of a high-N face-centered cubic structure with a free CrN precipitate outer (top) layer and a nitrogen-expanded austenite S-phase bottom layer. The rapid nitriding-assisted hollow cathode discharge technique permits the use of high temperatures, as high as 530 °C, without promoting degradation in the corrosion resistance of stainless steel.

  8. Studies on laser-assisted Penning ionization by the optogalvanic effect in Ne/Eu hollow cathode discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V K; Kumar, P; Dixit, S K; Nakhe, S V

    2015-02-01

    Laser-assisted Penning ionization (LAPI) is detected in a Ne/Eu hollow cathode (HC) discharge lamp using the pulsed optogalvanic (OG) method. In the Ne/Eu discharge, doubly ionized europium excited energy levels Eu[4f(7)(P(7/2,5/2)6)] lie within the thermal limit (∼kT) from the laser-excited neon's energy level [2p(5)(P3/202)3p or 2p(8) (in Paschen notation)] lying at 149,848  cm(-1). Therefore, Penning ionization (PI) of europium atoms likely to occur into its highly excited ionic states is investigated. To probe the PI of europium, the temporal profiles of its counterpart neon OG signal are studied as a function of discharge current for the transitions (1s(4)→2p(8)) and (1s(2)→2p(2)), corresponding to 650.65 and 659.89 nm wavelengths, respectively. It is observed that PI of europium alters the overall discharge characteristics significantly and, hence, modifies the temporal profile of the OG signals accordingly. The quasi-resonant ionizing energy transfer collisions between laser-excited Ne 2p(8) atoms and electronically excited europium P(9/2)10 atoms are used to explain the LAPI mechanism. Such LAPI studies carried out in HC discharge could be useful for the discharge of a metal-vapor laser with appropriate Penning mixtures.

  9. Building Honeycomb-Like Hollow Microsphere Architecture in a Bubble Template Reaction for High-Performance Lithium-Rich Layered Oxide Cathode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoyong; Yan, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ming; Cao, Kaifeng; Zhu, Huali; Li, Lingjun; Duan, Junfei

    2017-09-13

    In the family of high-performance cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries, lithium-rich layered oxides come out in front because of a high reversible capacity exceeding 250 mAh g -1 . However, the long-term energy retention and high energy densities for lithium-rich layered oxide cathode materials require a stable structure with large surface areas. Here we propose a "bubble template" reaction to build "honeycomb-like" hollow microsphere architecture for a Li 1.2 Mn 0.52 Ni 0.2 Co 0.08 O 2 cathode material. Our material is designed with ca. 8-μm-sized secondary particles with hollow and highly exposed porous structures that promise a large flexible volume to achieve superior structure stability and high rate capability. Our preliminary electrochemical experiments show a high capacity of 287 mAh g -1 at 0.1 C and a capacity retention of 96% after 100 cycles at 1.0 C. Furthermore, the rate capability is superior without any other modifications, reaching 197 mAh g -1 at 3.0 C with a capacity retention of 94% after 100 cycles. This approach may shed light on a new material engineering for high-performance cathode materials.

  10. Solvothermal Synthesis of a Hollow Micro-Sphere LiFePO₄/C Composite with a Porous Interior Structure as a Cathode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jieyu; Li, Ying; Hu, Yemin; Li, Wenxian; Zhu, Mingyuan; Hu, Pengfei; Chou, Shulei; Wang, Guoxiu

    2017-11-03

    To overcome the low lithium ion diffusion and slow electron transfer, a hollow micro sphere LiFePO₄/C cathode material with a porous interior structure was synthesized via a solvothermal method by using ethylene glycol (EG) as the solvent medium and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as the surfactant. In this strategy, the EG solvent inhibits the growth of the crystals and the CTAB surfactant boots the self-assembly of the primary nanoparticles to form hollow spheres. The resultant carbon-coat LiFePO₄/C hollow micro-spheres have a ~300 nm thick shell/wall consisting of aggregated nanoparticles and a porous interior. When used as materials for lithium-ion batteries, the hollow micro spherical LiFePO₄/C composite exhibits superior discharge capacity (163 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C), good high-rate discharge capacity (118 mAh g-1 at 10 C), and fine cycling stability (99.2% after 200 cycles at 0.1 C). The good electrochemical performances are attributed to a high rate of ionic/electronic conduction and the high structural stability arising from the nanosized primary particles and the micro-sized hollow spherical structure.

  11. The effects of a realistic hollow cathode plasma contactor model on the simulation of bare electrodynamic tether systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blash, Derek M.

    The region known as Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) has become populated with artificial satellites and space debris since humanities initial venture into the region. This has turned LEO into a hazardous region. Since LEO is very valuable to many different countries, there has been a push to prevent further buildup and talk of even deorbiting spent satellites and debris already in LEO. One of the more attractive concepts available for deorbiting debris and spent satellites is a Bare Electrodynamic Tether (BET). A BET is a propellantless propulsion technique in which two objects are joined together by a thin conducting material. When these tethered objects are placed in LEO, the tether sweeps across the magnetic field lines of the Earth and induces an electromotive force (emf) along the tether. Current from the space plasma is collected on the bare tether under the action of the induced emf, and this current interacts with the Earth's magnetic field to create a drag force that can be used to deorbit spent satellites and space debris. A Plasma Contactor (PC) is used to close the electrical circuit between the BET and the ionospheric plasma. The PC requires a voltage and, depending on the device, a gas flow to emit electrons through a plasma bridge to the ionospheric plasma. The PC also can require a plasma discharge electrode and a heater to condition the PC for operation. These parameters as well as the PC performance are required to build an accurate simulation of a PC and, therefore, a BET deorbiting system. This thesis focuses on the development, validation, and implementation of a simulation tool to model the effects of a realistic hollow cathode PC system model on a BET deorbit system.

  12. On a focal point instability in (B3Πg - C3Πu)N2 optogalvanic circuit with hollow cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencheva, V.

    2016-03-01

    The (B3Πg, v = 0 - C3 Πu, v = 0) N2 dynamic optogalvanic signals have been registered illuminating an Al hollow cathode lamp with a pulsed N2 laser generating at the wavelength of 337.1nm. The dynamic optogalvanic signal (DOGS) at certain discharge current of 8 mA is a harmonic oscillator due to a focal point instability produced by our optogalvanic circuit. This damped harmonic oscillator can be described as a solution of linear second order homogeneous differential equation. The oscillation frequency is estimated from the registered DOGS using Fourier synthesis. The analytical description of the damped harmonic DOGS is obtained.

  13. Efficient small molecular organic light emitting diode with graphene cathode covered by a Sm layer with nano-hollows and n-doped by Bphen:Cs2CO3 in the hollows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li; Li, Lei; Qin, Laixiang; Ma, Yaoguang; Wang, Wei; Meng, Hu; Jin, Weifeng; Wang, Yilun; Xu, Wanjin; Ran, Guangzhao; You, Liping; Qin, Guogang

    2017-03-01

    Graphene is a favorable candidate for electrodes of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Graphene has quite a high work function of ˜4.5 eV, and has been extensively studied when used as anodes of OLEDs. In order to use graphene as a cathode, the electron injection barrier between the graphene cathode and the electron transport layer has to be low enough. Using 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen):Cs2CO3 to n-dope graphene is a very good method, but the electron injection barrier between the n-doped graphene and Bphen:Cs2CO3 is still too high to be ˜1.0 eV. In this work, in order to further reduce the electron injection barrier, a novel method is suggested. On the graphene cathode, a Sm layer with a lot of nano-hollows, and subsequently a layer of Bphen:Cs2CO3, are deposited. The Bphen:Cs2CO3 can n-dope graphene in the nano-hollows, and the Fermi level of the graphene rises. The nano Sm layer is very easily oxidized. Oxygen adsorbed on the surface of graphene may react with Sm to form an O--Sm+ dipole layer. On the areas of the Sm oxide dipole layer without nano-hollows, the electron injection barrier can be further lowered by the dipole layer. Electrons tend to mainly inject through the lower electron barrier where the dipole layer exists. Based on this idea, an effective inverted small molecular OLED with the structure of graphene/1 nm Sm layer with a lot of nano-hollows/Bphen:Cs2CO3/Alq3:C545T/NPB/MoO3/Al is presented. The maximum current efficiency and maximum power efficiency of the OLED with a 1 nm Sm layer are about two and three times of those of the reference OLED without any Sm layer, respectively.

  14. Studies on the optogalvanic effect and isotope-selective excitation of ytterbium in a hollow cathode discharge lamp using a pulsed dye laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Kumar, Jitendra; Prakash, Om; Saini, Vinod K; Dixit, Sudhir K; Nakhe, Shankar V

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents studies on the pulsed optogalvanic effect and isotope-selective excitation of Yb 555.648 nm (0 cm(-1) → 17 992.007 cm(-1)) and 581.067 nm (17 992.007 cm(-1) → 35 196.98 cm(-1)) transitions, in a Yb/Ne hollow cathode lamp. The Yb atoms were excited by narrow linewidth (500-1000 MHz) Rh110 and Rh6G dye based pulsed lasers. Optogalvanic signal inversion for ground state transition at 555.648 nm was observed beyond a hollow cathode discharge current of 8.5 mA, in contrast to normal optogalvanic signal at 581.067 nm up to maximum current of 14 mA. The isotope-selective excitation studies of Yb were carried out by recording Doppler limited optogalvanic signals as a function of dye laser wavelength. For the 581.067 nm transition, three even isotopes, (172)Yb, (174)Yb, and (176)Yb, and one odd isotope, (171)Yb, were clearly resolved. These data were compared with selective isotope excitation by 10 MHz linewidth continuous-wave dye laser. For 555.648 nm transition, isotopes were not clearly resolved, although isotope peaks of low modulation were observed.

  15. Substrate temperature influence on the properties of GaN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alevli, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafaalevli@marmara.edu.tr; Gungor, Neşe [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Marmara University, Goztepe, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey); Haider, Ali; Kizir, Seda; Leghari, Shahid A.; Biyikli, Necmi, E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, 06800 Ankara, Turkey and National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    Gallium nitride films were grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition using triethylgallium and N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma. An optimized recipe for GaN film was developed, and the effect of substrate temperature was studied in both self-limiting growth window and thermal decomposition-limited growth region. With increased substrate temperature, film crystallinity improved, and the optical band edge decreased from 3.60 to 3.52 eV. The refractive index and reflectivity in Reststrahlen band increased with the substrate temperature. Compressive strain is observed for both samples, and the surface roughness is observed to increase with the substrate temperature. Despite these temperature dependent material properties, the chemical composition, E{sub 1}(TO), phonon position, and crystalline phases present in the GaN film were relatively independent from growth temperature.

  16. Deposition of thin film of titanium on ceramic substrate using the discharge for hollow cathode for Al2O3/Al2O3 indirect brazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Roberta Meira Marinho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of titanium were deposited onto Al2O3 substrate by hollow cathode discharge method for the formation of a ceramic-ceramic joint using indirect brazing method. An advantage of using this technique is that a relatively small amount of titanium is required for the metallization of the ceramic surface when compared with other conventional methods. Rapidly solidified brazing filler of Cu49Ag45Ce6 in the form of ribbons was used. The thickness of deposited titanium layer and the brazing temperature/time were varied. The quality of the brazed joint was evaluated through the three point bending flexural tests. The brazed joints presented high flexural resistance values up to 176 MPa showing the efficiency of the technique.

  17. Graphene-coated hollow fiber membrane as the cathode in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors – Effect of configuration and applied voltage on performance and membrane fouling

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Craig M.

    2015-12-22

    Electrically conductive, graphene-coated hollow-fiber porous membranes were used as cathodes in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors (AnEMBRs) operated at different applied voltages (0.7 V and 0.9 V) using a new rectangular reactor configuration, compared to a previous tubular design (0.7 V). The onset of biofouling was delayed and minimized in rectangular reactors operated at 0.9 V, compared to those at 0.7 V due to higher rates of hydrogen production. Maximum transmembrane pressures for the rectangular reactor were only 0.10 bar (0.7 V) or 0.05 bar (0.9 V) after 56 days of operation, compared to 0.46 bar (0.7 V) for the tubular reactor after 52 days. The thickness of the membrane biofouling layer was approximately 0.4 µm for rectangular reactors and 4 µm for the tubular reactor. Higher permeate quality (TSS = 0.05 mg/L) was achieved in the rectangular AnEMBR than the tubular AnEMBR (TSS = 17 mg/L), likely due to higher current densities that minimized the accumulation of cells in suspension. These results show that the new rectangular reactor design, which had increased rates of hydrogen production, successfully delayed the onset of cathode biofouling and improved reactor performance.

  18. [High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma with a Fassel-torch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Yu; Gong, Zhen-Bin; Huang, Ben-Li

    2006-02-01

    High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP-HCL) excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a Fassel-torch has been investigated. In wide condition ranges only IFS was observed, whilst atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) was not detectable. More intense ionic fluorescence signal was observed at lower observation heights and at lower incident RF powers. Without introduction of any reduction organic gases into the ICP, the limit of detection (LOD, 3sigma) of Ba was improved by 50-fold over that of a conventional pulsed (CP) HCL with the Baird sleeve-extended torch. For Ca and Sr, the LODs by HCMP-HCL-ICP-IFS and CP-HCL-ICP-AFS show no significant difference. Relative standard deviations were 0.6%-1.4% (0.1-0.2 microg x mL(-1), n = 10) for 5 ionic fluorescence lines. Preliminary studies showed that the intensity of ionic fluorescence could be depressed in the presence of K, Al and P.

  19. Electrostatic/magnetic ion acceleration through a slowly diverging magnetic nozzle between a ring anode and an on-axis hollow cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasoh, A.; Mizutani, K.; Iwakawa, A.

    2017-06-01

    Ion acceleration through a slowly diverging magnetic nozzle between a ring anode and a hollow cathode set on the axis of symmetry has been realized. Xenon was supplied as the propellant gas from an annular slit along the inner surface of the ring anode so that it was ionized near the anode, and the applied electric potential was efficiently transformed to an ion kinetic energy. As an electrostatic thruster, within the examined operation conditions, the thrust, F, almost scaled with the propellant mass flow rate; the discharge current, Jd, increased with the discharge voltage, Vd. An important characteristic was that the thrust also exhibited electromagnetic acceleration performance, i.e., the so-called "swirl acceleration," in which F ≅JdB Ra /√{2 }, where B and Ra were a magnetic field and an anode inner radius, respectively. Such a unique thruster performance combining both electrostatic and electromagnetic accelerations is expected to be useful as another option for in-space electric propulsion in its broad functional diversity.

  20. Interfacial Reaction Dependent Performance of Hollow Carbon NanoSphere – Sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming eZheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-sulfur (Li-S battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of technical challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycle life, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS with highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performances. These findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.

  1. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a hollow reservoir cathode to improve performance in ion and Hall thrusters. We will adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this purpose....

  2. Emittance measurements at PITZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashchenko, Grygorii; Asova, Galina; Baehr, Juergen; Grabosch, Hans Juergen; Hakobyan, Levon; Haenel, Marc; Ivanisenko, Yevgeniy; Khojoyan, Martin; Krasilnikov, Mikhail; Mahgoub, Mahmoud; Nozdrin, Mikhail; O' Shea, Brendon; Otevrel, Marek; Petrosyan, Bagrat; Richter, Dieter; Riemann, Sabine; Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Roensch, Juliane; Shapovalov, Andrey; Spesyvtsev, Roman; Staykov, Lazar; Stephan, Frank [DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Floettmann, Klaus; Lederer, Sven; Schreiber, Siegfried [DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Klemz, Guido; Will, Ingo [Max-Born-Institute, Berlin(Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site, (PITZ) has an aim to develop and optimize high brightness electron sources for Free Electron Lasers like FLASH and the European XFEL. The new laser system allows to produce trains of laser pulses with flat-top temporal profiles of about 20 ps FWHM and rise/fall time of about 2 ps had been commissioned at PITZ in late autumn 2008. Photo electrons emitted from the Cs{sub 2}Te cathode are accelerated by a 1.6-cell L band RF gun cavity operated at 60 MV/m maximum accelerating gradient at the cathode. For measuring of transverse projected emittance the so called single slit scan technique is used at PITZ. This procedure is discussed. Recent results on measured emittance of electron beam are presented.

  3. Comparison of trimethylgallium and triethylgallium as “Ga” source materials for the growth of ultrathin GaN films on Si (100) substrates via hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alevli, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafaalevli@marmara.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Marmara University, Göztepe Kadıköy, 34722 İstanbul (Turkey); Haider, Ali; Kizir, Seda; Leghari, Shahid A.; Biyikli, Necmi, E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr [Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Bilkent, 06800 Ankara, Turkey and National Nanotechnology Research Center (UNAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    GaN films grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMG) and triethylgallium (TEG) as gallium precursors are compared. Optimized and saturated TMG/TEG pulse widths were used in order to study the effect of group-III precursors. The films were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Refractive index follows the same trend of crystalline quality, mean grain, and crystallite sizes. GaN layers grown using TMG precursor exhibited improved structural and optical properties when compared to GaN films grown with TEG precursor.

  4. Quantum efficiency and thermal emittance of metal photocathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Dowell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern electron beams have demonstrated the brilliance needed to drive free electron lasers at x-ray wavelengths with major advances occurring since the invention of the photocathode gun and the realization of emittance compensation. These state-of-the-art electron beams are now becoming limited by the intrinsic thermal emittance of the cathode. In both dc and rf photocathode guns details of the cathode emission physics strongly influence the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance. Therefore improving cathode performance is essential to increasing the brightness of beams. It is especially important to understand the fundamentals of cathode quantum efficiency and thermal emittance. This paper investigates the relationship between the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance for metal cathodes using the Fermi-Dirac model for the electron distribution. We use a consistent theory to derive the quantum efficiency and thermal emittance, and compare our results to those of others.

  5. Metal-Organic Framework-Derived Reduced Graphene Oxide-Supported ZnO/ZnCo2O4/C Hollow Nanocages as Cathode Catalysts for Aluminum-O2Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yisi; Jiang, Hao; Hao, Jiayu; Liu, Yulong; Shen, Haibo; Li, Wenzhang; Li, Jie

    2017-09-20

    Aluminum-air battery is a promising candidate for large-scale energy applications because of its low cost and high energy density. Remarkably, tremendous efforts have been concentrated on developing efficient and stable cathode electrocatalysts toward the oxygen reduction reaction. In this work, a hydrothermal-calcination approach was utilized to prepare novel reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-supported hollow ZnO/ZnCo 2 O 4 nanoparticle-embedded carbon nanocages (ZnO/ZnCo 2 O 4 /C@rGO) using a zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67)/graphene oxide/zinc nitrate composite as the precursor. The ZnO/ZnCo 2 O 4 /C@rGO hybrid exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction under alkaline conditions and superior stability and methanol tolerance to those of the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Furthermore, novel and simple Al-air coin cells were first fabricated using the hybrid materials as cathode catalysts under ambient air conditions to further investigate their catalytic performance. The coin cell with the ZnO/ZnCo 2 O 4 /C@rGO cathode catalyst displays a higher open circuit voltage and discharge voltage and more sluggish potential drop than those of the cell with the ZnO/ZnCo 2 O 4 /C cathode catalyst, which confirms that rGO can enhance the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the catalyst system. The excellent electrocatalytic performance of the ZnO/ZnCo 2 O 4 /C@rGO hybrid is attributed to the prominent conductivity and high specific surface area resulting from rGO, the more accessible catalytic active sites induced by the unique porous hollow nanocage structure, and synergic covalent coupling between rGO sheets and ZnO/ZnCo 2 O 4 /C nanocages.

  6. Direct fabrication of metal-free hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure as efficient cathode catalysts of fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqi; Liu, Mingda; Nie, Huagui; Gu, Cancan; Liu, Ming; Yang, Zhi; Yang, Keqin; Chen, Xi'an; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-06-01

    Despite the good progress in developing carbon catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the current metal-free carbon catalysts are still far from satisfactory for large-scale applications of fuel cell. Developing hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure is considered to be an ideal method to inhibit graphene stacking and improve their catalytic performance. Herein, we fabricated metal-free hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure, through using a new strategy that involves direct metal-free catalytic growth from assembly of SiO2 spheres. To our knowledge, although much researches involving the synthesis of graphene balls have been reported, investigations into the direct metal-free catalytic growth of hollow graphene balls are rare. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic performance shows that the resulting hollow graphene balls have significantly high catalytic activity. More importantly, such catalysts also possess much improved stability and better methanol tolerance in alkaline media during the ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalysts. The outstanding performances coupled with an easy and inexpensive preparing method indicated the great potential of the hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure in large-scale applications of fuel cell.

  7. Synthesis of carbon-coated Na2MnPO4F hollow spheres as a potential cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jiequn; Zhu, Xing; Zhong, Shengkui

    2018-01-01

    Hollow sphere structure Na2MnPO4F/C composite is synthesized through spray drying, following in-situ pyrolytic carbon coating process. XRD results indicate that the well crystallized composite can be successfully synthesized, and no other impurity phases are detected. SEM and TEM results reveal that the Na2MnPO4F/C samples show intact hollow spherical architecture, and the hollow spherical shells with an average thickness of 150 nm-250 nm are composed of nanosized primary particles. Furthermore, the amorphous carbon layer is uniformly coated on the surface of the hollow sphere, and the nanosized Na2MnPO4F particles are well embedded in the carbon networks. Consequently, the hollow sphere structure Na2MnPO4F/C shows enhanced electrochemical performance. Especially, it is the first time that the obvious potential platforms (∼3.6 V) are observed during the charge and discharge process at room temperature.

  8. Hollow bunches production

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, S

    2017-01-01

    Hollow bunches address the issue of high-brightnessbeams suffering from transverse emittance growth in a strongspace charge regime. During the Proton Synchrotron (PS)injection plateau, the negative space charge tune shift canpush the beam onto theQy=6integer resonance. Modify-ing the longitudinal bunch profile in order to reduce the peakline charge density alleviates the detrimental impact of spacecharge. To this end we first produce longitudinally hollowphase space distributions in the PS Booster by exciting aparametric resonance with the phase loop feedback system.These inherently flat bunches are then transferred to the PS,where the beam becomes less prone to the emittance growthcaused by the integer resonance.During the late 2016 machine development sessions inthe PS Booster we profited from solved issues from 2015and managed to reliably extract hollow bunches of1.3eVsmatched longitudinal area. Furthermore, first results to cre-ate hollow bunches with larger longitudinal emittances to-wards the LHC Inject...

  9. A Microfiltration Polymer-Based Hollow-Fiber Cathode as a Promising Advanced Material for Simultaneous Recovery of Energy and Water

    KAUST Repository

    Katuri, Krishna

    2016-09-12

    A novel electrocatalytic and microfiltration polymeric hollow fiber is fabricated for simultaneous recovery of energy (H2) and clean fresh water from wastewater, hence addressing two grand challenges facing society in the current century (i.e., providing adequate supplies of clean fresh water and energy as the world\\'s population increases).

  10. Electron sources with a plasma emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreindel, Iu. E.

    Papers are presented concerning electron guns which utilize plasma emitters involving low-pressure cold-cathode gas discharges. Particular attention is given to the development of high-brightness plasma emitters and the control of their parameters; experimental results on the operating conditions of various types of gas discharges used to obtain continuous and pulsed electron beams of large cross section; and the designs and characteristics of plasma-emitter electron guns. A number of applications are considered, including electron-beam welding, sintering, thin-film technology, and electron-beam diagnostics. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  11. High-efficient thermoemission electron source with emitter of lanthanum hexaboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iremashvili, D.V.; Sukhomlinov, V.V.; Ksenofontov, V.A.; Chanturidze, V.G.; Petrakov, V.E.; Avatinyan, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    A high-efficient thermoemission electron source with LaB/sub 6/ emitter and indirect heating is described. The design of cathode unit with 30 and 50 mm diameters of emitter is given. The technique for investigating the source operation is described. At high reliability of operation the cathode unit provides with approximately 2 kA current at approximately 2000 K working temperature of the emitter. Permissible time of heating is approximately 15 min. Operation life of the cathode unit is 500 h at 2000 K temperature of the emitter multiple depressurizing (> 100 times).

  12. Asymmetrical field emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  13. Hollow Core?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Liu, J. F.; Wang, Yang; Wu, X. J.; Han, J. L.

    We carried out the Gaussian fitting to the profile of PSR B1237+25 and found that six components rather than five are necessary to make a good fit. In the central part, we found that the core emission is not filled pencil beam but is a small hollow cone. This implies that the impact angle could be $\\beta<0.5^\\circ$. The ``hollow core'' is in agreement with Inverse Compton Scattering model of radio pulsars.

  14. A High Performance Cathode Heater for Hall Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High current hollow cathodes are the baseline electron source for next generation high power Hall thrusters. Currently for electron sources providing current levels...

  15. Floating emitter solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  16. Structured electron beams from nano-engineered cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueangaramwong, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, D. [NICADD, DeKalb; Andonian, G. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piot, P. [Fermilab

    2017-03-07

    The ability to engineer cathodes at the nano-scale have open new possibilities such as enhancing quantum eciency via surface-plasmon excitation, forming ultra-low-emittance beams, or producing structured electron beams. In this paper we present numerical investigations of the beam dynamics associated to this class of cathode in the weak- and strong-field regimes.We finally discuss the possible applications of some of the achievable cathode patterns when coupled with other phase space manipulations.

  17. Cold cathode rf guns based study on field emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangkun Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently cold cathodes based on field emission have drawn attention and been considered to drive accelerators and free electron lasers, due to the progress in field emitter arrays and planar emitters like diamond films. In this paper, we reviewed the characteristics of field emission in rf fields. Simulations of S-band rf guns consisting of a cathode cell and a full cell were done. We showed that a shorter cathode cell with a length of 0.25–0.3 of λ/2 is in favor of obtaining both low emittance and low energy spread bunches when the amplitude of electric field on the cathode surface ranges from 60 to 80  MV/m. A single cell test cavity has been installed to study field emission of diamond films and the measured beam current showed a good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  18. Cathodic arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  19. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, D.T.; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; /Brookhaven; Miller, R.H.; /SLAC; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; /Brookhaven; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; /Brookhaven; Winick, H.; /SLAC; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  20. Field emitters made of the contacted ytterbium and carbon nanolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Sominski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The operation of field emitters of a new type prepared from contacted nanolayers of ytterbium and carbon has been investigated. The performed calculations and experiments allowed to optimize the emission characteristics of the emitters. The calculations took into account the existence of a transition zone between the layers of Yb and C. Emission characteristics of the cathodes including up to 40 pairs of layers of carbon and ytterbium with optimum thicknesses of 5 and 2 nm respectively were measured. The created multilayered emitters provide the average emission current density over the surface of the emitter up to 10–20 A/cm2 and show promise for use in miniature electronic devices.

  1. Hollow MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Emil

    a hollow MEMS sensor has been designed, fabricated and tested. Combined density, viscosity, buoyant mass spectrometry and IR absorption spectroscopy are possible on liquid samples and micron sized suspended particles (e.g. single cells). Measurements are based on changes in the resonant behavior...... of these sensors. Optimization of the microfabrication process has led to a process yield of almost 100% .This is achieved despite the fact, that the process still offers a high degree of flexibility. By simple modifications the Sensor shape can be optimized for different size ranges and sensitivities...... technologies and pre-concentration approaches. A thorough theoretical analysis of the expected sensor responsivity and sensitivity is performed. Predictions made are confirmed by finite element simulations. Using these tools the sensor geometry is optimized for ideal performance in both mass density and IR...

  2. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhoplav, Rodion [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  3. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, James Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  4. Beta emitters and radiation protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Beta emitters, such as 90Y, are increasingly being used for cancer treatment. However, beta emitters demand other precautions than gamma emitters during preparation and administration, especially concerning shielding. AIM. To discuss practical precautions for handling beta emitters...... on the outside of the primary shielding material. If suitable shielding is used and larger numbers of handlings are divided among several persons, then handling of beta emitters can be a safe procedure....

  5. Field-emission cathode gating for rf electron guns

    OpenAIRE

    Lewellen, J. W.; J. Noonan

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel method of combining the most desirable characteristics of thermionic-cathode and photocathode rf guns, using a field-emission cathode and multiple rf frequencies. Simulations indicate that extremely low-emittance beams (on the order of 2 nm normalized emittance) at moderate beam currents (1 mA) and beam energies of ∼2  MeV can be obtained using this technique. The resulting gun design promises to be useful as a driver source for a number of applications, including high-volt...

  6. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm-2) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm-2 for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm-2). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  7. Space Charge Mitigation by Hollow Bunches

    CERN Multimedia

    Oeftiger, AO

    2014-01-01

    To satisfy the requirements of the HL-LHC (High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider), the LHC injector chain will need to supply a higher brightness, i.e. deliver the same transverse beam emittances \\epsilon_{x,y} while providing a higher intensity N. However, a larger number of particles per bunch enhances space charge effects. One approach to mitigate the impact of space charge is to change the longitudinal phase space distribution: hollow bunches feature a depleted bunch centre and a densely populated periphery. Thus, the spatial line density maximum is depressed which ultimately decreases the tune spread imposed by space charge. Therefore, a higher intensity can be accepted while keeping the same overall space charge tune shift. 3 different methods to create hollow bunches in the PSBooster are simulated.

  8. A Vacuum Encapsulated Lateral FED with Various Cathode Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol-Min; Lim, Moo-Sup; Han, Min-Koo

    We have fabricated poly-Si, Si, and Ti-silicide field emitter arrays employing in-situ vacuum encapsulated lateral field emitter structures and investigated the field emission characteristics such as turn-on voltage, emission current density, and the stability of the emission current. Although poly-Si and Si emitter exhibit almost identical turn-on voltages, the Si emitter shows a sharp turn-on characteristic compared with the poly-Si emitter. It may be caused by the uniform surface of the Si emitter. The current densities of poly-Si, and Si emitter are 0.47, 0.43μA/tip respectively when the anode to cathode voltage is 90V. The turn-on voltage and current density of the Ti-silicide emitter are about 31V, and 1.81μA/tip at a VAK of 90V. The normalized current fluctuations shows that the Ti-silicide emitter exhibits the most stable current.

  9. Multiplexing and scaling-down of nanostructured photon-triggered silicon field emitter arrays for maximum total electron yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen D.; Swanwick, Michael E.; Keathley, Phillip D.; Kärtner, Franz X.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond ultrabright cathodes with spatially structured emission are a critical technology for applications such as free-electron lasers, tabletop coherent x-ray sources, and ultrafast imaging. In this work, the optimization of the total electron yield of ultrafast photon-triggered field emission cathodes composed of arrays of nanosharp, high-aspect-ratio, single-crystal silicon pillars is explored through the variation of the emitter pitch and height. Arrays of 6 nm tip radius silicon emitters with emitter densities between 1.2 and 73.9 million tips cm-2 (hexagonally packed arrays with emitter pitch between 1.25 and 10 μm) and emitter height between 2.0 and 8.5 μm were characterized using 35 fs 800 nm laser pulses. Three-photon electron emission for low-energy (1 μJ) light pulses was observed, in agreement with the literature. Of the devices tested, the arrays with emitter pitch equal to 2.5 μm produced the highest total electron yield; arrays with larger emitter pitch suffer area sub-utilization, and in devices with smaller emitter pitch the larger emitter density does not compensate the smaller per-emitter current due to the electric field shadowing that results from the proximity of the adjacent tips. Experimental data and simulations suggest that 2 μm tall emitters achieve practical optimal performance as shorter emitters have visibly smaller field factors due to the proximity of the emitter tip to the substrate, and taller emitters show marginal improvement in the electron yield at the expense of greater fabrication difficulty.

  10. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  11. Measurements of Transverse Emittance for RF Photocathode Gun at the PAL

    CERN Document Server

    Park Jang Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Soo Ko In; Wang, Xijie; Woon Parc, Yong; Xiang, Dao

    2005-01-01

    A BNL GUN-IV type RF photo-cathode gun is under fabrication for use in the FIR (Far Infra-Red) facility being built at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). Performance test of the gun will include the measurement of transverse emittance profile along the longitudinal direction. Successful measurement of the emittance profile will provide powerful tool for the commissioning of the 4GLS (4th generation light source) injectors based on the emittance compensation principle. We are going to achieve this withthe use of pepper-pot based emittance meters that can be moved along the longitudinal direction. In this article, we present design considerations on the emittance meter with the resolution of 1 mm mrad.

  12. Low-emittance Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The effects of synchrotron radiation on particle motion in storage rings are discussed. In the absence of radiation, particle motion is symplectic, and the beam emittances are conserved. The inclusion of radiation effects in a classical approximation leads to emittance damping: expressions for the damping times are derived. Then, it is shown that quantum radiation effects lead to excitation of the beam emittances. General expressions for the equilibrium longitudinal and horizontal (natural) emittances are derived. The impact of lattice design on the natural emittance is discussed, with particular attention to the special cases of FODO-, achromat- and theoretical-minimum-emittance-style lattices. Finally, the effects of betatron coupling and vertical dispersion (generated by magnet alignment and lattice tuning errors) on the vertical emittance are considered.

  13. 3D hollow sphere Co3O4/MnO2-CNTs: Its high-performance bi-functional cathode catalysis and application in rechargeable zinc-air battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been a continuous need for high active, excellently durable and low-cost electrocatalysts for rechargeable zinc-air batteries. Among many low-cost metal based candidates, transition metal oxides with the CNTs composite have gained increasing attention. In this paper, the 3-D hollow sphere MnO2 nanotube-supported Co3O4 nanoparticles and its carbon nanotubes hybrid material (Co3O4/MnO2-CNTs have been synthesized via a simple co-precipitation method combined with post-heat treatment. The morphology and composition of the catalysts are thoroughly analyzed through SEM, TEM, TEM-mapping, XRD, EDX and XPS. In comparison with the commercial 20% Pt/C, Co3O4/MnO2, bare MnO2 nanotubes and CNTs, the hybrid Co3O4/MnO2-CNTs-350 exhibits perfect bi-functional catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction and oxygen evolution reaction under alkaline condition (0.1 M KOH. Therefore, high cell performances are achieved which result in an appropriate open circuit voltage (∼1.47 V, a high discharge peak power density (340 mW cm−2 and a large specific capacity (775 mAh g−1 at 10 mA cm−2 for the primary Zn-air battery, a small charge–discharge voltage gap and a high cycle-life (504 cycles at 10 mA cm−2 with 10 min per cycle for the rechargeable Zn-air battery. In particular, the simple synthesis method is suitable for a large-scale production of this bifunctional material due to a green, cost effective and readily available process. Keywords: Bi-functional catalyst, Oxygen reduction reaction, Oxygen evolution reaction, Activity and stability, Rechargeable zinc-air battery

  14. Hollow Prosthetic Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, Emma

    A new technique to produce hollow prostheses is presented. A small case series of patients utilized standard methods to fabricate hollow ocular prostheses where rehabilitation had proved difficult. This article describes the fabrication and results of hollow ocular prostheses. Each hollow eye was significantly reduced in weight, one-third lighter than the original weight, with the exact size, shape, and volume of the existing solid prosthesis. This simple design significantly reduced the weight of these eyes and revolutionized these patients' rehabilitation. Previously the solid prostheses overburdened the lower eyelids, causing discomfort, irritation, discharge, and reddening, whereas the new lightweight prostheses are unobtrusive, comfortable, and good aesthetically.

  15. The cataphoretic emitter effect exhibited in high intensity discharge lamp electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentel, Juergen

    2018-01-01

    A mono-layer of atoms, electropositive with respect to the substrate atoms, forms a dipole layer, reducing its work function. Such a layer is generated by diffusion of emitter material from the interior of the substrate, by vapour deposition or by deposition of emitter material onto arc electrodes by cataphoresis. This cataphoretic emitter effect is investigated within metal halide lamps with transparent YAG ceramic burners, and within model lamps. Within the YAG lamps, arcs are operated with switched-dc current between rod shaped tungsten electrodes in high pressure Hg vapour seeded with metal iodides. Within the model lamps, dc arcs are operated between rod-shaped tungsten electrodes—one doped—in atmospheric pressure Ar. Electrode temperatures are determined by 1λ -pyrometry, combined with simulation of the electrode heat balance. Plasma temperatures, atom and ion densities of emitter material are determined by emission and absorption spectroscopy. Phase resolved measurements in YAG lamps seeded with CeI3, CsI, DyI3, TmI3 and LaI3 show, within the cathodic half period, a reduction of the electrode temperature and an enhanced metal ion density in front of the electrode, and an opposite behavior after phase reversal. With increasing operating frequency, the state of the cathode overlaps onto the anodic phase—except for Cs, being low in adsorption energy. Generally, the phase averaged electrode tip temperature is reduced by seeding a lamp with emitter material; its height depends on admixtures. Measurements at tungsten electrodes doped with ThO2, La2O3 and Ce2O3 within the model lamp show that evaporated emitter material is redeposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface. It reduces the work function of tungsten cathodes above the evaporation temperature of the emitter material, too; and also of cold anodes, indicating a field reversal in front of them. The formation of an emitter spot at low cathode temperature and high emitter material

  16. Elastomeric Cathode Binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D. S.; Somoano, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble copolymer binder mixed with cathode material and solvent forms flexible porous cathode used in lithium and Ni/Cd batteries. Cathodes prepared by this process have lower density due to expanding rubbery binder and greater flexibility than conventional cathodes. Fabrication procedure readily adaptable to scaled-up processes.

  17. Investigation of the flickering of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ThO{sub 2} doped tungsten cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoebing, T.; Hermanns, P.; Bergner, A.; Ruhrmann, C.; Mentel, J.; Awakowicz, P. [Ruhr University Bochum, Electrical Engineering and Plasma Technology, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Traxler, H.; Wesemann, I.; Knabl, W. [Plansee SE, Metallwerk-Plansee-Str. 71, 6600 Reutte (Austria)

    2015-07-14

    Short-arc lamps are equipped with tungsten electrodes due to their ability to withstand a high thermal load during operation. Nominal currents of more than one hundred amperes lead to a cathode tip temperature near the melting point of tungsten. To reduce the electrode temperature and, thereby, to increase the maintenance of such lamps, ThO{sub 2} or tentatively La{sub 2}O{sub 3} are added to the electrode material. They generate a reduced work function by establishing a monolayer of emitter atoms on the tungsten surface. Emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of doped cathodes are formed. They are traced back to transport mechanisms of emitter oxides in the interior of the electrode and on the electrode surface in dependence of the electrode temperature and to the redeposition of vaporized and ionized emitter atoms onto the cathode tip by the electric field in front. The investigation is undertaken by means of glow discharge mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscope images, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and through measurements of the optical surface emissivity. The effect of emitter enrichments on the stability of the arc attachment is presented by means of temporally resolved electrode temperature measurements and by measurements of the luminous flux from the cathode-near plasma. They show that the emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of the cathode are attractive for the arc attachment if the emitter at the cathode tip is depleted. In this case, it moves along the lateral surface from the cathode tip to sections of the cathode with a reduced work function. It induces a temporary variation of the cathode tip temperature and of the light intensity from the cathode-near plasma, a so-called flickering. In particular, in case of lanthanated cathodes, strong flickering is observed.

  18. [Hollow foot in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S

    1997-01-01

    Contrary to the general impression, the hollow foot is much more common than the flat foot. We distinguish three categories of hollow foot: varus hollow (clinical form I), valgus hollow (clinical form II), and pseudo-hollow (clinical form III). These three clinical forms have a common deviation dynamics, the consequence of shortening of the sural-Achilles-calcaneoplantar system. Metatarsalgia often precedes deformation of the front of the foot. Talalgia is linked to excess traction or to a conflict between the heel and the back of the shoe. Common therapy consists of plantar orthoses, eventually toe orthoses and orthopedic shoes. When surgery is used in the adult, it is generally not to correct excess cavus but to correct problems of the front of the foot such as hallux valgus, involvement of the second metatarsal bone (??), or toenails.

  19. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  20. Nanotube cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  1. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, Grigory S.; Eletskii, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules. PMID:28348342

  2. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT-Based Electron Field Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Eletskii

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  3. Microwave-Assisted Solvothermal Synthesis of VO2 Hollow Spheres and Their Conversion into V2O5 Hollow Spheres with Improved Lithium Storage Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing; Zhong, Li; Li, Ming; Luo, Yuanyuan; Li, Guanghai

    2016-01-22

    Monodispersed hierarchically structured V2O5 hollow spheres were successfully obtained from orthorhombic VO2 hollow spheres, which are in turn synthesized by a simple template-free microwave-assisted solvothermal method. The structural evolution of VO2 hollow spheres has been studied and explained by a chemically induced self-transformation process. The reaction time and water content in the reaction solution have a great influence on the morphology and phase structure of the resulting products in the solvothermal reaction. The diameter of the VO2 hollow spheres can be regulated simply by changing vanadium ion content in the reaction solution. The VO2 hollow spheres can be transformed into V2O5 hollow spheres with nearly no morphological change by annealing in air. The nanorods composed of V2O5 hollow spheres have an average length of about 70 nm and width of about 19 nm. When used as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, the V2O5 hollow spheres display a diameter-dependent electrochemical performance, and the 440 nm hollow spheres show the highest specific discharge capacity of 377.5 mAhg(-1) at a current density of 50 mAg(-1) , and are better than the corresponding solid spheres and nanorod assemblies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Experimental characterization of emittance growth induced by the nonuniform transverse laser distribution in a photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhou

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The emittance of a high-brightness electron beam from a photoinjector is affected by the transverse and longitudinal distributions of the laser beam illuminating the cathode. A nonuniform laser beam generates a nonuniform electron-beam distribution that experiences emittance growth on a time scale of the plasma period. Experiments were performed at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility to investigate the emittance growth due to transversely nonuniform laser beams. Laser masks were fabricated to generate various laser distributions. Significant emittance growth was observed as the laser distribution deviated strongly from a uniform distribution. For cylindrically symmetric, nonuniform distributions, experimental results agree with PARMELA simulations. The emittance dependence on the bunch charge is linear as a function of the bunch charge for both uniform and nonuniform beams. For a uniform beam, the emittance measurements agree well with the predictions from PARMELA simulations, but the analytical approach overestimates the results. For nonuniform beams, analytical estimates are about 70% of the measurements. For noncylindrically symmetric, nonuniform beams, we observed that the emittance is linearly proportional to the rms laser nonuniformity and the best emittance for a perfectly uniform beam is extrapolated to be 1.07±0.13   mm mrad at 0.5 nC.

  5. Fuel cell components and systems having carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langry, Kevin C; Farmer, Joseph C

    2015-04-28

    A method, according to one embodiment, includes acquiring a structure having an ionically-conductive, electrically-resistive electrolyte/separator layer covering an inner or outer surface of a carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fiber and a catalyst along one side thereof, adding an anode that extends along at least part of a length of the structure, and adding a cathode that extends along at least part of the length of the structure, the cathode being on an opposite side of the hollow fiber as the anode.

  6. Surface-conduction electron-emitter characteristics and fabrication based on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Yi-Ting [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Li, Kuan-Wei [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Honda, Shin-ichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Lin, Pao-Hung; Huang, Ying-Sheng [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi, E-mail: kylee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: The pattern design provides a new structure of surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED). Delta-star shaped vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20o tips can simultaneously provide three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT, which produces numerous secondary electrons and enhance the SED efficiency. - Highlights: • The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. • The vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20° tips of the delta-star arrangement are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons. The cathode pattern simultaneously provides three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT. • The VACNT arrays were covered with magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). • The η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for developing SED applications. - Abstract: The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. Vertically aligned CNT arrays with a delta-star arrangement were patterned and synthesized onto a quartz substrate using photolithography and thermal chemical vapor deposition. Delta-star shaped VACNT arrays with 20° tips are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons because of their high electrical field gradient. In order to improve the field emission and secondary electrons (SEs) in SCE applications, magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures were coated onto the VACNT arrays to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). According to the definition of η in SCE applications, in this study, the η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for

  7. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

  8. Experimental optimization of the 6-dimentional electron beam emittance at the NSLS SDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, H. J.; Murphy, J. B.; Shen, Y.; Tang, C. X.; Wang, X. J.

    2011-08-01

    Experimental optimization of the 6-dimensional electron beam emittance generated by a Magnesium (Mg) photocathode RF gun is presented in this report. A new electron beam optimization algorithm for a low charge (<100 pC) beam was experimentally demonstrated; where the electron beam velocity bunching inside the RF gun plays a critical role, and the transverse emittance as a function of the laser-RF timing jitter was experimentally characterized for the first time. A 20 pC electron beam was optimized to have a normalized slice emittance of 0.15 mm mrad and a longitudinal projected emittance of 3.9 ps keV. Furthermore, the upper limit of the measured thermal emittance—0.5 mm mrad per mm of the rms laser size, is about 50% lower than the theoretical prediction for a Mg cathode (Qian et al., 2010) [1].

  9. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Reheem, A. M., E-mail: amreheem2009@yahoo.com [Accelerators and Ion Sources Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.N.13759, Cairo (Egypt); Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), Atomic Energy Authority (AEA), Cairo (Egypt); Ahmed, M. M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdelhamid, M. M.; Ashour, A. H. [Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), Atomic Energy Authority (AEA), Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition.

  10. Empirical evaluation of the field enhancement factor as a function from electrode spacing for LAFE and single emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumak, M. A.; Chikova, A. M.; Filippov, S. V.; Kolosko, A. G.; Popov, E. O.

    2017-11-01

    We have done a study of the electric field distribution on the surface of macroscopic and nanoscale field emitters. The electric field distribution was plotted by using simulation software COMSOL Multyphysics 5.2a. A numerical evaluation of the field enhancement factor dependence on the interelectrode distance was produced. We calculated parameter λ which describes this relationship for two different emission systems: elongated mono-tip metallic emitter with macro and micro scales. We conducted an experiments with model field cathodes: macroscopic tungsten tip and large area field emitter based on nanocomposite “carbon nanotubes / polystyrene”.

  11. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  12. Field-emission cathode gating for rf electron guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Lewellen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method of combining the most desirable characteristics of thermionic-cathode and photocathode rf guns, using a field-emission cathode and multiple rf frequencies. Simulations indicate that extremely low-emittance beams (on the order of 2 nm normalized emittance at moderate beam currents (1 mA and beam energies of ∼2  MeV can be obtained using this technique. The resulting gun design promises to be useful as a driver source for a number of applications, including high-voltage electron microscopy, precision electron-beam welding, and long-wavelength (THz radiation generation; we include performance calculations for the electron microscopy and precision welding applications.

  13. Field-emission cathode gating for rf electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewellen, J. W.; Noonan, J.

    2005-03-01

    We present a novel method of combining the most desirable characteristics of thermionic-cathode and photocathode rf guns, using a field-emission cathode and multiple rf frequencies. Simulations indicate that extremely low-emittance beams (on the order of 2 nm normalized emittance) at moderate beam currents (1 mA) and beam energies of ˜2 MeV can be obtained using this technique. The resulting gun design promises to be useful as a driver source for a number of applications, including high-voltage electron microscopy, precision electron-beam welding, and long-wavelength (THz) radiation generation; we include performance calculations for the electron microscopy and precision welding applications.

  14. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  15. How do Colluvial Hollows Fill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, T. C.; Parker, R.; Mudd, S. M.; Grieve, S. W. D.

    2016-12-01

    In humid, soil-mantled mountains shallow landslides commonly initiate in colluvial hollows, areas where convergent topography can lead to high pore pressures during storms. Immediately post-landslide initiation, a thin veneer of colluvial material accumulates by small-scale slumping from landslide headscarps. Thereafter colluvium accumulates in hollows primarily through creep-dominated processes like tree throw and animal burrowing, recording the hillslope sediment flux since the last landslide event. We measured the post-landslide hillslope sediment flux in 30 colluvial hollows in the southern Appalachians using radiocarbon measurements collected from soil pits excavated at the centre of steep, landslide-prone hollows. We collected material from the soil-saprolite/bedrock boundary at each location for radiocarbon dating and dated different chemical fractions of the soil (humic acid, humin, charcoal) in an attempt to bracket the "true" age of the soil. We calculated infilling rates of each hollow by measuring soil depths in cross-hollow transects and dividing this by the age of the hollow. The interquartile range of hollow basal ages is 2278-8184 cal. yrs B.P., demonstrating the long return period of landslides in most colluvial hollows. Hillslope erosion rates calculated assuming a linear diffusion transport law show that the transport coefficient (diffusivity) of the hollows varied by 4 orders of magnitude 10-5 to 10-1 m2 yr-1, despite the hollows being formed in regionally consistent geology and vegetation. Uncertainty in the dating and hollow geometry measurements can, at most, account for an order of magnitude of that variability. Our results show that hollows have a phase of rapid infilling that slows through time, consistent with previous observations. Despite this, the oldest hollows show several orders of magnitude variation in the transport coefficient, suggesting local, hollow scale variations in process significantly affect hillslope erosion rates.

  16. Cathodic Protection Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs Navy design and engineering of ship and submarine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for underwater hull corrosion control and...

  17. Transverse Emittance Measurement at REX ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Lanaia, D; Voulot, D

    2014-01-01

    The transverse emittance of REX-ISOLDE beams has been measured at 0.3 MeV/u (RFQ energy) and 2.85 MeV/u (maximum energy). This document compares RMS emittances measured with a slit-grid emittance meter (NTG emittance-meter) and RMS emittances measured with the quadrupole-scan method or three-gradient method. The results are compared with other measurements made with the slitgrid emittance meter in 2006 and 2008. The data treatment process is also described.

  18. Development of hollow anode penning ion source for laboratory application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, B. K.; Shyam, A.; Das, R.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-03-01

    The research work presented here focuses for the development of miniature penning type ion source. One hollow anode penning type ion source was developed in our laboratory. The size of the ion source is 38 mm diameter and 55 mm length. The ion source consists of two cathodes, a hollow anode and one piece of rare earth permanent magnet. The plasma was created in the plasma region between cathodes and the hollow anode. The J × B force in the region helps for efficient ionization of the gas even in the high vacuum region˜1×10 -5 Torr. The ions were extracted in the axial direction with help of the potential difference between the electrodes and the geometry of the extraction angle. The effect of the extraction electrode geometry for efficient extraction of the ions from the plasma region was examined. This ion source is a self extracted ion source. The self extracted phenomena reduce the cost and the size of the ion source. The extracted ion current was measured by a graphite probe. An ion current of more than 200 μA was observed at the probe placed 70 mm apart from the extraction electrode. In this paper, the structure of the ion source, effect of operating pressure, potential difference and the magnetic field on the extracted ion current is reported.

  19. Note: Arc discharge plasma source with plane segmented LaB6 cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetov, T D; Davydenko, V I; Ivanov, A A; Kreter, A; Mishagin, V V; Savkin, V Ya; Shulzhenko, G I; Unterberg, B

    2016-05-01

    A plane cathode composed of close-packed hexagonal LaB6 (lanthanum hexaboride) segments is described. The 6 cm diameter circular cathode is heated by radiation from a graphite foil flat spiral. The cathode along with a hollow copper anode is used for the arc discharge plasma production in a newly developed linear plasma device. A separately powered coil located around the anode is used to change the magnetic field strength and geometry in the anode region. Different discharge regimes were realized using this coil.

  20. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHenry, R.S. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine Engineering

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  1. Emitter location errors in electronic recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewski, Jan; Dikta, Anna

    2017-04-01

    The paper describes some of the problems associated with emitter location calculations. This aspect is the most important part of the series of tasks in the electronic recognition systems. The basic tasks include: detection of emission of electromagnetic signals, tracking (determining the direction of emitter sources), signal analysis in order to classify different emitter types and the identification of the sources of emission of the same type. The paper presents a brief description of the main methods of emitter localization and the basic mathematical formulae for calculating their location. The errors' estimation has been made to determine the emitter location for three different methods and different scenarios of emitters and direction finding (DF) sensors deployment in the electromagnetic environment. The emitter has been established using a special computer program. On the basis of extensive numerical calculations, the evaluation of precise emitter location in the recognition systems for different configuration alignment of bearing devices and emitter was conducted. The calculations which have been made based on the simulated data for different methods of location are presented in the figures and respective tables. The obtained results demonstrate that calculation of the precise emitter location depends on: the number of DF sensors, the distances between emitter and DF sensors, their mutual location in the reconnaissance area and bearing errors. The precise emitter location varies depending on the number of obtained bearings. The higher the number of bearings, the better the accuracy of calculated emitter location in spite of relatively high bearing errors for each DF sensor.

  2. Extreme regimes of femtosecond photoemission from a copper cathode in a dc electron gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. E. M. Pasmans

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The femtosecond photoemission yield from a copper cathode and the emittance of the created electron beams has been studied in a 12  MeV/m, 100 keV dc electron gun over a wide range of laser fluence, from the linear photoemission regime until the onset of image charge limitations and cathode damaging. The measured photoemission curves can be described well with available theory which includes the Schottky effect, second-order photoemission, and image charge limitation. The second-order photoemission can be explained by thermally assisted one-photon photoemission (1PPE and by above-threshold two-photon photoemission (2PPE. Measurements with a fresh cathode suggest that the 2PPE process is dominant. The beam emittance has been measured for the entire range of initial surface charge densities as well. The emittance measurements of space-charge dominated beams can be described well by an envelope equation with generalized perveance. The dc gun produces 0.1 pC bunches with 25 nm rms normalized emittance, corresponding to a normalized brightness usually associated with rf photoguns. In this experimental study the limits of femtosecond photoemission from a copper cathode have been explored and analyzed in great detail, resulting in improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  3. Hollow Microporous Organic Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Buyi; Yang, Xinjia; Xia, Lingling; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Tan, Bien

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of hollow microporous organic capsules (HMOCs) could be very useful because of their hollow and porous morphology, which combines the advantages of both microporous organic polymers and non-porous nanocapsules. They can be used as storage materials or reaction chambers while supplying the necessary path for the design of controlled uptake/release systems. Herein, the synthesis of HMOCs with high surface area through facile emulsion polymerization and hypercrosslinking reactions, is described. Due to their tailored porous structure, these capsules possessed high drug loading efficiency, zero-order drug release kinetics and are also demonstrated to be used as nanoscale reactors for the prepareation of nanoparticles (NPs) without any external stabilizer. Moreover, owing to their intrinsic biocompatibility and fluorescence, these capsules exhibit promising prospect for biomedical applications. PMID:23820511

  4. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-04-07

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes.

  6. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  8. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  9. Multi-proton bunch driven hollow plasma wakefield acceleration in the nonlinear regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangmei; Xia, Guoxing; Lotov, Konstantin V.; Sosedkin, Alexander P.; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete-Apsimon, Oznur

    2017-10-01

    Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration has been demonstrated in simulations to be capable of accelerating particles to the energy frontier in a single stage, but its potential is hindered by the fact that currently available proton bunches are orders of magnitude longer than the plasma wavelength. Fortunately, proton micro-bunching allows driving plasma waves resonantly. In this paper, we propose using a hollow plasma channel for multiple proton bunch driven plasma wakefield acceleration and demonstrate that it enables the operation in the nonlinear regime and resonant excitation of strong plasma waves. This new regime also involves beneficial features of hollow channels for the accelerated beam (such as emittance preservation and a uniform accelerating field) and long buckets of stable deceleration for the drive beam. The regime is attained at a proper ratio between plasma skin depth, driver radius, hollow channel radius, and micro-bunch period.

  10. Coupling boundary condition for high-intensity electric arc attached on a non-homogeneous refractory cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi Shirvan, Alireza; Choquet, Isabelle; Nilsson, Håkan; Jasak, Hrvoje

    2018-01-01

    The boundary coupling high-intensity electric arc and refractory cathode is characterized by three sub-layers: the cathode sheath, the Knudsen layer and the pre-sheath. A self-consistent coupling boundary condition accounting for these three sub-layers is presented; its novel property is to take into account a non-uniform distribution of electron emitters on the surface of the refractory cathode. This non-uniformity is due to cathode non-homogeneity induced by arcing. The computational model is applied to a one-dimensional test case to evaluate the validity of different modeling assumptions. It is also applied coupling a thoriated tungsten cathode with an argon plasma (assumed to be in local thermal equilibrium) to compare the calculation results with uniform and non-uniform distribution of the electron emitters to experimental measurements. The results show that the non-uniformity of the electron emitters' distribution has a significant effect on the calculated properties. It leads to good agreement with the cathode surface temperature, and with the plasma temperature in the hottest region. Some differences are observed in colder plasma regions, where deviation from local thermal equilibrium is known to occur.

  11. Optimizations of transverse projected emittance at the photo-injector test facility at DESY, location Zeuthen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimjaem, S., E-mail: r.sakhorn@gmail.com [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Stephan, F.; Krasilnikov, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ackermann, W. [Technische Universtaet Darmstadt, Schossgartenstrasse 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Asova, G.; Baehr, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Gjonaj, E. [Technische Universtaet Darmstadt, Schossgartenstrasse 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Grabosch, H.J.; Hakobyan, L.; Haenel, M.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Lederer, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Mahgoub, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Michelato, P.; Monaco, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano - LASA, Via F.lli Cervi 201, 20090 Segrate Milano (Italy); Nozdrin, M.; O' Shea, B.; Otevrel, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); and others

    2012-04-11

    High brightness electron sources for linac based short-wavelength free-electron lasers are developed and optimized for small transverse projected emittance at the photo-injector test facility at DESY, location Zeuthen (PITZ). A major part of the measurement program at PITZ is dedicated to transverse phase space optimization in order to fulfill the requirements of the European X-ray free-electron laser (European XFEL). A laser-driven RF-gun, treated with a dry-ice sublimation-impulse cleaning technique, a new photocathode laser system allowing short rise and fall times of the flat-top temporal distribution as well as several new diagnostic components have been installed at PITZ in 2008. The electrons generated via the photo-effect at a cesium telluride (Cs{sub 2}Te) cathode are accelerated by a 1.6 cell L-band RF-gun cavity with a maximum accelerating gradient at the cathode of about 60 MV/m. The transverse projected emittance is measured using a single slit scan technique. In the 2008-2009 run period, a detailed characterization of the projected transverse emittance was performed at different operating conditions. Optimizations and measurement results as well as simulation predictions of the transverse projected emittance for bunch charges of 1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.1 nC are presented and discussed in this paper. The geometric mean of the normalized projected rms emittance in both transverse directions for an electron bunch charge of 1 nC was measured to be 0.89{+-}0.01 mm mrad for a 100% rms phase-space distribution.

  12. Optimizations of transverse projected emittance at the photo-injector test facility at DESY, location Zeuthen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimjaem, S.; Stephan, F.; Krasilnikov, M.; Ackermann, W.; Asova, G.; Bähr, J.; Gjonaj, E.; Grabosch, H. J.; Hakobyan, L.; Hänel, M.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G.; Lederer, S.; Mahgoub, M.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.; Nozdrin, M.; O'Shea, B.; Otevrel, M.; Petrosyan, B.; Richter, D.; Rönsch-Schulenburg, J.; Sertore, D.; Schreiber, S.; Schnepp, S.; Shapovalov, A.; Spesyvtsev, R.; Staykov, L.; Vashchenko, G.; Weiland, T.; Will, I.

    2012-04-01

    High brightness electron sources for linac based short-wavelength free-electron lasers are developed and optimized for small transverse projected emittance at the photo-injector test facility at DESY, location Zeuthen (PITZ). A major part of the measurement program at PITZ is dedicated to transverse phase space optimization in order to fulfill the requirements of the European X-ray free-electron laser (European XFEL). A laser-driven RF-gun, treated with a dry-ice sublimation-impulse cleaning technique, a new photocathode laser system allowing short rise and fall times of the flat-top temporal distribution as well as several new diagnostic components have been installed at PITZ in 2008. The electrons generated via the photo-effect at a cesium telluride (Cs2Te) cathode are accelerated by a 1.6 cell L-band RF-gun cavity with a maximum accelerating gradient at the cathode of about 60 MV/m. The transverse projected emittance is measured using a single slit scan technique. In the 2008-2009 run period, a detailed characterization of the projected transverse emittance was performed at different operating conditions. Optimizations and measurement results as well as simulation predictions of the transverse projected emittance for bunch charges of 1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.1 nC are presented and discussed in this paper. The geometric mean of the normalized projected rms emittance in both transverse directions for an electron bunch charge of 1 nC was measured to be 0.89±0.01 mm mrad for a 100% rms phase-space distribution.

  13. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  14. Operation of an ungated diamond field-emission array cathode in a L-band radiofrequency electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115, USA; Accelerator Physics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA; Brau, C. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA; Choi, B. K. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA; Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA; Blomberg, B. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115, USA; Gabella, W. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA; Ivanov, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA; Jarvis, J. [Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medford, New York 11763, USA; Mendenhall, M. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA; Mihalcea, D. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115, USA; Panuganti, H. [Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development and Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115, USA; Prieto, P. [Accelerator Division, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA; Reid, J. [Accelerator Division, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA

    2014-06-30

    We report on the first successful operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of $\\sim 10^6$ diamond diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15~mA were reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed. Numerical simulations of the beam dynamics are also presented.

  15. High-current electron gun with a planar magnetron integrated with an explosive-emission cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiziridi, P. P.; Ozur, G. E.

    2017-05-01

    A new high-current electron gun with plasma anode and explosive-emission cathode integrated with planar pulsed powered magnetron is described. Five hundred twelve copper wires 1 mm in diameter and 15 mm in height serve as emitters. These emitters are installed on stainless steel disc (substrate) with 3-mm distance between them. Magnetron discharge plasma provides increased ion density on the periphery of plasma anode formed by high-current Penning discharge ignited within several milliseconds after starting of the magnetron discharge. The increased on the periphery ion density improves the uniformity of high-current electron beam produced in such an electron gun.

  16. Highly Efficient Micro Cathode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Company, Inc. proposes to develop a micro thermionic cathode that requires extremely low power and provides long lifetime. The basis for the cathode is a...

  17. Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a static, cathode-fed, 2000 psi, balanced-pressure Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) based on PEM electrolysis technology. It...

  18. Current-Fluctuation Mechanism of Field Emitters Using Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with High Crystallinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Shimoi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Field emitters can be used as a cathode electrode in a cathodoluminescence device, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs that are synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE properties. However, a cathodoluminescence device that uses field emitters radiates rays whose intensity considerably fluctuates at a low frequency, and the radiant fluctuation is caused by FE current fluctuation. To solve this problem, is very important to obtain a stable output for field emitters in a cathodoluminescence device. The authors consider that the electron-emission fluctuation is caused by Fowler–Nordheim electron tunneling and that the electrons in the Fowler–Nordheim regime pass through an inelastic potential barrier. We attempted to develop a theoretical model to analyze the power spectrum of the FE current fluctuation using metallic SWCNTs as field emitters, owing to their electrical conductivity by determining their FE properties. Field emitters that use metallic SWCNTs with high crystallinity were successfully developed to achieve a fluctuating FE current from field emitters at a low frequency by employing inelastic electron tunneling. This paper is the first report of the successful development of an inelastic-electron-tunneling model with a Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation for metallic SWCNTs based on the evaluation of FE properties.

  19. Study of direct-current, pulsed, and temperature--field emission from LaB/sub 6//tungsten field emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairnar, R. S.; Dharmadhikari, C. V.; Joag, D. S.; Kanitkar, P. L.; Nigavekar, A. S.

    1989-07-01

    This paper reports dc, temperature--field (/ital T/--/ital F/), and pulsed emission from a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/)--tungsten (W) field emitter. Various parameters are drived from the Fowler--Nordheim plots for the three configurations of the emitter, viz., clean tungsten, LaB/sub 6/ overgrowth on W(111) plane (''two spot''), and LaB/sub 6/ equilibrated W surface (''well spread''). The current stability is observed at 300, 730, and 850 K, (and 1065 K for well spread) under /ital T/--/ital F/ operation. A comparison is made with various types of field emitting cathodes and the results are discussed from the point of view of LaB/sub 6//W field emitting cathodes.

  20. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  1. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  2. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters...

  3. Quantum efficiency temporal response and lifetime of a GaAs cathode in SRF electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2010-05-23

    RF electron guns with a strained super lattice GaAs cathode can generate polarized electron beam of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface. In a normal conducting RF gun, the extremely high vaccum required by these cathodes can not be met. We report on an experiment with a superconducting SRF gun, which can maintain a vacuum of nearly 10-12 torr because of cryo-pumping at the temperature of 4.2K. With conventional activation, we obtained a QE of 3% at 532 nm, with lifetime of nearly 3 days in the preparation chamber. We plan to use this cathode in a 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun to study its performance. In addition, we studied the multipacting at the location of cathode. A new model based on the Forkker-Planck equation which can estimate the bunch length of the electron beam is discussed in this paper. Future particle accelerators such as eRHIC and ILC require high brightness, high current polarized electrons Recently, using a superlattice crystal, the maximum polarization of 95% was reached. Activation with Cs,O lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons excited in to the conduction band and reach the surface to escape into the vacuum. Presently the polarized electron sources are based on DC gun, such as that at the CEBAF at Jlab. In these devices, the life time of the cathode is extended due to the reduced back bombardment in their UHV conditions. However, the low accelerating gradient of the DC guns lead to poor longitudinal emittance. The higher accelerating gradient of the RF gun generates low emittance beams. Superconducting RF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of the DC guns with the higher accelerating gradients of the RF guns and provide potentially a long lived cathode with very low transverse and longitudinal emittance. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the GaAs. The quantum efficient is 3% at 532 nm and is

  4. Robust multiplatform RF emitter localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Issa, Huthaifa; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, position based services has increase. Thus, recent developments in communications and RF technology have enabled system concept formulations and designs for low-cost radar systems using state-of-the-art software radio modules. This research is done to investigate a novel multi-platform RF emitter localization technique denoted as Position-Adaptive RF Direction Finding (PADF). The formulation is based on the investigation of iterative path-loss (i.e., Path Loss Exponent, or PLE) metrics estimates that are measured across multiple platforms in order to autonomously adapt (i.e. self-adjust) of the location of each distributed/cooperative platform. Experiments conducted at the Air-Force Research laboratory (AFRL) indicate that this position-adaptive approach exhibits potential for accurate emitter localization in challenging embedded multipath environments such as in urban environments. The focus of this paper is on the robustness of the distributed approach to RF-based location tracking. In order to localize the transmitter, we use the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) data to approximate distance from the transmitter to the revolving receivers. We provide an algorithm for on-line estimation of the Path Loss Exponent (PLE) that is used in modeling the distance based on Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements. The emitter position estimation is calculated based on surrounding sensors RSS values using Least-Square Estimation (LSE). The PADF has been tested on a number of different configurations in the laboratory via the design and implementation of four IRIS wireless sensor nodes as receivers and one hidden sensor as a transmitter during the localization phase. The robustness of detecting the transmitters position is initiated by getting the RSSI data through experiments and then data manipulation in MATLAB will determine the robustness of each node and ultimately that of each configuration. The parameters that are used in the functions are

  5. Design and Development of Emittance Measurement Device by Using the Pepper-pot Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakluea, S.; Rimjaem, S.

    2017-09-01

    Transverse emittance of a charged particle beam is one of the most important properties that reveals the quality of the beam. It is related to charge density, transvers size and angular displacement of the beam in transverse phase space. There are several techniques to measure the transverse emittance value. One of practical methods is the pepper-pot technique, which can measure both horizontal and vertical emittance value in a single measurement. This research concentrates on development of a pepper-pot device to measure the transverse emittance of electron beam produced from an accelerator injector system, which consists of a thermionic cathode RF electron gun and an alpha magnet, at the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University. Simulation of beam dynamics was conducted with programs PARMELA, ELEGANT and self-developed codes using C and MATLAB. The geometry, dimensions and location of the pepper-pot as well as its corresponding screen station position were included in the simulation. The result from this study will be used to design and develop a practical pepper-pot experimental station.

  6. Surface-conduction electron-emitter characteristics and fabrication based on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yi-Ting; Li, Kuan-Wei; Honda, Shin-ichi; Lin, Pao-Hung; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Lee, Kuei-Yi

    2017-06-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. Vertically aligned CNT arrays with a delta-star arrangement were patterned and synthesized onto a quartz substrate using photolithography and thermal chemical vapor deposition. Delta-star shaped VACNT arrays with 20° tips are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons because of their high electrical field gradient. In order to improve the field emission and secondary electrons (SEs) in SCE applications, magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures were coated onto the VACNT arrays to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). According to the definition of η in SCE applications, in this study, the η was stably maintained in the 75-85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for developing SED applications.

  7. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  8. Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2011-03-28

    RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10{sup -12} Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to {approx}10{sup -9} Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and

  9. Core-shell Au-Pd nanoparticles as cathode catalysts for microbial fuel cell applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gaixiu Yang; Dong Chen; Pengmei Lv; Xiaoying Kong,; Yongming Sun; Zhongming Wang; Zhenhong Yuan; Hui Liu; Jun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles with core-shell structures usually display enhanced catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created between the core and shell regions. In this study, we demonstrate the application of bimetallic Au-Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a thin Pd shell as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells, which represent a promising technology for wastewater treatment, while directly generating electrical energy. In specific, in comparison with the hollow structured Pt ...

  10. Switching a Nanocluster Core from Hollow to Non-hollow

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2016-03-24

    Modulating the structure-property relationship in atomically precise nanoclusters (NCs) is vital for developing novel NC materials and advancing their applications. While promising biphasic ligand-exchange (LE) strategies have been developed primarily to attain novel NCs, understanding the mechanistic aspects involved in tuning the core and the ligand-shell of NCs in such biphasic processes is challenging. Here, we design a single phase LE process that enabled us to elucidate the mechanism of how a hollow NC (e.g., [Ag44(SR)30]4-, -SR: thiolate) converts into a non-hollow NC (e.g., [Ag25(SR)18]-), and vice versa. Our study reveals that the complete LE of the hollow [Ag44(SPhF)30]4- NCs (–SPhF: 4-fluorobenzenethiolate) with incoming 2,4-dimethylbenzenethiol (HSPhMe2) induced distortions in the Ag44 structure forming the non-hollow [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- by a disproportionation mechanism. While the reverse reaction of [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- with HSPhF prompted an unusual dimerization of Ag25, followed by a rearrangement step that reproduces the original [Ag44(SPhF)30]4-. Remarkably, both the forward and the backward reactions proceed through similar size intermediates that seem to be governed by the boundary conditions set by the thermodynamic and electronic stability of the hollow and non-hollow metal cores. Furthermore, the resizing of NCs highlights the surprisingly long-range effect of the ligands which are felt by atoms far deep in the metal core, thus opening a new path for controlling the structural evolution of nanoparticles.

  11. The Electrospun Ceramic Hollow Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Homaeigohar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hollow nanofibers are largely gaining interest from the scientific community for diverse applications in the fields of sensing, energy, health, and environment. The main reasons are: their extensive surface area that increases the possibilities of engineering, their larger accessible active area, their porosity, and their sensitivity. In particular, semiconductor ceramic hollow nanofibers show greater space charge modulation depth, higher electronic transport properties, and shorter ion or electron diffusion length (e.g., for an enhanced charging–discharging rate. In this review, we discuss and introduce the latest developments of ceramic hollow nanofiber materials in terms of synthesis approaches. Particularly, electrospinning derivatives will be highlighted. The electrospun ceramic hollow nanofibers will be reviewed with respect to their most widely studied components, i.e., metal oxides. These nanostructures have been mainly suggested for energy and environmental remediation. Despite the various advantages of such one dimensional (1D nanostructures, their fabrication strategies need to be improved to increase their practical use. The domain of nanofabrication is still advancing, and its predictable shortcomings and bottlenecks must be identified and addressed. Inconsistency of the hollow nanostructure with regard to their composition and dimensions could be one of such challenges. Moreover, their poor scalability hinders their wide applicability for commercialization and industrial use.

  12. Laser wire emittance measurement line AT CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, H; Blair, G A; Aumeyr, T; Schulte, D; Stulle, F

    2011-01-01

    A precise measurement of the transverse beam size and beam emittances upstream of the final focus is essential for ensuring the full luminosity at future linear colliders. A scheme for the emittance measurements at the RTML line of the CLIC using laser-wire beam profile monitors is described. A lattice of the measurement line is discussed and results of simulations of statistical errors and of their impact on the accuracy of the emittance reconstruction are given. Laser wire systems suitable for CLIC and their main characteristics are discussed.

  13. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  14. Design study of a low-emittance high-repetition rate thermionic rf gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasenko, A.; Mytrochenko, V.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Goryashko, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    We propose a novel gridless continuous-wave radiofrequency (rf) thermionic gun capable of generating nC ns electron bunches with a rms normalized slice emittance close to the thermal level of 0.3 mm mrad. In order to gate the electron emission, an externally heated thermionic cathode is installed into a stripline-loop conductor. Two high-voltage pulses propagating towards each other in the stripline-loop overlap in the cathode region and create a quasielectrostatic field gating the electron emission. The repetition rate of pulses is variable and can reach up to one MHz with modern solid-state pulsers. The stripline attached to a rf gun cavity wall has with the wall a common aperture that allows the electrons to be injected into the rf cavity for further acceleration. Thanks to this innovative gridless design, simulations suggest that the bunch emittance is approximately at the thermal level after the bunch injection into the cavity provided that the geometry of the cathode and aperture are properly designed. Specifically, a concave cathode is adopted to imprint an Ƨ-shaped distribution onto the beam transverse phase-space to compensate for an S-shaped beam distribution created by the spherical aberration of the aperture-cavity region. In order to compensate for the energy spread caused by rf fields of the rf gun cavity, a 3rd harmonic cavity is used. A detailed study of the electrodynamics of the stripline and rf gun cavity as well as the beam optics and bunch dynamics are presented.

  15. Understanding the role of different conductive polymers in improving the nanostructured sulfur cathode performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiyang; Zhang, Qianfan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Lithium sulfur batteries have brought significant advancement to the current state-of-art battery technologies because of their high theoretical specific energy, but their wide-scale implementation has been impeded by a series of challenges, especially the dissolution of intermediate polysulfides species into the electrolyte. Conductive polymers in combination with nanostructured sulfur have attracted great interest as promising matrices for the confinement of lithium polysulfides. However, the roles of different conductive polymers on the electrochemical performances of sulfur electrode remain elusive and poorly understood due to the vastly different structural configurations of conductive polymer-sulfur composites employed in previous studies. In this work, we systematically investigate the influence of different conductive polymers on the sulfur cathode based on conductive polymer-coated hollow sulfur nanospheres with high uniformity. Three of the most well-known conductive polymers, polyaniline (PANI), polypyrrole (PPY), and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), were coated, respectively, onto monodisperse hollow sulfur nanopsheres through a facile, versatile, and scalable polymerization process. The sulfur cathodes made from these well-defined sulfur nanoparticles act as ideal platforms to study and compare how coating thickness, chemical bonding, and the conductivity of the polymers affected the sulfur cathode performances from both experimental observations and theoretical simulations. We found that the capability of these three polymers in improving long-term cycling stability and high-rate performance of the sulfur cathode decreased in the order of PEDOT > PPY > PANI. High specific capacities and excellent cycle life were demonstrated for sulfur cathodes made from these conductive polymer-coated hollow sulfur nanospheres.

  16. Hollow waveguide for urology treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínková, H.; Němec, M.; Koranda, P.; Pokorný, J.; Kőhler, O.; Drlík, P.; Miyagi, M.; Iwai, K.; Matsuura, Y.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of our work was the application of the special sealed hollow waveguide system for the urology treatment - In our experimental study we have compared the effects of Ho:YAG (wavelength 2100 nm) and Er:YAG (wavelength 2940 nm) laser radiation both on human urinary stones (or compressed plaster samples which serve as a model) fragmentation and soft ureter tissue incision in vitro. Cyclic Olefin Polymer - coated silver (COP/Ag) hollow glass waveguides with inner and outer diameters 700 and 850 μm, respectively, were used for the experiment. To prevent any liquid to diminish and stop the transmission, the waveguide termination was utilized.

  17. Quartz antenna with hollow conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Benabou, Elie

    2002-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) antenna for plasma ion sources is formed of a hollow metal conductor tube disposed within a glass tube. The hollow metal tubular conductor has an internal flow channel so that there will be no coolant leakage if the outer glass tube of the antenna breaks. A portion of the RF antenna is formed into a coil; the antenna is used for inductively coupling RF power to a plasma in an ion source chamber. The antenna is made by first inserting the metal tube inside the glass tube, and then forming the glass/metal composite tube into the desired coil shape.

  18. Multinozzle emitter arrays for ultrahigh-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong

    2017-10-17

    The present invention provides for a structure comprising a plurality of emitters, wherein a first nozzle of a first emitter and a second nozzle of a second emitter emit in two directions that are not or essentially not in the same direction; wherein the walls of the nozzles and the emitters form a monolithic whole. The present invention also provides for a structure comprising an emitter with a sharpened end from which the emitter emits; wherein the emitters forms a monolithic whole. The present invention also provides for a fully integrated separation of proteins and small molecules on a silicon chip before the electrospray mass spectrometry analysis.

  19. Hollow Force, Hollow Metaphor: Assessing The Current Defense Drawdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    of a period of war and the threats diminish and everyone starts cutting the hell out of the defense budget….we are not going to hollow out the force...and tactical unit performance at the National Training Center. Henderson concluded that structural barriers and adopted practices in the new All

  20. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  1. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Previtali, Valentina [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bruce, Roderik [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Redaelli, Stefano [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, Adriana [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salvachua Ferrando, Belen [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  2. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

  3. Multiphoton photoemission from a copper cathode illuminated by ultrashort laser pulses in an RF photoinjector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Cultrera, L; Ferrario, M; Filippetto, D; Gatti, G; Gutierrez, M S; Moody, J T; Moore, N; Rosenzweig, J B; Scoby, C M; Travish, G; Vicario, C

    2010-02-26

    In this Letter we report on the use of ultrashort infrared laser pulses to generate a copious amount of electrons by a copper cathode in an rf photoinjector. The charge yield verifies the generalized Fowler-Dubridge theory for multiphoton photoemission. The emission is verified to be prompt using a two pulse autocorrelation technique. The thermal emittance associated with the excess kinetic energy from the emission process is comparable with the one measured using frequency tripled uv laser pulses. In the high field of the rf gun, up to 50 pC of charge can be extracted from the cathode using a 80 fs long, 2 microJ, 800 nm pulse focused to a 140 mum rms spot size. Taking into account the efficiency of harmonic conversion, illuminating a cathode directly with ir laser pulses can be the most efficient way to employ the available laser power.

  4. ZnO nanowires grown on carbon cloth for flexible cold cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haoying; Liu, Tengjiao; Jiang, Peng

    2013-02-01

    Nanostructures grown on carbon cloth are recently attracted great interests for flexible field emitter and cold cathode. In this paper, we report high-aspect ratio ZnO nanowires grown on carbon cloth by a low-temperature solution chemical approach that can be used as a flexible and high performance cold cathode. The carbon cloth is covered by outward-grown ZnO nanowires uniformly and densely with spiny structures. The hybrid structures exhibits a turn-on electrical field of 4.36 V/microm and a field enhancement factor of 1157, which benefit from the high-aspect ratios of both ZnO nanowires and carbon cloth. These results demonstrate a low cost and scalable approach for flexible cold cathode lighting and field emission display.

  5. Barium Depletion in the NSTAR Discharge Cathode After 30,000 Hours of Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of barium released by impregnant materials in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. Examinations of cathode inserts from long duration ion engine tests show deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of barium from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of barium transport in the insert plasma indicates that the barium partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant barium-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress barium loss in the upstream part of the insert. New measurements of the depth of barium depletion from a cathode insert operated for 30,352 hours reveal that barium loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis.

  6. X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun at UTNL

    CERN Document Server

    Fukasawa, Atsushi; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Ebina, Futaro; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higo, Toshiyasu; Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Matsuo, Kennichi; Ogino, Haruyuki; Sakae, Hisaharu; Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Urakawa, Junji

    2005-01-01

    The X-band (11.424 GHz) linac for compact Compton scattering hard X-ray source are under construction at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. This linac designed to accelerate up to 35 MeV, and this electron beam will be used to produce hard X-ray by colliding with laser. It consists of a thermionic cathode RF gun, an alpha magnet, and a traveling wave tube. The gun has 3.5 cells (unloaded Q is 8250) and will be operated at pi-mode. A dispenser cathode is introduced. Since the energy spread of the beam from the gun is predicted to be broad due to the continuous emission from the thermionic cathode, a slit is placed in the alpha magnet to eliminate low energy electrons. The simulation on the injector shows the beam energy 2.9 MeV, the charge 23 pC/bunch, and the emittance less than 10 mm.mrad. The experiment on the gun is planed in the beginning of 2005, and the details will be discussed on the spot.

  7. Nanostructured lanthanum manganate composite cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    that the (La1-xSrx)(y)MnO3 +/-delta (LSM) composite cathodes consist of a network of homogenously distributed LSM, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and pores. The individual grain size of LSM or YSZ is approximately 100 nm. The degree of contact between cathode and electrolyte is 39% on average. (c) 2005...

  8. A Two-Frequency RF Cavity for the PSI Low Emittance Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Raguin, J Y; Li, K S B; Pedrozzi, M

    2005-01-01

    In the Low Emittance Gun (LEG) under development at PSI an extremely bright electron beam is produced from a field emission array and then rapidly accelerated in a diode configuration up to 1 MeV with gradients of the order of 250 to 500 MV/m. The electronic emission from such a cold cathode allows normalized intrinsic emittance below 0.1 mm.mrad well suited for X-ray FELs or linear collider applications. The diode is followed by an L-band RF-gun like cavity to further accelerate the beam. A third harmonic field is superposed to the fundamental [1] 1.5 GHz pi-mode field to minimize the RF emittance. We report here on the design of such a two-frequency RF cavity with some details on the RF coupling and possible tuning mechanisms. Beam dynamics studies, performed with PARMELA and the fully self-consistent code MAFIA, are presented and compared with the results obtained for an RF cavity excited with the fundamental frequency only.

  9. COMPENSATION FOR BUNCH EMITTANCE IN A MAGNETIZATION AND SPACE CHARGE DOMINATED BEAM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    In order to obtain sufficient cooling rates for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) electron cooling, a bunched beam with high bunch charge, high repetition frequency and high energy is required and it is necessary to use a ''magnetized'' beam, i.e., an electron beam with non-negligible angular momentum. Applying a longitudinal solenoid field on the cathode can generate such a beam, which rotates around its longitudinal axis in a field-free region. This paper suggests how a magnetized beam can be accelerated and transported from a RF photocathode electron gun to the cooling section without significantly increasing its emittance. The evolution of longitudinal slices of the beam under a combination of space charge and magnetization is investigated, using paraxial envelope equations and numerical simulations. We find that we must modify the traditional method of compensating for emittance as used for normal non-magnetized beam with space charge to account for magnetization. The results of computer simulations of successful compensation are presented. Alternately, we show an electron bunch density distribution for which all slices propagate uniformly and which does not require emittance compensation.

  10. Novel deep-blue emitting phosphorescent emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, C.; Ginev, G.; Kammoun, A.; Riedl, T.; Kowalsky, W.; Johannes, H.-H.; Lennartz, C.; Kahle, K.; Egen, M.; Geßner, T.; Bold, M.; Nord, S.; Erk, P.

    2005-10-01

    Currently, one of the most challenging applications for OLEDs is the full color display. The most energy-efficient way to realize light generation in OLEDs is by using phosphorescent emitters. Green and red emitters have already been demonstrated, but the search for blue emitting organic phosphorescent emitters with good color purity is still ongoing with arduous effort. Here we present our work with a new material developed at BASF which allows phosphorescent emission in the deep-blue spectral range. The emitter has an emission maximum at 400 nm, which gives CIE color coordinates of x = 0.16 and y = 0.06. An OLED device made with this new material shows a maximum external quantum efficiency of 1.5 %. The OLED was built in a three layer structure, with the emitting zone being a hybrid guest-host system. As host material we used the optically and electronically inert polymer poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA). Because of its lack of charge transport abilities we doped the host material with a high concentration of the triplet emitting material, i.e. the emitter itself is also used as charge transport material.

  11. High-temperature plasmonic thermal emitter for thermophotovotaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jingjing; Guler, Urcan; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We use titanium nitride (TiN) to demonstrate an ultra-thin plasmonic thermal emitter operating at high temperatures (830 K). The spectrally selective emitter exhibits a large emittance at around 2.5 μm and below, and suppresses emission at longer wavelengths.......We use titanium nitride (TiN) to demonstrate an ultra-thin plasmonic thermal emitter operating at high temperatures (830 K). The spectrally selective emitter exhibits a large emittance at around 2.5 μm and below, and suppresses emission at longer wavelengths....

  12. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Denissen, C.; Suijker, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.

    2015-08-01

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  13. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J. [Electrical Engineering and Plasma Technology, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Denissen, C.; Suijker, J. [Philips Lighting, Category Professional Lamps, P.O. Box 80020, NL-5600JM Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-08-07

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  14. Observation of emittance growth at KEK PS

    CERN Document Server

    Igarashi, S; Nakamura, E; Shimosaki, Y; Shirakata, M; Takayama, K; Toyama, T

    2003-01-01

    Emittance growth has been observed in the transverse direction at the injection period of the 12 GeV main ring of the KEK proton synchrotron. Measurement of the beam profiles using flying wires has revealed a characteristic temporal change of the beam profile within a few milliseconds after injection. Horizontal emittance growth was observed when the horizontal tune was close to the integer. The effect was more enhanced for higher beam intensity and could not be explained with the injection mismatch. Resonance created by the space charge field was the cause of the emittance growth. A multiparticle tracking simulation program, ACCSIM, taking account of space charge effects has qualitatively reproduced the beam profiles.

  15. Camphor soot: a tunable light emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna, M. S.; Saritha Devi, H. V.; Sankararaman, S.

    2018-01-01

    The work in this paper is the first report on the green synthesis of the blue light emitter from waxy, flammable solid collected from Cinnamomum camphora by controlled combustion for photonic applications. Analysis with field emission scanning electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope provides the morphology, whereas the thermogravimetric analysis gives the thermal stability of the soot. The optical and structural characterizations are done by recording UV-Visible, Photoluminescent, and Raman Spectrum. The CIE plot and the power spectrum of the sample show a blue emission at an excitation of 350 nm at room temperature with a quantum yield of 46.15%. The dependence of luminescent behavior on temperature and excitation wavelength reveals that the material is a tunable blue emitter. This green synthesis of the blue light emitter is highly significant, when the world is in search of a simple, phosphor-free, non-toxic, cost-effective material with good quantum efficiency.

  16. Ampère-Class Pulsed Field Emission from Carbon-Nanotube Cathodes in a Radiofrequency Resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, D. [Northern Illinois U.; Faillace, L. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Hartzell, J. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Panuganti, H. [Northern Illinois U.; Boucher, S. M. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, A. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, J. C.T. [Fermilab

    2014-12-01

    Pulsed field emission from cold carbon-nanotube cathodes placed in a radiofrequency resonant cavity was observed. The cathodes were located on the backplate of a conventional $1+\\frac{1}{2}$-cell resonant cavity operating at 1.3-GHz and resulted in the production of bunch train with maximum average current close to 0.7 Amp\\`ere. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristic, transverse emittance, and pulse duration are presented and, when possible, compared to numerical simulations. The implications of our results to high-average-current electron sources are briefly discussed.

  17. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  18. Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-28

    MOT-OOO1AF I Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters Prepared by DI Jeffrey C. Buchholz E L ri: 8 James P. Stec OCT C "t989 Mary C...Schutte Micro -Optics Technologies, Inc. 8608 University Green #5 Middleton, WI 53562 28 September 1989 D,:?UqflON SA2". N’.’ _ Disuibunon Uanu-ted Contract...Title Report Date Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters 28 September 1989 Authors Jeffrey C. Buchholz, James P. Stec, Mary C. Schutte

  19. Quadrupole Transfer Function for Emittance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Peter; Jansson, Andreas; Tan, Cheng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    Historically the use of the quadrupole moment measurement has been impeded by the requirement for large dynamic range, as well as measurement sensitivity to beam position. We investigate the use of the transfer function technique [1-3] in combination with the sensitivity and 160dB revolution line rejection of the direct diode detection analog front end [4] to open the possibility of an emittance diagnostic that may be implemented without operational complication, quasi- parasitic to the operation of existing tune measurement systems. Such a diagnostic would be particularly useful as an emittance monitor during acceleration ramp development in machines like RHIC and the LHC.

  20. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huck Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  1. Magnetron priming by multiple cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. C.; Neculaes, V. B.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; White, W. M.; Hoff, B. W.; Jordan, N. M.

    2005-08-01

    A relativistic magnetron priming technique using multiple cathodes is simulated with a three-dimensional, fully electromagnetic, particle-in-cell code. This technique is based on electron emission from N /2 individual cathodes in an N-cavity magnetron to prime the π mode. In the case of the six-cavity relativistic magnetron, π-mode start-oscillation times are reduced up to a factor of 4, and mode competition is suppressed. Most significantly, the highest microwave field power is observed by utilizing three cathodes compared to other recently explored priming techniques.

  2. Electrochemically Active Polymeric Hollow Fibers based on Poly(ether- b -amide)/Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Cuevas, Carolina

    2017-09-18

    A simple and effective method to incorporate catalytic activity to a hollow fiber membrane is reported. Polyetherimide hollow fiber membranes were coated with a solution containing carboxyl-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(ether-b-amide). Electron microscopy images confirmed the presence of a layer of percolating carbon nanotubes on the surface of the membranes. Cyclic voltammetry and linear swept voltammetry experiments showed that these membranes are able to drive the reactions of hydrogen evolution, and oxygen reduction, making them a cheaper, and greener substitute for platinum based cathodes in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. Water flux and molecular weight cut off experiments indicated that the electrochemically active coating layer does not affect the ultrafiltration performance of the membrane.

  3. Efficient Overall Water-Splitting Electrocatalysis Using Lepidocrocite VOOH Hollow Nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Huanhuan

    2016-11-29

    Herein we report the control synthesis of lepidocrocite VOOH hollow nanospheres and further their applications in electrocatalytic water splitting for the first time. By tuning the surface area of the nanospheres, the optimal performance can be achieved with low overpotentials of 270 mV for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and 164 mV for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) at 10 mA cm-2 in 1 m KOH, respectively. Furthermore, when used as both the anode and cathode for overall water splitting, a low cell voltage of 1.62 V is required to reach the current density of 10 mA cm-2 , making the VOOH hollow nanospheres an efficient alternative to water splitting.

  4. Space Charge Mitigation With Longitudinally Hollow Bunches

    CERN Multimedia

    Oeftiger, Adrian; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Hollow longitudinal phase space distributions have a flat profile and hence reduce the impact of transverse space charge. Dipolar parametric excitation with the phase loop feedback systems provides such hollow distributions under reproducible conditions. We present a procedure to create hollow bunches during the acceleration ramp of CERN’s PS Booster machine with minimal changes to the operational cycle. The improvements during the injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron are assessed in comparison to standard parabolic bunches.

  5. Space charge mitigation with longitudinally hollow bunches

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088716; Hancock, Steven; Rumolo, Giovanni; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Suitably, hollow longitudinal phase space distributions have a flat profile and hence reduce the impact of transverse space charge. Dipolar parametric excitation with the phase loop feedback systems provides such hollow distributions under reproducible conditions. We present a procedure to create hollow bunches during the acceleration ramp of CERN’s PS Booster machine with minimal changes to the operational cycle. The improvements during the injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron are assessed in comparison to standard parabolic bunches.

  6. Method to fabricate hollow microneedle arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM); Schmidt, Carrie (Los Lunas, NM); Flemming, Jeb (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-11-07

    An inexpensive and rapid method for fabricating arrays of hollow microneedles uses a photoetchable glass. Furthermore, the glass hollow microneedle array can be used to form a negative mold for replicating microneedles in biocompatible polymers or metals. These microneedle arrays can be used to extract fluids from plants or animals. Glucose transport through these hollow microneedles arrays has been found to be orders of magnitude more rapid than natural diffusion.

  7. Evaluation of numerical characteristics of the current load distribution on the surface of multi-tip field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, S. V.; Popov, E. O.; Kolosko, A. G.; Vinnichek, R. N.

    2017-11-01

    The uniformity of the emission sites distribution over the surface of the multi-tip field emitter is one of the main factors affecting its electrical characteristics. Increase of the uniformity leads to increase of the thermal stability and allowable current limit. The paper describes an experimental setup and a method for monitoring uniformity of the emission sites based on analysis of a field emission site images registered on the phosphor screen of a computerized field-emission projector. The analysis includes estimation of the statistical distributions of the sites by radius, by angle and by intensity, as well as the distribution of the current load over the emitter surface. The technique was tested with the perspective nanocomposite cathode MWCNT / polystyrene.

  8. Longitudinal emittance measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Jones, R.M.; Jones, R M; Pasini, M; Posocco, P A; Voulot, D; Wenander, F

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the longitudinal emittance at the Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) at ISOLDE, CERN. The rms longitudinal emittance was measured as 0.34 ± 0.08 π ns keV/u at the output of the RFQ and as 0.36 ± 0.04π ns keV/u in front of the third 7-gap split-ring resonator (7G3) using the three-gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are estimated at approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48 ± 0.2 and 1.55 ± 0.12π ns keV/u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread of the beam as it was manipulated by varying the voltage of the rebuncher (ReB) and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The transfer matrix for a multi-gap bunching cavity is derived and suitably truncated to allow for the accurate reconstruction of the beam parameters from measurement. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rig...

  9. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  10. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej OSSOWSKI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Glow discharge nitriding is being used increasingly more often for modifying the properties of titanium and its alloys with the aim to increase their frictional wear resistance, fatigue strength, and, in the case of medical applications, to eliminate the metallosis effect. Unlike PVD methods, ion nitriding ensures the formation of diffusive layers with very good adhesion to the substrate, but which still have some disadvanteges such as the “edge effect” or “hollow cathode effect” which hinders treatment of complex workpieces. The paper compares nitrided layers produced on Ti6Al4V alloy using two different types of nitriding processes. The first process is conventional dc plasma nitriding (DCPN where the samples were placed at the cathode potential, while the second one is a new method of cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN process, where the substrate is insulated from the cathode and anode. The experiments have shown that the treatment conducted in a cathodic cage can be alternative for conventional ion nitriding, especially when used for small parts with complicated shapes used in the space or medical industry. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.7343

  11. HIGH-CURRENT COLD CATHODE FIELD EMISSION ARRAY FOR ELECTRON LENS APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-12-28

    During Phase I, the following goals were achieved: (1) design and fabrication of a novel, nano-dimensional CNT field emitter assembly for high current density application, with high durability; (2) fabrication of a ceramic based micro channel plate (MCP) and characterization of its secondary electron emission; and (3) characterizing the CNT/MCP cathode for high field emission and durability. As a result of these achievements, a relatively high current density of ~ 1.2 A/cm2 from a CNT cathode and single channel MCP were measured. The emission current was also extremely stable with a peak-to-peak variation of only 1.8%. The emission current could be further enhanced to meet requirements for electron lens applications by increasing the number of MCP channels. A calculation for maximum possible current density with a 1200 channel/cm2 MCP, placed over a cathode with 1200 uniformly functioning CNTs, would be ~1.46 kA/cm2, neglecting space charge limitations. Clearly this level of emission is far greater than what is needed for the electron lens application, but it does offer a highly comforting margin to account for sub-standard emitters and/or to allow the lesser challenge of building a cathode with fewer channels/cm2. A satisfactory goal for the electron lens application would be a controllable emission of 2-4 mA per channel in an ensemble of 800-1200 uniformly-functioning channels/cm2, and a cathode with overall area of about 1 cm2.

  12. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  13. Hollow system with fin. Transient Green function method combination for two hollow cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buikis Andris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop mathematical model for three dimensional heat equation for the system with hollow wall and fin and construct its analytical solution for two hollow cylindrical sample. The method of solution is based on Green function method for one hollow cylinder. On the conjugation conditions between both hollow cylinders we construct solution for system wall with fin. As result we come to integral equation on the surface between both hollow cylinders. Solution is obtained in the form of second kind Fredholm integral equation. The generalizing of Green function method allows us to use Green function method for regular non-canonical domains.

  14. Hollow nanocrystals and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Yin, Yadong [Moreno Valley, CA; Erdonmez, Can Kerem [Berkeley, CA

    2011-07-05

    Described herein are hollow nanocrystals having various shapes that can be produced by a simple chemical process. The hollow nanocrystals described herein may have a shell as thin as 0.5 nm and outside diameters that can be controlled by the process of making.

  15. Proton beam emittance growth in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available With the significant beam intensity improvement in RHIC polarized proton run 2005 and run 2006, the emittance growth becomes a luminosity limiting factor. The beam emittance growth has a dependence on the dynamic pressure rise, which in RHIC proton runs is mainly caused by the electron cloud. The dependence of the emittance growth on other electron cloud related parameters is also identified. The beam instability is usually absent, and the emittance growth rate is much slower than the ones typically caused by the head-tail instability. It is suspected that the emittance growth is caused by the electron cloud below the instability threshold. A discussion follows.

  16. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters. [for thermovoltaic energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus, low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied, Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF EMITTANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE FOR ION BEAM CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a fi gure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally a high quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifi eld Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profi les, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fi tting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplifi ed, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate.

  18. Low emittance coatings and the thermal performance of vacuum glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yueping; Hyde, Trevor J.; Zhao, Junfu; Wang, Jinlei; Huang, Ye [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, School of the Built Environment, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip C. [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Norton, Brian [Dublin Institute of Technology, Aungier Street, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2007-01-15

    The thermal performances of vacuum glazings employing coatings with emittance between 0.02 and 0.16 were simulated using a three-dimensional finite volume model. Physical samples of vacuum glazings with hard and soft coatings with emittance of 0.04, 0.12 and 0.16 were fabricated and their thermal performance characterised experimentally using a guarded hot box calorimeter. Good agreement was found between experimental and theoretical thermal performances for both a vacuum glazing with a soft coating (emittance 0.04) and those with hard coatings (emittance 0.12 and 0.16). Simulations showed that for a low value of emittance (e.g. 0.02), the use of two low-emittance coatings gives limited improvement in thermal performance of the glazing system. The use of a single high performance low-emittance coating in a vacuum glazing has been shown to provide excellent performance. (author)

  19. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Peter John [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  20. FIrpic: archetypal blue phosphorescent emitter for electroluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoff, Etienne; Curchod, Basile F E

    2015-05-14

    FIrpic is the most investigated bis-cyclometallated iridium complex in particular in the context of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) because of its attractive sky-blue emission, high emission efficiency, and suitable energy levels. In this Perspective we review the synthesis, structural characterisations, and key properties of this emitter. We also survey the theoretical studies and summarise a series of selected monochromatic electroluminescent devices using FIrpic as the emitting dopant. Finally we highlight important shortcomings of FIrpic as an emitter for OLEDs. Despite the large body of work dedicated to this material, it is manifest that the understanding of photophysical and electrochemical processes are only broadly understood mainly because of the different environment in which these properties are measured, i.e., isolated molecules in solvent vs. device.

  1. Emittance growth in coast in the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Alekou, A; Bartosik, H; Calaga, R

    2017-01-01

    The CERN SPS will be used as a test-bed for the LHCprototype crab-cavities, which will be installed and testedin the SPS in 2018. As the time available for experimen-tal beam dynamics studies with the crab cavities installedin the machine will be limited, a very good preparation isrequired in advance. One of the main concerns is the in-duced emittance growth, driven by phase jitter in the crabcavities. In this respect, several machine development (MD)studies were performed during the past years to quantifyand characterize the emittance evolution of proton beamsin coast in the SPS. In these proceedings, the experimentalobservations from past years are summarized and the MDstudies from 2016 are presented. Finally, a proposal for anexperimental program for 2017 is discussed.

  2. Development of arrayed microcolumns and field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Seob; Bok Lee, Young; Choi, Sung Woong; Kim, Hyung Woo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Ahn, Seung Joon; Oh, Tae Sik; Song, Yoon-Ho; Chon Park, Byong; Jong Lim, Sun

    2017-06-01

    Electron beam devices have been widely used for inspection or lithography processes. The multibeam technology based on arrayed microcolumns has been developed to overcome the low throughput issue. However, the multicolumn system has some drawbacks such as complexity, electron optics, and electron source. The first drawback is the difficulty in multicolumn assembly. In particular, the alignment process of a source lens and a tip requires sophisticated techniques. The second drawback is that the e-beam characteristics of microcolumns constituting the multicolumn differ from column to column. To solve the first drawback, a sub-5-nm-resolution probe beam optic design with a simple structure and a two-dimensional carbon nanotube (2D-CNT) electron emitter instead of the widely used tungsten field emitter tip have been studied.

  3. Computing Eigen-Emittances from Tracking Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexahin, Y. [Fermilab

    2014-09-18

    In a strongly nonlinear system the particle distribution in the phase space may develop long tails which contribution to the covariance (sigma) matrix should be suppressed for a correct estimate of the beam emittance. A method is offered based on Gaussian approximation of the original particle distribution in the phase space (Klimontovich distribution) which leads to an equation for the sigma matrix which provides efficient suppression of the tails and cannot be obtained by introducing weights. This equation is easily solved by iterations in the multi-dimensional case. It is also shown how the eigen-emittances and coupled optics functions can be retrieved from the sigma matrix in a strongly coupled system. Finally, the developed algorithm is applied to 6D ionization cooling of muons in HFOFO channel.

  4. Study of Thermal-Field Emission Properties and Investigation of Temperature dependent Noise in the Emission Current form vertical Carbon nanotube emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu

    2017-05-05

    We have investigated temperature dependent field electron emission characteristics of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The generalized expression for electron emission from well defined cathode surface is given by Millikan and Lauritsen [1] for the combination of temperature and electric field effect. The same expression has been used to explain the electron emission characteristics from vertical CNT emitters. Furthermore, this has been applied to explain the electron emission for different temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1500 K. The real-time field electron emission images at room temperature and 1500 K are recorded by using Charge Coupled Device (CCD), in order to understand the effect of temperature on electron emission spots in image morphology (as indicated by ring like structures) and electron emission spot intensity of the emitters. Moreover, the field electron emission images can be used to calculate the total number of emitters per cm2 for electron emission. The calculated number of emitters per cm2 is 4.5x107 and, the actual number emitters per cm2 present for electron emission calculated from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data is 1.2x1012. The measured Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristics obey the Folwer-Nordheim (F-N) type behavior. The fluctuations in the emission current are recorded at different temperatures and, temperature dependence of power spectral density obeys power law relation s(f)=I2/f2 with that of emission current and frequency.

  5. Emittance growths in resonance crossing at FFAGs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab; Pang, X.; Wang, F.; Wang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-01

    Scaling laws of the emittance growth for a beam crossing the 6th-order systematic space-charge resonances and the random-octupole driven 4th-order resonance are obtained by numerical multi-particle simulations. These laws can be important in setting the minimum acceleration rate and maximum tolerable resonance strength for the design of non-scaling fixed-field alternating gradient accelerators.

  6. Measurement system for alpha emitters in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, A. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Genie Radioactif); Sella, C.; Heindl, R. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 92 - Meudon-Bellevue (France))

    1984-08-01

    The measurement of alpha emitter concentrations in solution corresponds to a need felt in particular by laboratories working on actinides and in the spent fuel reprocessing industry. The instrument present here allows this measurement continuously by the use of a new scintillator that is insensitive to corrosive liquids. The extreme thinness of the scintillator guarantees good detection selectivity of alpha particles in the presence of beta and gamma emissions. Examples of uranium-233, plutonium-239 and americium-241 concentration measurements are presented.

  7. Longitudinal Emittance Measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, MA; Piselli, E; Posocco, PA; Voulot, D; Wenander, F; Zocca, F

    2011-01-01

    The rms longitudinal emittance at output from the REX-ISOLDE RFQ was measured as 0.34 ± 0.08 π ns keV/u and at entry to the 7G3 as 0.36 ± 0.04 π ns keV/u using the three gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are thought to be approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48 ± 0.2 and 1.55 ± 0.12 π ns keV/u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX-ISOLDE switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread as the beam was manipulated by changing the voltage of the ReB and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rigorously simulated and validated. A formalism was developed to accurately reconstruct the longitudinal beam parameters using a multi-gap constant-velocity bunching cavity when the voltage cannot be kept small. A silicon detector in its development phase was also exploited to measure the longitudinal beam properties. Th...

  8. Modified theoretical minimum emittance lattice for an electron storage ring with extreme-low emittance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jiao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the continuing efforts to reduce the beam emittance of an electron storage ring composed of theoretical minimum emittance (TME lattice, down to a level of several tens of picometers, nonlinear dynamics grows to be a great challenge to the performance of the storage ring because of the strong sextupoles needed to compensate for its large global natural chomaticities coupled with its small average dispersion function. To help in dealing with the challenge of nonlinear optimization, we propose a novel variation of theoretical minimum emittance (TME lattice, named as “modified-TME” lattice, with minimal emittance about 3 times of the exact theoretical minimum, while with more compact layout, lower phase advance per cell, smaller natural chromaticities, and more relaxed optical functions than that in a TME cell, by using horizontally defocusing quadrupole closer to the dipole or simply combined-function dipole with horizontally defocusing gradient. We present approximate scaling formulas to describe the relationships of the design parameters in a modified-TME cell. The applications of modified-TME lattice in the PEP-X storage ring design are illustrated and the proposed lattice appears a good candidate for synchrotron radiation light source with extremely low emittance.

  9. Cathodes Delivered for Space Station Plasma Contactor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station's (ISS) power system is designed with high-voltage solar arrays that typically operate at output voltages of 140 to 160 volts (V). The ISS grounding scheme electrically ties the habitat modules, structure, and radiators to the negative tap of the solar arrays. Without some active charge control method, this electrical configuration and the plasma current balance would cause the habitat modules, structure, and radiators to float to voltages as large as -120 V with respect to the ambient space plasma. With such large negative floating potentials, the ISS could have deleterious interactions with the space plasma. These interactions could include arcing through insulating surfaces and sputtering of conductive surfaces as ions are accelerated by the spacecraft plasma sheath. A plasma contactor system was baselined on the ISS to prevent arcing and sputtering. The sole requirement for the system is contained within a single directive (SSP 30000, paragraph 3.1.3.2.1.8): "The Space Station structure floating potential at all points on the Space Station shall be controlled to within 40 V of the ionospheric plasma potential using a plasma contactor." NASA is developing this plasma contactor as part of the ISS electrical power system. For ISS, efficient and rapid emission of high electron currents is required from the plasma contactor system under conditions of variable and uncertain current demand. A hollow cathode plasma source is well suited for this application and was, therefore, selected as the design approach for the station plasma contactor system. In addition to the plasma source, which is referred to as a hollow cathode assembly, or HCA, the plasma contactor system includes two other subsystems. These are the power electronics unit and the xenon gas feed system. The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American is responsible for the design, fabrication, assembly, test, and integration of the plasma contactor system. Because of

  10. High stability electron field emitters made of nanocrystalline diamond coated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Srinivasu, K.; Leou, K. C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-16

    We report enhanced life-time stability for the electron field emitters prepared by coating nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Upon overcoming the problem of poor stability in CNTs, the NCD-CNTs exhibit excellent life-time stability of 250 min tested at different applied voltages of 600 and 900 V. In contrast, the life-time stability of CNTs is only 33 min even at relatively low voltage of 360 V and starts arcing at 400 V. Hence, the NCD-CNTs with improved life-time stability have great potential for the applications as cathodes in flat panel displays and microplasma display devices.

  11. Method for analyzing the mass of a sample using a cold cathode ionization source mass filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felter, Thomas E.

    2003-10-14

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  12. A carbon nanotube field emission cathode with high current density and long-term stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Zhou, Otto [Curriculum in Applied Science and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Geng Huaizhi; Gao Bo [Xintek, Incorporated, 7020 Kit Creek Road, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); An Lei; Cao Guohua [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2009-08-12

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters are now being evaluated for a wide range of vacuum electronic applications. However, problems including short lifetime at high current density, instability under high voltage, poor emission uniformity, and pixel-to-pixel inconsistency are still major obstacles for device applications. We developed an electrophoretic process to fabricate composite CNT films with controlled nanotube orientation and surface density, and enhanced adhesion. The cathodes have significantly enhanced macroscopic field emission current density and long-term stability under high operating voltages. The application of this CNT electron source for high-resolution x-ray imaging is demonstrated.

  13. Reducing Back-Bombardment Effect Using Thermionic Cathode in IAE RF Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Murakami, Shio; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Tetsuo; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Zen, Heishun

    2004-01-01

    We have numerically studied on improvement of electron beam macro-pulse properties from thermionic RF gun [1,2]. Beam properties, such as energy spectrum, macro-pulse duration and emittance were measured with a 2 mm diameter slim thermionic dispenser cathode. Effect of the transverse magnetic field to reduce back-streaming electrons to these properties was studied experimentally. Comparison with measured and numerical results will be discussed. Effect of a non-flat RF input to compensate a decreasing beam energy during macropulse due to a back-bombardment effect will be also presented.

  14. Hollow Micro-/Nanostructures: Synthesis and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2008-11-03

    Hollow micro-nanostructures are of great interest in many current and emerging areas of technology. Perhaps the best-known example of the former is the use of fly-ash hollow particles generated from coal power plants as partial replacement for Portland cement, to produce concrete with enhanced strength and durability. This review is devoted to the progress made in the last decade in synthesis and applications of hollow micro-nanostructures. We present a comprehensive overview of synthetic strategies for hollow structures. These strategies are broadly categorized into four themes, which include well-established approaches, such as conventional hard-templating and soft-templating methods, as well as newly emerging methods based on sacrificial templating and template-free synthesis. Success in each has inspired multiple variations that continue to drive the rapid evolution of the field. The Review therefore focuses on the fundamentals of each process, pointing out advantages and disadvantages where appropriate. Strategies for generating more complex hollow structures, such as rattle-type and nonspherical hollow structures, are also discussed. Applications of hollow structures in lithium batteries, catalysis and sensing, and biomedical applications are reviewed. © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA,.

  15. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a reservoir cathode to improve performance in both ion and Hall-effect thrusters. We propose to adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this...

  16. Current transmission and nonlinear effects in un-gated thermionic cathode RF guns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Harris, J. R. [Air Force Weapons Lab

    2017-05-03

    Un-gated thermionic cathode RF guns are well known as a robust source of electrons for many accelerator applications. These sources are in principle scalable to high currents without degradation of the transverse emittance due to control grids but they are also known for being limited by back-bombardment. While back-bombardment presents a significant limitation, there is still a lack of general understanding on how emission over the whole RF period will affect the nature of the beams produced from these guns. In order to improve our understanding of how these guns can be used in general we develop analytical models that predict the transmission efficiency as a function of the design parameters, study how bunch compression and emission enhancement caused by Schottky barrier lowering affect the output current profile in the gun, and study the onset of space-charge limited effects and the resultant virtual cathode formation leading to a modulation in the output current distribution.

  17. Nanofiber-based composite cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Lee, Jongseo; Lee, Wonyoung

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate the Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ (SSC) nanofiber-based composite cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs), showing a cathode area-specific resistance (ASR) value of 0.024 Ωcm2 at 650 °C. The hollow and porous SSC nanofiber layer, fabricated by electrospinning, is sintered at low temperatures to preserve the high specific surface area for facile oxygen surface exchange reactions. The low sintering temperature is enabled by additional SSC powder layer, providing sufficient adhesion between the electrolyte and the nanofiber layer. Our results can provide a design guideline to fully utilize the nanostructured electrodes by engineering the structural properties of the surface and the interface, and hence high-performance IT-SOFCs can be achieved by structural modification with conventional materials.

  18. Current self-limitation in a transverse nanosecond discharge with a slotted cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashurbekov, N. A.; Iminov, K. O.; Popov, O. A.; Shakhsinov, G. S.

    2017-03-01

    A high-voltage transverse pulsed nanosecond discharge with a slotted hollow cathode was found to be a source of high-energy (few kV) ribbon electron beams. Conditions for the formation and extinction of electron beams were experimentally studied in discharges in helium at pressures of 1-100 Torr. It was found that interaction of fast electrons with a non-uniform electric field near the slotted cathode led to limitation of the magnitude of the discharge current. A physical model was developed to describe the discharge current self-limitation that was in satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. Some technical solutions that are expected to increase the upper current limits in transverse nanosecond discharge are discussed.

  19. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsman, Eric [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  20. Hollow Core, Whispering Gallery Resonator Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan M; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2014-01-01

    A review of hollow core whispering gallery resonators (WGRs)is given. After a short introduction to the topic of whispering gallery resonators we provide a description of whispering gallery modes in hollow or liquid core WGRs. Next, whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensing mechanisms are outlined and some fabrication methods for microbubbles, microcapillaries and other tubular WGM devices are discussed. We then focus on the most common applications of hollow core WGRs, namely refractive index and temperature sensing, gas sensing, force sensing, biosensing, and lasing. The review highlights some of the key papers in this field and gives the reader a general overview of the current state-of-the-art.

  1. Novel Cathodes Prepared by Impregnation Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eduardo Paz

    2006-09-30

    (1) We showed that similar results were obtained when using various LSM precursors to produce LSM-YSZ cathodes. (2) We showed that enhanced performance could be achieved by adding LSCo to LSMYSZ cathodes. (3) We have preliminary results showing that there is a slow deactivation with LSFYSZ cathodes.

  2. Low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector for a compact free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Takao; Ego, Hiroyasu; Hanaki, Hirohumi; Hara, Toru; Hasegawa, Taichi; Hasegawa, Teruaki; Inagaki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toshiaki; Kondo, Chikara; Maesaka, Hirokazu; Matsubara, Shinichi; Matsui, Sakuo; Ohshima, Takashi; Otake, Yuji; Sakurai, Tatsuyuki; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Tajiri, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Togawa, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2017-08-01

    A low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector was developed for the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility known as the SPring-8 angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA). The thermionic-gun-based system has the advantages of maintainability, reliability, and stability over a photocathode radio-frequency (rf) gun because of its robust thermionic cathode. The basic performance of the injector prototype was confirmed at the SPring-8 compact self-amplified spontaneous emission source (SCSS) test accelerator, where stable FEL generation in an extreme ultraviolet wavelength range was demonstrated. The essential XFEL innovation is the achievement of a constant beam peak current of 3-4 kA, which is 10 times higher than that generated by the SCSS test accelerator, while maintaining a normalized-slice emittance below 1 mm mrad. Thus, the following five modifications were applied to the SACLA injector: (i) a nonlinear energy chirp correction; (ii) the optimization of the rf acceleration frequency; (iii) rf system stabilization; (iv) nondestructive beam monitoring; and (v) a geomagnetic field correction. The SACLA injector successfully achieved the target beam performance, which shows that a thermionic-gun-based injector is applicable to an XFEL accelerator system. This paper gives an overview of the SACLA injector and describes the physical and technical details, together with the electron beam performance obtained in the beam commissioning.

  3. Low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector for a compact free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Asaka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector was developed for the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL facility known as the SPring-8 angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA. The thermionic-gun-based system has the advantages of maintainability, reliability, and stability over a photocathode radio-frequency (rf gun because of its robust thermionic cathode. The basic performance of the injector prototype was confirmed at the SPring-8 compact self-amplified spontaneous emission source (SCSS test accelerator, where stable FEL generation in an extreme ultraviolet wavelength range was demonstrated. The essential XFEL innovation is the achievement of a constant beam peak current of 3–4 kA, which is 10 times higher than that generated by the SCSS test accelerator, while maintaining a normalized-slice emittance below 1 mm mrad. Thus, the following five modifications were applied to the SACLA injector: (i a nonlinear energy chirp correction; (ii the optimization of the rf acceleration frequency; (iii rf system stabilization; (iv nondestructive beam monitoring; and (v a geomagnetic field correction. The SACLA injector successfully achieved the target beam performance, which shows that a thermionic-gun-based injector is applicable to an XFEL accelerator system. This paper gives an overview of the SACLA injector and describes the physical and technical details, together with the electron beam performance obtained in the beam commissioning.

  4. Repetitive operation of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Fen [Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Key Laboratory on High Power Microwave Technology, Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wang, Dong, E-mail: mr20001@sina.com; Xu, Sha; Zhang, Yong [Key Laboratory on High Power Microwave Technology, Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Fan, Zhi-kai [Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2016-04-15

    We present the repetitive operation research results of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode (MAC-MILO) in this paper. To ensure a more uniform emission of electrons emitted from the cathode, metal plates with different outer radii and thicknesses are periodically arranged in longitudinal direction on the cathode substrate to act as emitters. The higher order mode depressed MILO (HDMILO) structure is applied to ensure stability of the tube. Comparison experiments are carried out between velvet cathode and MAC MILO driven by a 20 GW/40 Ω/40 ns/20 Hz pulse power system. Experimental results reveal that the MAC has much lower outgassing rate, much longer life time, and higher repetitive stability. The MAC-MILO could work stably with a rep-rate up to 20 Hz at a power level of 550 MW when employing a 350 kV/35 kA electric pulse. The TE{sub 11} mode radiation pattern in the farfield region reveals the tube works steadily on the dominant mode. More than 2000 shots have been tested in repetitive mode without any obvious degradation of the detected microwave parameters.

  5. Retrofitting of bridge hollow piers with CFRP

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Delgado; Patrício Rocha; João Pedrosa; António Arêde; Nelson Vila Pouca; Miguel Santos; Aníbal Costa; Raimundo Delgado

    2007-01-01

    Hollow bridge piers generally have large section dimensions, with reinforcement barsspread along both wall faces. Unlike common solid section columns, quite often the shear effect hasgreat importance on the pier behavior. Therefore, it is of particular relevance that special attention isgiven to this issue when the assessment and retrofit of RC hollow section piers is envisaged. Representativeof typical bridge construction, RC piers were tested at LESE ¿ the Laboratory of Earthquakeand Struct...

  6. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaozheng Ji

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening

  7. Influence of cathode geometry on electron dynamics in an ultrafast electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shaozheng; Piazza, Luca; Cao, Gaolong; Park, Sang Tae; Reed, Bryan W.; Masiel, Daniel J.; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to understand matter at ever-increasing spatial and temporal resolutions have led to the development of instruments such as the ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM) that can capture transient processes with combined nanometer and picosecond resolutions. However, analysis by UEM is often associated with extended acquisition times, mainly due to the limitations of the electron gun. Improvements are hampered by tradeoffs in realizing combinations of the conflicting objectives for source size, emittance, and energy and temporal dispersion. Fundamentally, the performance of the gun is a function of the cathode material, the gun and cathode geometry, and the local fields. Especially shank emission from a truncated tip cathode results in severe broadening effects and therefore such electrons must be filtered by applying a Wehnelt bias. Here we study the influence of the cathode geometry and the Wehnelt bias on the performance of a photoelectron gun in a thermionic configuration. We combine experimental analysis with finite element simulations tracing the paths of individual photoelectrons in the relevant 3D geometry. Specifically, we compare the performance of guard ring cathodes with no shank emission to conventional truncated tip geometries. We find that a guard ring cathode allows operation at minimum Wehnelt bias and improve the temporal resolution under realistic operation conditions in an UEM. At low bias, the Wehnelt exhibits stronger focus for guard ring than truncated tip cathodes. The increase in temporal spread with bias is mainly a result from a decrease in the accelerating field near the cathode surface. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the temporal dispersion is also influenced by the intrinsic angular distribution in the photoemission process and the initial energy spread. However, a smaller emission spot on the cathode is not a dominant driver for enhancing time resolution. Space charge induced temporal broadening shows a close to

  8. Intelligent Variable Emittance Panels Using New, ""True"" Solid Electrolyte Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work further developed a highly promising Variable Emittance technology for spacecraft thermal control based on Conducting Polymer (CP) electrochromics...

  9. Multi-channel polarized thermal emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P

    2013-07-16

    A multi-channel polarized thermal emitter (PTE) is presented. The multi-channel PTE can emit polarized thermal radiation without using a polarizer at normal emergence. The multi-channel PTE consists of two layers of metallic gratings on a monolithic and homogeneous metallic plate. It can be fabricated by a low-cost soft lithography technique called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The spectral positions of the mid-infrared (MIR) radiation peaks can be tuned by changing the periodicity of the gratings and the spectral separation between peaks are tuned by changing the mutual angle between the orientations of the two gratings.

  10. Summary report on transverse emittance preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; Vos, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    During the past years, significant progress has been made in understanding the beam transverse emittance blow-up and its preservation. However, one often finds him-/herself ignorant when he/she tries to explain what was observed in an existing machine or to predict what will happen in a machine under design. There are a number of such examples given in this report. Some of them are even fundamental. These are the challenges. But they are also the directions leading to new achievements. The workshop gladly acknowledged them and promised to work on them.

  11. Preliminary Design Study of the Hollow Electron Lens for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Perini, Diego; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    A Hollow Electron Lens (HEL) has been proposed in order to improve performance of halo control and collimation in the Large Hadron Collider in view of its High Luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The concept is based on a beam of electrons that travels around the protons for a few meters. The electron beam is produced by a cathode and then guided by a strong magnetic field generated by a set of superconducting solenoids. The first step of the design is the definition of the magnetic fields that drive the electron trajectories. The estimation of such trajectories by means of a dedicated MATLAB® tool is presented. The influence of the main geometrical and electrical parameters are analysed and discussed. Then, the main mechanical design choices for the solenoids, cryostats gun and collector are described. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the preliminary design of the Electron Lens for LHC. The methods used in this study also serve as examples for future mechanical and integration designs of similar ...

  12. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  13. Efficient sulfur host based on NiCo2O4 hollow microtubes for advanced Li-S batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Azhar; Ali Ghazi, Zahid; Muqsit Khattak, Abdul; Ahmad, Aziz

    2017-12-01

    High energy density and cost effectiveness make lithium-sulfur battery a promising candidate for next-generation electrochemical energy storage technology. Here, we have synthesized a highly efficient sulfur host namely NiCo2O4 hollow microtubes/sulfur composite (NiCo2O4/S). The hollow interior cavity providing structural integrity while sufficient self-functionalized surfaces of NiCo2O4 chemically bind polysulfides to prevent their dissolution in the organic electrolyte. When used in lithium-sulfur batteries, the synthesized NiCo2O4/S cathode delivers high specific capacity (1274 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C), long cycling performance at 0.5 C, and good rate capability at high current rates.

  14. Minimizing Emittance for the CLIC Damping Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Levitchev, E; Piminov, P; Schulte, Daniel; Siniatkin, S; Vobly, P P; Zimmermann, Frank; Zolotarev, Konstantin V; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC damping rings aim at unprecedented small normalized equilibrium emittances of 3.3 nm vertical and 550 nm horizontal, for a bunch charge of 2.6·109 particles and an energy of 2.4 GeV. In this parameter regime the dominant emittance growth mechanism is intra-beam scattering. Intense synchrotron radiation damping from wigglers is required to counteract its effect. Here the overall optimization of the wiggler parameters is described, taking into account state-of-the-art wiggler technologies, wiggler effects on dynamic aperture, and problems of wiggler radiation absorption. Two technical solutions, one based on superconducting magnet technology the other on permanent magnets are presented. Although dynamic aperture and tolerances of this ring design remain challenging, benefits are obtained from the strong damping. For optimized wigglers, only bunches for a single machine pulse may need to be stored, making injection/extraction particularly simple and limiting the synchrotron-radiation power. With a 36...

  15. Therapeutic use of alpha-emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassmann, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    In recent years there is a growing interest in the therapeutic use of {alpha}-emitters for patient treatment, {alpha}-particles have much higher energy and their range is only a few cell diameters. Their high LET and the limited ability of cells to repair DNA damage from {alpha}-radiation explain their high relative biological effectiveness and cytotoxicity. Potential {alpha}-emitting isotopes for therapeutic applications are {sup 224}Ra, {sup 223}Ra, {sup 213}Bi and {sup 211}At. The treatment with {alpha}-particles is focused upon targeted cancer therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, on palliation of bone metastases or upon pain relief in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Examples for targeted cancer therapy are the treatment of melanoma with {sup 213}Bi and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with {sup 211}At. For metastatic bone pain palliation {sup 223}Ra was applied in a phase I clinical trial. For amelioration of pain in AS-patients {sup 224}Ra-chloride is used. This radiopharmaceutical is licensed for this particular application in Germany. Today there are some potential clinical applications for {alpha}-emitters although most of them are in the state of scientific, non-routine investigations. In-vivo dosimetry for risk assessment associated with this treatment is even more difficult to perform than for therapies using beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. (orig.)

  16. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, D. J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Hart, T. L. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, J. G. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, L. M. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Oliveros, S. J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Perera, L. P. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, D. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  17. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  18. Effect of pulsed hollow electron-lens operation on the proton beam core in LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitterer, Miriam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-11-08

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the HL-LHC. In order to further increase the diffusion rates for a fast halo removal as e.g. desired before the squeeze, the electron lens (e-lens) can be operated in pulsed mode. In case of profile imperfections in the electron beam the pulsing of the e-lens induces noise on the proton beam which can, depending on the frequency content and strength, lead to emittance growth. In order to study the sensitivity to the pulsing pattern and the amplitude, a beam study (machine development MD) at the LHC has been proposed for August 2016 and we present in this note the preparatory simulations and estimates.

  19. Effect of pulsed hollow electron-lens operation on the proton beam core in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, Miriam; Valishev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the HL-LHC. In order to further increase the diffusion rates for a fast halo removal as e.g. desired before the squeeze, the electron lens (e-lens) can be operated in pulsed mode. In case of profile imperfections in the electron beam the pulsing of the e-lens induces noise on the proton beam which can, depending on the frequency content and strength, lead to emittance growth. In order to study the sensitivity to the pulsing pattern and the amplitude, a beam study (machine development MD) at the LHC has been proposed for August 2016 and we present in this note the preparatory simulations and estimates.

  20. Work function and surface stability of tungsten-based thermionic electron emission cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ryan; Morgan, Dane; Booske, John

    2017-11-01

    Materials that exhibit a low work function and therefore easily emit electrons into vacuum form the basis of electronic devices used in applications ranging from satellite communications to thermionic energy conversion. W-Ba-O is the canonical materials system that functions as the thermionic electron emitter commercially used in a range of high-power electron devices. However, the work functions, surface stability, and kinetic characteristics of a polycrystalline W emitter surface are still not well understood or characterized. In this study, we examined the work function and surface stability of the eight lowest index surfaces of the W-Ba-O system using density functional theory methods. We found that under the typical thermionic cathode operating conditions of high temperature and low oxygen partial pressure, the most stable surface adsorbates are Ba-O species with compositions in the range of Ba0.125O-Ba0.25O per surface W atom, with O passivating all dangling W bonds and Ba creating work function-lowering surface dipoles. Wulff construction analysis reveals that the presence of O and Ba significantly alters the surface energetics and changes the proportions of surface facets present under equilibrium conditions. Analysis of previously published data on W sintering kinetics suggests that fine W particles in the size range of 100-500 nm may be at or near equilibrium during cathode synthesis and thus may exhibit surface orientation fractions well described by the calculated Wulff construction.

  1. Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

    1989-01-01

    Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

  2. Magnetic tunnel transistor with a silicon hot-electron emitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Minh, P.; Gökcan, H.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a modified magnetic tunnel transistor having a silicon tunnel emitter. The device has the structure Si/Al2O3 /base/Si with a spin-valve metal base, a Schottky barrier collector, but a silicon emitter separated from the base by a thin tunnel oxide. The energy of the hot electrons

  3. Coated nano-particle jamming of quantum emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Spherical active coated nano-particles are examined analytically and numerically in the presence of one, two or four quantum emitters (electric Hertzian dipoles). The ability of the coated nano-particle to effectively cloak the emitters to a far-field observer is reported. This offers...

  4. Properties of nanolasers based on few discrete emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Lorke, Michael

    2012-01-01

    emitters and 100 photon states the density matrix has more than 2.5 × 106 elements. We have been able to simplify the problem significantly by adiabatically eliminating the photon-assisted polarizations and the correlations between emitters and cavity [3]. This results in a set of rate equations...

  5. Low Cost Constant – Head Drip Irrigation Emitter for Climate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The drip system comprises of abarrel, sub-main line, lateral lines, tubes and emitters, it can irrigate140 crop stands and can be extended to 560 stands. The emitters produced a mean discharge and emission uniformity (Eu) of 1.60l/hr. and 74 % respectively; while the calibrated manufacturer's coefficient of variation and ...

  6. Emittance measurements of low-energy beam line at KVI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toprek, D; Formanoy, [No Value

    2006-01-01

    In this paper is represented the results of beam profile measurements of He-3(+) beam delivered from ECR ion source at KVI. The beam emittance is estimated by varying quadrupole method. The estimated values for the beam emittance at the different profile grid locations along the transport beam line

  7. Emittance measurement by multi-changing focusing strength

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Shu Hong; Cao Jian She; Ma Li; Liu Yu Cheng; Le Qi; Pei Guo Xi; Zhang Jia Fei

    2002-01-01

    Some advanced techniques to optimize the emittance measurement devices have been studied, such as thin lens approximation, multi-changing focusing strength, optimizing the position of the profile monitor and software improvement for accurate data acquisition and effective processing. By applying these techniques to the emittance measurement for electron beam of BEPC Linac, the satisfactory measurement results have been obtained

  8. Radiation induced erosion of autoelectron emitter surface

    CERN Document Server

    Mazilova, T I; Ksenofontov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of erosion of the needle-shaped autoemitter surface under the effect of the helium ions bombardment are studied. The analysis of the radiation-induced formation of the surface atomic roughness testifies to the nondynamic character of shifting the surface atoms by the ions energies below the threshold of the Frenkel stable pairs formation and cathode sputtering. The quasistatic mechanism of the surface erosion due to the atoms shift into the low-coordination positions by releasing the energy of the helium internodal atoms formation is discussed

  9. Vacuum Rabi spectra of a single quantum emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Yasutomo; Ohta, Ryuichi; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-04-10

    We report the observation of the vacuum Rabi splitting of a single quantum emitter by measuring its direct spontaneous emission into free space. We use a semiconductor quantum dot inside a photonic crystal nanocavity, in conjunction with an appropriate cavity design and filtering with a polarizer and an aperture, enabling the extraction of the inherently weak emitter's signal. The emitter's vacuum Rabi spectra exhibit clear differences from those measured by detecting the cavity photon leakage. Moreover, we observe an asymmetric vacuum Rabi spectrum induced by interference between the emitter and cavity detection channels. Our observations lay the groundwork for accessing various cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena that manifest themselves only in the emitter's direct spontaneous emission.

  10. GTF Transverse and Longitudinal Emittance Data Analysis Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-07

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Measurements at the GTF include quadrupole scan transverse emittance measurements and linac phase scan longitudinal emittance measurements. Typically the beam size is measured on a screen as a function of a quadrupole current or linac phase and the beam matrix is then fit to the measured data. Often the emittance which is the final result of the measurement is the only number reported. However, the method used to reduce the data to the final emittance value can have a significant effect on the result. This paper describes in painful detail the methods used to analyze the transverse and longitudinal emittance data collected at the GTF.

  11. Study of thermal-field emission properties and investigation of temperature dependent noise in the field emission current from vertical carbon nanotube emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Sadhu; Patole, S. P.; Patil, Sumati; Yoo, J. B.; Dharmadhikari, C. V.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated temperature dependent field electron emission characteristics of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The generalized expression for electron emission from well-defined cathode surface is given by Millikan and Lauritsen [1] for the combination of temperature and electric field effect. The same expression has been used to explain the electron emission characteristics from vertical CNT emitters. Furthermore, this has been applied to explain the electron emission for different temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1500 K. The real-time field electron emission images at room temperature and 1500 K are recorded by using Charge Coupled Device (CCD) in order to understand the effect of temperature on distribution of electron emission spots and ring like structures in Field Emission Microscope (FEM) image. The FEM images could be used to calculate the total number of emitters per cm2 for electron emission. The calculated number of emitters per cm2 from FEM image is typically, 4.5 × 107 and the actual number emitters per cm2 present as per Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data is 1.2 × 1012. The measured Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit non linear Folwer-Nordheim (F-N) type behavior. The fluctuations in the emission current were recorded at different temperatures and Fast Fourier transformed into temperature dependent power spectral density. The latter was found to obey power law relation S(f) = A(Iδ/fξ), where δ and ξ are temperature dependent current and frequency exponents respectively.

  12. Theory and measurements of emittance preservation in plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederico, Joel

    2016-12-01

    In this dissertation, we examine the preservation and measurement of emittance in the plasma wakefield acceleration blowout regime. Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) is a revolutionary approach to accelerating charged particles that has been demonstrated to have the potential for gradients orders of magnitude greater than traditional approaches. The application of PWFA to the design of a linear collider will make new high energy physics research possible, but the design parameters must first be shown to be competitive with traditional methods. Emittance preservation is necessary in the design of a linear collider in order to maximize luminosity. We examine the conditions necessary for circular symmetry in the PWFA blowout regime, and demonstrate that current proposals meet these bounds. We also present an application of beam lamentation which describes the process of beam parameter and emittance matching. We show that the emittance growth saturates as a consequence of energy spread in the beam. The initial beam parameters determine the amount of emittance growth, while the contribution of energy spread is negligible. We also present a model for ion motion in the presence of a beam that is much more dense than the plasma. By combining the model of ion motion and emittance growth, we find the emittance growth due to ion motion is minimal in the case of marginal ion motion. In addition, we present a simulation that validates the ion motion model, which is under further development to examine emittance growth of both marginal and pronounced ion motion. Finally, we present a proof-of-concept of an emittance measurement which may enable the analysis of emittance preservation in future PWFA experiments.

  13. Reflective article having a sacrificial cathodic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Buchanan, Michael J.; Scott, Matthew S.; Rearick, Brian K.; Medwick, Paul A.; McCamy, James W.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention relates to reflective articles, such as solar mirrors, that include a sacrificial cathodic layer. The reflective article, more particularly includes a substrate, such as glass, having a multi-layered coating thereon that includes a lead-free sacrificial cathodic layer. The sacrificial cathodic layer includes at least one transition metal, such as a particulate transition metal, which can be in the form of flakes (e.g., zinc flakes). The sacrificial cathodic layer can include an inorganic matrix formed from one or more organo-titanates. Alternatively, the sacrificial cathodic layer can include an organic polymer matrix (e.g., a crosslinked organic polymer matrix formed from an organic polymer and an aminoplast crosslinking agent). The reflective article also includes an outer organic polymer coating, that can be electrodeposited over the sacrificial cathodic layer.

  14. Mesoscopic quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Lykke

    This thesis reports research on quantum dots coupled to dielectric and plasmonic nano-structures by way of nano-structure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. To study light-matter interaction, plasmonic gap waveguides with nanometer dimensions as well as samples for studies...... of quantum dots in proximity to semiconductor/air and semiconductor/metal interfaces, were fabricated. We measured the decay dynamics of quantum dots near plasmonic gap waveguides and observed modied decay rates. The obtainable modications with the fabricated structures are calculated to be too small...... to allow for e- cient plasmon-based single-photon sources. Theoretical studies of coupling and propagation properties of plasmonic waveguides reveal that a high-refractive index of the medium surrounding the emitter, e.g. nGaAs = 3.5, limits the realizability of ecient plasmon-based single-photon sources...

  15. A simple X-ray emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroaki; Ono, Ryoichi; Hirai, Atsuhiko; Hosokawa, Yoshinori; Kawai, Jun

    2005-07-01

    A compact X-ray emission instrument is made, and the X-ray spectra are measured by changing the applied electric potential. Strong soft X-rays are observed when evacuating roughly and applying a high voltage to an insulator settled in this device. The X-ray intensity is higher as the applied voltage is increased. A light-emitting phenomenon is observed when this device emits X-rays. The present X-ray emitter is made of a small cylinder with a radius of 20 mm and a height of 50 mm. This X-ray generator has a potential to be used as an X-ray source in an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

  16. Emitter frequency refinement based on maximum likelihood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Wang, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Frequency estimation via signal sorting is widely recognized as one of the most practical technologies in signal processing. However, the estimated frequencies via signal sorting may be inaccurate and biased due to signal fluctuation under different emitter working modes, problems of transmitter circuit, environmental noises or certain unknown interference sources. Therefore, it has become an important issue to further analyze and refine signal frequencies after signal sorting. To address the above problem, we have brought forward an iterative frequency refinement method based on maximum likelihood. Iteratively, the initial estimated signal frequency values are refined. Experimental results indicate that the refined signal frequencies are more informative than the initial ones. As another advantage of our method, noises and interference sources could be filtered out simultaneously. The efficiency and flexibility enables our method to apply in a wide application area, i.e., communication, electronic reconnaissance and radar intelligence analysis.

  17. Method for the production of fabricated hollow microspheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramanayake, Shan; Luebke, David R.

    2015-06-09

    The method relates to the fabrication of a polymer microspheres comprised of an asymmetric layer surrounding a hollow interior. The fabricated hollow microsphere is generated from a nascent hollow microsphere comprised of an inner core of core fluid surrounded by a dope layer of polymer dope, where the thickness of the dope layer is at least 10% and less than 50% of the diameter of the inner core. The nascent hollow microsphere is exposed to a gaseous environment, generating a vitrified hollow microsphere, which is subsequently immersed in a coagulation bath. Solvent exchange produces a fabricated hollow microsphere comprised of a densified outer skin surrounding a macroporous inner layer, which surrounds a hollow interior. In an embodiment, the polymer is a polyimide or a polyamide-imide, and the non-solvent in the core fluid and the coagulation bath is water. The fabricated hollow microspheres are particularly suited as solvent supports for gas separation processes.

  18. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing. [of leaves, soil and plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental determinations of the emittance of soils and leaves are reviewed, and an error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements is developed as an aid to remote sensing applications. In particular, an equation for the upper bound of the absolute error in an emittance determination is derived. The absolute error is found to decrease with an increase in contact temperature and to increase with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. The difference between temperature and band radiance temperature is plotted as a function of emittance for the wavelength intervals 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  19. Transmission properties of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Charlotte Ijeoma; Hald, Jan; Petersen, Jan C.

    2010-01-01

    Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers.......Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers....

  20. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  1. Cathode fall measurements in fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtrieb, Robert [Lutron Electronics Co Inc., 7200 Suter Rd., Coopersburg, PA 18036 (United States); Khan, Farheen [Lutron Electronics Co Inc., 7200 Suter Rd., Coopersburg, PA 18036 (United States); Waymouth, John F [Consultant, 16 Bennett Rd. Marblehead, MA 01945 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    We describe an improved method and apparatus for making capacitive measurements of the cathode fall in fluorescent lamps employing known behaviour of anode oscillations to provide a zero-of-potential reference, placing the entire cathode and anode fall waveform on an absolute rather than relative scale. The improved method is applicable to any diameter of fluorescent lamp currently manufactured. We also describe a method and apparatus for making spectroscopic measurements of the cathode fall in fluorescent lamps. This uses the abrupt onset of emission of certain selected spectral lines of the rare gas filling as a signal that the cathode fall has exceeded the excitation potentials of the spectral lines in question.

  2. Effect of thin emitter set-back layer on GaAs delta-doped emitter bipolar junction transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, K. L.; Yoon, S. F.

    2005-05-01

    GaAs delta-doped emitter bipolar junction transistors (δ-BJT) with different emitter set-back layer thicknesses of 10to50nm were fabricated to study the emitter set-back layer thickness effect on device dc performance. We found that the current gain decreases following decrease in the emitter set-back layer thickness. A detailed analysis was performed to explain this phenomenon, which is believed to be caused by reduction of the effective barrier height in the δ-BJT. This is due to change in the electric-field distribution in the delta-doped structure caused by the built-in potential of the base-emitter (B-E ) junction. Considering the recombination and barrier height reduction effects, the thickness of the emitter set-back layer should be designed according to the B-E junction depletion width with a tolerance of ±5nm. The dc performance of a δ-BJT designed based on this criteria is compared to that of a Al0.25Ga0.75As /GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). Both devices employed base doping of 2×1019cm-3 and base-to-emitter doping ratio of 40. Large emitter area (AE≈1.6×10-5cm-2) and small emitter area (AE≈1.35×10-6cm-2) device current gains of 40 and 20, respectively, were obtained in both types of transistors passivated by (NH4)2S treatment. The measured current gain of the GaAs δ-BJT is the highest reported for a homojunction device with such high base-to-emitter doping ratio normally used in HBT devices.

  3. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  4. Computational predictions of zinc oxide hollow structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuoc, Vu Ngoc; Huan, Tran Doan; Thao, Nguyen Thi

    2018-03-01

    Nanoporous materials are emerging as potential candidates for a wide range of technological applications in environment, electronic, and optoelectronics, to name just a few. Within this active research area, experimental works are predominant while theoretical/computational prediction and study of these materials face some intrinsic challenges, one of them is how to predict porous structures. We propose a computationally and technically feasible approach for predicting zinc oxide structures with hollows at the nano scale. The designed zinc oxide hollow structures are studied with computations using the density functional tight binding and conventional density functional theory methods, revealing a variety of promising mechanical and electronic properties, which can potentially find future realistic applications.

  5. Microfabricated hollow microneedle array using ICP etcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Jing [Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore, 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Tay, Francis E H [Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore, 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Miao Jianmin [MicroMachines Center, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a developed process for fabrication of hollow silicon microneedle arrays. The inner hollow hole and the fluidic reservoir are fabricated in deep reactive ion etching. The profile of outside needles is achieved by the developed fabrication process, which combined isotropic etching and anisotropic etching with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher. Using the combination of SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} isotropic etching chemistry and Bosch process, the high aspect ratio 3D and high density microneedle arrays are fabricated. The generated needle external geometry can be controlled by etching variables in the isotropic and anisotropic cases.

  6. Microfabricated hollow microneedle array using ICP etcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis E. H.; Miao, Jianmin

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a developed process for fabrication of hollow silicon microneedle arrays. The inner hollow hole and the fluidic reservoir are fabricated in deep reactive ion etching. The profile of outside needles is achieved by the developed fabrication process, which combined isotropic etching and anisotropic etching with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher. Using the combination of SF6/O2 isotropic etching chemistry and Bosch process, the high aspect ratio 3D and high density microneedle arrays are fabricated. The generated needle external geometry can be controlled by etching variables in the isotropic and anisotropic cases.

  7. Bioreactor design considerations for hollow organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Jeff; Halberstadt, Craig; McCoy, Darell W; Robbins, Neil

    2013-01-01

    There are many important considerations in the design, construction, and use of a bioreactor for growing hollow organs such as vessels, gastrointestinal tissue, esophagus, and others. The growth of new organs requires a specialized container that provides sterility and an environment conducive to cell-seeding and attachment onto a three-dimensional bioabsorbable porous scaffold, incubation, maturation, and shipping for implantation. The materials' selection, dimensions, manufacturing, testing, and use of the bioreactor are all factors that should be considered in designing a bioreactor for the development of hollow organs.

  8. Scaffold Characteristics for Functional Hollow Organ Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Eberli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many medical conditions require surgical reconstruction of hollow organs. Tissue engineering of organs and tissues is a promising new technique without harvest site morbidity. An ideal biomaterial should be biocompatible, support tissue formation and provide adequate structural support. It should degrade gradually and provide an environment allowing for cell-cell interaction, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Although tissue formation is feasible, functionality has never been demonstrated. Mainly the lack of proper innervation and vascularisation are hindering contractility and normal function. In this chapter we critically review the current state of engineering hollow organs with a special focus on innervation and vascularisation.

  9. Membrane electrode assembly fabricated with the combination of Pt/C and hollow shell structured-Pt-SiO2@ZrO2 sphere for self-humidifying proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Y. D.; Yang, H. N.; Züttel, Andreas; Kim, S. D.; Kim, W. J.

    2017-11-01

    The Pt-supported hollow structured Pt-HZrO2 with the shell thickness of 27 nm is successfully synthesized. The water retention ability of Pt-HZrO2 is significantly enhanced compared with that of SiO2@ZrO2 due to the hydrophilic hollow structured HZrO2with high BET surface area. Pt-C and Pt-HZrO2 are combined with different weight fractions to prepare the double catalyst electrode (DCE). The membrane electrode assembly with the DCE is fabricated and applied to both anode and cathode or anode side only. The water flooding and thus rapid voltage drop is affected by the presence/or absence of the DCE at the cathode side. The cell test and visual experiment suggests that the Pt-HZrO2 layer adsorb the water molecules generated by the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), preventing the water flooding. The power generation under RH 0% strongly suggests the back-diffusion of water molecules generated by the ORR. The flow rate to the cathode significantly affects the water flooding and cell performance. Higher flow rate to the cathode is advantageous to expel the water generated by the ORR, thus preventing water flooding and enhancing the cell performance. Therefore, the weight fraction of Pt-C to Pt-HZrO2 and the flow rate to the cathode should be well balanced.

  10. The Hollow-Face Illusion in Infancy: Do Infants See a Screen Based Rotating Hollow Mask as Hollow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Tsuruhara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether infants experience the hollow-face illusion using a screen-based presentation of a rotating hollow mask. In experiment 1 we examined preferential looking between rotating convex and concave faces. Adults looked more at the concave—illusory convex—face which appears to counter rotate. Infants of 7- to 8-month-old infants preferred the convex face, and 5- to 6-month-olds showed no preference. While older infants discriminate, their preference differed from that of adults possibly because they don't experience the illusion or counter rotation. In experiment 2 we tested preference in 7- to 8-month-olds for angled convex and concave static faces both before and after habituation to the stimuli shown in experiment 1. The infants showed a novelty preference for the static shape opposite to the habituation stimulus, together with a general preference for the static convex face. This shows that they discriminate between convex and concave faces and that habituation to either transfers across a change in view. Seven- to eight-month-olds have been shown to discriminate direction of rigid rotation on the basis of perspective changes. Our results suggest that this, perhaps together with a weaker bias to perceive faces as convex, allows these infants to see the screen-based hollow face as hollow even though adults perceive it as convex.

  11. Lithiation-Assisted Strengthening Effect and Reactive Flow in Bulk and Nano-Confined Sulfur Cathodes of Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingchao; Yu, Jingui; Lin, Shangchao

    Sulfur (S) serves as a promising cathode material in Li-ion batteries owing to its abundance on earth, low cost and high theoretical specific capacity 1670 mAhg-1, which is 3-5 times higher than that of current commercial Li-ion batteries. Nowadays, the most popular strategies of using S cathode are based on producing nanostructured carbon matrices (i.e. hollow carbon nanospheres and nanofibers) to sustain S cathode loading. However, the possible stress evolution and mechanical degradation of the confined S cathode in those carbon matrices have never been explored before. In addition, the associated structural and conductivity changes of the confined S cathode during the lithiation/delithiation process plays a significant role in the battery performance. With the above in mind, here we conduct reactive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the microstructural and stress evolution of the confined S cathode during lithiation/delithiation process. Simulation results indicate an unusual stress relaxation state in LixS compounds at lower Li concentrations (x >0.7). The strength of corresponding Li-S compounds also increases with respect to the Li concentration.

  12. Three-gradient Emittance Measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Olsson, T; Lanaia, D; Voulot, D

    2013-01-01

    The transverse emittance was measured using the three-gradient method (also known as the quadrupole scan method) and compared to the slit-grid method that is normally used at REX-ISOLDE. For a 2.85 MeV/u beam with A=q = 4 the rms normalised emittance was measured as 0:32 0:06 mm mrad with the three-gradient method, a factor of 5 larger than was measured by the NTG emittance meter. An investigation into the discrepancy and a hypothesis for its cause are detailed in this note.

  13. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  14. Optical Properties of Selective Emitter Materials for Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of new "selective emitter" materials for possible use in high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic power systems. These are systems which directly convert heat to radiation at a wavelength closely matched to the bandgap energy of the solar cell. Candidate materials which have strong absorption lines fairly close to the bandgap of good solar-cell materials were chosen for study. Their emittance was measured as a function of wavelength to evaluate their promise as selective TPV emitters. Useful and informative results were obtained. Some of these results were presented at a January 1996 solar energy conference of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  15. The dust nature of micro field emitters in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V.M.

    2016-11-21

    Field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters are a limiting factor for the operational gradients of accelerating radio frequency (rf) cavities. Within the rf field emission theory the existence of needle like micro field emitters with very high length relative to the radius and corresponding high enhancement factor (β) is assumed. In this article the hypothesis that micro field emitters consists of long chains of conductive micro-particles is considered. Five different forces acting onto the particles in a high rf field are considered and the respective equations are derived. Some experimental observations and their explanation within this hypothesis are discussed.

  16. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 ± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  17. Triggering of cold-cathode thyratron in electric circuit with grounded grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Y. D.; Landl, N. V.; Geyman, V. G.; Frants, O. B.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    This paper deals with the investigations of the sealed-off hold-cathode thyratron (pseudospark switch) TPI1-10k/50, which is commercially produced by the Pulsed Technology Ltd., Ryazan, Russia. The trigger unit of the switch is based on a low-current auxiliary glow discharge. The new method for the switch triggering is proposed. The essence of the method is that the thyratron grid and the hollow cathode of the auxiliary discharge has to be grounded and the trigger pulse is applied to the ring anode of the trigger unit. In the proposed method, an undesirable high-voltage spike at the thyratron grid, which can appear with a usage of the other methods of triggering, is absent. It is shown that to trigger the thyratron a critical pulsed current to the main cathode cavity at a level of 0.8 A and higher should be provided. When the current exceeds the critical value, the jitter in the delay time to triggering falls in a range of 10 ns. This means that the method of triggering can be used in a variety of applications that require a low jitter in the delay time.

  18. Hollow circular-truncated cone resonator and its hollow variable biconical laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinglun; Chen, Mei; Wang, Qionghua; Sun, Nianchun

    2014-05-01

    To obtain a hollow variable biconical laser beam (HVBLB), a CO2 laser having a hollow circular-truncated cone resonator (HCTCR) is presented. This HCTCR comprises a rotationally symmetric total-reflecting concave mirror at the bottom, a rotationally symmetric part-reflecting convex mirror at the top, and a hollow circular-truncated cone discharge tube at the middle. The cross section of this generated biconical laser beam changes from annulus to circular to annulus and the size of this cross section from big to small to large as the propagation distance increases. So, a kind of laser beam with variable center intensity from zero to peak value to zero is obtained and is known as HVBLB. Due to the inclusion of part of the hollow laser beam (HLB) and solid laser beam, this HVBLB requires no additional beam-shaping element and has broad applications such as optical trapping and commercial manufacturing.

  19. Field emission from entangled carbon nanotubes coated on/in a hollow metallic tube

    CERN Document Server

    Tokura, Y; Ohigashi, N; Akita, S; Nakayama, Y; Imasaki, K; Mima, K; Nakai, S

    2001-01-01

    Field emission properties of entangled carbon nanotubes were studied for an electron beam source of Cherenkov or Smith-Purcell free electron laser. The cathode was made of carbon nanotubes which were mixed with a very small amount of resin and coated on/in a hollow metallic tube with outer diameter of 0.5 mm. The emission current was as high as 2.2 mA with a fluctuation of <4%. It seems that some entangled nanotubes were frayed under the high electric field and then electrons were emitted mainly from their tips. Reduction of the work function of the carbon nanotubes was observed with the degradation of vacuum pressure in the experimental apparatus.

  20. Engineered Emitters for Improved Silicon Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ronak A.

    In 2014, installation of 5.3GW of new Photovoltaic (PV) systems occurred in the United States, raising the total installed capacity to 16.36GW. Strong growth is predicted for the domestic PV market with analysts reporting goals of 696GW by 2020. Conventional single crystalline silicon cells are the technology of choice, accounting for 90% of the installations in the global commercial market. Cells made of GaAs offer higher efficiencies, but at a substantially higher cost. Thin film technologies such as CIGS and CdTe compete favorably with multi-crystalline Si (u-Si), but at 20% efficiency, still lag the c-Si cell in performance. The c-Si cell can be fabricated to operate at approximately 25% efficiency, but commercially the efficiencies are in the 18-21% range, which is a direct result of cost trade-offs between process complexity and rapid throughput. With the current cost of c-Si cell modules at nearly 0.60/W. The technology is well below the historic metric of 1/W for economic viability. The result is that more complex processes, once cost-prohibitive, may now be viable. An example is Panasonic's HIT cell which operates in the 22-24% efficiency range. To facilitate research and development of novel PV materials and techniques, RIT has developed a basic solar cell fabrication process. Student projects prior to this work had produced cells with 12.8% efficiency using p type substrates. This thesis reports on recent work to improve cell efficiencies while simultaneously expanding the capability of the rapid prototyping process. In addition to the p-Si substrates, cells have been produced using n-Si substrates. The cell emitter, which is often done with a single diffusion or implant has been re-engineered using a dual implant of the same dose. This dual-implanted emitter has been shown to lower contact resistance, increase Voc, and increase the efficiency. A p-Si substrate cell has been fabricated with an efficiency of 14.6% and n-Si substrate cell with a 13

  1. Sulfonate-immobilized artificial cathode electrolyte interphases layer on Ni-rich cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Bum-Jin; Yim, Taeeun

    2017-08-01

    Although lithium nickel cobalt manganese layered oxides with a high nickel composition have gained great attention due to increased overall energy density for energy conversion/storage systems, poor interfacial stability is considered a critical bottleneck impeding its widespread adoption. We propose a new approach based on immobilizing the artificial cathode-electrolyte interphase layer, which effectively reduces undesired surface reactions, leading to high interfacial stability of cathode material. For installation of artificial cathode-electrolyte interphases, a sulfonate-based amphiphilic organic precursor, which effectively suppresses electrolyte decomposition, is synthesized and subjected to immobilization on cathode material via simple wet-coating, followed by heat treatment at low temperature. The sulfonate-based artificial cathode-electrolyte interphase layer is well-developed on the cathode surface, and the cell controlled by the sulfonate-immobilized cathode exhibits remarkable electrochemical performance, including a high average Coulombic efficiency (99.8%) and cycling retention (97.4%) compared with pristine cathode material. The spectroscopic analyses of the cycled cathode show that the sulfonate-based artificial cathode-electrolyte interphase layer effectively mitigates electrolyte decomposition on the cathode surface, resulting in decreased interfacial resistance between electrode and electrolyte.

  2. Hollow fibre supported liquid membrane extraction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple sample pre-treatment method utilizing hollow fibre supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) was carried out on pharmaceuticals samples comprising of cough syrups (CS1 and CS2) and an anti-inflammatory product (AI). The active ingredients targeted in the extraction process were diphenylhydramine (DPH), ...

  3. Electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties of hollow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A mass of hollow carbon nanospheres (HCNSs) was fabricated by chemical vapour deposition of methane over Ni/Al2O3 catalyst at 600 °C. The products were ... Airworthiness Certification Technology Research and Management Centre, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300 300, China; School of Materials Science ...

  4. Fabrication of polypyrrole/vanadium oxide nanotube composite with enhanced electrochemical performance as cathode in rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Chen, Xu; He, Taoling; Bi, Qinsong; Sun, Li; Liu, Zhu

    2017-05-01

    Vanadium oxide nanotubes (VOxNTs) with hollow as well as multi-walled features were fabricated under hydrothermal condition by soft-template method. This novel VOxNTs can be used as cathode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), but displaying low specific capacity and poor cycling performance owing to the residual of a mass of soft-template (C12H27N) and intrinsic low conductivity of VOx. Cation exchange technique and oxidative polymerization process of pyrrole monomers were conducted to wipe off partial soft-template without electrochemical activity within VOxNTs and simultaneously form polypyrrole coating on VOxNTs, respectively. The resulting polypyrrole/VOxNTs nanocomposite delivers much improved capacity and cyclic stability. Further optimizations, such as complete elimination of organic template and enhancing the crystallinity, can make this unique nanostructure a promising cathode for LIBs.

  5. Evidence of fire resistance of hollow-core slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Giuliani, Luisa

    Hollow-core slabs have during the past 50 years comprised a variety of different structures with different cross-sections and reinforcement. At present the extruded hollow-core slabs without cross-reinforcement in the bottom flange and usually round or oval longitudinal channels (holes...... is therefore going on in the Netherlands about the fire resistance of hollow-core slabs. In 2014 the producers of hollow-core slabs have published a report of a project called Holcofire containing a collection of 162 fire tests on hollow-core slabs giving for the first time an overview of the fire tests made....... The present paper analyses the evidence now available for assessment of the fire resistance of extruded hollow-core slabs. The 162 fire tests from the Holcofire report are compared against the requirements for testing from the product standard for hollow-core slabs EN1168 and knowledge about the possible...

  6. Estimation Method for Turn-off Collector Voltage of IGBTs Using Emitter-auxiliary Inductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Haoze; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    of high-voltage and high-power IGBT module, there exists an emitter-auxiliary inductor between the power emitter and Kelvin emitter. The same variable dic/dt during turn-off transition will also induce a measurable voltage veE across the emitter-auxiliary inductor LeE. As a result, the hazardous turn...

  7. Emittance preservation in plasma-based accelerators with ion motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-11-01

    In a plasma-accelerator-based linear collider, the density of matched, low-emittance, high-energy particle bunches required for collider applications can be orders of magnitude above the background ion density, leading to ion motion, perturbation of the focusing fields, and, hence, to beam emittance growth. By analyzing the response of the background ions to an ultrahigh density beam, analytical expressions, valid for nonrelativistic ion motion, are derived for the transverse wakefield and for the final (i.e., after saturation) bunch emittance. Analytical results are validated against numerical modeling. Initial beam distributions are derived that are equilibrium solutions, which require head-to-tail bunch shaping, enabling emittance preservation with ion motion.

  8. Measurement of Emittance of Beam in the Debuncher During Stacking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halling, Mike

    1991-12-11

    The emittance of antiprotons in the debuncher was measured using two methods during normal stacking conditions. With 2.3 seconds of cooling the vertical emittance was found to be 3.6 {pi} mm-mr using scraper D:TJ308, and 2.9 {pi} mm-mr using the profile on SEM806. With 6.9 seconds of cooling time time the measured horizontal emittance was 2.1 {pi} mm-mr using D:RJ306 v.s. 1.9 {pi} mm-mr using SEM806; but with 2.3 seconds of cooling the measured emittance in the debuncher was larger than in the DTOA line, 4.5 {pi} mm-mr v.s. 2.8 {pi} mm-mr. This suggests that some beam is being scraped on a horizontal aperture restriction someplace in the extraction process.

  9. An Online Multisensor Data Fusion Framework for Radar Emitter Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar emitter classification is a special application of data clustering for classifying unknown radar emitters in airborne electronic support system. In this paper, a novel online multisensor data fusion framework is proposed for radar emitter classification under the background of network centric warfare. The framework is composed of local processing and multisensor fusion processing, from which the rough and precise classification results are obtained, respectively. What is more, the proposed algorithm does not need prior knowledge and training process; it can dynamically update the number of the clusters and the cluster centers when new pulses arrive. At last, the experimental results show that the proposed framework is an efficacious way to solve radar emitter classification problem in networked warfare.

  10. Optimization of Metamaterial Selective Emitters for Use in Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiester, Nicole A.

    The increasing costs of fossil fuels, both financial and environmental, has motivated many to look into sustainable energy sources. Thermophotovoltaics (TPVs), specialized photovoltaic cells focused on the infrared range, offer an opportunity to achieve both primary energy capture, similar to traditional photovoltaics, as well as secondary energy capture in the form of waste heat. However, to become a feasible energy source, TPV systems must become more efficient. One way to do this is through the development of selective emitters tailored to the bandgap of the TPV diode in question. This thesis proposes the use of metamaterial emitters as an engineerable, highly selective emitter that can withstand the temperatures required to collect waste heat. Metamaterial devices made of platinum and a dielectric such as alumina or silicon nitride were initially designed and tested as perfect absorbers. High temperature robustness testing demonstrates the device's ability to withstand the rigors of operating as a selective emitter.

  11. Nanobubble induced formation of quantum emitters in monolayer semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Gabriella D.; Ajayi, Obafunso A.; Li, Xiangzhi; Zhu, X.-Y.; Hone, James; Strauf, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery of exciton quantum emitters in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) has triggered renewed interest of localized excitons in low-dimensional systems. Open questions remain about the microscopic origin previously attributed to dopants and/or defects as well as strain potentials. Here we show that the quantum emitters can be deliberately induced by nanobubble formation in WSe2 and BN/WSe2 heterostructures. Correlations of atomic-force microscope and hyperspectral photoluminescence images reveal that the origin of quantum emitters and trion disorder is extrinsic and related to 10 nm tall nanobubbles and 70 nm tall wrinkles, respectively. We further demonstrate that ‘hot stamping’ results in the absence of 0D quantum emitters and trion disorder. The demonstrated technique is useful for advances in nanolasers and deterministic formation of cavity-QED systems in monolayer materials.

  12. Transverse Emittance Measurement and Preservation at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082907

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation will be discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constra...

  13. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  14. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  15. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Connolly, R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Summers, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  16. New technique to measure emittance for beams with space charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Poorrezaei

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of the transverse phase space of beams is a fundamental requirement for particle accelerators. We present a novel approach for measurement of transverse emittance for beams with space charge, an important quality indicator of transverse phase space. The method utilizes a lens-drift-screen setup similar to that of a quadrupole scan emittance measurement. Measurements of radius and divergence that can be obtained from beam produced radiation, e.g. optical transition, are used to calculate the cross-correlation term and therefore the rms emittance. A linear space-charge model is used in the envelope equations; hence, the errors in the measurement relate to the nonuniformity of the beam distribution. The emittance obtained with our method shows small deviation from those obtained by WARP simulations for beams with high space charge, in contrast to other techniques.

  17. Two-photon interference from two blinking quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöns, Klaus D.; Stensson, Katarina; Reindl, Marcus; Swillo, Marcin; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo; Björk, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of blinking on the two-photon interference measurement from two independent quantum emitters. We find that blinking significantly alters the statistics in the Hong-Ou-Mandel second-order intensity correlation function g(2 )(τ ) and the outcome of two-photon interference measurements performed with independent quantum emitters. We theoretically demonstrate that the presence of blinking can be experimentally recognized by a deviation from the gD(2 )(0 ) =0.5 value when distinguishable photons from two emitters impinge on a beam splitter. Our findings explain the significant differences between linear losses and blinking for correlation measurements between independent sources and are experimentally verified using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source. We show that blinking imposes a mandatory cross-check measurement to correctly estimate the degree of indistinguishability of photons emitted by independent quantum emitters.

  18. Intelligent Variable Emittance Panels Using New, ?True? Solid Electrolyte Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This firm has, in ongoing work in collaboration with the Air Force, NASA and JPL, developed a unique Variable Emittance technology based on the electrochromism of...

  19. Emittance display on the new Linac controls computer

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    Top left : horizontal emittance plot. Top right : above-angular beam profile; below-horizontal beam profile. Bottom : "mountain range" display combining beam intensity distribution as the third dimension with the horizontal.

  20. Emittance preservation in plasma-based accelerators with ion motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric E.; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    In a plasma-accelerator-based linear collider, the density of matched, low-emittance, high-energy particle bunches required for collider applications can be orders of magnitude above the background ion density, leading to ion motion, nonlinear focusing fields, and, hence, to beam emittance growth. By analyzing the response of the background ions to an ultra-high density beam, analytical expressions, valid for nonrelativistic ion motion, are derived for the transverse wakefield and for the final (i.e., after saturation) bunch emittance. Analytical results are validated against numerical modeling. A class of initial beam distributions are derived that are equilibrium solutions, which require head-to-tail bunch shaping, enabling emittance preservation with ion motion. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  1. Scanning Anode Field Emission Characterisation of Carbon Nanotube emitter arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhanu, S.; Gröning, O.; Chen, Z.; Merikhi, J.; Bachmann, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Scanning anode field emission microscopy (SAFEM) was used to characterise carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays produced within Philips CediX-Technotubes' activities. Four different samples were investigated and compared. The field enhancement distributions were determined and the local field

  2. Vacuum arc on the polycrystalline silica cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of silica and its compounds are used in modern technology to produce Li-ion batteries, wear-resistant and protective coatings, thin-films insulators, etc. This coating is produced with CVD methods, with magnetron sputtering systems or with electron-beam evaporation. The vacuum arc evaporation method, presently, is not used.The paper demonstrates a possibility for a long-term operation of vacuum arc evaporator with polycrystalline silica-aluminum alloy (90% of silica cathode and with magnetic system to create a variable form of arch-like magnetic field on the cathode surface. It was shown that archlike configuration of magnetic field provides a stable discharge and uniform cathode spots moving with the velocities up to 5 m/s with magnetic fields induction about 10 mT. Thus, there is no local melting of the cathode, and this provides its long-term work without chips, cracks and destruction. Cathodes spots move over the cathode surface leaving t big craters with melted edges on its surface. The craters size was 150-450μm. The cathode spot movement character and the craters on the cathode surface were like the spots movement, when working on the copper or aluminum cathodes. With the magnetic field induction less than 1 mT, the cathode spots movement was the same as that of on the silica mono-crystal without magnetic field. Thus, the discharge volt-ampere characteristics for different values of magnetic fields were obtained. Voltampere characteristics were increasing and were shifted to the higher voltage with increasing magnetic field. The voltage was 18.7-26.5 V for the arc current 30-140 A.So, it was confirmed that vacuum arc evaporation method could be used for effective evaporation of silica and silica-based alloys and for thin films deposition of this materials.

  3. Hollow needle-to-plate electrical discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekárek, S.; Kríha, V.; Simek, M.; Bálek, R.; Hanitz, F.

    1999-08-01

    Ecological applications dealing with the cleaning of flue gases, the decomposition of volatile hydrocarbons and the destruction of toxic pollutants require, in order to reach high efficiency, the use of non-thermal plasma sources. Typical sources of such non-equilibrium plasmas are barrier discharge, direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC) gliding arc, pulsed or DC corona and DC atmospheric pressure discharge stabilized by a fast gas flow (APD-GFS). In case of APD-GFS the gas flows in a rectangular channel, the top wall of which serves as the anode and the multi-needle cathode is built into the bottom wall of the channel. In order to prevent the transition to a spark and to stabilize this type of discharge the velocity of the gas should be about 100-200 m s-1 or the discharge current must be limited. To avoid the problem connected with the acceleration of the primary (polluted) gas at such a velocity, the external flow of the primary gas around the needle electrodes can be superimposed by a flow of a secondary gas through the needles. Thus the primary gas need not be accelerated to high velocity and in order to stabilize the discharge a relatively small amount of a secondary gas supplied through the needle is required. This work is therefore focused on the study of the DC APD-GFS in hollow needle-to-plane geometry. The basic electrical characteristics, magnetic noise and integral emission spectra of this type discharge with the flow of nitrogen or air through the needle are given.

  4. Internal emitter limits for iodine, radium and radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenker, R.A.

    1984-08-15

    This paper identifies some of the issues which arise in the consideration of the derivation of new limits on exposure to internal emitters. Basic and secondary radiation protection limits are discussed. Terms are defined and applied to the limitation of risk from stochastic effects. Non-stochastic data for specific internal emitters (/sup 131/I and the radium isotopes) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative aspects of the limit setting problem. 65 references, 2 figures, 12 tables.

  5. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    OpenAIRE

    Guag Joshua W; Seidman Seth J; Pantchenko Oxana S; Witters Donald M; Sponberg Curt L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, inco...

  6. Study of ultra-low emittance design for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; /SLAC

    2015-09-17

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now, to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  7. Preliminary Mechanical Design Study of the Hollow Electron Lens for HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanoni, Carlo [CERN; Gobbi, Giorgia [CERN; Perini, Diego [CERN; Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    A Hollow Electron Lens (HEL) has been proposed in order to improve performance of halo control and collimation in the Large Hadron Collider in view of its High Luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The concept is based on a hollow beam of electrons that travels around the protons for a few meters. The electron beam is produced by a cathode and then guided by a strong magnetic field. The first step of the design is the definition of the magnetic field that drives the electron trajectories. The estimation of such trajectories by means of a dedicated MATLAB tool is presented. The influence of the main geometrical and electrical parameters is analyzed and discussed. Then, the main mechanical design choices for the solenoids, cryostats gun and collector are described. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the feasibility study of the Electron Lens for LHC. The methods used in this study also serve as examples for future mechanical and integration designs of similar devices.

  8. Mesoporous hollow carbon spheres for lithium–sulfur batteries: distribution of sulfur and electrochemical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika C. Juhl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hollow carbon spheres (HCS with a nanoporous shell are promising for the use in lithium–sulfur batteries because of the large internal void offering space for sulfur and polysulfide storage and confinement. However, there is an ongoing discussion whether the cavity is accessible for sulfur. Yet no valid proof of cavity filling has been presented, mostly due to application of unsuitable high-vacuum methods for the analysis of sulfur distribution. Here we describe the distribution of sulfur in hollow carbon spheres by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy along with results from scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen physisorption. The results of these methods lead to the conclusion that the cavity is not accessible for sulfur infiltration. Nevertheless, HCS/sulfur composite cathodes with areal sulfur loadings of 2.0 mg·cm−2 were investigated electrochemically, showing stable cycling performance with specific capacities of about 500 mAh·g−1 based on the mass of sulfur over 500 cycles.

  9. Preliminary Mechanical Design Study of the Hollow Electron Lens for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Carlo; Gobbi, Giorgia; Perini, Diego; Stancari, Giulio

    2017-07-01

    A Hollow Electron Lens (HEL) has been proposed in order to improve performance of halo control and collimation in the Large Hadron Collider in view of its High Luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The concept is based on a hollow beam of electrons that travels around the protons for a few meters. The electron beam is produced by a cathode and then guided by a strong magnetic field. The first step of the design is the definition of the magnetic field that drives the electron trajectories. The estimation of such trajectories by means of a dedicated MATLAB tool is presented. The influence of the main geometrical and electrical parameters is analyzed and discussed. Then, the main mechanical design choices for the solenoids, cryostats gun and collector are described. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the feasibility study of the Electron Lens for LHC. The methods used in this study also serve as examples for future mechanical and integration designs of similar devices.

  10. Plasmon-assisted quantum control of distant emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susa, Cristian E. [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Reina, John H., E-mail: john.reina@correounivalle.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Departamento de Óptica, Facultad de Física, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hildner, Richard [Experimentalphysik IV, Universität Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-06-27

    We show how to generate and control the correlations in a set of two distant quantum emitters coupled to a one-dimensional dissipative plasmonic waveguide. An external laser field enhances the dimer's steady-state correlations and allows an active control (switching on/off) of nonclassical correlations. The plasmon-assisted dipolar-interacting qubits exhibit persistent correlations, which in turn can be decoupled and made to evolve independently from each other. The setup enables long-distance (∼1 μm) qubit control that works for both resonant and detuned emitters. For suitable emitter initialization, we also show that the quantum correlation is always greater than the classical one. - Highlights: • Experimentally realistic setup: single emitters coupled to plasmon waveguide. • Conditional dynamics and qubit control of quantum emitters at long (>μm) distance. • Quantum mechanism: plasmon-assisted qubit coupling and driving by laser field. • Quantum discord dominates induced conditional dynamics. • Long-range quantum mechanism effective for both resonant and detuned emitters.

  11. Validated Analytical Model of a Pressure Compensation Drip Irrigation Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Taylor, Katherine; Tran, Davis; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    This work is focused on analytically characterizing the behavior of pressure-compensating drip emitters in order to design low-cost, low-power irrigation solutions appropriate for off-grid communities in developing countries. There are 2.5 billion small acreage farmers worldwide who rely solely on their land for sustenance. Drip, compared to flood, irrigation leads to up to 70% reduction in water consumption while increasing yields by 90% - important in countries like India which are quickly running out of water. To design a low-power drip system, there is a need to decrease the pumping pressure requirement at the emitters, as pumping power is the product of pressure and flow rate. To efficiently design such an emitter, the relationship between the fluid-structure interactions that occur in an emitter need to be understood. In this study, a 2D analytical model that captures the behavior of a common drip emitter was developed and validated through experiments. The effects of independently changing the channel depth, channel width, channel length and land height on the performance were studied. The model and the key parametric insights presented have the potential to be optimized in order to guide the design of low-pressure, clog-resistant, pressure-compensating emitters.

  12. Measured emittance dependence on injection method in laser plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Samuel; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Lehe, Remi; Tsai, Hai-En; Swanson, Kelly; Steinke, Sven; Nakamura, Kei; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    The success of many laser plasma accelerator (LPA) based applications relies on the ability to produce electron beams with excellent 6D brightness, where brightness is defined as the ratio of charge to the product of the three normalized emittances. As such, parametric studies of the emittance of LPA generated electron beams are essential. Profiting from a stable and tunable LPA setup, combined with a carefully designed single-shot transverse emittance diagnostic, we present a direct comparison of charge dependent emittance measurements of electron beams generated by two different injection mechanisms: ionization injection and shock induced density down-ramp injection. Notably, the measurements reveal that ionization injection results in significantly higher emittance. With the down-ramp injection configuration, emittances less than 1 micron at spectral charge densities up to 2 pC/MeV were measured. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, by the NSF under Grant No. PHY-1415596, by the U.S. DOE NNSA, DNN R&D (NA22), and by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation under Grant ID GBMF4898.

  13. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantchenko, Oxana S; Seidman, Seth J; Guag, Joshua W; Witters, Donald M; Sponberg, Curt L

    2011-06-09

    The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  14. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters. PMID:21658266

  15. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guag Joshua W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  16. In-situ synthesis of sulfur-TiO2 hollow shell materials for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Bo; Ma, Litong; Yan, Hui; Wei, Hang

    2017-05-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries with higher energy density are highly attractive, but the practical applications have been greatly affected by their poor cycle performance. Despite much effort has been devoted to design the structure of sulfur cathode to suppress polysulfide dissolution, relatively little emphasis has been placed on in-situ immobilizing the sulfur atoms. Herein, we demonstrate a new approach of in-situ immobilizing the sulfur atoms into the TiO2 host, in which, the polysulphides can localized in the cathode side and efficiently reused during cycling due to the novel S-TiO2 hollow shell structure. The battery based on the well-designed S-TiO2 cathode can deliver a discharge capacity of 601 mA h g-1 at 0.5 C after 100 cycles. The good electrochemical performance could be attributed to the homogeneous dispersing of sulfur in the TiO2 host in the in-situ formation process, and the hollow structure of the S-TiO2 materials. The economical and simple strategy to overcome the polysulfide dissolution issues provides a commercially feasible way for the construction of lithium-sulfur batteries.

  17. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  18. Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O hollow nanofibers prepared by electrospinning as additive for improving electrochemical performance of lithium–sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Hao [Institute for Advanced Materials, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yao, Shanshan, E-mail: yaosshan@ujs.edu.cn [Institute for Advanced Materials, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jing, Maoxiang; Wu, Xiao; Hou, Jinli; Qian, Xinye; Rao, Dewei [Institute for Advanced Materials, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Shen, Xiangqian, E-mail: shenxq@ujs.edu.cn [Institute for Advanced Materials, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Hunan Engineering Laboratory of Power Battery Cathode Materials, Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Changsha 410012 (China); Xi, Xiaoming; Xiao, Kesong [Hunan Engineering Laboratory of Power Battery Cathode Materials, Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Changsha 410012 (China)

    2015-11-25

    Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O hollow nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning technique and subsequent thermal treatment. The as-prepared Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O hollow nanofibers were used as an additive to prepare sulfur/Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O composite cathodes. Their crystalline phase and morphologies were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM observation revealed that the sulfur morphology was changed by the Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O addition, from smooth to rough agglomerated particles. The initial discharge profiles and cyclic voltammetry tests demonstrated the hollow nanofibers of Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O can not only contribute to reducing the dissolution of polysulfides into electrolytes, but also improve the electrochemical reaction kinetics during charge–discharge process. In addition, the hollow nanofibers of Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O ensure short diffusion distance for Li{sup +} on interaction in charge–discharge cycles. The effect of the Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O hollow nanofibers heat treatment temperature on the S/Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O cycling performance was also investigated. As a result, the cathode with Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O hollow nanofibers calcined at 700 °C exhibited 910 mAh g{sup −1} of initial capacity and keeping the remaining capacity of 554 mAh g{sup −1} over 20 cycles. - Highlights: • Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O hollow nanofibers was first prepared via an electrospinning technique. • Sulfur/Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O hollow nanofibers composite cathode showed improved performance of Li–S batteries. • Mg{sub 0.6}Ni{sub 0.4}O had a function of absorption of polysulfides and the catalytic activity towards the Li/S redox reaction.

  19. Cathodic oxygen consumption and electrically induced osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, C T; Adler, S; Black, J; Itada, N; Friedenberg, Z B

    1975-01-01

    Small amounts of electric current stimulate bone formation in the region of a cathode. The purpose of this experiment is to compare changes in oxygen and hydroxyl ion concentration that occur at the cathode at current levels known to be capable of inducing osteogenesis (10-20 muamps) with those changes that occur at current levels known to be toxic to bone (100 muamps). An oxygen consumption chamber containing an oxygen electrode is fitted with two stainless steel electrodes which are connected to a constant current source. At the cathode, with a current of 100 muamps, oxygen is consumed at nearly stoichiometric rates. At higher current (100 muamps) levels, cathodic oxygen consumption gives way to hydrogen evolution. Cathodic hydroxyl ion production is directly proportional to current. It is concluded from these in vitro experiments that at 10-20 muamps the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the cathode is lowered and the pH is moderately increased. At 100 muamps the oxygen tension is not lowered, but the pH is increased dramatically. If these same changes occur in the vicinity of a cathode in vivo, then lowering the local tissue oxygen tension and raising the local pH may be mechanisms operative in electrically induced bone formation.

  20. Design Of Photovoltaic Powered Cathodic Protection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golina Samir Adly

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion caused by chemical reaction between metallic structures and surrounding mediums such as soil or water .the CP cathodic protection system is used to protect metallic structure against corrosion. Cathodic protection CP used to minimize corrosion by utilizing an external source of electrical current which forces the entire structure to become a cathode. There are two Types of cathodic protection system Galvanic current Impressed current.the Galvanic current is called a sacrificial anode is connected to the protected structure cathode through a DC power supply. In Galvanic current system a current passes from the sacrificing anode to the protected structure .the sacrificial anode is corroded rather than causing the protected structure corrosion .protected structure requires a constant current to stop the corrosion which determined by area structure metal and the surrounding medium. The rains humidity are decrease soil resistivity and increase the DC current .The corrosion and over protection resulting from increase in the DC current is harmful for the metallic structure. This problem can be solved by conventional cathodic protection system by manual adjustment of DC voltage periodically to obtain a constant current .the manual adjustment of DC voltage depends on experience of the technician and using the accuracy of the measuring equipment. The errors of measuring current depend on error from the technician or error from the measuring equipment. the corrosion of structure may occur when the interval between two successive adjustment is long .An automatically regulated cathodic protection system is used to overcome problems from conventional cathodic protection system .the regulated cathodic protection system adjust the DC voltage of the system automatically when it senses the variations of surrounding medium resistivity so the DC current is constant at the required level.

  1. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshi; Skotheim, Terje A.; Lee, Hung S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS.sub.x).sub.n, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode.

  2. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Y.; Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS{sub x}){sub n}, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode. 5 figs.

  3. DSm Evidence Modeling and Radar Emitter Fusion Recognition Method Based on Cloud Model DSm Evidence Modeling and Radar Emitter Fusion Recognition Method Based on Cloud Model

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Qiang; He, You

    2015-01-01

    To improve the correct radar emitter recognition rate in cases that radar emitter characteristic parameters are overlapped with each other and existence of multiple modes, a DSm (Dezert-Smarandache) evidence modeling and radar emitter fusion recognition method based on cloud model is proposed.

  4. A case for ZnO nanowire field emitter arrays in advanced x-ray source applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Vance S.; Bergkvist, Magnus; Chen, Daokun; Chen, Jun; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-09-01

    Reviewing current efforts in X-ray source miniaturization reveals a broad spectrum of applications: Portable and/or remote nondestructive evaluation, high throughput protein crystallography, invasive radiotherapy, monitoring fluid flow and particulate generation in situ, and portable radiography devices for battle-front or large scale disaster triage scenarios. For the most part, all of these applications are being addressed with a top-down approach aimed at improving portability, weight and size. That is, the existing system or a critical sub-component is shrunk in some manner in order to miniaturize the overall package. In parallel to top-down x-ray source miniaturization, more recent efforts leverage field emission and semiconductor device fabrication techniques to achieve small scale x-ray sources via a bottom-up approach where phenomena effective at a micro/nanoscale are coordinated for macro-scale effect. The bottom-up approach holds potential to address all the applications previously mentioned but its entitlement extends into new applications with much more ground-breaking potential. One such bottom-up application is the distributed x-ray source platform. In the medical space, using an array of microscale x-ray sources instead of a single source promises significant reductions in patient dose as well as smaller feature detectability and fewer image artifacts. Cold cathode field emitters are ideal for this application because they can be gated electrostatically or via photonic excitation, they do not generate excessive heat like other common electron emitters, they have higher brightness and they are relatively compact. This document describes how ZnO nanowire field emitter arrays are well suited for distributed x-ray source applications because they hold promise in each of the following critical areas: emission stability, simple scalable fabrication, performance, radiation resistance and photonic coupling.

  5. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each cathodic protection system required by this subpart must provide a level of cathodic protection that complies with one...

  6. Emittance and Phase Space Tomography for the Fermilab Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F.G.G.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moore, C.D.; /Fermilab; Newhart, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Linac delivers a variable intensity, 400-MeV beam to the MuCool Test Area experimental hall via a beam line specifically designed to facilitate measurements of the Linac beam emittance and properties. A 10 m, dispersion-free and magnet-free straight utilizes an upstream quadrupole focusing triplet in combination with the necessary in-straight beam diagnostics to fully characterize the transverse beam properties. Since the Linac does not produce a strictly elliptical phase space, tomography must be performed on the profile data to retrieve the actual particle distribution in phase space. This is achieved by rotating the phase space distribution using different waist focusing conditions of the upstream triplet and performing a deconvolution of the profile data. Preliminary measurements using this diagnostic section are reported here. These data represent a first-pass measurement of the Linac emittance based on various techniques. It is clear that the most accurate representation of the emittance is given by the 3-profile approach. Future work will entail minimizing the beam spot size on MW5 to test and possibly improve the accuracy of the 2-profile approach. The 95% emittance is {approx} 18{pi} in the vertical and {approx} 13{pi} in the horizontal, which is especially larger than anticipated - 8-10{pi} was expected. One possible explanation is that the entire Linac pulse is extracted into the MTA beamline and during the first few microseconds, the feed forward and RF regulation are not stable. This may result in a larger net emittance observed versus beam injected into Booster, where the leading part of the Linac beam pulse is chopped. Future studies will clearly entail a measurement of the emittance vs. pulse length. One additional concern is that the Linac phase space is most likely aperture-defined and non-elliptical in nature. A non-elliptical phase-space determination would require a more elaborate analysis and provide another explanation of the

  7. Surface functionalized hollow silica particles and composites

    KAUST Repository

    Rodionov, Valentin

    2017-05-26

    Composition comprising hollow spherical silica particles having outside particle walls and inside particle walls, wherein the particles have an average particle size of about 10 nm to about 500 nm and an average wall thickness of about 10 nm to about 50 nm; and wherein the particles are functionalized with at least one organic functional group on the outside particle wall, on the inside particle wall, or on both the outside and inside particle walls, wherein the organic functional group is in a reacted or unreacted form. The organic functional group can be epoxy. The particles can be mixed with polymer precursor or a polymer material such as epoxy to form a prepreg or a nanocomposite. Lightweight but strong materials can be formed. Low loadings of hollow particles can be used.

  8. Mesoporous hollow spheres from soap bubbling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianglin; Liang, Fuxin; Liu, Jiguang; Lu, Yunfeng; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2012-02-01

    The smaller and more stable bubbles can be generated from the large parent bubbles by rupture. In the presence of a bubble blowing agent, hollow spheres can be prepared by bubbling a silica sol. Herein, the trapped gas inside the bubble acts as a template. When the porogen, i.e., other surfactant, is introduced, a mesostructured shell forms by the co-assembly with the silica sol during sol-gel process. Morphological evolution emphasizes the prerequisite of an intermediate interior gas flow rate and high exterior gas flow rate for hollow spheres. The method is valid for many compositions from inorganic, polymer to their composites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MnO2Nanofilms on Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Graphene Spheres as a High-Performance Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiangmin; Xu, Jiaoxing; Wu, Chuxin; Zhang, Jianshuo; Guan, Lunhui

    2016-12-28

    Platinum is commonly chosen as an electrocatalyst used for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we report an active catalyst composed of MnO 2 nanofilms grown directly on nitrogen-doped hollow graphene spheres, which exhibits high activity toward ORR with positive onset potential (0.94 V vs RHE), large current density (5.2 mA cm -2 ), and perfect stability. Significantly, when it was used as catalyst for air electrode, a zinc-air battery exhibited a high power density (82 mW cm -2 ) and specific capacities (744 mA h g -1 ) comparable to that with Pt/C (20 wt %) as air cathode. The enhanced activity is ascribed to the synergistic interaction between MnO 2 and the doped hollow carbon nanomaterials. This easy and cheap method paves a way of synthesizing high-performance electrocatalysts for ORR.

  10. Reservoir Scandate Cathode for Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to combine two revolutionary cathode technologies into a single device for use in electric space propulsion. This will overcome problems that both...

  11. Transverse emittance measurement and preservation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Maria

    2016-06-20

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation are discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constraints of various systems such as tune measurement precision and powering limitations of the LHC superconducting circuits into account. With sinusoidal k-modulation record low beta function measurement uncertainties in the LHC have been reached. 2015 LHC beta function and β*, which is the beta function at the collision point, measurements with k-modulation will be presented. Wire scanners and synchrotron light monitors are presently used in the LHC to measure the transverse beam size. Accuracy and limitations of the LHC transverse profile monitors are discussed. During the 2012 LHC proton run it was found that wire scanner photomultiplier saturation added significant uncertainty on all measurements. A large discrepancy between emittances from wire scanners and luminosity was discovered but not solved. During Long Shutdown 1 the wire scanner system was upgraded with new photomultipliers. A thorough study of LHC wire scanner measurement precision in 2015 is presented

  12. Construction of a ultrananocrystalline diamond-based cold cathode arrays for a flat-panel x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, E. J.; Posada, C. M.; Divan, R.; Sumant, A. V.; Rosenmann, D.; Stan, L.; Avachat, A.; Castano, C. H.; Lee, H. K.

    2013-06-01

    A novel cold cathode field emission array (FEA) X-ray source based on ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) field emitters is being constructed as an alternative for detection of obscured objects and material. Depending on the geometry of the given situation the flat-panel X-ray source could be used in tomography, radiography, or tomosynthesis. Furthermore, the unit could be used as a portable X-ray scanner or an integral part of an existing detection system. UNCD field emitters show great field emission output and can be deposited over large areas as the case with carbon nanotube "forest" (CNT) cathodes. Furthermore, UNCDs have better mechanical and thermal properties as compared to CNT tips which further extend the lifetime of UNCD based FEA. This work includes the first generation of the UNCD based FEA prototype which is being manufactured at the Center for Nanoscale Materials within Argonne National Laboratory with standard microfabrication techniques. The prototype is a 3x3 pixel FEA, with a pixel pitch of 500 μm, where each pixel is individually controllable.

  13. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith...elements on the kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed on titanium oxide in order to develop new approaches for controlling galvanic corrosion

  14. Microfluidic White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on Integrated Patterns of Greenish-Blue and Yellow Solvent-Free Liquid Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naofumi; Kasahara, Takashi; Edura, Tomohiko; Oshima, Juro; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Tsuwaki, Miho; Imato, Toshihiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a novel microfluidic white organic light-emitting diode (microfluidic WOLED) based on integrated sub-100-μm-wide microchannels. Single-μm-thick SU-8-based microchannels, which were sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and cathode pairs, were fabricated by photolithography and heterogeneous bonding technologies. 1-Pyrenebutyric acid 2-ethylhexyl ester (PLQ) was used as a solvent-free greenish-blue liquid emitter, while 2,8-di-tert-butyl-5,11-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)-6,12-diphenyltetracene (TBRb)-doped PLQ was applied as a yellow liquid emitter. In order to form the liquid white light-emitting layer, the greenish-blue and yellow liquid emitters were alternately injected into the integrated microchannels. The fabricated electro-microfluidic device successfully exhibited white electroluminescence (EL) emission via simultaneous greenish-blue and yellow emissions under an applied voltage of 100 V. A white emission with Commission Internationale de l’Declairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.40, 0.42) was also obtained; the emission corresponds to warm-white light. The proposed device has potential applications in subpixels of liquid-based microdisplays and for lighting. PMID:26439164

  15. Transverse emittance growth in staged laser-wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mehrling

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the emittance evolution of electron bunches, externally injected into laser-driven plasma waves using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC code OSIRIS. Results show order-of-magnitude transverse emittance growth during the injection process, if the electron bunch is not matched to its intrinsic betatron motion inside the wakefield. This behavior is supported by analytic theory reproducing the simulation data to a percent level. The length over which the full emittance growth develops is found to be less than or comparable to the typical dimension of a single plasma module in current multistage designs. In addition, the analytic theory enables the quantitative prediction of emittance degradation in two consecutive accelerators coupled by free-drift sections, excluding this as a scheme for effective emittance-growth suppression, and thus suggests the necessity of beam-matching sections between acceleration stages with fundamental implications on the overall design of staged laser-wakefield accelerators.

  16. Analytical solution for irradiance due to inhomogeneous Lambertian polygonal emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Arvo, James

    2003-05-01

    We present an analytic solution for the irradiance at a point due to a polygonal Lambertian emitter with radiant exitance that varies with position according to a polynomial of arbitrary degree. This is a basic problem that arises naturally in radiative transfer and more specifically in global illumination, a subfield of computer graphics. Our solution is closed form except for a single nonalgebraic special function known as the Clausen integral. We begin by deriving several useful formulas for high-order tensor analogs of irradiance, which are natural generalizations of the radiation pressure tensor. We apply the resulting tensor formulas to linearly varying emitters, obtaining a solution that exhibits the general structure of higher-degree cases, including the dependence on the Clausen integral. We then generalize to higher-degree polynomials with a recurrence formula that combines solutions for lower-degree polynomials; the result is a generalization of Lambert's formula for homogeneous diffuse emitters, a well-known formula with many applications in radiative transfer and computer graphics. Similar techniques have been used previously to derive closed-form solutions for the irradiance due to homogeneous polygonal emitters with directionally varying radiance. The present work extends this previous result to include inhomogeneous emitters, which proves to be significantly more challenging to solve in closed form. We verify our theoretical results with numerical approximations and briefly discuss their potential applications.

  17. Graphene field emitters: A review of fabrication, characterization and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Leifeng, E-mail: chlf@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yu, Hu; Zhong, Jiasong; Song, Lihui [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wu, Jun, E-mail: wujun@hdu.edu.cn [Institute of Electron Device & Application, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310018 (China); Su, Weitao [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The preparation, characterization and field emission properties for Gs are reviewed. • The review provides an updated progress on design and construction of Gs field emitters. • The review offers fundamental insights into understanding and design of Gs emitters. • The review can broach the subject and inspire readers in field of Gs based emitters. - Abstract: Graphenes are beneficial to electrons field emission due to its high aspect ratio, high carrier density, the larger carrier mobility, excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, excellent mechanical strength and chemical stability. In recent years, graphene or reduced oxide graphene field emitters have been successfully constructed by various methods such as chemical vapor deposition, chemical exfoliation, electrophoretic deposition, screen-printing and chemical synthesis methods. Graphene emitters are tried to construct in distribution with some angles or vertical orientation with respect to the substrate surface. The vertical alignment of graphene sheets or edges arrays can facilitate efficient electron emission from the atomically thick sheets. Therefore they have even more a low turn-on and threshold-field electronic field, high field enhancement factor, high current stability and high luminance. In this review, we shortly survey and discuss recent research progress in graphene field emission properties with particular an emphasis on their preparing method, characterization and applications in devices especially for vertical graphene and single layer graphene, also including their challenges and future prospects.

  18. Study of Abnormal Vertical Emittance Growth in ATF Extraction Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alabau, M.; Faus-Golfe, A.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Le Meur, G.; Rimbault, C.; Touze, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.K.; /Daresbury; Appleby, R.; Scarfe, A.; /Manchester U.; Kuroda, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; White, G.R.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Since several years, the vertical beam emittance measured in the Extraction Line (EXT) of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, that will transport the electron beam from the ATF Damping Ring (DR) to the future ATF2 Final Focus beam line, is significantly larger than the emittance measured in the DR itself, and there are indications that it grows rapidly with increasing beam intensity. This longstanding problem has motivated studies of possible sources of this anomalous emittance growth. One possible contribution is non-linear magnetic fields in the extraction region experimented by the beam while passing off-axis through magnets of the DR during the extraction process. In this paper, simulations of the emittance growth are presented and compared to observations. These simulations include the effects of predicted non-linear field errors in the shared DR magnets and orbit displacements from the reference orbit in the extraction region. Results of recent measurements using closed orbit bumps to probe the relation between the extraction trajectory and the anomalous emittance growth are also presented.

  19. Electrical control of optical emitter relaxation pathways enabled by graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielrooij, K. J.; Orona, L.; Ferrier, A.; Badioli, M.; Navickaite, G.; Coop, S.; Nanot, S.; Kalinic, B.; Cesca, T.; Gaudreau, L.; Ma, Q.; Centeno, A.; Pesquera, A.; Zurutuza, A.; de Riedmatten, H.; Goldner, P.; García de Abajo, F. J.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Koppens, F. H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the energy flow processes and the associated energy relaxation rates of a light emitter is of fundamental interest and has many applications in the fields of quantum optics, photovoltaics, photodetection, biosensing and light emission. Advanced dielectric, semiconductor and metallic systems have been developed to tailor the interaction between an emitter and its environment. However, active control of the energy flow from an emitter into optical, electronic or plasmonic excitations has remained challenging. Here, we demonstrate in situ electrical control of the relaxation pathways of excited erbium ions, which emit light at the technologically relevant telecommunication wavelength of 1.5 μm. By placing the erbium at a few nanometres distance from graphene, we modify the relaxation rate by more than a factor of three, and control whether the emitter decays into electron-hole pairs, emitted photons or graphene near-infrared plasmons, confined to new paradigm for active (quantum) photonics and can be applied using any combination of light emitters and two-dimensional materials.

  20. Silica hollow spheres with nano-macroholes like diatomaceous earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masahiro; Shiokawa, Kumi; Sakakura, Ikuko; Nakahara, Yoshiko

    2006-12-01

    Artificial synthesis of hollow cell walls of diatoms is an ultimate target of nanomaterial science. The addition of some water-soluble polymers such as sodium polymethacrylate to a solution of water/oil/water emulsion system, which is an essential step of the simple synthetic procedure of silica hollow spheres (microcapsules), led to the formation of silica hollow spheres with nano-macroholes (>100 nm) in their shell walls, the morphologies of which are analogous to those of diatom earth.

  1. Review of Synthetic Methods to Form Hollow Polymer Nanocapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Madeline T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-13

    Syntactic foams have grown in interest due to the widened range of applications because of their mechanical strength and high damage tolerance. In the past, hollow glass or ceramic particles were used to create the pores. This paper reviews literature focused on the controlled synthesis of hollow polymer spheres with diameters ranging from 100 –200 nm. By using hollow polymer spheres, syntactic foams could reach ultra-low densities.

  2. Pinhole Viewing Strengthens the Hollow-Face Illusion

    OpenAIRE

    Koessler, Trent; Hill, Harold

    2015-01-01

    A hollow (concave) mask appears convex when viewed from beyond a certain distance even when viewed stereoscopically—this is the hollow-face illusion. At close viewing distances, the same mask is seen as hollow even when disparity information is eliminated by monocular viewing. A potential source of nonpictorial, monocular information that favors a veridical percept at close distances is accommodation in conjunction with focus blur. In this article, we used pinhole viewing to minimize this pot...

  3. Magnetic and Optical Properties of Submicron-Size Hollow Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Yoshikawa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic hollow spheres with a controlled diameter and shell thickness have emerged as an important class of magnetic nanomaterials. The confined hollow geometry and pronouncedly curved surfaces induce unique physical properties different from those of flat thin films and solid counterparts. In this paper, we focus on recent progress on submicron-size spherical hollow magnets (e.g., cobalt- and iron-based materials, and discuss the effects of the hollow shape and the submicron size on magnetic and optical properties.

  4. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2003-03-31

    This report represents a summary of the work carried out on this project which started October 1999 and ended March 2003. A list of the publications resulting from the work are contained in Appendix A. The most significant achievements are: (1) Dense nanocrystalline zirconia and ceria films were obtained at temperatures < 400 C. (2) Nanocrystalline films of both ceria and zirconia were characterized. (3) We showed that under anodic conditions 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films of Sc doped zirconia have sufficient electronic conductivity to prevent them from being useful as an electrolyte. (4) We have developed a process by which dense 0.5 to 5 micron thick dense films of either YSZ or ceria can be deposited on sintered porous substrates which serve as either the cathode or anode at temperatures as low as 400 C. (5) The program has provided the research to produce two PhD thesis for students, one is now working in the solid oxide fuel cell field. (6) The results of the research have resulted in 69 papers published, 3 papers submitted or being prepared for publication, 50 oral presentations and 3 patent disclosures.

  5. Outgassing rate analysis of a velvet cathode and a carbon fiber cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Kun; Fan, Yu-Wei; Qian, Bao-Liang; Zhang, Zi-cheng; Xun, Tao

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the outgassing-rates of a carbon fiber array cathode and a polymer velvet cathode are tested and discussed. Two different methods of measurements are used in the experiments. In one scheme, a method based on dynamic equilibrium of pressure is used. Namely, the cathode works in the repetitive mode in a vacuum diode, a dynamic equilibrium pressure would be reached when the outgassing capacity in the chamber equals the pumping capacity of the pump, and the outgassing rate could be figured out according to this equilibrium pressure. In another scheme, a method based on static equilibrium of pressure is used. Namely, the cathode works in a closed vacuum chamber (a hard tube), and the outgassing rate could be calculated from the pressure difference between the pressure in the chamber before and after the work of the cathode. The outgassing rate is analyzed from the real time pressure evolution data which are measured using a magnetron gauge in both schemes. The outgassing rates of the carbon fiber array cathode and the velvet cathode are 7.3 ± 0.4 neutrals/electron and 85 ± 5 neutrals/electron in the first scheme and 9 ± 0.5 neutrals/electron and 98 ± 7 neutrals/electron in the second scheme. Both the results of two schemes show that the outgassing rate of the carbon fiber array cathode is an order smaller than that of the velvet cathode under similar conditions, which shows that this carbon fiber array cathode is a promising replacement of the velvet cathode in the application of magnetically insulated transmission line oscillators and relativistic magnetrons.

  6. Laser Process for Selective Emitter Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Poulain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective emitter solar cells can provide a significant increase in conversion efficiency. However current approaches need many technological steps and alignment procedures. This paper reports on a preliminary attempt to reduce the number of processing steps and therefore the cost of selective emitter cells. In the developed procedure, a phosphorous glass covered with silicon nitride acts as the doping source. A laser is used to open locally the antireflection coating and at the same time achieve local phosphorus diffusion. In this process the standard chemical etching of the phosphorous glass is avoided. Sheet resistance variation from 100 Ω/sq to 40 Ω/sq is demonstrated with a nanosecond UV laser. Numerical simulation of the laser-matter interaction is discussed to understand the dopant diffusion efficiency. Preliminary solar cells results show a 0.5% improvement compared with a homogeneous emitter structure.

  7. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schulze, Martin E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accuracy of emittance measurements using a solenoid focal scan following the quadrupole magnets. If the beam is round after the solenoids, the simulations indicate that the measurement is highly accurate, but it is substantially inaccurate for elliptical beams

  8. High efficiency and stable white OLED using a single emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Mechanical, Aerospace, Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2016-01-18

    The ultimate objective of this project was to demonstrate an efficient and stable white OLED using a single emitter on a planar glass substrate. The focus of the project is on the development of efficient and stable square planar phosphorescent emitters and evaluation of such class of materials in the device settings. Key challenges included improving the emission efficiency of molecular dopants and excimers, controlling emission color of emitters and their excimers, and improving optical and electrical stability of emissive dopants. At the end of this research program, the PI has made enough progress to demonstrate the potential of excimer-based white OLED as a cost-effective solution for WOLED panel in the solid state lighting applications.

  9. A polarization-insensitive plasmonic photoconductive terahertz emitter

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Xurong

    2017-11-16

    We present a polarization-insensitive plasmonic photoconductive terahertz emitter that uses a two-dimensional array of nanoscale cross-shaped apertures as the plasmonic contact electrodes. The geometry of the cross-shaped apertures is set to maximize optical pump absorption in close proximity to the contact electrodes. The two-dimensional symmetry of the cross-shaped apertures offers a polarization-insensitive interaction between the plasmonic contact electrodes and optical pump beam. We experimentally demonstrate a polarization-insensitive terahertz radiation from the presented emitter in response to a femtosecond optical pump beam and similar terahertz radiation powers compared to previously demonstrated polarization-sensitive photoconductive emitters with plasmonic contact electrode gratings at the optimum optical pump polarization.

  10. Control and Data Analysis for Emittance Measuring Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, T

    2001-01-01

    Due to the wide range of heavy ion beam intensities and energies in the GSI linac and the associated transfer channel to the synchrotron, several different types of emittance measurement systems have been established. Many common devices such as slit/grid or dipole-sweep systems are integrated into the GSI control system. Other systems like the single shot pepper pot method using CCD-cameras or stand-alone slit/grid set-ups are connected to personal computers. An overview is given about the various systems and their software integration. Main interest is directed on the software development for emittance front-end control and data analysis such as evaluation algorithms or graphical presentation of the results. In addition, special features for improved usability of the software such as data export, project databases and automatic report generation will be presented. An outlook on a unified evaluation procedure for all different types of emittance measurement is given.

  11. DC-SC Photoinjector with Low Emittance at Peking University

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang Rong; Hao, J; Huang, Senlin; Lu Xiang Yang; Quan, Shengwen; Zhang, Baocheng; Zhao, Kui

    2005-01-01

    High average power Free Electron Lasers require the high quality electron beams with the low emittance and the sub-picosecond bunches. The design of DC-SC photoinjector, directly combining a DC photoinjector with an SRF cavity, can produce high average current beam with moderate bunch charge and high duty factor. Because of the DC gun, the emittance increases quickly at the beginning, so a carefully design is needed to control that. In this paper, the simulation of an upgraded design has been done to lower the normalized emittance below 1.5mm·mrad. The photoinjector consists of a DC gap and a 2+1/2-cell SRF cavity, and it is designed to produce 4.2 MeV electron beams at 100pC bunch charge and 81.25MHz repetition rate (8 mA average current).

  12. Optical characterization of OLED emitter properties by radiation pattern analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaemmich, Michael

    2011-09-08

    Researches in both, academia and industry are investigating optical loss channels in OLED layered systems by means of optical simulation tools in order to derive promising concepts for a further enhancement of the overall device performance. Besides other factors, the prospects of success of such optimization strategies rely severely on the credibility of the optical input data. The present thesis provides a guideline to measure the active optical properties of OLED emitter materials in situ by radiation pattern analyses. Reliable and widely applicable methods are introduced to determine the internal electroluminescence spectrum, the profile of the emission zone, the dipole emitter orientation, and the internal luminescence quantum efficiency of emissive materials from the optical far field emission of OLEDs in electrical operation. The proposed characterization procedures are applied to sets of OLEDs containing both, fluorescent polymeric materials as well as phosphorescent small-molecular emitters, respectively. On the one hand, quite expected results are obtained. On the other hand, several novel and truly surprising results are found. Most importantly, this thesis contains the first report of a non-isotropic, mainly parallel emitter orientation in a phosphorescent small-molecular guest-host system (Ir(MDQ)2(acac) in a-NPD). Due to the latter result, emitter orientation based optimization of phosphorescent OLEDs seems to be within reach. Since parallel dipoles emit preferably into air, the utilization of smart emissive materials with advantageous molecular orientation is capable to boost the efficiency of phosphorescent OLEDs by 50%. Materials design, the influence of the matrix material and the substrate, as well as film deposition conditions are just a few parameters that need to be studied further in order to exploit the huge potential of the dipole emitter orientation in phosphorescent OLEDs.

  13. High-efficiency photonic crystal narrowband thermal emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G. B.; Su, M. F.; Reda Taha, M. M.; El-Kady, I.

    2010-02-01

    Photonic crystals (PhC) are artificial structures fabricated with a periodicity in the dielectric function. This periodic electromagnetic potential results in creation of energy bandgaps where photon propagation is prohibited. PhC structures have promising use in thermal applications if optimized to operate at specific thermal emission spectrum. Here, novel utilization of optimized PhC's in thermal applications is presented. We demonstrate through numerical simulation the modification of the thermal emission spectrum by a metallic photonic crystal (PhC) to create high-efficiency multispectral thermal emitters. These emitters funnel radiation from a broad emission spectrum associated with a Plancklike distribution into a prescribed narrow emission band. A detailed quantitative evaluation of the spectral and power efficiencies of a PhC thermal emitter and its portability across infrared (IR) spectral bands are provided. We show an optimized tungsten PhC with a predominant narrow-band emission profile with an emitter efficiency that is more than double that of an ideal blackbody and ~65-75% more power-efficiency across the IR spectrum. We also report on using optimal three-dimensional Lincoln log photonic crystal (LL-PhC) emitters for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generation as opposed to using a passive filtering approach to truncate the broadband thermal source emission to match the bandgap of a photovoltaic (PV) cell. The emitter performance is optimized for the 1-2μm PV band using different PhC materials, specifically copper, silver and gold. The use of the proposed PhC in TPV devices can produce significant energy savings not reported before. The optimal design of the PhC geometry is obtained by implementing a variety of optimization methods integrated with artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms.

  14. Unveiling the synergistic effect of polysulfide additive and MnO2 hollow spheres in evolving a stable cyclic performance in Li-S batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahad, Syed Abdul; Ragupathy, P; Ryu, Soojy; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Do Kyung

    2017-08-11

    Herein, we demonstrate a synergistic approach involving polar-based oxide and polysulfide additives for effectively suppressing polysulfide dissolution during cycling. The MnO2 hollow spheres not only provide physical confinement for the polysulfide species but also enable strong chemical interactions between polysulfide species and oxides, while the added polysulfide furnishes a mass buffering effect and compensates for the capacity losses due to partial cathode dissolution during discharge. The capacity retentions of S/KB, S/KB/LiPS, S/KB/MnO2, and S/KB/MnO2/LiPS composite cathodes are 31%, 45%, 59%, and 91% respectively. The remarkable capacity retention of the S/KB/LiPS/MnO2 composite electrode is mainly attributed to the synergistic effect between MnO2 and polysulfide additives.

  15. Pyrometric method for measuring emittances at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez, J.; Carra, M. E.; Cañadas, I.; Roldan, M. I.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work an alternative method for emittance determination based on pyrometric measurements is presented. The measurement procedure has been applied to AISI 310S steel samples in the Plataforma Solar de Almería vertical axis solar furnace SF5. The experimental results show that emittance increases with increasing temperature and decreases with increasing wavelength. This behaviour is in agreement with experimental results obtained by other authors. Analysis of tests has revealed a good repeatability (1%) and accuracy (< 2%) of this measurement procedure.

  16. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  17. Nanodiamonds with photostable, sub-gigahertz linewidth quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Kianinia, Mehran; Bray, Kerem; Kim, Sejeong; Xu, Zai-Quan; Gentle, Angus; Sontheimer, Bernd; Bradac, Carlo; Aharonovich, Igor

    2017-11-01

    Single-photon emitters with narrow linewidths are highly sought after for applications in quantum information processing and quantum communications. In this letter, we report on a bright, highly polarized near infrared single photon emitter embedded in diamond nanocrystals with a narrow, sub-GHz optical linewidth at 10 K. The observed zero-phonon line at ˜780 nm is optically stable under low power excitation and blue shifts as the excitation power increases. Our results highlight the prospect for using new near infrared color centers in nanodiamonds for quantum applications.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Su Kang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube emitter, and the transmitted X-ray image was of high resolution.

  19. Beam emittance reduction during operation of Indus-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar, E-mail: fakhri@rrcat.gov.in; Kant, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Singh, Gurnam [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Indus-2 storage ring is a 2.5 GeV third generation synchrotron radiation source. This source was commissioned using a moderate optics. Beam injection was accomplished using an off momentum electron beam to avoid difficulties faced in storage of beam at 550 MeV. The injection procedure and relevant beam dynamical studies are discussed. The switch over from the moderate optics to low emittance optics is done at 2.5 GeV after storing the electron beam. The procedure evolved to reduce the beam emittance and its implementation during the operation is discussed.

  20. Improved cathode materials for microbial electrosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T; Nie, HR; Bain, TS; Lu, HY; Cui, MM; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Franks, AE; Nevin, KP; Russell, TP; Lovley, DR

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis is a promising strategy for the microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to transportation fuels and other organic commodities, but optimization of this process is required for commercialization. Cathodes which enhance electrode-microbe electron transfer might improve rates of product formation. To evaluate this possibility, biofilms of Sporomusa ovata, which are effective in acetate electrosynthesis, were grown on a range of cathode materials and acetate production was monitored over time. Modifications of carbon cloth that resulted in a positive-charge enhanced microbial electrosynthesis. Functionalization with chitosan or cyanuric chloride increased acetate production rates 6-7 fold and modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane gave rates 3-fold higher than untreated controls. A 3-fold increase in electrosynthesis over untreated carbon cloth cathodes was also achieved with polyaniline cathodes. However, not all strategies to provide positively charged surfaces were successful, as treatment of carbon cloth with melamine or ammonia gas did not stimulate acetate electrosynthesis. Treating carbon cloth with metal, in particular gold, palladium, or nickel nanoparticles, also promoted electrosynthesis, yielding electrosynthesis rates that were 6-,4.7- or 4.5-fold faster than the untreated control, respectively. Cathodes comprised of cotton or polyester fabric treated with carbon nanotubes yielded cathodes that supported acetate electrosynthesis rates that were similar to 3-fold higher than carbon cloth controls. Recovery of electrons consumed in acetate was similar to 80% for all materials. The results demonstrate that one approach to increase rates of carbon dioxide reduction in microbial electrosynthesis is to modify cathode surfaces to improve microbe-electrode interactions.

  1. A High Capacity Li-Ion Cathode: The Fe(III/VI Super-Iron Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Licht

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A super-iron Li-ion cathode with a 3-fold higher reversible capacity (a storage capacity of 485 mAh/g is presented. One of the principle constraints to vehicle electrification is that the Li-ion cathode battery chemistry is massive, and expensive. Demonstrated is a 3 electron storage lithium cathodic chemistry, and a reversible Li super-iron battery, which has a significantly higher capacity than contemporary Li-ion batteries. The super-iron Li-ion cathode consists of the hexavalent iron (Fe(VI salt, Na2FeO4, and is formed from inexpensive and clean materials. The charge storage mechanism is fundamentally different from those of traditional lithium ion intercalation cathodes. Instead, charge storage is based on multi-electron faradaic reduction, which considerably enhances the intrinsic charge storage capacity.

  2. Boundary conditions on the plasma emitter surface in the presence of a particle counter flow: I. Ion emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrelin, V. T., E-mail: V.T.Astrelin@inp.nsk.su; Kotelnikov, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Emission of positively charged ions from a plasma emitter irradiated by a counterpropagating electron beam is studied theoretically. A bipolar diode with a plasma emitter in which the ion temperature is lower than the electron temperature and the counter electron flow is extracted from the ion collector is calculated in the one-dimensional model. An analog of Bohm’s criterion for ion emission in the presence of a counterpropagating electron beam is derived. The limiting density of the counterpropagating beam in a bipolar diode operating in the space-charge-limited-emission regime is calculated. The full set of boundary conditions on the plasma emitter surface that are required for operation of the high-current optics module in numerical codes used to simulate charged particle sources is formulated.

  3. Spectral Clustering of Hermean craters hollows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Pajola, Maurizio; Cremonese, Gabriele; Carli, Cristian; Marzo, Giuseppe; Roush, Ted

    2017-04-01

    The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS, Hawkins et al., 2007) onboard NASA MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft, provided high-resolution images of "hollows", i.e. shallow, irregular, rimless, flat-floored depressions with bright interiors and halos, often found on crater walls, rims, floors and central peaks (Blewett et al., 2011, 2013). The formation mechanism of these features was suggested to be related to the depletion of subsurface volatiles (Blewett et al., 2011, Vaughan et al., 2012). To understand the hollows' mineralogical composition, which can provide new insights on Mercury's surface characterization, we applied a spectral clustering method to different craters where hollows are present. We chose, as first test case, the 20 km wide Dominici crater due to previous multiple spectral detection (Vilas et al., 2016). We used the MDIS WAC dataset covering Dominici crater with a scale of 935 m/pixel through eight filters, ranging from 0.433 to 0.996 μm. First, the images have been photometrically corrected using the Hapke parameters (Hapke et al., 2002) derived in Domingue et al. (2015). We then applied a statistical clustering over the entire dataset based on a K-means partitioning algorithm (Marzo et al., 2006). This approach was developed and evaluated by Marzo et al. (2006, 2008, 2009) and makes use of the Calinski and Harabasz criterion (Calinski, T., Harabasz, J., 1974) to identify the intrinsically natural number of clusters, making the process unsupervised. The natural number of ten clusters was identified and spectrally separates the Dominici surrounding terrains from its interior, as well as the two hollows from their edges. The units located on the brightest part of the south wall/rim of Dominici crater clearly present a wide absorption band between 0.558 and 0.828 μm. Hollows surrounding terrains typically present a red slope in the VNIR with a possible weak absorption band centered at 0.748

  4. Hollow-Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Mitchell, Keith; Settles, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The hollow-fiber spacesuit water membrane evaporator (HoFi SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits and spacecraft to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust, heat-rejection device that is less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. After recent contamination tests, a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) micro porous hollow-fiber membrane was selected for prototype development as the most suitable candidate among commercial hollow-fiber evaporator alternatives. An innovative design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was developed into a full-scale prototype for the spacesuit application. Vacuum chamber testing has been performed to characterize heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor back-pressure, and to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the wastewater reclamation distillation processes. Other tests showed tolerance to freezing and suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment. In summary, HoFi SWME is a lightweight, compact evaporator for heat rejection in the spacesuit that is robust, contamination- insensitive, freeze-tolerant, and able to reject the required heat of spacewalks in microgravity, lunar, and Martian environments. The HoFi is packaged to reject 810 W of heat through 800 hours of use in a vacuum environment, and 370 W in a Mars environment. The device also eliminates free gas and dissolved gas from the coolant loop.

  5. A novel anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactor (AnEMBR) with conductive hollow-fiber membrane for treatment of low-organic strength solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Katuri, Krishna

    2014-11-04

    A new anaerobic treatment system that combined a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with membrane filtration using electrically conductive, porous, nickel-based hollow-fiber membranes (Ni-HFMs) was developed to treat low organic strength solution and recover energy in the form of biogas. This new system is called an anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactor (AnEMBR). The Ni-HFM served the dual function as the cathode for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the membrane for filtration of the effluent. The AnEMBR system was operated for 70 days with synthetic acetate solution having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 320 mg/L. Removal of COD was >95% at all applied voltages tested. Up to 71% of the substrate energy was recovered at an applied voltage of 0.7 V as methane rich biogas (83% CH4; < 1% H2) due to biological conversion of the hydrogen evolved at the cathode to methane. A combination of factors (hydrogen bubble formation, low cathode potential and localized high pH at the cathode surface) contributed to reduced membrane fouling in the AnEMBR compared to the control reactor (open circuit voltage). The net energy required to operate the AnEMBR system at an applied voltage of 0.7 V was significantly less (0.27 kWh/m3) than that typically needed for wastewater treatment using aerobic membrane bioreactors (1-2 kWh/m3).

  6. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kosier, S.L. [VTC Inc., Bloomington, MN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  7. A combined emitter threat assessment method based on ICW-RCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Hongwei; Guo, Xiaotao; Wang, Yubing

    2017-08-01

    Considering that the tradition al emitter threat assessment methods are difficult to intuitively reflect the degree of target threaten and the deficiency of real-time and complexity, on the basis of radar chart method(RCM), an algorithm of emitter combined threat assessment based on ICW-RCM (improved combination weighting method, ICW) is proposed. The coarse sorting is integrated with fine sorting in emitter combined threat assessment, sequencing the emitter threat level roughly accordance to radar operation mode, and reducing task priority of the low-threat emitter; On the basis of ICW-RCM, sequencing the same radar operation mode emitter roughly, finally, obtain the results of emitter threat assessment through coarse and fine sorting. Simulation analyses show the correctness and effectiveness of this algorithm. Comparing with classical method of emitter threat assessment based on CW-RCM, the algorithm is visual in image and can work quickly with lower complexity.

  8. Hollow Electron Lens Simulation for the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Previtali, V; Stancari, G; Valishev, A

    2013-01-01

    The hardware of the Tevatron hollow electron lens, which has been used in the past for collimation purposes, is presently available. Possible applications of similar devices in the LHC are under evaluation, but a realistic date for installation of electron lenses in the LHC would be not earlier than the machine shutdown scheduled for 2018. We investigated the possibility of beam tests with the available hardware in the meantime in the SPS. This article aims to answer this question by presenting the results of dedicated numerical simulations

  9. Casting of particle-based hollow shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchhofer, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A method for the production of hollow articles made of a particle-based material; e.g., ceramics and sintered metals. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, a thermally settable slurry containing a relatively high concentration of the particles is coated onto a prewarmed continuous surface in a relatively thin layer so that the slurry is substantially uniformly coated on the surface. The heat of the prewarmed surface conducts to the slurry to initiate a reaction which causes the slurry to set or harden in a shape conforming to the surface. The hardened configurations may then be sintered to consolidate the particles and provide a high density product.

  10. Using the Orbit Tracking Code Z3CYCLONE to Predict the Beam Produced by a Cold Cathode PIG Ion Source for Cyclotrons under DC Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Forringer, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the emittance and luminosity of beams produced by a cold-cathode Phillips Ionization Guage (PIG) ion source for cyclotrons under dc extraction are reviewed. (The source being studied is of the same style as ones that will be used in a series of 250 MeV proton cyclotrons being constructed for cancer therapy by ACCEL Inst, Gmbh, of Bergisch Gladbach, Germany.) The concepts of 'plasma boundary' and 'plasma temperature' are presented as a useful set of parameters for describing the initial conditions used in computational orbit tracking. Experimental results for r-pr and z-pz emittance are compared to predictions from the MSU orbit tracking code Z3CYCLONE with results indicating that the code is able to predict the beam produced by these ion sources with adequate accuracy such that construction of actual cyclotrons can proceed with reasonably prudent confidence that the cyclotron will perform as predicted.

  11. Porous-wall hollow glass microspheres as carriers for biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Dynan, William S; Wicks, George; Serkiz, Steven

    2013-09-17

    The present invention includes compositions of porous-wall hollow glass microspheres and one or more biomolecules, wherein the one or more biomolecules are positioned within a void location within the hollow glass microsphere, and the use of such compositions for the diagnostic and/or therapeutic delivery of biomolecules.

  12. Wet spinning of asymmetric hollow fibre membranes for gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Jacob Adriaan

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the spinning and characterizatin of hollow fibre membranes for gas separation. The type of fibres studied here are made by a wet spinning process. A homogeneous solution is prepared, consisting of a polymer in a suitable organic solvent, and extruded as a hollow fibre. Both the

  13. Fabrication of Closed Hollow Bulb Obturator Using Thermoplastic Resin Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidhan Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Closed hollow bulb obturators are used for the rehabilitation of postmaxillectomy patients. However, the time consuming process, complexity of fabrication, water leakage, and discoloration are notable disadvantages of this technique. This paper describes a clinical report of fabricating closed hollow bulb obturator using a single flask and one time processing method for an acquired maxillary defect. Hard thermoplastic resin sheet has been used for the fabrication of hollow bulb part of the obturator. Method. After fabrication of master cast conventionally, bulb and lid part of the defect were formed separately and joined by autopolymerizing acrylic resin to form one sized smaller hollow body. During packing procedure, the defect area was loaded with heat polymerizing acrylic resin and then previously fabricated smaller hollow body was adapted over it. The whole area was then loaded with heat cure acrylic. Further processes were carried out conventionally. Conclusion. This technique uses single flask which reduces laboratory time and makes the procedure simple. The thickness of hollow bulb can be controlled and light weight closed hollow bulb prosthesis can be fabricated. It also minimizes the disadvantages of closed hollow bulb obturator such as water leakage, bacterial infection, and discoloration.

  14. optimizing compression zone of flanged hollow cored concrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    effective flange width and the hollow core position in the compression zone of a plain concrete beam with a point loaded at .... OPTIMIZING COMPRESSION ZONE OF FLANGED HOLLOW CORED CONCRETE BEAMS USING MOMENT OF INERTIA THEORY, ... chi-square test, a correction factor was obtained using.

  15. Safety of carbon fibre reinforced plastic hollow sections in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of steel hollow sections as compression members in structures has been a common practice. This study highlights the safety of using Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) hollow sections as compression structural members. The primary compression members in structures are columns and this study uses Finite ...

  16. The influence of cathode excavation of cathodic arc evaporator on thickness uniformity and erosion products angle distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathodic arc evaporators are used for coating with functional films. Prolonged or buttend evaporators may be used for this purposes. In butt-end evaporator the cathode spots move continuously on the cathode work surface and evaporate cathode material. High depth excavation profile forms on the cathode work surface while the thick coating precipitation (tens or hundreds of microns. The cathode excavation profile is shaped like a “cup” with high walls for electrostatic discharge stabilization systems with axial magnetic fields. Cathode spots move on the bottom of the “cup”. It is very likely that high “cup” walls are formed as a result of lasting work time influence on the uniformity of precipitated films.In the present work the influence of excavation profile walls height on the uniformity of precipitated coating was carried out. The high profile walls are formed due to lasting work of DC vacuum arc evaporator. The cathode material used for tests was 3003 aluminum alloy. The extended substrate was placed parallel to the cathode work surface. Thickness distribution along the substrate length with the new cathode was obtained after 6 hours and after 12 hours of continuous operation.The thickness distribution of precipitated coating showed that the cathode excavation has an influence on the angular distribution of the matter escaping the cathode. It can be clearly seen from the normalized dependence coating thickness vs the distance from the substrate center. Also the angular distribution of the matter flow from the cathode depending on the cathode working time was obtained. It was shown that matter flow from the cathode differs from the LambertKnudsen law. The more the cathode excavation the more this difference.So, cathode excavation profile has an influence on the uniformity of precipitated coating and it is necessary to take in account the cathode excavation profile while coating the thick films.

  17. Growth of hollow cell spheroids in microbead templated chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Eddie; Wang, Dong; Geng, Andrew; Seo, Richard; Gong, Xiaohua

    2017-10-01

    Cells form hollow, spheroidal structures during the development of many tissues, including the ocular lens, inner ear, and many glands. Therefore, techniques for in vitro formation of hollow spheroids are valued for studying developmental and disease processes. Current in vitro methods require cells to self-organize into hollow morphologies; we explored an alternative strategy based on cell growth in predefined, spherical scaffolds. Our method uses sacrificial, gelatin microbeads to simultaneously template spherical chambers within a hydrogel and deliver cells into the chambers. We use mouse lens epithelial cells to demonstrate that cells can populate the internal surfaces of the chambers within a week to create numerous hollow spheroids. The platform supports manipulation of matrix mechanics, curvature, and biochemical composition to mimic in vivo microenvironments. It also provides a starting point for engineering organoids of tissues that develop from hollow spheroids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A 200 W Hall thruster with hollow indented anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongjie; Sun, Hezhi; Wei, Liqiu; Li, Peng; Su, Hongbo; Peng, Wuji; Yu, Daren

    2017-10-01

    A hollow indented anode is proposed for increasing the neutral gas density in a discharge channel, in order to improve the performance of the thruster. The experimental results show that a hollow indented anode structure can effectively improve the performance, compared to a hollow straight anode under similar operating conditions, in terms of thrust, propellant utilization, ionization rate, and anode efficiency. Furthermore, simulations show that the indented anode can effectively increase the neutral gas density in a discharge channel and on the centerline of the channel, compared to a hollow straight anode. In addition, it can increase the ionization rate in the channel and the pre-ionization in the anode. Therefore, the hollow indented anode could be considered as an important design idea for improving thruster performance.

  19. Hollow fiber bioreactor technology for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbali, Hadis; Nava, Michele M; Mohebbi-Kalhori, Davod; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber bioreactors are the focus of scientific research aiming to mimic physiological vascular networks and engineer organs and tissues in vitro. The reason for this lies in the interesting features of this bioreactor type, including excellent mass transport properties. Indeed, hollow fiber bioreactors allow limitations to be overcome in nutrient transport by diffusion, which is often an obstacle to engineer sizable constructs in vitro. This work reviews the existing literature relevant to hollow fiber bioreactors in organ and tissue engineering applications. To this purpose, we first classify the hollow fiber bioreactors into 2 categories: cylindrical and rectangular. For each category, we summarize their main applications both at the tissue and at the organ level, focusing on experimental models and computational studies as predictive tools for designing innovative, dynamic culture systems. Finally, we discuss future perspectives on hollow fiber bioreactors as in vitro models for tissue and organ engineering applications.

  20. Self-templated chemically stable hollow spherical covalent organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandambeth, Sharath; Venkatesh, V.; Shinde, Digambar B.; Kumari, Sushma; Halder, Arjun; Verma, Sandeep; Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    Covalent organic frameworks are a family of crystalline porous materials with promising applications. Although active research on the design and synthesis of covalent organic frameworks has been ongoing for almost a decade, the mechanisms of formation of covalent organic frameworks crystallites remain poorly understood. Here we report the synthesis of a hollow spherical covalent organic framework with mesoporous walls in a single-step template-free method. A detailed time-dependent study of hollow sphere formation reveals that an inside-out Ostwald ripening process is responsible for the hollow sphere formation. The synthesized covalent organic framework hollow spheres are highly porous (surface area ~1,500 m2 g-1), crystalline and chemically stable, due to the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding. These mesoporous hollow sphere covalent organic frameworks are used for a trypsin immobilization study, which shows an uptake of 15.5 μmol g-1 of trypsin.

  1. Selective emitter using porous silicon for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Inyong; Kim, Kyunghae; Kim, Youngkuk; Han, Kyumin; Kyeong, Doheon; Kwon, Taeyoung; Vinh Ai, Dao; Lee, Jeongchul; Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea); Thamilselvan, M. [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea); Government College of Technology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu (India); Ju, Minkyu; Lee, Kyungsoo [KPE Ins. Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea)

    2009-06-15

    This study is devoted to the formation of high-low-level-doped selective emitter for crystalline silicon solar cells for photovoltaic application. We report here the formation of porous silicon under chemical reaction condition. The chemical mixture containing hydrofluoric and nitric acid, with de-ionized water, was used to make porous on the half of the silicon surface of size 125 x 125 cm. Porous and non-porous areas each share half of the whole silicon surface. H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}:methanol gives the best deposited layer with acceptable adherence and uniformity on the non-porous and porous areas of the silicon surface to get high- and low-level-doped regions. The volume concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} does not exceed 10% of the total volume emulsion. Phosphoric acid was used as an n-type doping source to make emitter for silicon solar cells. The measured emitter sheet resistances at the high- and low-level-doped regions were 30-35 and 97-474 {omega}/{open_square} respectively. A simple process for low- and high-level doping has been achieved by forming porous and porous-free silicon surface, in this study, which could be applied for solar cells selective emitter doping. (author)

  2. Selective solar absorber emittance measurement at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Philémon; Braillon, Julien; Raccurt, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The characterization of a material in such condition is complicated and requires advanced apparatuses, and different measurement methods exist for the determination of the two quantities of relevance regarding an absorber, which are its emittance and its solar absorbance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for measure the emittance of this solar absorber at elevated temperature. In this paper, we present an optical bench developed for emittance measurement on absorbers is conditions of use. Results will be shown, with a discussion of some factors of influence over this measurement and how to control them.

  3. Analysis of Urine for Pure Beta Emitters: Methods and Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    by combustion to separate tritiated water from organically-bound tritium. Inorganic C-14 from organically-bound C-14, the separated tritium and C-14 were measured using liquid scintillation counting. Iodine-129, a long-lived beta emitter, is normally released to the atmosphere during the operation of nuclear...

  4. The brightest Ly α emitter: Pop III or black hole?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallottini, A.; Ferrara, A.; Pacucci, F.; Gallerani, S.; Salvadori, S.; Schneider, R.; Schaerer, D.; Sobral, D.; Matthee, J.

    2015-01-01

    CR7 is the brightest z = 6.6 Ly α emitter (LAE) known to date, and spectroscopic follow-up by Sobral et al. suggests that CR7 might host Population (Pop) III stars. We examine this interpretation using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Several simulated galaxies show the same `Pop III wave'

  5. Application of positron emitters to studies on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishioka, N.S.; Matsuoka, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sekine, T. [and others

    1998-10-01

    A newly developed positron emitting tracer imaging system enables us to study dynamically the physiological function of plants, although this system covers, at present, a limited area in a plant. Production of the positron emitters {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 18}F and {sup 48}V for this application, using an AVF cyclotron, is described. (author)

  6. Jamming of Quantum Emitters by Active Coated Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    A spherical active coated nanoparticle consisting of a silica nanocore covered concentrically with a silver nanoshell is examined analytically and numerically in the presence of one, two, or four quantum emitters modeled by electric Hertzian dipoles. The ability of the active coated nanoparticle...

  7. Brightness limitations of cold field emitters caused by Coulomb interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, B.J.; Verduin, T.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    Emission theory predicts that high brightness cold field emitters can enhance imaging in the electron microscope. This (neglecting chromatic aberration) is because of the large (coherent) probe current available from a high brightness source and is based on theoretically determined values of reduced

  8. Electron Emission from Ultra-Large Area MOS Electron Emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Nielsen, Gunver; Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm

    2009-01-01

    Ultralarge metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with an active oxide area of 1 cm2 have been fabricated for use as electron emitters. The MOS structures consist of a Si substrate, a SiO2 tunnel barrier (~5 nm), a Ti wetting layer (3–10 Å), and a Au top layer (5–60 nm). Electron emission from...

  9. Scanning Emitter Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Spontaneous Emission Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimmer, Martin; Chen, Yuntian; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2011-01-01

    We report an experimental technique to map and exploit the local density of optical states of arbitrary planar nanophotonic structures. The method relies on positioning a spontaneous emitter attached to a scanning probe deterministically and reversibly with respect to its photonic environment while...

  10. M11.4.1: Electron beam emittance meter finished

    CERN Document Server

    CORDE, S

    2011-01-01

    The method that we have successfully developed based on the X ray radiation emitted by betatronic motion of electrons in the plasma is reported here. We show here very preliminary experimental results that are very promising to determine in a single shot the electron beam emittance with a high resolution.

  11. Auger Emitter Based Radiotherapy- A Possible New Treatment for Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredericia, Pil; Groesser, Torsten; Severin, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    be able to kill only the target cell while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. In addition due to the multiple electrons released during the decay these emitters are more likely to produce at cluster of complex DNA damage which are considered to be much more harmful to the cell than dispersed DNA...

  12. D11.4.1: Preliminary electron beam emittance measurement report

    CERN Document Server

    THAURY, C; MALKA, V

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new method for measuring the beam emittance in laser-plasma accelerator which is based on the observation of the X ray radiation emitted by betatronic motion of electrons in the plasma. We show here the first measurement of the emittance using this technique. The results indicate that emittance is comprised between .5 and 3 mm.mrad.

  13. Sea urchin-like mesoporous carbon material grown with carbon nanotubes as a cathode catalyst support for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ping-Lin; Hsu, Chun-Han; Li, Wan-Ting; Jhan, Jing-Yi; Chen, Wei-Fu

    A sea urchin-like carbon (UC) material with high surface area (416 m 2 g -1), adequate electrical conductivity (59.6 S cm -1) and good chemical stability was prepared by growing carbon nanotubes onto mesoporous carbon hollow spheres. A uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles was then anchored on the UC, where the Pt nanoparticles were prepared using benzylamine as the stabilizer. For this Pt loaded carbon, cyclic voltammogram measurements showed an exceptionally high electrochemically active surface area (EAS) (114.8 m 2 g -1) compared to the commonly used commercial E-TEK catalyst (65.2 m 2 g -1). The durability test demonstrates that the carbon used as a support exhibited minor loss in EAS of Pt. Compared to the E-TEK (20 wt%) cathode catalyst, this Pt loaded UC catalyst has greatly enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, less cathode flooding and considerably improved performance, resulting in an enhancement of ca. 37% in power density compared with that of E-TEK. Based on the results obtained, the UC is an excellent support for Pt nanoparticles used as cathode catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  14. Sea urchin-like mesoporous carbon material grown with carbon nanotubes as a cathode catalyst support for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Ping-Lin; Hsu, Chun-Han; Li, Wan-Ting; Jhan, Jing-Yi; Chen, Wei-Fu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A sea urchin-like carbon (UC) material with high surface area (416 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}), adequate electrical conductivity (59.6 S cm{sup -1}) and good chemical stability was prepared by growing carbon nanotubes onto mesoporous carbon hollow spheres. A uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles was then anchored on the UC, where the Pt nanoparticles were prepared using benzylamine as the stabilizer. For this Pt loaded carbon, cyclic voltammogram measurements showed an exceptionally high electrochemically active surface area (EAS) (114.8 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) compared to the commonly used commercial E-TEK catalyst (65.2 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). The durability test demonstrates that the carbon used as a support exhibited minor loss in EAS of Pt. Compared to the E-TEK (20 wt%) cathode catalyst, this Pt loaded UC catalyst has greatly enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, less cathode flooding and considerably improved performance, resulting in an enhancement of ca. 37% in power density compared with that of E-TEK. Based on the results obtained, the UC is an excellent support for Pt nanoparticles used as cathode catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. (author)

  15. Long-term evaluation of hollow screw and hollow cylinder dental implants : Clinical and radiographic results after 10 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telleman, Gerdien; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    Background: In 1988, an implant manufacturer offered a new dental implant system, with a wide choice of hollow cylinder (HC) and hollow screw (HS) implants. The purpose of this retrospective study of HS and HC implants was to evaluate clinical and radiographic parameters of peri-implant tissue and

  16. Experimentally minimized beam emittance from an L-band photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krasilnikov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available High brightness electron sources for linac based free-electron lasers (FELs are being developed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ. Production of electron bunches with extremely small transverse emittance is the focus of the PITZ scientific program. The photoinjector optimization in 2008–2009 for a bunch charge of 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1 nC resulted in measured emittance values which are beyond the requirements of the European XFEL [S. Rimjaem et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 671, 62 (2012NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2011.12.101]. Several essential modifications were commissioned in 2010–2011 at PITZ, resulting in further improvement of the photoinjector performance. Significant improvement of the rf gun phase stability is a major contribution in the reduction of the measured transverse emittance. The old TESLA prototype booster was replaced by a new cut disk structure cavity. This allows acceleration of the electron beam to higher energies and supports much higher flexibility for stable booster operation as well as for longer rf pulses which is of vital importance especially for the emittance optimization of low charge bunches. The transverse phase space of the electron beam was optimized at PITZ for bunch charges in the range between 0.02 and 2 nC, where the quality of the beam measurements was preserved by utilizing long pulse train operation. The experimental optimization yielded worldwide unprecedented low normalized emittance beams in the whole charge range studied.

  17. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  18. Hollow Pollen Shells to Enhance Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego-Taboada, Alberto; Beckett, Stephen T.; Atkin, Stephen L.; Mackenzie, Grahame

    2014-01-01

    Pollen grain and spore shells are natural microcapsules designed to protect the genetic material of the plant from external damage. The shell is made up of two layers, the inner layer (intine), made largely of cellulose, and the outer layer (exine), composed mainly of sporopollenin. The relative proportion of each varies according to the plant species. The structure of sporopollenin has not been fully characterised but different studies suggest the presence of conjugated phenols, which provide antioxidant properties to the microcapsule and UV (ultraviolet) protection to the material inside it. These microcapsule shells have many advantageous properties, such as homogeneity in size, resilience to both alkalis and acids, and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 250 °C. These hollow microcapsules have the ability to encapsulate and release actives in a controlled manner. Their mucoadhesion to intestinal tissues may contribute to the extended contact of the sporopollenin with the intestinal mucosa leading to an increased efficiency of delivery of nutraceuticals and drugs. The hollow microcapsules can be filled with a solution of the active or active in a liquid form by simply mixing both together, and in some cases operating a vacuum. The active payload can be released in the human body depending on pressure on the microcapsule, solubility and/or pH factors. Active release can be controlled by adding a coating on the shell, or co-encapsulation with the active inside the shell. PMID:24638098

  19. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  20. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function

  1. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  2. Process For Patterning Dispenser-Cathode Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Charles E.; Deininger, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Several microfabrication techniques combined into process cutting slots 100 micrometer long and 1 to 5 micrometer wide into tungsten dispenser cathodes for traveling-wave tubes. Patterned photoresist serves as mask for etching underlying aluminum. Chemically-assisted ion-beam etching with chlorine removes exposed parts of aluminum layer. Etching with fluorine or chlorine trifluoride removes tungsten not masked by aluminum layer. Slots enable more-uniform low-work function coating dispensed to electron-emitting surface. Emission of electrons therefore becomes more uniform over cathode surface.

  3. Klystron Amplifier Utilizing Scandate Cathode and Electrostatic Focusing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build an electrostatically focused klystron that exploits recent breakthroughs in scandate cathode technology. We have built cathodes with greater than...

  4. Long Life Cold Cathodes for Hall effect Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electron source incorporating long life, high current density cold cathodes inside a microchannel plate for use with ion thrusters is proposed. Cathode lifetime...

  5. Nano-Particle Scandate Cathode for Space Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an improved cathode based on our novel theory of the role of scandium oxide in enhancing emission in tungsten impregnate cathodes. Recent results have...

  6. High-quality electron beam generation in a proton-driven hollow plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Xia, G.; Lotov, K. V.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Hanahoe, K.; Mete-Apsimon, O.

    2017-10-01

    Simulations of proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerators have demonstrated substantially higher accelerating gradients compared to conventional accelerators and the viability of accelerating electrons to the energy frontier in a single plasma stage. However, due to the strong intrinsic transverse fields varying both radially and in time, the witness beam quality is still far from suitable for practical application in future colliders. Here we demonstrate the efficient acceleration of electrons in proton-driven wakefields in a hollow plasma channel. In this regime, the witness bunch is positioned in the region with a strong accelerating field, free from plasma electrons and ions. We show that the electron beam carrying the charge of about 10% of 1 TeV proton driver charge can be accelerated to 0.6 TeV with a preserved normalized emittance in a single channel of 700 m. This high-quality and high-charge beam may pave the way for the development of future plasma-based energy frontier colliders.

  7. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    . However, they have the potential of being useful as an interface on the anode side of the electrolyte. NexTech has focused much of its effort during the past few months on establishing tape casting methods for porous LSM substrates. This work, performed under a separate DOE-funded program, involved tape casting formulations comprising LSM powders with bi-modal particle size distributions and fugitive pore forming additives. Sintered LSM substrates with porosities in the 30 to 40 vol% range, and pore sizes of 10 {approx} 20 microns have been prepared. In addition, tape casting formulations involving composite mixtures of LSM and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) have been evaluated. The LSM/SDC cathode substrates are expected to provide better performance at low temperatures. Characterization of these materials is currently underway.

  8. The selection of small forest hollows for pollen analysis in boreal and temperate forest regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overballe-Petersen, Mette V; Bradshaw, Richard H.W.

    2011-01-01

    Small forest hollows represent a specialised site type for pollen analysis, since they mainly record the vegetation within an approximate radius of 20-100 m from the hollow. We discuss how to choose the most appropriate small forest hollow for pollen analysis. Hollow size, site topography, location...

  9. Erosion of a copper cathode in a negative corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asinovskiĭ, É. I.; Petrov, A. A.; Samoylov, I. S.

    2008-02-01

    The pulsed-periodic regime of a negative corona (Trichel pulses) in atmospheric-pressure air, which leads to explosion emission mechanisms (ecton generation) of pointed cathode erosion, is investigated. The jet erosion process at the copper cathode is discovered, and micrometer dendritelike structures formed by erosion products returning to the cathode are detected.

  10. A Transient Model for Fuel Cell Cathode-Water Propagation Behavior inside a Cathode after a Step Potential

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Der-Sheng Chan; Kan-Lin Hsueh

    2010-01-01

      Most of the voltage losses of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are due to the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction on the cathode and the low oxygen diffusion rate inside the flooded cathode...

  11. Formation map of air-liquid hollow profile under microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohira, Y.; Kuga, Y.; Ando, K. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry; Idogawa, K.; Fukuda, T. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    From the viewpoint of oxygen recovery and supply in a space station, the formation of an air-liquid hollow profile which has a suitable interface shape to cultivate microalgae under microgravity conditions is experimentally investigated. The air-liquid interface profiles in a rotating vessel were observed and recorded. The effects of the modified Weber number and modified Reynolds number on formation of the air-liquid hollow profile were experimentally investigated. We developed a basis for judging conditions forming the air-liquid hollow profile from the video images. When the volume ratio of the liquid/vessel is 0.60 and the modified Weber number is greater than 2.2, it is found that the air-liquid hollow profile forms and is independent of the modified Reynolds number. From the experimental results using liquids with different surface tension, the validity of using the modified Weber number is confirmed as a dimensionless number for judging the formation of the air-liquid hollow profile. It is experimentally found that the formation conditions for the air-liquid hollow profile under microgravity can be determined by the modified Weber number and the volume ratio of the liquid/vessel. In a map of the volume ratio of the liquid/vessel vs. the modified Weber number, the discrimination of the formation of the air-liquid hollow profile is performed by a line experimentally obtained in this study. (author)

  12. Self-Templated Formation of Interlaced Carbon Nanotubes Threaded Hollow Co3S4 Nanoboxes for High-Rate and Heat-Resistant Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Zhang, Zewen; Cheng, Baorui; Chen, Renpeng; Hu, Yi; Ma, Lianbo; Zhu, Guoyin; Liu, Jie; Jin, Zhong

    2017-09-13

    Lithium-sulfur batteries (Li-S) have attracted soaring attention due to the particularly high energy density for advanced energy storage system. However, the practical application of Li-S batteries still faces multiple challenges, including the shuttle effect of intermediate polysulfides, the low conductivity of sulfur and the large volume variation of sulfur cathode. To overcome these issues, here we reported a self-templated approach to prepare interconnected carbon nanotubes inserted/wired hollow Co3S4 nanoboxes (CNTs/Co3S4-NBs) as an efficient sulfur host material. Originating from the combination of three-dimensional CNT conductive network and polar Co3S4-NBs, the obtained hybrid nanocomposite of CNTs/Co3S4-NBs can offer ultrahigh charge transfer properties, and efficiently restrain polysulfides in hollow Co3S4-NBs via the synergistic effect of structural confinement and chemical bonding. Benefiting from the above advantages, the S@CNTs/Co3S4-NBs cathode shows a significantly improved electrochemical performance in terms of high reversible capacity, good rate performance, and long-term cyclability. More remarkably, even at an elevated temperature (50 °C), it still exhibits high capacity retention and good rate capacity.

  13. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  14. A multi-use cathode cell MWPC

    CERN Document Server

    Delpierre, P A; Bonierbal, P; Diop, A; Espigat, P; Herteault, L; Jobez, J P; Saget, G; Saigne, R; Sotiras, D; Turlot, J P; Vassent, M

    1982-01-01

    Describes a highly flexible modular design for multiwire proportional chambers used in the CERN-NA3 experiment. The authors illustrate this flexibility by describing the transformation of one chamber into a cathode-cell shower detector and giving its performance as such.

  15. Close cathode chamber: Low material budget MWPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Dezső; Kiss, Gábor; Hamar, Gergő; Bencédi, Gyula

    2013-01-01

    Performance of asymmetric-type MWPC-s are presented. In this structure, referred to as Close Cathode Chamber in an earlier study, the material budget is significantly reduced on one hand by the elimination of external support frame, on the other hand by thin detector walls. In this paper it is demonstrated that the outline is compatible with large size detectors (1 m wire length), maintaining mechanical and operation stability, with total weight of 3 kg (including support structure) for a half square meter surface. The detection efficiency and response time is shown to be sufficient for L0 triggering in the ALICE VHMPID layout. Reduced sensitivity to cathode deformations (due to internal overpressure as mechanical strain) is directly demonstrated. On small sized chambers, improvement of position resolution with analog readout is evaluated, reaching 0.09 mm RMS with 2 mm wide cathode segments. Simulation results on signal time evolutions are presented. With the above studies, comparison of classical MWPC-s and the Close Cathode Chamber design is performed in all major aspects.

  16. pipelines cathodic protection design methodologies for impressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    total external surface area of 226224m2. The computation further showed the current requirement was attainable with connection of 3620 anodes to set up a natural potential between sacrificial anode and pipeline. Key words: Cathodic protection, corrosion, impressed current, pipeline, sacrificial anodes. 1. INTRODUCTION.

  17. Pipelines cathodic protection design methodologies for impressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... X42 pipeline with total external surface area of 226224m2. The computation further showed the current requirement was attainable with connection of 3620 anodes to set up a natural potential between sacrificial anode and pipeline. Keywords: Cathodic protection, corrosion, impressed current, pipeline, sacrificial anodes ...

  18. Electrochemical Impedance Studies of SOFC Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm, Johan; Søgaard, Martin; Wandel, Marie

    2007-01-01

    . The full cells had a Ni-YSZ anode and anode support, a thin YSZ electrolyte, and a CGO barrier layer. The symmetric and full cell cathode responses were compared at open-circuit voltage. Humidified hydrogen was used as the fuel in the full cell measurements. Differential analysis of the impedance data...

  19. Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric Determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the electro-reduction behaviour and determination of ciprofloxacin using a hanging mercury drop electrode. Methods: Cyclic voltammograms of ciprofloxacin recorded in Britton – Robinson buffers pH 2 – 5 exhibit a single irreversible cathodic peak. The dependence of the peak current and peak ...

  20. Axisymmetric Vibration of Piezo-Lemv Composite Hollow Multilayer Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Nehru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Axisymmetric vibration of an infinite piezolaminated multilayer hollow cylinder made of piezoelectric layers of 6 mm class and an isotropic LEMV (Linear Elastic Materials with Voids layers is studied. The frequency equations are obtained for the traction free outer surface with continuity conditions at the interfaces. Numerical results are carried out for the inner, middle, and outer hollow piezoelectric layers bonded by LEMV (It is hypothetical material layers and the dispersion curves are compared with that of a similar 3-layer model and of 3 and 5 layer models with inner, middle, and outer hollow piezoelectric layers bonded by CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

  1. Hollow fiber membranes and methods for forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Dhaval Ajit; McCloskey, Patrick Joseph; Howson, Paul Edward; Narang, Kristi Jean; Koros, William

    2016-03-22

    The invention provides improved hollow fiber membranes having at least two layers, and methods for forming the same. The methods include co-extruding a first composition, a second composition, and a third composition to form a dual layer hollow fiber membrane. The first composition includes a glassy polymer; the second composition includes a polysiloxane; and the third composition includes a bore fluid. The dual layer hollow fiber membranes include a first layer and a second layer, the first layer being a porous layer which includes the glassy polymer of the first composition, and the second layer being a polysiloxane layer which includes the polysiloxane of the second composition.

  2. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Assmann, R.; Kabantsev, A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams

  3. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G; Kuznetsov, G; Shiltsev, V; Still, D A; Valishev, A; Vorobiev, L G; Assmann, R; Kabantsev, A

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  4. Permeability of Hollow Microspherical Membranes to Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinoviev, V. N.; Kazanin, I. V.; Pak, A. Yu.; Vereshchagin, A. S.; Lebiga, V. A.; Fomin, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the sorption characteristics of various hollow microspherical membranes to reveal particles most suitable for application in the membrane-sorption technologies of helium extraction from a natural gas. The permeability of the investigated sorbents to helium and their impermeability to air and methane are shown experimentally. The sorption-desorption dependences of the studied sorbents have been obtained, from which the parameters of their specific permeability to helium are calculated. It has been established that the physicochemical modification of the original particles exerts a great influence on the coefficient of the permeability of a sorbent to helium. Specially treated cenospheres have displayed high efficiency as membranes for selective extraction of helium.

  5. Hollow-tip scanning photoelectron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkun, A. P.; Mironov, B. N.; Aseyev, S. A.; Chekalin, S. V.

    2014-07-01

    A new type of microscopy based on scanning in vacuum by a beam of charged particles transmitted through a hollow probe has been implemented. This approach provides controllable motion of spatially localized ion, electron, molecular (atomic), and soft X-ray beams and investigation of the surface in the shear force mode. In the photoelectron mode, in which electrons are transmitted through a 2-μm quartz capillary, a surface profile of gadolinium irradiated by 400-nm femtosecond laser pulses has been visualized with a subwave spatial resolution. The new method of microscopy opens an opportunity of investigations in the field of nanometer local photodesorption of molecular ions (one of the last ideas of V.S. Letokhov).

  6. Hollow micro string based calorimeter device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a micron-scale calorimeter and a calorimetry method utilizing the micron-scale calorimeter. In accordance with the invention, there is provided a micron-scale calorimeter comprising a micro-channel string, being restrained at at least two longitudinally distanced...... positions so as to form a free released double clamped string in-between said two longitudinally distanced positions said micro-channel string comprising a microfluidic channel having a closed cross section and extending in the longitudinal direction of the hollow string, acoustical means adapted...... to oscillate the string at different frequencies by emitting sound waves towards the string, optical means adapted to detect oscillating frequencies of the string, and controlling means controlling the strength and frequency of the sound wave emitted by the acoustical means and receiving a signal from...

  7. Two-piece hollow bulb obturator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam Elangovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various types of obturator fabrication achievable by prosthodontist. Maxillectomy, which is a term used by head and neck surgeons and prosthodontists to describe the partial or total removal of the maxilla in patients suffering from benign or malignant neoplasms is a defect for which to provide an effective obturator is a difficult task for the maxillofacial prosthodontist. Multidisciplinary treatment planning is essential to achieve adequate retention and function for the prosthesis. Speech is often unintelligible as a result of the marked defects in articulation and nasal resonance. This paper describes how to achieve the goal for esthetics and phonetics and also describes the fabrication of a hollow obturator by two piece method, which is simple and maybe used as definitive obturator for maximum comfort of the patient.

  8. Impact of water temperature and structural parameters on the hydraulic labyrinth-channel emitter performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed I. Al-Amoud

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of water temperature and structural parameters of a labyrinth emitter on drip irrigation hydraulic performance were investigated. The inside structural parameters of the trapezoidal labyrinth emitter include path width (W and length (L, trapezoidal unit numbers (N, height (H, and spacing (S. Laboratory experiments were conducted using five different types of labyrinth-channel emitters (three non-pressure compensating and two pressure-compensating emitters commonly used for subsurface drip irrigation systems. The water temperature effect on the hydraulic characteristics at various operating pressures was recorded and a comparison was made to identify the most effective structural parameter on emitter performance. The pressure compensating emitter flow exponent (x average was 0.014, while non-pressure compensating emitter’s values average was 0.456, indicating that the sensitivity of non-pressure compensating emitters to pressure variation is an obvious characteristic (p<0.001 of this type of emitters. The effects of water temperature on emitter flow rate were insignificant (p>0.05 at various operating pressures, where the flow rate index values for emitters were around one. The effects of water temperature on manufacturer’s coefficient of variation (CV values for all emitters were insignificant (p>0.05. The CV values of the non-pressure compensating emitters were lower than those of pressure compensating emitters. This is typical for most compensating models because they are manufactured with more elements than non-compensating emitters are. The results of regression analysis indicate that N and H are the essential factors (p<0.001 to affect the hydraulic performance.

  9. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorita, T., E-mail: yorita@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  10. Photosensitivity of p-type black Si field emitter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingels, S., E-mail: smingels@uni-wuppertal.de; Porshyn, V.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G. [School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Physics Department, University of Wuppertal, Wuppertal 42119 (Germany); Prommesberger, C.; Langer, C.; Schreiner, R. [Faculty of General Sciences and Microsystems Technology, OTH Regensburg, Regensburg 93053 (Germany)

    2016-04-28

    We have investigated the properties of black Si field emitter arrays under strong electric fields and laser illumination. A low onset field of 1.8 MV/m for an emission current of 1 nA was obtained. A pronounced saturation region of the dark and photo-enhanced current was observed, which provided a short-term stability of 0.1% at 0.4 μA and 0.7% at 1.0 μA, respectively. As maximum value for the photosensitivity, an on-off current switching ratio of 43 reaching about 13 μA was achieved at a laser power of 15 mW. Electron spectra in the dark and under laser illumination are presented, showing a current and light-sensitive voltage drop across the emitters as well as hints for hot electron emission.

  11. First observation of the exchange of transverse and longitudinal emittances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.P.; Koeth, T.; Sun, Y.-E; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    An experimental program to demonstrate a novel phase space manipulation in which the horizontal and longitudinal emittances of a particle beam are exchanged has been completed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, consisting of a TM{sub 110} deflecting mode cavity flanked by two horizontally dispersive doglegs has been installed. We report on the first direct observation of transverse and longitudinal emittance exchange: {l_brace}{var_epsilon}{sub x}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub z}{sup n}{r_brace} = {l_brace} 2.9 {+-} 0.1, 2.4 {+-} 0.1, 13.1 {+-} 1.3{r_brace} {yields} {l_brace}11.3 {+-} 1.1, 2.9 {+-} 0.5, 3.1 {+-} 0.3{r_brace} mm-mrad.

  12. Commissioning of the LINAC4 Ion Source Transverse Emittance Meter

    CERN Document Server

    Bravin, E; Dutriat, C; Lokhovitsky, A; Raich, U; Roncarolo, F; Scrivens, R; Zorin, E

    2010-01-01

    LINAC4 is the first step in the upgrade of the injector chain for the LHC, and will accelerate H- ions from 45 keV to 160 MeV. Currently the ion source is installed in a test setup and its commissioning started at the end of 2009. A slit-grid system is used to measure the transverse emittance of the beam at the exit of the source. The results of the measurements have been compared with analytical and numerical predictions of the performance of the emittance meter, addressing the system resolution, accuracy and sensitivity. The outcome of this analysis has been used to improve the design of a new slit-grid system foreseen for the commissioning of LINAC 4 at higher energy locations.

  13. Oxidation and emittance of superalloys in heat shield applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recently developed superalloys that form alumina coatings have a high potential for heat shield applications for advanced aerospace vehicles at temperatures above 1095C. Both INCOLOY alloy MA 956 (of the Inco Alloys International, Inc.), an iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy, and CABOT alloy No. 214 (of the Cabot Corporation), an alumina-forming nickel-chromium alloy, have good oxidation resistance and good elevated temperature strength. The oxidation resistance of both alloys has been attributed to the formation of a thin alumina layer (alpha-Al2O3) at the surface. Emittance and oxidation data were obtained for simulated Space Shuttle reentry conditions using a hypersonic arc-heated wind tunnel. The surface oxides and substrate alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis unit. The mass loss and emittance characteristics of the two alloys are discussed.

  14. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  15. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Mark; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Livezey, Jesse; Lyndaker, Aaron; Makita, Junki; McDonald, Michael; Medjidzade, Valeri; Meller, Robert; O'Connell, Tim; Peck, Stuart; Peterson, Daniel; Ramirez, Gabriel; Rendina, Matthew; Revesz, Peter; Rider, Nate; Rice, David; Rubin, David; Sagan, David; Savino, James; Schwartz, Robert; Seeley, Robert; Sexton, James; Shanks, James; Sikora, John; Smith, Eric; Strohman, Charles; Williams, Heather; Antoniou, Fanouria; Calatroni, Sergio; Gasior, Marek; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pfingstner, Juergen; Rumolo, Giovanni; Schmickler, Hermann; Taborelli, Mauro; Asner, David; Boon, Laura; Garfinkel, Arthur; Byrd, John; Celata, Christine; Corlett, John; De Santis, Stefano; Furman, Miguel; Jackson, Alan; Kraft, Rick; Munson, Dawn; Penn, Gregory; Plate, David; Venturini, Marco; Carlson, Benjamin; Demma, Theo; Dowd, Rohan; Flanagan, John; Jain, Puneet; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Sakai, Hiroshi; Shibata, Kyo; Suetsugu, Yusuke; Tobiyama, Makoto; Gonnella, Daniel; Guo, Weiming; Harkay, Katherine; Holtzapple, Robert; Jones, James; Wolski, Andrzej; Kharakh, David; Ng, Johnny; Pivi, Mauro; Wang, Lanfa; Ross, Marc; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Zwaska, Robert; Schachter, Levi; Wilkinson, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud’s effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results

  16. Extended emitter target tracking using GM-PHD filter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youqing Zhu

    Full Text Available If equipped with several radar emitters, a target will produce more than one measurement per time step and is denoted as an extended target. However, due to the requirement of all possible measurement set partitions, the exact probability hypothesis density filter for extended target tracking is computationally intractable. To reduce the computational burden, a fast partitioning algorithm based on hierarchy clustering is proposed in this paper. It combines the two most similar cells to obtain new partitions step by step. The pseudo-likelihoods in the Gaussian-mixture probability hypothesis density filter can then be computed iteratively. Furthermore, considering the additional measurement information from the emitter target, the signal feature is also used in partitioning the measurement set to improve the tracking performance. The simulation results show that the proposed method can perform better with lower computational complexity in scenarios with different clutter densities.

  17. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Migliorati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  18. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Mark; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Alexander, James; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Billing, Michael; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Calvey, Joseph; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Conolly, Christopher; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Crittenden, James; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Dobbins, John; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Dugan, Gerald; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Eggert, Nicholas; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Fontes, Ernest; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Forster, Michael; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Gallagher, Richard; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Gray, Steven; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Greenwald, Shlomo; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Hartill, Donald; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Hopkins, Walter; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Kreinick, David; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Kreis, Benjamin; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Leong, Zhidong; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Li, Yulin; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Liu, Xianghong; /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN; /more authors..

    2012-07-06

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  19. Rose, a rotating system for 4D emittance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Michael; Groening, Lars; Xiao, Chen; Mickat, Sascha; Du, Xiaonan; Gerhard, Peter; Vormann, Hartmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A ROtating System for Emittance measurements ROSE, to measure the full 4 dimensional transverse beam matrix of a heavy ion beam has been developed and commissioned. Different heavy ion beams behind the HLI at GSI have been used in two commissioning beam times. All technical aspects of Rose have been tested, Rose has been benchmarked against existing emittance scanners for horizontal and vertical projections and the method, hard- and software to measure the 4D beam matrix has been upgraded, refined and successfully commissioned. The inter plane correlations of the HLI beam have been measured, yet as no significant initial correlations were found to be present, controlled coupling of the beam by using a skew triplet has been applied and confirmed with Rose. The next step is to use ROSE to measure and remove the known inter plane correlations of a Uranium beam before SIS18 injection.

  20. Progress of air-breathing cathode in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zejie; Mahadevan, Gurumurthy Dummi; Wu, Yicheng; Zhao, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an emerging technology to produce green energy and vanquish the effects of environmental contaminants. Cathodic reactions are vital for high electrical power density generated from MFCs. Recently tremendous attentions were paid towards developing high performance air-breathing cathodes. A typical air-breathing cathode comprises of electrode substrate, catalyst layer, and air-diffusion layer. Prior researches demonstrated that each component influenced the performance of air-breathing cathode MFCs. This review summarized the progress in development of the individual component and elaborated main factors to the performance of air-breathing cathode.

  1. Current-voltage characteristics of a cathodic plasma contactor with discharge chamber for application in electrodynamic tether propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kan; Martinez, Rafael A.; Williams, John D.

    2014-04-01

    This paper focuses on the net electron-emission current as a function of bias voltage of a plasma source that is being used as the cathodic element in a bare electrodynamic tether system. An analysis is made that enables an understanding of the basic issues determining the current-voltage (C-V) behaviour. This is important for the efficiency of the electrodynamic tether and for low impedance performance without relying on the properties of space plasma for varying orbital altitudes, inclinations, day-night cycles or the position of the plasma contactor relative to the wake of the spacecraft. The cathodic plasma contactor considered has a cylindrical discharge chamber (10 cm in diameter and ˜11 cm in length) and is driven by a hollow cathode. Experiments and a 1D spherical model are both used to study the contactor's C-V curves. The experiments demonstrate how the cathodic contactor would emit electrons into space for anode voltages in the range of 25-40 V, discharge currents in the range of 1-2.5 A, and low xenon gas flows of 2-4 sccm. Plasma properties are measured and compared with (3 A) and without net electron emission. A study of the dependence of relevant parameters found that the C-V behaviour strongly depends on electron temperature, initial ion energy and ion emission current at the contactor exit. However, it depended only weakly on ambient plasma density. The error in the developed model compared with the experimental C-V curves is within 5% at low electron-emission currents (0-2 A). The external ionization processes and high ion production rate caused by the discharge chamber, which dominate the C-V behaviour at electron-emission currents over 2 A, are further highlighted and discussed.

  2. Evaluation of parameters affecting emitter discharge of some low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four tapes, sold as Chapin, Dream, T-tape, and Typhoon 25, were evaluated. Slopes were varied from 0% to 4%; lateral lengths varied from 5.0m to 20.0m; and water supply heads varied from 0.5m to 2.0m. The results showed that emitter discharges for Chapin were between 0.43 and 0.51 l/hr for 0-2% slopes with standard ...

  3. Correlated blinking of fluorescent emitters mediated by single plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, D.; Lhuillier, E.; Ithurria, S.; Gulinatti, A.; Rech, I.; Carminati, R.; De Wilde, Y.; Krachmalnicoff, V.

    2017-03-01

    We observe time-correlated emission between a single CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot exhibiting single-photon statistics and a fluorescent nanobead located micrometers apart. This is accomplished by coupling both emitters to a silver nanowire. Single plasmons are created on the latter from the quantum dot, and transfer energy to excite in turn the fluorescent nanobead. We demonstrate that the molecules inside the bead show the same blinking behavior as the quantum dot.

  4. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  5. Industrial application of electron sources with plasma emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Belyuk, S I; Rempe, N G

    2001-01-01

    Paper contains a description, operation, design and parameters of electron sources with plasma emitters. One presents examples of application of these sources as part of automated electron-beam welding lines. Paper describes application of such sources for electron-beam deposition of composite powders. Electron-beam deposition is used to rebuild worn out part and to increase strength of new parts of machines and tools. Paper presents some examples of rebuilding part and the advantages gained in this case

  6. Porous Emitter Colloid Thruster Performance Characterization Using Optical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    80 Figure 24. Shimadzu HPV -2 high speed camera used to image Taylor Cone formation. 81 Figure 25. Shimadzu HPV -2 camera...the Shimadzu HPV -2 camera. The pictures show the brightness contrast depending on the location of the mirror used to image the emitter...such as the vacuum chamber and power supplies are discussed first. Then, a detailed description of the processes and tools used to accomplish the

  7. Low Emittance Gun Project based on Field Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ganter, Romain; Dehler, M; Gobrecht, Jens; Gough, Chris; Ingold, Gerhard; Leemann, Simon C; Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Paraliev, Martin; Pedrozzi, Marco; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Schlott, Volker; Sehr, Harald; Streun, Andreas; Wrulich, Albin F; Zelenika, Sasa

    2004-01-01

    The design of an electron gun capable of producing beam emittance one order of magnitude lower than current technology would reduce considerably the cost and size of a free electron laser emitting at 0.1nm. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) including a gate and a focusing layer are an attractive technology for such high brightness sources. Electrons are extracted from micrometric tips thanks to voltage pulses between gate and tips. The focusing layer should then reduce the initial divergence of each emitted beamlets. This FEA will be inserted in a high gradient diode configuration coupled with a radiofrequency structure. In the diode part very high electric field pulses (several hundreds of MV/m) will limit the degradation of emittance due to space charge effect. This first acceleration will be obtained with high voltage pulses (typically a megavolt in a few hundred of nanoseconds) synchronized with the low voltage pulses applied to the FEA (typically one hundred of volts in one nanosecond at frequency below kilohe...

  8. Emittance scans for CMS luminosity calibration in 2017

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Emittance scans are short van der Meer type scans performed at the beginning and at the end of LHC fills. The beams are scanned against each other in X and Y planes in 7 displacement steps. These scans are used for LHC diagnostics and since 2017 for a cross check of the CMS luminosity calibration. An XY pair of scans takes around 3 minutes. The BRIL project provides to LHC three independent online luminosity measurement from the Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT), the Fast Beam Condition Monitor (BCM1F) and the Forward calorimeter (HF). The excellent performance of the BRIL detector front-ends, fast back-end electronics and CMS XDAQ based data processing and publication allow the use of emittance scans for linearity and stability studies of the luminometers. Emittance scans became a powerful tool and dramatically improved the understanding of the luminosity measurement during the year. Since each luminometer is independently calibrated in every scan the measurements are independent and ratios of luminometers ca...

  9. Emittance Measurement for Beamline Extension at the PET Cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Hoon Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle-induced X-ray emission is used for determining the elemental composition of materials. This method uses low-energy protons (of several MeV, which can be obtained from high-energy (of tens MeV accelerators. Instead of manufacturing an accelerator for generating the MeV protons, the use of a PET cyclotron has been suggested for designing the beamline for multipurpose applications, especially for the PIXE experiment, which has a dedicated high-energy (of tens MeV accelerator. The beam properties of the cyclotron were determined at this experimental facility by using an external beamline before transferring the ion beam to the experimental chamber. We measured the beam profile and calculated the emittance using the pepper-pot method. The beam profile was measured as the beam current using a wire scanner, and the emittance was measured as the beam distribution at the beam dump using a radiochromic film. We analyzed the measurement results and are planning to use the results obtained in the simulations of external beamline and aligned beamline components. We will consider energy degradation after computing the beamline simulation. The experimental study focused on measuring the emittance from the cyclotron, and the results of this study are presented in this paper.

  10. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Samina [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India)

    2017-01-15

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  11. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and properties of hollow nickel phosphide nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni Yonghong; Tao Ali; Hu Guangzhi; Cao Xiaofeng; Wei Xianwen; Yang Zhousheng [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

    2006-10-14

    Nickel phosphide (Ni{sub 12}P{sub 5}) hollow nanospheres with a mean diameter of 100 nm and a shell thickness of 15-20 nm have been successfully prepared by a hydrothermal-microemulsion route, using NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2} as a phosphorus source. XRD, EDS (HR)TEM, SEM and the SAED pattern were used to characterize the final product. Experiments showed that the as-prepared nickel phosphide hollow nanospheres could selectively catalytically degrade some organic dyes such as methyl red and Safranine T under 254 nm UV light irradiation. At the same time, the nickel phosphide hollow nanospheres showed a stronger ability to promote electron transfer between the glass-carbon electrode and adrenalin than nickel phosphide honeycomb-like particles prepared by a simple hydrothermal route. A possible formation process for nickel phosphide hollow nanospheres was suggested based on the experimental results.

  13. High strength and low weight hollow carbon fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, T.; Brüll, R.; Pursche, F.; Langgartner, J.; Seide, G.; Gries, T.

    2017-10-01

    Carbon fibres have strengths of 2.5 to 5 GPa in the fibre direction and an elastic modulus of 200 to 500 GPa. Carbon fibres have equal mechanical properties as steel but 20% of the weight. But the material is more expensive than steel. Therefore, they are only used in industry sectors where the benefits legitimate the high costs. The use of hollow rather than solid fibres allows an even lower weight of the components. At the same time, similar mechanical properties are achieved by the circular cross section. Carbon fibres are obtained from polyacrylonitrile fibers (PAN). These can be produced as hollow fibres. As a first step stabilization and carbonization of hollow PAN precursors is investigated to produce hollow carbon fibres.

  14. Hollow Au–Ag Alloy Nanorices and Their Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keke Yu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hollow noble metal nanoparticles have excellent performance not only in surface catalysis but also in optics. In this work, the hollow Au–Ag alloy nanorices are fabricated by the galvanic replacement reaction. The dark-field spectrum points out that there is a big difference in the optical properties between the pure Ag nanorices and the hollow alloy nanorices that exhibit highly tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR and that possess larger radiative damping, which is also indicated by the finite element method. Furthermore, the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS and oxidation test indicate that hollow Au–Ag alloy nanorices show good anti-oxidation and have broad application prospects in surface-plasmon-related fields.

  15. Polyazole hollow fiber membranes for direct contact membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Maab, Husnul

    2013-08-07

    Porous hollow fiber membranes were fabricated from fluorinated polyoxadiazole and polytriazole by a dry-wet spinning method for application in desalination of Red Sea water by direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The data were compared with commercially available hollow fiber MD membranes prepared from poly(vinylidene fluoride). The membranes were characterized by electron microscopy, liquid entry pressure (LEP), and pore diameter measurements. Finally, the hollow fiber membranes were tested for DCMD. Salt selectivity as high as 99.95% and water fluxes as high as 35 and 41 L m -2 h-1 were demonstrated, respectively, for polyoxadiazole and polytriazole hollow fiber membranes, operating at 80 C feed temperature and 20 C permeate. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. The influence of emittance of low-emittance coating on the thermal performance of triple vacuum glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Y.; Hyde, T.J.; Hewitt, N. [Ulster Univ., Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). School of the Built Environment

    2010-08-13

    The concept of vacuum glazing was first patented in 1913, and has since been the subject of much research. This paper used the finite volume model to investigate the effects low-e coating on one to four glass surfaces in the two vacuum gaps of triple vacuum glazing. The numerical simulation results were compared with those calculated using the analytical model. Specifically, the paper provided schematic diagrams of the triple vacuum glazing plan view and heat transfer mechanisms through the glazing and outlined the analytical and numerical model approach. The influence of emittance of low-emittance coatings was also discussed. The simulation results revealed that when using three low-e coatings in the triple vacuum glazing, the vacuum gap with two low-e coatings should be set to the direction facing the hot side environment, while the vacuum gap with one coating should face the cold environment. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  17. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C.B., E-mail: CBSchroeder@lbl.gov; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron–positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  18. Thin-walled reinforcement lattice structure for hollow CMC buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Diego, Peter

    2017-06-27

    A hollow ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine bucket with an internal reinforcement lattice structure has improved vibration properties and stiffness. The lattice structure is formed of thin-walled plies made of CMC. The wall structures are arranged and located according to high stress areas within the hollow bucket. After the melt infiltration process, the mandrels melt away, leaving the wall structure to become the internal lattice reinforcement structure of the bucket.

  19. Flat Bunches with a Hollow Distribution for Space Charge Mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Oeftiger, Adrian; Findlay, Alan James; Hancock, Steven; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinally hollow bunches provide one means to mitigate the impact of transverse space charge. The hollow distributions are created via dipolar parametric excitation during acceleration in CERN's Proton Synchrotron Booster. We present simulation work and beam measurements. Particular emphasis is given to the alleviation of space charge effects on the long injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron machine, which is the main goal of this study.

  20. Highly efficient fluorescence sensing with hollow core photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Barth, Michael; Benson, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We investigate hollow core photonic crystal fibers for ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection by selectively infiltrating the central hole with fluorophores. Dye concentrations down to 10(-9) M can be detected using only nanoliter sample volumes.......We investigate hollow core photonic crystal fibers for ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection by selectively infiltrating the central hole with fluorophores. Dye concentrations down to 10(-9) M can be detected using only nanoliter sample volumes....

  1. Liquid Temperature Measurements Using Two Different Tunable Hollow Prisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Sergio; Rosete-Aguilar, Martha; Torres-Gomez, Ismael

    2017-01-29

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of two hollow prisms. One is a prism with a grating glued to its hypotenuse. This ensemble, prism + grating, is called a grism. It can be applied as an on-axis tunable spectrometer. The other hollow prism is a constant deviation one called a Pellin-Broca. It can be used as a tunable dispersive element in a spectrometer with no moving parts. The application of prisms as temperature sensors is shown.

  2. 3D hollow nanostructures as building blocks for multifunctional plasmonics

    KAUST Repository

    De Angelis, Francesco De

    2013-08-14

    We present an advanced and robust technology to realize 3D hollow plasmonic nanostructures which are tunable in size, shape, and layout. The presented architectures offer new and unconventional properties such as the realization of 3D plasmonic hollow nanocavities with high electric field confinement and enhancement, finely structured extinction profiles, and broad band optical absorption. The 3D nature of the devices can overcome intrinsic difficulties related to conventional architectures in a wide range of multidisciplinary applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Cool and warm hybrid white organic light-emitting diode with blue delayed fluorescent emitter both as blue emitter and triplet host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Joo; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with an external quantum efficiency above 20% was developed using a new blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent material, 4,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (DCzIPN), both as a blue emitter and a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. DCzIPN showed high quantum efficiency of 16.4% as a blue emitter and 24.9% as a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. The hybrid WOLEDs with the DCzIPN host based yellow emitting layer sandwiched between DCzIPN emitter based blue emitting layers exhibited high external quantum efficiency of 22.9% with a warm white color coordinate of (0.39, 0.43) and quantum efficiency of 21.0% with a cool white color coordinate of (0.31, 0.33) by managing the thickness of the yellow emitting layer. PMID:25598436

  4. Macroscopic Graphene Fibers Directly Assembled from CVD-Grown Fiber-Shaped Hollow Graphene Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Dai, Liming

    2015-12-01

    Using a copper wire as the substrate for the CVD growth of a hollow multilayer graphene tube, we prepared a macroscopic porous graphene fiber by removing the copper in an aqueous mixture solution of iron chloride (FeCl3, 1 M) and hydrochloric acid (HCl, 3 M) and continuously drawing the newly released graphene tube out of the liquid. The length of the macroscopic graphene fiber thus produced is determined mainly by the length of the copper wire used. The resultant macroscopic graphene fiber with the integrated graphene structure exhibited a high electrical conductivity (127.3 S cm(-1)) and good flexibility over thousands bending cycles, showing great promise as flexible electrodes for wearable optoelectronics and energy devices-exemplified by its use as a flexible conductive wire for lighting a LED and a cathode in a fiber-shaped dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with one of the highest energy conversion efficiencies (3.25%) among fiber-shaped DSSCs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of hollow V2O5 microspheres for supercapacitor electrode with pseudocapacitance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yifu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hollow V2O5 microspheres (HVOM were fabricated using NH4VO3, ethylene glycol and carbon spheres as the starting materials by a template solvothermal approach and subsequent calcination. The morphology and composition were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET. The results showed that the obtained HVOM were constructed from nanoparticles with rough surface. The electrochemical properties of HVOM as a supercapacitor electrode were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD. HVOM displayed excellent pseudocapacitance property and their specific capacitances were 488 F·g–1, 455 F·g–1, 434 F·g–1 and 396 F·g–1 at the current density of 0.5 A·g–1, 1 A·g–1, 2 A·g–1 and 5 A·g–1, respectively. They also exhibited an excellent energy density of 8.784 × 105 J·kg–1 at a power density of 900 W·kg–1 . The good electrochemical properties of the as-synthesized HVOM make them a promising candidate as a cathode material for supercapacitors.

  6. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  7. The stationary vacuum arc on non-thermionic hot cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, R. Kh; Antonov, N. N.; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Liziakin, G. D.; Polistchook, V. P.; Samoylov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental study of vacuum arc with distributed spot on plumbum cathode at temperatures 1.25-1.45 kK has been presented. At these conditions current density of thermionic emission from cathode was less than 1 μA/cm2, while the mean current density on the cathode was about 10 A/cm2. Plumbum was placed in heat-insulated crucible (cathode) with external diameter 25 mm. Electron-beam heater was situated under the crucible. Arc current was changed in the range 20-70 A, arc voltage was about 15 V. The studied arc is characterized by the absence of the random voltage fluctuations; the micro particles of cathode erosion products were observed only in transition regimes. Spectral data of plasma radiation and values of the heat flow from plasma to cathode were obtained. It has been experimentally established that the evaporation rate in arc approximately two times less than without discharge. The average charge of plumbum particles in the cathode jet was in range 0.2-0.3e. Comparison of the characteristics of studied discharge on thermionic gadolinium cathode and non-thermionic cathodes was fulfilled. One can assume that ions provide the charge transfer on the cathode in the studied discharge.

  8. A definitive criterion for cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Roger [Cathodic Protection Network International Ltd., Reading (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion reaction is defined using the Pourbaix Diagram and includes consideration of the pH, temperature, pressure, nobility of the metal and conductivity of the electrolyte. The passive zone can be established in a laboratory by creating a closed circuit condition in which the voltages can be measured. Natural corrosion cells occurring in simple conditions can be evaluated for the purpose of monitoring the performance of cathodic protection. Metal pipelines are complex networks of conductors submerged in electrolyte of infinitely variable qualities. The present method used to ascertain the effectiveness of cathodic protection has many inherent errors and results in costly and unpredictable corrosion failures. An electrode has been devised to define the exact electrical status of the corrosion reaction at its location. The design allows a closed circuit measurement of the corrosion current that can determine whether or not corrosion has been stopped by cathodic protection. This has allowed the development of software that can calculate the condition and corrosion status throughout a network of pipelines, using electrical circuit analysis common in the electronics industry. (author)

  9. Nitrogen-doped hollow porous carbon nanospheres coated with MnO2 nanosheets as excellent sulfur hosts for Li–S batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Yang, He; Guo, Junling; Zhao, Shupeng; Gong, Shoutao; Du, Xinyu; Zhang, Fengxiang

    2017-11-01

    In this work, nitrogen-doped hollow porous carbon nanospheres coated with MnO2 nanosheets (NHPC@MnO2) were prepared as a novel sulfur host for the cathode of lithium–sulfur battery. N-doping of carbon and deposition of the inherently polar MnO2 promote chemical binding of the host with sulfur and its reduction products, known as polysulfides. Meanwhile, proper N-doping can improve the electron conductivity of carbon, and the nanosheet structure may help to guarantee facile electron- and lithium-ion transport through MnO2. Attributed to these advantages, the NHPC@MnO2/S cathode with a high sulfur content (70 wt% and 2.6 mg cm‑2) exhibited an excellent cycle stability: its capacity retention was 93% within 100 cycles at 0.5 C. It also displayed a good rate capability: discharge capacities being ∼1130 mAh g‑1 at 0.2 C, ∼1000 mAh g‑1 at 0.5 C, ∼820 mAh g‑1 at 1 C, and ∼630 mAh g‑1 at 2 C. Our work demonstrates the synergistic effect of MnO2 nanostructure and N-doped carbon nanospheres for enhanced performance of lithium–sulfur battery cathodes.

  10. Ion Motion Induced Emittance Growth of Matched Electron Beams in Plasma Wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Weiming; Lu, Wei; Huang, Chengkun; Xu, Xinlu; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren B.

    2017-06-01

    Plasma-based acceleration is being considered as the basis for building a future linear collider. Nonlinear plasma wakefields have ideal properties for accelerating and focusing electron beams. Preservation of the emittance of nano-Coulomb beams with nanometer scale matched spot sizes in these wakefields remains a critical issue due to ion motion caused by their large space charge forces. We use fully resolved quasistatic particle-in-cell simulations of electron beams in hydrogen and lithium plasmas, including when the accelerated beam has different emittances in the two transverse planes. The projected emittance initially grows and rapidly saturates with a maximum emittance growth of less than 80% in hydrogen and 20% in lithium. The use of overfocused beams is found to dramatically reduce the emittance growth. The underlying physics that leads to the lower than expected emittance growth is elucidated.

  11. Vibroacoustic response of an eccentric hollow cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M.; Mousavi-akbarzadeh, Hessam

    2012-07-01

    The linear 3D elasticity theory in conjunction with the classical method of separation of variables and the translational addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions are employed to investigate the three-dimensional steady-state sound radiation characteristics of an arbitrarily thick eccentric hollow cylinder of infinite length, submerged in an unbounded ideal acoustic medium, and subjected to arbitrary time-harmonic on-surface mechanical drives. The spatial Fourier transform along the shell axis and Fourier series expansion in the circumferential direction are utilized to obtain a formal integral expression for the radiated pressure field in the frequency domain. The method of stationary phase is subsequently implemented to evaluate the integral for an observation point in the far field. The analytical results are illustrated with numerical examples in which air-filled water-submerged concentric and eccentric steel cylinders are driven by harmonic concentrated radial and transverse surface loads. Effects of excitation and cylinder eccentricity on the far-field radiated pressure amplitudes/directivities are discussed and contributions from pseudo-Rayleigh, whispering gallery, and axially guided waves are examined through selected spatial dispersion patterns. Limiting cases are considered and the validity of results is established with the aid of a commercial finite element package as well as by comparison with the data in the existing literature.

  12. Hollow plasmonic antennas for broadband SERS spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele C. Messina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemical environment of cells is an extremely complex and multifaceted system that includes many types of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and various other components. With the final aim of studying these components in detail, we have developed multiband plasmonic antennas, which are suitable for highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS and are activated by a wide range of excitation wavelengths. The three-dimensional hollow nanoantennas were produced on an optical resist by a secondary electron lithography approach, generated by fast ion-beam milling on the polymer and then covered with silver in order to obtain plasmonic functionalities. The optical properties of these structures have been studied through finite element analysis simulations that demonstrated the presence of broadband absorption and multiband enhancement due to the unusual geometry of the antennas. The enhancement was confirmed by SERS measurements, which showed a large enhancement of the vibrational features both in the case of resonant excitation and out-of-resonance excitation. Such characteristics indicate that these structures are potential candidates for plasmonic enhancers in multifunctional opto-electronic biosensors.

  13. Reluctance Machine for a Hollow Cylinder Flywheel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Hedlund

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A hollow cylinder flywheel rotor with a novel outer rotor switched reluctance machine (SRM mounted on the interior rim is presented, with measurements, numerical analysis and analytical models. Practical experiences from the construction process are also discussed. The flywheel rotor does not have a shaft and spokes and is predicted to store 181 Wh / kg at ultimate tensile strength (UTS according to simulations. The novel SRM is an axial flux machine, chosen due to its robustness and tolerance for high strain. The computed maximum tip speed of the motor at UTS is 1050 m / s . A small-scale proof-of-concept electric machine prototype has been constructed, and the machine inductance has been estimated from measurements of voltage and current and compared against results from analytical models and finite element analysis (FEA. The prototype measurements were used to simulate operation during maximal speed for a comparison towards other high-speed electric machines, in terms of tip speed and power. The mechanical design of the flywheel was performed with an analytical formulation assuming planar stress in concentric shells of orthotropic (unidirectionally circumferentially wound carbon composites. The analytical approach was verified with 3D FEA in terms of stress and strain.

  14. PECASE: Resonantly-Enhanced Lanthanide Emitters for Subwavelength-Scale, Active Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-19

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0052 PECASE- RESONATLY-ENHANCHED LANTHANIDE EMITTERS FOR SUBWAVELENGTH-SCALE, ACTIVE Photonics Rashid Zia BROWN UNIVERSITY IN...From - To) 15 Dec. 2009 – 14 Dec. 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE i i i 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER PECASE: Resonantly-Enhanced Lanthanide Emitters for...PECASE: Resonantly-Enhanced Lanthanide Emitters for Subwavelength-Scale, Active Photonics Contract/Grant #: FA9550-10-1-0026 Reporting Period: 15

  15. Specified gas emitters regulation : offset credit project guidance document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-09-15

    The Alberta Government has developed a carbon compliance system to take action against climate change. The system allows emission offsets as a compliance option. As of July 2007, Alberta's regulatory system for managing greenhouse gases has enabled a compliance-based carbon market to develop in the province by establishing market demand through regulated emission reduction targets for large emitters and by enabling market supply through allowing emission offsets as a compliance option for regulated emitters. Regulated firms in Alberta can now buy verified emission reductions or removal of greenhouse gases from voluntary actions arising from unregulated activities in the province. This market-based approach offers flexibility for emitters, since markets generally determine the most cost-effective emission reduction opportunities. In addition, the ability to sell offsets provides an incentive to invest in activities that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions beyond regulated activities. Since this approach is new, this guidance document was prepared in an effort to outline the process and requirements for undertaking offset projects in Alberta. The market-based approach is an alternative to traditional command and control measures to reducing pollution. It allows for the flexibility of the private market to find reduction opportunities, resulting in cost-effective strategies to reduce greenhouse gases. The approach has been used successfully for sulphur dioxide and lead in gasoline. An emission offset (or a carbon credit) is generated when a project results in GHG reduction or removals that go beyond normal business operations. This document defined the criteria needed for generating offsets in the Alberta system. 2 tabs., 3 figs., 2 appendices.

  16. Cathode power distribution system and method of using the same for power distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Koehl, Eugene R; Bailey, James L; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2014-11-11

    Embodiments include a cathode power distribution system and/or method of using the same for power distribution. The cathode power distribution system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly of the plurality of cathode assemblies includes a plurality of cathode rods. The system also includes a plurality of bus bars configured to distribute current to each of the plurality of cathode assemblies. The plurality of bus bars include a first bus bar configured to distribute the current to first ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies and a second bus bar configured to distribute the current to second ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies.

  17. Improvements in emittance wake field optimization for the SLAC Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Franz Josef

    2003-01-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time ...

  18. Experimental studies on coherent synchrotron radiation at an emittance exchange beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. T. Thangaraj

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate experimentally the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line could limit the performance of the emittance exchanger at short bunch lengths. In this paper, we present experimental and simulation studies of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR in the emittance exchange line at the A0 photoinjector. We report on time-resolved CSR studies using a skew-quadrupole technique. We also demonstrate the advantages of running the EEX with an energy-chirped beam.

  19. Effect of dipole orientation on Purcell factor for the quantum emitter near silicon nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalogina, Anastasia S.; Javadzade, Javid; Zuev, Dmitry A.; Savelev, Roman S.; Vorobyov, Vadim V.; Makarov, Sergey V.; Belov, Pavel A.; Akimov, Alexey V.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the optical properties of quantum emitters is the cornerstone of many phenomena in nanophotonics. Spontaneous emission from quantum emitters can be modified when they are placed in resonators, for example, near plasmonic or dielectric nanoantennas. We numerically study the Purcell factor of the emitter inside a nanodiamond placed near the resonant silicon nanoparticle. We show that in this system the 11-fold enhancement can be achieved for a specific orientation of the dipole moment of the emitter. The obtained results are of particular importance for nanophotonic applications which aim to control optical properties of quantum light sources.

  20. Method of manufacturing a hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2017-02-07

    A method of manufacturing an all back contact solar cell which has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. A second emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The method further includes forming contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.