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Sample records for emittance growth caused

  1. Proton beam emittance growth in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available With the significant beam intensity improvement in RHIC polarized proton run 2005 and run 2006, the emittance growth becomes a luminosity limiting factor. The beam emittance growth has a dependence on the dynamic pressure rise, which in RHIC proton runs is mainly caused by the electron cloud. The dependence of the emittance growth on other electron cloud related parameters is also identified. The beam instability is usually absent, and the emittance growth rate is much slower than the ones typically caused by the head-tail instability. It is suspected that the emittance growth is caused by the electron cloud below the instability threshold. A discussion follows.

  2. Observation of emittance growth at KEK PS

    CERN Document Server

    Igarashi, S; Nakamura, E; Shimosaki, Y; Shirakata, M; Takayama, K; Toyama, T

    2003-01-01

    Emittance growth has been observed in the transverse direction at the injection period of the 12 GeV main ring of the KEK proton synchrotron. Measurement of the beam profiles using flying wires has revealed a characteristic temporal change of the beam profile within a few milliseconds after injection. Horizontal emittance growth was observed when the horizontal tune was close to the integer. The effect was more enhanced for higher beam intensity and could not be explained with the injection mismatch. Resonance created by the space charge field was the cause of the emittance growth. A multiparticle tracking simulation program, ACCSIM, taking account of space charge effects has qualitatively reproduced the beam profiles.

  3. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  4. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  5. Emittance growths in resonance crossing at FFAGs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab; Pang, X.; Wang, F.; Wang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-01

    Scaling laws of the emittance growth for a beam crossing the 6th-order systematic space-charge resonances and the random-octupole driven 4th-order resonance are obtained by numerical multi-particle simulations. These laws can be important in setting the minimum acceleration rate and maximum tolerable resonance strength for the design of non-scaling fixed-field alternating gradient accelerators.

  6. Emittance growth in coast in the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Alekou, A; Bartosik, H; Calaga, R

    2017-01-01

    The CERN SPS will be used as a test-bed for the LHCprototype crab-cavities, which will be installed and testedin the SPS in 2018. As the time available for experimen-tal beam dynamics studies with the crab cavities installedin the machine will be limited, a very good preparation isrequired in advance. One of the main concerns is the in-duced emittance growth, driven by phase jitter in the crabcavities. In this respect, several machine development (MD)studies were performed during the past years to quantifyand characterize the emittance evolution of proton beamsin coast in the SPS. In these proceedings, the experimentalobservations from past years are summarized and the MDstudies from 2016 are presented. Finally, a proposal for anexperimental program for 2017 is discussed.

  7. Ion Motion Induced Emittance Growth of Matched Electron Beams in Plasma Wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Weiming; Lu, Wei; Huang, Chengkun; Xu, Xinlu; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren B.

    2017-06-01

    Plasma-based acceleration is being considered as the basis for building a future linear collider. Nonlinear plasma wakefields have ideal properties for accelerating and focusing electron beams. Preservation of the emittance of nano-Coulomb beams with nanometer scale matched spot sizes in these wakefields remains a critical issue due to ion motion caused by their large space charge forces. We use fully resolved quasistatic particle-in-cell simulations of electron beams in hydrogen and lithium plasmas, including when the accelerated beam has different emittances in the two transverse planes. The projected emittance initially grows and rapidly saturates with a maximum emittance growth of less than 80% in hydrogen and 20% in lithium. The use of overfocused beams is found to dramatically reduce the emittance growth. The underlying physics that leads to the lower than expected emittance growth is elucidated.

  8. Impact of Optics on CSR-Related Emittance Growth in Bunch Compressor Chicanes

    CERN Document Server

    Limberg, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    The dependence of emittance growth due to Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) in bunch compressor chicanes on optics has been noticed and empirically studied in the past. We revisit the subject, suggesting a model to explain slice emittance growth dependence on chicane optics. A simplified model to calculate projected emittance growth when it is mainly caused by transverse slice centroid offsets is presented. It is then used to find optimal compensation of centroid kicks in the single chicanes of a two-stage compression system by adjusting the phase advance of the transport in between and the ration of the compression factors.

  9. Transverse emittance growth in staged laser-wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mehrling

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the emittance evolution of electron bunches, externally injected into laser-driven plasma waves using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC code OSIRIS. Results show order-of-magnitude transverse emittance growth during the injection process, if the electron bunch is not matched to its intrinsic betatron motion inside the wakefield. This behavior is supported by analytic theory reproducing the simulation data to a percent level. The length over which the full emittance growth develops is found to be less than or comparable to the typical dimension of a single plasma module in current multistage designs. In addition, the analytic theory enables the quantitative prediction of emittance degradation in two consecutive accelerators coupled by free-drift sections, excluding this as a scheme for effective emittance-growth suppression, and thus suggests the necessity of beam-matching sections between acceleration stages with fundamental implications on the overall design of staged laser-wakefield accelerators.

  10. Study of Abnormal Vertical Emittance Growth in ATF Extraction Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alabau, M.; Faus-Golfe, A.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Le Meur, G.; Rimbault, C.; Touze, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.K.; /Daresbury; Appleby, R.; Scarfe, A.; /Manchester U.; Kuroda, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; White, G.R.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Since several years, the vertical beam emittance measured in the Extraction Line (EXT) of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, that will transport the electron beam from the ATF Damping Ring (DR) to the future ATF2 Final Focus beam line, is significantly larger than the emittance measured in the DR itself, and there are indications that it grows rapidly with increasing beam intensity. This longstanding problem has motivated studies of possible sources of this anomalous emittance growth. One possible contribution is non-linear magnetic fields in the extraction region experimented by the beam while passing off-axis through magnets of the DR during the extraction process. In this paper, simulations of the emittance growth are presented and compared to observations. These simulations include the effects of predicted non-linear field errors in the shared DR magnets and orbit displacements from the reference orbit in the extraction region. Results of recent measurements using closed orbit bumps to probe the relation between the extraction trajectory and the anomalous emittance growth are also presented.

  11. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schulze, Martin E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accuracy of emittance measurements using a solenoid focal scan following the quadrupole magnets. If the beam is round after the solenoids, the simulations indicate that the measurement is highly accurate, but it is substantially inaccurate for elliptical beams

  12. Low Emittance Growth in a LEBT with Un-Neutralized Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, Lionel [Fermilab; Carneiro, Jean-Paul [Fermilab; Shemyakin, Alexander [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    In a Low Energy Beam Transport line (LEBT), the emittance growth due to the beam's own space charge is typically suppressed by way of neutralization from either electrons or ions, which originate from ionization of the background gas. In cases where the beam is chopped, the neutralization pattern changes throughout the beginning of the pulse, causing the Twiss parameters to differ significantly from their steady state values, which, in turn, may result in beam losses downstream. For a modest beam perveance, there is an alternative solution, in which the beam is kept un-neutralized in the portion of the LEBT that contains the chopper. The emittance can be nearly preserved if the transition to the un-neutralized section occurs where the beam exhibits low transverse tails. This report discusses the experimental realization of such a scheme at Fermilab's PXIE, where low beam emittance dilution was demonstrated

  13. Brightness limitations of cold field emitters caused by Coulomb interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, B.J.; Verduin, T.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    Emission theory predicts that high brightness cold field emitters can enhance imaging in the electron microscope. This (neglecting chromatic aberration) is because of the large (coherent) probe current available from a high brightness source and is based on theoretically determined values of reduced

  14. Emittance growth induced by electron cloud in proton storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Coppa, G

    2006-01-01

    In proton and positron storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, a large number of electrons can accumulate in the beam pipe due to various mechanisms (photoemission, residual gas ionization, beam-induced multipacting). The so-formed electron cloud interacts with the positively charged bunches, giving rise to instabilities, emittance growth and losses. This phenomenon has been observed in several existing machines such as the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), whose operation has been constrained by the electron-cloud problem, and it is a concern for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud has features which cannot be fully taken into account by the conventional and known theories from accelerators and plasma physics. Computer simulations are indispensable for a proper prediction and understanding of the instability dynamics. The main feature which renders the beam-cloud interactions so peculiar is that the the electron cloud...

  15. Low Emittance Growth in a LEBT with Un-Neutralized Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L. [Fermilab; Carneiro, J.-P. [Fermilab; Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab

    2017-12-20

    In a Low Energy Beam Transport line (LEBT), the emittance growth due to the beam’s space charge is typically suppressed by way of neutralization from either electrons or ions, which originate from ionization of the background gas. In cases where the beam is chopped, the neutralization pattern usually changes throughout the beginning of the pulse, causing the Twiss parameters to differ significantly from their steady state values, which, in turn, may result in beam losses downstream. For a modest beam perveance, there is an alternative solution, in which the beam is kept un-neutralized in the portion of the LEBT that contains the chopper. The emittance can be nearly preserved if the transition to the un-neutralized section occurs where the beam exhibits low transverse tails. This report introduces the rationale for the proposed scheme and formulates the physical arguments for it as well as its limitations. An experimental realization of the scheme was carried out at Fermilab’s PIP2IT where low beam emittance dilution was demonstrated for a 5 mA, 30 keV H- beam.

  16. Experimental characterization of emittance growth induced by the nonuniform transverse laser distribution in a photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhou

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The emittance of a high-brightness electron beam from a photoinjector is affected by the transverse and longitudinal distributions of the laser beam illuminating the cathode. A nonuniform laser beam generates a nonuniform electron-beam distribution that experiences emittance growth on a time scale of the plasma period. Experiments were performed at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility to investigate the emittance growth due to transversely nonuniform laser beams. Laser masks were fabricated to generate various laser distributions. Significant emittance growth was observed as the laser distribution deviated strongly from a uniform distribution. For cylindrically symmetric, nonuniform distributions, experimental results agree with PARMELA simulations. The emittance dependence on the bunch charge is linear as a function of the bunch charge for both uniform and nonuniform beams. For a uniform beam, the emittance measurements agree well with the predictions from PARMELA simulations, but the analytical approach overestimates the results. For nonuniform beams, analytical estimates are about 70% of the measurements. For noncylindrically symmetric, nonuniform beams, we observed that the emittance is linearly proportional to the rms laser nonuniformity and the best emittance for a perfectly uniform beam is extrapolated to be 1.07±0.13   mm mrad at 0.5 nC.

  17. Emittance Growth due to Crab Cavity Ramping for LHC Beam-1 Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Morita, A

    2008-01-01

    In LHC upgrade scenarios using global crab crossing, it is desired to turn on the crab cavity only at top energy. Turning on the crab cavity could increase the emittance of the stored beam, since the transverse kick of the crab cavity excites betatron oscillations. For a sufficiently slow ramping speed of the crab cavity voltage, however, the changes in z-dependent closed orbit are sufficiently adiabatic that the emittance growth becomes negligible. In order to determine the safe ramping speed of the LHC crab-cavity voltage, the dependence of the emittance growth on the ramping speed is estimated via a 6D particle-tracking simulation.

  18. MD 400: LHC emittance growth in presence of an external source of noise during collision

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco Garcia, Javier; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia; Trad, Georges; Valuch, Daniel; Betz, Michael; Wendt, Manfred; Pojer, Mirko; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Albert, Markus; Qiang, Ji; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between head-on beam-beam interaction and external sources of noise can be a significant source of emittance growth, especially when considering large beam-beam tune shifts as for the HL-LHC upgrade project. In this experiment the emittance growth of colliding bunches with different brightness and therefore different beam-beam parameters in the presence of an external white noise source with different amplitudes is measured for different gains of the transverse feedback.

  19. Root Causes of Field Emitters in SRF Cavities Placed in CEBAF Tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli

    2016-05-01

    It has been suspected that appearance of new field emitters can occur in SRF cavities after their placement in accelerator tunnel for long term beam operation. This apparently has been the case for CEBAF. However, no physical evidence has been shown in the past. In this contribution, we will report on the recent results concerning the root cause of field emitters in SRF cavities placed in CEBAF tunnel. We will discuss these results in the context of high-reliability and low-cryogenic-loss operation of CEBAF.

  20. Big emitters: how growth in consumption drives climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satterthwaite, David

    2009-12-15

    It seems obvious that the more people there are on the planet, the more the pressure on planetary resources and the larger the emissions of greenhouse gases. So it also seems obvious that population growth must be a major driver of global warming. But it is just as obvious that very poor households contribute very little to greenhouse gas emissions. So if most of the world's population growth is among very poor households, population growth is not the culprit. The greatest human driver of global warming is the number of consumers on the planet and their consumption level. Individuals and households contribute to global warming by consuming goods and services that cause greenhouse gas emissions – for instance, by owning a refrigerator or a car. Through this they are responsible for all the fossil fuels that go into making, distributing, advertising, selling, using and disposing of it.

  1. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Migliorati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  2. Simulation study of electron cloud induced instabilities and emittance growth for the CERN Large Hadron Collider proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Schulte, Daniel; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The electron cloud may cause transverse single-bunch instabilities of proton beams such as those in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We simulate these instabilities and the consequent emittance growth with the code HEADTAIL, which models the turn-by-turn interaction between the cloud and the beam. Recently some new features were added to the code, in particular, electric conducting boundary conditions at the chamber wall, transverse feedback, and variable beta functions. The sensitivity to several numerical parameters has been studied by varying the number of interaction points between the bunch and the cloud, the phase advance between them, and the number of macroparticles used to represent the protons and the electrons. We present simulation results for both LHC at injection and SPS with LHC-type beam, for different electron-cloud density levels, chromaticities, and bunch intensities. Two regimes with qualitatively different emittance growth are observed: above th...

  3. Emittance growth due to multiple passes through H-minus stripping foil in Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-02

    Expressions for transverse emittance growth due to turn-by-turn passes through the H-minus stripping foil in Booster are developed here from simple principles of statistics and simple assumptions about the initial distribution of particles incident on the foil. These are meant to complement work already presented by Zeno [1, 2, 3] and Brown [4]. The expressions show that while the average emittance hEi of the distribution simply increases linearly with turn number, the emittance E based on the mean square particle position does so with an additional oscillatory term that depends on the machine tune. It is shown that this term can be ignored as long as the turn number is su ciently large and the tune is su ciently far from integer and half-integer values. Under these conditions the relation between hEi and E is simply hEi = 2 E. This relation is shown to hold for a Gaussian distribution that is matched to the machine lattice. Two symmetry conditions which help characterize the particle distribution are identi ed. These provide justi cation for calling E an emittance. It is shown that if the conditions are satis ed by the initial distribution, they will not be satis ed after a single traversal of the foil and one turn around the machine. However, on subsequent turns the distribution can (and does) return to satisfying the conditions. Moreover, for su ciently large turn number, the symmetry conditions are approximately satis ed. As already noted in [4], the emittance growth per turn is proportional to the lattice beta at the foil and the mean square angular kick received by protons passing through the foil. We take the former to be 5 m. The latter is obtained from simulations performed with the code TRIM [5]. Having these numbers in hand, actual numbers for emittance growth are presented. The reader may wish to start with Section 11 and refer to previous sections as needed or desired.

  4. Benchmarking of measurement and simulation of transverse rms-emittance growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Groening

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Transverse emittance growth along the Alvarez drift tube linac (DTL section is a major concern with respect to the preservation of beam quality of high current beams at the GSI UNILAC. In order to define measures to reduce this growth, appropriate tools to simulate the beam dynamics are indispensable. This paper is about the benchmarking of three beam dynamics simulation codes, i.e. DYNAMION, PARMILA, and PARTRAN against systematic measurements of beam emittances for different transverse phase advances along the DTL. Special emphasis is put on the modeling of the initial distribution for the simulations. The concept of rms equivalence is expanded from full intensity to fractions of less than 100% of the beam. The experimental setup, data reduction, preparation of the simulations, and the evaluation of the simulations are described. In the experiments and in the simulations, a minimum of the rms-emittance growth was observed at zero current phase advances of about 60°. In general, good agreement was found between simulations and experiment for the mean values of horizontal and vertical emittances at the DTL exit.

  5. Aberrations and Emittance Growth in the DARHT 2nd Axis Downstream Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Martin E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-24

    The emittance of the DARHT 2nd Axis has been inferred from solenoid scans performed in the downstream transport (DST) region using a short kicked pulse. The beam spot size is measured by viewing optical transition radiation (OTR) in the near field as a function of the field (current) of a solenoid magnet (S4). The imaging station containing the OTR target is located about 100 cm downstream of the solenoid magnet. The emittance is then inferred using a beam optics code such as LAMDA or XTR by fitting the data to initial conditions upstream of the S4 solenoid magnet. The initial conditions are the beam size, beam convergence and emittance. The beam energy and current are measured. In preparation for a solenoid scan, the magnets upstream of the solenoid are adjusted to produce a round beam with no beam losses due to scraping in the beam tube. This is different from the standard tune in which the beam tune is adjusted to suppress the effects of ions and rf in the septum dump. In this standard tune, approximately 10% of the beam is lost due to scraping as the beam enters the small 3.75” ID beam tube after the septum. The normalized emittance inferred from recent solenoid scans typically ranges from 600 to 800 π(mm-mrad). This larger beam size increases the sensitivity to any non-linear fields in the Collins quadrupoles that are mounted along the small diameter beam tube. The primary magnet used to adjust the beam size in this region is the S3 solenoid magnet. Measurements made of the beam shape as the beam size was decreased showed significant structure consistent with non-linear fields. Using the measured magnetic fields in the Collins quadrupoles including higher order multipoles, the beam transport through the Collins quadrupoles is simulated and compared to the observed OTR images. The simulations are performed using the beam optics codes TRANSPORT [1] and TURTLE [2]. Estimates of the emittance growth and beam losses are made as a function of the S3

  6. Simulations of beam emittance growth from the collectiverelaxation of space-charge nonuniformities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Steven M.; Grote, David P.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-05-01

    Beams injected into a linear focusing channel typically have some degree of space-charge nonuniformity. For unbunched beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in linear focusing channels, Debye screening of self-field interactions tends to make the transverse density profile flat. An injected particle distribution with a large systematic charge nonuniformity will generally be far from an equilibrium of the focusing channel and the initial condition will launch a broad spectrum of collective modes. These modes can phase-mix and experience nonlinear interactions which result in an effective relaxation to a more thermal-equilibrium-like distribution characterized by a uniform density profile. This relaxation transfers self-field energy from the initial space-charge nonuniformity to the local particle temperature, thereby increasing beam phase space area (emittance growth). Here they employ two-dimensional electrostatic particle in cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the effects of initial transverse space-charge nonuniformities on the equality of beams with high space-charge intensity propagating in a continuous focusing channel. Results are compared to theoretical bounds of emittance growth developed in previous studies. Consistent with earlier theory, it is found that a high degree of initial distribution nonuniformity can be tolerated with only modest emittance growth and that beam control can be maintained. The simulations also provide information on the rate of relaxation and characteristic levels of fluctuations in the relaxed states. This research suggests that a surprising degree of initial space-charge nonuniformity can be tolerated in practical intense beam experiments.

  7. Current-horn suppression for reduced coherent-synchrotron-radiation-induced emittance growth in strong bunch compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, T. K.; Paganin, D. M.; Latina, A.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R. T.

    2017-03-01

    Control of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR)-induced emittance growth is essential in linear accelerators designed to deliver very high brightness electron beams. Extreme current values at the head and tail of the electron bunch, resulting from strong bunch compression, are responsible for large CSR production leading to significant transverse projected emittance growth. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) truncates the head and tail current spikes which greatly improves free electron laser (FEL) performance. Here we consider the underlying dynamics that lead to formation of current spikes (also referred to as current horns), which has been identified as caustics forming in electron trajectories. We present a method to analytically determine conditions required to avoid the caustic formation and therefore prevent the current spikes from forming. These required conditions can be easily met, without increasing the transverse slice emittance, through inclusion of an octupole magnet in the middle of a bunch compressor.

  8. Stochastic Boundary, Diffusion, Emittance Growth and Lifetime calculation for the RHIC e-lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-20

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a low energy electron beam with proper Gaussian transverse profiles was proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, using a modified version of SixTrack [1], we investigate stability of the single particle in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. The Lyapunov exponent and action diffusion are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation for two different working points and various bunch intensities. Using the action diffusion results the emittance growth rate and lifetime of the proton beam is also estimated for the different scenarios.

  9. Halo formation and emittance growth in the transport of spherically symmetric mismatched bunched beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrêa da Silva, Thales M., E-mail: thalestr@gmail.com; Pakter, Renato; Rizzato, Felipe B.; Levin, Yan [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Caixa Postal 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    The effect of an initial envelope mismatch on the transport of bunched spherically symmetric beams is investigated. A particle-core model is used to estimate the maximum radius that halo particles can reach. The theory is used to obtain an empirical formula that provides the halo size as a function of system parameters. Taking into account, the incompressibility property of the Vlasov dynamics and the resulting Landau damping, an explicit form for the final stationary distribution attained by the beam is proposed. The distribution is fully self-consistent, presenting no free fitting parameters. The theory is used to predict the relevant beam transport properties, such as the final particle density distribution, the emittance growth, and the fraction of particles that will be expelled to form halo. The theoretical results are compared to the explicit N-particle dynamics simulations, showing a good agreement.

  10. Emittance growth due to static and radiative space charge forces in an electron bunch compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Talman

    2009-01-01

    2004 FEL Conference, pp. 18–21, MOCOS05, available at http://www.JACoW.org], a code with similar capabilities. For this comparison an appropriately new, 50 MeV, “standard chicane” is introduced. Unlike CSRTrack (which neglects vertical forces the present simulation shows substantial growth of vertical emittance. But “turning off” vertical forces in the UAL code (to match the CSRTrack treatment brings the two codes into excellent agreement. (iii Results are also obtained for 5 GeV electrons passing through a previously introduced “standard chicane” [Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, CSR Workshop, Berlin 2002, http://www.desy.de/csr] [of the sort needed for linear colliders and free electron lasers (FEL’s currently under design or construction]. Relatively little emittance growth is predicted for typical bunch parameters at such high electron energy. Results are obtained for both round beams and ribbon beams (like those actually needed in practice. Little or no excess emittance growth is found for ribbon bunches compared to round bunches of the same charge and bunch width. The UAL string space charge formulation (like TraFic4 and CSRTrack avoids the regularization step (subtracting the free-space space charge force which is required (to remove divergence in some methods. Also, by avoiding the need to calculate a retarded-time, four-dimensional field history, the computation time needed for realistic bunch evolution calculations is modest. Some theories of bunch dilution, because they ascribe emittance growth entirely to CSR, break down at low energy. In the present treatment, as well as CSR, all free-space Coulomb and magnetic space charge forces (but not image forces, and also the centrifugal space charge force (CSCF are included. Charge-dependent beam steering due to CSCF, as observed recently by Beutner et al. [B. Beutner et al., in Proceedings of FEL Conference, BESSY, Berlin, Germany, 2006, MOPPH009], is also investigated.

  11. Ion Emittance Growth Due to Focusing Modulation from Slipping Electron Bunch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-02-17

    Low energy RHIC operation has to be operated at an energy ranging from γ = 4.1 to γ = 10. The energy variation causes the change of revolution frequency. While the rf system for the circulating ion will operate at an exact harmonic of the revolution frequency (h=60 for 4.5 MHz rf and h=360 for 28 MHz rf.), the superconducting rf system for the cooling electron beam does not have a frequency tuning range that is wide enough to cover the required changes of revolution frequency. As a result, electron bunches will sit at different locations along the ion bunch from turn to turn, i.e. the slipping of the electron bunch with respect to the circulating ion bunch. At cooling section, ions see a coherent focusing force due to the electrons’ space charge, which differs from turn to turn due to the slipping. We will try to estimate how this irregular focusing affects the transverse emittance of the ion bunch.

  12. Super-emitters in natural gas infrastructure are caused by abnormal process conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Alvarez, Ramón A.; Lyon, David R.; Allen, David T.; Marchese, Anthony J.; Zimmerle, Daniel J.; Hamburg, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    Effectively mitigating methane emissions from the natural gas supply chain requires addressing the disproportionate influence of high-emitting sources. Here we use a Monte Carlo simulation to aggregate methane emissions from all components on natural gas production sites in the Barnett Shale production region (Texas). Our total emission estimates are two-thirds of those derived from independent site-based measurements. Although some high-emitting operations occur by design (condensate flashing and liquid unloadings), they occur more than an order of magnitude less frequently than required to explain the reported frequency at which high site-based emissions are observed. We conclude that the occurrence of abnormal process conditions (for example, malfunctions upstream of the point of emissions; equipment issues) cause additional emissions that explain the gap between component-based and site-based emissions. Such abnormal conditions can cause a substantial proportion of a site's gas production to be emitted to the atmosphere and are the defining attribute of super-emitting sites.

  13. Beam lifetime and emittance growth in RHIC under normal operating conditions with the hydrogen gas jet, the cluster-jet and pellet targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, D.

    2010-09-01

    The inelastic scattering of the beam and the residual gas molecules in RHIC could represent one of the limitations on the beam life time and emittance growth. This report covers the dominant central nuclear collisions influence on the beam lifetime and transverse emittance growth. The cross sections for the beam-gas electron radiative captures are an order of magnitude smaller. The capture cross sections include the radiative and non-radiative capture, and the capture from the electron-positron pair creation from the 'vacuum capture'.

  14. Growth of GaN-based non- and semipolar heterostructures for high efficiency light emitters; Wachstum von nicht- und semipolaren InAIGaN-Heterostrukturen fuer hocheffiziente Lichtemitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernicke, Tim

    2010-07-01

    Optoelectronic devices based on GaN and its alloys InGaN and AlGaN are capable of emitting light from the visible to the ultraviolet spectral region. Blue and green lasers have applications in laser projectors, DNA sequencing and spectroscopy. But it is extremely difficult to fabricate green laser diodes. Currently almost all of the light emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers are grown on GaN crystals that are oriented in the polar (0001) c-plane direction, which provides the most stable growth surface. However the resulting polarization fields on (0001)GaN have detrimental effects on the optical properties of nitride light emitters, e.g. causing significant wavelength shifts and reduced efficiencies in InGaN LEDs. Growth on crystal surfaces with non- and semipolar orientations, e.g. (10 anti 10) m-plane or (11 anti 22), could enable devices with new and improved optical properties. For example, for nonpolar and semipolar LEDs the degree of polarization of the emitted light can be tailored. Furthermore easier to grow devices with green light emission, since the indium incorporation is enhanced for semipolar orientations. In contrast to c-plane GaN there is no polarization field across quantum wells on nonpolar GaN. By reducing the polarization fields an increase in the radiative recombination rate can be expected and would lead to higher LED efficiencies and lower laser thresholds. One of the biggest challenges for the growth of light emitters on non- and semipolar GaN is the choice of a suitable substrate: Heteroepitaxial growth on sapphire or LiAlO{sub 2} allows the deposition of GaN on 2'' diameter wafers and larger. However, these layers show a very high defect density in particular basal plane stacking faults, in comparison to c-plane GaN on sapphire. In order to reduce the defect density we applied successfully epitaxial lateral overgrowth to heteroepitaxial nonpolar a-plane GaN and verified the improvement by spatially and spectrally

  15. Attenuation and Emittance Growth of 450 GeV and 7 TeV Proton Beams in Low-Z Absorber Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Goddard, B; Schmidt, R

    2004-01-01

    The intensity of the LHC beams will be several orders of magnitude above the damage thresholds for equipment. Passive protection of accelerator equipment against failures during beam transfer, injection and dumping of the beam with diluters and collimators is foreseen. These protection devices must be robust in case of beam impact, and low-Z materials such as carbon are favored. In these diluters, the reduction of the energy density is determined both by the attenuation due to inelastic nuclear collisions and by the emittance growth of the surviving protons due to elastic scattering processes. The physics principles leading to attenuation and emittance growth for a hadron beam traversing matter are summarised, and FLUKA simulation results for 450 GeV and 7 TeV proton beams on low-Z absorbers are compared with these predictions. Design criteria for the LHC absorbers are derived from these results.

  16. Growth, structural, thermal, dielectric and optical studies on HBST crystal: A potential THz emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuzhe; Teng, Bing; Cao, Lifeng; Zhong, Degao; Ji, Shaohua; Teng, Fei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Yao, Yuan; Tang, Jie; Tong, Jiaming

    2018-02-01

    The efficient organic nonlinear optical material 4-hydroxy benzaldehyde-N-methyl 4-stilbazolium tosylate (HBST) was grown from methanol by slope nucleation method combined with slow cooling (SNM-SC) for the first time. The optimum growth conditions based on the cooling rate was further investigated. The single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that the chromophores of HBST crystal make an angle of about 33° with respect to the a-axis, which is close to the optimum of Terahertz (THz)-wave generation and electro-optics applications. NMR and FT-IR spectral studies have been performed to ascertain various functional groups present in the sample. Futhermore, the thermal stability and decomposition stages were analyzed through TG-DTA and DSC techniques. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of HBST crystal have been studied. Critical optical properties like the absorption coefficient, refractive index, cut-off wavelength and band gap energy were calculated. Photoluminescence (PL) exication studies indicated green emission occured at 507 nm. All the results of HBST crystal make it a promising candidate in the fields of optoelectronic and the generation of THz.

  17. Bacterial ammonia causes significant plant growth inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Weise

    Full Text Available Many and complex plant-bacteria inter-relationships are found in the rhizosphere, since plants release a variety of photosynthetic exudates from their roots and rhizobacteria produce multifaceted specialized compounds including rich mixtures of volatiles, e.g., the bouquet of Serratia odorifera 4Rx13 is composed of up to 100 volatile organic and inorganic compounds. Here we show that when growing on peptone-rich nutrient medium S. odorifera 4Rx13 and six other rhizobacteria emit high levels of ammonia, which during co-cultivation in compartmented Petri dishes caused alkalization of the neighboring plant medium and subsequently reduced the growth of A. thaliana. It is argued that in nature high-protein resource degradations (carcasses, whey, manure and compost are also accompanied by bacterial ammonia emission which alters the pH of the rhizosphere and thereby influences organismal diversity and plant-microbe interactions. Consequently, bacterial ammonia emission may be more relevant for plant colonization and growth development than previously thought.

  18. Emittance growth, debunching and integrated luminosity in the LHC with a higher harmonic RF system

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, T

    2011-01-01

    Beam dynamics with a double RF system has been considered in several references. Recently the idea of adding a secondary RF system has resurfaced due to heating effects in the beam screens of the LHC that are caused by the high particle densities in the bunch centres with a Gaussian longitudinal profile. It is well known that one can change the longitudinal bunch profile from a Gaussian profile like the pink curve in Figure 1 into a plateau shape like the blue curve in Figure 1 reducing the particle density in the bunch centres. Here we study the evolution of a bunch with such a longitudinal plateau like shape under the influence of IBS in a double RF system and how adding a secondary RF system in the LHC influences debunching losses and integrated luminosity. The simulations presented here are done with the particle tracking code that was used to study IBS effects in the 2010 ion fills. The results of our simulations indicate that installing a secondary higher harmonic RF system in the LHC would significantl...

  19. Macroparticle model for longitudinal emittance growth caused by negative mass instability in a proton synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    MacLachlan, J A

    2004-01-01

    Both theoretical models and beam observations of negative mass instability fall short of a full description of the dynamics and the dynamical effects. Clarification by numerical modeling is now practicable because of the recent proliferation of so-called computing farms. The results of modeling reported in this paper disagree with some predictions based on a long-standing linear perturbation calculation. Validity checks on the macroparticle model are described.

  20. Epidermal growth factor causes hypocalcemia in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, G P; Wilkinson, M; Panaretto, B A; Delbridge, L W; Posen, S

    1986-04-01

    During iv infusions of epidermal growth factor into sheep, serum calcium concentrations fell, whereas serum magnesium and serum immunoreactive PTH levels increased. Urinary calcium and magnesium decreased significantly. The role of epidermal growth factor in calcium homeostasis is discussed.

  1. Asymmetrical field emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  2. Unveiling causes for growth retardation in piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paredes Escobar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of hyper‐prolific sow breeds has led to a higher number of piglets born per sow per year. This increase in litter size has enlarged the number of light weight (or growth retarded) piglets, increased pre‐weaning mortality and heterogeneity at the end of the nursery phase (ten weeks of

  3. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome causing growth retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil İbrahim Taşcı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a rare and lifethreateningclinical condition caused by the compressionof the third portion of the duodenum between the aortaand the superior mesenteric artery’s proximal part. Thiscompression may lead to chronic intermittent, acute totalor partial obstruction. Sudden weight-loss and the relateddecrease in the fat tissue are considered to be the etiologicalreason of acute stenosis. Weight-loss accompaniedby nausea, vomiting, anorexia, epigastric pain, andbloating are the leading complaints. Barium radiographs,computerized tomography, conventional angiography,tomographic and magnetic resonance angiography areused in the diagnosis. There are medical and surgical approachesto treatment. We hereby present the case ofa patient with superior mesenteric artery syndrome withdelayed diagnosis.Key words: superior mesenteric artery syndrome, nausea-vomiting, anorexia

  4. Floating emitter solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  5. Recent Progress in the Growth of Mid-Infrared Emitters by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biefeld, R.M.; Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R.; Baucom, K.C.

    1998-01-01

    We report on recent progress and improvements in the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of mid-infrared lasers and using a high speed rotating disk reactor (RDR). The devices contain AlAsSb active regions. These lasers have multi-stage, type I InAsSb/InAsP quantum well active regions. A semi-metal GaAsSb/InAs layer acts as an internal electron source for the multi-stage injection lasers and AlAsSb is an electron confinement layer. These structures are the first MOCVD multi-stage devices. Growth in an RDR was necessary to avoid the previously observed Al memory effects found in conventional horizontal reactors. A single stage, optically pumped laser yielded improved power (greater than 650 mW/facet) at 80K and 3.8um. A multi-stage 3.8-3.9um laser structure operated up to T=170K. At 80K, peak power greater than 100mW and a high slope- efficiency were observed in gain guided lasers.

  6. Possible causes for growth variability and summer growth reduction in juvenile plaice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, H.W.; Jung, A.S.; Freitas, V.; Philippart, C.J.; Witte, J.IJ.

    2016-01-01

    Growth variability within individuals and among groups and locations and the phenomenon of summer growth reduction has been described for juvenile flatfish in a variety of European coastal areas whereby the underlying causes still remain elusive. Potential mechanisms were tested for juvenile plaice

  7. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonami, Hiroshi [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan); Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  8. ON CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF UNPRECEDENTED RUBLE EXCHANGE GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyakov Egor Nikolaevich

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We provide an analysis of real effective exchange rate dynamics in Russia throughout the last decade. Authors analysed the causes and consequences of real effective exchange growth and assessed how Russian ruble real effective exchange rate comply with its equilibrium level. Authors present results of empiric analysis of relationship between real effective exchange rate and labour productivity in industry of 20 european, asian countries and Russia. The result of this writing was the formulation of key copyright conclusions, namely: 1. The price level in the country (and the level of the real exchange rate of the national currency is a key factor of competitiveness. Accordingly, the real exchange rate of the national currency - is one of the most important policy tools. 2. The ruble today seriously overvalued. Overvaluation of the national currency relative to the equilibrium level is extremely harmful to the economy. Less recognized, but also widespread YaV it possible to the idea that an undervalued currency is a prerequisite for rapid economic growth. 3. A direct consequence of the growth of the real exchange rate in the past 12 years has been the growth of the external debt of the private sector. 4. Restraining the growth rate of the national currency - is also a common practice for countries who are concerned about the level of competitiveness. But Russia is this day-the only country of the G-20, which is impossible to control the REER.

  9. Deletion of PREPl causes growth impairment and hypotonia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mari Lone

    Full Text Available Genetic studies of rare diseases can identify genes of unknown function that strongly impact human physiology. Prolyl endopeptidase-like (PREPL is an uncharacterized member of the prolyl peptidase family that was discovered because of its deletion in humans with hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome (HCS. HCS is characterized by a number of physiological changes including diminished growth and neonatal hypotonia or low muscle tone. HCS patients have deletions in other genes as well, making it difficult to tease apart the specific role of PREPL. Here, we develop a PREPL null (PREPL(-/- mouse model to address the physiological role of this enzyme. Deletion of exon 11 from the Prepl gene, which encodes key catalytic amino acids, leads to a loss of PREPL protein as well as lower Prepl mRNA levels. PREPL(-/- mice have a pronounced growth phenotype, being significantly shorter and lighter than their wild type (PREPL(+/+ counterparts. A righting assay revealed that PREPL(-/- pups took significantly longer than PREPL(+/+ pups to right themselves when placed on their backs. This deficit indicates that PREPL(-/- mice suffer from neonatal hypotonia. According to these results, PREPL regulates growth and neonatal hypotonia in mice, which supports the idea that PREPL causes diminished growth and neonatal hypotonia in humans with HCS. These animals provide a valuable asset in deciphering the underlying biochemical, cellular and physiological pathways that link PREPL to HCS, and this may eventually lead to new insights in the treatment of this disease.

  10. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, James Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  11. ON CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF UNPRECEDENTED RUBLE EXCHANGE GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Егор Николаевич Поляков

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide an analysis of real effective exchange rate dynamics in Russia throughout the last decade. Authors analysed the causes and consequences of real effective exchange growth and assessed how Russian ruble real effective exchange rate comply with its equilibrium level. Authors present results of empiric analysis of relationship between real effective exchange rate and labour productivity in industry of 20 european, asian countries and Russia.The result of this writing was the formulation of key copyright conclusions, namely:1. The price level in the country (and the level of the real exchange rate of the national currency is a key factor of competitiveness. Accordingly, the real exchange rate of the national currency - is one of the most important policy tools.2. The ruble today seriously overvalued. Overvaluation of the national currency relative to the equilibrium level is extremely harmful to the economy. Less recognized, but also widespread YaV it possible to the idea that an undervalued currency is a prerequisite for rapid economic growth.3. A direct consequence of the growth of the real exchange rate in the past 12 years has been the growth of the external debt of the private sector.4. Restraining the growth rate of the national currency - is also a common practice for countries who are concerned about the level of competitiveness. But Russia is this day-the only country of the G-20, which is impossible to control the REER.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-3-4

  12. Beta emitters and radiation protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Beta emitters, such as 90Y, are increasingly being used for cancer treatment. However, beta emitters demand other precautions than gamma emitters during preparation and administration, especially concerning shielding. AIM. To discuss practical precautions for handling beta emitters...... on the outside of the primary shielding material. If suitable shielding is used and larger numbers of handlings are divided among several persons, then handling of beta emitters can be a safe procedure....

  13. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorisaem Rhee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings.

  14. Theory and measurements of emittance preservation in plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederico, Joel

    2016-12-01

    In this dissertation, we examine the preservation and measurement of emittance in the plasma wakefield acceleration blowout regime. Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) is a revolutionary approach to accelerating charged particles that has been demonstrated to have the potential for gradients orders of magnitude greater than traditional approaches. The application of PWFA to the design of a linear collider will make new high energy physics research possible, but the design parameters must first be shown to be competitive with traditional methods. Emittance preservation is necessary in the design of a linear collider in order to maximize luminosity. We examine the conditions necessary for circular symmetry in the PWFA blowout regime, and demonstrate that current proposals meet these bounds. We also present an application of beam lamentation which describes the process of beam parameter and emittance matching. We show that the emittance growth saturates as a consequence of energy spread in the beam. The initial beam parameters determine the amount of emittance growth, while the contribution of energy spread is negligible. We also present a model for ion motion in the presence of a beam that is much more dense than the plasma. By combining the model of ion motion and emittance growth, we find the emittance growth due to ion motion is minimal in the case of marginal ion motion. In addition, we present a simulation that validates the ion motion model, which is under further development to examine emittance growth of both marginal and pronounced ion motion. Finally, we present a proof-of-concept of an emittance measurement which may enable the analysis of emittance preservation in future PWFA experiments.

  15. Growth without growth hormone in combined pituitary hormone deficiency caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH is an essential element for normal growth. However, reports of normal growth without GH have been made in patients who have undergone brain surgery for craniopharyngioma. Normal growth without GH can be explained by hyperinsulinemia, hyperprolactinemia, elevated leptin levels, and GH variants; however, its exact mechanism has not been elucidated yet. We diagnosed a female patient aged 13 with combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS. The patient has experienced recurrent hypoglycemic seizures since birth, but reached the height of 160 cm at the age of 13, showing normal growth. She grew another 8 cm for 3 years after the diagnosis, and she reached her final adult height of 168 cm which was greater than the midparental height, at the age of 16. The patient's blood GH and insulin-like growth factor-I levels were consistently subnormal, although her insulin levels were normal. Her physical examination conducted at the age of 15 showed truncal obesity, dyslipidemia, and osteoporosis, which are metabolic features of GH deficiency (GHD. Herein, we report a case in which a PSIS-induced CPHD patient attained her final height above mid parental height despite a severe GHD.

  16. Beam-target interaction and intrabeam scattering in the HESR ring. Emittance, momentum resolution and luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterberger, F. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik

    2006-02-15

    The beam-target interaction is studied with respect to the transverse and longitudinal emittance growth of the HESR antiproton beam. The transverse emittance growth caused by the small angle Coulomb scattering can be described analytically using the differential cross section of the Coulomb interaction. Similarly, the longitudinal emittance growth caused by the energy loss of the beam can be calculated using the differential cross section of the energy-loss distribution. It is shown that particles with energy losses near the maximum energy loss in a head-on collision with a target electron are lost due to momentum acceptance of the HESR ring. Taking a relative momentum acceptance of about 1 x 10{sup -3} into account yields an order of magnitude smaller growth rate of the mean square momentum deviation. The necessary cooling rates for the High Resolution mode and the High Luminosity mode are deduced assuming that the beam-target interaction is the dominant beam heating process. For comparison the effects of intrabeam scattering are estimated. For electron and stochastic cooling, analytic expressions are quoted in order to evaluate the momentum resolution and cooling rate. The potentialities of electron and stochastic cooling are discussed with respect to the achievable momentum resolution and beam-target overlap. Beam loss rates and average luminosities are evaluated taking the total hadronic cross section, the restricted momentum acceptance of the HESR ring, the large angle Coulomb scattering and the Touschek effect into account. (orig.)

  17. DNA Methylation Causes Predominant Maternal Controls of Plant Embryo Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan FitzGerald; Ming Luo; Abed Chaudhury; Frédéric Berger

    2008-01-01

    The parental conflict hypothesis predicts that the mother inhibits embryo growth counteracting growth enhancement by the father. In plants the DNA methyltransferase MET1 is a central regulator of parentally imprinted genes that affect seed growth. However the relation between the role of MET1 in imprinting and its control of seed size has remained unclear. Here we combine cytological, genetic and statistical analyses to study the effect of MET1 on seed growth. We show that the loss of MET1 du...

  18. Low-emittance Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The effects of synchrotron radiation on particle motion in storage rings are discussed. In the absence of radiation, particle motion is symplectic, and the beam emittances are conserved. The inclusion of radiation effects in a classical approximation leads to emittance damping: expressions for the damping times are derived. Then, it is shown that quantum radiation effects lead to excitation of the beam emittances. General expressions for the equilibrium longitudinal and horizontal (natural) emittances are derived. The impact of lattice design on the natural emittance is discussed, with particular attention to the special cases of FODO-, achromat- and theoretical-minimum-emittance-style lattices. Finally, the effects of betatron coupling and vertical dispersion (generated by magnet alignment and lattice tuning errors) on the vertical emittance are considered.

  19. Emittance measurements at PITZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashchenko, Grygorii; Asova, Galina; Baehr, Juergen; Grabosch, Hans Juergen; Hakobyan, Levon; Haenel, Marc; Ivanisenko, Yevgeniy; Khojoyan, Martin; Krasilnikov, Mikhail; Mahgoub, Mahmoud; Nozdrin, Mikhail; O' Shea, Brendon; Otevrel, Marek; Petrosyan, Bagrat; Richter, Dieter; Riemann, Sabine; Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Roensch, Juliane; Shapovalov, Andrey; Spesyvtsev, Roman; Staykov, Lazar; Stephan, Frank [DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Floettmann, Klaus; Lederer, Sven; Schreiber, Siegfried [DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Klemz, Guido; Will, Ingo [Max-Born-Institute, Berlin(Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site, (PITZ) has an aim to develop and optimize high brightness electron sources for Free Electron Lasers like FLASH and the European XFEL. The new laser system allows to produce trains of laser pulses with flat-top temporal profiles of about 20 ps FWHM and rise/fall time of about 2 ps had been commissioned at PITZ in late autumn 2008. Photo electrons emitted from the Cs{sub 2}Te cathode are accelerated by a 1.6-cell L band RF gun cavity operated at 60 MV/m maximum accelerating gradient at the cathode. For measuring of transverse projected emittance the so called single slit scan technique is used at PITZ. This procedure is discussed. Recent results on measured emittance of electron beam are presented.

  20. Effect of thin emitter set-back layer on GaAs delta-doped emitter bipolar junction transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, K. L.; Yoon, S. F.

    2005-05-01

    GaAs delta-doped emitter bipolar junction transistors (δ-BJT) with different emitter set-back layer thicknesses of 10to50nm were fabricated to study the emitter set-back layer thickness effect on device dc performance. We found that the current gain decreases following decrease in the emitter set-back layer thickness. A detailed analysis was performed to explain this phenomenon, which is believed to be caused by reduction of the effective barrier height in the δ-BJT. This is due to change in the electric-field distribution in the delta-doped structure caused by the built-in potential of the base-emitter (B-E ) junction. Considering the recombination and barrier height reduction effects, the thickness of the emitter set-back layer should be designed according to the B-E junction depletion width with a tolerance of ±5nm. The dc performance of a δ-BJT designed based on this criteria is compared to that of a Al0.25Ga0.75As /GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). Both devices employed base doping of 2×1019cm-3 and base-to-emitter doping ratio of 40. Large emitter area (AE≈1.6×10-5cm-2) and small emitter area (AE≈1.35×10-6cm-2) device current gains of 40 and 20, respectively, were obtained in both types of transistors passivated by (NH4)2S treatment. The measured current gain of the GaAs δ-BJT is the highest reported for a homojunction device with such high base-to-emitter doping ratio normally used in HBT devices.

  1. Drought causes reduced growth of trembling aspen in western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Jian-Guo; Alam, Syed Ashraful; Zhai, Lihong; Dawson, Andria; Stadt, Kenneth J; Comeau, Philip G

    2017-07-01

    Adequate and advance knowledge of the response of forest ecosystems to temperature-induced drought is critical for a comprehensive understanding of the impacts of global climate change on forest ecosystem structure and function. Recent massive decline in aspen-dominated forests and an increased aspen mortality in boreal forests have been associated with global warming, but it is still uncertain whether the decline and mortality are driven by drought. We used a series of ring-width chronologies from 40 trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) sites along a latitudinal gradient (from 52° to 58°N) in western Canada, in an attempt to clarify the impacts of drought on aspen growth by using Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). Results indicated that prolonged and large-scale droughts had a strong negative impact on trembling aspen growth. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal variability of drought indices is useful for explaining the spatial heterogeneity in the radial growth of trembling aspen. Due to ongoing global warming and rising temperatures, it is likely that severer droughts with a higher frequency will occur in western Canada. As trembling aspen is sensitive to drought, we suggest that drought indices could be applied to monitor the potential effects of increased drought stress on aspen trees growth, achieve classification of eco-regions and develop effective mitigation strategies to maintain western Canadian boreal forests. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor 23: a potential cause of cardiovascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) has been identified as one of the risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Although FGF-23 is necessary for the maintenance of phosphate balance, it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of left ventricular ...

  3. Three-gradient Emittance Measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Olsson, T; Lanaia, D; Voulot, D

    2013-01-01

    The transverse emittance was measured using the three-gradient method (also known as the quadrupole scan method) and compared to the slit-grid method that is normally used at REX-ISOLDE. For a 2.85 MeV/u beam with A=q = 4 the rms normalised emittance was measured as 0:32 0:06 mm mrad with the three-gradient method, a factor of 5 larger than was measured by the NTG emittance meter. An investigation into the discrepancy and a hypothesis for its cause are detailed in this note.

  4. The slowdown in population growth: causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, H; Hoyt, S

    1989-01-01

    U.S. population trends are projected using data from the Bureau of the Census. The focus is on the economic consequences of these trends. The authors conclude that the economic impact will be relatively slight up to the year 2000. "After 2000, the changes to the economic outlook will be more significant. The aging of the population will accelerate and the pace of economic growth is likely to slow even further. More resources will be devoted to caring for the elderly, while public and private pension systems will need to draw down savings to provide for the retirement of the baby-boom generation." excerpt

  5. Emittance preservation in plasma-based accelerators with ion motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-11-01

    In a plasma-accelerator-based linear collider, the density of matched, low-emittance, high-energy particle bunches required for collider applications can be orders of magnitude above the background ion density, leading to ion motion, perturbation of the focusing fields, and, hence, to beam emittance growth. By analyzing the response of the background ions to an ultrahigh density beam, analytical expressions, valid for nonrelativistic ion motion, are derived for the transverse wakefield and for the final (i.e., after saturation) bunch emittance. Analytical results are validated against numerical modeling. Initial beam distributions are derived that are equilibrium solutions, which require head-to-tail bunch shaping, enabling emittance preservation with ion motion.

  6. Transverse Emittance Measurement and Preservation at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082907

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation will be discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constra...

  7. Emittance preservation in plasma-based accelerators with ion motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric E.; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    In a plasma-accelerator-based linear collider, the density of matched, low-emittance, high-energy particle bunches required for collider applications can be orders of magnitude above the background ion density, leading to ion motion, nonlinear focusing fields, and, hence, to beam emittance growth. By analyzing the response of the background ions to an ultra-high density beam, analytical expressions, valid for nonrelativistic ion motion, are derived for the transverse wakefield and for the final (i.e., after saturation) bunch emittance. Analytical results are validated against numerical modeling. A class of initial beam distributions are derived that are equilibrium solutions, which require head-to-tail bunch shaping, enabling emittance preservation with ion motion. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  9. Transverse emittance measurement and preservation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Maria

    2016-06-20

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation are discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constraints of various systems such as tune measurement precision and powering limitations of the LHC superconducting circuits into account. With sinusoidal k-modulation record low beta function measurement uncertainties in the LHC have been reached. 2015 LHC beta function and β*, which is the beta function at the collision point, measurements with k-modulation will be presented. Wire scanners and synchrotron light monitors are presently used in the LHC to measure the transverse beam size. Accuracy and limitations of the LHC transverse profile monitors are discussed. During the 2012 LHC proton run it was found that wire scanner photomultiplier saturation added significant uncertainty on all measurements. A large discrepancy between emittances from wire scanners and luminosity was discovered but not solved. During Long Shutdown 1 the wire scanner system was upgraded with new photomultipliers. A thorough study of LHC wire scanner measurement precision in 2015 is presented

  10. Causes of World Trade Growth in Agricultural and Food Products, 1951 - 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Serrano; Vicente Pinilla

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to analyse the causes of the growth of international agricultural and food trade in volume terms from 1951 to 2000. The results suggest that income growth has been the principal reason for this expansion, while exchange rate stability and the real price of agricultural products played only a minor role. Multilateral trade liberalisation and trade costs, given their long-term stability, are not elements which could have stimulated their growth. Finally, th...

  11. Improvements in emittance wake field optimization for the SLAC Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Franz Josef

    2003-01-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time ...

  12. Selective-area growth of GaN nanocolumns on Si(111) substrates for application to nanocolumn emitters with systematic analysis of dislocation filtering effect of nanocolumns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishino, Katsumi; Ishizawa, Shunsuke

    2015-06-05

    The growth of highly uniform arrays of GaN nanocolumns with diameters from 122 to 430 nm on Si (111) substrates was demonstrated. The employment of GaN film templates with flat surfaces (root mean square surface roughness of 0.84 nm), which were obtained using an AlN/GaN superlattice (SL) buffer on Si, contributed to the high-quality selective-area growth of nanocolumns using a thin Ti mask of 5 nm thickness by rf-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Although the GaN template included a large number of dislocations (dislocation density ∼10(11) cm(-2)), the dislocation filtering effect of nanocolumns was enhanced with decreasing nanocolumn diameters (D). Systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation enabled us to explain the dependence of the dislocation propagation behavior in nanocolumns on the nanocolumn diameter for the first time. Plan-view TEM analysis was performed for nanocolumns with D = 120-324 nm by slicing the nanocolumns horizontally at a height of ∼300 nm above their bottoms and dislocation propagation through the nanocolumns was analyzed by the cross-sectional TEM observation of nanocolumns with D ∼ 200 nm. It was clarified that dislocations were effectively filtered in the bottom 300 nm region of the nanocolumns, the dislocation density of the nanocolumns decreased with decreasing D, and for narrow nanocolumns with D dislocation-free crystals were obtained in the upper part of the nanocolumns. The dramatic improvement in the emission properties of GaN nanocolumns observed with decreasing diameter is discussed in relation to the decreased dislocation density. The laser action of InGaN/GaN-based nanocolumn arrays with a nanocolumn diameter of 170 nm and a period of 200 nm on Si under optical excitation was obtained with an emission wavelength of 407 nm. We also fabricated red-emitting InGaN-based nanocolumn light-emitting diodes on Si that operated at a wavelength of 652 nm, demonstrating vertical conduction through the Al

  13. Transverse Emittance Measurement at REX ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Lanaia, D; Voulot, D

    2014-01-01

    The transverse emittance of REX-ISOLDE beams has been measured at 0.3 MeV/u (RFQ energy) and 2.85 MeV/u (maximum energy). This document compares RMS emittances measured with a slit-grid emittance meter (NTG emittance-meter) and RMS emittances measured with the quadrupole-scan method or three-gradient method. The results are compared with other measurements made with the slitgrid emittance meter in 2006 and 2008. The data treatment process is also described.

  14. Mesa-top quantum dot single photon emitter arrays: Growth, optical characteristics, and the simulated optical response of integrated dielectric nanoantenna-waveguide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiefei; Chattaraj, Swarnabha; Lu, Siyuan; Madhukar, Anupam

    2016-12-01

    Nanophotonic quantum information processing systems require spatially ordered, spectrally uniform single photon sources (SPSs) integrated on-chip with co-designed light manipulating elements providing emission rate enhancement, emitted photon guidance, and lossless propagation. Towards this goal, we consider systems comprising an SPS array with each SPS coupled to a dielectric building block (DBB) based multifunctional light manipulation unit (LMU). For the SPS array, we report triggered single photon emission from GaAs(001)/InGaAs single quantum dots grown selectively on top of nanomesas using the approach of substrate-encoded size-reducing epitaxy (SESRE). Systematic temperature and power dependent photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation, time-resolved PL, and emission statistics studies reveal high spectral uniformity and single photon emission at 8 K with g(2)(0) of 0.19 ± 0.03. The SESRE based SPS arrays, following growth of a planarizing overlayer, are readily integrable with LMUs fabricated subsequently using either the 2D photonic crystal approach or, as theoretically examined here, DBB based LMUs. We report the simulated optical response of SPS embedded in DBB based nanoantenna-waveguide structures as the multifunctional LMU. The multiple functions of emission rate enhancement, guiding, and lossless propagation are derived from the behavior of the same collective Mie resonance (dominantly magnetic) of the interacting DBB based LMU tuned to the SPS targeted emission wavelength of 980 nm. The simulation utilizes an analytical approach that provides physical insight into the obtained numerical results. Together, the combined experimental and modelling demonstrations open a rich approach to implementing co-designed on-chip integrated SPS-LMUs that, in turn, serve as basic elements of integrated nanophotonic information processing systems.

  15. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHenry, R.S. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine Engineering

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  16. Emitter location errors in electronic recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewski, Jan; Dikta, Anna

    2017-04-01

    The paper describes some of the problems associated with emitter location calculations. This aspect is the most important part of the series of tasks in the electronic recognition systems. The basic tasks include: detection of emission of electromagnetic signals, tracking (determining the direction of emitter sources), signal analysis in order to classify different emitter types and the identification of the sources of emission of the same type. The paper presents a brief description of the main methods of emitter localization and the basic mathematical formulae for calculating their location. The errors' estimation has been made to determine the emitter location for three different methods and different scenarios of emitters and direction finding (DF) sensors deployment in the electromagnetic environment. The emitter has been established using a special computer program. On the basis of extensive numerical calculations, the evaluation of precise emitter location in the recognition systems for different configuration alignment of bearing devices and emitter was conducted. The calculations which have been made based on the simulated data for different methods of location are presented in the figures and respective tables. The obtained results demonstrate that calculation of the precise emitter location depends on: the number of DF sensors, the distances between emitter and DF sensors, their mutual location in the reconnaissance area and bearing errors. The precise emitter location varies depending on the number of obtained bearings. The higher the number of bearings, the better the accuracy of calculated emitter location in spite of relatively high bearing errors for each DF sensor.

  17. Concurrent Supermassive Black Hole and Galazy Growth: Linking Environment and Nuclear Activity in Zeta Equals 2.23 H Alpha Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Lucy, A. B.; Alexander, D. M.; Best, P. N.; Geach, J. E.; Harrison, C. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Matsuda, Y.; Mullaney, J. R.; Smail, Ian; hide

    2013-01-01

    equal (0.2-0.4) × 10(exp -3), somewhat lower than the local MBH/M relation, but comparable to that found for z approximately equal 1-2 star-forming galaxies with similar mean X-ray luminosities. We estimate that a periodic QSO phase with duty cycle approximately 2%-8% would be sufficient to bring star-forming galaxies onto the local M(BH)/Stellar Mass relation. This duty cycle is broadly consistent with the observed C-COSMOS HAE AGN fraction (Approximately equal 0.4%-2.3%) for powerful AGN with LX approximately greater than 10(exp 44) erg s(exp -1). Future observations of 2QZ Clus will be needed to identify key factors responsible for driving the mutual growth of the SMBHs and galaxies.

  18. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-08-21

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

  19. Recent unprecedented tree-ring growth in bristlecone pine at the highest elevations and possible causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Matthew W.; Hughes, Malcolm K.; Bunn, Andrew G.; Kipfmueller, Kurt F.

    2009-01-01

    Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) at 3 sites in western North America near the upper elevation limit of tree growth showed ring growth in the second half of the 20th century that was greater than during any other 50-year period in the last 3,700 years. The accelerated growth is suggestive of an environmental change unprecedented in millennia. The high growth is not overestimated because of standardization techniques, and it is unlikely that it is a result of a change in tree growth form or that it is predominantly caused by CO2 fertilization. The growth surge has occurred only in a limited elevational band within ≈150 m of upper treeline, regardless of treeline elevation. Both an independent proxy record of temperature and high-elevation meteorological temperature data are positively and significantly correlated with upper-treeline ring width both before and during the high-growth interval. Increasing temperature at high elevations is likely a prominent factor in the modern unprecedented level of growth for Pinus longaeva at these sites. PMID:19918054

  20. Minimizing Emittance for the CLIC Damping Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Levitchev, E; Piminov, P; Schulte, Daniel; Siniatkin, S; Vobly, P P; Zimmermann, Frank; Zolotarev, Konstantin V; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC damping rings aim at unprecedented small normalized equilibrium emittances of 3.3 nm vertical and 550 nm horizontal, for a bunch charge of 2.6·109 particles and an energy of 2.4 GeV. In this parameter regime the dominant emittance growth mechanism is intra-beam scattering. Intense synchrotron radiation damping from wigglers is required to counteract its effect. Here the overall optimization of the wiggler parameters is described, taking into account state-of-the-art wiggler technologies, wiggler effects on dynamic aperture, and problems of wiggler radiation absorption. Two technical solutions, one based on superconducting magnet technology the other on permanent magnets are presented. Although dynamic aperture and tolerances of this ring design remain challenging, benefits are obtained from the strong damping. For optimized wigglers, only bunches for a single machine pulse may need to be stored, making injection/extraction particularly simple and limiting the synchrotron-radiation power. With a 36...

  1. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, D. J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Hart, T. L. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, J. G. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, L. M. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Oliveros, S. J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Perera, L. P. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, D. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  2. Causes of mortality in California sea otters during periods of population growth and decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, J.A.; Hatfield, B.B.; Ralls, K.; Ames, J.

    2003-01-01

    Elevated mortality appears to be the main reason for both sluggish growth and periods of decline in the threatened California sea otter population. We assessed causes of mortality from salvage records of 3,105 beach-cast carcasses recovered from 1968 through 1999, contrasting two periods of growth with two periods of decline. Overall, an estimated 40%-60% of the deaths were not recovered and 70% of the recovered carcasses died from unknown causes. Nonetheless, several common patterns were evident in the salvage records during the periods of population decline. These included greater percentages of (1) prime age animals (3-10 yr), (2) carcasses killed by great white shark attacks, (3) carcasses recovered in spring and summer, and (4) carcasses for which the cause of death was unknown. Neither sex composition nor the proportion of carcasses dying of infectious disease varied consistently between periods of population increase and decline. The population decline from 1976 to 1984 was likely due to incidental mortality in a set-net fishery, and the decline from 1995 to 1999 may be related to a developing live-fish fishery. Long-term trends unrelated to periods of growth and decline included a decrease in per capita pup production and mass/length ratios of adult carcasses over the 31-yr study. The generally high proportion of deaths from infectious disease suggests that this factor has contributed to the chronically sluggish growth rate of the California sea otter population.

  3. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  5. Importance of cell damage causing growth delay for high pressure inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanba, Masaru; Nomura, Kazuki; Nasuhara, Yusuke; Hayashi, Manabu; Kido, Miyuki; Hayashi, Mayumi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru; Hirayama, Masao; Ueno, Shigeaki; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2013-06-01

    A high pressure (HP) tolerant (barotolerant) mutant a2568D8 and a variably barotolerant mutant a1210H12 were generated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae using ultra-violet mutagenesis. The two mutants, a barosensitive mutant a924E1 and the wild-type strain, were pressurized (225 MPa), and pressure inactivation behavior was analyzed. In the wild-type strain, a proportion of the growth-delayed cells were detected after exposure to HP. In a924E1, the proportion of growth-delayed cells significantly decreased compared with the wild-type. In a2568D8, the proportion of growth-delayed cells increased and the proportion of inactivated cells decreased compared with the wild-type. In a1210H12, the growth-delayed cells could not be detected within 120 s of exposure to HP. The proportion of growth-delayed cells, which incurred the damage, would affect the survival ratio by HP. These results suggested that cellular changes in barotolerance caused by mutations are remarkably affected by the ability to recover from cellular damage, which results in a growth delay.

  6. Reducing ppGpp level rescues an extreme growth defect caused by mutant EF-Tu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Bergman

    Full Text Available Transcription and translation of mRNA's are coordinated processes in bacteria. We have previously shown that a mutant form of EF-Tu (Gln125Arg in Salmonella Typhimurium with a reduced affinity for aa-tRNA, causes ribosome pausing, resulting in an increased rate of RNase E-mediated mRNA cleavage, causing extremely slow growth, even on rich medium. The slow growth phenotype is reversed by mutations that reduce RNase E activity. Here we asked whether the slow growth phenotype could be reversed by overexpression of a wild-type gene. We identified spoT (encoding ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase as a gene that partially reversed the slow growth rate when overexpressed. We found that the slow-growing mutant had an abnormally high basal level of ppGpp that was reduced when spoT was overexpressed. Inactivating relA (encoding the ribosome-associated ppGpp synthetase also reduced ppGpp levels and significantly increased growth rate. Because RelA responds specifically to deacylated tRNA in the ribosomal A-site this suggested that the tuf mutant had an increased level of deacylated tRNA relative to the wild-type. To test this hypothesis we measured the relative acylation levels of 4 families of tRNAs and found that proline isoacceptors were acylated at a lower level in the mutant strain relative to the wild-type. In addition, the level of the proS tRNA synthetase mRNA was significantly lower in the mutant strain. We suggest that an increased level of deacylated tRNA in the mutant strain stimulates RelA-mediated ppGpp production, causing changes in transcription pattern that are inappropriate for rich media conditions, and contributing to slow growth rate. Reducing ppGpp levels, by altering the activity of either SpoT or RelA, removes one cause of the slow growth and reveals the interconnectedness of intracellular regulatory mechanisms.

  7. Growth restriction in gastroschisis: quantification of its severity and exploration of a placental cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Sam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroschisis patients are commonly small for gestational age (SGA, birth weight [BW] th centile. However, the extent, symmetry and causes of that growth restriction remain controversial. Methods We compared BW, crown-heel length (LT, occipitofrontal circumference (OFC and ponderal index (PI in 179 gastroschisis cases and 895 matched controls by univariate and multiple regression. Fetal ultrasounds (N = 80 were reviewed to determine onset of growth restriction. Placental histology was examined in 31 gastroschisis patients whose placental tissue was available and in 29 controls. Results Gastroschisis cases weighed less than controls (BW = 2400 ± 502 g vs. 2750 ± 532 g, p Conclusions Marked, relatively symmetric intrauterine growth restriction is an intrinsic part of gastroschisis. It begins early in the second trimester, and is associated with placental chorangiosis.

  8. Mechanics Aspects of Microcrack Growth in Inconel 718-Implications for Engine Retirement for Cause Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-18

    transient growth process. Equally important are multiple initiation and branching. Because artificial flaws would tend to concentrate deformation and...asymmetric cracking and the related loss of section caused yield at the notch where crack 2 initiated. For this reason, this multiple initiation developed...in an inelastic field. Yet another feature unique to corner cracks is the periods of dormancy, such as evident here in CH1, crack 1,1. Both multiple

  9. Gefitinib causes growth arrest and inhibition of metastasis in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Zhu, Jiaxue; Zhao, Qiang; Tian, Baofang

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are primary malignant cartilage-forming tumors of bone which are not responsive either to chemotherapy or radiation treatment and display potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway plays an important role in the development and progression of many cancers. However, the effect of EGFR inhibitor gefitinib on cell growth and metastasis in human chondrosarcoma cells is largely unknown. Features of the protein expression of EGFR in 3 human chondrosarcoma cell lines JJ2012, SW1353 and OUMS27 were analyzed. The inhibitory effects of EGFR inhibitor gefitinib on cell proliferation, cell cycle and metastasis were assessed by using MTS, flow cytometry and migration assays, respectively. The expression of metastasis-related proteins was evaluated by western blotting. All the three human chondrosarcoma cell lines expressed EGFR protein. Gefitinib significantly inhibited the growth, induced cell cycle arrest and decreased the migra- tion ability of human chondrosarcoma cells. In addition, gefitinib also reduced the expression of metastasis-related proteins, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9). The discovery that gefitinib inhibited the proliferation and reduced the metastatic capacity of chondrosarcoma cells may help increase the understanding of the mechanism underlying human chondrosarcoma growth and metastasis. Thus, gefitinib may represent a promising agent for controlling chondrosarcoma proliferation and metastasis.

  10. Enhanced lignin monomer production caused by cinnamic Acid and its hydroxylated derivatives inhibits soybean root growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Barbosa Lima

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid and its hydroxylated derivatives (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids are known allelochemicals that affect the seed germination and root growth of many plant species. Recent studies have indicated that the reduction of root growth by these allelochemicals is associated with premature cell wall lignification. We hypothesized that an influx of these compounds into the phenylpropanoid pathway increases the lignin monomer content and reduces the root growth. To confirm this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids on soybean root growth, lignin and the composition of p-hydroxyphenyl (H, guaiacyl (G and syringyl (S monomers. To this end, three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in nutrient solution with or without allelochemical (or selective enzymatic inhibitors of the phenylpropanoid pathway in a growth chamber for 24 h. In general, the results showed that 1 cinnamic, p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids reduced root growth and increased lignin content; 2 cinnamic and p-coumaric acids increased p-hydroxyphenyl (H monomer content, whereas p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic acids increased guaiacyl (G content, and sinapic acid increased sinapyl (S content; 3 when applied in conjunction with piperonylic acid (PIP, an inhibitor of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, C4H, cinnamic acid reduced H, G and S contents; and 4 when applied in conjunction with 3,4-(methylenedioxycinnamic acid (MDCA, an inhibitor of the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, 4CL, p-coumaric acid reduced H, G and S contents, whereas caffeic, ferulic and sinapic acids reduced G and S contents. These results confirm our hypothesis that exogenously applied allelochemicals are channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway causing excessive production of lignin and its main monomers. By consequence, an enhanced stiffening of the cell wall restricts soybean root growth.

  11. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

  12. Growth condition dependency is the major cause of non-responsiveness upon genetic perturbation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Amini

    Full Text Available Investigating the role and interplay between individual proteins in biological processes is often performed by assessing the functional consequences of gene inactivation or removal. Depending on the sensitivity of the assay used for determining phenotype, between 66% (growth and 53% (gene expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion strains show no defect when analyzed under a single condition. Although it is well known that this non-responsive behavior is caused by different types of redundancy mechanisms or by growth condition/cell type dependency, it is not known what the relative contribution of these different causes is. Understanding the underlying causes of and their relative contribution to non-responsive behavior upon genetic perturbation is extremely important for designing efficient strategies aimed at elucidating gene function and unraveling complex cellular systems. Here, we provide a systematic classification of the underlying causes of and their relative contribution to non-responsive behavior upon gene deletion. The overall contribution of redundancy to non-responsive behavior is estimated at 29%, of which approximately 17% is due to homology-based redundancy and 12% is due to pathway-based redundancy. The major determinant of non-responsiveness is condition dependency (71%. For approximately 14% of protein complexes, just-in-time assembly can be put forward as a potential mechanistic explanation for how proteins can be regulated in a condition dependent manner. Taken together, the results underscore the large contribution of growth condition requirement to non-responsive behavior, which needs to be taken into account for strategies aimed at determining gene function. The classification provided here, can also be further harnessed in systematic analyses of complex cellular systems.

  13. Growth condition dependency is the major cause of non-responsiveness upon genetic perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Saman; Holstege, Frank C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the role and interplay between individual proteins in biological processes is often performed by assessing the functional consequences of gene inactivation or removal. Depending on the sensitivity of the assay used for determining phenotype, between 66% (growth) and 53% (gene expression) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion strains show no defect when analyzed under a single condition. Although it is well known that this non-responsive behavior is caused by different types of redundancy mechanisms or by growth condition/cell type dependency, it is not known what the relative contribution of these different causes is. Understanding the underlying causes of and their relative contribution to non-responsive behavior upon genetic perturbation is extremely important for designing efficient strategies aimed at elucidating gene function and unraveling complex cellular systems. Here, we provide a systematic classification of the underlying causes of and their relative contribution to non-responsive behavior upon gene deletion. The overall contribution of redundancy to non-responsive behavior is estimated at 29%, of which approximately 17% is due to homology-based redundancy and 12% is due to pathway-based redundancy. The major determinant of non-responsiveness is condition dependency (71%). For approximately 14% of protein complexes, just-in-time assembly can be put forward as a potential mechanistic explanation for how proteins can be regulated in a condition dependent manner. Taken together, the results underscore the large contribution of growth condition requirement to non-responsive behavior, which needs to be taken into account for strategies aimed at determining gene function. The classification provided here, can also be further harnessed in systematic analyses of complex cellular systems. PMID:28257504

  14. Host growth can cause invasive spread of crops by soilborne pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melen Leclerc

    Full Text Available Invasive soilborne plant pathogens cause substantial damage to crops and natural populations, but our understanding of how to prevent their epidemics or reduce their damage is limited. A key and experimentally-tested concept in the epidemiology of soilborne plant diseases is that of a threshold spacing between hosts below which epidemics (invasive spread can occur. We extend this paradigm by examining how plant-root growth may alter the conditions for occurrence of soilborne pathogen epidemics in plant populations. We hypothesise that host-root growth can 1 increase the probability of pathogen transmission between neighbouring plants and, consequently, 2 decrease the threshold spacing for epidemics to occur. We predict that, in systems initially below their threshold conditions, root growth can trigger soilborne pathogen epidemics through a switch from non-invasive to invasive behaviour, while in systems above threshold conditions root growth can enhance epidemic development. As an example pathosystem, we studied the fungus Rhizoctonia solani on sugar beet in field experiments. To address hypothesis 1, we recorded infections within inoculum-donor and host-recipient pairs of plants with differing spacing. We translated these observations into the individual-level concept of pathozone, a host-centred form of dispersal kernel. To test hypothesis 2 and our prediction, we used the pathozone to parameterise a stochastic model of pathogen spread in a host population, contrasting scenarios of spread with and without host growth. Our results support our hypotheses and prediction. We suggest that practitioners of agriculture and arboriculture account for root system expansion in order to reduce the risk of soilborne-disease epidemics. We discuss changes in crop design, including increasing plant spacing and using crop mixtures, for boosting crop resilience to invasion and damage by soilborne pathogens. We speculate that the disease-induced root growth

  15. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters...

  16. Biocontrol traits of plant growth suppressive arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi against root rot in tomato caused by Pythium aphanidermatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John; Graham, James H.; Cubero, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi known to cause plant growth depressions in tomato were examined for their biocontrol effects against root rot caused by Pythium aphanidermatum. The main hypothesis was that plant growth suppressive AM fungi would elicit a defence response in the host plant reduci...... AM fungi may offer plant beneficial traits in terms of biocontrol of root cortical pathogens.......Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi known to cause plant growth depressions in tomato were examined for their biocontrol effects against root rot caused by Pythium aphanidermatum. The main hypothesis was that plant growth suppressive AM fungi would elicit a defence response in the host plant reducing...... the pathogen root infection level, measured both in terms of Pythium ELISA and by recovery on selective media and only at the first harvest. Likewise, P. aphanidermatum root infection reduced colonization levels of G. intraradices, but not that of the two other AM fungi. In conclusion, plant growth suppressive...

  17. Robust multiplatform RF emitter localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Issa, Huthaifa; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, position based services has increase. Thus, recent developments in communications and RF technology have enabled system concept formulations and designs for low-cost radar systems using state-of-the-art software radio modules. This research is done to investigate a novel multi-platform RF emitter localization technique denoted as Position-Adaptive RF Direction Finding (PADF). The formulation is based on the investigation of iterative path-loss (i.e., Path Loss Exponent, or PLE) metrics estimates that are measured across multiple platforms in order to autonomously adapt (i.e. self-adjust) of the location of each distributed/cooperative platform. Experiments conducted at the Air-Force Research laboratory (AFRL) indicate that this position-adaptive approach exhibits potential for accurate emitter localization in challenging embedded multipath environments such as in urban environments. The focus of this paper is on the robustness of the distributed approach to RF-based location tracking. In order to localize the transmitter, we use the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) data to approximate distance from the transmitter to the revolving receivers. We provide an algorithm for on-line estimation of the Path Loss Exponent (PLE) that is used in modeling the distance based on Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements. The emitter position estimation is calculated based on surrounding sensors RSS values using Least-Square Estimation (LSE). The PADF has been tested on a number of different configurations in the laboratory via the design and implementation of four IRIS wireless sensor nodes as receivers and one hidden sensor as a transmitter during the localization phase. The robustness of detecting the transmitters position is initiated by getting the RSSI data through experiments and then data manipulation in MATLAB will determine the robustness of each node and ultimately that of each configuration. The parameters that are used in the functions are

  18. Neutral sphingomyelinase (SMPD3) deficiency disrupts the Golgi secretory pathway and causes growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Wilhelm; Hammels, Ina; Jenke, Bitta; Binczek, Erika; Schmidt-Soltau, Inga; Brodesser, Susanne; Schauss, Astrid; Etich, Julia; Heilig, Juliane; Zaucke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Systemic loss of neutral sphingomyelinase (SMPD3) in mice leads to a novel form of systemic, juvenile hypoplasia (dwarfism). SMPD3 deficiency in mainly two growth regulating cell types contributes to the phenotype, in chondrocytes of skeletal growth zones to skeletal malformation and chondrodysplasia, and in hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons to systemic hypothalamus–pituitary–somatotropic hypoplasia. The unbiased smpd3−/− mouse mutant and derived smpd3−/− primary chondrocytes were instrumental in defining the enigmatic role underlying the systemic and cell autonomous role of SMPD3 in the Golgi compartment. Here we describe the unprecedented role of SMPD3. SMPD3 deficiency disrupts homeostasis of sphingomyelin (SM), ceramide (Cer) and diacylglycerol (DAG) in the Golgi SMPD3-SMS1 (SM-synthase1) cycle. Cer and DAG, two fusogenic intermediates, modify the membrane lipid bilayer for the initiation of vesicle formation and transport. Dysproteostasis, unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis perturb the Golgi secretory pathway in the smpd3−/− mouse. Secretion of extracellular matrix proteins is arrested in chondrocytes and causes skeletal malformation and chondrodysplasia. Similarly, retarded secretion of proteo-hormones in hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons leads to hypothalamus induced combined pituitary hormone deficiency. SMPD3 in the regulation of the protein vesicular secretory pathway may become a diagnostic target in the etiology of unknown forms of juvenile growth and developmental inhibition. PMID:27882938

  19. Rapamycin causes growth arrest and inhibition of invasion in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhu, Jiaxue; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a highly malignant tumor that is characterized by a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis and notable for its lack of response to conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Rapamycin, the inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is a valuable drug with diverse clinical applications and regulates many cellular processes. However, the effects of rapamycin on cell growth and invasion of human chondrosarcoma cells are not well known. We determined the effect of rapamycin on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and invasion by using MTS, flow cytometry and invasion assays in two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, SW1353 and JJ012. Cell cycle regulatory and invasion-related genes' expression analysis was performed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). We also evaluated the effect of rapamycin on tumor growth by using mice xenograph models. Rapamycin significantly inhibited the cell proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest and decreased the invasion ability of human chondrosarcoma cells. Meanwhile, rapamycin modulated the cell cycle regulatory and invasion-related genes' expression. Furthermore, the tumor growth of mice xenograph models with human chondrosarcoma cells was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. These results provided further insight into the role of rapamycin in chondrosarcoma. Therefore, rapamycin targeted therapy may be a potential treatment strategy for chondrosarcoma.

  20. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  2. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhoplav, Rodion [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  3. Systemic administration of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) causes growth of the rat prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, N; Vinter-Jensen, L; Pedersen, S B

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the rat prostate. In addition, we investigated the effect of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) inhibition with alpha-diflouromethylornitine (DFMO) on the expected growth of the prostate.MA...

  4. The Influence of Fertigation on Clogging of Some Emitters in Drip Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shahrzad gharcheh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An appropriate water resources management and planning is necessary due to the scarcity of water resources and rapidly growing world population. In this regard, selecting appropriate methods for irrigation is one of the most important issues. Drip irrigation is a recent advanced irrigation method in which fertilizers can be efficiently applied along with irrigation water. Drip fertigation, however, can potentially cause clogging of emitters. Various factors such as clogging increase manufactures’ coefficient of variation and water temperature and pressure changes could alter emitter discharge and water distribution uniformity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of fertigation on clogging of emitters and the performance of drip irrigation systems. Materials and Methods: This study was performed as a laboratory experiment at the University of Zabol. The experiment was done in the form of factorial in a completely randomized design with three replications in the hydraulics laboratory, the University of Zabol. The first factor was fertilizer type including: F0 (control, F1 (ammonium nitrate and F2 (urea and the second factor was the emitter types including one-nozzle on line (A, six-nozzles in line (B and eight-nozzles on line (C. The tap water was used for irrigation. The system included 9 laterals, 3 m each with 18 emitters on each lateral. Fertilizer solution with known concentrations of 0.08 grams per liter was entered into the system from a plastic tank. Fertilizer tank was covered to avoid water evaporation even in a small amount. The experiment lasted for 60 days with 12 operating hours per day. The emitter discharge was measured every three days at the end of day. In order to evaluate the degree of emitter clogging, the percentages of discharge reduction (Qt, Christiansen’s coefficient of uniformity (CU, distribution uniformity (DU and discharge coefficient of variations (Vm were calculated as follows: (1 (2 (3

  5. Multivariate Analysis of Variance: Finding significant growth in mice with craniofacial dysmorphology caused by the Crouzon mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Signe Strann; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2010-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome is characterized by growth disturbances caused by premature fusion of the cranial growth zones. A mouse model with mutation Fgfr2C342Y, equivalent to the most common Crouzon syndrome mutation (henceforth called the Crouzon mouse model), has a phenotype showing many parallels to t...

  6. Impaired plant growth and development caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueno, Marni E; Hibi, Yurina; Imai, Kenichi; Laurena, Antonio C; Okamoto, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    Previous attempts to express the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) Tat (trans-activator of transcription) protein in plants resulted in a number of physiological abnormalities, such as stunted growth and absence of seed formation, that could not be explained. In the study reported here, we expressed Tat in tomato and observed phenotypic abnormalities, including stunted growth, absence of root formation, chlorosis, and plant death, as a result of reduced cytokinin levels. These reduced levels were ascribed to a differentially expressed CKO35 in Tat-bombarded tomato. Of the two CKO isoforms that are naturally expressed in tomato, CKO43 and CKO37, only the expression of CKO37 was affected by Tat. Our analysis of the Tat confirmed that the Arg-rich and RGD motifs of Tat have functional relevance in tomato and that independent mutations at these motifs caused inhibition of the differentially expressed CKO isoform and the extracellular secretion of the Tat protein, respectively, in our Tat-bombarded tomato samples.

  7. Laser wire emittance measurement line AT CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, H; Blair, G A; Aumeyr, T; Schulte, D; Stulle, F

    2011-01-01

    A precise measurement of the transverse beam size and beam emittances upstream of the final focus is essential for ensuring the full luminosity at future linear colliders. A scheme for the emittance measurements at the RTML line of the CLIC using laser-wire beam profile monitors is described. A lattice of the measurement line is discussed and results of simulations of statistical errors and of their impact on the accuracy of the emittance reconstruction are given. Laser wire systems suitable for CLIC and their main characteristics are discussed.

  8. Electron sources with a plasma emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreindel, Iu. E.

    Papers are presented concerning electron guns which utilize plasma emitters involving low-pressure cold-cathode gas discharges. Particular attention is given to the development of high-brightness plasma emitters and the control of their parameters; experimental results on the operating conditions of various types of gas discharges used to obtain continuous and pulsed electron beams of large cross section; and the designs and characteristics of plasma-emitter electron guns. A number of applications are considered, including electron-beam welding, sintering, thin-film technology, and electron-beam diagnostics. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  9. Electrospray ionization from nanopipette emitters with tip diameters of less than 100 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuill, Elizabeth M; Sa, Niya; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M; Baker, Lane A

    2013-09-17

    Work presented here demonstrates application of nanopipettes pulled to orifice diameters of less than 100 nm as electrospray ionization emitters for mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometric analysis of a series of peptides and proteins electrosprayed from pulled-quartz capillary nanopipette emitters with internal diameters ranging from 37 to 70 nm is detailed. Overall, the use of nanopipette emitters causes a shift toward the production of ions of higher charge states and leads to a reduction in width of charge-state distribution as compared to typical nanospray conditions. Further, nanopipettes show improved S/N and the same signal precision as typical nanospray, despite the much smaller dimensions. As characterized by SEM images acquired before and after spray, nanopipettes are shown to be robust under conditions employed. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are used to calculate the electric field at the emitter tip, which can be significant for the small diameter tips used.

  10. Engineered Emitters for Improved Silicon Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ronak A.

    In 2014, installation of 5.3GW of new Photovoltaic (PV) systems occurred in the United States, raising the total installed capacity to 16.36GW. Strong growth is predicted for the domestic PV market with analysts reporting goals of 696GW by 2020. Conventional single crystalline silicon cells are the technology of choice, accounting for 90% of the installations in the global commercial market. Cells made of GaAs offer higher efficiencies, but at a substantially higher cost. Thin film technologies such as CIGS and CdTe compete favorably with multi-crystalline Si (u-Si), but at 20% efficiency, still lag the c-Si cell in performance. The c-Si cell can be fabricated to operate at approximately 25% efficiency, but commercially the efficiencies are in the 18-21% range, which is a direct result of cost trade-offs between process complexity and rapid throughput. With the current cost of c-Si cell modules at nearly 0.60/W. The technology is well below the historic metric of 1/W for economic viability. The result is that more complex processes, once cost-prohibitive, may now be viable. An example is Panasonic's HIT cell which operates in the 22-24% efficiency range. To facilitate research and development of novel PV materials and techniques, RIT has developed a basic solar cell fabrication process. Student projects prior to this work had produced cells with 12.8% efficiency using p type substrates. This thesis reports on recent work to improve cell efficiencies while simultaneously expanding the capability of the rapid prototyping process. In addition to the p-Si substrates, cells have been produced using n-Si substrates. The cell emitter, which is often done with a single diffusion or implant has been re-engineered using a dual implant of the same dose. This dual-implanted emitter has been shown to lower contact resistance, increase Voc, and increase the efficiency. A p-Si substrate cell has been fabricated with an efficiency of 14.6% and n-Si substrate cell with a 13

  11. Multinozzle emitter arrays for ultrahigh-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong

    2017-10-17

    The present invention provides for a structure comprising a plurality of emitters, wherein a first nozzle of a first emitter and a second nozzle of a second emitter emit in two directions that are not or essentially not in the same direction; wherein the walls of the nozzles and the emitters form a monolithic whole. The present invention also provides for a structure comprising an emitter with a sharpened end from which the emitter emits; wherein the emitters forms a monolithic whole. The present invention also provides for a fully integrated separation of proteins and small molecules on a silicon chip before the electrospray mass spectrometry analysis.

  12. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  13. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  14. Effect of low frequency noise on the evolution of the emittance and halo population

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, Miriam; Antoniou, Fanouria; Bravin, Enrico; Bruce, Roderik; Fartoukh, Stephane; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Hofle, Wolfgang; Gasior, Marek; Jaussi, Michael; Jacquet, Delphine; Kotzian, Gerd; Olexa, Jakub; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papotti, Giulia; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Stancari, Giulio; Trad, Georges; Valuch, Daniel; Valentino, Gianluca; Wagner, Joschka; Wenninger, Jorg; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    For the High Luminosity upgrade the β* in IR1 and IR5 will be further reduced compared to the current LHC. As the β* decreases the β-functions in the inner triplet (IT) increase resulting in a higher sensitivity of the HL-LHC to ground motion in the IT region or to increases of the low frequency noise. Noise can in general lead to emittance growth and higher halo population and diffusion rate. However, it is usually assumed in the literature that only frequencies close to the betatron frequencies and sidebands have an effect on the emittance and tail population. To test this theory, an MD was carried out to observe if also low frequency noise can lead to emittance growth and stronger halo population and diffusion.

  15. MD1271: Effect of low frequency noise on the evolution of the emittance and halo population

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, Miriam; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Hofle, Wolfgang; Hostettler, Michi; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papotti, Giulia; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pellegrini, Dario; Trad, Georges; Valuch, Daniel; Valentino, Gianluca; Wagner, Joschka; Cai, Xu; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    For the High Luminosity upgrade the β* in IR1 and IR5 will be further reduced compared to the current LHC. As the β* decreases the β-functions in the inner triplet (IT) increase resulting in a higher sensitivity of the HL-LHC to ground motion in the IT region or to increases of the low frequency noise. Noise can in general lead to emittance growth and higher halo population and diffusion rate. However, it is usually assumed in the literature that only frequencies close to the betatron frequencies and sidebands have an effect on the emittance and tail population. To test this theory, an MD was carried out to observe if also low frequency noise can lead to emittance growth and stronger halo population and diffusion. This MD conducted on 24.08.2016 follows a previous MD on 05.11.2015/06.11.2015

  16. Accurate estimation of the RMS emittance from single current amplifier data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R.F.; Keller, R.; Letchford, A.P.; Thomae, R.W.; Thomason, J.W.G.

    2002-05-31

    This paper presents the SCUBEEx rms emittance analysis, a self-consistent, unbiased elliptical exclusion method, which combines traditional data-reduction methods with statistical methods to obtain accurate estimates for the rms emittance. Rather than considering individual data, the method tracks the average current density outside a well-selected, variable boundary to separate the measured beam halo from the background. The average outside current density is assumed to be part of a uniform background and not part of the particle beam. Therefore the average outside current is subtracted from the data before evaluating the rms emittance within the boundary. As the boundary area is increased, the average outside current and the inside rms emittance form plateaus when all data containing part of the particle beam are inside the boundary. These plateaus mark the smallest acceptable exclusion boundary and provide unbiased estimates for the average background and the rms emittance. Small, trendless variations within the plateaus allow for determining the uncertainties of the estimates caused by variations of the measured background outside the smallest acceptable exclusion boundary. The robustness of the method is established with complementary variations of the exclusion boundary. This paper presents a detailed comparison between traditional data reduction methods and SCUBEEx by analyzing two complementary sets of emittance data obtained with a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an ISIS H{sup -} ion source.

  17. Energy transfer processes among emitters dispersed in a single polymer layer for colour tuning in OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiadou, D.G. [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , 15310 Athens (Greece); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Athens (Greece); Vasilopoulou, M.; Palilis, L.; Argitis, P. [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , 15310 Athens (Greece); Pistolis, G. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , 15310 Athens (Greece); Dimotikali, D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Athens (Greece)

    2008-11-15

    The energy transfer processes taking place in a single polymeric layer that enable the definition of the three primary colours (red, green and blue) in selected areas via photochemically induced emission tuning are discussed. The polymers used as hosts are two wide band gap polymers, PVK and a polyfluorenyl derivative. In the polymer matrix are dispersed the green emitter, 1-(4'-dimethyl-aminophenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DMA-DPH), the red emitter, 4-dimethylamino-4'-nitrostilbene (DANS) and a photoacid generator (PAG). Upon irradiation, protons are released from the PAG and they react gradually with the two emitters, causing the blue shift of the green emitter fluorescence and the extinction of the red emitter fluorescence. Depending on the protonation extent, the relative concentrations of the emitters and the exposure dose the energy transfer processes occurring inside the matrix result in definition of different colour emitting areas. The understanding of the energy transfer processes with photoluminescence experiments is a necessary first step in order to rationalize the selection of suitable components enabling the definition of the three primary colours in OLEDs. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. In vitro growth inhibition of mastitis causing bacteria by phenolics and metal chelators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, B.P.; Tjoelker, L.W.; Tanaka, T.S.

    1985-11-01

    Antimicrobial activities of three phenolic compounds and four metal chelators were tested at 0, 250, 500, and 1000 ppm in vitro against four major mastitis-causing bacteria, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pnuemoniae, and Escherichia coli. Overall, butylated hydroxyanisole and tert-butylhydroquinone showed the greatest antimicrobial activity. These phenolics were bactericidal at 250 to 500 ppm against all four bacteria tested. The butylated hydroxytoluene was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but was ineffective against the coliforms. At 250 ppm, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was bactericidal against the gram-positive bacteria but much less effective against the gram-negatives. However, diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid was more growth inhibitory than ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid against the gram-negative bacteria and especially against Escherichia coli. All other compounds were generally much less effective or ineffective against all four microorganisms. Therefore, butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene, tert-butylhydroquinone, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid may have practical implications in the prevention or treatment of bovine mastitis.

  19. Inhibition growth of pomegranate seeds extract against streptococcus sanguis: the cause of recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riani Setiadhi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. seeds contain high of phytonutrients and phytochemicals, rich in polyphenol antioxidants namely tannins and flavonoids which also have antibacterial activity. Streptococcus sanguis is a bacterium known as one of the factors causing Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS. To examine the potential antibacterial of Pomegranate seeds against Streptococcus sanguis. Material anda Methods : In vitro study of Pomegranate seed were extracted with maceration method using 70% ethanol as the solvent to obtain stable extract, continued with phytochemical screening against phenolic, flavonoids, alkaloids, steroids, triterpenoid, saponins and tannins.  The extract was evaluated for Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and Minimum Bactericide Concentration against Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556, using microdiluted method through 96 wells microplate. Results : Chlorhexidine was used as positive control while 70% ethanol was used as solvent as well as negative control. Phytochemical screening gave positive results for phenolics, flavonoids, steroids, saponins and tannins. Microdilution test showed the concentration of 500 ppm as MIC and MBC value at 2,000 ppm. Conclusion : Pomegranate seeds extract have a growth inhibitory against Streptococcus sanguis with MIC value of 500 ppm and 2,000 ppm as MBC.

  20. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrling, T.J., E-mail: timon.mehrling@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Robson, R.E. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, School of Natural Sciences, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Erbe, J-H.; Osterhoff, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  1. Prolonged shelf life and reduced drip loss of chicken filets by the use of carbon dioxide emitters and modified atmosphere packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Askild L; Pettersen, Marit K; Moen, Marie H; Sørheim, Oddvin

    2014-07-01

    Modified atmosphere packaging containing CO2 is widely used for extending the shelf life of chicken meat. Active packaging by adding CO2 emitter sachets to packages of meat is an alternative to traditional modified atmosphere packaging. The purpose of the study was to investigate the shelf life of chicken filets under different CO2 concentrations at 4°C storage. The inhibition of microbial growth was proportional to the CO2 concentration. Storage in 100% CO2 both with and without a CO2 emitter sachet gave a microbiological shelf-life extension of 7 days compared with 60% CO2. Carnobacterium divergens, Carnobacterium sp., and Lactococcus sp. were the dominating species at the end of the storage period. During storage in pure CO2, the carbon dioxide dissolved in the meat and caused the collapse of the packages. The resulting squeeze of the meat lead to a severe increase in drip loss. The drip loss was reduced profoundly by using the CO2 emitting sachet in the packages. The addition of CO2 emitters can easily be implemented at industrial packaging lines without reduction in production efficiency.

  2. Possible causes for growth variability and summer growth reduction in juvenile plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. in the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veer, Henk W.; Jung, Alexa Sarina; Freitas, Vânia; Philippart, Catharina J. M.; Witte, Johannes IJ.

    2016-05-01

    Growth variability within individuals and among groups and locations and the phenomenon of summer growth reduction has been described for juvenile flatfish in a variety of European coastal areas whereby the underlying causes still remain elusive. Potential mechanisms were tested for juvenile plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. in the western Dutch Wadden Sea, by analysing published and unpublished information from long-term investigations (1986-present). Growth variability did occur and could be explained by differences induced by environmental variability (water temperature), and by non-genetic irreversible adaptation and sex. Dynamic Energy Budget analysis indicated that especially sexually-dimorphic growth in combination with variability in sex ratio could explain most of the variability in growth and the increase in the range of the size of individuals within the population over time. Summer growth reduction was not only observed among 0-group plaice in the intertidal, but also in the subtidal and tidal gullies as well as among I- and II-group plaice. Intraspecific competition for food was not detected but some support for interspecific competition with other predators was found. Also resource competition (due to crowding) with the other abundant epibenthic species (0-, I- and II-group flounder Platichthys flesus; the brown shrimp Crangon crangon; the shore crab Carcinus maenas; the goby species Pomatoschistus minutus and Pomatoschistus microps) could not explain the summer growth reduction. The observed growth reduction coincided with a decrease in stomach content, especially of regenerating body parts of benthic prey items. It is hypothesised that macrozoobenthos becomes less active after the spring phytoplankton bloom, reducing prey availability for juvenile plaice in summer, causing a reduction in food intake and hence in growth.

  3. Novel deep-blue emitting phosphorescent emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, C.; Ginev, G.; Kammoun, A.; Riedl, T.; Kowalsky, W.; Johannes, H.-H.; Lennartz, C.; Kahle, K.; Egen, M.; Geßner, T.; Bold, M.; Nord, S.; Erk, P.

    2005-10-01

    Currently, one of the most challenging applications for OLEDs is the full color display. The most energy-efficient way to realize light generation in OLEDs is by using phosphorescent emitters. Green and red emitters have already been demonstrated, but the search for blue emitting organic phosphorescent emitters with good color purity is still ongoing with arduous effort. Here we present our work with a new material developed at BASF which allows phosphorescent emission in the deep-blue spectral range. The emitter has an emission maximum at 400 nm, which gives CIE color coordinates of x = 0.16 and y = 0.06. An OLED device made with this new material shows a maximum external quantum efficiency of 1.5 %. The OLED was built in a three layer structure, with the emitting zone being a hybrid guest-host system. As host material we used the optically and electronically inert polymer poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA). Because of its lack of charge transport abilities we doped the host material with a high concentration of the triplet emitting material, i.e. the emitter itself is also used as charge transport material.

  4. Impact of forward emitter current gain and geometry of pnp power transistors on radiation tolerance of voltage regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukić Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-dropout voltage regulators with various geometries and technological realisations of serial pnp power transistors were exposed to ionizing radiation. Although devices with vertical emitters were considered much less susceptible to the influence of radiation on forward emitter current gain than circuits with round emitters, the experiment showed a similar degradation of current gain in both cases. The main reason of high radiation susceptibility of the examined vertical serial pnp transistor is the implementation of an interdigitated emitter, with high perimeter-to-area ratio, causing the great increase of serial transistor’s base current, but a minor influence on the maximum output current. Transistors with round emitters with small perimeter-to-area ratio expressed a moderate current gain degradation, but a rapid fall of the emitter injection efficiency, causing a significant decrease of the maximum output current. Regardless of the similar forward emitter current gain degradation, reliability and operational characteristics of two types of low-dropout voltage regulators were completely different.

  5. High-temperature plasmonic thermal emitter for thermophotovotaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jingjing; Guler, Urcan; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We use titanium nitride (TiN) to demonstrate an ultra-thin plasmonic thermal emitter operating at high temperatures (830 K). The spectrally selective emitter exhibits a large emittance at around 2.5 μm and below, and suppresses emission at longer wavelengths.......We use titanium nitride (TiN) to demonstrate an ultra-thin plasmonic thermal emitter operating at high temperatures (830 K). The spectrally selective emitter exhibits a large emittance at around 2.5 μm and below, and suppresses emission at longer wavelengths....

  6. Emittance measurement and modeling for the Fermilab Booster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobiao Huang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Turn-by-turn beam profile data measured at the Fermilab Booster are studied. Lattice models with experimental accelerator ramping parameters are used to obtain the lattice functions for data analysis. We studied the horizontal and vertical emittance growth behavior in different stages of a booster ramping cycle and its relation to the beam intensity. The transverse and longitudinal components in the horizontal beam width are separated by a fitting model which makes use of the different scaling rules of the beam momentum. We analyze the post-transition horizontal beam size oscillation based on a model where the longitudinal phase-space mismatch has resulted from rf voltage mismatch during the transition-energy crossing. We carried out systematic multiparticle simulation to show that the source of the vertical emittance growth is a combination of the random errors in skew-quadrupole and dipole fields, and the systematic Montague resonance. The effect of random quadrupole field is small for the Fermilab Booster because the betatron envelope tunes are reasonably far away from the half-integer stop band.

  7. Camphor soot: a tunable light emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna, M. S.; Saritha Devi, H. V.; Sankararaman, S.

    2018-01-01

    The work in this paper is the first report on the green synthesis of the blue light emitter from waxy, flammable solid collected from Cinnamomum camphora by controlled combustion for photonic applications. Analysis with field emission scanning electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope provides the morphology, whereas the thermogravimetric analysis gives the thermal stability of the soot. The optical and structural characterizations are done by recording UV-Visible, Photoluminescent, and Raman Spectrum. The CIE plot and the power spectrum of the sample show a blue emission at an excitation of 350 nm at room temperature with a quantum yield of 46.15%. The dependence of luminescent behavior on temperature and excitation wavelength reveals that the material is a tunable blue emitter. This green synthesis of the blue light emitter is highly significant, when the world is in search of a simple, phosphor-free, non-toxic, cost-effective material with good quantum efficiency.

  8. Double emittance exchanger as a bunch compressor for the MaRIE XFEL electron beam line at 1 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Yampolsky, Nikolai A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate an alternative realization of a bunch compressor (specifically, the second bunch compressor for the MaRIE XFEL beamline, 1GeV electron energy) using a double emittance exchanger (EEX) and a telescope in the transverse phase space. We compare our results with a traditional bunch compressor realized via a chicane, taking into account the nonlinear dynamics, Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) and Space Charge (SC) effects. In particular, we use the Elegant code for tracking particles through the beamline, and analyze the evolution of the eigen-emittances to separate the influence of the CSR/SC effects from the nonlinear dynamics effects. We optimize the scheme parameters to reach a desirable compression factor and minimize the emittance growth. We observe dominant CSR effects in our scheme, resulting in critical emittance growth, and introduce an alternative version of an emittance exchanger with a reduced number of bending magnets to minimize the impact of CSR effects.

  9. Double Emittance Exchanger as a Bunch Compressor for the MaRIE XFEL electron beam line at 1GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Yampolsky, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carlsten, Bruce Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-22

    We demonstrate an alternative realization of a bunch compressor (specifically the second bunch compressor for the MaRIE XFEL beamline, 1GeV electron energy) using a double emittance exchanger (EEX) and a telescope in the transverse phase space.We compare our results with a traditional bunch compressor realized via chicane, taking into account the nonlinear dynamics, Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) and Space Charge (SC) effects. In particular, we use the Elegant code for tracking particles through the beam line and analyze the eigen-emittances evolution to separate the influence of the CSR/SC effects from the nonlinear dynamics effects. We optimize the scheme parameters to reach a desirable compression factor and minimize the emittance growth. We observe dominant CSR-effects in our scheme resulting in critical emittance growth and introduce alternative version of an emittance exchanger with a reduced number of bending magnets to minimize the impact of CSR effects.

  10. DOES GROWTH-HORMONE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH TURNERS SYNDROME CAUSE AN ABNORMAL BODY SHAPE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERVER, WJM; DRAYER, NM; VANES, A

    The effect of human growth hormone on the body shape of 51 patients with Turner's syndrome (aged 6-19 years) was evaluated. Biosynthetic growth hormone was given in a dose of 24 IU/m2 body surface/week for two years. Karyotype analysis on peripheral blood was performed. Patients older than 12 years

  11. Rematching AGS Booster synchrotron injection lattice for smaller transverse beam emittances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Beebe-Wang, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gardner, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zeno, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-01-25

    The polarized proton beam is injected into the booster via the charge-exchange (H- to H+) scheme. The emittance growth due to scattering at the stripping foil is proportional to the beta functions at the foil. It was demonstrated that the current scheme of reducing the beta functions at the stripping foil preserves the emittance better; however the betatron tunes are above but very close to half integer. Due to concern of space charge and half integer in general, options of lattice designs aimed towards reducing the beta functions at the stripping foil with tunes at more favorable places are explored.

  12. Aberrant temporal growth pattern and morphology of root and shoot caused by a defective circadian clock in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruts, Tom; Matsubara, Shizue; Wiese-Klinkenberg, Anika; Walter, Achim

    2012-10-01

    Circadian clocks synchronized with the environment allow plants to anticipate recurring daily changes and give a fitness advantage. Here, we mapped the dynamic growth phenotype of leaves and roots in two lines of Arabidopsis thaliana with a disrupted circadian clock: the CCA1 over-expressing line (CCA1ox) and the prr9 prr7 prr5 (prr975) mutant. We demonstrate leaf growth defects due to a disrupted circadian clock over a 24 h time scale. Both lines showed enhanced leaf growth compared with the wild-type during the diurnal period, suggesting increased partitioning of photosynthates for leaf growth. Nocturnal leaf growth was reduced and growth inhibition occurred by dawn, which may be explained by ineffective starch degradation in the leaves of the mutants. However, this growth inhibition was not caused by starch exhaustion. Overall, these results are consistent with the notion that the defective clock affects carbon and energy allocation, thereby reducing growth capacity during the night. Furthermore, rosette morphology and size as well as root architecture were strikingly altered by the defective clock control. Separate analysis of the primary root and lateral roots revealed strong suppression of lateral root formation in both CCA1ox and prr975, accompanied by unusual changes in lateral root growth direction under light-dark cycles and increased lateral extension of the root system. We conclude that growth of the whole plant is severely affected by improper clock regulation in A. thaliana, resulting not only in altered timing and capacity for growth but also aberrant development of shoot and root architecture. © 2012 Forschungszentrum Jülich. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-28

    MOT-OOO1AF I Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters Prepared by DI Jeffrey C. Buchholz E L ri: 8 James P. Stec OCT C "t989 Mary C...Schutte Micro -Optics Technologies, Inc. 8608 University Green #5 Middleton, WI 53562 28 September 1989 D,:?UqflON SA2". N’.’ _ Disuibunon Uanu-ted Contract...Title Report Date Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters 28 September 1989 Authors Jeffrey C. Buchholz, James P. Stec, Mary C. Schutte

  14. Quadrupole Transfer Function for Emittance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Peter; Jansson, Andreas; Tan, Cheng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    Historically the use of the quadrupole moment measurement has been impeded by the requirement for large dynamic range, as well as measurement sensitivity to beam position. We investigate the use of the transfer function technique [1-3] in combination with the sensitivity and 160dB revolution line rejection of the direct diode detection analog front end [4] to open the possibility of an emittance diagnostic that may be implemented without operational complication, quasi- parasitic to the operation of existing tune measurement systems. Such a diagnostic would be particularly useful as an emittance monitor during acceleration ramp development in machines like RHIC and the LHC.

  15. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huck Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  16. Systemic administration of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) causes growth of the rat prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, N; Vinter-Jensen, L; Pedersen, S B

    1997-01-01

    .MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight week old Wistar rats were allocated into groups of eight, receiving systemic treatment for 3 and 7 days with either IGF-I (400 micrograms/rat/day) or EGF (30 micrograms/rat/day) alone or in combination with DFMO.RESULTS: Systemic treatment with IGF-I for 7 days resulted in a 29% (p ...-I after 3 days of treatment, and administration of IGF-I concomitantly with DFMO significantly inhibited ODC activity and the weight increase of the prostate. Stereological examination of the prostate in the IGF-I-treated animals showed growth of the epithelial component of the gland. Systemic treatment...

  17. Chronic systemic treatment with epidermal growth factor in pigs causes pronounced urothelial growth with accumulation of glycoconjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Juhl, C O; Djurhuus, Jens Christian

    1995-01-01

    with solvent (n = 5), EGF 30 micrograms/kg/day (n = 6) for 4 weeks, or EGF 30 micrograms/kg/day for 5 weeks followed by 3 weeks of recovery (n = 5). The ureters and bladders were examined by routine histology and electron microscopy and were immunostained for proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Four weeks...... of EGF treatment increased the median cross sectional area of the ureter fourfold with growth of all wall layers. The urothelium was widened from 5 cell layers in the controls to 10 in the EGF-treated animals. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining revealed an increased mitotic activity...

  18. Double Barrier Resonant Tunneling Transistor with a Fully Two Dimensional Emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MOON,J.S.; SIMMONS,JERRY A.; RENO,JOHN L.; BACA,WES E.; BLOUNT,MARK A.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.; JONES,ERIC D.

    2000-07-13

    A novel planar resonant tunneling transistor is demonstrated. The growth structure is similar to that of a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD), except for a fully two-dimensional (2D) emitter formed by a quantum well. Current is fed laterally into the emitter, and the 2D--2D resonant tunneling current is controlled by a surface gate. This unique device structure achieves figures-of-merit, i.e. peak current densities and peak voltages, approaching that of state-of-the-art RTDs. Most importantly, sensitive control of the peak current and voltage is achieved by gating of the emitter quantum well subband energy. This quantum tunneling transistor shows exceptional promise for ultra-high speed and multifunctional operation at room temperature.

  19. Transverse Emittance Measurements In High-power Fir Fel Energy-recovery Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Bolotin, V P; Matveenko, A N; Shevchenko, O A; Vinokurov, N A

    2004-01-01

    50 MeV accelerator-recirculator of Siberian Center for Photochemical Research has been designed to drive the FIR FEL with an average power of up to 10 kW in the wavelengths region from 5 to 200 μm. The first stage with the beam energy of 14 MeV was put into operation and laser power of about 200 W on 150 μm was achieved recently [1]. Transverse emittance measurements are carried out online in a number of locations along the beam-line. OTR screens and video-cameras are used to capture the beam shape images, video signal is digitized by a frame grabber and the pictures are processed further. Online measurements allow the accelerator parameters to be optimized to minimize the emittance growth, which is essential to the FEL operation. The transverse emittance measurements system and data processing techniques are presented in this paper.

  20. CDK10 Mutations in Humans and Mice Cause Severe Growth Retardation, Spine Malformations, and Developmental Delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windpassinger, Christian; Piard, Juliette; Bonnard, Carine; Alfadhel, Majid; Lim, Shuhui; Bisteau, Xavier; Blouin, Stéphane; Ali, Nur'Ain B.; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Lu, Hao; Tohari, Sumanty; Talib, S. Zakiah A.; van Hul, Noémi; Caldez, Matias J.; van Maldergem, Lionel; Yigit, Gökhan; Kayserili, Hülya; Youssef, Sameh A.; Coppola, Vincenzo; de Bruin, Alain; Tessarollo, Lino; Choi, Hyungwon; Rupp, Verena; Roetzer, Katharina; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Altmüller, Janine; Roy, Sudipto; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Ganger, Rudolf; Grill, Franz; Ben Chehida, Farid; Wollnik, Bernd; Altunoglu, Umut; Al Kaissi, Ali; Reversade, Bruno; Kaldis, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In five separate families, we identified nine individuals affected by a previously unidentified syndrome characterized by growth retardation, spine malformation, facial dysmorphisms, and developmental delays. Using homozygosity mapping, array CGH, and exome sequencing, we uncovered bi-allelic

  1. Modelling secondary succession of neotropical mangroves : Causes and consequences of growth reduction in pioneer species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, U.; Adams, M.; Grimm, V.; Hildenbrandt, H.

    2006-01-01

    Mangrove forest structure is the result of interactions between species responses to abiotic stress factors, disturbance, dispersal and competition. The combination of abiotic conditions and disturbance history may determine the growth potential of the species, whereas dispersal, competition and

  2. Boron Toxicity Causes Multiple Effects on Malus domestica Pollen Tube Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kefeng eFang; Weiwei eZhang; Yu eXing; Qing eZhang; Liu eYang; Qingqin eCao; Ling eQin

    2016-01-01

    Boron is an important micronutrient for plants. However, boron is also toxic to cells at high concentrations, although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of boron toxicity on Malus domestica pollen tube growth and its possible regulatory pathway. Our results showed that a high concentration of boron inhibited pollen germination and tube growth and led to the morphological abnormality of pollen tubes. Fluorescent labeling coupled with a scannin...

  3. Does Human Capital Cause Economic Growth? A Case Study of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Kumar Haldar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the time series behavior of investment in physical capital, human capital(comprising education and health and output in a co-integration framework, taking growthof primary gross enrolment rate and a dummy for structural adjustment programme (opennesswhich has been initiated in 1991 as exogenous variables in India from 1960 to 2006. Theresults suggest that physical capital investment has no long-run nor short-run effect butthe human capital investment has significant long-run effect on per capita GNP; the stockof human capital measured by primary gross enrolment rate (lagged by three years andopenness is found to have a significant effect on growth of per capita GNP. The GeneralizedImpulse Response Function confirms that the innovation in per capita GNP growth can onlyexplain the movements of the growth of per capita GNP (itself and investment in educationhuman capital positively and significantly only for a short period of time but does not explainthe movements of the investment in physical capital and health human capital. Moreover,the innovation in change in education human capital investment significantly and positivelyexplains the movement of the changes in education human capital investment (itself, healthhuman capital investment and growth of GNP per capita; the innovation in health humancapital investment significantly explains the changes of education and health human capitalinvestment only. This study may help towards policy modeling of economic growth in India,taking into account the relevance of endogenous growth.

  4. Longitudinal emittance measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Jones, R.M.; Jones, R M; Pasini, M; Posocco, P A; Voulot, D; Wenander, F

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the longitudinal emittance at the Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) at ISOLDE, CERN. The rms longitudinal emittance was measured as 0.34 ± 0.08 π ns keV/u at the output of the RFQ and as 0.36 ± 0.04π ns keV/u in front of the third 7-gap split-ring resonator (7G3) using the three-gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are estimated at approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48 ± 0.2 and 1.55 ± 0.12π ns keV/u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread of the beam as it was manipulated by varying the voltage of the rebuncher (ReB) and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The transfer matrix for a multi-gap bunching cavity is derived and suitably truncated to allow for the accurate reconstruction of the beam parameters from measurement. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rig...

  5. Devaluation of one's labor in labor-commodities-money-commodities-labor exchange as a cause of inequality growth

    OpenAIRE

    Tanguiane, Andranick S.

    2016-01-01

    The inequality growth during the last quarter century is explained as caused by a decreasing labor–labor exchange rate, i.e. devaluation of one’s labor in exchange for other’s labor embodied in the commodities affordable for one’s earnings. We show that the productivity growth allows employers to compensate workers with always a lower labor equivalent, i.e., in a sense increasingly underpay works, maintaining however an impression of fair pay due to an increasing purchasing power of earnings....

  6. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  7. Nanoassembly of quantum emitters in hexagonal boron nitride and gold nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh; Kim, Sejeong; Tran, Toan Trong; Xu, Zai-Quan; Kianinia, Mehran; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2018-01-10

    The assembly of quantum nanophotonic systems with plasmonic resonators is important for fundamental studies of single photon sources as well as for on-chip information processing. In this work, we demonstrate the controllable nanoassembly of gold nanospheres with ultra-bright narrow-band quantum emitters in 2D layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). We utilize an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip to precisely position gold nanospheres to close proximity to the quantum emitters and observe the resulting emission enhancement and fluorescence lifetime reduction. The extreme emitter photostability permits analysis at high excitation powers, and delineation of absorption and emission enhancement caused by the plasmonic resonators. A fluorescence enhancement of over 300% is achieved experimentally for quantum emitters in hBN, with a radiative quantum efficiency of up to 40% and a saturated count rate in excess of 5 × 106 counts per s. Our results are promising for the future employment of quantum emitters in hBN for integrated nanophotonic devices and plasmonic based nanosensors.

  8. On the feasibility of sub-100 nm rad emittance measurement in plasma accelerators using permanent magnetic quadrupoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Wu, Y. P.; Nie, Z.; Guo, B.; Zhang, X. H.; Huang, S.; Zhang, J.; Cheng, Z.; Ma, Y.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, C. J.; Wan, Y.; Xu, X. L.; Hua, J. F.; Pai, C. H.; Lu, W.; Gu, Y. Q.

    2018-01-01

    Low emittance (sub-100 nm rad) measurement of electron beams in plasma accelerators has been a challenging issue for a while. Among various measurement schemes, measurements based on single-shot quad-scan using permanent magnetic quadrupoles (PMQs) has been recently reported with emittance as low as ∼200 nm Weingartner (2012 Phys. Rev. Spec. Top. Accel. Beams 15 111302). However, the accuracy and reliability of this method have not been systematically analyzed. Such analysis is critical for evaluating the potential of sub-100 nm rad emittance measurement using any scheme. In this paper, we analyze the effects of various nonideal physical factors on the accuracy and reliability using the PMQ method. These factors include aberration induced by a high order field, PMQ misalignment and angular fluctuation of incoming beams. Our conclusions are as follows: (i) the aberrations caused by high order fields of PMQs are relatively weak for low emittance measurement as long as the PMQs are properly constructed. A series of PMQs were manufactured and measured at Tsinghua University, and using numerical simulations their high order field effects were found to be negligible . (ii) The largest measurement error of emittance is caused by the angular misalignment between PMQs. For low emittance measurement of ∼100 MeV beams, an angular alignment accuracy of 0.1° is necessary. This requirement can be eased for beams with higher energies. (iii) The transverse position misalignment of PMQs and angular fluctuation of incoming beams only cause a translational and rotational shift of measured signals, respectively, therefore, there is no effect on the measured value of emittance. (iv) The spatial resolution and efficiency of the detection system need to be properly designed to guarantee the accuracy of sub-100 nm rad emittance measurement.

  9. Chronic treatment with epidermal growth factor causes esophageal epithelial hyperplasia in pigs and rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, C O; Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1995-01-01

    . Subcutaneously administered EGF was visualized on cells located basally in the esophageal epithelium. In rats, EGF-treatment increased the esophageal volume of the epithelium, the lamina propria of the mucosa, and the submucosa. In conclusion, systemic EGF challenge induces growth of the esophageal epithelium...

  10. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on onion growth and onion stunting caused by Rhizoctonia solani, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A preliminary study was conducted in a greenhouse (15 ± 1oC, with supplemental lights for 12 h/day) to determine the role of AMF on onion growth and for reducing the severity of onion stunting, using a commercial AMF inoculant, BioTerra Plus, that contains 104 propagules/g (ppg) of Glomus intraradic...

  11. Boron toxicity causes multiple effects on Malus domestica pollen tube growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefeng eFang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants. However, boron is also toxic to cells at high concentrations, although the mechanism of this stress is not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of boron stress on Malus domestica pollen tube growth and its possible regulatory pathway. Our results show that a high concentration of boron inhibited pollen germination and tube growth and led to the morphological abnormality of pollen tubes. Fluorescent labeling coupled with a scanning ion-selective electrode technique detected that boron stress could decrease [Ca2+]c and induce the disappearance of the [Ca2+]c gradient, which are critical for pollen tube polar growth. Actin filaments were therefore altered by boron stress. Immuno-localization and fluorescence labeling, together with Fourier-transform infrared analysis (FTIR, suggested that boron stress influenced the accumulation and distribution of callose, de-esterified pectins, esterified pectins and arabinogalactan proteins in pollen tubes. All of the above results provide new insights into the regulatory role of boron in pollen tube development. In summary, boron likely plays a structural and regulatory role in relation to [Ca2+]c, actin cytoskeleton and cell wall components and thus regulates Malus domestica pollen germination and tube polar growth.

  12. Boron Toxicity Causes Multiple Effects on Malus domestica Pollen Tube Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kefeng; Zhang, Weiwei; Xing, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Liu; Cao, Qingqin; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Boron is an important micronutrient for plants. However, boron is also toxic to cells at high concentrations, although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of boron toxicity on Malus domestica pollen tube growth and its possible regulatory pathway. Our results showed that a high concentration of boron inhibited pollen germination and tube growth and led to the morphological abnormality of pollen tubes. Fluorescent labeling coupled with a scanning ion-selective electrode technique detected that boron toxicity could decrease [Ca(2+)]c and induce the disappearance of the [Ca(2+)]c gradient, which are critical for pollen tube polar growth. Actin filaments were therefore altered by boron toxicity. Immuno-localization and fluorescence labeling, together with fourier-transform infrared analysis, suggested that boron toxicity influenced the accumulation and distribution of callose, de-esterified pectins, esterified pectins, and arabinogalactan proteins in pollen tubes. All of the above results provide new insights into the regulatory role of boron in pollen tube development. In summary, boron likely plays a structural and regulatory role in relation to [Ca(2+)]c, actin cytoskeleton and cell wall components and thus regulates Malus domestica pollen germination and tube polar growth.

  13. Deregulation of the CEACAM expression pattern causes undifferentiated cell growth in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard B Singer

    Full Text Available CEACAM1, CEA/CEACAM5, and CEACAM6 are cell adhesion molecules (CAMs of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA family that have been shown to be deregulated in lung cancer and in up to 50% of all human cancers. However, little is known about the functional impact of these molecules on undifferentiated cell growth and tumor progression. Here we demonstrate that cell surface expression of CEACAM1 on confluent A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells plays a critical role in differentiated, contact-inhibited cell growth. Interestingly, CEACAM1-L, but not CEACAM1-S, negatively regulates proliferation via its ITIM domain, while in proliferating cells no CEACAM expression is detectable. Furthermore, we show for the first time that CEACAM6 acts as an inducer of cellular proliferation in A549 cells, likely by interfering with the contact-inhibiting signal triggered by CEACAM1-4L, leading to undifferentiated anchorage-independent cell growth. We also found that A549 cells expressed significant amounts of non-membrane anchored variants of CEACAM5 and CEACAM6, representing a putative source for the increased CEACAM5/6 serum levels frequently found in lung cancer patients. Taken together, our data suggest that post-confluent contact inhibition is established and maintained by CEACAM1-4L, but disturbances of CEACAM1 signalling by CEACAM1-4S and other CEACAMs lead to undifferentiated cell growth and malignant transformation.

  14. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters. [for thermovoltaic energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus, low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied, Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF EMITTANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE FOR ION BEAM CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a fi gure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally a high quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifi eld Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profi les, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fi tting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplifi ed, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate.

  16. Current-Fluctuation Mechanism of Field Emitters Using Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with High Crystallinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Shimoi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Field emitters can be used as a cathode electrode in a cathodoluminescence device, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs that are synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE properties. However, a cathodoluminescence device that uses field emitters radiates rays whose intensity considerably fluctuates at a low frequency, and the radiant fluctuation is caused by FE current fluctuation. To solve this problem, is very important to obtain a stable output for field emitters in a cathodoluminescence device. The authors consider that the electron-emission fluctuation is caused by Fowler–Nordheim electron tunneling and that the electrons in the Fowler–Nordheim regime pass through an inelastic potential barrier. We attempted to develop a theoretical model to analyze the power spectrum of the FE current fluctuation using metallic SWCNTs as field emitters, owing to their electrical conductivity by determining their FE properties. Field emitters that use metallic SWCNTs with high crystallinity were successfully developed to achieve a fluctuating FE current from field emitters at a low frequency by employing inelastic electron tunneling. This paper is the first report of the successful development of an inelastic-electron-tunneling model with a Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation for metallic SWCNTs based on the evaluation of FE properties.

  17. Variability in adherence to rhGH treatment: Socioeconomic causes and effect on children's growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pedro, Silvina; Murillo, Marta; Salinas, Isabel; Granada, Maria-Luisa; Martinez, María; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Andreu, Angels; Bel, Joan

    2016-02-01

    In children with growth disorders, mean final height is associated to poor adherence to Growth Hormone therapy. The primary goal of this study is to identify patients who do not adhere to GH therapy and determine the influence of adherence in response to the treatment. The role of serum IGF-I and influence of socio-economic factors on the therapeutic adherence will also be evaluated. 158 children under treatment with rhGH were included in the study. Age, gender, etiology, Tanner stage, duration of treatment, growth rate, IGF-I serum values, daily dose, and annual rhGH dose data were collected. Adherence to therapy was defined as moderate-to-poor when the patient had taken less than 92% of the prescribed medication. A subgroup of 106 patients completed a questionnaire to assess social and environmental effects. Moderate-to-poor adherence to rhGH treatment was determined in 33.5% of study patients. A decrease in adherence was associated to treatment duration (p=0.001). A significant correlation was determined between adherence and height velocity (p=0.002) and IGF-I (p<0.0001) levels. Adherence rates were associated to the mother's educational level (p=0.007). Poor adherence to GH therapy was observed in one-third of study patients, resulting in suboptimal growth. IGF-I levels can be helpful to identify patients with poor adherence to GH medication. Physicians should pay special attention to certain characteristics of the patient and their environment, and encourage desirable therapeutic compliance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. p27 Nuclear localization and growth arrest caused by perlecan knockdown in human endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Katsuya; Oka, Kiyomasa [Kringle Pharma Joint Research Division for Regenerative Drug Discovery, Center for Advanced Science and Innovation, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsumoto, Kunio [Division of Tumor Dynamics and Regulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, 13-1 Takaramachi, Kanazawa 920-0934 (Japan); Nakamura, Toshikazu, E-mail: nakamura@casi.osaka-u.ac.jp [Kringle Pharma Joint Research Division for Regenerative Drug Discovery, Center for Advanced Science and Innovation, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    Perlecan, a secreted heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a major component of the vascular basement membrane and participates in angiogenesis. Here, we used small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of perlecan expression to investigate the regulatory function of perlecan in the growth of human vascular endothelial cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced ERK phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression were unchanged by perlecan deficiency in endothelial cells; however, perlecan deficiency inhibited the Rb protein phosphorylation and DNA synthesis induced by bFGF. By contrast to cytoplasmic localization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 in control endothelial cells, p27 was localized in the nucleus and its expression increased in perlecan-deficient cells, which suggests that p27 mediates inhibition of Rb phosphorylation. In addition to the well-characterized function of perlecan as a co-receptor for heparin-binding growth factors such as bFGF, our results suggest that perlecan plays an indispensible role in endothelial cell proliferation and acts through a mechanism that involves subcellular localization of p27.

  19. Low emittance coatings and the thermal performance of vacuum glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yueping; Hyde, Trevor J.; Zhao, Junfu; Wang, Jinlei; Huang, Ye [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, School of the Built Environment, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip C. [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Norton, Brian [Dublin Institute of Technology, Aungier Street, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2007-01-15

    The thermal performances of vacuum glazings employing coatings with emittance between 0.02 and 0.16 were simulated using a three-dimensional finite volume model. Physical samples of vacuum glazings with hard and soft coatings with emittance of 0.04, 0.12 and 0.16 were fabricated and their thermal performance characterised experimentally using a guarded hot box calorimeter. Good agreement was found between experimental and theoretical thermal performances for both a vacuum glazing with a soft coating (emittance 0.04) and those with hard coatings (emittance 0.12 and 0.16). Simulations showed that for a low value of emittance (e.g. 0.02), the use of two low-emittance coatings gives limited improvement in thermal performance of the glazing system. The use of a single high performance low-emittance coating in a vacuum glazing has been shown to provide excellent performance. (author)

  20. Specific Emitter Identification Based on the Natural Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Jia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific emitter identification (SEI techniques are often used in civilian and military spectrum-management operations, and they are also applied to support the security and authentication of wireless communication. In this letter, a new SEI method based on the natural measure of the one-dimensional component of the chaotic system is proposed. We find that the natural measures of the one-dimensional components of higher dimensional systems exist and that they are quite diverse for different systems. Based on this principle, the natural measure is used as an RF fingerprint in this letter. The natural measure can solve the problems caused by a small amount of data and a low sample rate. The Kullback–Leibler divergence is used to quantify the difference between the natural measures obtained from diverse emitters and classify them. The data obtained from real application are exploited to test the validity of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the proposed method is not only easy to operate, but also quite effective, even though the amount of data is small and the sample rate is low.

  1. Final Muon Emittance Exchange in Vacuum for a Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, Don [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, Lucien [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Hart, Terry [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Oliveros, Sandra [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Perera, Lalith [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Wu, Wanwei [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, David [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-07

    We outline a plan for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets focusing onto short absorbers followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small transverse beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low β region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized xyz emittances of (0.071, 0.141, 2.4) mm-rad are exchanged into (0.025, 0.025, 70) mm-rad. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 μs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87%.

  2. An experimental test of the causes of forest growth decline with stand age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Ryan; Dan Binkley; James H. Fownes; Christian Giardina; Randy S. Senock

    2004-01-01

    The decline in aboveground wood production after canopy closure in even-aged forest stands is a common pattern in forests, but clear evidence for the mechanism causing the decline is lacking. The problem is fundamental to forest biology, commercial forestry (the decline sets the rotation age), and to carbon storage in forests. We tested three hypotheses...

  3. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Peter John [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  4. FIrpic: archetypal blue phosphorescent emitter for electroluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoff, Etienne; Curchod, Basile F E

    2015-05-14

    FIrpic is the most investigated bis-cyclometallated iridium complex in particular in the context of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) because of its attractive sky-blue emission, high emission efficiency, and suitable energy levels. In this Perspective we review the synthesis, structural characterisations, and key properties of this emitter. We also survey the theoretical studies and summarise a series of selected monochromatic electroluminescent devices using FIrpic as the emitting dopant. Finally we highlight important shortcomings of FIrpic as an emitter for OLEDs. Despite the large body of work dedicated to this material, it is manifest that the understanding of photophysical and electrochemical processes are only broadly understood mainly because of the different environment in which these properties are measured, i.e., isolated molecules in solvent vs. device.

  5. Development of arrayed microcolumns and field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Seob; Bok Lee, Young; Choi, Sung Woong; Kim, Hyung Woo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Ahn, Seung Joon; Oh, Tae Sik; Song, Yoon-Ho; Chon Park, Byong; Jong Lim, Sun

    2017-06-01

    Electron beam devices have been widely used for inspection or lithography processes. The multibeam technology based on arrayed microcolumns has been developed to overcome the low throughput issue. However, the multicolumn system has some drawbacks such as complexity, electron optics, and electron source. The first drawback is the difficulty in multicolumn assembly. In particular, the alignment process of a source lens and a tip requires sophisticated techniques. The second drawback is that the e-beam characteristics of microcolumns constituting the multicolumn differ from column to column. To solve the first drawback, a sub-5-nm-resolution probe beam optic design with a simple structure and a two-dimensional carbon nanotube (2D-CNT) electron emitter instead of the widely used tungsten field emitter tip have been studied.

  6. Computing Eigen-Emittances from Tracking Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexahin, Y. [Fermilab

    2014-09-18

    In a strongly nonlinear system the particle distribution in the phase space may develop long tails which contribution to the covariance (sigma) matrix should be suppressed for a correct estimate of the beam emittance. A method is offered based on Gaussian approximation of the original particle distribution in the phase space (Klimontovich distribution) which leads to an equation for the sigma matrix which provides efficient suppression of the tails and cannot be obtained by introducing weights. This equation is easily solved by iterations in the multi-dimensional case. It is also shown how the eigen-emittances and coupled optics functions can be retrieved from the sigma matrix in a strongly coupled system. Finally, the developed algorithm is applied to 6D ionization cooling of muons in HFOFO channel.

  7. Measurement system for alpha emitters in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, A. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Genie Radioactif); Sella, C.; Heindl, R. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 92 - Meudon-Bellevue (France))

    1984-08-01

    The measurement of alpha emitter concentrations in solution corresponds to a need felt in particular by laboratories working on actinides and in the spent fuel reprocessing industry. The instrument present here allows this measurement continuously by the use of a new scintillator that is insensitive to corrosive liquids. The extreme thinness of the scintillator guarantees good detection selectivity of alpha particles in the presence of beta and gamma emissions. Examples of uranium-233, plutonium-239 and americium-241 concentration measurements are presented.

  8. Longitudinal Emittance Measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, MA; Piselli, E; Posocco, PA; Voulot, D; Wenander, F; Zocca, F

    2011-01-01

    The rms longitudinal emittance at output from the REX-ISOLDE RFQ was measured as 0.34 ± 0.08 π ns keV/u and at entry to the 7G3 as 0.36 ± 0.04 π ns keV/u using the three gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are thought to be approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48 ± 0.2 and 1.55 ± 0.12 π ns keV/u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX-ISOLDE switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread as the beam was manipulated by changing the voltage of the ReB and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rigorously simulated and validated. A formalism was developed to accurately reconstruct the longitudinal beam parameters using a multi-gap constant-velocity bunching cavity when the voltage cannot be kept small. A silicon detector in its development phase was also exploited to measure the longitudinal beam properties. Th...

  9. Modified theoretical minimum emittance lattice for an electron storage ring with extreme-low emittance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Jiao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the continuing efforts to reduce the beam emittance of an electron storage ring composed of theoretical minimum emittance (TME lattice, down to a level of several tens of picometers, nonlinear dynamics grows to be a great challenge to the performance of the storage ring because of the strong sextupoles needed to compensate for its large global natural chomaticities coupled with its small average dispersion function. To help in dealing with the challenge of nonlinear optimization, we propose a novel variation of theoretical minimum emittance (TME lattice, named as “modified-TME” lattice, with minimal emittance about 3 times of the exact theoretical minimum, while with more compact layout, lower phase advance per cell, smaller natural chromaticities, and more relaxed optical functions than that in a TME cell, by using horizontally defocusing quadrupole closer to the dipole or simply combined-function dipole with horizontally defocusing gradient. We present approximate scaling formulas to describe the relationships of the design parameters in a modified-TME cell. The applications of modified-TME lattice in the PEP-X storage ring design are illustrated and the proposed lattice appears a good candidate for synchrotron radiation light source with extremely low emittance.

  10. Effect of four growth-promoting rhizobacteria on crown blight caused by Phytophthora capsici in sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ramírez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Crown blight, caused by Phytophthora capsici, is the most important disease of pepper (Capsicum annuum in the world and causes great economic losses in Costa Rica. Alternatives to chemical control against this disease are crucial to prevent damage to human health and the environment. The antagonism of Plant-Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR on P. capsici, and its ability to reduce wilt in pepper plants were evaluated. PGPR strains previously isolated from sugarcane and rice were identified, using 16S RNA gene sequence, as Pseudomonas fluorescens PC4, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila PC9, Pseudomonas fragi PC11 and Azospirillum lipoferum PCJ2. The inhibition of P. capcisi growth was evaluated in vitro, in the presence of the PGPR. The effect of the four bacterial strains on pepper plants inoculated with P. capsici (100 zoospores.plant-1 was evaluated in the greenhouse. P. fluorescens PC4, S. rhizophila PC9 and A. lipoferum PCJ2, inhibited in vitro growth of the oomycete by 54%, 30% and 50 % respectively, while S. rhizophila PC9 increased by 14% shoot fresh weight of pepper plants at the greenhouse. Furthermore, PCJ2 and PC9 strains reduced the shoot and root severity of the disease, and PCJ2-inoculated plants showed no symptoms at all, indicating that PC9 and PCJ2 are promising rizobacteria for the control of crown blight in pepper.

  11. Radiation-induced gain degradation in lateral PNP BJTs with lightly and heavily doped emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Schrimpf, R.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kosier, S.L. [VTC Inc., Bloomington, MN (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Ionizing radiation may cause failures in ICs due to gain degradation of individual devices. The base current of irradiated bipolar devices increases with total dose, while the collector current remains relatively constant. This results in a decrease in the current gain. Lateral PNP (LPNP) transistors typically exhibit more degradation than vertical PNP devices at the same total dose, and have been blamed as the cause of early IC failures at low dose rates. It is important to understand the differences in total-dose response between devices with heavily- and lightly-doped emitters in order to compare different technologies and evaluate the applicability of proposed low-dose-rate hardness-assurance methods. This paper addresses these differences by comparing two different LPNP devices from the same process: one with a heavily-doped emitter and one with a lightly-doped emitter. Experimental results demonstrate that the lightly-doped devices are more sensitive to ionizing radiation and simulations illustrate that increased recombination on the emitter side of the junction is responsible for the higher sensitivity.

  12. Noncanonical transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling in cranial neural crest cells causes tongue muscle developmental defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2013-10-11

    Microglossia is a congenital birth defect in humans and adversely impacts quality of life. In vertebrates, tongue muscle derives from the cranial mesoderm, whereas tendons and connective tissues in the craniofacial region originate from cranial neural crest (CNC) cells. Loss of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) type II receptor in CNC cells in mice (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre) causes microglossia due to a failure of cell-cell communication between cranial mesoderm and CNC cells during tongue development. However, it is still unclear how TGFβ signaling in CNC cells regulates the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts during tongue development. Here we show that activation of the cytoplasmic and nuclear tyrosine kinase 1 (ABL1) cascade in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice results in a failure of CNC-derived cell differentiation followed by a disruption of TGFβ-mediated induction of growth factors and reduction of myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation activities. Among the affected growth factors, the addition of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) and neutralizing antibody for follistatin (FST; an antagonist of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)) could most efficiently restore cell proliferation, differentiation, and organization of muscle cells in the tongue of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice. Thus, our data indicate that CNC-derived fibroblasts regulate the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts through TGFβ-mediated regulation of FGF and BMP signaling during tongue development.

  13. A recurring dominant negative mutation causes autosomal dominant growth hormone deficiency - a clinical research center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, J.D.; Prince, M.; Phillips, J. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Familial isolated GH deficiency type II (IGHD-II) is an autosomal dominant disorder that has been previously shown in some patients to be caused by heterogeneous GH gene defects that affect GH messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. We report here our findings of multiple G{r_arrow}A transitions of the first base of the donor splice site of IVS 3 (+1G{r_arrow}A) in IGHD II subjects from three nonrelated kindreds from Sweden, North America, and South Africa. This + 1G{r_arrow}A substitution creates an NlaIII site that was used to demonstrate that all affected individuals in all three families were heterozygous for the mutation. To determine the effect of this mutation of GH mRNA processing, HeLa cells were transfected with expression plasmids containing normal or mutant +1G{r_arrow}A alleles, and complementary DNAs from the resulting GH mRNAs were sequenced. The mutation was found to destroy the GH IVS3 donor splice site, causing skipping of exon 3 and loss of the codons for amino acids 32-71 of the mature GH peptide from the mutant GH mRNA. Our finding of exon 3 skipping in transcripts of the +1G{r_arrow}A mutant allele is identical to our previous report of a different sixth base transition (+6T{r_arrow}C) mutation of the IVS 3 donor splice site that also causes IGHD II. Microsatellite analysis of an affected subjects` DNA from each of the three nonrelated kindreds indicates that the +1G{r_arrow}A mutation arose independently in each family. Finding that neither grandparent has the mutation in the first family suggests that it arose de novo in that family. Our data indicate that (1) +1G{r_arrow}A IVS 3 mutations perturb GH mRNA splicing and cause IGHD II; and (2) these mutations can present as de novo GHD cases. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. SnoRNA Snord116 (Pwcr1/MBII-85 deletion causes growth deficiency and hyperphagia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ding

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is the leading genetic cause of obesity. After initial severe hypotonia, PWS children become hyperphagic and morbidly obese, if intake is not restricted. Short stature with abnormal growth hormone secretion, hypogonadism, cognitive impairment, anxiety and behavior problems are other features. PWS is caused by lack of expression of imprinted genes in a approximately 4 mb region of chromosome band 15q11.2. Our previous translocation studies predicted a major role for the C/D box small nucleolar RNA cluster SNORD116 (PWCR1/HBII-85 in PWS. To test this hypothesis, we created a approximately 150 kb deletion of the > 40 copies of Snord116 (Pwcr1/MBII-85 in C57BL/6 mice. Snord116del mice with paternally derived deletion lack expression of this snoRNA. They have early-onset postnatal growth deficiency, but normal fertility and lifespan. While pituitary structure and somatotrophs are normal, liver Igf1 mRNA is decreased. In cognitive and behavior tests, Snord116del mice are deficient in motor learning and have increased anxiety. Around three months of age, they develop hyperphagia, but stay lean on regular and high-fat diet. On reduced caloric intake, Snord116del mice maintain their weight better than wild-type littermates, excluding increased energy requirement as a cause of hyperphagia. Normal compensatory feeding after fasting, and ability to maintain body temperature in the cold indicate normal energy homeostasis regulation. Metabolic chamber studies reveal that Snord116del mice maintain energy homeostasis by altered fuel usage. Prolonged mealtime and increased circulating ghrelin indicate a defect in meal termination mechanism. Snord116del mice, the first snoRNA deletion animal model, reveal a novel role for a non-coding RNA in growth and feeding regulation.

  15. The Municipal Bonds – the Cause and the Effect of the Local Financial Decentralisation Growth. Romanian Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maria Lacatus

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper work analyses the connection between local financial decentralization and the potential of local public administration to sustain the local economic and social development by its own forces by taking part to the capital market. Next to the ordinary financial sources, which are the local taxes, the local collectivities resorted last years more and more to the loans, by issuing municipal bonds. As an effect and then as a cause of the local autonomy and financial independence growth, these kinds of financial instruments gave the chance to the local public administrations to answer all community needs in efficiency and efficacy terms.

  16. A novel de novo germline mutation Glu40Lys in AKT3 causes megalencephaly with growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masaki; Dobashi, Kazushige; Nagahara, Keiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Nishimura, Gen; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2017-04-01

    Germline or somatic gain-of-function mutations in the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) have been reported to cause syndromic megalencephaly. We describe a novel germline mutation, p.Glu40Lys, in AKT3. Phenotypically, the patient presented with megalencephaly with hypotonia, apparent connective tissue laxity, and growth hormone (GH) deficiency. To our knowledge, this is the first instance of a patient with megalencephaly with GH deficiency, harboring a germline de novo mutation in AKT3. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Development of a knowledge assessment tool for dermatotoxicity caused by inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Dimitrios Konstantinos; Konstantinidis, Theocharis; Konsatntinidis, Theocharis; Skandalaki, Nektaria; Papadouri, Anna; Pappa, Theodora; Poulopoulou, Stavroula

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a knowledge assessment tool for dermatotoxicity caused by inhibitors of EGFR (intravenous regimens). Five nurses with experience in oncology created a 25-item questionnaire. The questionnaire was presented to six experts for assessment of face and content validity. Item analysis and reliability testing were evaluated on the test results of 76 nurses. Face and content validity was achieved for 25 items. Two items with low biserial correlations were deleted. The values for item difficulty range from 0.2 to 0.7. The values for item discrimination ranged from 0.25 to 0.64. The complete post-tested 23-item questionnaire showed excellent internal consistency with Kuder-Richardson 20 score of 0.909. The Cohen κ tests showed that the questionnaire has very good test-retest reliability. The specific tool can be used in several studies, leading to the development of educational interventions.

  18. Quantum efficiency and thermal emittance of metal photocathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Dowell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern electron beams have demonstrated the brilliance needed to drive free electron lasers at x-ray wavelengths with major advances occurring since the invention of the photocathode gun and the realization of emittance compensation. These state-of-the-art electron beams are now becoming limited by the intrinsic thermal emittance of the cathode. In both dc and rf photocathode guns details of the cathode emission physics strongly influence the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance. Therefore improving cathode performance is essential to increasing the brightness of beams. It is especially important to understand the fundamentals of cathode quantum efficiency and thermal emittance. This paper investigates the relationship between the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance for metal cathodes using the Fermi-Dirac model for the electron distribution. We use a consistent theory to derive the quantum efficiency and thermal emittance, and compare our results to those of others.

  19. Inactivation of fibroblast growth factor binding protein 3 causes anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yasunari; Kitano, Ayumi; Takao, Keizo; Prasansuklab, Anchalee; Mushiroda, Taisei; Yamazaki, Keiko; Kumada, Tomohiro; Shibata, Minoru; Takaoka, Yuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Kato, Takeo; Abe, Takaya; Iwata, Nakao; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Heike, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms of emotional modulation and the molecular pathophysiology of anxiety disorders are largely unknown. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family has been implicated in the regulation of many physiological and pathological processes, which include the control of emotional behaviors. The present study examined mice with a targeted deletion of the fgf-bp3 gene, which encodes a novel FGF-binding protein, in animal models relevant to anxiety. To define the behavioral consequences of FGF-BP3 deficiency, we evaluated fgf-bp3-deficient mice using anxiety-related behavioral paradigms that provide a conflict between the desire to explore an unknown area or objects and the aversion to a brightly lit open space. The fgf-bp3-deficient mice exhibited alterations in time spent in the central area of the open-field arena, were less active in the lit areas of a light/dark transition test, and had a prolonged latency to feed during a novelty-induced hypophagia test. These changes were associated with alterations in light-induced orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) activation in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that FGF-BP3 is a potent mediator of anxiety-related behaviors in mice and suggest that distinct pathways regulate emotional behaviors. Therefore, FGF-BP3 plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional states and in the development of anxiety disorders and should be investigated as a therapeutic target for anxiety disease in humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Semiconductor Quantum Dash Broadband Emitters: Modeling and Experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    Broadband light emitters operation, which covers multiple wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, has been established as an indispensable element to the human kind, continuously advancing the living standard by serving as sources in important multi-disciplinary field applications such as biomedical imaging and sensing, general lighting and internet and mobile phone connectivity. In general, most commercial broadband light sources relies on complex systems for broadband light generation which are bulky, and energy hungry. \\tRecent demonstration of ultra-broadband emission from semiconductor light sources in the form of superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLDs) has paved way in realization of broadband emitters on a completely novel platform, which offered compactness, cost effectiveness, and comparatively energy efficient, and are already serving as a key component in medical imaging systems. The low power-bandwidth product is inherent in SLDs operating in the amplified spontaneous emission regime. A quantum leap in the advancement of broadband emitters, in which high power and large bandwidth (in tens of nm) are in demand. Recently, the birth of a new class of broadband semiconductor laser diode (LDs) producing multiple wavelength light in stimulated emission regime was demonstrated. This very recent manifestation of a high power-bandwidth-product semiconductor broadband LDs relies on interband optical transitions via quantum confined dot/dash nanostructures and exploiting the natural inhomogeneity of the self-assembled growth technology. This concept is highly interesting and extending the broad spectrum of stimulated emission by novel device design forms the central focus of this dissertation. \\tIn this work, a simple rate equation numerical technique for modeling InAs/InP quantum dash laser incorporating the properties of inhomogeneous broadening effect on lasing spectra was developed and discussed, followed by a comprehensive experimental analysis

  1. Analisis Emitter alternatif dalam Sistem Irigasi Tetes pada Budidaya Tanaman Sawi (Brasssica Sp)

    OpenAIRE

    Mutia, Siska

    2011-01-01

    Drip irrigation system is an applied irrigation technology by dripping water through pipes to root plants area. This research was utilizing alternative emitter as applicator water irrigation construction, and then the parameters data were observed during plant growth. This research was carried out to study the irrigation uniformity and the efficiency of water application on the productivity of mustard green. The result of this research indicated the uniformity of irrigation was 93,06%...

  2. Novel protein kinase D inhibitors cause potent arrest in prostate cancer cell growth and motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazo John S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinase D (PKD has been implicated in a wide range of cellular processes and pathological conditions including cancer. However, targeting PKD therapeutically and dissecting PKD-mediated cellular responses remains difficult due to lack of a potent and selective inhibitor. Previously, we identified a novel pan-PKD inhibitor, CID755673, with potency in the upper nanomolar range and high selectivity for PKD. In an effort to further enhance its selectivity and potency for potential in vivo application, small molecule analogs of CID755673 were generated by modifying both the core structure and side-chains. Results After initial activity screening, five analogs with equal or greater potencies as CID755673 were chosen for further analysis: kb-NB142-70, kb-NB165-09, kb-NB165-31, kb-NB165-92, and kb-NB184-02. Our data showed that modifications to the aromatic core structure in particular significantly increased potency while retaining high specificity for PKD. When tested in prostate cancer cells, all compounds inhibited PMA-induced autophosphorylation of PKD1, with kb-NB142-70 being most active. Importantly, these analogs caused a dramatic arrest in cell proliferation accompanying elevated cytotoxicity when applied to prostate cancer cells. Cell migration and invasion were also inhibited by these analogs with varying potencies that correlated to their cellular activity. Conclusions Throughout the battery of experiments, the compounds kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 emerged as the most potent and specific analogs in vitro and in cells. These compounds are undergoing further testing for their effectiveness as pharmacological tools for dissecting PKD function and as potential anti-cancer agents in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  3. Intelligent Variable Emittance Panels Using New, ""True"" Solid Electrolyte Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work further developed a highly promising Variable Emittance technology for spacecraft thermal control based on Conducting Polymer (CP) electrochromics...

  4. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS.

  5. Multi-channel polarized thermal emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P

    2013-07-16

    A multi-channel polarized thermal emitter (PTE) is presented. The multi-channel PTE can emit polarized thermal radiation without using a polarizer at normal emergence. The multi-channel PTE consists of two layers of metallic gratings on a monolithic and homogeneous metallic plate. It can be fabricated by a low-cost soft lithography technique called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The spectral positions of the mid-infrared (MIR) radiation peaks can be tuned by changing the periodicity of the gratings and the spectral separation between peaks are tuned by changing the mutual angle between the orientations of the two gratings.

  6. Summary report on transverse emittance preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; Vos, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    During the past years, significant progress has been made in understanding the beam transverse emittance blow-up and its preservation. However, one often finds him-/herself ignorant when he/she tries to explain what was observed in an existing machine or to predict what will happen in a machine under design. There are a number of such examples given in this report. Some of them are even fundamental. These are the challenges. But they are also the directions leading to new achievements. The workshop gladly acknowledged them and promised to work on them.

  7. Modeling quantum yield, emittance, and surface roughness effects from metallic photocathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, D. A.; Bell, G. I.; Smedley, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Feng, J.; Karkare, S.; Padmore, H. A.

    2017-10-01

    Detailed measurements of momentum distributions of emitted electrons have allowed the investigation of the thermal limit of the transverse emittance from metal photocathodes. Furthermore, recent developments in material design and growth have resulted in photocathodes that can deliver high quantum efficiency and are sufficiently robust to use in high electric field gradient photoinjectors and free electron lasers. The growth process usually produces photoemissive material layers with rough surface profiles that lead to transverse accelerating fields and possible work function variations, resulting in emittance growth. To better understand the effects of temperature, density of states, and surface roughness on the properties of emitted electrons, we have developed realistic three-dimensional models for photocathode materials with grated surface structures. They include general modeling of electron excitation due to photon absorption, charge transport, and emission from flat and rough metallic surfaces. The models also include image charge and field enhancement effects. We report results from simulations with flat and rough surfaces to investigate how electron scattering, controlled roughness, work function variation, and field enhancement affect emission properties. Comparison of simulation results with measurements of the quantum yield and transverse emittance from flat Sb emission surfaces shows the importance of including efficient modeling of photon absorption, temperature effects, and the material density of states to achieve agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Clinical use of bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals with focus on alpha-emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, Hinrich A; Lassmann, Michael; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S; Czernin, Johannes; Herrmann, Ken

    2014-07-28

    Various single or multi-modality therapeutic options are available to treat pain of bone metastasis in patients with prostate cancer. Different radionuclides that emit β-rays such as (153)Samarium and (89)Strontium and achieve palliation are commercially available. In contrast to β-emitters, (223)Radium as a α-emitter has a short path-length. The advantage of the α-emitter is thus a highly localized biological effect that is caused by radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks and subsequent cell killing and/or limited effectiveness of cellular repair mechanisms. Due to the limited range of the α-particles the bone surface to red bone marrow dose ratio is also lower for (223)Radium which is expressed in a lower myelotoxicity. The α emitter (223)Radium dichloride is the first radiopharmaceutical that significantly prolongs life in castrate resistant prostate cancer patients with wide-spread bone metastatic disease. In a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study 921 patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases were randomly assigned. The analysis confirmed the (223)Radium survival benefit compared to the placebo (median, 14.9 mo vs 11.3 mo; P US Food and Drug Administration.

  9. Variable Emittance Electrochromics Using Ionic Electrolytes and Low Solar Absorptance Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Prasanna

    2011-01-01

    One of the last remaining technical hurdles with variable emittance devices or skins based on conducting polymer electrochromics is the high solar absorptance of their top surfaces. This high solar absorptance causes overheating of the skin when facing the Sun in space. Existing technologies such as mechanical louvers or loop heat pipes are virtually inapplicable to micro (< 20 kg) and nano (< 5 kg) spacecraft. Novel coatings lower the solar absorption to Alpha(s) of between 0.30 and 0.46. Coupled with the emittance properties of the variable emittance skins, this lowers the surface temperature of the skins facing the Sun to between 30 and 60 C, which is much lower than previous results of 100 C, and is well within acceptable satellite operations ranges. The performance of this technology is better than that of current new technologies such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), electrostatics, and electrophoretics, especially in applications involving micro and nano spacecraft. The coatings are deposited inside a high vacuum, layering multiple coatings onto the top surfaces of variable emittance skins. They are completely transparent in the entire relevant infrared region (about 2 to 45 microns), but highly reflective in the visible-NIR (near infrared) region of relevance to solar absorptance.

  10. Is paradoxical hair growth caused by low-level radiant exposure by home-use laser and intense pulsed light devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Godfrey; Bjerring, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This qualitative review of paradoxical hair growth, following professional treatments reviews, clarifies whether low fluence is the most probable cause of unwanted hair regrowth after at home light-based treatments. The proposed causes of unexpected hair regrowth are examined, and our scientific understanding of absorption and scattering of light in turbid tissue is reviewed. Published reports of paradoxical hair growth are assessed. Early laser hair removal studies failed to record the occurrence of hair induction despite the significant numbers of subjects treated. Neither published paradoxical hair growth studies following home-based laser or intense pulsed light (IPL) hair removal treatments, nor randomised or controlled studies documenting paradoxical hair growth following professional treatments could be found. Several authors directly proposed inflammatory response to be the primary cause of hair growth induction. It is unlikely that hair regrowth several centimetres or more away from the irradiated tissue can be attributed to the laser or IPL used. In many cases of paradoxical hair growth, other causes may be responsible for the unexpected hair growth. The primary cause of instances of 'true' paradoxical hair growth is probably limited to darker phototypes with one or more other characteristics including polycystic ovarian syndrome or other androgen hormonal irregularities following high energy treatments with the corresponding inflammatory sequelae.

  11. An Observation of a Transverse to Longitudinal Emittance Exchange at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeth, Timothy W [State Univ. of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2009-05-01

    An experimental program to perform a proof of principle of transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (ϵxin ↔ ϵzout and ϵxin ↔ ϵzout) has been developed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, including two magnetic dogleg channels and a TM110 deflecting mode radio frequency cavity, were constructed for the emittance exchange experiment. The first priority was a measurement of the Emittance Exchange beamline transport matrix. The method of difference orbits was used to measure the transport matrix. Through varying individual beam input vector elements, such as xin, x'in, yin, y'in, zin, or δin, and measuring the changes in all of the beam output vector's elements, xout, x'out, yout, y'out, zout, δout, the full 6 x 6 transport matrix was measured. The measured emittance exchange transport matrix was in overall good agreement with our calculated transport matrix. A direct observation of an emittance exchange was performed by measuring the electron beam's characteristics before and after the emittance exchange beamline. Operating with a 14.3 MeV, 250pC electron bunch, ϵzin of 21.1 ± 1.5 mm • mrad was observed to be exchanged with ϵxout of 20.8 ± 2.00 mm • mrad. Diagnostic limitations in the ϵzout measurement did not account for an energy-time correlation, thus potentially returning values larger than the actual longitudinal emittance. The ϵxin of 4.67 ± 0.22 mm • mrad was observed to be exchanged with ϵzout of 7.06 ± 0.43 mm • mrad. The apparent ϵzoutgrowth is consistent with calculated values in which the correlation term is neglected.

  12. Therapeutic use of alpha-emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassmann, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    In recent years there is a growing interest in the therapeutic use of {alpha}-emitters for patient treatment, {alpha}-particles have much higher energy and their range is only a few cell diameters. Their high LET and the limited ability of cells to repair DNA damage from {alpha}-radiation explain their high relative biological effectiveness and cytotoxicity. Potential {alpha}-emitting isotopes for therapeutic applications are {sup 224}Ra, {sup 223}Ra, {sup 213}Bi and {sup 211}At. The treatment with {alpha}-particles is focused upon targeted cancer therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, on palliation of bone metastases or upon pain relief in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Examples for targeted cancer therapy are the treatment of melanoma with {sup 213}Bi and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with {sup 211}At. For metastatic bone pain palliation {sup 223}Ra was applied in a phase I clinical trial. For amelioration of pain in AS-patients {sup 224}Ra-chloride is used. This radiopharmaceutical is licensed for this particular application in Germany. Today there are some potential clinical applications for {alpha}-emitters although most of them are in the state of scientific, non-routine investigations. In-vivo dosimetry for risk assessment associated with this treatment is even more difficult to perform than for therapies using beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. (orig.)

  13. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  14. Measurement of the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity using optical fiber DTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaros, Jakub; Papes, Martin; Liner, Andrej; Vašinek, Vladimir; Smira, Pavel; Nasswettrova, Andrea; Cubik, Jakub; Kepak, Stanislav

    2014-06-01

    Researcher's teams were dealing with the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity problem since the microwaves were used. One possible way, how to measure electromagnetic field is the measurement on inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the irradiated sample, which can cause problems as in other material processing, so in the undesirable change of properties and even security. Inhomogeneity of electromagnetic field is specific by creating spots with higher or lower temperature called "hot spots". This inhomogeneity strongly affects the temperature distribution in the cross section of the material and its resultant heating. Given the impossibility of using classical electronic devices with metal temperature sensors were various indirect methods used in the past. This paper deals with experimental measurement of the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity (2.45 GHz) using the optical fiber DTS. The greatest advantage of this sensor system is just in using of the optical fiber (electromagnetic resistance, small size, safety using in inflammable and explosive area, easy installation). Due to these properties of the optical fiber sensor it's possible to measure the temperature of the sample in real time. These sensor are able to measure the temperature along the fiber, in some cases they use nonlinear effect in optical fiber (Raman nonlinear effect). The verification of non-homogeneity consists in experimental measuring of the temperature distribution within the wooden sample. The method is based on heat exchange in an isolated system where wooden sample serves as an absorber of the irradiated energy. To identify locations with different power density was used DTS system, based on nonlinear phenomena in optical fibers.

  15. Magnetic tunnel transistor with a silicon hot-electron emitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Minh, P.; Gökcan, H.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a modified magnetic tunnel transistor having a silicon tunnel emitter. The device has the structure Si/Al2O3 /base/Si with a spin-valve metal base, a Schottky barrier collector, but a silicon emitter separated from the base by a thin tunnel oxide. The energy of the hot electrons

  16. Coated nano-particle jamming of quantum emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Spherical active coated nano-particles are examined analytically and numerically in the presence of one, two or four quantum emitters (electric Hertzian dipoles). The ability of the coated nano-particle to effectively cloak the emitters to a far-field observer is reported. This offers...

  17. Properties of nanolasers based on few discrete emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Lorke, Michael

    2012-01-01

    emitters and 100 photon states the density matrix has more than 2.5 × 106 elements. We have been able to simplify the problem significantly by adiabatically eliminating the photon-assisted polarizations and the correlations between emitters and cavity [3]. This results in a set of rate equations...

  18. Low Cost Constant – Head Drip Irrigation Emitter for Climate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The drip system comprises of abarrel, sub-main line, lateral lines, tubes and emitters, it can irrigate140 crop stands and can be extended to 560 stands. The emitters produced a mean discharge and emission uniformity (Eu) of 1.60l/hr. and 74 % respectively; while the calibrated manufacturer's coefficient of variation and ...

  19. Emittance measurements of low-energy beam line at KVI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toprek, D; Formanoy, [No Value

    2006-01-01

    In this paper is represented the results of beam profile measurements of He-3(+) beam delivered from ECR ion source at KVI. The beam emittance is estimated by varying quadrupole method. The estimated values for the beam emittance at the different profile grid locations along the transport beam line

  20. Emittance measurement by multi-changing focusing strength

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Shu Hong; Cao Jian She; Ma Li; Liu Yu Cheng; Le Qi; Pei Guo Xi; Zhang Jia Fei

    2002-01-01

    Some advanced techniques to optimize the emittance measurement devices have been studied, such as thin lens approximation, multi-changing focusing strength, optimizing the position of the profile monitor and software improvement for accurate data acquisition and effective processing. By applying these techniques to the emittance measurement for electron beam of BEPC Linac, the satisfactory measurement results have been obtained

  1. The Influence of Fertigation on Clogging of Some Emitters in Drip Irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    shahrzad gharcheh; M. Delbari; Ganji, F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: An appropriate water resources management and planning is necessary due to the scarcity of water resources and rapidly growing world population. In this regard, selecting appropriate methods for irrigation is one of the most important issues. Drip irrigation is a recent advanced irrigation method in which fertilizers can be efficiently applied along with irrigation water. Drip fertigation, however, can potentially cause clogging of emitters. Various factors such as clogging incr...

  2. A cytochrome P450 monooxygenase commonly used for negative selection in transgenic plants causes growth anomalies by disrupting brassinosteroid signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manivasagam Sindhu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases form a large superfamily of enzymes that catalyze diverse reactions. The P450SU1 gene from the soil bacteria Streptomyces griseolus encodes CYP105A1 which acts on various substrates including sulfonylurea herbicides, vitamin D, coumarins, and based on the work presented here, brassinosteroids. P450SU1 is used as a negative-selection marker in plants because CYP105A1 converts the relatively benign sulfonyl urea pro-herbicide R7402 into a highly phytotoxic product. Consistent with its use for negative selection, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated with P450SU1 situated between recognition sequences for FLP recombinase from yeast to select for recombinase-mediated excision. However, unexpected and prominent developmental aberrations resembling those described for mutants defective in brassinosteroid signaling were observed in many of the lines. Results The phenotypes of the most affected lines included severe stunting, leaf curling, darkened leaves characteristic of anthocyanin accumulation, delayed transition to flowering, low pollen and seed yields, and delayed senescence. Phenotype severity correlated with P450SU1 transcript abundance, but not with transcript abundance of other experimental genes, strongly implicating CYP105A1 as responsible for the defects. Germination and seedling growth of transgenic and control lines in the presence and absence of 24-epibrassinolide indicated that CYP105A1 disrupts brassinosteroid signaling, most likely by inactivating brassinosteroids. Conclusions Despite prior use of this gene as a genetic tool, deleterious growth in the absence of R7402 has not been elaborated. We show that this gene can cause aberrant growth by disrupting brassinosteroid signaling and affecting homeostasis.

  3. [Concordance between a head circumference growth function and intellectual disability in relation with the cause of microcephaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, R; Macaya Ruíz, A; Giraldo Arjonilla, J; Roig-Quilis, M

    2015-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate the correlations between patterns of head growth and intellectual disability among distinct aetiological presentations of microcephaly. 3,269 head circumference (HC) charts of patients from a tertiary neuropediatric unit were reviewed and 136 microcephalic participants selected. Using the Z-scores of registered HC measurements we defined the variables: HC Minimum, HC Drop and HC Catch-up. We classified patients according to the presence or absence of intellectual disability (IQ below 71) and according to the cause of microcephaly (idiopathic, familial, syndromic, symptomatic and mixed). Using Discriminant Analysis a C-function was defined as C=HC Minimum + HC Drop with a cut-off level of C=-4.32 Z-score. In our sample 95% of patients scoring below this level, severe microcephaly, were classified in the disabled group while the overall concordance was 66%. In the symptomatic-mixed group the concordance between HC function and outcome reached 82% in contrast to only 54% in the idiopathic-syndromic group (P-value=0.0002). We defined a HC growth function which discriminates intellectual disability of microcephalic patients better than isolated HC measurements, especially for those with secondary and mixed aetiologies. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Betulinic acid delivered in liposomes reduces growth of human lung and colon cancers in mice without causing systemic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullauer, Franziska B; van Bloois, Louis; Daalhuisen, Joost B; Ten Brink, Marieke S; Storm, Gert; Medema, Jan Paul; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Kessler, Jan H

    2011-03-01

    Betulinic acid (BetA) is a plant-derived pentacyclic triterpenoid with potent anticancer capacity that targets the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. BetA has a broad efficacy in vitro against prevalent cancer types, including lung, colorectal, prostate, cervix and breast cancer, melanomas, neuroblastomas, and leukemias. The cytotoxic effects of the compound against healthy cells are minimal, rendering BetA a promising potential anticancer drug. However, because of the weak hydrosolubility of BetA, it has been difficult to study its efficacy in vivo and a pharmaceutical formulation is not yet available. We report the development of a liposome formulation of BetA and show its successful application in mice. Large liposomes, assembled without cholesterol to reduce their rigidity, efficiently incorporated BetA. Nude mice xenografted with human colon and lung cancer tumors were treated intravenously with the BetA-containing liposomes. Tumor growth was reduced to more than 50% compared with the control treatment, leading to an enhanced survival of the mice. Oral administration of the liposomal formulation of BetA also slowed tumor growth. Any signs of systemic toxicity caused by BetA treatment were absent. Thus, liposomes are an efficient formulation vehicle for BetA, enabling its preclinical development as a nontoxic compound for the treatment of cancers.

  5. Loss of epidermal growth factor receptor in vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes causes arterial hypotension and cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Barbara; Rabe, Sindy; Schneider, Bettina; Bretschneider, Maria; Rupp, Sebastian; Ruhs, Stefanie; Neumann, Joachim; Rueckschloss, Uwe; Sibilia, Maria; Gotthardt, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia; Gekle, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a receptor tyrosine kinase, contributes to parainflammatory dysregulation, possibly causing cardiovascular dysfunction and remodeling. The physiological role of cardiovascular EGFR is not completely understood. To investigate the physiological importance of EGFR in vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes, we generated a mouse model with targeted deletion of the EGFR using the SM22 (smooth muscle-specific protein 22) promoter. While the reproduction of knockout animals was not impaired, life span was significantly reduced. Systolic blood pressure was not different between the 2 genotypes-neither in tail cuff nor in intravascular measurements-whereas total peripheral vascular resistance, diastolic blood pressure, and mean blood pressure were reduced. Loss of vascular smooth muscle cell-EGFR results in a dilated vascular phenotype with minor signs of fibrosis and inflammation. Echocardiography, necropsy, and histology revealed a dramatic eccentric cardiac hypertrophy in knockout mice (2.5-fold increase in heart weight), with increased stroke volume and cardiac output as well as left ventricular wall thickness and lumen. Cardiac hypertrophy is accompanied by an increase in cardiomyocyte volume, a strong tendency to cardiac fibrosis and inflammation, as well as enhanced NADPH-oxidase 4 and hypertrophy marker expression. Thus, in cardiomyocytes, EGFR prevents excessive hypertrophic growth through its impact on reactive oxygen species balance, whereas in vascular smooth muscle cells EGFR contributes to the appropriate vascular wall architecture and vessel reactivity, thereby supporting a physiological vascular tone.

  6. Plasma insulin-like growth factor I as predictor of progression and all cause mortality in chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Kistorp, Caroline; Raymond, Ilan

    2009-01-01

    , renal function and LVEF) IGF-I levels did not influence the overall mortality risk or the admission rate to hospital, hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence intervals) 1.05 (0.75-1.47) (P=0.77) and 1.00 (0.80-1.26) (P=0.96), respectively per each SD increase in log IGF-I levels. CONCLUSIONS: IGF-I levels......OBJECTIVES: Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is an anabolic growth factor that seems to increase cardiac contractility. Reduced levels of IGF-I may be implicated in progression of CHF. The objective was to compare plasma IGF-I in CHF patients with healthy controls, and to examine...... the associations between baseline IGF-I levels, cardiac contractility and the prognosis as judged by all cause mortality and progression of CHF requiring admission to hospital. METHODS: A prospective study comprising 194 CHF outpatients, and 169 matched controls. All patients and controls underwent...

  7. Vacuum Rabi spectra of a single quantum emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Yasutomo; Ohta, Ryuichi; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-04-10

    We report the observation of the vacuum Rabi splitting of a single quantum emitter by measuring its direct spontaneous emission into free space. We use a semiconductor quantum dot inside a photonic crystal nanocavity, in conjunction with an appropriate cavity design and filtering with a polarizer and an aperture, enabling the extraction of the inherently weak emitter's signal. The emitter's vacuum Rabi spectra exhibit clear differences from those measured by detecting the cavity photon leakage. Moreover, we observe an asymmetric vacuum Rabi spectrum induced by interference between the emitter and cavity detection channels. Our observations lay the groundwork for accessing various cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena that manifest themselves only in the emitter's direct spontaneous emission.

  8. GTF Transverse and Longitudinal Emittance Data Analysis Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-07

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Measurements at the GTF include quadrupole scan transverse emittance measurements and linac phase scan longitudinal emittance measurements. Typically the beam size is measured on a screen as a function of a quadrupole current or linac phase and the beam matrix is then fit to the measured data. Often the emittance which is the final result of the measurement is the only number reported. However, the method used to reduce the data to the final emittance value can have a significant effect on the result. This paper describes in painful detail the methods used to analyze the transverse and longitudinal emittance data collected at the GTF.

  9. Silicon heterojunction solar cells with p nanocrystalline thin emitter on monocrystalline substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zignani, F.; Desalvo, A.; Centurioni, E.; Iencinella, D.; Rizzoli, R.; Summonte, C.; Migliori, A

    2004-03-22

    In the framework of plasma deposition of silicon heterojunction solar cells, the issue of depositing by very high frequency, a microcrystalline emitter, without affecting the passivating properties of the underlying amorphous buffer layer, is addressed. The sequence, deposition-exposure to H{sub 2} plasma-deposition, was used to fabricate the microcrystalline emitter. Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we give microscopic evidence of the long-range effects of hydrogen, already inferred by large area optical techniques. Upon exposure to H{sub 2} plasma, it is observed that silicon nanocrystallites are formed within the amorphous layer. Thinner amorphous layers undergo etching, and epitaxial growth takes place from the substrate. Photovoltaic devices with open circuit voltage up to 638 mV were fabricated.

  10. Nanowires-based light emitters on thermally and electrically conductive substrates and of making same

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-04-27

    Elemental or compound semiconductors on metal substrates and methods of growing them are provided. The methods can include the steps of: (i) providing a metal substrate; (ii) adding an interlayer on a surface of the metal substrate, and (iii) growing semiconductor nanowires on the interlayer using a semiconductor epitaxy growth system to form the elemental or compound semiconductor. The method can include direct growth of high quality group III-V and group III-N based materials in the form of nanowires and nanowires-based devices on metal substrates. The nanowires on all- metal scheme greatly simplifies the fabrication process of nanowires based high power light emitters.

  11. Mesoscopic quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Lykke

    This thesis reports research on quantum dots coupled to dielectric and plasmonic nano-structures by way of nano-structure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. To study light-matter interaction, plasmonic gap waveguides with nanometer dimensions as well as samples for studies...... of quantum dots in proximity to semiconductor/air and semiconductor/metal interfaces, were fabricated. We measured the decay dynamics of quantum dots near plasmonic gap waveguides and observed modied decay rates. The obtainable modications with the fabricated structures are calculated to be too small...... to allow for e- cient plasmon-based single-photon sources. Theoretical studies of coupling and propagation properties of plasmonic waveguides reveal that a high-refractive index of the medium surrounding the emitter, e.g. nGaAs = 3.5, limits the realizability of ecient plasmon-based single-photon sources...

  12. A simple X-ray emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroaki; Ono, Ryoichi; Hirai, Atsuhiko; Hosokawa, Yoshinori; Kawai, Jun

    2005-07-01

    A compact X-ray emission instrument is made, and the X-ray spectra are measured by changing the applied electric potential. Strong soft X-rays are observed when evacuating roughly and applying a high voltage to an insulator settled in this device. The X-ray intensity is higher as the applied voltage is increased. A light-emitting phenomenon is observed when this device emits X-rays. The present X-ray emitter is made of a small cylinder with a radius of 20 mm and a height of 50 mm. This X-ray generator has a potential to be used as an X-ray source in an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

  13. Emitter frequency refinement based on maximum likelihood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Wang, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Frequency estimation via signal sorting is widely recognized as one of the most practical technologies in signal processing. However, the estimated frequencies via signal sorting may be inaccurate and biased due to signal fluctuation under different emitter working modes, problems of transmitter circuit, environmental noises or certain unknown interference sources. Therefore, it has become an important issue to further analyze and refine signal frequencies after signal sorting. To address the above problem, we have brought forward an iterative frequency refinement method based on maximum likelihood. Iteratively, the initial estimated signal frequency values are refined. Experimental results indicate that the refined signal frequencies are more informative than the initial ones. As another advantage of our method, noises and interference sources could be filtered out simultaneously. The efficiency and flexibility enables our method to apply in a wide application area, i.e., communication, electronic reconnaissance and radar intelligence analysis.

  14. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing. [of leaves, soil and plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental determinations of the emittance of soils and leaves are reviewed, and an error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements is developed as an aid to remote sensing applications. In particular, an equation for the upper bound of the absolute error in an emittance determination is derived. The absolute error is found to decrease with an increase in contact temperature and to increase with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. The difference between temperature and band radiance temperature is plotted as a function of emittance for the wavelength intervals 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  15. Light scattering and photon statistics of quantum emitters coupled to metallic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Di Stefano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We study theoretically the quantum optical properties of hybrid artificial molecules composed of an individual quantum emitter and a metallic nanoparticle. The coupling between the two systems can give rise to a Fano interference effect which strongly influences the quantum statistical properties of the scattered photons: a small frequency shift of the incident light field may cause changes in the intensity correlation function of the scattered field of orders of magnitude. The system opens a good perspective for applications in active metamaterials and ultracompact single-photon devices. We also demonstrate with accurate scattering calculations that a system constituted by a single quantum emitter (a semiconductor quantum dot placed in the gap between two metallic nanoparticles can display the vacuum Rabi splitting.

  16. Vizantin inhibits bacterial adhesion without affecting bacterial growth and causes Streptococcus mutans biofilm to detach by altering its internal architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Shoji; Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Yuki; Ohshima, Hayato; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Terao, Yutaka; Noiri, Yuichiro

    2016-11-11

    An ideal antibiofilm strategy is to control both in the quality and quantity of biofilm while maintaining the benefits derived from resident microflora. Vizantin, a recently developed immunostimulating compound, has also been found to have antibiofilm property. This study evaluated the influence on biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans in the presence of sulfated vizantin and biofilm development following bacterial adhesion on a hydroxyapatite disc coated with sulfated vizantin. Supplementation with sulfated vizantin up to 50 μM did not affect either bacterial growth or biofilm formation, whereas 50 μM sulfated vizantin caused the biofilm to readily detach from the surface. Sulfated vizantin at the concentration of 50 μM upregulated the expression of the gtfB and gtfC genes, but downregulated the expression of the gtfD gene, suggesting altered architecture in the biofilm. Biofilm development on the surface coated with sulfated vizantin was inhibited depending on the concentration, suggesting prevention from bacterial adhesion. Among eight genes related to bacterial adherence in S. mutans, expression of gtfB and gtfC was significantly upregulated, whereas the expression of gtfD, GbpA and GbpC was downregulated according to the concentration of vizantin, especially with 50 μM vizantin by 0.8-, 0.4-, and 0.4-fold, respectively. These findings suggest that sulfated vizantin may cause structural degradation as a result of changing gene regulation related to bacterial adhesion and glucan production of S. mutans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  18. Optical Properties of Selective Emitter Materials for Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambourger, Paul D.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the optical properties of new "selective emitter" materials for possible use in high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic power systems. These are systems which directly convert heat to radiation at a wavelength closely matched to the bandgap energy of the solar cell. Candidate materials which have strong absorption lines fairly close to the bandgap of good solar-cell materials were chosen for study. Their emittance was measured as a function of wavelength to evaluate their promise as selective TPV emitters. Useful and informative results were obtained. Some of these results were presented at a January 1996 solar energy conference of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  19. The dust nature of micro field emitters in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V.M.

    2016-11-21

    Field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters are a limiting factor for the operational gradients of accelerating radio frequency (rf) cavities. Within the rf field emission theory the existence of needle like micro field emitters with very high length relative to the radius and corresponding high enhancement factor (β) is assumed. In this article the hypothesis that micro field emitters consists of long chains of conductive micro-particles is considered. Five different forces acting onto the particles in a high rf field are considered and the respective equations are derived. Some experimental observations and their explanation within this hypothesis are discussed.

  20. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 ± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  1. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increases during Blood-Brain Barrier-Enhanced Permeability Caused by Phoneutria nigriventer Spider Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique C. P. Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phoneutria nigriventer spider accidental envenomation provokes neurotoxic manifestations, which when critical, results in epileptic-like episodes. In rats, P. nigriventer venom (PNV causes blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBb. The PNV-induced excitotoxicity results from disturbances on Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels and glutamate handling. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, beyond its angiogenic effect, also, interferes on synaptic physiology by affecting the same ion channels and protects neurons from excitotoxicity. However, it is unknown whether VEGF expression is altered following PNV envenomation. We found that adult and neonates rats injected with PNV showed immediate neurotoxic manifestations which paralleled with endothelial occludin, β-catenin, and laminin downregulation indicative of BBBb. In neonate rats, VEGF, VEGF mRNA, and Flt-1 receptors, glutamate decarboxylase, and calbindin-D28k increased in Purkinje neurons, while, in adult rats, the BBBb paralleled with VEGF mRNA, Flk-1, and calbindin-D28k increases and Flt-1 decreases. Statistically, the variable age had a role in such differences, which might be due to age-related unequal maturation of blood-brain barrier (BBB and thus differential cross-signaling among components of the glial neurovascular unit. The concurrent increases in the VEGF/Flt-1/Flk-1 system in the cerebellar neuron cells and the BBBb following PNV exposure might imply a cytokine modulation of neuronal excitability consequent to homeostatic perturbations induced by ion channels-acting PNV neuropeptides. Whether such modulation represents neuroprotection needs further investigation.

  2. Estimation Method for Turn-off Collector Voltage of IGBTs Using Emitter-auxiliary Inductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Haoze; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    of high-voltage and high-power IGBT module, there exists an emitter-auxiliary inductor between the power emitter and Kelvin emitter. The same variable dic/dt during turn-off transition will also induce a measurable voltage veE across the emitter-auxiliary inductor LeE. As a result, the hazardous turn...

  3. Measurement of Emittance of Beam in the Debuncher During Stacking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halling, Mike

    1991-12-11

    The emittance of antiprotons in the debuncher was measured using two methods during normal stacking conditions. With 2.3 seconds of cooling the vertical emittance was found to be 3.6 {pi} mm-mr using scraper D:TJ308, and 2.9 {pi} mm-mr using the profile on SEM806. With 6.9 seconds of cooling time time the measured horizontal emittance was 2.1 {pi} mm-mr using D:RJ306 v.s. 1.9 {pi} mm-mr using SEM806; but with 2.3 seconds of cooling the measured emittance in the debuncher was larger than in the DTOA line, 4.5 {pi} mm-mr v.s. 2.8 {pi} mm-mr. This suggests that some beam is being scraped on a horizontal aperture restriction someplace in the extraction process.

  4. An Online Multisensor Data Fusion Framework for Radar Emitter Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar emitter classification is a special application of data clustering for classifying unknown radar emitters in airborne electronic support system. In this paper, a novel online multisensor data fusion framework is proposed for radar emitter classification under the background of network centric warfare. The framework is composed of local processing and multisensor fusion processing, from which the rough and precise classification results are obtained, respectively. What is more, the proposed algorithm does not need prior knowledge and training process; it can dynamically update the number of the clusters and the cluster centers when new pulses arrive. At last, the experimental results show that the proposed framework is an efficacious way to solve radar emitter classification problem in networked warfare.

  5. Optimization of Metamaterial Selective Emitters for Use in Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiester, Nicole A.

    The increasing costs of fossil fuels, both financial and environmental, has motivated many to look into sustainable energy sources. Thermophotovoltaics (TPVs), specialized photovoltaic cells focused on the infrared range, offer an opportunity to achieve both primary energy capture, similar to traditional photovoltaics, as well as secondary energy capture in the form of waste heat. However, to become a feasible energy source, TPV systems must become more efficient. One way to do this is through the development of selective emitters tailored to the bandgap of the TPV diode in question. This thesis proposes the use of metamaterial emitters as an engineerable, highly selective emitter that can withstand the temperatures required to collect waste heat. Metamaterial devices made of platinum and a dielectric such as alumina or silicon nitride were initially designed and tested as perfect absorbers. High temperature robustness testing demonstrates the device's ability to withstand the rigors of operating as a selective emitter.

  6. Nanobubble induced formation of quantum emitters in monolayer semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Gabriella D.; Ajayi, Obafunso A.; Li, Xiangzhi; Zhu, X.-Y.; Hone, James; Strauf, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery of exciton quantum emitters in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) has triggered renewed interest of localized excitons in low-dimensional systems. Open questions remain about the microscopic origin previously attributed to dopants and/or defects as well as strain potentials. Here we show that the quantum emitters can be deliberately induced by nanobubble formation in WSe2 and BN/WSe2 heterostructures. Correlations of atomic-force microscope and hyperspectral photoluminescence images reveal that the origin of quantum emitters and trion disorder is extrinsic and related to 10 nm tall nanobubbles and 70 nm tall wrinkles, respectively. We further demonstrate that ‘hot stamping’ results in the absence of 0D quantum emitters and trion disorder. The demonstrated technique is useful for advances in nanolasers and deterministic formation of cavity-QED systems in monolayer materials.

  7. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  8. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  9. Field emitters made of the contacted ytterbium and carbon nanolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Sominski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The operation of field emitters of a new type prepared from contacted nanolayers of ytterbium and carbon has been investigated. The performed calculations and experiments allowed to optimize the emission characteristics of the emitters. The calculations took into account the existence of a transition zone between the layers of Yb and C. Emission characteristics of the cathodes including up to 40 pairs of layers of carbon and ytterbium with optimum thicknesses of 5 and 2 nm respectively were measured. The created multilayered emitters provide the average emission current density over the surface of the emitter up to 10–20 A/cm2 and show promise for use in miniature electronic devices.

  10. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Connolly, R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Summers, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  11. New technique to measure emittance for beams with space charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Poorrezaei

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of the transverse phase space of beams is a fundamental requirement for particle accelerators. We present a novel approach for measurement of transverse emittance for beams with space charge, an important quality indicator of transverse phase space. The method utilizes a lens-drift-screen setup similar to that of a quadrupole scan emittance measurement. Measurements of radius and divergence that can be obtained from beam produced radiation, e.g. optical transition, are used to calculate the cross-correlation term and therefore the rms emittance. A linear space-charge model is used in the envelope equations; hence, the errors in the measurement relate to the nonuniformity of the beam distribution. The emittance obtained with our method shows small deviation from those obtained by WARP simulations for beams with high space charge, in contrast to other techniques.

  12. Two-photon interference from two blinking quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöns, Klaus D.; Stensson, Katarina; Reindl, Marcus; Swillo, Marcin; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo; Björk, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of blinking on the two-photon interference measurement from two independent quantum emitters. We find that blinking significantly alters the statistics in the Hong-Ou-Mandel second-order intensity correlation function g(2 )(τ ) and the outcome of two-photon interference measurements performed with independent quantum emitters. We theoretically demonstrate that the presence of blinking can be experimentally recognized by a deviation from the gD(2 )(0 ) =0.5 value when distinguishable photons from two emitters impinge on a beam splitter. Our findings explain the significant differences between linear losses and blinking for correlation measurements between independent sources and are experimentally verified using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source. We show that blinking imposes a mandatory cross-check measurement to correctly estimate the degree of indistinguishability of photons emitted by independent quantum emitters.

  13. Intelligent Variable Emittance Panels Using New, ?True? Solid Electrolyte Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This firm has, in ongoing work in collaboration with the Air Force, NASA and JPL, developed a unique Variable Emittance technology based on the electrochromism of...

  14. Emittance display on the new Linac controls computer

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    Top left : horizontal emittance plot. Top right : above-angular beam profile; below-horizontal beam profile. Bottom : "mountain range" display combining beam intensity distribution as the third dimension with the horizontal.

  15. Scanning Anode Field Emission Characterisation of Carbon Nanotube emitter arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhanu, S.; Gröning, O.; Chen, Z.; Merikhi, J.; Bachmann, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Scanning anode field emission microscopy (SAFEM) was used to characterise carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays produced within Philips CediX-Technotubes' activities. Four different samples were investigated and compared. The field enhancement distributions were determined and the local field

  16. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  17. Internal emitter limits for iodine, radium and radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenker, R.A.

    1984-08-15

    This paper identifies some of the issues which arise in the consideration of the derivation of new limits on exposure to internal emitters. Basic and secondary radiation protection limits are discussed. Terms are defined and applied to the limitation of risk from stochastic effects. Non-stochastic data for specific internal emitters (/sup 131/I and the radium isotopes) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative aspects of the limit setting problem. 65 references, 2 figures, 12 tables.

  18. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    OpenAIRE

    Guag Joshua W; Seidman Seth J; Pantchenko Oxana S; Witters Donald M; Sponberg Curt L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, inco...

  19. Study of ultra-low emittance design for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; /SLAC

    2015-09-17

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now, to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  20. Plasmon-assisted quantum control of distant emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susa, Cristian E. [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Reina, John H., E-mail: john.reina@correounivalle.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Departamento de Óptica, Facultad de Física, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hildner, Richard [Experimentalphysik IV, Universität Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-06-27

    We show how to generate and control the correlations in a set of two distant quantum emitters coupled to a one-dimensional dissipative plasmonic waveguide. An external laser field enhances the dimer's steady-state correlations and allows an active control (switching on/off) of nonclassical correlations. The plasmon-assisted dipolar-interacting qubits exhibit persistent correlations, which in turn can be decoupled and made to evolve independently from each other. The setup enables long-distance (∼1 μm) qubit control that works for both resonant and detuned emitters. For suitable emitter initialization, we also show that the quantum correlation is always greater than the classical one. - Highlights: • Experimentally realistic setup: single emitters coupled to plasmon waveguide. • Conditional dynamics and qubit control of quantum emitters at long (>μm) distance. • Quantum mechanism: plasmon-assisted qubit coupling and driving by laser field. • Quantum discord dominates induced conditional dynamics. • Long-range quantum mechanism effective for both resonant and detuned emitters.

  1. Validated Analytical Model of a Pressure Compensation Drip Irrigation Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Taylor, Katherine; Tran, Davis; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    This work is focused on analytically characterizing the behavior of pressure-compensating drip emitters in order to design low-cost, low-power irrigation solutions appropriate for off-grid communities in developing countries. There are 2.5 billion small acreage farmers worldwide who rely solely on their land for sustenance. Drip, compared to flood, irrigation leads to up to 70% reduction in water consumption while increasing yields by 90% - important in countries like India which are quickly running out of water. To design a low-power drip system, there is a need to decrease the pumping pressure requirement at the emitters, as pumping power is the product of pressure and flow rate. To efficiently design such an emitter, the relationship between the fluid-structure interactions that occur in an emitter need to be understood. In this study, a 2D analytical model that captures the behavior of a common drip emitter was developed and validated through experiments. The effects of independently changing the channel depth, channel width, channel length and land height on the performance were studied. The model and the key parametric insights presented have the potential to be optimized in order to guide the design of low-pressure, clog-resistant, pressure-compensating emitters.

  2. Measured emittance dependence on injection method in laser plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Samuel; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Lehe, Remi; Tsai, Hai-En; Swanson, Kelly; Steinke, Sven; Nakamura, Kei; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    The success of many laser plasma accelerator (LPA) based applications relies on the ability to produce electron beams with excellent 6D brightness, where brightness is defined as the ratio of charge to the product of the three normalized emittances. As such, parametric studies of the emittance of LPA generated electron beams are essential. Profiting from a stable and tunable LPA setup, combined with a carefully designed single-shot transverse emittance diagnostic, we present a direct comparison of charge dependent emittance measurements of electron beams generated by two different injection mechanisms: ionization injection and shock induced density down-ramp injection. Notably, the measurements reveal that ionization injection results in significantly higher emittance. With the down-ramp injection configuration, emittances less than 1 micron at spectral charge densities up to 2 pC/MeV were measured. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, by the NSF under Grant No. PHY-1415596, by the U.S. DOE NNSA, DNN R&D (NA22), and by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation under Grant ID GBMF4898.

  3. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantchenko, Oxana S; Seidman, Seth J; Guag, Joshua W; Witters, Donald M; Sponberg, Curt L

    2011-06-09

    The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  4. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters. PMID:21658266

  5. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guag Joshua W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  6. Pulsed laser-deposited nanocrystalline GdB{sub 6} thin films on W and Re as field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; More, Mahendra A. [Savitribai Phule Pune University, Department of Physics, Centre for Advanced Studies in Materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Pune (India); Singh, Anil K.; Sinha, Sucharita [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Phase, Deodatta M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research Indore Centre, Indore (India); Late, Dattatray J. [CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, Pune (India)

    2016-10-15

    Gadolinium hexaboride (GdB{sub 6}) nanocrystalline thin films were grown on tungsten (W), rhenium (Re) tips and foil substrates using optimized pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The X-ray diffraction analysis reveals formation of pure, crystalline cubic phase of GdB{sub 6} on W and Re substrates, under the prevailing PLD conditions. The field emission (FE) studies of GdB{sub 6}/W and GdB{sub 6}/Re emitters were performed in a planar diode configuration at the base pressure ∝10{sup -8} mbar. The GdB{sub 6}/W and GdB{sub 6}/Re tip emitters deliver high emission current densities of ∝1.4 and 0.811 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of ∝6.0 and 7.0 V/μm, respectively. The Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plots were found to be nearly linear showing metallic nature of the emitters. The noticeably high values of field enhancement factor (β) estimated using the slopes of the F-N plots indicate that the PLD GdB{sub 6} coating on W and Re substrates comprises of high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. Interestingly, the GdB{sub 6}/W and GdB{sub 6}/Re planar emitters exhibit excellent current stability at the preset values over a long-term operation, as compared to the tip emitters. Furthermore, the values of workfunction of the GdB{sub 6}/W and GdB6/Re emitters, experimentally measured using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, are found to be same, ∝1.6 ± 0.1 eV. Despite possessing same workfunction value, the FE characteristics of the GdB{sub 6}/W emitter are markedly different from that of GdB{sub 6}/Re emitter, which can be attributed to the growth of GdB{sub 6} films on W and Re substrates. (orig.)

  7. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  8. Influence of injection beam emittance on beam transmission efficiency in a cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron accelerates various kinds of high-energy ion beams for research in biotechnology and materials science. Beam intensities of an ion species of the order of 10(-9)-10(-6) ampere are often required for various experiments performed sequentially over a day. To provide ion beams with sufficient intensity and stability, an operator has to retune an ion source in a short time. However, the beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron rarely increases in proportion to the intensity at the ion source. To understand the cause of this beam behavior, transmission efficiencies of a (12)C(5+) beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the cyclotron were measured for various conditions of the ion source. Moreover, a feasible region for acceleration in the emittance of the injection beam was clarified using a transverse-acceptance measuring system. We confirmed that the beam emittance and profile were changed depending on the condition of the ion source and that matching between the beam emittance and the acceptance of the cyclotron was degraded. However, after fine-tuning to improve the matching, beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron increased.

  9. A novel integrase-containing element may interact with Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) to cause slow growth in giant tiger shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Sriurairatana Siriporn; Senapin Saengchan; Panphut Wattana; Withyachumnarnkul Boonsirm; Flegel Timothy W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background From 2001-2003 monodon slow growth syndrome (MSGS) caused severe economic losses for Thai shrimp farmers who cultivated the native, giant tiger shrimp, and this led them to adopt exotic stocks of the domesticated whiteleg shrimp as the species of cultivation choice, despite the higher value of giant tiger shrimp. In 2008, newly discovered Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) was proposed as a necessary but insufficient cause of MSGS, and this stimulated the search for the additional co...

  10. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  11. DSm Evidence Modeling and Radar Emitter Fusion Recognition Method Based on Cloud Model DSm Evidence Modeling and Radar Emitter Fusion Recognition Method Based on Cloud Model

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Qiang; He, You

    2015-01-01

    To improve the correct radar emitter recognition rate in cases that radar emitter characteristic parameters are overlapped with each other and existence of multiple modes, a DSm (Dezert-Smarandache) evidence modeling and radar emitter fusion recognition method based on cloud model is proposed.

  12. Emittance and Phase Space Tomography for the Fermilab Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F.G.G.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moore, C.D.; /Fermilab; Newhart, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Linac delivers a variable intensity, 400-MeV beam to the MuCool Test Area experimental hall via a beam line specifically designed to facilitate measurements of the Linac beam emittance and properties. A 10 m, dispersion-free and magnet-free straight utilizes an upstream quadrupole focusing triplet in combination with the necessary in-straight beam diagnostics to fully characterize the transverse beam properties. Since the Linac does not produce a strictly elliptical phase space, tomography must be performed on the profile data to retrieve the actual particle distribution in phase space. This is achieved by rotating the phase space distribution using different waist focusing conditions of the upstream triplet and performing a deconvolution of the profile data. Preliminary measurements using this diagnostic section are reported here. These data represent a first-pass measurement of the Linac emittance based on various techniques. It is clear that the most accurate representation of the emittance is given by the 3-profile approach. Future work will entail minimizing the beam spot size on MW5 to test and possibly improve the accuracy of the 2-profile approach. The 95% emittance is {approx} 18{pi} in the vertical and {approx} 13{pi} in the horizontal, which is especially larger than anticipated - 8-10{pi} was expected. One possible explanation is that the entire Linac pulse is extracted into the MTA beamline and during the first few microseconds, the feed forward and RF regulation are not stable. This may result in a larger net emittance observed versus beam injected into Booster, where the leading part of the Linac beam pulse is chopped. Future studies will clearly entail a measurement of the emittance vs. pulse length. One additional concern is that the Linac phase space is most likely aperture-defined and non-elliptical in nature. A non-elliptical phase-space determination would require a more elaborate analysis and provide another explanation of the

  13. An Investigation of Emitters Clogging Under Magnetic Field and Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kiani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Water scarcity is one of the major problems for crop production. Using drip irrigation as an effective method in the efficient use of water is expanding in arid and semi-arid regions. One of the problems in under pressure irrigation during use of saline, unconventional and waste is emitters clogging. There are several ways to prevent particle deposits in pipes and clogging of emitters. Generally, conventional methods are divided into two categories: physical and chemical methods. In physical method, suspended solids and inorganic materials are removed using particles sediment sand and disc filters. In the chemical method the pH drops by adding acid to water resulting in the dissolution of carbonate sediments. With chlorine handling, organisms (i.e. algae, fungi and bacteria that are the main causes of biological clogging are destroyed. However, the application of these methods is not successful in all cases. It has been observed that the emitters have gradually become obstructed. Magnetic water is obtained by passing water through permanent magnets or through the electromagnets installed in or on a feed pipeline. When a fluid passes through the magnetized field, its structure and some physical characteristic such as density, salt solution capacity, and deposition ratio of solid particles will be changed. An experimental study showed that a relatively weak magnetic influence increases the viscosity of water and consequently causes stronger hydrogen bonds under the magnetic field.There exist very few documented research projects related to the magnetization of water technology and its application to agricultural issues in general and emitter clogging in drip irrigation method, in particular. This technology is already used in some countries, especially in the Persian Gulf states. This research was designed and implemented aimed at increasing knowledge about the application of magnetic technology and its effects on emitters clogging

  14. Development of test method for evaluating root resistance of pavement used for roof garden caused by thickening growth of root

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Saori; Tanaka, Kyoji [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    The growth of roots of plants can damage roof garden components, such as pavements. This paper developed a test method for evaluating the resistance of pavement used in roof gardens to damage from a thickening growth of roots. The study assessed the behaviour of plant roots and evaluated the force of root growth subjected to hypertrophy. A system to measure the enlargement force of roots was designed and used for measurements over a period of 8 months on a cherry blossom of 21 years growth. The enlargement force was approximately 440 N/cm. A mechanical simulated root was designed and used to carry out experimental tests on asphalt pavements. The tests results demonstrated the viability of simulated root for evaluation of root resistances in pavements and various components of roof gardens.

  15. Analytical solution for irradiance due to inhomogeneous Lambertian polygonal emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Arvo, James

    2003-05-01

    We present an analytic solution for the irradiance at a point due to a polygonal Lambertian emitter with radiant exitance that varies with position according to a polynomial of arbitrary degree. This is a basic problem that arises naturally in radiative transfer and more specifically in global illumination, a subfield of computer graphics. Our solution is closed form except for a single nonalgebraic special function known as the Clausen integral. We begin by deriving several useful formulas for high-order tensor analogs of irradiance, which are natural generalizations of the radiation pressure tensor. We apply the resulting tensor formulas to linearly varying emitters, obtaining a solution that exhibits the general structure of higher-degree cases, including the dependence on the Clausen integral. We then generalize to higher-degree polynomials with a recurrence formula that combines solutions for lower-degree polynomials; the result is a generalization of Lambert's formula for homogeneous diffuse emitters, a well-known formula with many applications in radiative transfer and computer graphics. Similar techniques have been used previously to derive closed-form solutions for the irradiance due to homogeneous polygonal emitters with directionally varying radiance. The present work extends this previous result to include inhomogeneous emitters, which proves to be significantly more challenging to solve in closed form. We verify our theoretical results with numerical approximations and briefly discuss their potential applications.

  16. Graphene field emitters: A review of fabrication, characterization and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Leifeng, E-mail: chlf@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yu, Hu; Zhong, Jiasong; Song, Lihui [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wu, Jun, E-mail: wujun@hdu.edu.cn [Institute of Electron Device & Application, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310018 (China); Su, Weitao [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The preparation, characterization and field emission properties for Gs are reviewed. • The review provides an updated progress on design and construction of Gs field emitters. • The review offers fundamental insights into understanding and design of Gs emitters. • The review can broach the subject and inspire readers in field of Gs based emitters. - Abstract: Graphenes are beneficial to electrons field emission due to its high aspect ratio, high carrier density, the larger carrier mobility, excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, excellent mechanical strength and chemical stability. In recent years, graphene or reduced oxide graphene field emitters have been successfully constructed by various methods such as chemical vapor deposition, chemical exfoliation, electrophoretic deposition, screen-printing and chemical synthesis methods. Graphene emitters are tried to construct in distribution with some angles or vertical orientation with respect to the substrate surface. The vertical alignment of graphene sheets or edges arrays can facilitate efficient electron emission from the atomically thick sheets. Therefore they have even more a low turn-on and threshold-field electronic field, high field enhancement factor, high current stability and high luminance. In this review, we shortly survey and discuss recent research progress in graphene field emission properties with particular an emphasis on their preparing method, characterization and applications in devices especially for vertical graphene and single layer graphene, also including their challenges and future prospects.

  17. Electrical control of optical emitter relaxation pathways enabled by graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielrooij, K. J.; Orona, L.; Ferrier, A.; Badioli, M.; Navickaite, G.; Coop, S.; Nanot, S.; Kalinic, B.; Cesca, T.; Gaudreau, L.; Ma, Q.; Centeno, A.; Pesquera, A.; Zurutuza, A.; de Riedmatten, H.; Goldner, P.; García de Abajo, F. J.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Koppens, F. H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the energy flow processes and the associated energy relaxation rates of a light emitter is of fundamental interest and has many applications in the fields of quantum optics, photovoltaics, photodetection, biosensing and light emission. Advanced dielectric, semiconductor and metallic systems have been developed to tailor the interaction between an emitter and its environment. However, active control of the energy flow from an emitter into optical, electronic or plasmonic excitations has remained challenging. Here, we demonstrate in situ electrical control of the relaxation pathways of excited erbium ions, which emit light at the technologically relevant telecommunication wavelength of 1.5 μm. By placing the erbium at a few nanometres distance from graphene, we modify the relaxation rate by more than a factor of three, and control whether the emitter decays into electron-hole pairs, emitted photons or graphene near-infrared plasmons, confined to new paradigm for active (quantum) photonics and can be applied using any combination of light emitters and two-dimensional materials.

  18. Intrauterine growth restriction decreases pulmonary alveolar and vessel growth and causes pulmonary artery endothelial cell dysfunction in vitro in fetal sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedorf, Gregory J.; Brown, Alicia; Roe, Gates; O'Meara, Meghan C.; Gien, Jason; Tang, Jen-Ruey; Abman, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Abnormal lung structure has been noted in animal models of IUGR, but whether IUGR adversely impacts fetal pulmonary vascular development and pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) function is unknown. We hypothesized that IUGR would decrease fetal pulmonary alveolarization, vascular growth, and in vitro PAEC function. Studies were performed in an established model of severe placental insufficiency and IUGR induced by exposing pregnant sheep to elevated temperatures. Alveolarization, quantified by radial alveolar counts, was decreased 20% (P IUGR fetuses. Pulmonary vessel density was decreased 44% (P IUGR fetuses. In vitro, insulin increased control PAEC migration, tube formation, and nitric oxide (NO) production. This response was absent in IUGR PAECs. VEGFA stimulated tube formation, and NO production also was absent. In control PAECs, insulin increased cell growth by 68% (P IUGR PAECs by 29% at baseline (P IUGR PAECs, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein expression as well as basal and insulin-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation were decreased in IUGR PAECs. Both VEGFA and VEGFR2 also were decreased in IUGR PAECs. We conclude that fetuses with IUGR are characterized by decreased alveolar and vascular growth and PAEC dysfunction in vitro. This may contribute to the increased risk for adverse respiratory outcomes and BPD in infants with IUGR. PMID:21873446

  19. A class of DNA-binding peptides from wheat bud causes growth inhibition, G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgjo Kjell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deproteinized DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells still contains a low-molecular weight peptidic fraction which can be dissociated by alkalinization of the medium. This fraction inhibits RNA transcription and tumor cell growth. Removal from DNA of normal cells causes amplification of DNA template activity. This effect is lower or absent in several cancer cell lines. Likewise, the amount of active peptides in cancer cell DNA extracts is lower than in DNA preparation of the corresponding normal cells. Such evidence, and their ubiquitous presence, suggests that they are a regulatory, conserved factor involved in the control of normal cell growth and gene expression. Results We report that peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin induce growth inhibition, G2 arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. The growth rate is decreased in cells treated during the S phase only and it is accompanied by DNA damage and DNA synthesis inhibition. In G2 cells, this treatment induces inactivation of the CDK1-cyclin B1 complex and an increase of active chk1 kinase expression. Conclusion The data indicate that the chromatin peptidic pool inhibits HeLa cell growth by causing defective DNA replication which, in turn, arrests cell cycle progression to mitosis via G2 checkpoint pathway activation.

  20. Laser Process for Selective Emitter Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Poulain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective emitter solar cells can provide a significant increase in conversion efficiency. However current approaches need many technological steps and alignment procedures. This paper reports on a preliminary attempt to reduce the number of processing steps and therefore the cost of selective emitter cells. In the developed procedure, a phosphorous glass covered with silicon nitride acts as the doping source. A laser is used to open locally the antireflection coating and at the same time achieve local phosphorus diffusion. In this process the standard chemical etching of the phosphorous glass is avoided. Sheet resistance variation from 100 Ω/sq to 40 Ω/sq is demonstrated with a nanosecond UV laser. Numerical simulation of the laser-matter interaction is discussed to understand the dopant diffusion efficiency. Preliminary solar cells results show a 0.5% improvement compared with a homogeneous emitter structure.

  1. High efficiency and stable white OLED using a single emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Mechanical, Aerospace, Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2016-01-18

    The ultimate objective of this project was to demonstrate an efficient and stable white OLED using a single emitter on a planar glass substrate. The focus of the project is on the development of efficient and stable square planar phosphorescent emitters and evaluation of such class of materials in the device settings. Key challenges included improving the emission efficiency of molecular dopants and excimers, controlling emission color of emitters and their excimers, and improving optical and electrical stability of emissive dopants. At the end of this research program, the PI has made enough progress to demonstrate the potential of excimer-based white OLED as a cost-effective solution for WOLED panel in the solid state lighting applications.

  2. A polarization-insensitive plasmonic photoconductive terahertz emitter

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Xurong

    2017-11-16

    We present a polarization-insensitive plasmonic photoconductive terahertz emitter that uses a two-dimensional array of nanoscale cross-shaped apertures as the plasmonic contact electrodes. The geometry of the cross-shaped apertures is set to maximize optical pump absorption in close proximity to the contact electrodes. The two-dimensional symmetry of the cross-shaped apertures offers a polarization-insensitive interaction between the plasmonic contact electrodes and optical pump beam. We experimentally demonstrate a polarization-insensitive terahertz radiation from the presented emitter in response to a femtosecond optical pump beam and similar terahertz radiation powers compared to previously demonstrated polarization-sensitive photoconductive emitters with plasmonic contact electrode gratings at the optimum optical pump polarization.

  3. Control and Data Analysis for Emittance Measuring Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, T

    2001-01-01

    Due to the wide range of heavy ion beam intensities and energies in the GSI linac and the associated transfer channel to the synchrotron, several different types of emittance measurement systems have been established. Many common devices such as slit/grid or dipole-sweep systems are integrated into the GSI control system. Other systems like the single shot pepper pot method using CCD-cameras or stand-alone slit/grid set-ups are connected to personal computers. An overview is given about the various systems and their software integration. Main interest is directed on the software development for emittance front-end control and data analysis such as evaluation algorithms or graphical presentation of the results. In addition, special features for improved usability of the software such as data export, project databases and automatic report generation will be presented. An outlook on a unified evaluation procedure for all different types of emittance measurement is given.

  4. DC-SC Photoinjector with Low Emittance at Peking University

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang Rong; Hao, J; Huang, Senlin; Lu Xiang Yang; Quan, Shengwen; Zhang, Baocheng; Zhao, Kui

    2005-01-01

    High average power Free Electron Lasers require the high quality electron beams with the low emittance and the sub-picosecond bunches. The design of DC-SC photoinjector, directly combining a DC photoinjector with an SRF cavity, can produce high average current beam with moderate bunch charge and high duty factor. Because of the DC gun, the emittance increases quickly at the beginning, so a carefully design is needed to control that. In this paper, the simulation of an upgraded design has been done to lower the normalized emittance below 1.5mm·mrad. The photoinjector consists of a DC gap and a 2+1/2-cell SRF cavity, and it is designed to produce 4.2 MeV electron beams at 100pC bunch charge and 81.25MHz repetition rate (8 mA average current).

  5. Enhanced thermaly managed packaging for III-nitride light emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudsieh, Nicolas

    In this Dissertation our work on `enhanced thermally managed packaging of high power semiconductor light sources for solid state lighting (SSL)' is presented. The motivation of this research and development is to design thermally high stable cost-efficient packaging of single and multi-chip arrays of III-nitrides wide bandgap semiconductor light sources through mathematical modeling and simulations. Major issues linked with this technology are device overheating which causes serious degradation in their illumination intensity and decrease in the lifetime. In the introduction the basics of III-nitrides WBG semiconductor light emitters are presented along with necessary thermal management of high power cingulated and multi-chip LEDs and laser diodes. This work starts at chip level followed by its extension to fully packaged lighting modules and devices. Different III-nitride structures of multi-quantum well InGaN/GaN and AlGaN/GaN based LEDs and LDs were analyzed using advanced modeling and simulation for different packaging designs and high thermal conductivity materials. Study started with basic surface mounted devices using conventional packaging strategies and was concluded with the latest thermal management of chip-on-plate (COP) method. Newly discovered high thermal conductivity materials have also been incorporated for this work. Our study also presents the new approach of 2D heat spreaders using such materials for SSL and micro LED array packaging. Most of the work has been presented in international conferences proceedings and peer review journals. Some of the latest work has also been submitted to well reputed international journals which are currently been reviewed for publication. .

  6. Development of additional pituitary hormone deficiencies in pediatric patients originally diagnosed with isolated growth hormone deficiency due to organic causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Christopher J; Blum, Werner F; Deal, Cheri; Zimmermann, Alan G; Quigley, Charmian A; Drop, Stenvert L S; Cutler, Gordon B; Rosenfeld, Ron G

    2016-05-01

    To determine characteristics of children initially diagnosed with isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD) of organic aetiology, who later developed multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD). Data were analysed for 716 growth hormone-treated children with organic IGHD, who were growth hormone-naïve at baseline in the multinational, observational Genetics and Neuroendocrinology of Short Stature International Study. Development of MPHD was ascertained from investigator-provided diagnoses, adverse events and concomitant medications. Analyses were performed for all patients and separately for those who developed MPHD within 4.5 years or had >3.5 years follow-up and continued to have IGHD (4-year cohort). MPHD developed in 71/716 (9.9%) children overall, and in 60/290 (20.7%) in the 4-year cohort. The most frequent additional deficiencies were thyroid-stimulating hormone (47 patients) and gonadotropins (23 patients). Compared with those who remained with IGHD, children who developed MPHD had more severe GHD at study entry, significantly lower baseline insulin-like growth factor1, peak stimulated growth hormone, and more frequent diagnosis of intracranial tumour or mutation of gene(s) controlling hypothalamic-pituitary development and/or function. Multivariate logistic regression analyses identified female gender, longer follow-up, higher baseline age and lower peak stimulated growth hormone as predictors of MPHD development. MPHD is more likely to develop in patients with severe organic IGHD, especially those with history of intracranial tumour or mutation of gene(s) controlling hypothalamic-pituitary development and/or function. Older baseline age, female gender and longer follow-up duration were also associated with higher incidence of MPHD. Long-term monitoring of pituitary function is recommended, irrespective of the aetiology of GHD. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  7. Influence of Modified Natural or Synthetic Surfactant Preparations on Growth of Bacteria Causing Infections in the Neonatal Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauprich, Petra; Möller, Oliver; Walter, Gabriele; Herting, Egbert; Robertson, Bengt

    2000-01-01

    Connatal bacterial pneumonia is common in neonates. Animal studies and initial clinical reports indicate that surfactant dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of severe neonatal pneumonia. Since respiratory distress syndrome and connatal pneumonia may be difficult to differentiate in the first hours of life, neonates with respiratory failure due to bacterial infections might receive surfactant. Under such conditions surfactant components might be catabolized by bacteria and promote bacterial growth. We therefore investigated the influence of three modified natural (Curosurf, Alveofact, and Survanta) and two synthetic (Exosurf and Pumactant) surfactant preparations on the growth of bacteria frequently cultured from blood or tracheal aspirate fluid in the first days of life. Group B streptococci (GBS), Staphyloccocus aureus, and Escherichia coli were incubated in a nutrient-free medium (normal saline) for 5 h at 37°C, together with different surfactants at concentrations of 0, 1, 10, and 20 mg/ml. With the exception of E. coli, incubation in saline alone led to a variable decrease in CFU. In the presence of Alveofact, Exosurf, and Pumactant the decline in bacterial numbers was less marked than in saline alone. Curosurf was bactericidal in a dose-dependent fashion for GBS and had a strong negative impact on the growth of a GBS subtype that lacked the polysaccharide capsule. In contrast, Survanta (10 and 20 mg/ml) significantly promoted the growth of E. coli, indicating that surfactant components may actually serve as nutrients. We conclude that bacterial growth in different surfactant preparations is influenced by microbial species and the composition and dose of the surfactant. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms behind our findings and to evaluate the effects of surfactant on bacterial growth in vivo. PMID:10973461

  8. Optical characterization of OLED emitter properties by radiation pattern analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaemmich, Michael

    2011-09-08

    Researches in both, academia and industry are investigating optical loss channels in OLED layered systems by means of optical simulation tools in order to derive promising concepts for a further enhancement of the overall device performance. Besides other factors, the prospects of success of such optimization strategies rely severely on the credibility of the optical input data. The present thesis provides a guideline to measure the active optical properties of OLED emitter materials in situ by radiation pattern analyses. Reliable and widely applicable methods are introduced to determine the internal electroluminescence spectrum, the profile of the emission zone, the dipole emitter orientation, and the internal luminescence quantum efficiency of emissive materials from the optical far field emission of OLEDs in electrical operation. The proposed characterization procedures are applied to sets of OLEDs containing both, fluorescent polymeric materials as well as phosphorescent small-molecular emitters, respectively. On the one hand, quite expected results are obtained. On the other hand, several novel and truly surprising results are found. Most importantly, this thesis contains the first report of a non-isotropic, mainly parallel emitter orientation in a phosphorescent small-molecular guest-host system (Ir(MDQ)2(acac) in a-NPD). Due to the latter result, emitter orientation based optimization of phosphorescent OLEDs seems to be within reach. Since parallel dipoles emit preferably into air, the utilization of smart emissive materials with advantageous molecular orientation is capable to boost the efficiency of phosphorescent OLEDs by 50%. Materials design, the influence of the matrix material and the substrate, as well as film deposition conditions are just a few parameters that need to be studied further in order to exploit the huge potential of the dipole emitter orientation in phosphorescent OLEDs.

  9. High-efficiency photonic crystal narrowband thermal emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G. B.; Su, M. F.; Reda Taha, M. M.; El-Kady, I.

    2010-02-01

    Photonic crystals (PhC) are artificial structures fabricated with a periodicity in the dielectric function. This periodic electromagnetic potential results in creation of energy bandgaps where photon propagation is prohibited. PhC structures have promising use in thermal applications if optimized to operate at specific thermal emission spectrum. Here, novel utilization of optimized PhC's in thermal applications is presented. We demonstrate through numerical simulation the modification of the thermal emission spectrum by a metallic photonic crystal (PhC) to create high-efficiency multispectral thermal emitters. These emitters funnel radiation from a broad emission spectrum associated with a Plancklike distribution into a prescribed narrow emission band. A detailed quantitative evaluation of the spectral and power efficiencies of a PhC thermal emitter and its portability across infrared (IR) spectral bands are provided. We show an optimized tungsten PhC with a predominant narrow-band emission profile with an emitter efficiency that is more than double that of an ideal blackbody and ~65-75% more power-efficiency across the IR spectrum. We also report on using optimal three-dimensional Lincoln log photonic crystal (LL-PhC) emitters for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generation as opposed to using a passive filtering approach to truncate the broadband thermal source emission to match the bandgap of a photovoltaic (PV) cell. The emitter performance is optimized for the 1-2μm PV band using different PhC materials, specifically copper, silver and gold. The use of the proposed PhC in TPV devices can produce significant energy savings not reported before. The optimal design of the PhC geometry is obtained by implementing a variety of optimization methods integrated with artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms.

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling in acinar cells causes growth dependent release of pancreatic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Bremholm, l

    2016-01-01

    -like peptide 1 (GLP-1) on the exocrine pancreas. Here, we identify GLP-1 receptors on pancreatic acini and analyze the impact of receptor activation in humans, rodents, isolated acini, and cell lines from the exocrine pancreas. GLP-1 did not directly stimulate amylase or lipase release. However, we saw...... that GLP-1 induces phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and activation of Foxo1, resulting in cell growth with concomitant enzyme release. Our work uncovers GLP-1-induced signaling pathways in the exocrine pancreas and suggests that increases in amylase and lipase levels in subjects...

  11. Pyrometric method for measuring emittances at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez, J.; Carra, M. E.; Cañadas, I.; Roldan, M. I.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work an alternative method for emittance determination based on pyrometric measurements is presented. The measurement procedure has been applied to AISI 310S steel samples in the Plataforma Solar de Almería vertical axis solar furnace SF5. The experimental results show that emittance increases with increasing temperature and decreases with increasing wavelength. This behaviour is in agreement with experimental results obtained by other authors. Analysis of tests has revealed a good repeatability (1%) and accuracy (< 2%) of this measurement procedure.

  12. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  13. Nanodiamonds with photostable, sub-gigahertz linewidth quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Kianinia, Mehran; Bray, Kerem; Kim, Sejeong; Xu, Zai-Quan; Gentle, Angus; Sontheimer, Bernd; Bradac, Carlo; Aharonovich, Igor

    2017-11-01

    Single-photon emitters with narrow linewidths are highly sought after for applications in quantum information processing and quantum communications. In this letter, we report on a bright, highly polarized near infrared single photon emitter embedded in diamond nanocrystals with a narrow, sub-GHz optical linewidth at 10 K. The observed zero-phonon line at ˜780 nm is optically stable under low power excitation and blue shifts as the excitation power increases. Our results highlight the prospect for using new near infrared color centers in nanodiamonds for quantum applications.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Su Kang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube emitter, and the transmitted X-ray image was of high resolution.

  15. Beam emittance reduction during operation of Indus-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar, E-mail: fakhri@rrcat.gov.in; Kant, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Singh, Gurnam [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Indus-2 storage ring is a 2.5 GeV third generation synchrotron radiation source. This source was commissioned using a moderate optics. Beam injection was accomplished using an off momentum electron beam to avoid difficulties faced in storage of beam at 550 MeV. The injection procedure and relevant beam dynamical studies are discussed. The switch over from the moderate optics to low emittance optics is done at 2.5 GeV after storing the electron beam. The procedure evolved to reduce the beam emittance and its implementation during the operation is discussed.

  16. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24) inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells caused by BMP-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chen-Shuang [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Tian, Haijun, E-mail: haijuntianmd@gmail.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Surgery, Bethune School of Medics, Shijiazhuang (China); Zou, Min [Department of Orthodontics, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Zhao, Ke-Wei [Research Service, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Li, Yawei; Lao, Lifeng [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Brochmann, Elsa J. [Research Service, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Duarte, M. Eugenia L. [National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Daubs, Michael D. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Zhou, Yan-Heng, E-mail: yanhengzhou@vip.163.com [Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Murray, Samuel S. [Research Service, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wang, Jeffrey C. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-10-16

    The emerging role of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in the initiation and progression of multiple cancers has drawn great attention in cancer research. In this study, we report that BMP-2 can promote the proliferation of the pancreatic tumor cell line, PANC-1. Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24), a BMP binding protein, did not affect the proliferation of the cells but promoted the apoptosis of the cells in vitro. In a xeneograft tumor model using PANC-1 cells, BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth, while Spp24 not only abolished the effect of BMP-2, but also dramatically induced tumor shrinking when used alone. Activation of Smad1/5/8 participated in this process as demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8. We conclude that Spp24 can be developed into a therapeutic agent that could be employed in clinical situations where the inhibition of BMPs and related proteins is advantageous. - Highlights: • Spp24 effectively inhibited the in vivo tumor growth of PANC-1. • BMP-2 dramatically promoted tumor growth by promoting PANC-1 proliferation. • Spp24 abolished the tumor growth effect of BMP-2 by promoting PANC-1 apoptosis. • Spp24 may be a candidate as a therapeutic agent of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Boundary conditions on the plasma emitter surface in the presence of a particle counter flow: I. Ion emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrelin, V. T., E-mail: V.T.Astrelin@inp.nsk.su; Kotelnikov, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Emission of positively charged ions from a plasma emitter irradiated by a counterpropagating electron beam is studied theoretically. A bipolar diode with a plasma emitter in which the ion temperature is lower than the electron temperature and the counter electron flow is extracted from the ion collector is calculated in the one-dimensional model. An analog of Bohm’s criterion for ion emission in the presence of a counterpropagating electron beam is derived. The limiting density of the counterpropagating beam in a bipolar diode operating in the space-charge-limited-emission regime is calculated. The full set of boundary conditions on the plasma emitter surface that are required for operation of the high-current optics module in numerical codes used to simulate charged particle sources is formulated.

  18. Plasma growth differentiation factor-15 independently predicts all-cause and cardiovascular mortality as well as deterioration of kidney function in type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Jorsal, Anders; Tarnow, Lise

    2010-01-01

    Growth deferentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) is involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Expression is induced in the heart in response to ischemia and in atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was to investigate GDF-15 levels in relation to all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and mo...... and morbidity, decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and progression toward end-stage renal disease (ESRD)....

  19. Notable signs observed in the growth process of “siblings" of handicapped children : their cause and mother's care of ""siblings"

    OpenAIRE

    立山, 清美; 立山, 順一; 宮前, 珠子

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate anxiety symptoms (hereafter referred to as “signs") observed in the growth process of brothers and sisters of handicapped children (hereafter referred to as “siblings"), their cause, and the special attention of the mother in bringing up the siblings by interviewing handicapped children's mothers and “siblings". The results of the investigation revealed that 12 of 32 siblings of handicapped children brought up by 20 mothers showed some signs, and 10 ...

  20. Morphological aspects of self-repair of lesions caused by internal growth stresses in stems of Aristolochia macrophylla and Aristolochia ringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Sebastian; Seidel, Robin; Speck, Olga; Speck, Thomas

    2010-07-22

    This study reveals in detail the mechanism of self-repair during secondary growth in the vines Aristolochia macrophylla and Aristolochia ringens based on morphological data. For a comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms during the self-repair of lesions in the sclerenchymatous cylinder of the stem, which are caused by internal growth stresses, a classification of morphological changes in the cells involved in the repair process is required. In an early stage of self-repair, we observed morphological changes as a mere extension of the turgescent cortex cells surrounding the lesion, whereby the cell wall extends locally through visco-elastic/plastic deformation without observable cell wall synthesis. Later stages involve typical cell growth and cell division. Several successive phases of self-repair were investigated by light microscopy of stained samples and confocal laser-scanning microscopy in fluorescence mode. The results indicate that A. macrophylla and A. ringens respond to lesions caused by internal growth stresses with a sophisticated self-repair mechanism comprising several phases of different repair modes.

  1. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kosier, S.L. [VTC Inc., Bloomington, MN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  2. A combined emitter threat assessment method based on ICW-RCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Hongwei; Guo, Xiaotao; Wang, Yubing

    2017-08-01

    Considering that the tradition al emitter threat assessment methods are difficult to intuitively reflect the degree of target threaten and the deficiency of real-time and complexity, on the basis of radar chart method(RCM), an algorithm of emitter combined threat assessment based on ICW-RCM (improved combination weighting method, ICW) is proposed. The coarse sorting is integrated with fine sorting in emitter combined threat assessment, sequencing the emitter threat level roughly accordance to radar operation mode, and reducing task priority of the low-threat emitter; On the basis of ICW-RCM, sequencing the same radar operation mode emitter roughly, finally, obtain the results of emitter threat assessment through coarse and fine sorting. Simulation analyses show the correctness and effectiveness of this algorithm. Comparing with classical method of emitter threat assessment based on CW-RCM, the algorithm is visual in image and can work quickly with lower complexity.

  3. Essential oil of Artemisia scoparia inhibits plant growth by generating reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harminder Pal; Kaur, Shalinder; Mittal, Sunil; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the chemical composition and phytotoxicity of the essential oil extracted from leaves of Artemisia scoparia Waldst. et Kit. (red stem wormwood, Asteraceae). GC/GC-MS analyses revealed 33 chemical constituents representing 99.83% of the oil. The oil, in general, was rich in monoterpenes that constitute 71.6%, with beta-myrcene (29.27%) as the major constituent followed by (+)-limonene (13.3%), (Z)-beta-ocimene (13.37%), and gamma-terpinene (9.51%). The oil and beta-myrcene were evaluated in a dose-response bioassay under laboratory conditions for phytotoxicity against three weeds-Avena fatua, Cyperus rotundus, and Phalaris minor. A significant reduction in germination, seedling growth, and dry matter accumulation was observed in the test weeds. At the lowest treatment of 0.07 mg/ml Artemisia oil, germination was reduced by 39%, 19%, and 10.6% in C. rotundus, P. minor, and A. fatua, respectively. However, the inhibitory effect of beta-myrcene was less. In general, a dose-dependent effect was observed and the growth declined with increasing concentration. Among the three weeds, the inhibitory effect was greatest on C. rotundus, so it was selected for further studies. We explored the explanation for observed growth inhibition in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS: lipid peroxidation, membrane integrity, and amounts of conjugated dienes and hydrogen peroxide)-induced oxidative stress. Exposure of C. rotundus to Artemisia oil or beta-myrcene enhanced solute leakage, indicating membrane disintegration. There were increased levels of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide, indicating lipid peroxidation and induction of oxidative stress. We conclude that Artemisia oil inhibits plant root growth through generation of ROS-induced oxidative damage.

  4. Alteration in Auxin Homeostasis and Signaling by Overexpression Of PINOID Kinase Causes Leaf Growth Defects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumud Saini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In plants many developmental processes are regulated by auxin and its directional transport. PINOID (PID kinase helps to regulate this transport by influencing polar recruitment of PIN efflux proteins on the cellular membranes. We investigated how altered auxin levels affect leaf growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis mutants and transgenic plants with altered PID expression levels were used to study the effect on auxin distribution and leaf development. Single knockouts showed small pleiotropic growth defects. Contrastingly, several leaf phenotypes related to changes in auxin concentrations and transcriptional activity were observed in PID overexpression (PIDOE lines. Unlike in the knockout lines, the leaves of PIDOE lines showed an elevation in total indole-3-acetic acid (IAA. Accordingly, enhanced DR5-visualized auxin responses were detected, especially along the leaf margins. Kinematic analysis revealed that ectopic expression of PID negatively affects cell proliferation and expansion rates, yielding reduced cell numbers and small-sized cells in the PIDOE leaves. We used PIDOE lines as a tool to study auxin dose effects on leaf development and demonstrate that auxin, above a certain threshold, has a negative affect on leaf growth. RNA sequencing further showed how subtle PIDOE-related changes in auxin levels lead to transcriptional reprogramming of cellular processes.

  5. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Nuytens

    Full Text Available Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  6. Selective emitter using porous silicon for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Inyong; Kim, Kyunghae; Kim, Youngkuk; Han, Kyumin; Kyeong, Doheon; Kwon, Taeyoung; Vinh Ai, Dao; Lee, Jeongchul; Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea); Thamilselvan, M. [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea); Government College of Technology, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu (India); Ju, Minkyu; Lee, Kyungsoo [KPE Ins. Chunchun-dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon-City, Kyunggi-Do 440-746 (Korea)

    2009-06-15

    This study is devoted to the formation of high-low-level-doped selective emitter for crystalline silicon solar cells for photovoltaic application. We report here the formation of porous silicon under chemical reaction condition. The chemical mixture containing hydrofluoric and nitric acid, with de-ionized water, was used to make porous on the half of the silicon surface of size 125 x 125 cm. Porous and non-porous areas each share half of the whole silicon surface. H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}:methanol gives the best deposited layer with acceptable adherence and uniformity on the non-porous and porous areas of the silicon surface to get high- and low-level-doped regions. The volume concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} does not exceed 10% of the total volume emulsion. Phosphoric acid was used as an n-type doping source to make emitter for silicon solar cells. The measured emitter sheet resistances at the high- and low-level-doped regions were 30-35 and 97-474 {omega}/{open_square} respectively. A simple process for low- and high-level doping has been achieved by forming porous and porous-free silicon surface, in this study, which could be applied for solar cells selective emitter doping. (author)

  7. Selective solar absorber emittance measurement at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Philémon; Braillon, Julien; Raccurt, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The characterization of a material in such condition is complicated and requires advanced apparatuses, and different measurement methods exist for the determination of the two quantities of relevance regarding an absorber, which are its emittance and its solar absorbance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for measure the emittance of this solar absorber at elevated temperature. In this paper, we present an optical bench developed for emittance measurement on absorbers is conditions of use. Results will be shown, with a discussion of some factors of influence over this measurement and how to control them.

  8. Analysis of Urine for Pure Beta Emitters: Methods and Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    by combustion to separate tritiated water from organically-bound tritium. Inorganic C-14 from organically-bound C-14, the separated tritium and C-14 were measured using liquid scintillation counting. Iodine-129, a long-lived beta emitter, is normally released to the atmosphere during the operation of nuclear...

  9. The brightest Ly α emitter: Pop III or black hole?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallottini, A.; Ferrara, A.; Pacucci, F.; Gallerani, S.; Salvadori, S.; Schneider, R.; Schaerer, D.; Sobral, D.; Matthee, J.

    2015-01-01

    CR7 is the brightest z = 6.6 Ly α emitter (LAE) known to date, and spectroscopic follow-up by Sobral et al. suggests that CR7 might host Population (Pop) III stars. We examine this interpretation using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Several simulated galaxies show the same `Pop III wave'

  10. Application of positron emitters to studies on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishioka, N.S.; Matsuoka, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sekine, T. [and others

    1998-10-01

    A newly developed positron emitting tracer imaging system enables us to study dynamically the physiological function of plants, although this system covers, at present, a limited area in a plant. Production of the positron emitters {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 18}F and {sup 48}V for this application, using an AVF cyclotron, is described. (author)

  11. Jamming of Quantum Emitters by Active Coated Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    A spherical active coated nanoparticle consisting of a silica nanocore covered concentrically with a silver nanoshell is examined analytically and numerically in the presence of one, two, or four quantum emitters modeled by electric Hertzian dipoles. The ability of the active coated nanoparticle...

  12. Electron Emission from Ultra-Large Area MOS Electron Emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Nielsen, Gunver; Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm

    2009-01-01

    Ultralarge metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with an active oxide area of 1 cm2 have been fabricated for use as electron emitters. The MOS structures consist of a Si substrate, a SiO2 tunnel barrier (~5 nm), a Ti wetting layer (3–10 Å), and a Au top layer (5–60 nm). Electron emission from...

  13. Scanning Emitter Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Spontaneous Emission Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimmer, Martin; Chen, Yuntian; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2011-01-01

    We report an experimental technique to map and exploit the local density of optical states of arbitrary planar nanophotonic structures. The method relies on positioning a spontaneous emitter attached to a scanning probe deterministically and reversibly with respect to its photonic environment while...

  14. M11.4.1: Electron beam emittance meter finished

    CERN Document Server

    CORDE, S

    2011-01-01

    The method that we have successfully developed based on the X ray radiation emitted by betatronic motion of electrons in the plasma is reported here. We show here very preliminary experimental results that are very promising to determine in a single shot the electron beam emittance with a high resolution.

  15. Auger Emitter Based Radiotherapy- A Possible New Treatment for Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredericia, Pil; Groesser, Torsten; Severin, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    be able to kill only the target cell while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. In addition due to the multiple electrons released during the decay these emitters are more likely to produce at cluster of complex DNA damage which are considered to be much more harmful to the cell than dispersed DNA...

  16. Mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 cause Kallmann syndrome with a wide spectrum of reproductive phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Meysing, Astrid; Quinton, Richard; Acierno, James S.; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Plummer, Lacey; Fliers, Eric; Boepple, Paul; Hayes, Frances; Seminara, Stephanie; Hughes, Viriginia A.; Ma, Jinghong; Bouloux, Pierre; Mohammadi, Moosa; Crowley, William F.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kallmann's syndrome (KS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder consisting of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and anosmia. Mutations in KAL1 causing the X-linked form of KS have been identified in 10% of all KS patients and consistently result in a severe

  17. D11.4.1: Preliminary electron beam emittance measurement report

    CERN Document Server

    THAURY, C; MALKA, V

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new method for measuring the beam emittance in laser-plasma accelerator which is based on the observation of the X ray radiation emitted by betatronic motion of electrons in the plasma. We show here the first measurement of the emittance using this technique. The results indicate that emittance is comprised between .5 and 3 mm.mrad.

  18. An intronic growth hormone receptor mutation causing activation of a pseudoexon is associated with a broad spectrum of growth hormone insensitivity phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, A; Camacho-Hübner, C; Bhangoo, A; Rose, S J; Miraki-Moud, F; Akker, S A; Butler, G E; Ten, S; Clayton, P E; Clark, A J L; Savage, M O; Metherell, L A

    2007-02-01

    Inherited GH insensitivity (GHI) is usually caused by mutations in the GH receptor (GHR). Patients present with short stature associated with high GH and low IGF-I levels and may have midfacial hypoplasia (typical Laron syndrome facial features). We previously described four mildly affected GHI patients with an intronic mutation in the GHR gene (A(-1)-->G(-1) substitution in intron 6), resulting in the activation of a pseudoexon (6Psi) and inclusion of 36 amino acids. The study aimed to analyze the clinical and genetic characteristics of additional GHI patients with the pseudoexon (6Psi) mutation. Auxological, biochemical, genetic, and haplotype data from seven patients with severe short stature and biochemical evidence of GHI were assessed. We assessed genotype-phenotype relationship. One patient belongs to the same extended family, previously reported. She has normal facial features, and her IGF-I levels are in the low-normal range for age. The six unrelated patients, four of whom have typical Laron syndrome facial features, have heights ranging from -3.3 to -6.0 sd and IGF-I levels that vary from normal to undetectable. We hypothesize that the marked difference in biochemical and clinical phenotypes might be caused by variations in the splicing efficiency of the pseudoexon. Activation of the pseudoexon in the GHR gene can lead to a variety of GHI phenotypes. Therefore, screening for the presence of this mutation should be performed in all GHI patients without mutations in the coding exons.

  19. Mutations in PLK4, encoding a master regulator of centriole biogenesis, cause microcephaly, growth failure and retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carol-Anne; Ahmad, Ilyas; Klingseisen, Anna; Hussain, Muhammad Sajid; Bicknell, Louise S; Leitch, Andrea; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Murray, Jennie E; Hunt, David; Khan, Fawad; Ali, Zafar; Tinschert, Sigrid; Ding, James; Keith, Charlotte; Harley, Margaret E; Heyn, Patricia; Müller, Rolf; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Dollfus, Hélène; Dupuis, Lucie; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Kenneth; Kariminejad, Ariana; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Moore, Anthony T; Saggar, Anand; Schlechter, Catie; Weleber, Richard; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Höhne, Wolfgang; Hurles, Matthew E; Noegel, Angelika Anna; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Andrew P

    2014-12-01

    Centrioles are essential for ciliogenesis. However, mutations in centriole biogenesis genes have been reported in primary microcephaly and Seckel syndrome, disorders without the hallmark clinical features of ciliopathies. Here we identify mutations in the genes encoding PLK4 kinase, a master regulator of centriole duplication, and its substrate TUBGCP6 in individuals with microcephalic primordial dwarfism and additional congenital anomalies, including retinopathy, thereby extending the human phenotypic spectrum associated with centriole dysfunction. Furthermore, we establish that different levels of impaired PLK4 activity result in growth and cilia phenotypes, providing a mechanism by which microcephaly disorders can occur with or without ciliopathic features.

  20. PBP1a-deficiency causes major defects in cell division, growth and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zezhang T Wen

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of human dental caries, lives almost exclusively on the tooth surface in plaque biofilms and is known for its ability to survive and respond to various environmental insults, including low pH, and antimicrobial agents from other microbes and oral care products. In this study, a penicillin-binding protein (PBP1a-deficient mutant, strain JB467, was generated by allelic replacement mutagenesis and analyzed for the effects of such a deficiency on S. mutans' stress tolerance response and biofilm formation. Our results so far have shown that PBP1a-deficiency in S. mutans affects growth of the deficient mutant, especially at acidic and alkaline pHs. As compared to the wild-type, UA159, the PBP1a-deficient mutant, JB467, had a reduced growth rate at pH 6.2 and did not grow at all at pH 8.2. Unlike the wild-type, the inclusion of paraquat in growth medium, especially at 2 mM or above, significantly reduced the growth rate of the mutant. Acid killing assays showed that the mutant was 15-fold more sensitive to pH 2.8 than the wild-type after 30 minutes. In a hydrogen peroxide killing assay, the mutant was 16-fold more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide (0.2%, w/v after 90 minutes than the wild-type. Relative to the wild-type, the mutant also had an aberrant autolysis rate, indicative of compromises in cell envelope integrity. As analyzed using on 96-well plate model and spectrophotometry, biofilm formation by the mutant was decreased significantly, as compared to the wild-type. Consistently, Field Emission-SEM analysis also showed that the PBP1a-deficient mutant had limited capacity to form biofilms. TEM analysis showed that PBP1a mutant existed primarily in long rod-like cells and cells with multiple septa, as compared to the coccal wild-type. The results presented here highlight the importance of pbp1a in cell morphology, stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in S. mutans.

  1. Experimentally minimized beam emittance from an L-band photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krasilnikov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available High brightness electron sources for linac based free-electron lasers (FELs are being developed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ. Production of electron bunches with extremely small transverse emittance is the focus of the PITZ scientific program. The photoinjector optimization in 2008–2009 for a bunch charge of 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1 nC resulted in measured emittance values which are beyond the requirements of the European XFEL [S. Rimjaem et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 671, 62 (2012NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2011.12.101]. Several essential modifications were commissioned in 2010–2011 at PITZ, resulting in further improvement of the photoinjector performance. Significant improvement of the rf gun phase stability is a major contribution in the reduction of the measured transverse emittance. The old TESLA prototype booster was replaced by a new cut disk structure cavity. This allows acceleration of the electron beam to higher energies and supports much higher flexibility for stable booster operation as well as for longer rf pulses which is of vital importance especially for the emittance optimization of low charge bunches. The transverse phase space of the electron beam was optimized at PITZ for bunch charges in the range between 0.02 and 2 nC, where the quality of the beam measurements was preserved by utilizing long pulse train operation. The experimental optimization yielded worldwide unprecedented low normalized emittance beams in the whole charge range studied.

  2. Pressurized Martian-Like Pure CO2 Atmosphere Supports Strong Growth of Cyanobacteria, and Causes Significant Changes in their Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murukesan, Gayathri; Leino, Hannu; Mäenpää, Pirkko; Ståhle, Kurt; Raksajit, Wuttinun; Lehto, Harry J.; Allahverdiyeva-Rinne, Yagut; Lehto, Kirsi

    2016-03-01

    Surviving of crews during future missions to Mars will depend on reliable and adequate supplies of essential life support materials, i.e. oxygen, food, clean water, and fuel. The most economical and sustainable (and in long term, the only viable) way to provide these supplies on Martian bases is via bio-regenerative systems, by using local resources to drive oxygenic photosynthesis. Selected cyanobacteria, grown in adequately protective containment could serve as pioneer species to produce life sustaining substrates for higher organisms. The very high (95.3 %) CO2 content in Martian atmosphere would provide an abundant carbon source for photo-assimilation, but nitrogen would be a strongly limiting substrate for bio-assimilation in this environment, and would need to be supplemented by nitrogen fertilizing. The very high supply of carbon, with rate-limiting supply of nitrogen strongly affects the growth and the metabolic pathways of the photosynthetic organisms. Here we show that modified, Martian-like atmospheric composition (nearly 100 % CO2) under various low pressure conditions (starting from 50 mbar to maintain liquid water, up to 200 mbars) supports strong cellular growth. Under high CO2 / low N2 ratio the filamentous cyanobacteria produce significant amount of H2 during light due to differentiation of high amount of heterocysts.

  3. Transgenic modification of gai or rg/1 causes dwarfing and alters gibberellins, root growth, and metabolite profiles in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Busov, V. [Michigan Technological University; Meilan, R [Purdue University; Pearce, D [University of Lethbridge; Rood, s [University of Lethbridge; Ma, C [Oregon State University; Strauss, S [Oregon State University

    2006-01-01

    In Arabidopsis and other plants, gibberellin (GA)-regulated responses are mediated by proteins including GAI, RGA and RGL1-3 that contain a functional DELLA domain. Through transgenic modification, we found that DELLA-less versions of GAI (gai) and RGL1 (rgl1) in a Populus tree have profound, dominant effects on phenotype, producing pleiotropic changes in morphology and metabolic profiles. Shoots were dwarfed, likely via constitutive repression of GA-induced elongation, whereas root growth was promoted two- to threefold in vitro. Applied GA{sub 3} inhibited adventitious root production in wild-type poplar, but gai/rgl1 poplars were unaffected by the inhibition. The concentrations of bioactive GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 4} in leaves of gai- and rgl1-expressing plants increased 12- to 64-fold, while the C{sub 19} precursors of GA{sub 1} (GA{sub 53}, GA{sub 44} and GA{sub 19}) decreased three- to ninefold, consistent with feedback regulation of GA 20-oxidase in the transgenic plants. The transgenic modifications elicited significant metabolic changes. In roots, metabolic profiling suggested increased respiration as a possible mechanism of the increased root growth. In leaves, we found metabolite changes suggesting reduced carbon flux through the lignin biosynthetic pathway and a shift towards allocation of secondary storage and defense metabolites, including various phenols, phenolic glucosides, and phenolic acid conjugates.

  4. 2, 6-dichlorobenzonitrile Causes Multiple Effects on Pollen Tube Growth beyond Altering Cellulose Synthesis in Pinus bungeana Zucc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huaiqing; Chen, Tong; Fan, Lusheng; Li, Ruili; Wang, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose is an important component of cell wall, yet its location and function in pollen tubes remain speculative. In this paper, we studied the role of cellulose synthesis in pollen tube elongation in Pinus bungeana Zucc. by using the specific inhibitor, 2, 6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). In the presence of DCB, the growth rate and morphology of pollen tubes were distinctly changed. The organization of cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking were also disturbed. Ultrastructure of pollen tubes treated with DCB was characterized by the loose tube wall and damaged organelles. DCB treatment induced distinct changes in tube wall components. Fluorescence labeling results showed that callose, and acidic pectin accumulated in the tip regions, whereas there was less cellulose when treated with DCB. These results were confirmed by FTIR microspectroscopic analysis. In summary, our findings showed that inhibition of cellulose synthesis by DCB affected the organization of cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking in pollen tubes, and induced changes in the tube wall chemical composition in a dose-dependent manner. These results confirm that cellulose is involved in the establishment of growth direction of pollen tubes, and plays important role in the cell wall construction during pollen tube development despite its lower quantity. PMID:24146903

  5. Early exposure of bay scallops (Argopecten irradians) to high CO₂ causes a decrease in larval shell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Meredith M; McCorkle, Daniel C; Mullineaux, Lauren S; Cohen, Anne L

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification, characterized by elevated pCO₂ and the associated decreases in seawater pH and calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω), has a variable impact on the growth and survival of marine invertebrates. Larval stages are thought to be particularly vulnerable to environmental stressors, and negative impacts of ocean acidification have been seen on fertilization as well as on embryonic, larval, and juvenile development and growth of bivalve molluscs. We investigated the effects of high CO₂ exposure (resulting in pH = 7.39, Ω(ar) = 0.74) on the larvae of the bay scallop Argopecten irradians from 12 h to 7 d old, including a switch from high CO₂ to ambient CO₂ conditions (pH = 7.93, Ω(ar) = 2.26) after 3 d, to assess the possibility of persistent effects of early exposure. The survival of larvae in the high CO₂ treatment was consistently lower than the survival of larvae in ambient conditions, and was already significantly lower at 1 d. Likewise, the shell length of larvae in the high CO₂ treatment was significantly smaller than larvae in the ambient conditions throughout the experiment and by 7 d, was reduced by 11.5%. This study also demonstrates that the size effects of short-term exposure to high CO₂ are still detectable after 7 d of larval development; the shells of larvae exposed to high CO₂ for the first 3 d of development and subsequently exposed to ambientCO₂ were not significantly different in size at 3 and 7 d than the shells of larvae exposed to high CO₂ throughout the experiment.

  6. Early exposure of bay scallops (Argopecten irradians to high CO₂ causes a decrease in larval shell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith M White

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification, characterized by elevated pCO₂ and the associated decreases in seawater pH and calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω, has a variable impact on the growth and survival of marine invertebrates. Larval stages are thought to be particularly vulnerable to environmental stressors, and negative impacts of ocean acidification have been seen on fertilization as well as on embryonic, larval, and juvenile development and growth of bivalve molluscs. We investigated the effects of high CO₂ exposure (resulting in pH = 7.39, Ω(ar = 0.74 on the larvae of the bay scallop Argopecten irradians from 12 h to 7 d old, including a switch from high CO₂ to ambient CO₂ conditions (pH = 7.93, Ω(ar = 2.26 after 3 d, to assess the possibility of persistent effects of early exposure. The survival of larvae in the high CO₂ treatment was consistently lower than the survival of larvae in ambient conditions, and was already significantly lower at 1 d. Likewise, the shell length of larvae in the high CO₂ treatment was significantly smaller than larvae in the ambient conditions throughout the experiment and by 7 d, was reduced by 11.5%. This study also demonstrates that the size effects of short-term exposure to high CO₂ are still detectable after 7 d of larval development; the shells of larvae exposed to high CO₂ for the first 3 d of development and subsequently exposed to ambientCO₂ were not significantly different in size at 3 and 7 d than the shells of larvae exposed to high CO₂ throughout the experiment.

  7. Short- and long-term reproductive effects of prenatal and lactational growth restriction caused by maternal diabetes in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amorim Elaine MP

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A suboptimal intrauterine environment may have a detrimental effect on gonadal development and thereby increases the risk for reproductive disorders and infertility in adult life. Here, we used uncontrolled maternal diabetes as a model to provoke pre- and perinatal growth restriction and evaluate the sexual development of rat male offspring. Methods Maternal diabetes was induced in the dams through administration of a single i.v. dose of 40 mg/kg streptozotocin, 7 days before mating. Female rats presenting glycemic levels above 200 mg/dL after the induction were selected for the experiment. The male offspring was analyzed at different phases of sexual development, i.e., peripuberty, postpuberty and adulthood. Results Body weight and blood glucose levels of pups, on the third postnatal day, were lower in the offspring of diabetic dams compared to controls. Maternal diabetes also provoked delayed testicular descent and preputial separation. In the offspring of diabetic dams the weight of reproductive organs at 40, 60 and 90 days-old was lower, as well as sperm reserves and sperm transit time through the epididymis. However the plasma testosterone levels were not different among experimental groups. Conclusions It is difficult to isolate the effects directly from diabetes and those from IUGR. Although the exposure to hyperglycemic environment during prenatal life and lactation delayed the onset of puberty in male rats, the IUGR, in the studied model, did not influenced the structural organization of the male gonads of the offspring at any point during sexual development. However the decrease in sperm reserves in epididymal cauda and the acceleration in sperm transit time in this portion of epididymis may lead to an impairment of sperm quality and fertility potential in these animals. Additional studies are needed in attempt to investigate the fertility of animals with intrauterine growth restriction by maternal diabetes and

  8. Root-Specific Reduction of Cytokinin Causes Enhanced Root Growth, Drought Tolerance, and Leaf Mineral Enrichment in Arabidopsis and Tobacco[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Tomáš; Nehnevajova, Erika; Köllmer, Ireen; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Krämer, Ute; Schmülling, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Optimizing root system architecture can overcome yield limitations in crop plants caused by water or nutrient shortages. Classic breeding approaches are difficult because the trait is governed by many genes and is difficult to score. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with enhanced root-specific degradation of the hormone cytokinin, a negative regulator of root growth. These transgenic plants form a larger root system, whereas growth and development of the shoot are similar. Elongation of the primary root, root branching, and root biomass formation were increased by up to 60% in transgenic lines, increasing the root-to-shoot ratio. We thus demonstrated that a single dominant gene could regulate a complex trait, root growth. Moreover, we showed that cytokinin regulates root growth in a largely organ-autonomous fashion that is consistent with its dual role as a hormone with both paracrine and long-distance activities. Transgenic plants had a higher survival rate after severe drought treatment. The accumulation of several elements, including S, P, Mn, Mg, Zn, as well as Cd from a contaminated soil, was significantly increased in shoots. Under conditions of sulfur or magnesium deficiency, leaf chlorophyll content was less affected in transgenic plants, demonstrating the physiological relevance of shoot element accumulation. Our approach might contribute to improve drought tolerance, nutrient efficiency, and nutrient content of crop plants. PMID:21148816

  9. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  10. Endophytic Bacteria Improve Plant Growth, Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and Induce Suppression of Root Rot Caused by Fusarium solani under Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilfuza Egamberdieva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Salinity causes disturbance in symbiotic performance of plants, and increases susceptibility of plants to soil-borne pathogens. Endophytic bacteria are an essential determinant of cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. The aim of this study was to isolate non–rhizobial endophytic bacteria from the root nodules of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L., and to assess their ability to improve plant growth and symbiotic performance, and to control root rot in chickpea under saline soil conditions. A total of 40 bacterial isolates from internal root tissues of chickpea grown in salinated soil were isolated. Four bacterial isolates, namely Bacillus cereus NUU1, Achromobacter xylosoxidans NUU2, Bacillus thuringiensis NUU3, and Bacillus subtilis NUU4 colonizing root tissue demonstrated plant beneficial traits and/or antagonistic activity against F. solani and thus were characterized in more detail. The strain B. subtilis NUU4 proved significant plant growth promotion capabilities, improved symbiotic performance of host plant with rhizobia, and promoted yield under saline soil as compared to untreated control plants under field conditions. A combined inoculation of chickpea with M. ciceri IC53 and B. subtilis NUU4 decreased H2O2 concentrations and increased proline contents compared to the un-inoculated plants indicating an alleviation of adverse effects of salt stress. Furthermore, the bacterial isolate was capable to reduce the infection rate of root rot in chickpea caused by F. solani. This is the first report of F. solani causing root rot of chickpea in a salinated soil of Uzbekistan. Our findings demonstrated that the endophytic B. subtilis strain NUU4 provides high potentials as a stimulator for plant growth and as biological control agent of chickpea root rot under saline soil conditions. These multiple relationships could provide promising practical approaches to increase the productivity of legumes under salt stress.

  11. Evaluation of placental growth factor and soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 as predictors of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with Type 1 diabetes with and without diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, S; Lajer, Maria Stenkil; Jorsal, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Placental growth factor is a vascular endothelial growth factor involved in angiogenesis, vascular inflammation and plaque formation. Soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 is a decoy receptor for placental growth factor, reducing its activity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the predictive valu...... of placental growth factor and soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 in relation to all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and decline in kidney function in Type 1 diabetes....

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 inhibitor cediranib causes regression of endometriotic lesions in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xian-Xia; Min, Shu-Yun; Liu, Yi-Xuan; Zuo, Zhi; Jin, Zhi-Xing; Zhu, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 plays an essential role in angiogenesis, and it also expressed in the glandular epithelium and stromal cells of ectopic endometrium. Cediranib is a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor that potently inhibits VEGF receptor-2, but there is no study about its effects on the endometriosis. We induced endometriosis on both sides of the abdominal wall in 20 female Sprague-Dawley rats and randomly divided them into 2 groups. They were administered: cediranib 4 mg/kg/day (group 1), equal saline (group 2) for 12 days. Then, the lesion volumes were calculated, and Masson trichrome was used to detect fibrosis. Angiogenesis was evaluated by CD-31 immunohistochemistry and serum VEGF levels. Proliferation was indicated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis was measured by a TUNEL assay and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. In the treatment group, the lesion volumes were smaller (P < 0.05), and the degree of fibrosis was greater. The microvessel density was lower (P < 0.05) than control, however, serum VEGF was up-regulated by a negative feedback mechanism (P < 0.01). In addition, proliferation was significantly suppressed (P < 0.01), and apoptosis in the lesions was more obvious in the treatment group. These data indicated that cediranib can inhibit development of endometriotic lesions in rats. PMID:25973002

  13. Deletion of SHP-2 in mesenchymal stem cells causes growth retardation, limb and chest deformity, and calvarial defects in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Lapinski

    2013-11-01

    In mice, induced global disruption of the Ptpn11 gene, which encodes the SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase, results in severe skeletal abnormalities. To understand the extent to which skeletal abnormalities can be attributed to perturbation of SHP-2 function in bone-forming osteoblasts and chondrocytes, we generated mice in which disruption of Ptpn11 is restricted to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and their progeny, which include both cell types. MSC-lineage-specific SHP-2 knockout (MSC SHP-2 KO mice exhibited postnatal growth retardation, limb and chest deformity, and calvarial defects. These skeletal abnormalities were associated with an absence of mature osteoblasts and massive chondrodysplasia with a vast increase in the number of terminally differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes in affected bones. Activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs and protein kinase B (PKB; also known as AKT was impaired in bone-forming cells of MSC SHP-2 KO mice, which provides an explanation for the skeletal defects that developed. These findings reveal a cell-autonomous role for SHP-2 in bone-forming cells in mice in the regulation of skeletal development. The results add to our understanding of the pathophysiology of skeletal abnormalities observed in humans with germline mutations in the PTPN11 gene (e.g. Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome.

  14. Biliary obstruction caused by intra-biliary tumor growth from recurred hepatocellular carcinoma after radiofrequency ablation: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jae Won [Dept. of Radiology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    A 59-year-old man with a known central hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) underwent a trans-arterial-chemo-embolization (TACE) and a post-TACE percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (PRFA). Two months after the PRFA, the patient presented jaundice and an abdominal computed tomography was obtained. An arterial enhancing mass adjacent to the ablated necrotic lesion with a continuously coexisting mass inside the right hepatic duct, suggestive of a HCC recurrence with a direct extension to the biliary tract was found. Finally a biliary tumor obstruction has been developed and a percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed. This case of biliary obstruction caused by directly invaded recurred HCC after PRFA will be reported because of its rare occurrence.

  15. Ethanol-induced impairment of polyamine homeostasis--a potential cause of neural tube defect and intrauterine growth restriction in fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi Poodeh, Saeid; Alhonen, Leena; Salonurmi, Tuire; Savolainen, Markku J

    2014-03-28

    Polyamines play a fundamental role during embryogenesis by regulating cell growth and proliferation and by interacting with RNA, DNA and protein. The polyamine pools are regulated by metabolism and uptake from exogenous sources. The use of certain inhibitors of polyamine synthesis causes similar defects to those seen in alcohol exposure e.g. retarded embryo growth and endothelial cell sprouting. CD-1 mice received two intraperitoneal injections of 3 g/kg ethanol at 4 h intervals 8.75 days post coitum (dpc). The fetal head, trunk, yolk sac and placenta were collected at 9.5 and 12.5 dpc and polyamine concentrations were determined. No measurable quantity of polyamines could be detected in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc, 12 h after ethanol exposure. Putrescine was not detectable in the trunk of the embryo at that time, whereas polyamines in yolk sac and placenta were at control level. Polyamine deficiency was associated with slow cell growth, reduction in endothelial cell sprouting, an altered pattern of blood vessel network formation and consequently retarded migration of neural crest cells and growth restriction. Our results indicate that the polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. Alcohol administration, at the critical stage, perturbs polyamine levels with various patterns, depending on the tissue and its developmental stage. The total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc may explain why this stage is so vulnerable to the development of neural tube defect, and growth restriction, the findings previously observed in fetal alcohol syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of water temperature and structural parameters on the hydraulic labyrinth-channel emitter performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed I. Al-Amoud

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of water temperature and structural parameters of a labyrinth emitter on drip irrigation hydraulic performance were investigated. The inside structural parameters of the trapezoidal labyrinth emitter include path width (W and length (L, trapezoidal unit numbers (N, height (H, and spacing (S. Laboratory experiments were conducted using five different types of labyrinth-channel emitters (three non-pressure compensating and two pressure-compensating emitters commonly used for subsurface drip irrigation systems. The water temperature effect on the hydraulic characteristics at various operating pressures was recorded and a comparison was made to identify the most effective structural parameter on emitter performance. The pressure compensating emitter flow exponent (x average was 0.014, while non-pressure compensating emitter’s values average was 0.456, indicating that the sensitivity of non-pressure compensating emitters to pressure variation is an obvious characteristic (p<0.001 of this type of emitters. The effects of water temperature on emitter flow rate were insignificant (p>0.05 at various operating pressures, where the flow rate index values for emitters were around one. The effects of water temperature on manufacturer’s coefficient of variation (CV values for all emitters were insignificant (p>0.05. The CV values of the non-pressure compensating emitters were lower than those of pressure compensating emitters. This is typical for most compensating models because they are manufactured with more elements than non-compensating emitters are. The results of regression analysis indicate that N and H are the essential factors (p<0.001 to affect the hydraulic performance.

  17. Scutellarin suppresses growth and causes apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells by regulating the p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Zhao, Yuying; Wang, Zhipeng; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yanqiao

    2017-02-01

    Scutellarin is a flavonoid isolated from a medicinal herb Scutellaria barbata D. Don and exerts therapeutic effects on cardiovascular diseases. However, it remains unclear whether Scutellarin exhibits anti‑tumor actions on human colon cancer. The current study aimed to investigate whether Scutellarin produces antiproliferative and pro‑apoptotic effects on HCT‑116 human colon cancer cells and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. Human colon cancer cells were exposed to different concentrations of Scutellarin, and cellular growth and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, western blot analysis and other assays. A cell viability assay demonstrated that Scutellarin treatment reduced the viability of HCT‑116 cells in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. TUNEL staining demonstrated that Scutellarin also induced apoptotic changes in HCT‑116 cells. The expression level of the anti‑apoptotic protein, Bcl‑2 apoptosis regulator (Bcl‑2), was reduced by Scutellarin in HCT‑116 cells, whereas the expression Bcl‑2 associated X apoptosis regulator (Bax) and the activation of caspase‑3 protein were increased by Scutellarin treatment. Further investigation revealed that Scutellarin significantly increased the phosphorylation of p53 protein in HCT‑116 cells. Additionally, suppression of p53 using a specific inhibitor, pifithrin‑α, abrogated the pro‑apoptotic effects of Scutellarin in HCT‑116 cells. Collectively, Scutellarin reduced the viability and induced apoptosis of human colon carcinoma cells, potentially by regulating p53 and Bcl‑2/Bax expression. These data suggested that Scutellarin may be useful as a promising anti‑tumor drug for treating colon cancer.

  18. Tolerance of anaerobic conditions caused by flooding during germination and early growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta eMiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rice is semi-aquatic, adapted to a wide range of hydrologies, from aerobic soils in uplands to anaerobic and flooded fields in waterlogged lowlands, to even deeply submerged soils in flood-prone areas. Considerable diversity is present in native rice landraces selected by farmers over centuries. Our understanding of the adaptive features of these landraces to native ecosystems has improved considerably over the recent past. In some cases, major genes associated with tolerance have been cloned, such as SUB1A that confers tolerance of complete submergence and SNORKEL genes that control plant elongation to escape deepwater. Modern rice varieties are sensitive to flooding during germination and early growth, a problem commonly encountered in rainfed areas, but few landraces capable of germination under these conditions have recently been identified, enabling research into tolerance mechanisms. Major QTLs were also identified, and are being targeted for molecular breeding and for cloning. Nevertheless, limited progress have been made in identifying regulatory processes for traits that are unique to tolerant genotypes, including faster germination and coleoptile elongation, formation of roots and leaves under hypoxia, ability to catabolize starch into simple sugars for subsequent use in glycolysis and fermentative pathways to generate energy. Here we discuss the state of knowledge on the role of the PDC-ALDH-ACS bypass and the ALDH enzyme as the likely candidates effective in tolerant rice genotypes. Potential involvement of factors such as cytoplasmic pH regulation, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species scavenging and other metabolites is also discussed. Further characterization of contrasting genotypes would help in elucidating the genetic and biochemical regulatory and signaling mechanisms associated with tolerance. This could facilitate breeding rice varieties suitable for direct seeding systems and guide efforts for improving waterlogging

  19. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorita, T., E-mail: yorita@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  20. Photosensitivity of p-type black Si field emitter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingels, S., E-mail: smingels@uni-wuppertal.de; Porshyn, V.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G. [School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Physics Department, University of Wuppertal, Wuppertal 42119 (Germany); Prommesberger, C.; Langer, C.; Schreiner, R. [Faculty of General Sciences and Microsystems Technology, OTH Regensburg, Regensburg 93053 (Germany)

    2016-04-28

    We have investigated the properties of black Si field emitter arrays under strong electric fields and laser illumination. A low onset field of 1.8 MV/m for an emission current of 1 nA was obtained. A pronounced saturation region of the dark and photo-enhanced current was observed, which provided a short-term stability of 0.1% at 0.4 μA and 0.7% at 1.0 μA, respectively. As maximum value for the photosensitivity, an on-off current switching ratio of 43 reaching about 13 μA was achieved at a laser power of 15 mW. Electron spectra in the dark and under laser illumination are presented, showing a current and light-sensitive voltage drop across the emitters as well as hints for hot electron emission.

  1. First observation of the exchange of transverse and longitudinal emittances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.P.; Koeth, T.; Sun, Y.-E; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    An experimental program to demonstrate a novel phase space manipulation in which the horizontal and longitudinal emittances of a particle beam are exchanged has been completed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, consisting of a TM{sub 110} deflecting mode cavity flanked by two horizontally dispersive doglegs has been installed. We report on the first direct observation of transverse and longitudinal emittance exchange: {l_brace}{var_epsilon}{sub x}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub z}{sup n}{r_brace} = {l_brace} 2.9 {+-} 0.1, 2.4 {+-} 0.1, 13.1 {+-} 1.3{r_brace} {yields} {l_brace}11.3 {+-} 1.1, 2.9 {+-} 0.5, 3.1 {+-} 0.3{r_brace} mm-mrad.

  2. Commissioning of the LINAC4 Ion Source Transverse Emittance Meter

    CERN Document Server

    Bravin, E; Dutriat, C; Lokhovitsky, A; Raich, U; Roncarolo, F; Scrivens, R; Zorin, E

    2010-01-01

    LINAC4 is the first step in the upgrade of the injector chain for the LHC, and will accelerate H- ions from 45 keV to 160 MeV. Currently the ion source is installed in a test setup and its commissioning started at the end of 2009. A slit-grid system is used to measure the transverse emittance of the beam at the exit of the source. The results of the measurements have been compared with analytical and numerical predictions of the performance of the emittance meter, addressing the system resolution, accuracy and sensitivity. The outcome of this analysis has been used to improve the design of a new slit-grid system foreseen for the commissioning of LINAC 4 at higher energy locations.

  3. Oxidation and emittance of superalloys in heat shield applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recently developed superalloys that form alumina coatings have a high potential for heat shield applications for advanced aerospace vehicles at temperatures above 1095C. Both INCOLOY alloy MA 956 (of the Inco Alloys International, Inc.), an iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy, and CABOT alloy No. 214 (of the Cabot Corporation), an alumina-forming nickel-chromium alloy, have good oxidation resistance and good elevated temperature strength. The oxidation resistance of both alloys has been attributed to the formation of a thin alumina layer (alpha-Al2O3) at the surface. Emittance and oxidation data were obtained for simulated Space Shuttle reentry conditions using a hypersonic arc-heated wind tunnel. The surface oxides and substrate alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis unit. The mass loss and emittance characteristics of the two alloys are discussed.

  4. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Mark; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Livezey, Jesse; Lyndaker, Aaron; Makita, Junki; McDonald, Michael; Medjidzade, Valeri; Meller, Robert; O'Connell, Tim; Peck, Stuart; Peterson, Daniel; Ramirez, Gabriel; Rendina, Matthew; Revesz, Peter; Rider, Nate; Rice, David; Rubin, David; Sagan, David; Savino, James; Schwartz, Robert; Seeley, Robert; Sexton, James; Shanks, James; Sikora, John; Smith, Eric; Strohman, Charles; Williams, Heather; Antoniou, Fanouria; Calatroni, Sergio; Gasior, Marek; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pfingstner, Juergen; Rumolo, Giovanni; Schmickler, Hermann; Taborelli, Mauro; Asner, David; Boon, Laura; Garfinkel, Arthur; Byrd, John; Celata, Christine; Corlett, John; De Santis, Stefano; Furman, Miguel; Jackson, Alan; Kraft, Rick; Munson, Dawn; Penn, Gregory; Plate, David; Venturini, Marco; Carlson, Benjamin; Demma, Theo; Dowd, Rohan; Flanagan, John; Jain, Puneet; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Sakai, Hiroshi; Shibata, Kyo; Suetsugu, Yusuke; Tobiyama, Makoto; Gonnella, Daniel; Guo, Weiming; Harkay, Katherine; Holtzapple, Robert; Jones, James; Wolski, Andrzej; Kharakh, David; Ng, Johnny; Pivi, Mauro; Wang, Lanfa; Ross, Marc; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Zwaska, Robert; Schachter, Levi; Wilkinson, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud’s effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results

  5. Extended emitter target tracking using GM-PHD filter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youqing Zhu

    Full Text Available If equipped with several radar emitters, a target will produce more than one measurement per time step and is denoted as an extended target. However, due to the requirement of all possible measurement set partitions, the exact probability hypothesis density filter for extended target tracking is computationally intractable. To reduce the computational burden, a fast partitioning algorithm based on hierarchy clustering is proposed in this paper. It combines the two most similar cells to obtain new partitions step by step. The pseudo-likelihoods in the Gaussian-mixture probability hypothesis density filter can then be computed iteratively. Furthermore, considering the additional measurement information from the emitter target, the signal feature is also used in partitioning the measurement set to improve the tracking performance. The simulation results show that the proposed method can perform better with lower computational complexity in scenarios with different clutter densities.

  6. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Mark; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Alexander, James; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Billing, Michael; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Calvey, Joseph; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Conolly, Christopher; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Crittenden, James; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Dobbins, John; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Dugan, Gerald; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Eggert, Nicholas; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Fontes, Ernest; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Forster, Michael; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Gallagher, Richard; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Gray, Steven; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Greenwald, Shlomo; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Hartill, Donald; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Hopkins, Walter; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Kreinick, David; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Kreis, Benjamin; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Leong, Zhidong; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Li, Yulin; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Liu, Xianghong; /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN; /more authors..

    2012-07-06

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  7. Rose, a rotating system for 4D emittance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Michael; Groening, Lars; Xiao, Chen; Mickat, Sascha; Du, Xiaonan; Gerhard, Peter; Vormann, Hartmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A ROtating System for Emittance measurements ROSE, to measure the full 4 dimensional transverse beam matrix of a heavy ion beam has been developed and commissioned. Different heavy ion beams behind the HLI at GSI have been used in two commissioning beam times. All technical aspects of Rose have been tested, Rose has been benchmarked against existing emittance scanners for horizontal and vertical projections and the method, hard- and software to measure the 4D beam matrix has been upgraded, refined and successfully commissioned. The inter plane correlations of the HLI beam have been measured, yet as no significant initial correlations were found to be present, controlled coupling of the beam by using a skew triplet has been applied and confirmed with Rose. The next step is to use ROSE to measure and remove the known inter plane correlations of a Uranium beam before SIS18 injection.

  8. Biochemical effects and growth inhibition in MCF-7 cells caused by novel sulphonamido oxa-polyamine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, V; Lin, P Kong Thoo; Rodilla, V

    2002-04-01

    The novel polyamine derivatives sulphonamido oxa-spermine (oxa-Spm) and sulphonamido oxa-spermidine (oxa-Spd) exhibited rapid cytotoxic action towards MCF-7 human breast cancer cells with IC50 values of 4.35 and 6.47 pM, respectively, after 24-h drug exposure. Neither compound is a substrate of serum amine oxidase. Both oxa-Spm and oxa-Spd caused cell shrinkage, as determined by phase-contrast microscopy. After incubation with 10 microM of either compound for 8 h, the cells underwent chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation. However, no clear DNA ladder was obtained by electrophoresis. The sulphonamido oxa-polyamine derivatives and especially oxa-Spd enhanced the activity of polyamine oxidase (PAO), an enzyme capable of oxidising N1-acetylated spermine and spermidine to spermidine and putrescine, respectively, generating cytotoxic H2O2 and 3-acetamidopropanal as by-products. The intracellular polyamine content was only marginally reduced in response to drug treatment. In conclusion, our data show that these novel sulphonamido oxa-polyamine derivatives possess high cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 cells and indicate that induction of PAO may mediate their cytotoxicity via apoptosis.

  9. Evaluation of parameters affecting emitter discharge of some low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four tapes, sold as Chapin, Dream, T-tape, and Typhoon 25, were evaluated. Slopes were varied from 0% to 4%; lateral lengths varied from 5.0m to 20.0m; and water supply heads varied from 0.5m to 2.0m. The results showed that emitter discharges for Chapin were between 0.43 and 0.51 l/hr for 0-2% slopes with standard ...

  10. Correlated blinking of fluorescent emitters mediated by single plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, D.; Lhuillier, E.; Ithurria, S.; Gulinatti, A.; Rech, I.; Carminati, R.; De Wilde, Y.; Krachmalnicoff, V.

    2017-03-01

    We observe time-correlated emission between a single CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot exhibiting single-photon statistics and a fluorescent nanobead located micrometers apart. This is accomplished by coupling both emitters to a silver nanowire. Single plasmons are created on the latter from the quantum dot, and transfer energy to excite in turn the fluorescent nanobead. We demonstrate that the molecules inside the bead show the same blinking behavior as the quantum dot.

  11. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  12. Industrial application of electron sources with plasma emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Belyuk, S I; Rempe, N G

    2001-01-01

    Paper contains a description, operation, design and parameters of electron sources with plasma emitters. One presents examples of application of these sources as part of automated electron-beam welding lines. Paper describes application of such sources for electron-beam deposition of composite powders. Electron-beam deposition is used to rebuild worn out part and to increase strength of new parts of machines and tools. Paper presents some examples of rebuilding part and the advantages gained in this case

  13. Porous Emitter Colloid Thruster Performance Characterization Using Optical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    80 Figure 24. Shimadzu HPV -2 high speed camera used to image Taylor Cone formation. 81 Figure 25. Shimadzu HPV -2 camera...the Shimadzu HPV -2 camera. The pictures show the brightness contrast depending on the location of the mirror used to image the emitter...such as the vacuum chamber and power supplies are discussed first. Then, a detailed description of the processes and tools used to accomplish the

  14. Low Emittance Gun Project based on Field Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ganter, Romain; Dehler, M; Gobrecht, Jens; Gough, Chris; Ingold, Gerhard; Leemann, Simon C; Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Paraliev, Martin; Pedrozzi, Marco; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Schlott, Volker; Sehr, Harald; Streun, Andreas; Wrulich, Albin F; Zelenika, Sasa

    2004-01-01

    The design of an electron gun capable of producing beam emittance one order of magnitude lower than current technology would reduce considerably the cost and size of a free electron laser emitting at 0.1nm. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) including a gate and a focusing layer are an attractive technology for such high brightness sources. Electrons are extracted from micrometric tips thanks to voltage pulses between gate and tips. The focusing layer should then reduce the initial divergence of each emitted beamlets. This FEA will be inserted in a high gradient diode configuration coupled with a radiofrequency structure. In the diode part very high electric field pulses (several hundreds of MV/m) will limit the degradation of emittance due to space charge effect. This first acceleration will be obtained with high voltage pulses (typically a megavolt in a few hundred of nanoseconds) synchronized with the low voltage pulses applied to the FEA (typically one hundred of volts in one nanosecond at frequency below kilohe...

  15. Emittance scans for CMS luminosity calibration in 2017

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Emittance scans are short van der Meer type scans performed at the beginning and at the end of LHC fills. The beams are scanned against each other in X and Y planes in 7 displacement steps. These scans are used for LHC diagnostics and since 2017 for a cross check of the CMS luminosity calibration. An XY pair of scans takes around 3 minutes. The BRIL project provides to LHC three independent online luminosity measurement from the Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT), the Fast Beam Condition Monitor (BCM1F) and the Forward calorimeter (HF). The excellent performance of the BRIL detector front-ends, fast back-end electronics and CMS XDAQ based data processing and publication allow the use of emittance scans for linearity and stability studies of the luminometers. Emittance scans became a powerful tool and dramatically improved the understanding of the luminosity measurement during the year. Since each luminometer is independently calibrated in every scan the measurements are independent and ratios of luminometers ca...

  16. Emittance Measurement for Beamline Extension at the PET Cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Hoon Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle-induced X-ray emission is used for determining the elemental composition of materials. This method uses low-energy protons (of several MeV, which can be obtained from high-energy (of tens MeV accelerators. Instead of manufacturing an accelerator for generating the MeV protons, the use of a PET cyclotron has been suggested for designing the beamline for multipurpose applications, especially for the PIXE experiment, which has a dedicated high-energy (of tens MeV accelerator. The beam properties of the cyclotron were determined at this experimental facility by using an external beamline before transferring the ion beam to the experimental chamber. We measured the beam profile and calculated the emittance using the pepper-pot method. The beam profile was measured as the beam current using a wire scanner, and the emittance was measured as the beam distribution at the beam dump using a radiochromic film. We analyzed the measurement results and are planning to use the results obtained in the simulations of external beamline and aligned beamline components. We will consider energy degradation after computing the beamline simulation. The experimental study focused on measuring the emittance from the cyclotron, and the results of this study are presented in this paper.

  17. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, Grigory S.; Eletskii, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules. PMID:28348342

  18. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Samina [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India)

    2017-01-15

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  19. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT-Based Electron Field Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Eletskii

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  20. LINE-1 Mediated Insertion into Poc1a (Protein of Centriole 1 A Causes Growth Insufficiency and Male Infertility in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista A Geister

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal dysplasias are a common, genetically heterogeneous cause of short stature that can result from disruptions in many cellular processes. We report the identification of the lesion responsible for skeletal dysplasia and male infertility in the spontaneous, recessive mouse mutant chagun. We determined that Poc1a, encoding protein of the centriole 1a, is disrupted by the insertion of a processed Cenpw cDNA, which is flanked by target site duplications, suggestive of a LINE-1 retrotransposon-mediated event. Mutant fibroblasts have impaired cilia formation and multipolar spindles. Male infertility is caused by defective spermatogenesis early in meiosis and progressive germ cell loss. Spermatogonial stem cell transplantation studies revealed that Poc1a is essential for normal function of both Sertoli cells and germ cells. The proliferative zone of the growth plate is small and disorganized because chondrocytes fail to re-align after cell division and undergo increased apoptosis. Poc1a and several other genes associated with centrosome function can affect the skeleton and lead to skeletal dysplasias and primordial dwarfisms. This mouse mutant reveals how centrosome dysfunction contributes to defects in skeletal growth and male infertility.

  1. Extracellular matrix remodeling and transforming growth factor-β signaling abnormalities induced by lamin A/C variants that cause lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Dour, Caroline; Wu, Wei; Béréziat, Véronique; Capeau, Jacqueline; Vigouroux, Corinne; Worman, Howard J

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene encoding nuclear lamins A and C (lamin A/C) cause familial partial lipodystrophy type 2 (FPLD2) and related lipodystrophy syndromes. These are mainly characterized by redistribution of adipose tissue associated with insulin resistance. Several reports suggest that alterations in the extracellular matrix of adipose tissue leading to fibrosis play a role in the pathophysiology of lipodystrophy syndromes. However, the extent of extracellular matrix alterations in FPLD2 remains unknown. We show significantly increased fibrosis and altered expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins in cervical subcutaneous adipose tissue from a human subject with FLPD2. Similar extracellular matrix alterations occur in adipose tissue of transgenic mice expressing an FPLD2-causing human lamin A variant and in cultured fibroblasts from human subjects with FPLD2 and related lipodystrophies. These abnormalities are associated with increased transforming growth factor-β signaling and defects in matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity. Our data demonstrate that lamin A/C gene mutations responsible for FPLD2 and related lipodystrophies are associated with transforming growth factor-β activation and an extracellular matrix imbalance in adipose tissue, suggesting that targeting these alterations could be the basis of novel therapies. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. LINE-1 Mediated Insertion into Poc1a (Protein of Centriole 1 A) Causes Growth Insufficiency and Male Infertility in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geister, Krista A; Brinkmeier, Michelle L; Cheung, Leonard Y; Wendt, Jennifer; Oatley, Melissa J; Burgess, Daniel L; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Cavalcoli, James D; Oatley, Jon M; Camper, Sally A

    2015-10-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are a common, genetically heterogeneous cause of short stature that can result from disruptions in many cellular processes. We report the identification of the lesion responsible for skeletal dysplasia and male infertility in the spontaneous, recessive mouse mutant chagun. We determined that Poc1a, encoding protein of the centriole 1a, is disrupted by the insertion of a processed Cenpw cDNA, which is flanked by target site duplications, suggestive of a LINE-1 retrotransposon-mediated event. Mutant fibroblasts have impaired cilia formation and multipolar spindles. Male infertility is caused by defective spermatogenesis early in meiosis and progressive germ cell loss. Spermatogonial stem cell transplantation studies revealed that Poc1a is essential for normal function of both Sertoli cells and germ cells. The proliferative zone of the growth plate is small and disorganized because chondrocytes fail to re-align after cell division and undergo increased apoptosis. Poc1a and several other genes associated with centrosome function can affect the skeleton and lead to skeletal dysplasias and primordial dwarfisms. This mouse mutant reveals how centrosome dysfunction contributes to defects in skeletal growth and male infertility.

  3. Growth retardation in untreated autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus caused by one recurring and two novel mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Cécile; Birk, Julia; Christophe, Catherine; Tenoutasse, Sylvie; Velkeniers, Brigitte; Heinrichs, Claudine; Rutishauser, Jonas

    2011-02-01

    Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI), a disorder caused by mutations in the vasopressin (AVP)-neurophysin II (NPII) gene, manifests gradually during early childhood with progressive polyuria and polydipsia. Patients are usually treated with synthetic AVP analog. If unlimited access to water is provided, prognosis is usually good even in the absence of specific treatment. In this study, we describe three families with adFNDI, in which growth failure was a prominent complaint, on the clinical and molecular level. Histories from affected and unaffected family members were taken. Height and weight of index patients were recorded longitudinally. Patients underwent water deprivation tests, magnetic resonance imaging, and genetic analysis. One mutant was studied by heterologous expression in cell culture. A total of ten affected individuals were studied. In two of the three pedigrees, a novel mutation in the AVP-NPII gene was found. The index children in each pedigree showed growth retardation, which was the reason for referral in two. In these cases, water intake was tightly restricted by the parents in an attempt to overcome suspected psychogenic polydipsia and to improve appetite. Once the children were treated by hormone replacement, they rapidly caught up to normal weight and height. Genetic testing and appropriate parent counseling should be enforced in adFNDI families to ensure adequate treatment and avoid chronic water deprivation, which causes failure to thrive.

  4. Putrescine production via the agmatine deiminase pathway increases the growth of Lactococcus lactis and causes the alkalinization of the culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Fernández, Maria; Martin, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the most important starter culture organism used in the dairy industry. Although L. lactis species have been awarded Qualified Presumption of Safety status by the European Food Safety Authority, and Generally Regarded as Safe status by the US Food and Drug Administration, some strains can produce the biogenic amine putrescine. One such strain is L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14), which was isolated from Genestoso cheese. This strain catabolizes agmatine to putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway, which involves the production of ATP and two ammonium ions. The present work shows that the availability of agmatine and its metabolization to putrescine allows for greater bacterial growth (in a biphasic pattern) and causes the alkalinization of the culture medium in a dose-dependent manner. The construction of a mutant lacking the AGDI cluster (L. lactis CECT 8666 Δagdi) confirmed the latter's direct role in putrescine production, growth, and medium alkalinization. Alkalinization did not affect the putrescine production pattern and was not essential for increased bacterial growth.

  5. A novel TRPS1 gene mutation causing trichorhinophalangeal syndrome with growth hormone responsive short stature: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merjaneh, Lina; Parks, John S; Muir, Andrew B; Fadoju, Doris

    2014-01-01

    The role of growth hormone (GH) and its therapeutic supplementation in the trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type I (TRPS I) is not well delineated. TRPS I is a rare congenital syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and skeletal malformations including short stature, sparse, thin scalp hair and lateral eyebrows, pear-shaped nose, cone shaped epiphyses and hip dysplasia. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and caused by haploinsufficiency of the TRPS1 gene. We report a family (Mother and 3 of her 4 children) with a novel mutation in the TRPS1 gene. The diagnosis was suspected only after meeting all family members and comparing affected and unaffected siblings since the features of this syndrome might be subtle. The eldest sibling, who had neither GH deficiency nor insensitivity, improved his growth velocity and height SDS after 2 years of treatment with exogenous GH. No change in growth velocity was observed in the untreated siblings during this same period. This report emphasizes the importance of examining all family members when suspecting a genetic syndrome. It also demonstrates the therapeutic effect of GH treatment in TRPS I despite normal GH-IGF1 axis. A review of the literature is included to address whether TRPS I is associated with: a) GH deficiency, b) GH resistance, or c) GH-responsive short stature. More studies are needed before recommending GH treatment for TRPS I but a trial should be considered on an individual basis.

  6. The effect of local application of insulin-like growth factor for prevention of inner-ear damage caused by electrode trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, H; Alimoglu, Y; Duzenli, U; Korkmaz, S; Inan, S; Olgun, L

    2017-03-01

    Electrode insertion during cochlear implantation causes cochlear damage and apoptosis. Insulin-like growth factor applied locally was investigated in 21 rats. In the sham group, an intracochlear dummy electrode was inserted through the round window. In the control group, after the same insertion procedure, saline-soaked porcine skin gelatine was placed on the round window. In the study group, insulin-like growth factor 1 soaked gelatine was placed on the round window. Auditory brainstem response thresholds were measured and histopathological examination was performed. In the study group, at 2-4 kHz, one rat had deterioration, one showed improvement and the rest had stable thresholds 14 days after intervention. At 6 kHz, four rats showed improvement and the rest remained stable. At 8 kHz, four showed improvement, one had deterioration and two remained stable. In the other groups, hearing loss deteriorated in about half of the rats and remained stable in the rest. The mean post-operative 6 kHz threshold was significantly lower than that immediately after the intervention in the study group, contrary to the other groups. The study group had significantly better mean histopathological grading than the other groups. Local insulin-like growth factor 1 application may protect hearing after cochlear implantation.

  7. Ethanol-induced impairment of polyamine homeostasis – A potential cause of neural tube defect and intrauterine growth restriction in fetal alcohol syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighi Poodeh, Saeid, E-mail: saeid.haghighi@oulu.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Alhonen, Leena [Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, Kuopio (Finland); School of Pharmacy, Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Salonurmi, Tuire; Savolainen, Markku J. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. • Alcohol administration perturbs polyamine levels in the tissues with various patterns. • Total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc is critical for development. • The deficiency is associated with reduction in endothelial cell sprouting in the head. • Retarded migration of neural crest cells may cause development of neural tube defect. - Abstract: Introduction: Polyamines play a fundamental role during embryogenesis by regulating cell growth and proliferation and by interacting with RNA, DNA and protein. The polyamine pools are regulated by metabolism and uptake from exogenous sources. The use of certain inhibitors of polyamine synthesis causes similar defects to those seen in alcohol exposure e.g. retarded embryo growth and endothelial cell sprouting. Methods: CD-1 mice received two intraperitoneal injections of 3 g/kg ethanol at 4 h intervals 8.75 days post coitum (dpc). The fetal head, trunk, yolk sac and placenta were collected at 9.5 and 12.5 dpc and polyamine concentrations were determined. Results: No measurable quantity of polyamines could be detected in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc, 12 h after ethanol exposure. Putrescine was not detectable in the trunk of the embryo at that time, whereas polyamines in yolk sac and placenta were at control level. Polyamine deficiency was associated with slow cell growth, reduction in endothelial cell sprouting, an altered pattern of blood vessel network formation and consequently retarded migration of neural crest cells and growth restriction. Discussion: Our results indicate that the polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. Alcohol administration, at the critical stage, perturbs polyamine levels with various patterns, depending on the tissue and its developmental stage. The total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc may explain why this

  8. The influence of emittance of low-emittance coating on the thermal performance of triple vacuum glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Y.; Hyde, T.J.; Hewitt, N. [Ulster Univ., Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). School of the Built Environment

    2010-08-13

    The concept of vacuum glazing was first patented in 1913, and has since been the subject of much research. This paper used the finite volume model to investigate the effects low-e coating on one to four glass surfaces in the two vacuum gaps of triple vacuum glazing. The numerical simulation results were compared with those calculated using the analytical model. Specifically, the paper provided schematic diagrams of the triple vacuum glazing plan view and heat transfer mechanisms through the glazing and outlined the analytical and numerical model approach. The influence of emittance of low-emittance coatings was also discussed. The simulation results revealed that when using three low-e coatings in the triple vacuum glazing, the vacuum gap with two low-e coatings should be set to the direction facing the hot side environment, while the vacuum gap with one coating should face the cold environment. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  9. Cool and warm hybrid white organic light-emitting diode with blue delayed fluorescent emitter both as blue emitter and triplet host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Joo; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with an external quantum efficiency above 20% was developed using a new blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent material, 4,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (DCzIPN), both as a blue emitter and a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. DCzIPN showed high quantum efficiency of 16.4% as a blue emitter and 24.9% as a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. The hybrid WOLEDs with the DCzIPN host based yellow emitting layer sandwiched between DCzIPN emitter based blue emitting layers exhibited high external quantum efficiency of 22.9% with a warm white color coordinate of (0.39, 0.43) and quantum efficiency of 21.0% with a cool white color coordinate of (0.31, 0.33) by managing the thickness of the yellow emitting layer. PMID:25598436

  10. A novel integrase-containing element may interact with Laem-Singh virus (LSNV to cause slow growth in giant tiger shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriurairatana Siriporn

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From 2001-2003 monodon slow growth syndrome (MSGS caused severe economic losses for Thai shrimp farmers who cultivated the native, giant tiger shrimp, and this led them to adopt exotic stocks of the domesticated whiteleg shrimp as the species of cultivation choice, despite the higher value of giant tiger shrimp. In 2008, newly discovered Laem-Singh virus (LSNV was proposed as a necessary but insufficient cause of MSGS, and this stimulated the search for the additional component cause(s of MSGS in the hope that discovery would lead to preventative measures that could revive cultivation of the higher value native shrimp species. Results Using a universal shotgun cloning protocol, a novel RNA, integrase-containing element (ICE was found in giant tiger shrimp from MSGS ponds (GenBank accession number FJ498866. In situ hybridization probes and RT-PCR tests revealed that ICE and Laem-Singh virus (LSNV occurred together in lymphoid organs (LO of shrimp from MSGS ponds but not in shrimp from normal ponds. Tissue homogenates of shrimp from MSGS ponds yielded a fraction that gave positive RT-PCR reactions for both ICE and LSNV and showed viral-like particles by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Bioassays of this fraction with juvenile giant tiger shrimp resulted in retarded growth with gross signs of MSGS, and in situ hybridization assays revealed ICE and LSNV together in LO, eyes and gills. Viral-like particles similar to those seen in tissue extracts from natural infections were also seen by TEM. Conclusions ICE and LSNV were found together only in shrimp from MSGS ponds and only in shrimp showing gross signs of MSGS after injection with a preparation containing ICE and LSNV. ICE was never found in the absence of LSNV although LSNV was sometimes found in normal shrimp in the absence of ICE. The results suggest that ICE and LSNV may act together as component causes of MSGS, but this cannot be proven conclusively without single

  11. A novel integrase-containing element may interact with Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) to cause slow growth in giant tiger shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panphut, Wattana; Senapin, Saengchan; Sriurairatana, Siriporn; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Flegel, Timothy W

    2011-05-14

    From 2001-2003 monodon slow growth syndrome (MSGS) caused severe economic losses for Thai shrimp farmers who cultivated the native, giant tiger shrimp, and this led them to adopt exotic stocks of the domesticated whiteleg shrimp as the species of cultivation choice, despite the higher value of giant tiger shrimp. In 2008, newly discovered Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) was proposed as a necessary but insufficient cause of MSGS, and this stimulated the search for the additional component cause(s) of MSGS in the hope that discovery would lead to preventative measures that could revive cultivation of the higher value native shrimp species. Using a universal shotgun cloning protocol, a novel RNA, integrase-containing element (ICE) was found in giant tiger shrimp from MSGS ponds (GenBank accession number FJ498866). In situ hybridization probes and RT-PCR tests revealed that ICE and Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) occurred together in lymphoid organs (LO) of shrimp from MSGS ponds but not in shrimp from normal ponds. Tissue homogenates of shrimp from MSGS ponds yielded a fraction that gave positive RT-PCR reactions for both ICE and LSNV and showed viral-like particles by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Bioassays of this fraction with juvenile giant tiger shrimp resulted in retarded growth with gross signs of MSGS, and in situ hybridization assays revealed ICE and LSNV together in LO, eyes and gills. Viral-like particles similar to those seen in tissue extracts from natural infections were also seen by TEM. ICE and LSNV were found together only in shrimp from MSGS ponds and only in shrimp showing gross signs of MSGS after injection with a preparation containing ICE and LSNV. ICE was never found in the absence of LSNV although LSNV was sometimes found in normal shrimp in the absence of ICE. The results suggest that ICE and LSNV may act together as component causes of MSGS, but this cannot be proven conclusively without single and combined bioassays using purified preparations of

  12. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, Paenibacillus polymyxa and Paenibacillus lentimorbus suppress disease complex caused by root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S H; Khan, Z; Kim, S G; Kim, Y H

    2009-08-01

    To screen and evaluate the biocontrol potential of Paenibacillus strains against disease complex caused by Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici interactions. Paenibacillus strains were collected from rotten ginseng roots. The strains were tested under in vitro and pots for their inhibitory activities, and biocontrol potential against disease complex caused by M. incognita and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici on tomato. In in vitro experiments, among 40 tested strains of Paenibacillus spp., 11 strains showed antifungal and nematicidal activities against F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and M. incognita, respectively. Paenibacillus polymyxa GBR-462; GBR-508 and P. lentimorbus GBR-158 showed the strongest antifungal and nematicidal activities. These three strains used in pot experiment reduced the symptom development of the disease complex (wilting and plant death), and increased plant growth. The control effects were estimated to be 90-98%, and also reduced root gall formation by 64-88% compared to the untreated control. The protective properties of selected Paenibacillus strains make them as potential tool to reduce deleterious impact of disease complex plants. The study highlights biocontrol potential of Paenibacillus strains in management of disease complex caused by nematode-fungus interaction.

  13. DNA double strand breaks as predictor of efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter Ac-225 and the electron emitter Lu-177 for somatostatin receptor targeted radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Graf

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. METHODS: To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track, somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. RESULTS: Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5-10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g, though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%. Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC. CONCLUSION: γH2AX-foci formation, triggered

  14. Synthesis of Cu-doped InP nanocrystals (d-dots) with ZnSe diffusion barrier as efficient and color-tunable NIR emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Renguo; Peng, Xiaogang

    2009-08-05

    Efficient Cu-doped InP quantum dots (Cu:InP d-dots) emitters were successfully synthesized by epitaxial growth of a ZnSe diffusion barrier for the dopants. The Cu dopant emission of the Cu:InP/ZnSe core/shell d-dots covered the important red and near-infrared (NIR) window for biomedical applicaitons, from 630 to 1100 nm, by varying the size of the InP host nanocrystals. These new d-dots emitters not only compensate for the emission wavelength of the existing noncadmium d-dots emitters, Cu- and Mn-doped ZnSe d-dots (450-610 nm), but also offer a complete series of efficient nanocrystal emitters based on InP nanocrystals. The one-pot synthetic scheme for the formation of Cu:InP/ZnSe core/shell d-dots was successfully established by systematically studying the doping process, the dopant concentration-dependent photophysical properties, and the dopant diffusion during shell epitaxy, etc. Complete elimination of InP bandgap emission and efficient pure dopant emission (with photoluminescence quantum yield as high as between 35-40%) of the core/shell d-dots were achieved by optimizing the final doping level and the diffusion barrier thickness.

  15. High-Precision Resonant Cavity Beam Position, Emittance and Third-Moment Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Barov, Nikolai; Miller, Roger H; Nantista, Christopher D; Weidemann, A W

    2005-01-01

    Linear colliders and FEL facilities need fast, nondestructive beam position and profile monitors to facilitate machine tune-up, and for use with feedback control. FAR-TECH, Inc. is developing a resonant cavity diagnostic to simultaneously measure the dipole, quadrupole and sextupole moments of the beam distribution. Measurements of dipole and quadrupole moments at multiple locations yield information about beam orbit and emittance. The sextupole moment can reveal information about beam asymmetry which is useful in diagnosing beam tail deflections caused by short range dipole wakefields. In addition to the resonance enhancement of a single-cell cavity, use of a multi-cell standign-wave structure further enhances signal strength and improves the resolution of the device. An estimated rms beam size resolution is sub micro-meters and beam position is sub nano-meter.

  16. Five-Level Common-Emitter Inverter Using Reverse-Blocking IGBTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Noguchi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In a high switching frequency operation of current-source inverter (CSI, a conventional way to obtain unidirectional power switches is by connecting discrete diodes in series with the high speed power switches, i.e. power MOSFETs or IGBTs. However, these discrete diodes will cause extra losses to the power converter. This paper presents experimental test results of high switching frequency five-level common-emitter CSI using the emerging unidirectional power switches, i.e. reverse blocking (RB-IGBTs. Experimental tests were also conducted to compare the performance between power MOSFETs in series with the discrete diodes, and the RB-IGBTs having inherent reverse blocking capability. The results show that using RB-IGBTs, the efficiency of the power converter will increase. However, it is also confirmed that the recently available RB-IGBTs have slow reverse recovery current than the discrete fast-recovery diodes connected in series with power MOSFETs.

  17. PECASE: Resonantly-Enhanced Lanthanide Emitters for Subwavelength-Scale, Active Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-19

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0052 PECASE- RESONATLY-ENHANCHED LANTHANIDE EMITTERS FOR SUBWAVELENGTH-SCALE, ACTIVE Photonics Rashid Zia BROWN UNIVERSITY IN...From - To) 15 Dec. 2009 – 14 Dec. 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE i i i 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER PECASE: Resonantly-Enhanced Lanthanide Emitters for...PECASE: Resonantly-Enhanced Lanthanide Emitters for Subwavelength-Scale, Active Photonics Contract/Grant #: FA9550-10-1-0026 Reporting Period: 15

  18. Volatile organic compounds from Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibit growth of decay causing fungi and control postharvest diseases of strawberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, Lucia; Feliziani, Erica; Ciani, Maurizio; Romanazzi, Gianfranco; Comitini, Francesca

    2018-01-16

    The effectiveness of Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as biocontrol agents on postharvest decay of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, cv. 'Alba') fruit, and their inhibitory activities on some decay-causing fungi were evaluated. Volatile organic compounds from these yeasts decreased mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea by 69%, and by less for Monilinia fructicola, Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus carbonarius, Penicillium digitatum, Cladosporium spp., and Colletotrichum spp. Strawberry fruit exposed to 6-day-old liquid cultures of W. anomalus, M. pulcherrima and S. cerevisiae for 48h showed 89%, 40%, and 32% reductions, respectively, in gray mold McKinney Index. Vapours of ethyl acetate, the main volatile organic compound of these yeasts, completely inhibited B. cinerea growth at 8.97mg/cm3, and suppressed gray mold on strawberry fruit at 0.718mg/cm3. The biocontrol activities of these yeasts can be ascribed to ethyl acetate, which can be used for control of postharvest gray mold of strawberry fruit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Small molecule inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 by volasertib (BI 6727) causes significant melanoma growth delay and regression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Brian D; Ndiaye, Mary A; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xiaoqi; Ahmad, Nihal

    2017-01-28

    The objective of this study was to determine the therapeutic potential of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) inhibition in melanoma, in vivo. Employing Vectra technology, we assessed the Plk1 expression profile in benign nevi, malignant (stages I-IV) and metastatic melanomas. We found a significant elevation of Plk1 immunostaining in melanoma tissues. Further, a second generation small molecule Plk1 inhibitor, BI 6727, resulted in reductions in growth, viability and clonogenic survival, as well as an increase in apoptosis of A375 and Hs 294T melanoma cells. BI 6727 treatment also resulted in a G2/M-as well as S-phase cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Importantly, BI 6727 (intravenous injection; 10 and 25 mg/kg body weight) treatment resulted in significant tumor growth delay and regression in vivo in A375-and Hs 294T-implanted xenografts in athymic nude mice. These anti-melanoma effects were accompanied with a decreased cellular proliferation (Ki-67 staining) and induction of apoptosis (caspase 3 activation). In addition, BI 6727 treatment caused a marked induction of p53 and p21 in vitro as well as in vivo. Overall, we suggest that Plk1 inhibition may be a useful approach as a monotherapy as well as in combination with other existing therapeutics, for melanoma management. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Specified gas emitters regulation : offset credit project guidance document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-09-15

    The Alberta Government has developed a carbon compliance system to take action against climate change. The system allows emission offsets as a compliance option. As of July 2007, Alberta's regulatory system for managing greenhouse gases has enabled a compliance-based carbon market to develop in the province by establishing market demand through regulated emission reduction targets for large emitters and by enabling market supply through allowing emission offsets as a compliance option for regulated emitters. Regulated firms in Alberta can now buy verified emission reductions or removal of greenhouse gases from voluntary actions arising from unregulated activities in the province. This market-based approach offers flexibility for emitters, since markets generally determine the most cost-effective emission reduction opportunities. In addition, the ability to sell offsets provides an incentive to invest in activities that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions beyond regulated activities. Since this approach is new, this guidance document was prepared in an effort to outline the process and requirements for undertaking offset projects in Alberta. The market-based approach is an alternative to traditional command and control measures to reducing pollution. It allows for the flexibility of the private market to find reduction opportunities, resulting in cost-effective strategies to reduce greenhouse gases. The approach has been used successfully for sulphur dioxide and lead in gasoline. An emission offset (or a carbon credit) is generated when a project results in GHG reduction or removals that go beyond normal business operations. This document defined the criteria needed for generating offsets in the Alberta system. 2 tabs., 3 figs., 2 appendices.

  1. Experimental studies on coherent synchrotron radiation at an emittance exchange beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. T. Thangaraj

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate experimentally the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line could limit the performance of the emittance exchanger at short bunch lengths. In this paper, we present experimental and simulation studies of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR in the emittance exchange line at the A0 photoinjector. We report on time-resolved CSR studies using a skew-quadrupole technique. We also demonstrate the advantages of running the EEX with an energy-chirped beam.

  2. High-efficient thermoemission electron source with emitter of lanthanum hexaboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iremashvili, D.V.; Sukhomlinov, V.V.; Ksenofontov, V.A.; Chanturidze, V.G.; Petrakov, V.E.; Avatinyan, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    A high-efficient thermoemission electron source with LaB/sub 6/ emitter and indirect heating is described. The design of cathode unit with 30 and 50 mm diameters of emitter is given. The technique for investigating the source operation is described. At high reliability of operation the cathode unit provides with approximately 2 kA current at approximately 2000 K working temperature of the emitter. Permissible time of heating is approximately 15 min. Operation life of the cathode unit is 500 h at 2000 K temperature of the emitter multiple depressurizing (> 100 times).

  3. Effect of dipole orientation on Purcell factor for the quantum emitter near silicon nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalogina, Anastasia S.; Javadzade, Javid; Zuev, Dmitry A.; Savelev, Roman S.; Vorobyov, Vadim V.; Makarov, Sergey V.; Belov, Pavel A.; Akimov, Alexey V.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the optical properties of quantum emitters is the cornerstone of many phenomena in nanophotonics. Spontaneous emission from quantum emitters can be modified when they are placed in resonators, for example, near plasmonic or dielectric nanoantennas. We numerically study the Purcell factor of the emitter inside a nanodiamond placed near the resonant silicon nanoparticle. We show that in this system the 11-fold enhancement can be achieved for a specific orientation of the dipole moment of the emitter. The obtained results are of particular importance for nanophotonic applications which aim to control optical properties of quantum light sources.

  4. Method of manufacturing a hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2017-02-07

    A method of manufacturing an all back contact solar cell which has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. A second emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The method further includes forming contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  5. High Turndown Ratio, High Delta-Emittance, Variable Emissivity Electrochromics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Among thermal control methods, variable-emittance materials remain the most promising for addressing deficiencies of current systems (mechanical louvers, loop heat...

  6. Ultrahigh-vacuum field emitter array wafer tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, H.F.; Ardis, L.; Campisi, G.J.

    1987-02-01

    The device reported here allows the researcher the opportunity of gaining primitive yield information, threshold voltages, emission stability, and other information, e.g., gas effects, on field emitter arrays (FEA) which are microminiature ''vacuum tubes'' fabricated by microelectronic processing methods on silicon wafers, without scribing, dicing, and mounting each device on individual vacuum-compatible headers. This device also speeds up the entire data-acquisition process by requiring only one ultrahigh-vacuum pumpdown and one set of vacuum feedthroughs.

  7. Revisiting the Level Scheme of the Proton Emitter 151Lu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.; Sun, B. H.; Liu, Z.; Scholey, C.; Ashley, S. F.; Bianco, L.; Cullen, D. M.; Cullen, I. J.; Darby, I. G.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jones, G. A.; Jones, P.; Joss, D. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kettelhut, S.; Khan, S.; Kishada, A.; Leino, M.; Niikura, M.; Nyman, M.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Pietri, S.; Podolyak, Z.; Rahkila, P.; Rigby, S.; Saren, J.; Seweryniak, D.; Shizuma, T.; Simpson, J.; Sorri, J.; Steer, S.; Thompson, N. J.; Uusitalo, J.; Walker, P. M.; Williams, S.

    An experiment aiming to search for new isomers in the region of proton emitter 151Lu was performed at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä (JYFL), by combining the high resolution γ-ray array JUROGAM, gas-filled RITU separator and GREAT detectors with the triggerless total data readout acquisition (TDR) system. In this proceeding, we revisit the level scheme of 151Lu by using the proton-tagging technique. A level scheme consistent with the latest experimental results is obtained, and 3 additional levels are identified at high excitation energies.

  8. Quantum emitters coupled to surface plasmons of an nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzsotjan, David; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a system consisting of a single, as well as two emitters strongly coupled to surface plasmon modes of a nanowire using a Green's function approach. Explicit expressions are derived for the spontaneous decay rate into the plasmon modes and for the atom-plasmon coupling as well...... as a plasmon-mediated atom-atom coupling. Phenomena due to the presence of losses in the metal are discussed. In case of two atoms, we observe Dicke subradiance and superradiance resulting from their plasmon-mediated interaction. Based on this phenomenon, we propose a scheme for a deterministic two...

  9. Coupling of individual quantum emitters to channel plasmons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bermúdez-Urena, E.; Gonzalez-Ballestero, C.; Geiselmann, M.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient light-matter interaction lies at the heart of many emerging technologies that seek on-chip integration of solid-state photonic systems. Plasmonic waveguides, which guide the radiation in the form of strongly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes, represent a promising solution...... the position and orientation of the quantum emitter for optimum coupling. Concomitantly with these predictions, we demonstrate experimentally that 42% of a single nitrogen-vacancy centre emission efficiently couples into the supported modes of the V-groove. This work paves the way towards practical realization...

  10. QEC value of the superallowed β emitter 42Sc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eronen, T.; Hardy, J. C.; Canete, L.; Jokinen, A.; Hakala, J.; Kankainen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Koponen, J.; Moore, I. D.; Murray, I. M.; Penttilä, H.; Pohjalainen, I.; Poleshchuk, O.; Reinikainen, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Soukouti, N.; Voss, A.; ńystö, J.

    2017-02-01

    The QEC value of the superallowed β+ emitter 42Sc has been measured with the JYFLTRAP Penning-trap mass spectrometer at the University of Jyväskylä to be 6426.350(53) keV. This result is at least a factor of four more precise than all previous measurements, which were also inconsistent with one another. As a byproduct we determine the excitation energy of the 7+ isomeric state in 42Sc to be 616.762(46) keV, which deviates by 8 σ from the previous measurement.

  11. Analysis of measured radar data for specific emitter identification

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Conning_2010.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 19790 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Conning_2010.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Analysis of Measured Radar Data... for Specific Emitter Identification Mariëtte Conning and Ferdie Potgieter Defence, Peace, Safety and Security Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Pretoria, South Africa mconning@csir.co.za Abstract—Measured radar data assisted...

  12. Longitudinal emittance control in high intensity proton synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinto, K.; Takagi, A.; Machida, S.; Yoshii, M.; Mori, Y.; Koba, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    Experiments of synchrotron injection using the direct fast chopped H{sup -} beam extracted from a surface-plasma-type H{sup -} ion source has been successfully achieved. The injection phase of the fast chopped beam from linac into the booster synchrotron is adjustable to the center of rf bucket by using this beam. It was obtained that the longitudinal emittance was controlled at the extraction of the booster synchrotron, and that the beam loss during the injection into main ring of the KEK-PS was reduced by this fast chopped beam. (author)

  13. Listeria monocytogenes virulence factor Listeriolysin O favors bacterial growth in co-culture with the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis, causes protozoan encystment and promotes bacterial survival inside cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermolaeva Svetlana A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is widely spread in the nature. L. monocytogenes was reported to be isolated from soil, water, sewage and sludge. Listeriolysin O (LLO is a L. monocytogenes major virulence factor. In the course of infection in mammals, LLO is required for intracellular survival and apoptosis induction in lymphocytes. In this study, we explored the potential of LLO to promote interactions between L. monocytogenes and the ubiquitous inhabitant of natural ecosystems bacteriovorous free-living ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. Results Wild type L. monocytogenes reduced T. pyriformis trophozoite counts and stimulated encystment. The effects were observed starting from 48 h of co-incubation. On the day 14, trophozoites were eliminated from the co-culture while about 5 × 104 cells/ml remained in the axenic T. pyriformis culture. The deficient in the LLO-encoding hly gene L. monocytogenes strain failed to cause mortality among protozoa and to trigger protozoan encystment. Replenishment of the hly gene in the mutant strain restored toxicity towards protozoa and induction of protozoan encystment. The saprophytic non-haemolytic species L. innocua transformed with the LLO-expressing plasmid caused extensive mortality and encystment in ciliates. During the first week of co-incubation, LLO-producing L. monocytogenes demonstrated higher growth rates in association with T. pyriformis than the LLO-deficient isogenic strain. At latter stages of co-incubation bacterial counts were similar for both strains. T. pyriformis cysts infected with wild type L. monocytogenes caused listerial infection in guinea pigs upon ocular and oral inoculation. The infection was proved by bacterial plating from the internal organs. Conclusions The L. monocytogenes virulence factor LLO promotes bacterial survival and growth in the presence of bacteriovorous ciliate T. pyriformis. LLO is responsible for L. monocytogenes

  14. A Complete Census of Hα Emitters in NGC 6397

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallanca, Cristina; Beccari, Giacomo; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Pasquini, Luca; Lanzoni, Barbara; Mucciarelli, Alessio

    2017-08-01

    We used a data set of archival Hubble Space Telescope images obtained through the F555W, F814W, and F656N filters to perform a complete search for objects showing {{H}}α emission in the globular cluster NGC 6397. As a photometric diagnostic, we used the {(V-{{H}}α )}0 color excess in the {(V-{{H}}α )}0-{(V-I)}0 color-color diagram. In the analyzed field of view, we identified 53 {{H}}α emitters. In particular, we confirmed the optical counterpart to 20 X-ray sources (7 cataclysmic variables, 2 millisecond pulsars and 11 active binaries) and identified 33 previously unknown sources, thus significantly enlarging the population of known active binaries in this cluster. We report the main characteristics for each class of objects. Photometric estimates of the equivalent width of the {{H}}α emission line were derived from the {(V-{{H}}α )}0-excess and, for the first time, compared to the spectroscopic measurements obtained from the analysis of MUSE spectra. The very good agreement between the spectroscopic and photometric measures fully confirmed the reliability of the proposed approach to measure the {{H}}α emission. The search demonstrated the efficiency of this novel approach to pinpoint and measure {{H}}α -emitters, thus offering a powerful tool to conduct a complete census of objects with formations and evolutions that can be strongly affected by dynamical interactions in star clusters.

  15. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  16. A laboratory goniometer system for measuring reflectance and emittance anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosjen, Peter P J; Clevers, Jan G P W; Bartholomeus, Harm M; Schaepman, Michael E; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela; Jalink, Henk; van der Schoor, Rob; de Jong, Arjan

    2012-12-13

    In this paper, a laboratory goniometer system for performing multi-angular measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A commercially available robotic arm enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements over the full hemisphere within a short time span making it much faster than other goniometers. In addition, the presented set-up enables assessment of anisotropic reflectance and emittance behaviour of soils, leaves and small canopies. Mounting a spectrometer enables acquisition of either hemispherical measurements or measurements in the horizontal plane. Mounting a thermal camera allows directional observations of the thermal emittance. This paper also presents three showcases of these different measurement set-ups in order to illustrate its possibilities. Finally, suggestions for applying this instrument and for future research directions are given, including linking the measured reflectance anisotropy with physically-based anisotropy models on the one hand and combining them with field goniometry measurements for joint analysis with remote sensing data on the other hand. The speed and flexibility of the system offer a large added value to the existing pool of laboratory goniometers.

  17. Longitudinal emittance reduction in LEIR of ion beams for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Findlay, A; Hancock, S; Manglunki, D

    2014-01-01

    For the 2013 LHC ion run the anticipated request for batches from the PS Complex comprising four ion bunches spaced by 100 ns was changed to batches of two bunches spaced by 200 ns. This modified demand was met by suppressing a splitting step in the PS machine, but with the consequence of halving the longitudinal emittance required from LEIR. Thus NOMINAL Pb54+ beams from LEIR had to be delivered inside ~9 eVs to provide sufficient blow-up margin in the PS. Machine Development (MD) sessions were carried out in LEIR to investigate methods to satisfy these stricter requirements. Two main ingredients were found to reduce longitudinal emittance. The first and most important was to adjust carefully the frequency offset at capture in order to align the RF with the position where the beam is deposited by the electron cooling system prior to acceleration. The second ingredient was to reduce the final bucket area in order to reduce any residual filamentation during capture. This note documents the results obtaine...

  18. Rayleigh scattering in an emitter-nanofiber-coupling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shui-Jing; Gao, Fei; Xu, Da; Li, Yan; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2017-04-01

    Scattering is a general process in both fundamental and applied physics. In this paper, we investigate Rayleigh scattering of a solid-state-emitter coupled to a nanofiber, by S -matrix-like theory in k -space description. Under this model, both Rayleigh scattering and dipole interaction are studied between a two-level artificial atom embedded in a nanocrystal and fiber modes (guided and radiation modes). It is found that Rayleigh scattering plays a critical role in the transport properties and quantum statistics of photons. On the one hand, Rayleigh scattering produces the transparency in the optical transmitted field of the nanofiber, accompanied by the change of atomic phase, population, and frequency shift. On the other hand, the interference between two kinds of scattering fields by Rayleigh scattering and dipole transition modifies the photon statistics (second-order autocorrelation function) of output fields, showing a strong wavelength dependence. This study provides guidance for the solid-state emitter acting as a single-photon source and can be extended to explore the scattering effect in many-body physics.

  19. Infrared Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Carbon Nanotube Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Arko; Murawski, Caroline; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C

    2018-01-30

    While organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) covering all colors of the visible spectrum are widespread, suitable organic emitter materials in the near-infrared (nIR) beyond 800 nm are still lacking. Here, the first OLED based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the emitter is demonstrated. By using a multilayer stacked architecture with matching charge blocking and charge-transport layers, narrow-band electroluminescence at wavelengths between 1000 and 1200 nm is achieved, with spectral features characteristic of excitonic and trionic emission of the employed (6,5) SWCNTs. Here, the OLED performance is investigated in detail and it is found that local conduction hot-spots lead to pronounced trion emission. Analysis of the emissive dipole orientation shows a strong horizontal alignment of the SWCNTs with an average inclination angle of 12.9° with respect to the plane, leading to an exceptionally high outcoupling efficiency of 49%. The SWCNT-based OLEDs represent a highly attractive platform for emission across the entire nIR. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Kevin L., E-mail: kevin.jensen@nrl.navy.mil [Code 6854, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Rittersdorf, Ian M. [Code 6770, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lebowitz, Joel L. [Department of Mathematics and Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Harris, John R. [U.S. Navy Reserve, New Orleans, Louisiana 70143 (United States); Lau, Y. Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Petillo, John J. [Leidos, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States); Luginsland, John W. [Physics and Electronics Directorate, AFOSR, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  1. Study of stacked-emitter layer for high efficiency amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngseok; Kim, Heewon; Iftiquar, S. M.; Kim, Sunbo; Kim, Sangho; Ahn, Shihyun; Lee, Youn-Jung; Dao, Vinh Ai; Yi, Junsin

    2014-12-01

    A modified emitter, of stacked two layer structure, was investigated for high-efficiency amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction (HJ) solar cells. Surface area of the cells was 181.5 cm2. The emitter was designed to achieve a high open circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF). When doping of the emitter layer was increased, it was observed that the silicon dihydride related structural defects within the films increased, and the Voc of the HJ cell decreased. On the other hand, while the doping concentration of the emitter was reduced the FF of the cell reduced. Therefore, a combination of a high conductivity and low defects of a single emitter layer appears difficult to obtain, yet becomes necessary to improve the cell performance. So, we investigated a stacked-emitter with low-doped/high-doped double layer structure. A low-doped emitter with reduced defect density was deposited over the intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon passivation layer, while the high-doped emitter with high conductivity was deposited over the low-doped emitter. The effects of doping and defect density of the emitter, on the device performance, were elucidated by using computer simulation and an optimized device structure was formulated. The simulation was performed with the help of Automat for the Simulation of Heterostructures simulation software. Finally, based on the simulation results, amorphous/crystalline heterojunction silicon solar cells were optimized by reducing density of defect states in the stacked-emitter structure and we obtained 725 mV, 77.41%, and 19.0% as the open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and photo-voltaic conversion efficiency of the device, respectively.

  2. Design study of a low-emittance high-repetition rate thermionic rf gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasenko, A.; Mytrochenko, V.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Goryashko, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    We propose a novel gridless continuous-wave radiofrequency (rf) thermionic gun capable of generating nC ns electron bunches with a rms normalized slice emittance close to the thermal level of 0.3 mm mrad. In order to gate the electron emission, an externally heated thermionic cathode is installed into a stripline-loop conductor. Two high-voltage pulses propagating towards each other in the stripline-loop overlap in the cathode region and create a quasielectrostatic field gating the electron emission. The repetition rate of pulses is variable and can reach up to one MHz with modern solid-state pulsers. The stripline attached to a rf gun cavity wall has with the wall a common aperture that allows the electrons to be injected into the rf cavity for further acceleration. Thanks to this innovative gridless design, simulations suggest that the bunch emittance is approximately at the thermal level after the bunch injection into the cavity provided that the geometry of the cathode and aperture are properly designed. Specifically, a concave cathode is adopted to imprint an Ƨ-shaped distribution onto the beam transverse phase-space to compensate for an S-shaped beam distribution created by the spherical aberration of the aperture-cavity region. In order to compensate for the energy spread caused by rf fields of the rf gun cavity, a 3rd harmonic cavity is used. A detailed study of the electrodynamics of the stripline and rf gun cavity as well as the beam optics and bunch dynamics are presented.

  3. Nitric oxide causes root apical meristem defects and growth inhibition while reducing PIN-FORMED 1 (PIN1)-dependent acropetal auxin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Marcos, María; Sanz, Luis; Lewis, Daniel R.; Muday, Gloria K.; Lorenzo, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is considered a key regulator of plant developmental processes and defense, although the mechanism and direct targets of NO action remain largely unknown. We used phenotypic, cellular, and genetic analyses in Arabidopsis thaliana to explore the role of NO in regulating primary root growth and auxin transport. Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, sodium nitroprusside, and S-nitrosoglutathione reduces cell division, affecting the distribution of mitotic cells and meristem size by reducing cell size and number compared with NO depletion by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO). Interestingly, genetic backgrounds in which the endogenous NO levels are enhanced [chlorophyll a/b binding protein underexpressed 1/NO overproducer 1 (cue1/nox1) mirror this response, together with an increased cell differentiation phenotype. Because of the importance of auxin distribution in regulating primary root growth, we analyzed auxin-dependent response after altering NO levels. Both elevated NO supply and the NO-overproducing Arabidopsis mutant cue1/nox1 exhibit reduced expression of the auxin reporter markers DR5pro:GUS/GFP. These effects were accompanied by a reduction in auxin transport in primary roots. NO application and the cue1/nox1 mutation caused decreased PIN-FORMED 1 (PIN1)-GFP fluorescence in a proteasome-independent manner. Remarkably, the cue1/nox1-mutant root phenotypes resemble those of pin1 mutants. The use of both chemical treatments and mutants with altered NO levels demonstrates that high levels of NO reduce auxin transport and response by a PIN1-dependent mechanism, and root meristem activity is reduced concomitantly. PMID:22021439

  4. Effect of Seed Priming on Growth and Some Physiological Characteristics of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. under salinity Stress Condition caused by Alkali Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bekhrad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Sesame (Sesamun indicum L. is an important oil seed crop. Its seed has excellent nutritional value with a high and unique protein composition, making it a perfect food. Salinity is a serious problem in many regions of the world including Iran. Salinity stress is one of the widespread environmental constraints affecting crop productivity. Salinity generally induces osmotic stress and causes direct ion injury by disrupting ion homeostasis and the ion balance within plant cells (25. Seed priming is one of the ways to reduce negative effects of salt which is used for increasing germination percentage and seed resistance in salty zones. Seed priming is a pre-germination treatment that provides a moisture level sufficient to start pre-germination metabolic processes. It entails the partial germination of seeds by soaking them in water (or in a solution of salts for specified period of time, and then re-dry them just before radicle emerges (24. Priming stimulates many of the metabolic processes involved with the early phases of germination. Given that part of the germination processes have been initiated, seedlings from primed seed grow faster, grow more vigorously, and perform better in adverse conditions (24. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of salinity stress caused by alkali salts on growth and some physiologic characteristics of sesame. Materials and Methods This study was conducted in a greenhouse in Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan as factorial arrangement in randomized complete block design with three replications. Experimental factors included priming (control (unprimed, hydropriming, halopriming with NaCl and NaHCO3 and level of salinity with sodium bicarbonate salt (Zero, 15, 30 and 45 mM. Seeds were planted in pots filled with perlite and cocopite (1:1. The pots were irrigated with a nutrient solution (with half strength Hoagland's solution. After the fourth true leaves appeared, salinty stress in

  5. Self-consistent β functions and emittances of round colliding beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Otboyev

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The flip-flop effect with the linearized beam-beam force is formulated through self-consistent β functions and equilibrium emittances which are both affected by collision. We give the results of two models of emittance dependence. The effect of finite bunch length is also discussed.

  6. Crucial role of the emitter-particle distance on the directivity of optical antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolly, Brice; Stout, Brian; Bidault, Sebastien; Bonod, Nicolas

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate that the reflecting properties of a single particle nanoantenna can be extremely sensitive to its distance from a quantum emitter at frequencies lower than the plasmon resonance. The phenomenon is shown to arise from rapid phase variations of the emitter field at short distances associated with a phase of the antenna particle polarizability lower than π/4.

  7. A transverse emittance and acceptance measurement system in a low-energy beam transport line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, H; Miyawaki, N; Kurashima, S; Okumura, S

    2014-02-01

    A transverse beam emittance and acceptance measurement system has been developed to visualize the relationship between the injected beam emittance and the acceptance of a cyclotron. The system is composed of a steering magnet, two pairs of slits to limit the horizontal and vertical phase-space, a beam intensity detector just behind the slits for the emittance measurement, and a beam intensity detector in the cyclotron for the acceptance measurement. The emittance is obtained by scanning the slits and measuring the beam intensity distribution. The acceptance is obtained by measuring the distribution of relative beam transmission by injecting small emittance beams at various positions in a transverse phase-space using the slits. In the acceptance measurement, the beam from an ion source is deflected to the defined region by the slits using the steering magnet so that measurable acceptance area covers a region outside the injection beam emittance. Measurement tests were carried out under the condition of accelerating a beam of (16)O(6+) from 50.2 keV to 160 MeV. The emittance of the injected beam and the acceptance for accelerating and transporting the beam to the entrance of the extraction deflector were successfully measured. The relationship between the emittance and acceptance is visualized by displaying the results in the same phase-plane.

  8. Low-emittance tuning at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shanks

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 the Cornell Electron/Positron Storage Ring (CESR was reconfigured from an electron/positron collider to serve as a test bed for the International Linear Collider damping rings. One of the primary goals of the CESR Test Accelerator (CesrTA project is to develop a fast low-emittance tuning method which scales well to large rings such as the ILC damping rings, and routinely achieves a vertical emittance of order 10 pm at 2.085 GeV. This paper discusses the tuning methods developed at CesrTA to achieve low-emittance conditions. One iteration of beam-based measurement and correction requires about 10 min. A minimum vertical emittance of 10.3(+3.2/−3.4^{sys}(±0.2^{stat}  pm has been achieved at 2.085 GeV. In various configurations and beam energies the correction technique routinely achieves vertical emittance around 10 pm after correction, with rms coupling <0.5%. The measured vertical dispersion is dominated by beam position monitor systematics. The propagation of uncertainties in the emittance measurement is described in detail. Simulations modeling the effects of magnet misalignments, beam position monitor errors, and the emittance correction algorithm suggest the residual vertical emittance measured at the conclusion of the tuning procedure is dominated by sources other than optics errors and misalignments.

  9. Annealed Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} emitter silicon heterojunction bipolar transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcubilla, R.; Bardes, D.; Orpella, A.; Calderer, J. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. d`Enginyeria Electronica; Marsal, L.F.; Pallares, J.; Correig, X. [Dept. d`Enginyeria Electronica, Univ. Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain)

    1998-08-01

    Non crystalline silicon-carbon alloys have been proposed as wide band gap materials to be used as emitters in silicon heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT). In this work we present the fabrication of HBTs with a PECVD deposited amorphous Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} emitter followed by a thermal annealing, and its characterisation. (orig.) 7 refs.

  10. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm-2) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm-2 for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm-2). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  11. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator - presentation slides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    Direct emittance measurement based on vertical undulator is discussed. Emittance was evaluated from peak ratios, the smallest measured being =0.9 ±0.3 pm rad. The angular distribution of undulator radiation departs from Gaussian approximations, a fact of which diffraction-limited light sources should be aware.

  12. Growth-hormone-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 signaling causes gigantism, inflammation, and premature death but protects mice from aggressive liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedbichler, Katrin; Themanns, Madeleine; Mueller, Kristina M; Schlederer, Michaela; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm; Terracciano, Luigi M; Kozlov, Andrey V; Haindl, Susanne; Kenner, Lukas; Kolbe, Thomas; Mueller, Mathias; Snibson, Kenneth J; Heim, Markus H; Moriggl, Richard

    2012-03-01

    Persistently high levels of growth hormone (GH) can cause liver cancer. GH activates multiple signal-transduction pathways, among them janus kinase (JAK) 2-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 5). Both hyperactivation and deletion of STAT5 in hepatocytes have been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); nevertheless, the role of STAT5 in the development of HCC as a result of high GH levels remains enigmatic. Thus, we crossed a mouse model of gigantism and inflammatory liver cancer caused by hyperactivated GH signaling (GH(tg) ) to mice with hepatic deletion of STAT5 (STAT5(Δhep) ). Unlike GH(tg) mice, GH(tg) STAT5(Δhep) animals did not display gigantism. Moreover, the premature mortality, which was associated with chronic inflammation, as well as the pathologic alterations of hepatocytes observed in GH(tg) mice, were not observed in GH(tg) animals lacking STAT5. Strikingly, loss of hepatic STAT5 proteins led to enhanced HCC development in GH(tg) mice. Despite reduced chronic inflammation, GH(tg) STAT5(Δhep) mice displayed earlier and more advanced HCC than GH(tg) animals. This may be attributed to the combination of increased peripheral lipolysis, hepatic lipid synthesis, loss of hepatoprotective mediators accompanied by aberrant activation of tumor-promoting c-JUN and STAT3 signaling cascades, and accumulation of DNA damage secondary to loss of cell-cycle control. Thus, HCC was never observed in STAT5(Δhep) mice. As a result of their hepatoprotective functions, STAT5 proteins prevent progressive fatty liver disease and the formation of aggressive HCC in the setting of hyperactivated GH signaling. At the same time, they play a key role in controlling systemic inflammation and regulating organ and body size. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. Sub-bandgap response of graphene/SiC Schottky emitter bipolar phototransistor examined by scanning photocurrent microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Bobby G., Jr.; Chava, Venkata Surya N.; Daniels, Kevin M.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.; Greytak, Andrew B.

    2018-01-01

    Graphene layers grown epitaxially on SiC substrates are attractive for a variety of sensing and optoelectronic applications because the graphene acts as a transparent, conductive, and chemically responsive layer that is mated to a wide-bandgap semiconductor with large breakdown voltage. Recent advances in control of epitaxial growth and doping of SiC epilayers have increased the range of electronic device architectures that are accessible with this system. In particular, a recently-introduced Schottky-emitter bipolar phototransistor (SEPT) based on an epitaxial graphene (EG) emitter grown on a p-SiC base epilayer has been found to exhibit a maximum common emitter current gain of 113 and a UV responsivity of 7.1 A W‑1. The behavior of this device, formed on an n +-SiC substrate that serves as the collector, was attributed to a very large minority carrier injection efficiency at the EG/p-SiC Schottky contact. This large minority carrier injection efficiency is in turn related to the large built-in potential found at a EG/p-SiC Schottky junction. The high performance of this device makes it critically important to analyze the sub bandgap visible response of the device, which provides information on impurity states and polytype inclusions in the crystal. Here, we employ scanning photocurrent microscopy (SPCM) with sub-bandgap light as well as a variety of other techniques to clearly demonstrate a localized response based on the graphene transparent electrode and an approximately 1000-fold difference in responsivity between 365 nm and 444 nm excitation. A stacking fault propagating from the substrate/epilayer interface, assigned as a single layer of the 8H-SiC polytype within the 4H-SiC matrix, is found to locally increase the photocurrent substantially. The discovery of this polytype heterojunction opens the potential for further development of heteropolytype devices based on the SEPT architecture.

  14. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, D.T.; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; /Brookhaven; Miller, R.H.; /SLAC; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; /Brookhaven; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; /Brookhaven; Winick, H.; /SLAC; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  15. Deterministic strain-induced arrays of quantum emitters in a two-dimensional semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branny, Artur; Kumar, Santosh; Proux, Raphaël; Gerardot, Brian D.

    2017-05-01

    An outstanding challenge in quantum photonics is scalability, which requires positioning of single quantum emitters in a deterministic fashion. Site positioning progress has been made in established platforms including defects in diamond and self-assembled quantum dots, albeit often with compromised coherence and optical quality. The emergence of single quantum emitters in layered transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors offers new opportunities to construct a scalable quantum architecture. Here, using nanoscale strain engineering, we deterministically achieve a two-dimensional lattice of quantum emitters in an atomically thin semiconductor. We create point-like strain perturbations in mono- and bi-layer WSe2 which locally modify the band-gap, leading to efficient funnelling of excitons towards isolated strain-tuned quantum emitters that exhibit high-purity single photon emission. We achieve near unity emitter creation probability and a mean positioning accuracy of 120+/-32 nm, which may be improved with further optimization of the nanopillar dimensions.

  16. Deterministic Coupling of Quantum Emitters in 2D Materials to Plasmonic Nanocavity Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Wang, Danqing; Xu, Zai-Quan; Yang, Ankun; Toth, Milos; Odom, Teri W; Aharonovich, Igor

    2017-04-12

    Quantum emitters in two-dimensional materials are promising candidates for studies of light-matter interaction and next generation, integrated on-chip quantum nanophotonics. However, the realization of integrated nanophotonic systems requires the coupling of emitters to optical cavities and resonators. In this work, we demonstrate hybrid systems in which quantum emitters in 2D hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) are deterministically coupled to high-quality plasmonic nanocavity arrays. The plasmonic nanoparticle arrays offer a high-quality, low-loss cavity in the same spectral range as the quantum emitters in hBN. The coupled emitters exhibit enhanced emission rates and reduced fluorescence lifetimes, consistent with Purcell enhancement in the weak coupling regime. Our results provide the foundation for a versatile approach for achieving scalable, integrated hybrid systems based on low-loss plasmonic nanoparticle arrays and 2D materials.

  17. Measurements of Transverse Emittance for RF Photocathode Gun at the PAL

    CERN Document Server

    Park Jang Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Soo Ko In; Wang, Xijie; Woon Parc, Yong; Xiang, Dao

    2005-01-01

    A BNL GUN-IV type RF photo-cathode gun is under fabrication for use in the FIR (Far Infra-Red) facility being built at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). Performance test of the gun will include the measurement of transverse emittance profile along the longitudinal direction. Successful measurement of the emittance profile will provide powerful tool for the commissioning of the 4GLS (4th generation light source) injectors based on the emittance compensation principle. We are going to achieve this withthe use of pepper-pot based emittance meters that can be moved along the longitudinal direction. In this article, we present design considerations on the emittance meter with the resolution of 1 mm mrad.

  18. Membrane-Based Emitter for Coupling Microfluidics with Ultrasensitive Nanoelectrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xuefei; Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-06-09

    An integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane-based microfluidic emitter for high performance nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) has been fabricated and evaluated. The ~100-μm-thick emitter was created by cutting a PDMS membrane that protrudes beyond the bulk substrate. The reduced surface area at the emitter enhances the electric field and reduces wetting of the surface by the electrospray solvent. As such, the emitter provides highly stable electrospray at flow rates as low as 10 nL/min, and is compatible with electrospray solvents containing a large organic component (e.g., 90% methanol). This approach enables facile emitter construction, and provides excellent stability, reproducibility and sensitivity, as well as compatibility with multilayer soft lithography.

  19. Loss of Glis2/NPHP7 causes kidney epithelial cell senescence and suppresses cyst growth in the Kif3a mouse model of cystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dongmei; Rauhauser, Alysha; Li, Binghua; Ren, Chongyu; McEnery, Kayla; Zhu, Jili; Chaki, Moumita; Vadnagara, Komal; Elhadi, Sarah; Jetten, Anton M; Igarashi, Peter; Attanasio, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Enlargement of kidney tubules is a common feature of multiple cystic kidney diseases in humans and mice. However, while some of these pathologies are characterized by cyst expansion and organ enlargement, in others, progressive interstitial fibrosis and kidney atrophy prevail. The Kif3a knockout mouse is an established non-orthologous mouse model of cystic kidney disease. Conditional inactivation of Kif3a in kidney tubular cells results in loss of primary cilia and rapid cyst growth. Conversely, loss of function of the gene GLIS2/NPHP7 causes progressive kidney atrophy, interstitial inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis. Kif3a null tubular cells have unrestrained proliferation and reduced stabilization of p53 resulting in a loss of cell cycle arrest in the presence of DNA damage. In contrast, loss of Glis2 is associated with activation of checkpoint kinase 1, stabilization of p53, and induction of cell senescence. Interestingly, the cystic phenotype of Kif3a knockout mice is partially rescued by genetic ablation of Glis2 and pharmacological stabilization of p53. Thus, Kif3a is required for cell cycle regulation and the DNA damage response, whereas cell senescence is significantly enhanced in Glis2 null cells. Hence, cell senescence is a central feature in nephronophthisis type 7 and Kif3a is unexpectedly required for efficient DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Normal spectral emittance of Inconel 718 aeronautical alloy coated with yttria stabilized zirconia films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Planta de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Campo, L. del [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Perez-Saez, R.B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Tello, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain)

    2012-02-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emittance of Inconel 718 coated with plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coating is opaque for {lambda} > 9 {mu}m and semi-transparent for {lambda} < 9 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the semi-transparent region the emittance decreases with coating thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 300 {mu}m thick coatings are still semi-transparent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the opaque region the surface roughness determines the emittance level. - Abstract: Knowledge of the radiative behaviour of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is needed to perform radiative heat transfer calculations in industrial applications. In this paper, normal spectral emittance experimental data of atmospheric plasma sprayed (PS) YSZ films layered on Inconel 718 substrates are shown. The spectral emittance was measured between 2.5 and 22 {mu}m on samples with film thicknesses ranging from 20 to 280 {mu}m. The samples were heated in a controlled environment, and the emittance was measured for several temperatures between 330 and 730 Degree-Sign C. The dependence of the spectral emittance with film thickness, surface roughness and temperature has been studied and compared with the available results for YSZ TBCs obtained by electron-beam physical vapour deposition. The PS-TBC samples show a Christiansen point at {lambda} = 12.8 {mu}m. The films are semi-transparent for {lambda} < 9 {mu}m, and opaque for {lambda} > 9 {mu}m. In the semi-transparent region, the contribution of the radiation emitted by the Inconel 718 substrate to the global emittance of the samples is analysed. In addition, the influence of the roughness in the emittance values in the opaque spectral region is discussed. Finally, the total normal emittance is obtained as a function of the TBC thickness.

  1. Coupling of Quantum Emitters in Nanodiamonds to Plasmonic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Shailesh

    applications such as sensing of the magnetic field. In this work, NV-centers in nanodiamond crystals smaller than 100 nm were used. For enhancing and channeling emission from the NV-centers, metallic waveguides are used in this work. In such waveguides, electromagnetic waves are guided at the interface between...... metallic and dielectric structures. These electromagnetic waves are known as surface plasmon polaritons. The metallic waveguides, and in general plasmonic waveguides, can confine light far beyond the diffraction limit known for the dielectric waveguides. This confinement of light enables the enhancement...... structure used for the coupling is two nanowires placed in parallel, which supports plasmonic modes in the gap between nanowires. The distribution of electromagnetic field in the plasmonic mode depends on the structure of the waveguide. The coupling between an emitter and the plasmonic mode, in turn...

  2. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, A.A. 4976, Bogotá (Colombia); Johnson, N. F. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Miami, FL 33124 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system’s quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  3. Magnet design for an ultralow emittance storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saeidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF is a new 3 GeV synchrotron radiation laboratory which is in the design stage. The ILSF storage ring (SR is based on a Five-Bend Achromat (5BA lattice providing an ultra-low beam emittance of 0.48 nm rad. The ring is comprised of 100 pure dipole magnets, 320 quadrupoles, and 320 sextupoles with additional coils for dipole and skew quadrupole correctors. In this paper, we present some design features of the SR magnets and discuss the detailed physical design of these electromagnets. The related electrical and cooling calculations and mechanical design issues have been investigated as well.

  4. Robust lanthanide emitters in polyelectrolyte thin films for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspon, Andrew S.; Marceaux, Brandt L.; Hu, Evelyn L.

    2018-02-01

    Trivalent lanthanides provide stable emission sources at wavelengths spanning the ultraviolet through the near infrared with uses in telecommunications, lighting, and biological sensing and imaging. We describe a method for incorporating an organometallic lanthanide complex within polyelectrolyte multilayers, producing uniform, optically active thin films on a variety of substrates. These films demonstrate excellent emission with narrow linewidths, stable over a period of months, even when bound to metal substrates. Utilizing different lanthanides such as europium and terbium, we are able to easily tune the resulting wavelength of emission of the thin film. These results demonstrate the suitability of this platform as a thin film emitter source for a variety of photonic applications such as waveguides, optical cavities, and sensors.

  5. Systematic Optimization of Boron Diffusion for Solar Cell Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, P.; Kolahdouz, M.; Iraj, M.; Ganjian, M.; Aghababa, H.; Asl-Soleimani, E.; Radamson, Henry H.

    2017-07-01

    To achieve p- n junctions for n-type solar cells, we have studied BBr3 diffusion in an open tube furnace, varying parameters of the BBr3 diffusion process such as temperature, gas flows, and duration of individual process steps, i.e., predeposition and drive-in. Then, output parameters such as carrier lifetime, sheet resistance, and diffusion profile were measured and statistically analyzed to optimize the emitter characteristics. Statistical analysis (factorial design) was finally employed to systematically explore the effects of the set of input variables on the outputs. The effect of the interactions between inputs was also evaluated for each output, quantified using a two-level factorial method. Temperature and BBr3 flow were found to have the most significant effect on different outputs such as carrier lifetime, junction depth, sheet resistance, and final surface concentration.

  6. Vertically integrated (Ga, In)N nanostructures for future single photon emitters operating in the telecommunication wavelength range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winden, A; Mikulics, M; Grützmacher, D; Hardtdegen, H

    2013-10-11

    Important technological steps are discussed and realized for future room-temperature operation of III-nitride single photon emitters. First, the growth technology of positioned single pyramidal InN nanostructures capped by Mg-doped GaN is presented. The optimization of their optical characteristics towards narrowband emission in the telecommunication wavelength range is demonstrated. In addition, a device concept and technology was developed so that the nanostructures became singularly addressable. It was found that the nanopyramids emit in the telecommunication wavelength range if their size is chosen appropriately. A p-GaN contacting layer was successfully produced as a cap to the InN pyramids and the top p-contact was achievable using an intrinsically conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS, allowing a 25% increase in light transmittance compared to standard Ni/Au contact technology. Single nanopyramids were successfully integrated into a high-frequency device layout. These decisive technology steps provide a promising route to electrically driven and room-temperature operating InN based single photon emitters in the telecommunication wavelength range.

  7. Azathioprine desensitizes liver cancer cells to insulin-like growth factor 1 and causes apoptosis when it is combined with bafilomycin A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández-Breijo, Borja [Departamento de Biología de Sistemas, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); Monserrat, Jorge [Departamento de Medicina y Especialidades Médicas, Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); Román, Irene D. [Departamento de Biología de Sistemas, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); González-Rodríguez, Águeda [Departamento de Biomedicina y Biotecnología, Instituto Ramón y Cajal de Investigación Sanitaria (IRYCIS), Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); Fernández-Moreno, M. Dolores [Departamento de Biología de Sistemas, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Universidad de Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); and others

    2013-11-01

    Hepatoblastoma is a primary liver cancer that affects children, due to the sensitivity of this tumor to insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). In this paper we show that azathioprine (AZA) is capable of inhibiting IGF1-mediated signaling cascade in HepG2 cells. The efficiency of AZA on inhibition of proliferation differs in the evaluated cell lines as follows: HepG2 (an experimental model of hepatoblastoma) > Hep3B (derived from a hepatocellular carcinoma) > HuH6 (derived from a hepatoblastoma) ≫ HuH7 (derived from a hepatocellular carcinoma) = Chang Liver cells (a non-malignant cellular model). The effect of AZA in HepG2 cells has been proven to derive from activation of Ras/ERK/TSC2, leading to activation of mTOR/p70S6K in a sustained manner. p70S6K phosphorylates IRS-1 in serine 307 which leads to the uncoupling between IRS-1 and p85 (the regulatory subunit of PI3K) and therefore causing the lack of response of HepG2 to IGF-1. As a consequence, proliferation induced by IGF-1 is inhibited by AZA and autophagy increases leading to senescence of HepG2 cells. Our results suggest that AZA induces the autophagic process in HepG2 activating senescence, and driving to deceleration of cell cycle but not to apoptosis. However, when simultaneous to AZA treatment the autophagy was inhibited by bafilomycin A1 and the degradation of regulatory proteins of cell cycle (e.g. Rb, E2F, and cyclin D1) provoked apoptosis. In conclusion, AZA induces resistance in hepatoblastoma cells to IGF-1, which leads to autophagy activation, and causes apoptosis when it is combined with bafilomycin A1. We are presenting here a novel mechanism of action of azathioprine, which could be useful in treatment of IGF-1 dependent tumors, especially in its combination with other drugs. - Highlights: • Azathioprine activated Ras/ERK/TSC-2/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway in HepG2 cells. • Azathioprine inhibited IGF-1-mediated signaling cascade. • Azathioprine induced autophagy leading to cell cycle

  8. Time-dependent wellbore breakout growth caused by drilling-induced pore pressure transients: Implications for estimations of far field stress magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.; Elsworth, D.

    2013-12-01

    One method used to constrain principal stress orientations and magnitudes in the crust combines estimates of rock strength with observations of wellbore failures, including drilling-induced tensile fractures (DITF) and compressional borehole breakouts (BO). This method has been applied at numerous Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) boreholes drilled into sediments in a wide range of settings, including the Gulf of Mexico, the N. Japan and Costa Rican subduction margins, and the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism. At Nankai and N. Japan, BO widths defined by logging-while-drilling (LWD) resistivity images have been used to estimate magnitudes of far-field horizontal tectonic stresses. At several drillsites (C0010, C0002, and C0011), sections of the borehole were relogged with LWD after the hole was left open for times ranging from ~30 min to 3 days; times between acquisition were associated with pipe connections (~30 min), cleaning and circulating the hole (up to ~3 hr), and evacuation of the site for weather (~3 days). Relogged portions exhibit widening of BO, hypothesized to reflect time-dependent re-equilibration of instantaneous changes in pore fluid pressure (Pf) induced by opening the borehole. In this conceptual model, Pf decrease caused by initial excavation of the borehole and resulting changes in the state of stress at the borehole wall lead to an initial strengthening of the sediment. Re-equilibration of Pf results in time-dependent weakening of the sediment and subsequent BO growth. If correct, this hypothesis implies that stress magnitudes estimated by BO widths could be significantly underestimated. We test this idea using a finite-element model in COMSOL multiphysics that couples fluid flow and deformation in a poroelastic medium. We specify far-field horizontal principal stresses (SHmax and Shmin) in the model domain. At the start of simulations/at the time of borehole opening, we impose a decreased stress at the borehole wall. We consider a

  9. Prototype of a subsurface drip irrigation emitter: Manufacturing, hydraulic evaluation and experimental analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Wanderley De Jesus; Rodrigues Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Arriel Botrel, Tarlei; Duarte Coelho, Rubens

    2013-04-01

    Root and soil intrusion into the conventional emitters is one of the major disadvantages to obtain a good uniformity of water application in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI). In the last years, there have been different approaches to reduce these problems such as the impregnation of emitters with herbicide, and the search for an emitter geometry impairing the intrusion of small roots. Within the last this study, has developed and evaluated an emitter model which geometry shows specific physical features to prevent emitter clogging. This work was developed at the Biosystems Engineering Department at ESALQ-USP/Brazil, and it is a part of a research in which an innovated emitteŕs model for SDI has been developed to prevent root and soil particles intrusion. An emitter with a mechanical-hydraulic mechanism (opening and closing the water outlet) for SDI was developed and manufactured using a mechanical lathe process. It was composed by a silicon elastic membrane a polyethylene tube and a Vnyl Polychloride membrane protector system. In this study the performance of the developed prototype was assessed in the laboratory and in the field conditions. In the laboratory, uniformity of water application was calculated by the water emission uniformity coefficient (CUE), and the manufacturer's coefficient of variation (CVm). In addition, variation in the membrane diameter submitted to internal pressures; head losses along the membrane, using the energy equation; and, precision and accuracy of the equation model, analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), and by Willmott's concordance index (d) were also calculated with samples of the developed emitters. In the field, the emitters were installed in pots with and without sugar cane culture from October 2010 to January 2012. During this time, flow rate in 20 emitters were measured periodically, and the aspects of them about clogging at the end of the experiment. Emitters flow rates were measured quarterly to calculate

  10. Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1 Causes Overproduction of IL-8, an Angiogenic Cytokine and Stimulates Neovascularization in Isoproterenol-Induced Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja Haleagrahara

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis factors are produced in response to hypoxic or ischemic insult at the site of pathology, which will cause neovascularization. Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 exerts potent proliferative, angiogenic and anti-apoptotic effects in target tissues. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of IGF-1 on circulating level of angiogenic cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, in experimentally-induced myocardial ischemia in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control, IGF-1 treated (2 µg/kg/day subcutaneously, for 5 and 10 days, isoproterenol (ISO treated (85 mg/kg, subcutaneously for two days and ISO with IGF-1 treated (for 5 and 10 days. Heart weight, serum IGF-1, IL-8 and cardiac marker enzymes (CK-MB and LDH were recorded after 5 and 10 days of treatment. Histopathological analyses of the myocardium were also done. There was a significant increase in serum cardiac markers with ISO treatment indicating myocardial infarction in rats. IGF-1 level increased significantly in ISO treated groups and the level of IGF-1 was significantly higher after 10 days of treatment. IL-8 level increased significantly after ISO treatment after 5 and 10 days and IGF-1 concurrent treatment to ISO rats had significantly increased IL-8 levels. Histopathologically, myocyte necrosis and nuclear pyknosis were reduced significantly in IGF-1 treated group and there were numerous areas of capillary sprouting suggestive of neovascularization in the myocardium. Thus, IGF-1 protects the ischemic myocardium with increased production of circulating angiogenic cytokine, IL-8 and increased angiogenesis.

  11. Complete Penile Disassembly for Repair of Epispadias Causes Erectile Tissue Alteration Through Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 Overexpression in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourchi, Ali; Shabaninia, Mahsa; Stewart, Meghan; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Di Carlo, Heather; Gearhart, John P

    2018-01-01

    To investigate corporal tissue viability and changes in endothelial content following current techniques used for epispadias repair in an animal model. Sixty rabbits were allocated into 3 groups: sham operation (penile degloving), complete disassembly model, and Cantwell-Ransley model. On weeks 2, 4, 12, and 24 postoperation, the penile tissue was harvested and processed for (1) Masson's trichrome staining for smooth muscle cell (SMC)-to-collagen ratios, (2) immunohistochemical staining for endothelial factor (CD31), and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) (3) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay to detect apoptosis. Masson trichrome staining of corporal tissue showed significant decrease in SMC-to-collagen ratio in complete disassembly group compared with sham operation group. The expression of CD31 was significantly lower (P <.05) in complete disassembly group compared with the other groups at all time points, whereas no significant difference was observed between the Cantwell-Ransley group and the sham operation group. Moreover, apoptotic index was markedly higher in the complete disassembly group compared with the 2 other operation groups (P <.05). Immunohistochemistry also showed a significantly higher expression of TGF-β1 in the penile tissue after complete disassembly than Cantwell-Ransley or sham operation. Complete detachment of the urethra from the corpus cavernosa may result in endothelial dysfunction, alteration of SMC content of erectile tissue, and replacement of the native cavernosal tissue with fibrotic tissue. An increased expression of TGF-β1, following the complete disassembly technique, might be one of the important factors causing the abovementioned alterations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a Rapid Beam Emittance Measurement System using a Real-Time Beam Profile Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Keita; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Ueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Takane; Morinobu, Shunpei; Nagayama, Keiichi; Tamura, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Yuusuke

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a rapid beam emittance measurement system for the injection beam of the K140 azimuthally varying field (AVF) cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP). So far, a conventional emittance monitor has been used in a section of a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) system to evaluate the quality of the injected beam to the K400 ring cyclotron. Two kinds of emittance monitors were supplemented in the low energy beam line for evaluation of ion beams from ion sources. One of them is a conventional type consisting of two sets of position-variable slits and a three-wire profile monitor (TPM), similar to the one installed in the MEBT system of the AVF cyclotron. It takes about 30 min to get emittances in both the horizontal and vertical planes. For quick emittance measurements, we have developed a new system equipped with a set of fast moving slits with a fixed gap and a real-time beam profile monitor (BPM83) with a rotating helical wire. With this system the measurement time was considerably reduced to 70 s for both the horizontal and vertical emittances. Moreover the data analysis and graphical processing were completely automated. The overall measurement and analysis time was successfully minimized within 75 s. This rapid emittance measurement system has contributed to improve the beam quality by optimizing parameters of ion sources and the beam transport system.

  13. A curvature calibrated bandgap reference with base—emitter current compensating in a 0.13 μm CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Ma; Xiaoqiang, Tan; Lunguo, Xie; Yang, Guo

    2010-11-01

    In bandgap references, the effect caused by the input offset of the operational amplifier can be effectively reduced by the utilization of cascade bipolar junction transistors (BJTs). But in modern CMOS logic processes, due to the small value of β, the base—emitter path of BJTs has a significant streaming effect on the collector current, which leads to a large temperature drift for the reference voltage. To solve this problem, a base—emitter current compensating technique is proposed in a cascade BJT bandgap reference structure to calibrate the curvature of the output voltage to temperature. Experimental results based on the 0.13 μm logic CMOS process show that the reference voltage is 1.238 V and the temperature coefficient is 6.2 ppm/°C within the range of -40 to 125 °C.

  14. Effects of a Plant Growth Regulator, Prohexadione Calcium (BX-112), on the Elongation of Rice Shoots Caused by Exogenouslyl Applied Gibberellins and Helminthosporol, Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Yuji, KAMIYA; Masatomo, Kobayashi; Shozo, FUJIOKA; Hisakazu, YAMANE; Ishizue, NAKAYAMA; Akira, Sakurai; The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research:(Present)Frontier Research Program RIKEN; Department of Agricultural Chemistry, The University of Tokyo; Life Science Research Institute, Kumiai Chemical Industry Co., Ltd.; The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research

    1991-01-01

    Prohexadione calcium (BX-112) is a novel plant growth regulator that inhibits the late stages of the biosynthesis of gibberellins in plants. Fourteen kinds of gibberellin, helminthosporol and helminthosporic acid were applied simultaneously with BX-112 to rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.), and their growth-promoting activities in terms of shoot elongation were examined. The growth-promoting activities of GA_1, GA_4, GA_, GA_, GA_, GA_, helminthosporol and helminthosporic acid were not inhibite...

  15. ACCELERATING STRUCTURE: Ultra-low emittance X-band photocathode RF gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Han

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we present the simulation results of a 1.6 cell X-band photocathode RF gun for ultra-low emittance electron beams. It will work at 9.3 GHz. The emittance, bunch length, electron energy and energy spread at the gun exit are optimized at bunch charge of 1pC using PARMELA. Electron bunches with emittance about 0.1 mm · mrad and bunch length less than 100 fs can be obtained from this gun. A PITZ type coupler is adopted in this gun and an initial simulation by MAFIA is also given in this paper.

  16. Achievement of ultra-low emittance beam in the ATF damping ring

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, Y; Araki, S; Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag; Brachmann, A; Frisch, J; Fukuda, M; Hasegawa, K; Hayano, H; Hendrickson, L; Higashi, Y; Higo, T; Hirano, K; Hirose, T; Iida, K; Imai, T; Inoue, Y; Karataev, P; Kubo, K; Kurihara, Y; Kuriki, M; Kuroda, R; Kuroda, S; Luo, X; Matsuda, M; McCormick, D; Muto, T; Nakajima, K; Nelson, J; Nomura, M; Ohashi, A; Okugi, T; Omori, T; Ross, M; Sakai, H; Sakai, I; Sasao, N; Smith, S; Suzuki, T; Takano, M; Takashi, N; Taniguchi, T; Terunuma, N; Toge, N; Turner, J; Urakawa, J; Vogel, V; Wolski, A; Woodley, M; Yamazaki, I; Yamazaki, Y; Yocky, J; Young, A; Zimmermann, Frank

    2003-01-01

    We report on the smallest vertical emittance achieved in single-bunch-mode operation of the ATF. The emittances were measured with a laser-wire beam-profile monitor installed in the damping ring. The bunch length and the momentum spread of the beam were also recorded under the same conditions. The smallest vertical rms emittance measured is 4 pm in the limit of zero current. It increases by a factor of 1.5 for a bunch intensity of 10^10 electrons. There are no discrepancies between the measured data and the calculations of intra-beam scattering.

  17. Coherent interaction of a metallic structure with a single quantum emitter: from super absorption to cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xue-Wen; Agio, Mario

    2012-01-01

    We provide a general theoretical platform based on quantized radiation in absorptive and inhomogeneous media for investigating the coherent interaction of light with metallic structures in the immediate vicinity of quantum emitters. In the case of a very small metallic cluster, we demonstrate extreme regimes where a single emitter can either counteract or enhance particle absorption by three orders of magnitude. For larger structures, we show that an emitter can eliminate both scattering and absorption and cloak a plasmonic antenna. We provide physical interpretations of our results and discuss their applications in active metamaterials and quantum plasmonics.

  18. Development and characterization of a rare earth emitter for a thermophotovoltaic power generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durisch, W.; Panitz, J.C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Energy conversion based on thermophotovoltaic (TPV) methods has recently attracted renewed interest. Efforts at PSI are directed towards the development of a modular TPV system based on existing technology to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Here, we report first results obtained with a prototype TPV generator based upon a modified rare earth emitter, a heat reflecting filter and commercial silicon solar cells. The preparation of the modified emitter is described, and first results of spectroscopic and electrical characterization of the TPV system are presented. The introduction of the modified emitter leads to an efficiency gain of 30-40%. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  19. Controlling Singlet-Triplet Energy Splitting for Deep-Blue Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lin-Song; Nomura, Hiroko; Geng, Yan; Kim, Jong Uk; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2017-02-01

    The development of efficient metal-free organic emitters with thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) properties for deep-blue emission is still challenging. A new family of deep-blue TADF emitters based on a donor-acceptor architecture has been developed. The electronic interaction between donor and acceptor plays a key role in the TADF mechanism. Deep-blue OLEDs fabricated with these TADF emitters achieved high external quantum efficiencies over 19.2 % with CIE coordinates of (0.148, 0.098). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Measured Emittance Dependence on the Injection Method in Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, S. K.; van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Lehe, R.; Tsai, H.-E.; Swanson, K. K.; Steinke, S.; Nakamura, K.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-09-01

    Single-shot, charge-dependent emittance measurements of electron beams generated by a laser plasma accelerator (LPA) reveal that shock-induced density down-ramp injection produces beams with normalized emittances a factor of 2 smaller than beams produced via ionization injection. Such a comparison is made possible by the tunable LPA setup, which allows electron beams with nearly identical central energy and peak spectral charge density to be produced using the two distinct injection mechanisms. Parametric measurements of this type are essential for the development of LPA-based applications which ultimately require high charge density and low emittance.

  1. Simple emittance measurement of H{sup -} beams from a large plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guharay, S.K.; Tsumori, K.; Hamabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Kuroda, T.

    1996-03-01

    An emittance meter is developed using pepper-pot method. Kapton foils are used to detect intensity distributions of small beamlets at the `image` plane of the pepper-pot. Emittance of H{sup -} beams from a large plasma source for the neutral beam injector of the Large Helical Device (LHD) has been measured. The normalized emittance (95%) of a 6 mA H{sup -} beam with emission current density of about 10 mA/cm{sup 2} is {approx}0.59 mm mrad. The present system is very simple, and it eliminates many complexities of the existing schemes. (author).

  2. Multiplexing and scaling-down of nanostructured photon-triggered silicon field emitter arrays for maximum total electron yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen D.; Swanwick, Michael E.; Keathley, Phillip D.; Kärtner, Franz X.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond ultrabright cathodes with spatially structured emission are a critical technology for applications such as free-electron lasers, tabletop coherent x-ray sources, and ultrafast imaging. In this work, the optimization of the total electron yield of ultrafast photon-triggered field emission cathodes composed of arrays of nanosharp, high-aspect-ratio, single-crystal silicon pillars is explored through the variation of the emitter pitch and height. Arrays of 6 nm tip radius silicon emitters with emitter densities between 1.2 and 73.9 million tips cm-2 (hexagonally packed arrays with emitter pitch between 1.25 and 10 μm) and emitter height between 2.0 and 8.5 μm were characterized using 35 fs 800 nm laser pulses. Three-photon electron emission for low-energy (1 μJ) light pulses was observed, in agreement with the literature. Of the devices tested, the arrays with emitter pitch equal to 2.5 μm produced the highest total electron yield; arrays with larger emitter pitch suffer area sub-utilization, and in devices with smaller emitter pitch the larger emitter density does not compensate the smaller per-emitter current due to the electric field shadowing that results from the proximity of the adjacent tips. Experimental data and simulations suggest that 2 μm tall emitters achieve practical optimal performance as shorter emitters have visibly smaller field factors due to the proximity of the emitter tip to the substrate, and taller emitters show marginal improvement in the electron yield at the expense of greater fabrication difficulty.

  3. High power telecommunication-compatible photoconductive terahertz emitters based on plasmonic nano-antenna arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardimci, Nezih Tolga; Lu, Hong; Jarrahi, Mona

    2016-11-07

    We present a high-power and broadband photoconductive terahertz emitter operating at telecommunication optical wavelengths, at which compact and high-performance fiber lasers are commercially available. The presented terahertz emitter utilizes an ErAs:InGaAs substrate to achieve high resistivity and short carrier lifetime characteristics required for robust operation at telecommunication optical wavelengths. It also uses a two-dimensional array of plasmonic nano-antennas to offer significantly higher optical-to-terahertz conversion efficiencies compared to the conventional photoconductive emitters, while maintaining broad operation bandwidths. We experimentally demonstrate pulsed terahertz radiation over 0.1-5 THz frequency range with the power levels as high as 300 μW. This is the highest-reported terahertz radiation power from a photoconductive emitter operating at telecommunication optical wavelengths.

  4. Research of thermal conditions over high-temperature gas-fired infrared emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermolaev Anton N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the study results of the thermal conditions in the area above high-temperature gas-fired infrared emitter. A number of bench tests and experiments were made on the basis of production facilities to control the distribution of temperatures above emitter in different heating system operating modes. Impact of the thermal characteristics in the area above high-temperature gas-fired infrared emitter on the heating system performance was estimated. Comparison of the bench tests results with existing experimental data has shown a good result convergence for both efficiency and accuracy. The obtained results can be used in the emitter development phase and in the construction phase of modern gas-fired radiant heating systems.

  5. Engineering and localization of quantum emitters in large hexagonal boron nitride layers

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Sumin; ElBadawi, Christopher; Lobo, Charlene; Wang, Xuewen; Juodkazis, Saulius; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a wide bandgap van der Waals material that has recently emerged as promising platform for quantum photonics experiments. In this work we study the formation and localization of narrowband quantum emitters in large flakes (up to tens of microns wide) of hBN. The emitters can be activated in as-grown hBN by electron irradiation or high temperature annealing, and the emitter formation probability can be increased by ion implantation or focused laser irradiation of the as-grown material. Interestingly, we show that the emitters are always localized at edges of the flakes, unlike most luminescent point defects in 3D materials. Our results constitute an important step on the road map of deploying hBN in nanophotonics applications.

  6. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  7. Strong Coupling and Entanglement of Quantum Emitters Embedded in a Nanoantenna-Enhanced Plasmonic Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Stephen K.; Heilpern, Tal; Hensen, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Walter

    2018-01-01

    Establishing strong coupling between spatially separated and thus selectively addressable quantum emitters is a key ingredient to complex quantum optical schemes in future technologies. Insofar as many plasmonic nanostructures are concerned, however, the energy transfer and mutual interaction strength between distant quantum emitters can fail to provide strong coupling. Here, based on mode hybridization, the longevity and waveguide character of an elliptical plasmon cavity are combined with intense and highly localized field modes of suitably designed nanoantennas. Based on FDTD simulations a quantum emitter-plasmon coupling strength hg = 16.7 meV is reached while simultaneously keeping a small plasmon resonance line width h gamma(s) = 33 meV. This facilitates strong coupling, and quantum dynamical simulations reveal an oscillatory exchange of excited state population arid a notable degree of entanglement between the quantum emitters spatially separated by 1.8 mu m, i.e., about twice the operating wavelength.

  8. Characterizing and Optimizing Photocathode Laser Distributions for Ultra-low Emittance Electron Beam Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bohler, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gilevich, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ratner, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Vetter, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Photocathode RF gun has been widely used for generation of high-brightness electron beams for many different applications. We found that the drive laser distributions in such RF guns play important roles in minimizing the electron beam emittance. Characterizing the laser distributions with measurable parameters and optimizing beam emittance versus the laser distribution parameters in both spatial and temporal directions are highly desired for high-brightness electron beam operation. In this paper, we report systematic measurements and simulations of emittance dependence on the measurable parameters represented for spatial and temporal laser distributions at the photocathode RF gun systems of Linac Coherent Light Source. The tolerable parameter ranges for photocathode drive laser distributions in both directions are presented for ultra-low emittance beam operations.

  9. High Turndown Ratio, High Delta-Emittance, Variable Emissivity Electrochromics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Variable-emittance materials are in high demand for applications ranging from manned and unmanned space platforms (e.g. in radiators at the Moon's poles where damage...

  10. Measurement of a small vertical emittance with a laser wire beam profile monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sakai

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe in this paper a measurement of vertical emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF damping ring at KEK with a laser wire beam profile monitor. This monitor is based on the Compton scattering process of electrons with a laser light target which is produced by injecting a cw laser beam into a Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We installed the monitor at a straight section of the damping ring and measured the vertical emittance with three different ring conditions. In all cases, the ATF ring was operated at 1.28 GeV in a single bunch mode. When the ring was tuned for ultralow emittance, the vertical emittance of ε_{y}=(1.18±0.08×10^{-11}   mrad was achieved. This shows that the ATF damping ring has realized its target value also vertically.

  11. Transverse emittance and current of multi-GeV trapped electrons in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kirby

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-GeV trapped electron bunches in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, ϵ_{N,x}/I_{t}, below the level of 0.2  μm/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the nonlinear “bubble” regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of ϵ_{N,x}/I_{t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few  μm and multi-kA peak currents.

  12. Experimental optimization of the 6-dimentional electron beam emittance at the NSLS SDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, H. J.; Murphy, J. B.; Shen, Y.; Tang, C. X.; Wang, X. J.

    2011-08-01

    Experimental optimization of the 6-dimensional electron beam emittance generated by a Magnesium (Mg) photocathode RF gun is presented in this report. A new electron beam optimization algorithm for a low charge (<100 pC) beam was experimentally demonstrated; where the electron beam velocity bunching inside the RF gun plays a critical role, and the transverse emittance as a function of the laser-RF timing jitter was experimentally characterized for the first time. A 20 pC electron beam was optimized to have a normalized slice emittance of 0.15 mm mrad and a longitudinal projected emittance of 3.9 ps keV. Furthermore, the upper limit of the measured thermal emittance—0.5 mm mrad per mm of the rms laser size, is about 50% lower than the theoretical prediction for a Mg cathode (Qian et al., 2010) [1].

  13. Single Light Emitters in Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers: Effect of Local Confinement on Radiative Decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, N.; Gu, S.; Gu, Shuying; Han, Mingyong; van Hulst, N.F.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2006-01-01

    The fabrication of light emitting polymer nanofibers by electrospinning of polymer solutions containing either fluorescent organic dye molecules or luminescent semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) is presented. The fluorescence spectra and lifetime of the embedded emitters, down to the level

  14. Insights to emitter saturation current densities of boron implanted samples based on defects simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mok, K.R.C.; Naber, R.C.G.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    Emitter saturation current densities, Joe have been investigated with different boron implantation dose and annealing conditions. The higher thermal budgets used here are shown experimentally to improve Joe, implying more complete defect dissolution. Simulations show that significant degradation in

  15. Pepper-pot diagnostic method to define emittance and Twiss parameters on low energies accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Dolinska, M E

    2002-01-01

    The new complex mathematical algorithm to determine beam transverse emittance data and the Twiss parameters from intensity measured with pepper-por diagnostic device on rf low energies accelerators is described.

  16. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-01-01

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the b...

  17. Photodynamics of quantum emitters in hexagonal boron nitride revealed by low-temperature spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontheimer, Bernd; Braun, Merle; Nikolay, Niko; Sadzak, Nikola; Aharonovich, Igor; Benson, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Quantum emitters in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) have recently emerged as promising bright single photon sources. In this Rapid Communication we investigate in detail their optical properties at cryogenic temperatures. In particular, we perform temperature-resolved photoluminescence studies and measure photon coherence times from the hBN emitters. The obtained value of 81 (1 )ps translates to a width of ˜6.5 GHz which is higher than the Fourier transform limited value of ˜32 MHz . To account for the photodynamics of the emitter, we perform ultrafast spectral diffusion measurements that partially account for the coherence times. Our results provide important insight into the relaxation processes in quantum emitters in hBN which is mandatory to evaluate their applicability for quantum information processing.

  18. Cancellation of RF Coupler-Induced Emittance Due to Astigmatism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, David H.; /SLAC

    2016-12-11

    It is well-known that the electron beam quality required for applications such as FEL’s and ultra-fast electron diffraction can be degraded by the asymmetric fields introduced by the RF couplers of superconducting linacs. This effect is especially troublesome in the injector where the low energy beam from the gun is captured into the first high gradient accelerator section. Unfortunately modifying the established cavity design is expensive and time consuming, especially considering that only one or two sections are needed for an injector. Instead, it is important to analyze the coupler fields to understand their characteristics and help find less costly solutions for their cancellation and mitigation. This paper finds the RF coupler-induced emittance for short bunches is mostly due to the transverse spatial sloping or tilt of the field, rather than the field’s time-dependence. It is shown that the distorting effects of the coupler can be canceled with a static (DC) quadrupole lens rotated about the z-axis.

  19. Magnetic Light Emitters: Plasmon-enhanced Magnetic Dipole Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Rashid

    2009-03-01

    Over the past decade, advances in both negative index metamaterials and resonant optical antennas have challenged traditional assumptions about light-matter interactions. While metamaterials research has shown that metallic structures can be engineered to support strong optical frequency magnetic resonances, resonant optical antennas have been designed to amplify and re-direct the emission from electric dipole emitters. In this talk, we explore the intersection of these distinct fields and investigate how resonant optical effects may be used to challenge the electric dipole approximation. Specifically, we will show how Purcell effects may be used to enhance the natural optical frequency magnetic dipole transitions in Lanthanide ions. We will present experimental and numerical results that demonstrate enhanced magnetic dipole emission from trivalent Europium ions near metallic films and nanoparticle composites. We will explore how the varying symmetries of electric and magnetic dipoles can be used to characterize and optimize magnetic light emission. Finally, we will discuss the implications of enhancing and controlling higher-order optical transitions for optical spectroscopy and photonic devices.

  20. Emitter-site-selective photoelectron circular dichroism of trifluoromethyloxirane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchen, M.; Hartmann, G.; Rupprecht, P.; Artemyev, A. N.; Coffee, R. N.; Li, Z.; Ohldag, H.; Ogasawara, H.; Osipov, T.; Ray, D.; Schmidt, Ph.; Wolf, T. J. A.; Ehresmann, A.; Moeller, S.; Knie, A.; Demekhin, Ph. V.

    2017-05-01

    The angle-resolved inner-shell photoionization of R-trifluoromethyloxirane, C3H3F3O , is studied experimentally and theoretically. Thereby, we investigate the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) for nearly symmetric O 1 s and F 1 s electronic orbitals, which are localized on different molecular sites. The respective dichroic β1 and angular distribution β2 parameters are measured at the photoelectron kinetic energies from 1 to 16 eV by using variably polarized synchrotron radiation and velocity map imaging spectroscopy. The present experimental results are in good agreement with the outcome of ab initio electronic structure calculations. We report a sizable chiral asymmetry β1 of up to about 9% for the K -shell photoionization of oxygen atom. For the individual fluorine atoms, the present calculations predict asymmetries of similar size. However, being averaged over all fluorine atoms, it drops down to about 2%, as also observed in the present experiment. Our study demonstrates a strong emitter and site sensitivity of PECD in the one-photon inner-shell ionization of this chiral molecule.

  1. Emittance reconstruction technique for the Linac4 high energy commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Lallement, JB; Posocco, PA

    2012-01-01

    Linac4 is a new 160 MeV linear accelerator for negative Hydrogen ions (H-) presently under construction which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac2 as injector for the CERN proton accelerator complex. Linac4 is 80 meters long and comprises a Low Energy Beam Transport line, a 3 MeV RFQ, a MEBT, a 50 MeV DTL, a 100 MeV CCDTL and a PIMS up to 160 MeV. The commissioning of the Linac is scheduled to start in 2013. It will be divided into several steps corresponding to the commissioning of the different accelerating structures. A temporary measurement bench will be dedicated to the high energy commissioning from 30 to 100 MeV (DTL tanks 2 and 3, and CCDTL). The commissioning of the PIMS will be done using the permanent equipment installed in between the end of the Linac and the main dump. This note describes the technique we will use for reconstructing the transverse emittances and the expected results.

  2. The cataphoretic emitter effect exhibited in high intensity discharge lamp electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentel, Juergen

    2018-01-01

    A mono-layer of atoms, electropositive with respect to the substrate atoms, forms a dipole layer, reducing its work function. Such a layer is generated by diffusion of emitter material from the interior of the substrate, by vapour deposition or by deposition of emitter material onto arc electrodes by cataphoresis. This cataphoretic emitter effect is investigated within metal halide lamps with transparent YAG ceramic burners, and within model lamps. Within the YAG lamps, arcs are operated with switched-dc current between rod shaped tungsten electrodes in high pressure Hg vapour seeded with metal iodides. Within the model lamps, dc arcs are operated between rod-shaped tungsten electrodes—one doped—in atmospheric pressure Ar. Electrode temperatures are determined by 1λ -pyrometry, combined with simulation of the electrode heat balance. Plasma temperatures, atom and ion densities of emitter material are determined by emission and absorption spectroscopy. Phase resolved measurements in YAG lamps seeded with CeI3, CsI, DyI3, TmI3 and LaI3 show, within the cathodic half period, a reduction of the electrode temperature and an enhanced metal ion density in front of the electrode, and an opposite behavior after phase reversal. With increasing operating frequency, the state of the cathode overlaps onto the anodic phase—except for Cs, being low in adsorption energy. Generally, the phase averaged electrode tip temperature is reduced by seeding a lamp with emitter material; its height depends on admixtures. Measurements at tungsten electrodes doped with ThO2, La2O3 and Ce2O3 within the model lamp show that evaporated emitter material is redeposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface. It reduces the work function of tungsten cathodes above the evaporation temperature of the emitter material, too; and also of cold anodes, indicating a field reversal in front of them. The formation of an emitter spot at low cathode temperature and high emitter material

  3. Selección tecnico-economica de emisores Technical and economical selection of emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Holzapfel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo estudiar los factores que intervienen en la selección técnico económico de goteros. En el estudio fueron utilizados emisores autocompensados y no autocompensados, considerando a los aspectos técnicos como porcentaje de suelo humedecido, número de emisores por planta y coeficiente de uniformidad y precio y la presión de operación del emisor como aspectos económicos. Los resultados muestran que la presión de operación de los emisores es el factor más importante a considerar en la selección, ya que para valores más bajos de presión de operación se obtuvieron menores valores de costo total anualizado, independiente del tipo de gotero. En general, los goteros no autocompesados presentaron valores de costo anualizado menores, para un rango de presión similar. Finalmente el análisis tecnico-económico en la selección de emisores es un procedimiento importante.The objective of this research was to study the parameters that affect the technical-economical selection of emitters. In the study compensated and non-compensated emitters were used. The technical aspects considered were: percentage of wetted soil, number of emitters per plant and the uniformity coefficient as well as price and operation pressure for economic aspects. The results shows that the operation pressure of emitters is the most important factor to be considered in the selection , with smaller values of pressure giving lower total annual cost, independently of the type of emitter. In general, the non-compensated emitter shows lower annual cost values than for compensated emitters, for a similar range of pressures. Finally the technical-economical analysis in the emitter selection is an important procedure.

  4. Coherent single-photon absorption by single emitters coupled to 1D nanophotonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yuntian; Wubs, Martijn; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We have derived an efficient model that allows calculating the dynamical single-photon absorption of an emitter coupled to a waveguide. We suggest a novel and simple structure that leads to strong single-photon absorption.......We have derived an efficient model that allows calculating the dynamical single-photon absorption of an emitter coupled to a waveguide. We suggest a novel and simple structure that leads to strong single-photon absorption....

  5. On the importance of nonlocal effects on the description of emitter-plasmon coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tserkezis, Christos; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2017-01-01

    light to subwavelength regions, and largely modify the local density of states, on which their interaction with an emitter mainly depends, thus paving new routes for exploring light-matter interactions. Advances in nanotechnology and nanofabrication have recently led to the minimisation of relative...... become relevant [1, 2]. Here we explore the influence of the latter, larger-scale effect, on the coupling of various emitters with canonical plasmonic nanostructures....

  6. Concepts for a low emittance-high capacity storage ring for the Diamond Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, Riccardo; Evans, Gwyndaf; Sawhney, Kawal; Zegenhagen, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    The Diamond Light Source is investigating several paths for a possible machine upgrade to Diamond II. The exercise is driven by a joint assessment of the science capabilities opened by a very low emittance ring and the machine design that will underpin them. The consultation is made on a beamline-by-beamline basis and has highlighted a significant preference for lattices that combine both a low emittance and large capacity for IDs.

  7. Facility for assessing spectral normal emittance of solid materials at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercatelli, Luca; Meucci, Marco; Sani, Elisa

    2015-10-10

    Spectral emittance is a key topic in the study of new compositions, depositions, and mechanical machining of materials for solar absorption and for renewable energies in general. The present work reports on the realization and testing of a new experimental facility for the measurement of directional spectral emittance in the range of 2.5-20 μm. Our setup provides emittance spectral information in a completely controlled environment at medium-high temperatures up to 1200 K. We describe the layout and first tests on the device, comparing the results obtained for hafnium carbide and tantalum diboride ultrarefractory ceramic samples to previous quasi-monochromatic measurements carried out in the PROMES-CNRS (PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire- Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France) solar furnace, obtaining a good agreement. Finally, to assess the reliability of the widely used approach of estimating the spectral emittance from room-temperature reflectance spectrum, we compared the calculation in the 2.5-17 μm spectral range to the experimental high-temperature spectral emittance, obtaining that the spectral trend of calculated and measured curves is similar but the calculated emittance underestimates the measured value.

  8. Unbiased continuous wave terahertz photomixer emitters with dis-similar Schottky barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad-Zamani, Mohammad Javad; Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammad Kazem; Neshat, Mohammad

    2015-07-27

    We are introducing a new bias free CW terahertz photomixer emitter array. Each emitter consists of an asymmetric metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) that is made of two side by side dis-similar Schottky contacts, on a thin layer of low temperature grown (LTG) GaAs, with barrier heights of difference (ΔΦ(B)) and a finite lateral spacing (s). Simulations show that when an appropriately designed structure is irradiated by two coherent optical beams of different center wavelengths, whose frequency difference (∆f) falls in a desired THz band, the built-in field between the two dis-similar potential barriers can accelerate the photogenerated carriers that are modulated by ∆ω, making each pitch in the array to act as a CW THz emitter, effectively. We also show the permissible values of s and ΔΦ(B) pairs, for which the strengths of the built-in electric field maxima fall below that of the critical of 50 V/μm- i.e., the breakdown limit for the LTG-GaAs layer. Moreover, we calculate the THz radiation power per emitter in an array. Among many potential applications for these bias free THz emitters their use in endoscopic imaging without a need for hazardous external biasing circuitry that reduces the patient health risk, could be the most important one. A hybrid numerical simulation method is used to design an optimum emitter pitch, radiating at 0.5 THz.

  9. Nanostructured GaAs solar cells via metal-assisted chemical etching of emitter layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yunwon; Choi, Keorock; Jun, Dong-Hwan; Oh, Jungwoo

    2017-10-02

    GaAs solar cells with nanostructured emitter layers were fabricated via metal-assisted chemical etching. Au nanoparticles produced via thermal treatment of Au thin films were used as etch catalysts to texture an emitter surface with nanohole structures. Epi-wafers with emitter layers 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 um in thickness were directly textured and a window layer removal process was performed before metal catalyst deposition. A nanohole-textured emitter layer provides effective light trapping capabilities, reducing the surface reflection of a textured solar cell by 11.0%. However, because the nanostructures have high surface area to volume ratios and large numbers of defects, various photovoltaic properties were diminished by high recombination losses. Thus, we have studied the application of nanohole structures to GaAs emitter solar cells and investigated the cells' antireflection and photovoltaic properties as a function of the nanohole structure and emitter thickness. Due to decreased surface reflection and improved shunt resistance, the solar cell efficiency increased from 4.25% for non-textured solar cells to 7.15% for solar cells textured for 5 min.

  10. Thin-film ‘Thermal Well’ Emitters and Absorbers for High-Efficiency Thermophotovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Huang, Yi; Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is introduced to significantly improve the performance of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems using low-dimensional thermal emitters and photovoltaic (PV) cells. By reducing the thickness of both the emitter and the PV cell, strong spectral selectivity in thermal emission and absorption can be achieved by confining photons in trapped waveguide modes inside the thin-films that act as thermal analogs to quantum wells. Simultaneously, photo-excited carriers travel shorter distances across the thin-films reducing bulk recombination losses resulting in a lower saturation current in the PV cell. We predict a TPV efficiency enhancement with near-field coupling between the thermal emitter and the PV cell up to 38.7% using a thin-film germanium (Ge) emitter at 1000 K and an ultra-thin gallium antimonide (GaSb) cell supported by perfect back reflectors separated by 100 nm. Even in the far-field limit, the efficiency is predicted to reach 31.5%, which is over an order of magnitude higher than the Shockley Queisser limit of 1.6% for a bulk GaSb cell and a blackbody emitter at 1000 K. The proposed design approach does not require nanoscale patterning of the emitter and PV cell surfaces, but instead offers a simple low-cost solution to improve the performance of thermophotovoltaic systems. PMID:26030711

  11. Thin-film 'Thermal Well' Emitters and Absorbers for High-Efficiency Thermophotovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jonathan K; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Huang, Yi; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Chen, Gang

    2015-06-01

    A new approach is introduced to significantly improve the performance of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems using low-dimensional thermal emitters and photovoltaic (PV) cells. By reducing the thickness of both the emitter and the PV cell, strong spectral selectivity in thermal emission and absorption can be achieved by confining photons in trapped waveguide modes inside the thin-films that act as thermal analogs to quantum wells. Simultaneously, photo-excited carriers travel shorter distances across the thin-films reducing bulk recombination losses resulting in a lower saturation current in the PV cell. We predict a TPV efficiency enhancement with near-field coupling between the thermal emitter and the PV cell up to 38.7% using a thin-film germanium (Ge) emitter at 1000 K and an ultra-thin gallium antimonide (GaSb) cell supported by perfect back reflectors separated by 100 nm. Even in the far-field limit, the efficiency is predicted to reach 31.5%, which is over an order of magnitude higher than the Shockley Queisser limit of 1.6% for a bulk GaSb cell and a blackbody emitter at 1000 K. The proposed design approach does not require nanoscale patterning of the emitter and PV cell surfaces, but instead offers a simple low-cost solution to improve the performance of thermophotovoltaic systems.

  12. Full three-dimensional power flow analysis of single-emitter-plasmonic-nanoantenna system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhyung; Song, Jung-Hwan; Jeong, Kwang-Yong; Ee, Ho-Seok; Seo, Min-Kyo

    2015-05-04

    We present a full three-dimensional (3D) power flow analysis of an emitter-nanoantenna system. A conventional analysis, based on the total Poynting vector, calculates only the coupling strength in terms of the Purcell enhancement. For a better understanding of the emitter-nanoantenna system, not only the Purcell enhancement but also complete information on the energy transfer channels is necessary. The separation of the pure scattering and emitter output Poynting vectors enables the quantification of the individual energy transfer channels. Employing the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD), we examine a nanodisk antenna that supports the bright dipole and dark quadrupole resonance modes for which the power flow characteristics are completely distinct, and we analyze the power flow enhancements to the energy transfer channels with respect to the wavelength, polarization, and position of the emitter coupled to the antenna. The 3D power flow analysis reveals how the constructive or destructive interference between the emitter and the antenna resonance mode affects the power flow enhancements and the far-field radiation pattern. Our proposed power flow analysis should play a critical role in characterizing the emitter-antenna system and customizing its energy transfer properties for desired applications.

  13. Medical applications of hybrids made from quantum emitter and metallic nanoshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Balakrishnan, Shankar; Masood, Shahbaz

    2017-07-01

    We have studied the photoluminescence emission in a quantum emitter and metallic nanoshell hybrid system. The metallic nanoshell is made of a dielectric core coated with a thin layer of metal and is surrounded by biological cells such as cancer cells. Surface plasmon polariton resonances in the metallic nanoshell are calculated using Maxwell's equations in the quasi-static approximation. It is found that the metallic nanoshell has two surface plasmon polariton resonances. Locations of surface plasmon polariton resonances can be manipulated by changing the size of the core and the metallic shell. We have compared our theory with the extinction coefficient of metallic nanoshells. A good agreement between theory and experiment is found. A probe laser field is applied to study the photoluminescence spectrum in the hybrid system. Dipoles are induced in the metallic nanoshell and quantum emitter due to the probe laser. Hence the quantum emitter and metallic nanoshell interact via the dipole-dipole interaction. The photoluminescence spectrum of the quantum emitter is calculated using the density matrix method in the presence of the dipole-dipole interaction. It is found that the photoluminescence spectrum of the quantum emitter with degenerate excitons splits from one peak to two or three peaks depending on the locations of two surface plasmon polariton resonances. Similarly, for the nondegenerate quantum emitter we found that the photoluminescence spectrum splits from two peaks to four peaks. These interesting findings may be useful in the fabrication of nanosensors, nanoswitches, and for other applications in medicine.

  14. Evaluation of the in vitro growth of urinary tract infection-causing gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in a proposed synthetic human urine (SHU) medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipe, Deepak S; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriuria is a hallmark of urinary tract infection (UTI) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which are among the most frequent infections in humans. A variety of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are associated with these infections but Escherichia coli contributes up to 80% of cases. Multiple bacterial species including E. coli can grow in human urine as a means to maintain colonization during infections. In vitro bacteriuria studies aimed at modeling microbial growth in urine have utilized various compositions of synthetic human urine (SHU) and a Composite SHU formulation was recently proposed. In this study, we sought to validate the recently proposed Composite SHU as a medium that supports the growth of several bacterial species that are known to grow in normal human urine and/or artificial urine. Comparative growth assays of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus faecalis were undertaken using viable bacterial count and optical density measurements over a 48h culture period. Three different SHU formulations were tested in various culture vessels, shaking conditions and volumes and showed that Composite SHU can support the robust growth of gram-negative bacteria but requires supplementation with 0.2% yeast extract to support the growth of gram-positive bacteria. Experiments are also presented that show an unexpected but major influence of P. mirabilis towards the ability to measure bacterial growth in generally accepted multiwell assays using absorbance readings, predicted to have a basis in the release of volatile organic compound(s) from P. mirabilis during growth in Composite SHU medium. This study represents an essential methodological validation of a more chemically defined type of synthetic urine that can be applied to study mechanisms of bacteriuria and we conclude will offer a useful in vitro model to investigate the

  15. Growth inhibition of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings in Ga- and In-contaminated acidic soils is respectively caused by Al and Al+In toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jeng-Yan; Syu, Chien-Hui; Lee, Dar-Yuan

    2017-10-12

    Limited information exists on the effects of emerging contaminants gallium (Ga) and indium (In) on rice plant growth. This study investigated the effects on growth and uptake of Ga and In by rice plants grown in soils with different properties. Pot experiment was conducted and the rice seedlings were grown in two soils of different pH (Pc and Cf) spiked with various Ga and In concentrations. The results showed concentrations of Ga, In, and Al in soil pore water increased with Ga- or In-spiking in acidic Pc soils, significantly decreasing growth indices. According to the dose-response curve, we observed that the EC50 value for Ga and In treatments were 271 and 390mgkg(-1) in Pc soils, respectively. The context of previous hydroponic studies suggests that growth inhibition of rice seedlings in Ga-spiked Pc soils is mainly due to Al toxicity resulting from enhanced Al release through competitive adsorption of Ga, rather than from Ga toxicity. In-spiked Pc soils, both In and Al toxicity resulted in growth inhibition, while no such effect was found in Cf soils due to the low availability of Ga, In and Al under neutral pH conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Automated Terrestrial EMI Emitter Detection, Classification, and Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottler, R.; Ong, J.; Gioia, C.; Bowman, C.; Bhopale, A.

    Clear operating spectrum at ground station antenna locations is critically important for communicating with, commanding, controlling, and maintaining the health of satellites. Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI) can interfere with these communications, so it is extremely important to track down and eliminate sources of EMI. The Terrestrial RFI-locating Automation with CasE based Reasoning (TRACER) system is being implemented to automate terrestrial EMI emitter localization and identification to improve space situational awareness, reduce manpower requirements, dramatically shorten EMI response time, enable the system to evolve without programmer involvement, and support adversarial scenarios such as jamming. The operational version of TRACER is being implemented and applied with real data (power versus frequency over time) for both satellite communication antennas and sweeping Direction Finding (DF) antennas located near them. This paper presents the design and initial implementation of TRACER’s investigation data management, automation, and data visualization capabilities. TRACER monitors DF antenna signals and detects and classifies EMI using neural network technology, trained on past cases of both normal communications and EMI events. When EMI events are detected, an Investigation Object is created automatically. The user interface facilitates the management of multiple investigations simultaneously. Using a variant of the Friis transmission equation, emissions data is used to estimate and plot the emitter’s locations over time for comparison with current flights. The data is also displayed on a set of five linked graphs to aid in the perception of patterns spanning power, time, frequency, and bearing. Based on details of the signal (its classification, direction, and strength, etc.), TRACER retrieves one or more cases of EMI investigation methodologies which are represented as graphical behavior transition networks (BTNs). These BTNs can be edited easily

  17. Specified gas emitters regulation : offset credit verification guidance document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-09-15

    In response to concerns about global warming, the Alberta Government has committed to taking effective action on climate change. One of actions was the development of a carbon compliance system which allows emission offsets as a compliance option. As of July 2007, Alberta's regulatory system for managing greenhouse gases has enabled a compliance-based carbon market to develop in the province. However, in order to be effective, the compliance-based carbon market must reflect Alberta's environmental and economic circumstances, and must also demonstrate consistency with national efforts to reduce climate change. Regulated firms in Alberta can now buy verified emission reductions or removal of greenhouse gases from voluntary actions arising from unregulated activities in the province. This market-based approach offers flexibility for emitters, since markets generally determine the most cost-effective emission reduction opportunities. In addition, the ability to sell offsets provides an incentive to innovate and invest in activities that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions beyond regulated activities. Since this approach is new, this guidance document was prepared to help buyers and sellers regarding their investments. In particular, it outlined the process requirements for undertaking offset projects in Alberta. Verification is a mandatory requirement for Alberta-based offsets that will be used for compliance purposes under the Alberta Regulation. This guide explained how to prepare for, and what to expect during verification. The offset verification process ensures that Alberta Environment receives emission offsets in compliance reports which are credible and of sufficient quality to use as a compliance option under the system. 2 tabs., 3 figs., 4 appendices.

  18. Alpha emitter radium-223 and survival in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, C; Nilsson, S; Heinrich, D; Helle, S I; O'Sullivan, J M; Fosså, S D; Chodacki, A; Wiechno, P; Logue, J; Seke, M; Widmark, A; Johannessen, D C; Hoskin, P; Bottomley, D; James, N D; Solberg, A; Syndikus, I; Kliment, J; Wedel, S; Boehmer, S; Dall'Oglio, M; Franzén, L; Coleman, R; Vogelzang, N J; O'Bryan-Tear, C G; Staudacher, K; Garcia-Vargas, J; Shan, M; Bruland, Ø S; Sartor, O

    2013-07-18

    Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223), an alpha emitter, selectively targets bone metastases with alpha particles. We assessed the efficacy and safety of radium-223 as compared with placebo, in addition to the best standard of care, in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases. In our phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomly assigned 921 patients who had received, were not eligible to receive, or declined docetaxel, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive six injections of radium-223 (at a dose of 50 kBq per kilogram of body weight intravenously) or matching placebo; one injection was administered every 4 weeks. In addition, all patients received the best standard of care. The primary end point was overall survival. The main secondary efficacy end points included time to the first symptomatic skeletal event and various biochemical end points. A prespecified interim analysis, conducted when 314 deaths had occurred, assessed the effect of radium-223 versus placebo on survival. An updated analysis, when 528 deaths had occurred, was performed before crossover from placebo to radium-223. At the interim analysis, which involved 809 patients, radium-223, as compared with placebo, significantly improved overall survival (median, 14.0 months vs. 11.2 months; hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55 to 0.88; two-sided P=0.002). The updated analysis involving 921 patients confirmed the radium-223 survival benefit (median, 14.9 months vs. 11.3 months; hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.83; Pradium-233 as compared with placebo. Radium-223 was associated with low myelosuppression rates and fewer adverse events. In this study, which was terminated for efficacy at the prespecified interim analysis, radium-223 improved overall survival. (Funded by Algeta and Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals; ALSYMPCA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00699751.).

  19. Universal modal radiation laws for all thermal emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Fan, Shanhui

    2017-01-01

    We derive four laws relating the absorptivity and emissivity of thermal emitters. Unlike the original Kirchhoff radiation law derivations, these derivations include diffraction, and so are valid also for small objects, and can also cover nonreciprocal objects. The proofs exploit two recent approaches. First, we express all fields in terms of the mode-converter basis sets of beams; these sets, which can be uniquely established for any linear optical object, give orthogonal input beams that are coupled one-by-one to orthogonal output beams. Second, we consider thought experiments using universal linear optical machines, which allow us to couple appropriate beams and black bodies. Two of these laws can be regarded as rigorous extensions of previously known laws: One gives a modal version of a radiation law for reciprocal objects—the absorptivity of any input beam equals the emissivity into the “backward” (i.e., phase-conjugated) version of that beam; another gives the overall equality of the sums of the emissivities and the absorptivities for any object, including nonreciprocal ones. The other two laws, valid for reciprocal and nonreciprocal objects, are quite different from previous relations. One shows universal equivalence of the absorptivity of each mode-converter input beam and the emissivity into its corresponding scattered output beam. The other gives unexpected equivalences of absorptivity and emissivity for broad classes of beams. Additionally, we prove these orthogonal mode-converter sets of input and output beams are the ones that maximize absorptivities and emissivities, respectively, giving these beams surprising additional physical meaning. PMID:28396436

  20. Probing the emitter site of Renilla luciferase using small organic molecules; an attempt to understand the molecular architecture of the emitter site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Farajollah; Emamzadeh, Rahman; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Renilla luciferase is a sensitive enzyme and has wide applications in biotechnology such as drug screening. Previous studies have tried to show the catalytic residues, nevertheless, the accurate architecture and molecular behavior of its emitter site remains uncharacterized. In this study, the activity of Renilla luciferase, in the presence of two small organic molecules including dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and isopropanol was considered and the structure was studied by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, the interaction of small organic molecules with the Renilla luciferase was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Kinetics studies showed that at low concentration of DMSO (16.6-66mM) and isopropanol (19.3-76mM) the K m changed and a competitive inhibition pattern was observed. Moreover, spectroscopy studies reveled that the changes of activity of Renilla luciferase in the presence of low concentrations of small organic molecules was not associated with structural collapse or severe changes in the enzyme conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that DMSO and isopropanol, as probing molecules, were both able to bind to the emitter site and remained with the residues of the emitter site. Based on the probing data, the architecture of the emitter site in the "non-binding" model was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Scattering of two photons on a quantum emitter in a one-dimensional waveguide: exact dynamics and induced correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; McCutcheon, Dara

    2015-01-01

    We develop a wavefunction approach to describe the scattering of two photons on a quantum emitter embedded in a one-dimensional waveguide. Our method allows us to calculate the exact dynamics of the complete system at all times, as well as the transmission properties of the emitter. We show...... that the nonlinearity of the emitter with respect to incoming photons depends strongly on the emitter excitation and the spectral shape of the incoming pulses, resulting in transmission of the photons which depends crucially on their separation and width. In addition, for counter-propagating pulses, we analyze...... the induced level of quantum correlations in the scattered state, and we show that the emitter behaves as a nonlinear beam-splitter when the spectral width of the photon pulses is similar to the emitter decay rate....

  2. Growth losses in Swiss forests caused by ozone: epidemiological data analysis of stem increment of Fagus sylvatica L. and Picea abies Karst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sabine; Schindler, Christian; Rihm, Beat

    2014-09-01

    The estimate of growth losses by ozone exposure of forest trees is a significant part in current C sequestration calculations and will also be important in future modeling. It is therefore important to know if the relationship between ozone flux and growth reduction of young trees, used to derive a Critical Level for ozone, is also valid for mature trees. Epidemiological analysis of stem increment data from Fagus sylvatica L. and Picea abies Karst. observed in Swiss forest plots was used to test this hypothesis. The results confirm the validity of the flux-response relationship at least for beech and therefore enable estimating forest growth losses by ozone on a country-wide scale. For Switzerland, these estimates amount to 19.5% growth reduction for deciduous forests, 6.6% for coniferous forests and 11.0% for all forested areas based on annual ozone stomatal uptake during the time period 1991-2011. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Forced expression of platelet-derived growth factor B in the mouse cerebellar primordium changes cell migration during midline fusion and causes cerebellar ectopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrae, Johanna; Afink, Gijs; Zhang, Xiao-Qun; Wurst, Wolfgang; Nistér, Monica

    2004-01-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and receptors are expressed in the developing central nervous system and in brain tumors. To investigate the role of PDGF during normal cerebellar development, we created transgenic mice where PDGF-B was introduced into the endogenous Engrailed1 locus (En1).

  4. Endoscopy in patients with diarrhea during treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors: Is the cause in the mucosa?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers-Sonderen, M.J.; Mulder, S.F.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Derikx, L.A.A.P.; Wanten, G.J.A.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Hoentjen, F.; Herpen, C.M.L. van

    2016-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is a frequently occurring adverse event during treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR TKIs) and is mostly accompanied by abdominal cramps, flatulence and pyrosis. These complaints impair quality of life and lead to dose

  5. Surface-conduction electron-emitter characteristics and fabrication based on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Yi-Ting [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Li, Kuan-Wei [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Honda, Shin-ichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Lin, Pao-Hung; Huang, Ying-Sheng [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi, E-mail: kylee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: The pattern design provides a new structure of surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED). Delta-star shaped vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20o tips can simultaneously provide three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT, which produces numerous secondary electrons and enhance the SED efficiency. - Highlights: • The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. • The vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20° tips of the delta-star arrangement are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons. The cathode pattern simultaneously provides three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT. • The VACNT arrays were covered with magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). • The η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for developing SED applications. - Abstract: The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. Vertically aligned CNT arrays with a delta-star arrangement were patterned and synthesized onto a quartz substrate using photolithography and thermal chemical vapor deposition. Delta-star shaped VACNT arrays with 20° tips are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons because of their high electrical field gradient. In order to improve the field emission and secondary electrons (SEs) in SCE applications, magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures were coated onto the VACNT arrays to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). According to the definition of η in SCE applications, in this study, the η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for

  6. Study and application of a controlled-potential electrochemistry-electrospray emitter for electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J; Granger, Michael C

    2005-07-15

    This paper discusses continued studies and new analytical applications of a recently developed three-electrode controlled-potential electrochemical cell incorporated into an electrospray ion source (Van Berkel, G. J.; Asano, K. G.; Granger, M. C. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 1493-1499.). This cell contains a porous flow-through working electrode (i.e., the emitter electrode) with high surface area and auxiliary electrodes with small total surface area that are incorporated into the emitter electrode circuit to control the electrochemical reactions of analytes in the electrospray emitter. The current at the working and auxiliary electrodes, and current at the grounding points upstream and downstream of the emitter in the electrospray circuit, were recorded in this study, along with the respective mass spectra of model compound reserpine, under various operating conditions to better understand the electrochemical and electrospray operation of this emitter cell. In addition to the ability to control analyte oxidation in positive ion mode (or reduction in negative ion mode) in the electrospray emitter, this emitter cell system was shown to provide the ability to efficiently reduce analytes in positive ion mode and oxidize analytes in negative ion mode. This was demonstrated by the reduction of methylene blue in positive ion mode and oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid in negative ion mode. Also, the ability to control electrochemical reactions via potential control was used to selectively ionize (oxidize) analytes with different standard electrochemical potentials within mixtures to different charge states to overcome overlapping molecular ion isotopic clusters. The analytical benefit of this ability was illustrated using a mixture of nickel and cobalt octaethylporphyrin.

  7. Delayed growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4 years Developmental milestones record - 5 years Causes Constitutional growth delay refers to children who are small ... nutrition expert who can help you choose the right foods to offer your child. What to Expect ...

  8. Emittance growth due to static and radiative space charge forces in an electron bunch compressor

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard; Stulle, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Evolution of short intense electron bunches passing through bunch-compressing beam lines is studied using the UAL (Unified Accelerator Libraries) string space charge formulation [R. Talman, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 7, 100701 (2004); N. Malitsky and R. Talman, in Proceedings of the 9th European Particle Accelerator Conference, Lucerne, 2004 (EPS-AG, Lucerne, 2004); R. Talman, Accelerator X-Ray Sources (Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2006), Chap. 13]. Three major configurations are studied, with the first most important and studied in greatest detail (because actual experimental results are available and the same results have been simulated with other codes): (i) Experimental bunch compression results were obtained at CTF-II, the CERN test facility for the “Compact Linear Collider” using electrons of about 40 MeV. Previous simulations of these results have been performed (using trafic4* [A. Kabel et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 455, 185 (2000)] and elegant [M. Borland, Argonne National Laboratory...

  9. Transformation of even-aged European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) to uneven-aged management under changing growth conditions caused by climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Erik; Meilby, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from even-aged to uneven-aged forest management is currently taking place throughout Europe. Climate change is, however, expected to change growth conditions—possibly quite radically. Using a deterministic approach, it was the objective of this study to investigate the influence...... of such changes on optimal transformation strategies for an even-aged stand of European Beech in Denmark. For a range of growth change scenarios, represented by changes in site index, optimal harvest policies were determined using a matrix modelling approach and a differential evolution algorithm. Transition...... probabilities were updated continuously based on stand level variables and the transition matrix was thus dynamic. With optimal transformation policies, stand development followed similar pathways during the transformation phase irrespective of climate change scenario. Optimal transformation policies were thus...

  10. Facile Formation of High-quality InGaN/GaN Quantum-disks-in-Nanowires on Bulk-Metal Substrates for High-power Light-emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2016-01-08

    High-quality nitride materials grown on scalable and low-cost metallic substrates are considerably attractive for high-power light emitters. We demonstrate here, for the first time, the high-power red (705 nm) InGaN/GaN quantum-disks (Qdisks)-in-nanowire light-emitting diodes (LEDs) self-assembled directly on metal-substrate. The LEDs exhibited a low turn-on voltage of ~2 V without efficiency droop up to injection current of 500 mA (1.6 kA/cm2) at ~5 V. This is achieved through the direct growth and optimization of high-quality nanowires on titanium (Ti) coated bulk polycrystalline-molybdenum (Mo) substrates. We performed extensive studies on the growth mechanisms, obtained high-crystal-quality nanowires, and confirmed the epitaxial relationship between the cubic titanium nitride (TiN) transition layer and the hexagonal nanowires. The growth of nanowires on all-metal stack of TiN/Ti/Mo enables simultaneous implementation of n-metal contact, reflector and heat-sink, which greatly simplifies the fabrication process of high-power light emitters. Our work ushers in a practical platform for high-power nanowires light emitters, providing versatile solutions for multiple cross-disciplinary applications that are greatly enhanced by leveraging on the chemical stability of nitride materials, large specific surface of nanowires, chemical lift-off ready layer structures, and reusable Mo substrates.

  11. Long-term response to growth hormone therapy in a patient with short stature caused by a novel heterozygous mutation in NPR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasques, Gabriela A; Hisado-Oliva, Alfonso; Funari, Mariana F A; Lerario, Antonio M; Quedas, Elisangela P S; Solberg, Paulo; Heath, Karen E; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the natriuretic peptide receptor B gene (NPR2) are responsible for short stature in patients without a distinct phenotype. Some of these patients have been treated with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy with a variable response. The proband was a healthy boy who presented at the age of 5.1 years with familial short stature (height SDS of -3.1). He had a prominent forehead, a depressed nasal bridge, centripetal fat distribution and a high-pitched voice resembling that of children with GH deficiency. His hormonal evaluation showed low insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) but a normal GH peak at a stimulation test. During the first year of rhGH treatment, his growth velocity increased from 3.4 to 10.4 cm/year (height SDS change of +1.1). At the last visit, he was 8.8 years old and still on treatment, his growth velocity was 6.4 cm/year and height SDS was -1.8. We identified through exome sequencing a novel heterozygous loss-of-function NPR2 mutation (c.2905G>C; p.Val969Leu). Cells cotransfected with the p.Val969Leu mutant showed a significant decrease in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production compared to the wild type (WT), suggesting a dominant negative effect. This case reveals a novel heterozygous loss-of-function NPR2 mutation responsible for familial short stature and the good response of rhGH therapy in this patient.

  12. Does Domestication Cause Changes in Growth Reaction Norms? A Study of Farmed, Wild and Hybrid Atlantic Salmon Families Exposed to Environmental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Monica Favnebøe; Skaala, Øystein; Nilsen, Frank; Glover, Kevin Alan

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important traits linked with the successful domestication of animals is reducing their sensitivity to environmental stressors in the human controlled environment. In order to examine whether domestication selection in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L., over approximately ten generations, has inadvertently selected for reduced responsiveness to stress, we compared the growth reaction norms of 29 wild, hybrid and domesticated families reared together under standard hatchery conditions (control) and in the presence of a stressor (reduced water level twice daily). The experiment was conducted for a 14 week period. Farmed salmon outgrew wild salmon 1∶2.93 in the control tanks, and no overlap in mean weight was displayed between families representing the three groups. Thus, the elevation of the reaction norms differed among the groups. Overall, growth was approximately 25% lower in the stressed tanksl; however, farmed salmon outgrew wild salmon 1∶3.42 under these conditions. That farmed salmon maintained a relatively higher growth rate than the wild salmon in the stressed tanks demonstrates a lower responsiveness to stress in the farmed salmon. Thus, flatter reaction norm slopes were displayed in the farmed salmon, demonstrating reduced plasticity for this trait under these specific experimental conditions. For all growth measurements, hybrid salmon displayed intermediate values. Wild salmon displayed higher heritability estimates for body weight than the hybrid and farmed salmon in both environments. This suggests reduced genetic variation for body weight in the farmed contra wild salmon studied here. While these results may be linked to the specific families and stocks investigated, and verification in other stocks and traits is needed, these data are consistent with the theoretical predictions of domestication. PMID:23382901

  13. Food Shortage Causes Differential Effects on Body Composition and Tissue-Specific Gene Expression in Salmon Modified for Increased Growth Hormone Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernathy, Jason; Panserat, Stéphane; Welker, Thomas; Plagne-Juan, Elisabeth; Sakhrani, Dionne; Higgs, David A; Audouin, Florence; Devlin, Robert H; Overturf, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenic salmon possesses markedly increased metabolic rate, appetite, and feed conversion efficiency, as well as an increased ability to compete for food resources. Thus, the ability of GH-transgenic fish to withstand periods of food deprivation as occurs in nature is potentially different than that of nontransgenic fish. However, the physiological and genetic effects of transgenic GH production over long periods of food deprivation remain largely unknown. Here, GH-transgenic coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and nontransgenic, wild-type coho salmon were subjected to a 3-month food deprivation trial, during which time performance characteristics related to growth were measured along with proximate compositions. To examine potential genetic effects of GH-transgenesis on long-term food deprivation, a group of genes related to muscle development and liver metabolism was selected for quantitative PCR analysis. Results showed that GH-transgenic fish lose weight at an increased rate compared to wild-type even though proximate compositions remained relatively similar between the groups. A total of nine genes related to muscle physiology (cathepsin, cee, insulin-like growth factor, myostatin, murf-1, myosin, myogenin, proteasome delta, tumor necrosis factor) and five genes related to liver metabolism (carnitine palmitoyltransferase, fatty acid synthase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase) were shown to be differentially regulated between GH-transgenic and wild-type coho salmon over time. These genetic and physiological responses assist in identifying differences between GH-transgenic and wild-type salmon in relation to fitness effects arising from elevated growth hormone during periods of long-term food shortage.

  14. Does domestication cause changes in growth reaction norms? A study of farmed, wild and hybrid Atlantic salmon families exposed to environmental stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Favnebøe Solberg

    Full Text Available One of the most important traits linked with the successful domestication of animals is reducing their sensitivity to environmental stressors in the human controlled environment. In order to examine whether domestication selection in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L., over approximately ten generations, has inadvertently selected for reduced responsiveness to stress, we compared the growth reaction norms of 29 wild, hybrid and domesticated families reared together under standard hatchery conditions (control and in the presence of a stressor (reduced water level twice daily. The experiment was conducted for a 14 week period. Farmed salmon outgrew wild salmon 1:2.93 in the control tanks, and no overlap in mean weight was displayed between families representing the three groups. Thus, the elevation of the reaction norms differed among the groups. Overall, growth was approximately 25% lower in the stressed tanksl; however, farmed salmon outgrew wild salmon 1:3.42 under these conditions. That farmed salmon maintained a relatively higher growth rate than the wild salmon in the stressed tanks demonstrates a lower responsiveness to stress in the farmed salmon. Thus, flatter reaction norm slopes were displayed in the farmed salmon, demonstrating reduced plasticity for this trait under these specific experimental conditions. For all growth measurements, hybrid salmon displayed intermediate values. Wild salmon displayed higher heritability estimates for body weight than the hybrid and farmed salmon in both environments. This suggests reduced genetic variation for body weight in the farmed contra wild salmon studied here. While these results may be linked to the specific families and stocks investigated, and verification in other stocks and traits is needed, these data are consistent with the theoretical predictions of domestication.

  15. Discovery of a Giant Lya Emitter Near the Reionization Epoch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Egami, Eiichi; Saito, Tomoki; Oguri, Masamune; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Farrah, Duncan; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Momcheva, Ivelina; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Furusawa, Hisanori; Akiyama, Masayuki; Dunlop, James S.; Mortier, Angela M.J.; Okamura, Sadanori; Hayashi, Masao; Cirasuolo, Michele; Dressler, Alan; Iye, Masanori; Jarvis, Matt.J.

    2008-08-01

    We report the discovery of a giant Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) with a Spitzer/IRAC counterpart near the reionization epoch at z = 6.595. The giant LAE is found from the extensive 1 deg{sup 2} Subaru narrow-band survey for z = 6.6 LAEs in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) field, and subsequently identified by deep spectroscopy of Keck/DEIMOS and Magellan/IMACS. Among our 207 LAE candidates, this LAE is not only the brightest narrow-band object with L(Ly{alpha}) = 3.9 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} in our survey volume of 10{sup 6} Mpc{sup 3}, but also a spatially extended Ly{alpha} nebula with the largest isophotal area whose major axis is at least {approx_equal} 3-inches. This object is more likely to be a large Ly{alpha} nebula with a size of {approx}> 17-kpc than to be a strongly-lensed galaxy by a foreground object. Our Keck spectrum with medium-high spectral and spatial resolutions suggests that the velocity width is v{sub FWHM} = 251 {+-} 21 km s{sup -1}, and that the line-center velocity changes by {approx_equal} 60 km s{sup -1} in a 10-kpc range. The stellar mass and star-formation rate are estimated to be 0.9-5.0 x 10{sup 10}M{sub {circle_dot}} and > 34 M{sub {circle_dot}}yr{sup -1}, respectively, from the combination of deep optical to infrared images of Subaru, UKIDSS-Ultra Deep Survey, and Spitzer/IRAC. Although the nature of this object is not yet clearly understood, this could be an important object for studying cooling clouds accreting onto a massive halo, or forming-massive galaxies with significant outflows contributing to cosmic reionization and metal enrichment of inter-galactic medium.

  16. Field emitter array RF amplifier development project. Cathode technology development. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, W. Devereux; McGuire, Gary E.

    1994-06-01

    This document presents the results of Phase I of the Field Emitter Array RF Amplifier Development Project. The primary goal of the Phase I performance period was the development of field emission cathodes with the following characteristics: 5 mA total emission current, 5 A/sq cm current density, operation at an applied voltage of less than 250 V, greater than 1 hour lifetime, and emission current modulation at 1 GHz or greater. The basic fabrication process for silicon field emitter arrays was defined during the first 18 months of the contract performance period. During the final 12 months of the contract, the process was refined using statistical process control, with the goal of maximizing electrical yield on large arrays. The resulting devices met each of the program performance criteria. Arrays of up to 232,630 emitters, the largest field emitter arrays in any material to date, were successfully fabricated and electrically tested. The emission currents measured from these devices were the highest reported in the literature for silicon field emitter arrays. Techniques for further enhancing performance through the deposition of low work function and metal coatings were developed. Recommended directions for further research were defined for implementation under ARPA leadership.

  17. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  18. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of γϵx = 3x10-6 m-rad and γϵy = 3x10-8 m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  19. Shortwave-infrared (SWIR emitters for biological imaging: a review of challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimsen Elijah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Shortwave infrared radiation (SWIR is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from approximately 900 nm to 2500 nm. Recent advances in imaging systems have expanded the application of SWIR emitters from traditional fields in materials science to biomedical imaging, and the new detectors in SWIR opened an opportunity of deep tissue imaging. Achieving deep photon penetration while maintaining high resolution is one of the main objectives and challenges in bioimaging used for the investigation of diverse processes in living organisms. The application of SWIR emitters in biological settings is, however, hampered by low quantum efficiency. So far, photoluminescent properties in the SWIR region have not been improved by extending concepts that have been developed for the visible (400–650 nm and near-infrared (NIR, 700–900 nm wavelengths, which indicates that the governing behavior is fundamentally different in the SWIR. The focus of this minireview is to examine the mechanisms behind the low efficiency of SWIR emitters as well as to highlight the progress in their design for biological applications. Several common mechanisms will be considered in this review: (a the effect of the energy gap between the excited and ground state on the quantum efficiency, (b the coupling of the excited electronic states in SWIR emitters to vibrational states in the surrounding matrix, and (c the role of environment in quenching the excited states. General strategies to improve the quantum yields for a diverse type of SWIR emitters will be also presented.

  20. Shortwave-infrared (SWIR) emitters for biological imaging: a review of challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimsen, Elijah; Sadtler, Bryce; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-06-01

    Shortwave infrared radiation (SWIR) is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from approximately 900 nm to 2500 nm. Recent advances in imaging systems have expanded the application of SWIR emitters from traditional fields in materials science to biomedical imaging, and the new detectors in SWIR opened an opportunity of deep tissue imaging. Achieving deep photon penetration while maintaining high resolution is one of the main objectives and challenges in bioimaging used for the investigation of diverse processes in living organisms. The application of SWIR emitters in biological settings is, however, hampered by low quantum efficiency. So far, photoluminescent properties in the SWIR region have not been improved by extending concepts that have been developed for the visible (400-650 nm) and near-infrared (NIR, 700-900 nm) wavelengths, which indicates that the governing behavior is fundamentally different in the SWIR. The focus of this minireview is to examine the mechanisms behind the low efficiency of SWIR emitters as well as to highlight the progress in their design for biological applications. Several common mechanisms will be considered in this review: (a) the effect of the energy gap between the excited and ground state on the quantum efficiency, (b) the coupling of the excited electronic states in SWIR emitters to vibrational states in the surrounding matrix, and (c) the role of environment in quenching the excited states. General strategies to improve the quantum yields for a diverse type of SWIR emitters will be also presented.

  1. Design and fabrication of spectrally selective emitter for thermophotovoltaic system by using nano-imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Moo; Park, Keum-Hwan; Kim, Da-Som; Hwang, Bo-yeon; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Chae, Hee-Man; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Kim, Young-Seok

    2018-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems have attracted attention as promising power generation systems that can directly convert the radiant energy produced by the combustion of fuel into electrical energy. However, there is a fundamental limit of their conversion efficiency due to the broadband distribution of the radiant spectrum. To overcome this problem, several spectrally selective thermal emitter technologies have been investigated, including the fabrication of photonic crystal (PhC) structures. In this paper, we present some design rules based on finite-a difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results for tungsten (W) PhC emitter. The W 2D PhC was fabricated by a simple nano-imprint lithography (NIL) process, and inductive coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) with an isotropic etching process, the benefits and parameters of which are presented. The fabricated W PhC emitter showed spectrally selective emission near the infrared wavelength range, and the optical properties varied depending on the size of the nano-patterns. The measured results of the fabricated prototype structure correspond well to the simulated values. Finally, compared with the performance of a flat W emitter, the total thermal emitter efficiency was almost 3.25 times better with the 2D W PhC structure.

  2. Highly flexible and robust N-doped SiC nanoneedle field emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shanliang

    2015-01-23

    Flexible field emission (FE) emitters, whose unique advantages are lightweight and conformable, promise to enable a wide range of technologies, such as roll-up flexible FE displays, e-papers and flexible light-emitting diodes. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time highly flexible SiC field emitters with low turn-on fields and excellent emission stabilities. n-Type SiC nanoneedles with ultra-sharp tips and tailored N-doping levels were synthesized via a catalyst-assisted pyrolysis process on carbon fabrics by controlling the gas mixture and cooling rate. The turn-on field, threshold field and current emission fluctuation of SiC nanoneedle emitters with an N-doping level of 7.58 at.% are 1.11 V μm-1, 1.55 V μm-1 and 8.1%, respectively, suggesting the best overall performance for such flexible field emitters. Furthermore, characterization of the FE properties under repeated bending cycles and different bending states reveal that the SiC field emitters are mechanically and electrically robust with unprecedentedly high flexibility and stabilities. These findings underscore the importance of concurrent morphology and composition controls in nanomaterial synthesis and establish SiC nanoneedles as the most promising candidate for flexible FE applications. © 2015 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.

  3. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jose V; Rao, S V L S; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P

    2015-07-01

    A 400 keV deuteron (D(+)) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H(+) and D(+) beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D(+) beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally.

  4. Stone growth patterns and risk for surgery among children presenting with hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia and cystinuria as underlying metabolic causes of urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu'bi, F; Sidler, M; Harvey, E; Lopes, R I; Hojjat, A; Naoum, N; Pokarowski, M; Lorenzo, A J; Farhat, W A; Papanikolaou, F; Dos Santos, J

    2017-08-01

    Hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia and cystinuria are the most common underlying metabolic stone abnormalities in children. The present study compared stone growth patterns, stone burden, and the risk of stone-related surgery among these underlying metabolic conditions. A retrospective cohort of 356 children with renal stones, followed from 2000 to 2015, was studied. Differences among metabolic groups were determined using Kruskal-Wallis test; the Scheffé-test was used for multiple comparisons to determine differences among single groups. Independent sample t-test was used when adequate, given the sample size, and Chi-squared test was used for categorical variables. Stone growth rates were calculated as differences in diameter divided by time elapsed between U/Ss (mm/year). Logistic regression was performed to assess the effect of initial stone size on the likelihood of surgery. Median stone size at presentation was significantly different among groups, with cystinuria being the group with the largest proportion of stones >10 mm, while patients with stones metabolic workup (P metabolic groups. On the other hand, the rate of new stone formation in cystinuric patients at their first follow-up was 30.4%, which was significantly higher than in patients with hypercalciuria (16.3%) or with a normal metabolic workup (17.2%; P 20 mm stones was almost 16 or 34 times, respectively (P metabolic groups, stones with a higher growth rate were significantly more likely to result in surgical treatment than slower growing stones. Initial stone size, location of largest stone, previous urinary tract infection, and patient's metabolic type significantly influenced the likelihood of a surgical intervention. Better understanding of the natural history ultimately helps surgeons and clinicians defining prognosis, treatment, and prevention plans for pediatric urolithiasis. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gastric achlorhydria in H/K-ATPase-deficient (Atp4a(-/-)) mice causes severe hyperplasia, mucocystic metaplasia and upregulation of growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Louise M; Andringa, Anastasia; Rubio, Carlos A; Spicer, Zachary; Shull, Gary E; Miller, Marian L

    2005-08-01

    Gastric neoplasia is common in humans, yet controversy remains over contributions of chronic achlorhydria, gastrinemia and hyperplasia, to cancer risk. To study this, mice lacking the gastric H/K-ATPase (Atp4a(-/-) mice) were used to determine whether chronic loss of acid secretion, with attendant hypergastrinemia, predisposes to cancer phenotype. Atp4a(-/-) and Atp4a(+/+) mice, paired for age and gender, were examined at 3, 8, 12 and 20 months for histopathology, and for expression of the trefoil factor family (TFF)1-3, Reg IIIbeta, gamma and delta, osteopontin, CD44, chromogranin A, Crp-ductin, and galectin, all of which are important in cell growth. By 8 months, the glandular stomach of the Atp4a(-/-) mice doubled in weight and thickness, and several modulators of growth were increased. Female Atp4a(-/-) mice were more hyperplastic than Atp4a(-/-) males at 12 and 20 months. By 1 year, severe mucocystic hyperplasia, incomplete intestinal metaplasia, ciliated metaplasia, a shift in mucins from neutral to acidic, and inflammation were widespread. Cells in the mucus pit zone developed a pyloric-type appearance, containing large hyaline-like, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-negative/alcian blue-negative inclusions. But critical characteristics of gastric neoplasia, such as nuclear atypia, invasion into the muscularis mucosa, and metastases were absent. In Atp4a(-/-) mice, chromogranin A and histidine decarboxylase, RegIIIgamma and delta, TFF3, osteopontin and CD44 were upregulated while Reg IIIbeta, and TFF1 were reduced. Chronic achlorhydria and hypergastrinemia in aged Atp4a(-/-) mice produced progressive hyperplasia, mucocystic and incomplete intestinal metaplasia, and the upregulation of growth factors without histological evidence of neoplasia.

  6. Efficiency of commercial Cz-Si solar cell with a shallow emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, C.; Alonso, J.; Vazquez, M.A.; Caballero, L.J. [Isofoton S.A., c/Severo Ochoa 50, PTA, 29590 Malaga (Spain); Romero, R. [Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficie (Unidad asociada al CSIC), Dpto. Fisica Aplicada Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E29071 Malaga (Spain); Ramos-Barrado, J.R., E-mail: barrado@uma.es [Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficie (Unidad asociada al CSIC), Dpto. Fisica Aplicada Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    The increase of a commercial solar cell performance implies an improvement in the different processes in the industrial production. In order to know the main limitations in the efficiency of Czocharalski-Si (Cz-Si) photovoltaic cells, the loss distribution was studied by means of external quantum efficiency, I-V measurements and PC-1D simulation in the current device. One of the most relevant losses is due to recombination in the emitter. The emitters with a low resistance (40 {Omega}/{open_square}) and a deep pn-junction, display a considerable loss ratio. Shallower emitters (80 {Omega}/{open_square}) with low doping density and a new paste for the front side result in a relative improvement in cell efficiency of 3.5%.

  7. Modeling of Diamond Field-Emitter-Arrays for high brightness photocathode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Thomas; Huang, Chengkun; Piryatinski, Andrei; Lewellen, John; Nichols, Kimberly; Choi, Bo; Pavlenko, Vitaly; Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Nguyen, Dinh; Andrews, Heather; Simakov, Evgenya

    2017-10-01

    We propose to employ Diamond Field-Emitter-Arrays (DFEAs) as high-current-density ultra-low-emittance photocathodes for compact laser-driven dielectric accelerators capable of generating ultra-high brightness electron beams for advanced applications. We develop a semi-classical Monte-Carlo photoemission model for DFEAs that includes carriers' transport to the emitter surface and tunneling through the surface under external fields. The model accounts for the electronic structure size quantization affecting the transport and tunneling process within the sharp diamond tips. We compare this first principle model with other field emission models, such as the Child-Langmuir and Murphy-Good models. By further including effects of carrier photoexcitation, we perform simulations of the DFEAs' photoemission quantum yield and the emitted electron beam. Details of the theoretical model and validation against preliminary experimental data will be presented. Work ssupported by LDRD program at LANL.

  8. Coupling of a dipolar emitter into one-dimensional surface plasmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Julien; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Dereux, Alain; Colas des Francs, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Quantum plasmonics relies on a new paradigm for light-matter interaction. It benefits from strong confinement of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) that ensures efficient coupling at a deep subwavelength scale, instead of working with a long lifetime cavity polariton that increases the duration of interaction. The large bandwidth and the strong confinement of one dimensional SPP enable controlled manipulation of a nearby quantum emitter. This paves the way to ultrafast nanooptical devices. However, the large SPP bandwidth originates from strong losses so that a clear understanding of the coupling process is needed. In this report, we investigate in details the coupling between a single emitter and a plasmonic nanowire, but also SPP mediated coupling between two emitters. We notably clarify the role of losses in the Purcell factor, unavoidable to achieve nanoscale confinement down to 10(-4)(λ/n)(3). Both the retarded and band-edge quasi-static regimes are discussed.

  9. Electrical determination of the bandgap energies of the emitter and base regions of bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimila-Arroyo, J.

    2016-10-01

    A pure electrical method is presented to extract emitter and base bandgaps of a bipolar junction transistor (BJT) at the locations where the minority carrier injection takes place. It is based on the simultaneous measurement of the collector and base currents as a function of the emitter-base forward bias (Gummer plot) and the corresponding current gain. From the obtained saturation currents as a function of temperature, we extract the bandgap energies. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated for InGaP-GaAs, Si, and Ge commercial devices. For InGaP-GaAs transistors, the results can be understood if the emitter-base heterojunction is not an abrupt but a gradual one. The presented method is a reliable tool that can aid in the development of new compound semiconductor based BJTs whose bandgap energies are highly sensitive to their composition.

  10. Low emittance electron beam formation with a 17 GHz RF gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Brown

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on electron beam quality measurement results from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 17 GHz RF gun experiment. The 1.5 cell RF gun uses a solenoid for emittance compensation. It has produced bunch charges up to 0.1 nC with beam energies up to 1 MeV. The normalized rms emittance of the beam after 35 cm of transport from the gun has been measured by a slit technique to be 3π mm mrad for a 50 pC bunch. This agrees well with PARMELA simulations at these beam energies. At the exit of the electron gun, we estimate the emittance to be about 1π mm mrad, which corresponds to a beam brightness of about 80 A/(π mm mrad^{2}. Improved beam quality should be possible with a higher energy output electron beam from the gun.

  11. Moving scanning emitter tracking by a single observer using time of interception: Observability analysis and algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei ZHANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The target motion analysis (TMA for a moving scanning emitter with known fixed scan rate by a single observer using the time of interception (TOI measurements only is investigated in this paper. By transforming the TOI of multiple scan cycles into the direction difference of arrival (DDOA model, the observability analysis for the TMA problem is performed. Some necessary conditions for uniquely identifying the scanning emitter trajectory are obtained. This paper also proposes a weighted instrumental variable (WIV estimator for the scanning emitter TMA, which does not require any initial solution guess and is closed-form and computationally attractive. More importantly, simulations show that the proposed algorithm can provide estimation mean square error close to the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB at moderate noise levels with significantly lower estimation bias than the conventional pseudo-linear least square (PLS estimator.

  12. Emitter and absorber assembly for multiple self-dual operation and directional transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalozoumis, P. A.; Morfonios, C. V.; Kodaxis, G.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate how to systematically design wave scattering systems with simultaneous coherent perfect absorbing and lasing operation at multiple and prescribed frequencies. The approach is based on the recursive assembly of non-Hermitian emitter and absorber units into self-dual emitter-absorber trimers at different composition levels, exploiting the simple structure of the corresponding transfer matrices. In particular, lifting the restriction to parity-time-symmetric setups enables the realization of emitter and absorber action at distinct frequencies and provides flexibility with respect to the choice of realistic parameters. We further show how the same assembled scatterers can be rearranged to produce unidirectional and bidirectional transparency at the selected frequencies. With the design procedure being generically applicable to wave scattering in single-channel settings, we demonstrate it with concrete examples of photonic multilayer setups.

  13. Optimization of multi-tip-shaped field emitters with bilayer protective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sominskii, G. G.; Taradaev, E. P.

    2017-06-01

    The calculations needed to optimize the ordered multi-tip-shaped silicon field emitters with the two-layer protective metal-fullerene coatings intended for use in high voltage electronic devices operating in technical vacuum have been performed. The calculations are fulfilled using the COMSOL program. The influence of the morphology of the surface on the emission characteristics of the emitters is determined, including the needles height and radius of their vertices, and also the distance between needles. It has been shown that the emitters with an area of 0.2 cm2, operating under the conditions of partial mutual screening, can provide currents of several hundred milliamps for fairly high voltages.

  14. Measurements of electron beam emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility damping ring operated in multibunch modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Honda

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the measurement results of electron beam emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility damping ring operated in multibunch modes. The measurements were carried out with an upgraded laser wire beam profile monitor. The monitor has now a vertical wire as well as a horizontal one and is able to make much faster measurements thanks to an increased effective laser power inside the cavity. The measured emittance shows no large bunch-to-bunch dependence in either the horizontal or vertical directions. The values of the vertical emittance are similar to those obtained in the single-bunch operation. The present results are an important step toward the realization of a high-energy linear collider.

  15. Electron injection and emittance control by transverse colliding pulses in a laser-plasma accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A method to inject electron beams with controllable transverse emittances in a laser-plasma accelerators is proposed and analyzed. It uses two colliding laser pulses that propagate transversely to the plasma wave. For colliding pulses with equal frequencies, a beam with very low emittance is generated when the collision is close to the density peak of the plasma wave. Electrons near the axis are accelerated longitudinally by the ponderomotive force of the colliding pulses, accelerated transversely by the beat wave, and subsequently injected into the second bucket of the wake. Ionization is used to increase the transverse injection area and the final trapped charge. Simulations show that the transverse emittance can be less than the 0.1 mm mrad level, which is important for many applications. For colliding laser pulses with different frequencies, the beat wave can produce asymmetric injection, which can enhance betatron radiation generated by the electron beam.

  16. Signal coverage approach to the detection probability of hypothetical extraterrestrial emitters in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Claudio

    2017-04-01

    The lack of evidence for the existence of extraterrestrial life, even the simplest forms of animal life, makes it is difficult to decide whether the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) is more a high-risk, high-payoff endeavor than a futile attempt. Here we insist that even if extraterrestrial civilizations do exist and communicate, the likelihood of detecting their signals crucially depends on whether the Earth lies within a region of the galaxy covered by such signals. By considering possible populations of independent emitters in the galaxy, we build a statistical model of the domain covered by hypothetical extraterrestrial signals to derive the detection probability that the Earth is within such a domain. We show that for general distributions of the signal longevity and directionality, the mean number of detectable emitters is less than one even for detection probabilities as large as 50%, regardless of the number of emitters in the galaxy.

  17. Emittance reconstruction from measured beam sizes in ATF2 and perspectives for ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faus-Golfe, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (CSIC-UV) (Spain); Laboratoire de L' Accélérateur Linéaire (LAL) (France); Navarro, J.; Fuster Martinez, N. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (CSIC-UV) (Spain); Resta Lopez, J. [Cockcroft Institute and University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Giner Navarro, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (CSIC-UV) (Spain); European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN (Switzerland)

    2016-05-21

    The projected emittance (2D) and the intrinsic emittance (4D) reconstruction method by using the beam size measurements at different locations is analyzed in order to study analytically the conditions of solvability of the systems of equations involved in this process. Some conditions are deduced and discussed, and general guidelines about the locations of the measurement stations have been obtained to avoid unphysical results. The special case of the multi-Optical Transition Radiation system (m-OTR), made of four measurement stations, in the Extraction Line (EXT) of Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) has been simulated in much detail and compared with measurements. Finally a feasibility study of a multi-station system for fast transverse beam size measurement, emittance reconstruction and coupling correction in the Ring to Main Linac (RTML) of International Linear Collider (ILC) Diagnostic sections of the RTML has been discussed in detail.

  18. Lower Emittance Lattice for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Using Reverse Bending Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, M.; Berenc, T.; Sun, Y.; Sajaev, V.

    2017-06-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is pursuing an upgrade to the storage ring to a hybrid seven-bend-achromat design [1]. The nominal design provides a natural emittance of 67 pm [2]. By adding reverse dipole fields to several quadrupoles [3, 4] we can reduce the natural emittance to 41 pm while simultaneously providing more optimal beta functions in the insertion devices and increasing the dispersion function at the chromaticity sextupole magnets. The improved emittance results from a combination of increased energy loss per turn and a change in the damping partition. At the same time, the nonlinear dynamics performance is very similar, thanks in part to increased dispersion in the sextupoles. This paper describes the properties, optimization, and performance of the new lattice.

  19. Markovian and non-Markovian dynamics of quantum emitters coupled to two-dimensional structured reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tudela, A.; Cirac, J. I.

    2017-10-01

    The interaction of quantum emitters with structured baths modifies both their individual and collective dynamics. In A. González-Tudela and J. I. Cirac, Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 143602 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.143602, we show how exotic quantum dynamics emerges when quantum emitters are spectrally tuned around the middle of the band of a two-dimensional structured reservoir, where we predict the failure of perturbative treatments, anisotropic non-Markovian interactions, and remarkable superradiant and subradiant behavior. In this work, we provide further analysis of that situation, together with a complete analysis for the quantum emitter dynamics in spectral regions different from the center of the band.

  20. Limitations of two-level emitters as nonlinearities in two-photon controlled-phase gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nysteen, Anders; McCutcheon, Dara P. S.; Heuck, Mikkel; Mørk, Jesper; Englund, Dirk R.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the origin of imperfections in the fidelity of a two-photon controlled-phase gate based on two-level-emitter nonlinearities. We focus on a passive system that operates without external modulations to enhance its performance. We demonstrate that the fidelity of the gate is limited by opposing requirements on the input pulse width for one- and two-photon-scattering events. For one-photon scattering, the spectral pulse width must be narrow compared with the emitter linewidth, while two-photon-scattering processes require the pulse width and emitter linewidth to be comparable. We find that these opposing requirements limit the maximum fidelity of the two-photon controlled-phase gate to 84 % for photons with Gaussian spectral profiles.