WorldWideScience

Sample records for emission tomography reconstruction

  1. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundermann, E; Lemahieu, I; Desmedt, P [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, University of Ghent, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundermann, E.; Lemahieu, I.; Desmedt, P.

    1994-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors)

  3. 3D fast reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egger, M.L.; Scheurer, A. Hermann; Joseph, C.; Morel, C.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of long reconstruction times in positron emission tomography (PET) has been addressed from several points of view, resulting in an affordable dedicated system capable of handling routine 3D reconstructions in a few minutes per frame : on the hardware side using fast processors and a parallel architecture, and on the software side, using efficient implementation of computationally less intensive algorithms

  4. Denoising multicriterion iterative reconstruction in emission spectral tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiong; Yin, Aihan

    2007-03-01

    In the study of optical testing, the computed tomogaphy technique has been widely adopted to reconstruct three-dimensional distributions of physical parameters of various kinds of fluid fields, such as flame, plasma, etc. In most cases, projection data are often stained by noise due to environmental disturbance, instrumental inaccuracy, and other random interruptions. To improve the reconstruction performance in noisy cases, an algorithm that combines a self-adaptive prefiltering denoising approach (SPDA) with a multicriterion iterative reconstruction (MCIR) is proposed and studied. First, the level of noise is approximately estimated with a frequency domain statistical method. Then the cutoff frequency of a Butterworth low-pass filter was established based on the evaluated noise energy. After the SPDA processing, the MCIR algorithm was adopted for limited-view optical computed tomography reconstruction. Simulated reconstruction of two test phantoms and a flame emission spectral tomography experiment were employed to evaluate the performance of SPDA-MCIR in noisy cases. Comparison with some traditional methods and experiment results showed that the SPDA-MCIR combination had obvious improvement in the case of noisy data reconstructions.

  5. Iterative concurrent reconstruction algorithms for emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.K.; Hasegawa, B.H.; Lang, T.F.

    1994-01-01

    Direct reconstruction techniques, such as those based on filtered backprojection, are typically used for emission computed tomography (ECT), even though it has been argued that iterative reconstruction methods may produce better clinical images. The major disadvantage of iterative reconstruction algorithms, and a significant reason for their lack of clinical acceptance, is their computational burden. We outline a new class of ''concurrent'' iterative reconstruction techniques for ECT in which the reconstruction process is reorganized such that a significant fraction of the computational processing occurs concurrently with the acquisition of ECT projection data. These new algorithms use the 10-30 min required for acquisition of a typical SPECT scan to iteratively process the available projection data, significantly reducing the requirements for post-acquisition processing. These algorithms are tested on SPECT projection data from a Hoffman brain phantom acquired with a 2 x 10 5 counts in 64 views each having 64 projections. The SPECT images are reconstructed as 64 x 64 tomograms, starting with six angular views. Other angular views are added to the reconstruction process sequentially, in a manner that reflects their availability for a typical acquisition protocol. The results suggest that if T s of concurrent processing are used, the reconstruction processing time required after completion of the data acquisition can be reduced by at least 1/3 T s. (Author)

  6. Positron Emission Tomography with Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, K.

    1996-10-01

    The development of two different low-cost scanners for positron emission tomography (PET) based on 3D acquisition are presented. The first scanner consists of two rotating scintillation cameras, and produces quantitative images, which have shown to be clinically useful. The second one is a system with two opposed sets of detectors, based on the limited angle tomography principle, dedicated for mammographic studies. The development of low-cost PET scanners can increase the clinical impact of PET, which is an expensive modality, only available at a few centres world-wide and mainly used as a research tool. A 3D reconstruction method was developed that utilizes all the available data. The size of the data-sets is considerably reduced, using the single-slice rebinning approximation. The 3D reconstruction is divided into 1D axial deconvolution and 2D transaxial reconstruction, which makes it relatively fast. This method was developed for the rotating scanner, but was also implemented for multi-ring scanners with and without inter plane septa. An iterative 3D reconstruction method was developed for the limited angle scanner, based on the new concept of `mobile pixels`, which reduces the finite pixel errors and leads to an improved signal to noise ratio. 100 refs.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography with Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlandsson, K.

    1996-10-01

    The development of two different low-cost scanners for positron emission tomography (PET) based on 3D acquisition are presented. The first scanner consists of two rotating scintillation cameras, and produces quantitative images, which have shown to be clinically useful. The second one is a system with two opposed sets of detectors, based on the limited angle tomography principle, dedicated for mammographic studies. The development of low-cost PET scanners can increase the clinical impact of PET, which is an expensive modality, only available at a few centres world-wide and mainly used as a research tool. A 3D reconstruction method was developed that utilizes all the available data. The size of the data-sets is considerably reduced, using the single-slice rebinning approximation. The 3D reconstruction is divided into 1D axial deconvolution and 2D transaxial reconstruction, which makes it relatively fast. This method was developed for the rotating scanner, but was also implemented for multi-ring scanners with and without inter plane septa. An iterative 3D reconstruction method was developed for the limited angle scanner, based on the new concept of 'mobile pixels', which reduces the finite pixel errors and leads to an improved signal to noise ratio. 100 refs

  8. Image-reconstruction algorithms for positron-emission tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.N.C.

    1982-01-01

    The positional uncertainty in the time-of-flight measurement of a positron-emission tomography system is modelled as a Gaussian distributed random variable and the image is assumed to be piecewise constant on a rectilinear lattice. A reconstruction algorithm using maximum-likelihood estimation is derived for the situation in which time-of-flight data are sorted as the most-likely-position array. The algorithm is formulated as a linear system described by a nonseparable, block-banded, Toeplitz matrix, and a sine-transform technique is used to implement this algorithm efficiently. The reconstruction algorithms for both the most-likely-position array and the confidence-weighted array are described by similar equations, hence similar linear systems can be used to described the reconstruction algorithm for a discrete, confidence-weighted array, when the matrix and the entries in the data array are properly identified. It is found that the mean square-error depends on the ratio of the full width at half the maximum of time-of-flight measurement over the size of a pixel. When other parameters are fixed, the larger the pixel size, the smaller is the mean square-error. In the study of resolution, parameters that affect the impulse response of time-of-flight reconstruction algorithms are identified. It is found that the larger the pixel size, the larger is the standard deviation of the impulse response. This shows that small mean square-error and fine resolution are two contradictory requirements

  9. Practical implementation of tetrahedral mesh reconstruction in emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutchko, R.; Sitek, A.; Gullberg, G. T.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a practical implementation of image reconstruction on tetrahedral meshes optimized for emission computed tomography with parallel beam geometry. Tetrahedral mesh built on a point cloud is a convenient image representation method, intrinsically three-dimensional and with a multi-level resolution property. Image intensities are defined at the mesh nodes and linearly interpolated inside each tetrahedron. For the given mesh geometry, the intensities can be computed directly from tomographic projections using iterative reconstruction algorithms with a system matrix calculated using an exact analytical formula. The mesh geometry is optimized for a specific patient using a two stage process. First, a noisy image is reconstructed on a finely-spaced uniform cloud. Then, the geometry of the representation is adaptively transformed through boundary-preserving node motion and elimination. Nodes are removed in constant intensity regions, merged along the boundaries, and moved in the direction of the mean local intensity gradient in order to provide higher node density in the boundary regions. Attenuation correction and detector geometric response are included in the system matrix. Once the mesh geometry is optimized, it is used to generate the final system matrix for ML-EM reconstruction of node intensities and for visualization of the reconstructed images. In dynamic PET or SPECT imaging, the system matrix generation procedure is performed using a quasi-static sinogram, generated by summing projection data from multiple time frames. This system matrix is then used to reconstruct the individual time frame projections. Performance of the new method is evaluated by reconstructing simulated projections of the NCAT phantom and the method is then applied to dynamic SPECT phantom and patient studies and to a dynamic microPET rat study. Tetrahedral mesh-based images are compared to the standard voxel-based reconstruction for both high and low signal-to-noise ratio

  10. Practical implementation of tetrahedral mesh reconstruction in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutchko, R; Gullberg, G T; Sitek, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a practical implementation of image reconstruction on tetrahedral meshes optimized for emission computed tomography with parallel beam geometry. Tetrahedral mesh built on a point cloud is a convenient image representation method, intrinsically three-dimensional and with a multi-level resolution property. Image intensities are defined at the mesh nodes and linearly interpolated inside each tetrahedron. For the given mesh geometry, the intensities can be computed directly from tomographic projections using iterative reconstruction algorithms with a system matrix calculated using an exact analytical formula. The mesh geometry is optimized for a specific patient using a two stage process. First, a noisy image is reconstructed on a finely-spaced uniform cloud. Then, the geometry of the representation is adaptively transformed through boundary-preserving node motion and elimination. Nodes are removed in constant intensity regions, merged along the boundaries, and moved in the direction of the mean local intensity gradient in order to provide higher node density in the boundary regions. Attenuation correction and detector geometric response are included in the system matrix. Once the mesh geometry is optimized, it is used to generate the final system matrix for ML-EM reconstruction of node intensities and for visualization of the reconstructed images. In dynamic PET or SPECT imaging, the system matrix generation procedure is performed using a quasi-static sinogram, generated by summing projection data from multiple time frames. This system matrix is then used to reconstruct the individual time frame projections. Performance of the new method is evaluated by reconstructing simulated projections of the NCAT phantom and the method is then applied to dynamic SPECT phantom and patient studies and to a dynamic microPET rat study. Tetrahedral mesh-based images are compared to the standard voxel-based reconstruction for both high and low signal-to-noise ratio

  11. A general class of preconditioners for statistical iterative reconstruction of emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinn, G.; Huang, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    A major drawback of statistical iterative image reconstruction for emission computed tomography is its high computational cost. The ill-posed nature of tomography leads to slow convergence for standard gradient-based iterative approaches such as the steepest descent or the conjugate gradient algorithm. In this paper new theory and methods for a class of preconditioners are developed for accelerating the convergence rate of iterative reconstruction. To demonstrate the potential of this class of preconditioners, a preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) iterative algorithm for weighted least squares reconstruction (WLS) was formulated for emission tomography. Using simulated positron emission tomography (PET) data of the Hoffman brain phantom, it was shown that the convergence rate of the PCG can reduce the number of iterations of the standard conjugate gradient algorithm by a factor of 2--8 times depending on the convergence criterion

  12. A Nonparametric Bayesian Approach For Emission Tomography Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, Eric; Dautremer, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a PET reconstruction algorithm following a nonparametric Bayesian (NPB) approach. In contrast with Expectation Maximization (EM), the proposed technique does not rely on any space discretization. Namely, the activity distribution--normalized emission intensity of the spatial poisson process--is considered as a spatial probability density and observations are the projections of random emissions whose distribution has to be estimated. This approach is nonparametric in the sense that the quantity of interest belongs to the set of probability measures on R k (for reconstruction in k-dimensions) and it is Bayesian in the sense that we define a prior directly on this spatial measure. In this context, we propose to model the nonparametric probability density as an infinite mixture of multivariate normal distributions. As a prior for this mixture we consider a Dirichlet Process Mixture (DPM) with a Normal-Inverse Wishart (NIW) model as base distribution of the Dirichlet Process. As in EM-family reconstruction, we use a data augmentation scheme where the set of hidden variables are the emission locations for each observed line of response in the continuous object space. Thanks to the data augmentation, we propose a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm (Gibbs sampler) which is able to generate draws from the posterior distribution of the spatial intensity. A difference with EM is that one step of the Gibbs sampler corresponds to the generation of emission locations while only the expected number of emissions per pixel/voxel is used in EM. Another key difference is that the estimated spatial intensity is a continuous function such that there is no need to compute a projection matrix. Finally, draws from the intensity posterior distribution allow the estimation of posterior functionnals like the variance or confidence intervals. Results are presented for simulated data based on a 2D brain phantom and compared to Bayesian MAP-EM

  13. Homotopic non-local regularized reconstruction from sparse positron emission tomography measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alexander; Liu, Chenyi; Wang, Xiao Yu; Fieguth, Paul; Bie, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography scanners collect measurements of a patient’s in vivo radiotracer distribution. The system detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (tracer), which is introduced into the body on a biologically active molecule, and the tomograms must be reconstructed from projections. The reconstruction of tomograms from the acquired PET data is an inverse problem that requires regularization. The use of tightly packed discrete detector rings, although improves signal-to-noise ratio, are often associated with high costs of positron emission tomography systems. Thus a sparse reconstruction, which would be capable of overcoming the noise effect while allowing for a reduced number of detectors, would have a great deal to offer. In this study, we introduce and investigate the potential of a homotopic non-local regularization reconstruction framework for effectively reconstructing positron emission tomograms from such sparse measurements. Results obtained using the proposed approach are compared with traditional filtered back-projection as well as expectation maximization reconstruction with total variation regularization. A new reconstruction method was developed for the purpose of improving the quality of positron emission tomography reconstruction from sparse measurements. We illustrate that promising reconstruction performance can be achieved for the proposed approach even at low sampling fractions, which allows for the use of significantly fewer detectors and have the potential to reduce scanner costs

  14. First results of genetic algorithm application in ML image reconstruction in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik, W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper concerns application of genetic algorithm in maximum likelihood image reconstruction in emission tomography. The example of genetic algorithm for image reconstruction is presented. The genetic algorithm was based on the typical genetic scheme modified due to the nature of solved problem. The convergence of algorithm was examined. The different adaption functions, selection and crossover methods were verified. The algorithm was tested on simulated SPECT data. The obtained results of image reconstruction are discussed. (author)

  15. Image reconstruction from projections and its application in emission computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuba, Attila; Csernay, Laszlo

    1989-01-01

    Computer tomography is an imaging technique for producing cross sectional images by reconstruction from projections. Its two main branches are called transmission and emission computer tomography, TCT and ECT, resp. After an overview of the theory and practice of TCT and ECT, the first Hungarian ECT type MB 9300 SPECT consisting of a gamma camera and Ketronic Medax N computer is described, and its applications to radiological patient observations are discussed briefly. (R.P.) 28 refs.; 4 figs

  16. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Positron Emission Tomography Instrumentation, Generator Systems for Positron Emitters, Reconstruction Algorithms, Cerebral Glucose Consumption: Methodology and Validation, Cerebral Blood Flow Tomography Using Xenon-133 Inhalation: Methods and Clinical Applications, PET Studies of Stroke, Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography, and Use of PET in Oncology

  17. A heuristic statistical stopping rule for iterative reconstruction in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Bouallegue, F.; Mariano-Goulart, D.; Crouzet, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a statistical stopping criterion for iterative reconstruction in emission tomography based on a heuristic statistical description of the reconstruction process. The method was assessed for maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction. Based on Monte-Carlo numerical simulations and using a perfectly modeled system matrix, our method was compared with classical iterative reconstruction followed by low-pass filtering in terms of Euclidian distance to the exact object, noise, and resolution. The stopping criterion was then evaluated with realistic PET data of a Hoffman brain phantom produced using the Geant4 application in emission tomography (GATE) platform for different count levels. The numerical experiments showed that compared with the classical method, our technique yielded significant improvement of the noise-resolution tradeoff for a wide range of counting statistics compatible with routine clinical settings. When working with realistic data, the stopping rule allowed a qualitatively and quantitatively efficient determination of the optimal image. Our method appears to give a reliable estimation of the optimal stopping point for iterative reconstruction. It should thus be of practical interest as it produces images with similar or better quality than classical post-filtered iterative reconstruction with a mastered computation time. (author)

  18. Image reconstruction using three-dimensional compound Gauss-Markov random field in emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shuichi; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Saito, Tsuneo

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new reconstruction algorithm based on MAP (maximum a posteriori probability) estimation principle for emission tomography. To improve noise suppression properties of the conventional ML-EM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) algorithm, direct three-dimensional reconstruction that utilizes intensity correlations between adjacent transaxial slices is introduced. Moreover, to avoid oversmoothing of edges, a priori knowledge of RI (radioisotope) distribution is represented by using a doubly-stochastic image model called the compound Gauss-Markov random field. The a posteriori probability is maximized by using the iterative GEM (generalized EM) algorithm. Computer simulation results are shown to demonstrate validity of the proposed algorithm. (author)

  19. Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstruction for novel imaging scenarios in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillam, John E.; Rafecas, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Emission imaging incorporates both the development of dedicated devices for data acquisition as well as algorithms for recovering images from that data. Emission tomography is an indirect approach to imaging. The effect of device modification on the final image can be understood through both the way in which data are gathered, using simulation, and the way in which the image is formed from that data, or image reconstruction. When developing novel devices, systems and imaging tasks, accurate simulation and image reconstruction allow performance to be estimated, and in some cases optimized, using computational methods before or during the process of physical construction. However, there are a vast range of approaches, algorithms and pre-existing computational tools that can be exploited and the choices made will affect the accuracy of the in silico results and quality of the reconstructed images. On the one hand, should important physical effects be neglected in either the simulation or reconstruction steps, specific enhancements provided by novel devices may not be represented in the results. On the other hand, over-modeling of device characteristics in either step leads to large computational overheads that can confound timely results. Here, a range of simulation methodologies and toolkits are discussed, as well as reconstruction algorithms that may be employed in emission imaging. The relative advantages and disadvantages of a range of options are highlighted using specific examples from current research scenarios.

  20. Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstruction for novel imaging scenarios in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillam, John E. [The University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences and The Brain and Mind Centre, Camperdown (Australia); Rafecas, Magdalena, E-mail: rafecas@imt.uni-luebeck.de [University of Lubeck, Institute of Medical Engineering, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2016-02-11

    Emission imaging incorporates both the development of dedicated devices for data acquisition as well as algorithms for recovering images from that data. Emission tomography is an indirect approach to imaging. The effect of device modification on the final image can be understood through both the way in which data are gathered, using simulation, and the way in which the image is formed from that data, or image reconstruction. When developing novel devices, systems and imaging tasks, accurate simulation and image reconstruction allow performance to be estimated, and in some cases optimized, using computational methods before or during the process of physical construction. However, there are a vast range of approaches, algorithms and pre-existing computational tools that can be exploited and the choices made will affect the accuracy of the in silico results and quality of the reconstructed images. On the one hand, should important physical effects be neglected in either the simulation or reconstruction steps, specific enhancements provided by novel devices may not be represented in the results. On the other hand, over-modeling of device characteristics in either step leads to large computational overheads that can confound timely results. Here, a range of simulation methodologies and toolkits are discussed, as well as reconstruction algorithms that may be employed in emission imaging. The relative advantages and disadvantages of a range of options are highlighted using specific examples from current research scenarios.

  1. Model-based respiratory motion compensation for emission tomography image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, M; Malandain, G; Koulibaly, P M; Gonzalez-Ballester, M A; Darcourt, J

    2007-01-01

    In emission tomography imaging, respiratory motion causes artifacts in lungs and cardiac reconstructed images, which lead to misinterpretations, imprecise diagnosis, impairing of fusion with other modalities, etc. Solutions like respiratory gating, correlated dynamic PET techniques, list-mode data based techniques and others have been tested, which lead to improvements over the spatial activity distribution in lungs lesions, but which have the disadvantages of requiring additional instrumentation or the need of discarding part of the projection data used for reconstruction. The objective of this study is to incorporate respiratory motion compensation directly into the image reconstruction process, without any additional acquisition protocol consideration. To this end, we propose an extension to the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm that includes a respiratory motion model, which takes into account the displacements and volume deformations produced by the respiratory motion during the data acquisition process. We present results from synthetic simulations incorporating real respiratory motion as well as from phantom and patient data

  2. Sparse representation and dictionary learning penalized image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shuhang; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and robust reconstruction of the radioactivity concentration is of great importance in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Given the Poisson nature of photo-counting measurements, we present a reconstruction framework that integrates sparsity penalty on a dictionary into a maximum likelihood estimator. Patch-sparsity on a dictionary provides the regularization for our effort, and iterative procedures are used to solve the maximum likelihood function formulated on Poisson statistics. Specifically, in our formulation, a dictionary could be trained on CT images, to provide intrinsic anatomical structures for the reconstructed images, or adaptively learned from the noisy measurements of PET. Accuracy of the strategy with very promising application results from Monte-Carlo simulations, and real data are demonstrated. (paper)

  3. A new iterative reconstruction technique for attenuation correction in high-resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knesaurek, K.; Machac, J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Buchsbaum, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    A new interative reconstruction technique (NIRT) for positron emission computed tomography (PET), which uses transmission data for nonuniform attenuation correction, is described. Utilizing the general inverse problem theory, a cost functional which includes a noise term was derived. The cost functional was minimized using a weighted-least-square maximum a posteriori conjugate gradient (CG) method. The procedure involves a change in the Hessian of the cost function by adding an additional term. Two phantoms were used in a real data acquisition. The first was a cylinder phantom filled with uniformly distributed activity of 74 MBq of fluorine-18. Two different inserts were placed in the phantom. The second was a Hoffman brain phantom filled with uniformly distributed activity of 7.4 MBq of 18 F. Resulting reconstructed images were used to test and compare a new interative reconstruction technique with a standard filtered backprojection (FBP) method. The results confirmed that NIRT, based on the conjugate gradient method, converges rapidly and provides good reconstructed images. In comaprison with standard results obtained by the FBP method, the images reconstructed by NIRT showed better noise properties. The noise was measured as rms% noise and was less, by a factor of 1.75, in images reconstructed by NIRT than in the same images reconstructed by FBP. The distance between the Hoffman brain slice created from the MRI image was 0.526, while the same distance for the Hoffman brain slice reconstructed by NIRT was 0.328. The NIRT method suppressed the propagation of the noise without visible loss of resolution in the reconstructed PET images. (orig.)

  4. Pinhole single-photon emission tomography reconstruction based on median root prior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohlberg, Antti; Kuikka, Jyrki T.; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    The maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (ML-EM) algorithm can be used to reduce reconstruction artefacts produced by filtered backprojection (FBP) methods in pinhole single-photon emission tomography (SPET). However, ML-EM suffers from noise propagation along iterations, which leads to quantitatively unpleasant reconstruction results. To avoid this increase in noise, the median root prior (MRP) algorithm for pinhole SPET was implemented. Projection data of a line source and Picker's thyroid phantom were collected using a single-head gamma camera with a pinhole collimator. MRP was added to existing pinhole ML-EM reconstruction algorithm and the phantom studies were reconstructed using MRP, ML-EM and FBP for comparison. Coefficients of variation, contrasts and full-widths at half-maximum were calculated and showed a clear reduction in noise without significant loss of resolution or decrease in contrast when MRP was applied. MRP also produced visually pleasing images even with high iteration numbers, free of the checkerboard-type noise patterns which are typical of ML-EM images. (orig.)

  5. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Krishnendu [Ohio Medical Physics Consulting, Dublin, Ohio 43017 (United States); Straus, Kenneth J.; Glick, Stephen J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Chen, Yu. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  6. An interior-point method for total variation regularized positron emission tomography image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bing

    2012-03-01

    There has been a lot of work on total variation (TV) regularized tomographic image reconstruction recently. Many of them use gradient-based optimization algorithms with a differentiable approximation of the TV functional. In this paper we apply TV regularization in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) image reconstruction. We reconstruct the PET image in a Bayesian framework, using Poisson noise model and TV prior functional. The original optimization problem is transformed to an equivalent problem with inequality constraints by adding auxiliary variables. Then we use an interior point method with logarithmic barrier functions to solve the constrained optimization problem. In this method, a series of points approaching the solution from inside the feasible region are found by solving a sequence of subproblems characterized by an increasing positive parameter. We use preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithm to solve the subproblems directly. The nonnegativity constraint is enforced by bend line search. The exact expression of the TV functional is used in our calculations. Simulation results show that the algorithm converges fast and the convergence is insensitive to the values of the regularization and reconstruction parameters.

  7. Detector response restoration in image reconstruction of high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical method was studied to model the detector response of high spatial-resolution positron emission tomography systems consisting of close-packed small crystals, and to restore the resolution deteriorated due to crystal penetration and/or nonuniform sampling across the field-of-view (FOV). The simulated detector system had 600 bismuth germanate crystals of 3.14 mm width and 30 mm length packed on a single ring of 60 cm diameter. The space between crystal was filled up with lead. Each crystal was in coincidence with 200 opposite crystals so that the FOV had a radius of 30 cm. The detector response was modeled based on the attenuating properties of the crystals and the septa, as well as the geometry of the detector system. The modeled detector-response function was used to restore the projections from the sinogram of the ring-detector system. The restored projections had a uniform sampling of 1.57 mm across the FOV. The crystal penetration and/or the nonuniform sampling were compensated in the projections. A penalized maximum-likelihood algorithm was employed to accomplish the restoration. The restored projections were then filtered and backprojected to reconstruct the image. A chest phantom with a few small circular ''cold'' objects located at the center and near the periphery of FOV was computer generated and used to test the restoration. The reconstructed images from the restored projections demonstrated resolution improvement off the FOV center, while preserving the resolution near the center

  8. Hemodynamic evaluation of vascular reconstructive surgery for childhood moyamoya disease using single photon emission computed tomography

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    Takikawa, Shugo; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Abe, Hiroshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Mitsumori, Kenji; Tsuru, Mitsuo

    1990-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of vascular reconstructive surgery for childhood moyamoya disease, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 31 hemispheres of 16 patients was examined by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using the {sup 133}Xe inhalation method. Results were divided into two groups; 17 hemispheres with superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis (A(+) group) and 14 hemispheres without anastomosis (A(-) group). The mean hemispheric CBF (mCBF) and regional CBF (rCBF) in the frontal, temporal, occipital, and basal ganglia regions were calculated. Pre- and postoperative SPECT on the 10 hemispheres of the A(+) group showed an increase in mCBF in 6 hemispheres, the disappearance of the low perfusion area (LPA) in all 5 hemispheres where LPA was present before surgery, and an improvement in rCBF distribution (an increase in rCBF in the frontal and temporal lobes and a decrease in the basal ganglia). This suggests that vascular reconstruction is greatly effective in treating this disease. A comparison between the A(+) group and the A(-) group by postoperative SPECT, as well as the clinical outcomes and the postoperative findings of electroencephalography and angiography, revealed that the A(+) group was superior to the A(-) group in the frequency of LPA (12% and 43%, respectively) and rCBF in the frontal region where STA-MCA anastomosis was usually performed. These results indicate that STA-MCA anastomosis with indirect synangiosis is the most effective treatment of childhood moyamoya disease. (author).

  9. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienhard, K.; Heiss, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    The principles and selected clinical applications of positron emission tomography are described. In this technique a chemical compound is labeled with a positron emitting isotope and its biochemical pathway is traced by coincidence detection of the two annihilation photons. The application of the techniques of computed tomography allows to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the radioactivity within a subject. The 18 F-deoxyglucose method for quantitative measurement of local glucose metabolism is discussed in order to illustrate the possibilities of positron emission tomography to record physiological processes in vivo. (orig.) [de

  10. Advanced modeling in positron emission tomography using Monte Carlo simulations for improving reconstruction and quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stute, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a medical imaging technique that plays a major role in oncology, especially using "1"8F-Fluoro-Deoxyglucose. However, PET images suffer from a modest spatial resolution and from high noise. As a result, there is still no consensus on how tumor metabolically active volume and tumor uptake should be characterized. In the meantime, research groups keep producing new methods for such characterizations that need to be assessed. A Monte Carlo simulation based method has been developed to produce simulated PET images of patients suffering from cancer, indistinguishable from clinical images, and for which all parameters are known. The method uses high resolution PET images from patient acquisitions, from which the physiological heterogeneous activity distribution can be modeled. It was shown that the performance of quantification methods on such highly realistic simulated images are significantly lower and more variable than using simple phantom studies. Fourteen different quantification methods were also compared in realistic conditions using a group of such simulated patients. In addition, the proposed method was extended to simulate serial PET scans in the context of patient monitoring, including a modeling of the tumor changes, as well as the variability over time of non-tumoral physiological activity distribution. Monte Carlo simulations were also used to study the detection probability inside the crystals of the tomograph. A model of the crystal response was derived and included in the system matrix involved in tomographic reconstruction. The resulting reconstruction method was compared with other sophisticated methods for modeling the detector response in the image space, proposed in the literature. We demonstrated the superiority of the proposed method over equivalent approaches on simulated data, and illustrated its robustness on clinical data. For a same noise level, it is possible to reconstruct PET images offering a

  11. Conditional probability distribution associated to the E-M image reconstruction algorithm for neutron stimulated emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, R.S.; Yoriyaz, H.; Santos, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Expectation-Maximization (E-M) algorithm is an iterative computational method for maximum likelihood (M-L) estimates, useful in a variety of incomplete-data problems. Due to its stochastic nature, one of the most relevant applications of E-M algorithm is the reconstruction of emission tomography images. In this paper, the statistical formulation of the E-M algorithm was applied to the in vivo spectrographic imaging of stable isotopes called Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). In the process of E-M algorithm iteration, the conditional probability distribution plays a very important role to achieve high quality image. This present work proposes an alternative methodology for the generation of the conditional probability distribution associated to the E-M reconstruction algorithm, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and with the application of the reciprocity theorem. (author)

  12. Conditional probability distribution associated to the E-M image reconstruction algorithm for neutron stimulated emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, R.S.; Yoriyaz, H.; Santos, A., E-mail: rodrigossviana@gmail.com, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.br, E-mail: asantos@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Expectation-Maximization (E-M) algorithm is an iterative computational method for maximum likelihood (M-L) estimates, useful in a variety of incomplete-data problems. Due to its stochastic nature, one of the most relevant applications of E-M algorithm is the reconstruction of emission tomography images. In this paper, the statistical formulation of the E-M algorithm was applied to the in vivo spectrographic imaging of stable isotopes called Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). In the process of E-M algorithm iteration, the conditional probability distribution plays a very important role to achieve high quality image. This present work proposes an alternative methodology for the generation of the conditional probability distribution associated to the E-M reconstruction algorithm, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and with the application of the reciprocity theorem. (author)

  13. Simulation, image reconstruction and SiPM characterisation for a novel endoscopic positron emission tomography detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvolsky, Milan

    2017-12-01

    In the scope of the EndoTOFPET-US project, a novel multimodal device for ultrasound (US) endoscopy and positron emission tomography (PET) is being developed. The project aims at detecting and quantifying morphologic and functional biomarkers and developing new biomarkers for pancreas and prostate oncology. The detector system comprises a small detector probe mounted on an ultrasound endoscope and an external detector plate. The detection of the gamma rays is realised by scintillator crystals with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) read-out. For the characterisation of over 4000 SiPMs for the external plate, an automatised measurement and data analysis procedure is established. The key properties of the SiPMs like breakdown voltage and dark count rate (DCR) are extracted. This knowledge is needed both as a quality assurance as well as for the calibration of the detector. The spread between minimum and maximum breakdown voltage within a SiPM array of 4 x 4 is at maximum 0.43 V with a mean of 0.15 V and an RMS of 0.06 V. This assures the optimal biasing of each SiPM at its individual operating voltage. The mean DCR amounts to 1.49 MHz with an RMS of 0.54 MHz and is thus well below the acceptable threshold of 3 MHz. Two spare modules from the external plate are re-measured and analysed several years after the module assembly, revealing a potential alteration of the SiPM noise properties over time. For the characterisation of SiPMs from different vendors, a software framework for the automatic extraction of performance parameters from pulseheight spectra, including a t of the entire spectrum, is developed and tested. In order to facilitate the modelling of the response of the EndoTOFPET-US detector, a framework is developed which is built around the Geant4-based simulation toolkit GAMOS, to simulate and reconstruct realistic imaging scenarios with this asymmetric PET detector. The simulation studies are used to compare different possible detector designs, guide the

  14. Simulation, image reconstruction and SiPM characterisation for a novel endoscopic positron emission tomography detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvolsky, Milan

    2017-12-15

    In the scope of the EndoTOFPET-US project, a novel multimodal device for ultrasound (US) endoscopy and positron emission tomography (PET) is being developed. The project aims at detecting and quantifying morphologic and functional biomarkers and developing new biomarkers for pancreas and prostate oncology. The detector system comprises a small detector probe mounted on an ultrasound endoscope and an external detector plate. The detection of the gamma rays is realised by scintillator crystals with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) read-out. For the characterisation of over 4000 SiPMs for the external plate, an automatised measurement and data analysis procedure is established. The key properties of the SiPMs like breakdown voltage and dark count rate (DCR) are extracted. This knowledge is needed both as a quality assurance as well as for the calibration of the detector. The spread between minimum and maximum breakdown voltage within a SiPM array of 4 x 4 is at maximum 0.43 V with a mean of 0.15 V and an RMS of 0.06 V. This assures the optimal biasing of each SiPM at its individual operating voltage. The mean DCR amounts to 1.49 MHz with an RMS of 0.54 MHz and is thus well below the acceptable threshold of 3 MHz. Two spare modules from the external plate are re-measured and analysed several years after the module assembly, revealing a potential alteration of the SiPM noise properties over time. For the characterisation of SiPMs from different vendors, a software framework for the automatic extraction of performance parameters from pulseheight spectra, including a t of the entire spectrum, is developed and tested. In order to facilitate the modelling of the response of the EndoTOFPET-US detector, a framework is developed which is built around the Geant4-based simulation toolkit GAMOS, to simulate and reconstruct realistic imaging scenarios with this asymmetric PET detector. The simulation studies are used to compare different possible detector designs, guide the

  15. Influence of the Pixel Sizes of Reference Computed Tomography on Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction Using Conjugate-gradient Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Kyohei; Sakimoto, Shota; Fujii, Susumu; Ida, Tomonobu; Moriyama, Shigeru

    The frame-of-reference using computed-tomography (CT) coordinate system on single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction is one of the advanced characteristics of the xSPECT reconstruction system. The aim of this study was to reveal the influence of the high-resolution frame-of-reference on the xSPECT reconstruction. 99m Tc line-source phantom and National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) image quality phantom were scanned using the SPECT/CT system. xSPECT reconstructions were performed with the reference CT images in different sizes of the display field-of-view (DFOV) and pixel. The pixel sizes of the reconstructed xSPECT images were close to 2.4 mm, which is acquired as originally projection data, even if the reference CT resolution was varied. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the line-source, absolute recovery coefficient, and background variability of image quality phantom were independent on the sizes of DFOV in the reference CT images. The results of this study revealed that the image quality of the reconstructed xSPECT images is not influenced by the resolution of frame-of-reference on SPECT reconstruction.

  16. Bayesian image reconstruction for emission tomography based on median root prior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenius, S.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate a new type of Bayesian one-step late reconstruction method which utilizes a median root prior (MRP). The method favours images which have locally monotonous radioactivity concentrations. The new reconstruction algorithm was applied to ideal simulated data, phantom data and some patient examinations with PET. The same projection data were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) methods for comparison. The MRP method provided good-quality images with a similar resolution to the FBP method with a ramp filter, and at the same time the noise properties were as good as with Hann-filtered FBP images. The typical artefacts seen in FBP reconstructed images outside of the object were completely removed, as was the grainy noise inside the object. Quantitativley, the resulting average regional radioactivity concentrations in a large region of interest in images produced by the MRP method corresponded to the FBP and ML-EM results but at the pixel by pixel level the MRP method proved to be the most accurate of the tested methods. In contrast to other iterative reconstruction methods, e.g. ML-EM, the MRP method was not sensitive to the number of iterations nor to the adjustment of reconstruction parameters. Only the Bayesian parameter β had to be set. The proposed MRP method is much more simple to calculate than the methods described previously, both with regard to the parameter settings and in terms of general use. The new MRP reconstruction method was shown to produce high-quality quantitative emission images with only one parameter setting in addition to the number of iterations. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative reconstruction of PIXE-tomography data for thin samples using GUPIX X-ray emission yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelet, C., E-mail: michelet@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Barberet, Ph., E-mail: barberet@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Devès, G., E-mail: deves@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bouguelmouna, B., E-mail: bbouguel@gmail.com [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bourret, S., E-mail: bourret@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Delville, M.-H., E-mail: delville@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Le Trequesser, Q., E-mail: letreque@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Gordillo, N., E-mail: nuri.gordillo@gmail.com [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Beasley, D.G., E-mail: d.beasley@ucl.ac.uk [Center of Medical Imaging Computing (CMIC), Department of Medical Physics & Bioengineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-04-01

    We present here a new development of the TomoRebuild software package, to perform quantitative Particle Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXET) reconstruction. X-ray yields are obtained from the GUPIX code. The GUPIX data base is available for protons up to 5 MeV and also in the 20–100 MeV energy range, deuterons up to 6 MeV, {sup 3}He and alphas up to 12 MeV. In this version, X-ray yields are calculated for thin samples, i.e. without simulating X-ray attenuation. PIXET data reconstruction is kept as long as possible independent from Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIMT). In this way, the local mass distribution (in g/cm{sup 3}) of each X-ray emitting element is reconstructed in all voxels of the analyzed volume, only from PIXET data, without the need of associated STIMT data. Only the very last step of data analysis requires STIMT data, in order to normalize PIXET data to obtain concentration distributions, in terms of normalized mass fractions (in μg/g). For this, a noise correction procedure has been designed in ImageJ. Moreover sinogram or image misalignment can be corrected, as well as the difference in beam size between the two experiments. The main features of the TomoRebuild code, user friendly design and modular C++ implementation, were kept. The software package is portable and can run on Windows and Linux operating systems. An optional user-friendly graphic interface was designed in Java, as a plugin for the ImageJ graphic software package. Reconstruction examples are presented from biological specimens of Caenorhabditis elegans – a small nematode constituting a reference model for biology studies. The reconstruction results are compared between the different codes TomoRebuild, DISRA and JPIXET, and different reconstruction methods: Filtered BackProjection (FBP) and Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM)

  18. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, F.

    2007-04-01

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  19. Optimization of pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (pinhole SPECT) reconstruction; Optimisation de la reconstruction en tomographie d'emission monophotonique avec colimateur stenope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel-Jost, V

    2006-11-15

    In SPECT small animal imaging, it is highly recommended to accurately model the response of the detector in order to improve the low spatial resolution. The volume to reconstruct is thus obtained both by back-projecting and de-convolving the projections. We chose iterative methods, which permit one to solve the inverse problem independently from the model's complexity. We describe in this work a Gaussian model of point spread function (PSF) whose position, width and maximum are computed according to physical and geometrical parameters. Then we use the rotation symmetry to replace the computation of P projection operators, each one corresponding to one position of the detector around the object, by the computation of only one of them. This is achieved by choosing an appropriate polar discretization, for which we control the angular density of voxels to avoid over-sampling the center of the field of view. Finally, we propose a new family of algorithms, the so-called frequency adapted algorithms, which enable to optimize the reconstruction of a given band in the frequency domain on both the speed of convergence and the quality of the image. (author)

  20. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Emission Computed Tomography is a technique used for producing single or multiple cross-sectional images of the distribution of radionuclide labelled agents in vivo. The techniques of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are described with particular regard to the function of the detectors used to produce images and the computer techniques used to build up images. (UK)

  1. Three-dimensional SPECT [single photon emission computed tomography] reconstruction of combined cone beam and parallel beam data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Jianying Li; Huili Wang; Coleman, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using cone beam (CB) collimation exhibits increased sensitivity compared with acquisition geometries using parallel (P) hole collimation. However, CB collimation has a smaller field-of-view which may result in truncated projections and image artifacts. A primary objective of this work is to investigate maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) methods to reconstruct simultaneously acquired parallel and cone beam (P and CB) SPECT data. Simultaneous P and CB acquisition can be performed with commercially available triple camera systems by using two cone-beam collimators and a single parallel-hole collimator. The loss in overall sensitivity (relative to the use of three CB collimators) is about 15 to 20%. The authors have developed three methods to combine P and CB data using modified ML-EM algorithms. (author)

  2. Bayesian Estimator for Angle Recovery: Event Classification and Reconstruction in Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foudray, Angela M K; Levin, Craig S

    2007-01-01

    PET at the highest level is an inverse problem: reconstruct the location of the emission (which localize biological function) from detected photons. Ideally, one would like to directly measure an annihilation photon's incident direction on the detector. In the developed algorithm, Bayesian Estimation for Angle Recovery (BEAR), we utilized the increased information gathered from localizing photon interactions in the detector and developed a Bayesian estimator for a photon's incident direction. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) were filled using an interaction energy weighted mean or center of mass (COM) reference space, which had the following computational advantages: (1) a significant reduction in the size of the data in measurement space, making further manipulation and searches faster (2) the construction of COM space does not depend on measurement location, it takes advantage of measurement symmetries, and data can be added to the training set without knowledge and recalculation of prior training data, (3) calculation of posterior probability map is fully parallelizable, it can scale to any number of processors. These PDFs were used to estimate the point spread function (PSF) in incident angle space for (i) algorithm assessment and (ii) to provide probability selection criteria for classification. The algorithm calculates both the incident θ and φ angle, with ∼16 degrees RMS in both angles, limiting the incoming direction to a narrow cone. Feature size did not improve using the BEAR algorithm as an angle filter, but the contrast ratio improved 40% on average

  3. Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography based on a detector response function estimated from point source measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohme, Michel S; Qi Jinyi

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed positron emission tomography (PET) images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of a geometric projection matrix and sinogram blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Direct measurement of a sinogram blurring matrix is difficult in practice because of the requirement of a collimated source. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D blurring kernels from uncollimated point source measurements. Since the resulting sinogram blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and hence provide a more accurate system model. Another advantage of the proposed method over MC simulation is that it can easily be applied to data that have undergone a transformation to reduce the data size (e.g., Fourier rebinning). Point source measurements were acquired with high count statistics in a relatively fine grid inside the microPET II scanner using a high-precision 2D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner and explicitly models the detector block structure. The resulting sinogram blurring matrix is incorporated into a maximum a posteriori (MAP) image reconstruction algorithm. The proposed method has been validated using a 3 x 3 line phantom, an ultra-micro resolution phantom and a 22 Na point source superimposed on a warm background. The results of the proposed method show improvements in both resolution and contrast ratio when compared with the MAP

  4. Computed tomography by reconstruction. Brain CT scanning. I. Basic physics, equipment, normal aspects, artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiras, J.; Palmieri, P.; Saudinos, J.; Salamon, G.

    1980-01-01

    The authors describe the physical basis, apparatus, normal images, and artefacts of computed tomography by reconstruction. Radio-anatomical sections enable clear comprehension of the computed tomography images. Other methods using computer reconstruction are outlined: tomography by Compton effect, tomography by positrons, tomography by gamma emission, tomography by protons, tomography by nuclear magnetic resonance [fr

  5. Preliminary Study on the Enhancement of Reconstruction Speed for Emission Computed Tomography Using Parallel Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min Jae; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Soo Mee; Kang, Ji Yeon; Lee, Dong Soo; Park, Kwang Suk

    2009-01-01

    Conventional image reconstruction uses simplified physical models of projection. However, real physics, for example 3D reconstruction, takes too long time to process all the data in clinic and is unable in a common reconstruction machine because of the large memory for complex physical models. We suggest the realistic distributed memory model of fast-reconstruction using parallel processing on personal computers to enable large-scale technologies. The preliminary tests for the possibility on virtual machines and various performance test on commercial super computer, Tachyon were performed. Expectation maximization algorithm with common 2D projection and realistic 3D line of response were tested. Since the process time was getting slower (max 6 times) after a certain iteration, optimization for compiler was performed to maximize the efficiency of parallelization. Parallel processing of a program on multiple computers was available on Linux with MPICH and NFS. We verified that differences between parallel processed image and single processed image at the same iterations were under the significant digits of floating point number, about 6 bit. Double processors showed good efficiency (1.96 times) of parallel computing. Delay phenomenon was solved by vectorization method using SSE. Through the study, realistic parallel computing system in clinic was established to be able to reconstruct by plenty of memory using the realistic physical models which was impossible to simplify

  6. Accelerated median root prior reconstruction for pinhole single-photon emission tomography (SPET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohlberg, Antti [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777 FIN-70211, Kuopio (Finland); Ruotsalainen, Ulla [Institute of Signal Processing, DMI, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 553 FIN-33101, Tampere (Finland); Watabe, Hiroshi [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujisihro-dai, Suita City, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Iida, Hidehiro [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujisihro-dai, Suita City, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Kuikka, Jyrki T [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777 FIN-70211, Kuopio (Finland)

    2003-07-07

    Pinhole collimation can be used to improve spatial resolution in SPET. However, the resolution improvement is achieved at the cost of reduced sensitivity, which leads to projection images with poor statistics. Images reconstructed from these projections using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithms, which have been used to reduce the artefacts generated by the filtered backprojection (FBP) based reconstruction, suffer from noise/bias trade-off: noise contaminates the images at high iteration numbers, whereas early abortion of the algorithm produces images that are excessively smooth and biased towards the initial estimate of the algorithm. To limit the noise accumulation we propose the use of the pinhole median root prior (PH-MRP) reconstruction algorithm. MRP is a Bayesian reconstruction method that has already been used in PET imaging and shown to possess good noise reduction and edge preservation properties. In this study the PH-MRP algorithm was accelerated with the ordered subsets (OS) procedure and compared to the FBP, OS-EM and conventional Bayesian reconstruction methods in terms of noise reduction, quantitative accuracy, edge preservation and visual quality. The results showed that the accelerated PH-MRP algorithm was very robust. It provided visually pleasing images with lower noise level than the FBP or OS-EM and with smaller bias and sharper edges than the conventional Bayesian methods.

  7. An introduction to emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report includes salient features of the theory and an examination of practical considerations for someone who is using or introducing tomography, selecting equipment for it or wishing to develop a clinical application. Emphasis is on gamma camera tomography. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: emission computed and gamma camera tomography and the relationship to other medical imaging techniques, the tomographic reconstruction technique theory, rotating gamma camera tomography, attenuation correction and quantitative reconstruction, other single photon tomographic techniques, positron tomography, image display, clinical application of single photon and positron tomography, and commercial systems for SPECT. Substantial bibliography. (U.K.)

  8. Single photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging technique. Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; Principle and role of functional or molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, main emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Single photon emission computed tomography: gamma cameras and their components, gamma camera specifications, planar single photon imaging characteristics, gamma camera and tomography; 4 - Quantification in single photon emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution, partial volume effect, movements, others; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  9. Automatic detection of patient position for incorporation in exact 3D reconstruction for emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyme, A.; Hutton, B.; Hatton, R.; Skerrett, D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: SPECT involves acquiring a set of projection images using one or more rotating gamma cameras. The projections are then reconstructed to create transverse slices. Patient motion during the scan can introduce inconsistencies into the data leading to artifacts. There remains a need for robust and effective motion correction. One approach uses the (corrupt) data itself to derive the patient position at each projection angle. Corrected data is periodically incorporated into a 3-D reconstruction. Fundamental aspects of the algorithm mechanics, particularly performance in the presence of Poisson noise, have been examined. Brain SPECT studies were simulated using a digital version of the Huffman brain phantom. Projection datasets with Poisson noise imposed, generated for different positions of the phantom, were combined and reconstructed to produce motion-corrupted reconstructions. To examine the behaviour of the cost function as the object position was changed, the corrupted re-construction was forward projected and the mean square difference (MSD) between the resulting re-projections and corresponding original projections was calculated. The ability to detect mis-positioned projections for different degrees of freedom, the importance of using dual-head camera geometry, and the effect of smoothing the original projections prior to the MSD calculation were assessed. Re-projection of the corrupt reconstruction was able to correctly identify mis-positioned projection data. The degree of movement as defined by MSD was more easily identified for translations than for rotations. Noise resulted in an increasing bias that made it difficult to distinguish the minimum MSD, particularly for z-axis rotations. This was improved by median filtering of projections. Right-angled dual-head geometry is necessary to provide stability to the algorithm and to better identify motion in all 6 degrees of freedom. These findings will assist the optimisation of a fully automated motion

  10. Poster – 02: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging Reconstruction using higher order Scattered Photon Coincidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hongwei; Pistorius, Stephen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, CancerCare, Manitoba (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    PET images are affected by the presence of scattered photons. Incorrect scatter-correction may cause artifacts, particularly in 3D PET systems. Current scatter reconstruction methods do not distinguish between single and higher order scattered photons. A dual-scattered reconstruction method (GDS-MLEM) that is independent of the number of Compton scattering interactions and less sensitive to the need for high energy resolution detectors, is proposed. To avoid overcorrecting for scattered coincidences, the attenuation coefficient was calculated by integrating the differential Klein-Nishina cross-section over a restricted energy range, accounting only for scattered photons that were not detected. The optimum image can be selected by choosing an energy threshold which is the upper energy limit for the calculation of the cross-section and the lower limit for scattered photons in the reconstruction. Data was simulated using the GATE platform. 500,000 multiple scattered photon coincidences with perfect energy resolution were reconstructed using various methods. The GDS-MLEM algorithm had the highest confidence (98%) in locating the annihilation position and was capable of reconstructing the two largest hot regions. 100,000 photon coincidences, with a scatter fraction of 40%, were used to test the energy resolution dependence of different algorithms. With a 350–650 keV energy window and the restricted attenuation correction model, the GDS-MLEM algorithm was able to improve contrast recovery and reduce the noise by 7.56%–13.24% and 12.4%–24.03%, respectively. This approach is less sensitive to the energy resolution and shows promise if detector energy resolutions of 12% can be achieved.

  11. Optimization of pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (pinhole SPECT) reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel-Jost, V.

    2006-11-01

    In SPECT small animal imaging, it is highly recommended to accurately model the response of the detector in order to improve the low spatial resolution. The volume to reconstruct is thus obtained both by back-projecting and de-convolving the projections. We chose iterative methods, which permit one to solve the inverse problem independently from the model's complexity. We describe in this work a Gaussian model of point spread function (PSF) whose position, width and maximum are computed according to physical and geometrical parameters. Then we use the rotation symmetry to replace the computation of P projection operators, each one corresponding to one position of the detector around the object, by the computation of only one of them. This is achieved by choosing an appropriate polar discretization, for which we control the angular density of voxels to avoid over-sampling the center of the field of view. Finally, we propose a new family of algorithms, the so-called frequency adapted algorithms, which enable to optimize the reconstruction of a given band in the frequency domain on both the speed of convergence and the quality of the image. (author)

  12. Quantification in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this lecture is to understand the possibilities and limitations of the quantitative analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. It is also to identify the conditions to be fulfilled to obtain reliable quantitative measurements from images. Content: 1 - Introduction: Quantification in emission tomography - definition and challenges; quantification biasing phenomena 2 - Main problems impacting quantification in PET and SPECT: problems, consequences, correction methods, results (Attenuation, scattering, partial volume effect, movement, un-stationary spatial resolution in SPECT, fortuitous coincidences in PET, standardisation in PET); 3 - Synthesis: accessible efficiency, know-how, Precautions, beyond the activity measurement

  13. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Ejmalian, G.

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is an intrinsically tool that provide a unique and unparalleled approach for clinicians and researchers to interrogate the heart noninvasively. The ability to label substances of physiological interest with positron-emitting radioisotopes has permitted insight into normal blood flow and metabolism and the alterations that occur with disease states. Positron emission tomography of the heart has evolved as a unique, noninvasive approach for the assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and function. Because of the intrinsic quantitative nature of positron emission tomography measurements as well as the diverse compounds that can be labeled with positron- emitting radioisotopes, studies with positron emission tomography have provided rich insight into the physiology of the heart under diverse conditions

  14. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    Utilization of positron emission tomography was reviewed in relation to construction and planned construction of small-size medical cyclotrons, planned construction of positron cameras and utilization of short-lived radionuclides. (Chiba, N.)

  15. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Gullberg, G.T.; Huesman, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to the methods of computer assisted tomography for determination of the three-dimensional distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the human body. The major applications of emission computed tomography are in biological research and medical diagnostic procedures. The objectives of these procedures are to make quantitative measurements of in vivo biochemical and hemodynamic functions

  16. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, O.

    1989-01-01

    The principle is briefly described of positron emission tomography, and its benefits and constraints are listed. It is emphasized that positron emission tomography (PET) provides valuable information on metabolic changes in the organism that are otherwise only very difficult to obtain, such as brain diagnosis including relationships between mental disorders and the physiology and pathophysiology of the brain. A PET machine is to be installed in Czechoslovakia in the near future. (L.O.)

  17. Small animal positron emission tomography with gas detectors. Simulations, prototyping, and quantitative image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernekohl, Don

    2014-04-15

    plain surfaces, predicted by simulations, was observed. Third, as the production of photon converters is time consuming and expensive, it was investigated whether or not thin gas detectors with single-lead-layer-converters would be an alternative to the HIDAC converter design. Following simulations, those concepts potentially offer impressive coincidence sensitivities up to 24% for plain lead foils and up to 40% for perforated lead foils. Fourth, compared to other PET scanner systems, the HIDAC concept suffers from missing energy information. Consequently, a substantial amount of scatter events can be found within the measured data. On the basis of image reconstruction and correction techniques the influence of random and scatter events and their characteristics on several simulated phantoms were presented. It was validated with the HIDAC simulator that the applied correction technique results in perfectly corrected images. Moreover, it was shown that the simulator is a credible tool to provide quantitatively improved images. Fifth, a new model for the non-collinearity of the positronium annihilation was developed, since it was observed that the model implemented in the GATE simulator does not correspond to the measured observation. The input parameter of the new model was trimmed to match to a point source measurement. The influence of both models on the spatial resolution was studied with three different reconstruction methods. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the reduction of converter depth, proposed for increased sensitivity, also has an advantage on the spatial resolution and that a reduction of the FOV from 17 cm to 4 cm (with only 2 detector heads) results in a remarkable sensitivity increase of 150% and a substantial increase in spatial resolution. The presented simulations for the spatial resolution analysis used an intrinsic detector resolution of 0.125 x 0.125 x 3.2 mm{sup 3} and were able to reach fair resolutions down to 0.9-0.5 mm, which is an

  18. Dual matrix ordered subsets reconstruction for accelerated 3D scatter compensation in single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamphuis, C.; Beekman, F.J.; Van Rijk, P.P.; Viergever, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithms for single-photon emission tomography (SPET) are capable of correcting image-degrading effects of non-uniform attenuation, distance-dependent camera response and patient shape-dependent scatter. However, the resulting improvements in quantitation, resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are obtained at the cost of a huge computational burden. This paper presents a new acceleration method for ML-EM: dual matrix ordered subsets (DM-OS). DM-OS combines two acceleration methods: (a) different matrices for projection and back-projection and (b) ordered subsets of projections. DM-OS was compared with ML-EM on simulated data and on physical thorax phantom data, for both 180 and 360 orbits. Contrast, normalized standard deviation and mean squared error were calculated for the digital phantom experiment. DM-OS resulted in similar image quality to ML-EM, even for speed-up factors of 200 compared to ML-EM in the case of 120 projections. The thorax phantom data could be reconstructed 50 times faster (60 projections) using DM-OS with preservation of image quality. ML-EM and DM-OS with scatter compensation showed significant improvement of SNR compared to ML-EM without scatter compensation. Furthermore, inclusion of complex image formation models in the computer code is simplified in the case of DM-OS. It is thus shown that DM-OS is a fast and relatively simple algorithm for 3D iterative scatter compensation, with similar results to conventional ML-EM, for both 180 and 360 acquired data. (orig.)

  19. Three-Dimensional Image Fusion of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography for Computer-Assisted Planning of Maxillectomy of Recurrent Maxillary Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Defect Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Guo, Chuan-Bin; Yu, Guang-Yan; Peng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe new technology assisted by 3-dimensional (3D) image fusion of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for computer planning of a maxillectomy of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma and defect reconstruction. Treatment of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma usually includes tumor resection and free flap reconstruction. FDG-PET/CT provided images of regions of abnormal glucose uptake and thus showed metabolic tumor volume to guide tumor resection. CECT data were used to create 3D reconstructed images of vessels to show the vascular diameters and locations, so that the most suitable vein and artery could be selected during anastomosis of the free flap. The data from preoperative maxillofacial CECT scans and FDG-PET/CT imaging were imported into the navigation system (iPlan 3.0; Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany). Three-dimensional image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was accomplished using Brainlab software according to the position of the 2 skulls simulated in the CECT image and PET/CT image, respectively. After verification of the image fusion accuracy, the 3D reconstruction images of the metabolic tumor, vessels, and other critical structures could be visualized within the same coordinate system. These sagittal, coronal, axial, and 3D reconstruction images were used to determine the virtual osteotomy sites and reconstruction plan, which was provided to the surgeon and used for surgical navigation. The average shift of the 3D image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was less than 1 mm. This technique, by clearly showing the metabolic tumor volume and the most suitable vessels for anastomosis, facilitated resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. We used 3D image fusion of FDG-PET/CT and CECT to successfully accomplish resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma

  20. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, Preethi; Himabindu, Pucha

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive nuclear imaging technique used to study different molecular pathways and anatomical structures. PET has found extensive applications in various fields of medicine viz. cardiology, oncology, psychiatry/psychology, neuro science and pulmonology. This study paper basically deals with the physics, chemistry and biology behind the PET technique. It discusses the methodology for generation of the radiotracers responsible for emission of positrons and the annihilation and detection techniques. (author)

  1. Validation of the Gate simulation platform in single photon emission computed tomography and application to the development of a complete 3-dimensional reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, D.

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are currently considered in nuclear medical imaging as a powerful tool to design and optimize detection systems, and also to assess reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for degrading physical effects. Among the many simulators available, none of them is considered as a standard in nuclear medical imaging: this fact has motivated the development of a new generic Monte Carlo simulation platform (GATE), based on GEANT4 and dedicated to SPECT/PET (single photo emission computed tomography / positron emission tomography) applications. We participated during this thesis to the development of the GATE platform within an international collaboration. GATE was validated in SPECT by modeling two gamma cameras characterized by a different geometry, one dedicated to small animal imaging and the other used in a clinical context (Philips AXIS), and by comparing the results obtained with GATE simulations with experimental data. The simulation results reproduce accurately the measured performances of both gamma cameras. The GATE platform was then used to develop a new 3-dimensional reconstruction method: F3DMC (fully 3-dimension Monte-Carlo) which consists in computing with Monte Carlo simulation the transition matrix used in an iterative reconstruction algorithm (in this case, ML-EM), including within the transition matrix the main physical effects degrading the image formation process. The results obtained with the F3DMC method were compared to the results obtained with three other more conventional methods (FBP, MLEM, MLEMC) for different phantoms. The results of this study show that F3DMC allows to improve the reconstruction efficiency, the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio with a satisfactory quantification of the images. These results should be confirmed by performing clinical experiments and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be applied in SPECT but also in PET. (author)

  2. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavuk, M.

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this project is to provide a simple summary of new trends in positron emission tomography and its basic physical principles. It provides thereby compendious introduction of the trends of the present development in diagnostics using PET systems. A review of available literature was performed. (author)

  3. Positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for determining biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a

  4. Clinical evaluation of iterative reconstruction (ordered-subset expectation maximization) in dynamic positron emission tomography: quantitative effects on kinetic modeling with N-13 ammonia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens D; Rasmussen, Rune; Freiberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the quantitative properties of ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) on kinetic modeling with nitrogen 13 ammonia compared with filtered backprojection (FBP) in healthy subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac N-13 ammonia positron...... emission tomography (PET) studies from 20 normal volunteers at rest and during dipyridamole stimulation were analyzed. Image data were reconstructed with either FBP or OSEM. FBP- and OSEM-derived input functions and tissue curves were compared together with the myocardial blood flow and spillover values...... and OSEM flow values were observed with a flow underestimation of 45% (rest/dipyridamole) in the septum and of 5% (rest) and 15% (dipyridamole) in the lateral myocardial wall. CONCLUSIONS: OSEM reconstruction of myocardial perfusion images with N-13 ammonia and PET produces high-quality images for visual...

  5. Clinical evaluation of iterative reconstruction (ordered-subset expectation maximization) in dynamic positron emission tomography: quantitative effects on kinetic modeling with N-13 ammonia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens Dahlgaard; Rasmussen, R.; Freiberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    emission tomography (PET) studies from 20 normal volunteers at rest and during dipyridamole stimulation were analyzed. Image data were reconstructed with either FBP or OSEM. FBP- and OSEM-derived input functions and tissue curves were compared together with the myocardial blood flow and spillover values...... and OSEM flow values were observed with a flow underestimation of 45% (rest/dipyridamole) in the septum and of 5% (rest) and 15% (dipyridamole) in the lateral myocardial wall. CONCLUSIONS: OSEM reconstruction of myocardial perfusion images with N-13 ammonia and PET produces high-quality images for visual...... interpretation. However, compared with FBP, OSEM is associated with substantial underestimation of perfusion on quantitative imaging. Our findings indicate that OSEM should be used with precaution in clinical PET studies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  6. Use of scanner characteristics in iterative image reconstruction for high-resolution positron emission tomography studies of small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, G. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Doll, J. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Bellemann, M.E. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Trojan, H. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schmidlin, P. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Ostertag, H. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve of the spatial resolution of a whole-body PET system for experimental studies of small animals by incorporation of scanner characteristics into the process of iterative image reconstruction. The image-forming characteristics of the PET camera were characterized by a spatially variant line-spread function (LSF), which was determined from 49 activated copper-64 line sources positioned over a field of view (FOV) of 21.0 cm. During the course of iterative image reconstruction, the forward projection of the estimated image was blurred with the LSF at each iteration step before the estimated projections were compared with the measured projections. Moreover, imaging studies of a rat and two nude mice were performed to evaluate the imaging properties of our approach in vivo. The spatial resolution of the scanner perpendicular to the direction of projection could be approximated by a one-dimensional Gaussian-shaped LSF with a full-width at half-maximum increasing from 6.5 mm at the centre to 6.7 mm at a radial distance of 10.5 cm. The incorporation of this blurring kernel into the iteration formula resulted in a significantly improved spatial resolution of about 3.9 mm over the examined FOV. As demonstrated by the phantom and the animal experiments, the high-resolution algorithm not only led to a better contrast resolution in the reconstructed emission scans but also improved the accuracy for quantitating activity concentrations in small tissue structures without leading to an amplification of image noise or image mottle. The presented data-handling strategy incorporates the image restoration step directly into the process of algebraic image reconstruction and obviates the need for ill-conditioned ``deconvolution`` procedures to be performed on the projections or on the reconstructed image. In our experience, the proposed algorithm is of special interest in experimental studies of small animals. (orig./AJ). With 9 figs.

  7. Use of scanner characteristics in iterative image reconstruction for high-resolution positron emission tomography studies of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Doll, J.; Bellemann, M.E.; Trojan, H.; Haberkorn, U.; Schmidlin, P.; Ostertag, H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve of the spatial resolution of a whole-body PET system for experimental studies of small animals by incorporation of scanner characteristics into the process of iterative image reconstruction. The image-forming characteristics of the PET camera were characterized by a spatially variant line-spread function (LSF), which was determined from 49 activated copper-64 line sources positioned over a field of view (FOV) of 21.0 cm. During the course of iterative image reconstruction, the forward projection of the estimated image was blurred with the LSF at each iteration step before the estimated projections were compared with the measured projections. Moreover, imaging studies of a rat and two nude mice were performed to evaluate the imaging properties of our approach in vivo. The spatial resolution of the scanner perpendicular to the direction of projection could be approximated by a one-dimensional Gaussian-shaped LSF with a full-width at half-maximum increasing from 6.5 mm at the centre to 6.7 mm at a radial distance of 10.5 cm. The incorporation of this blurring kernel into the iteration formula resulted in a significantly improved spatial resolution of about 3.9 mm over the examined FOV. As demonstrated by the phantom and the animal experiments, the high-resolution algorithm not only led to a better contrast resolution in the reconstructed emission scans but also improved the accuracy for quantitating activity concentrations in small tissue structures without leading to an amplification of image noise or image mottle. The presented data-handling strategy incorporates the image restoration step directly into the process of algebraic image reconstruction and obviates the need for ill-conditioned ''deconvolution'' procedures to be performed on the projections or on the reconstructed image. In our experience, the proposed algorithm is of special interest in experimental studies of small animals. (orig./AJ). With 9 figs

  8. Measuring techniques in emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.; Knoop, B.

    1988-01-01

    The chapter reviews the historical development of the emission computed tomography and its basic principles, proceeds to SPECT and PET, special techniques of emission tomography, and concludes with a comprehensive discussion of the mathematical fundamentals of the reconstruction and the quantitative activity determination in vivo, dealing with radon transformation and the projection slice theorem, methods of image reconstruction such as analytical and algebraic methods, limiting conditions in real systems such as limited number of measured data, noise enhancement, absorption, stray radiation, and random coincidence. (orig./HP) With 111 figs., 6 tabs [de

  9. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Diksic, M.; Meyer, E.; Feindel, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    One of the most exciting new technologies introduced in the last 10 yr is positron emission tomography (PET). PET provides quantitative, three-dimensional images for the study of specific biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. This approach is analogous to quantitative in-vivo autoradiography but has the added advantage of permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. PET scanning requires a small cyclotron to produce short-lived positron emitting isotopes such as oxygen-15, carbon-11, nitrogen-13 and fluorine-18. Proper radiochemical facilities and advanced computer equipment are also needed. Most important, PET requires a multidisciplinary scientific team of physicists, radiochemists, mathematicians, biochemists and physicians. The most recent trends are reviewed in the imaging technology, radiochemistry, methodology and clinical applications of positron emission tomography. (author)

  10. Statistical reconstruction for cosmic ray muon tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Larry J; Blanpied, Gary S; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Fraser, Andrew M; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Klimenko, Alexei V; Morris, Christopher L; Orum, Chris; Sossong, Michael J

    2007-08-01

    Highly penetrating cosmic ray muons constantly shower the earth at a rate of about 1 muon per cm2 per minute. We have developed a technique which exploits the multiple Coulomb scattering of these particles to perform nondestructive inspection without the use of artificial radiation. In prior work [1]-[3], we have described heuristic methods for processing muon data to create reconstructed images. In this paper, we present a maximum likelihood/expectation maximization tomographic reconstruction algorithm designed for the technique. This algorithm borrows much from techniques used in medical imaging, particularly emission tomography, but the statistics of muon scattering dictates differences. We describe the statistical model for multiple scattering, derive the reconstruction algorithm, and present simulated examples. We also propose methods to improve the robustness of the algorithm to experimental errors and events departing from the statistical model.

  11. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenkov, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    The foundations of the positron emission tomography (PET), widely used for the medical diagnostics, are considered. The brief description of the cyclotron for production of radionuclides, applied in the PET, the target devices for manufacturing the position emitters, the moduli for the radiopharmaceuticals synthesis (RPS) for the PET is presented. The necessity and concept of complete automation of the RPS for the PET are discussed [ru

  12. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paans, A.M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals have special applications in in-vivo studies of biochemical processes. The combination of a cyclotron for the production of radionuclides and a positron emission tomograph for the registration of the distribution of radioactivity in the body enables the measurement of local radioactivity concentration in tissues, and opens up new possibilities in the diagnosis and examination of abnormalities in the metabolism. The principles and procedures of positron emission tomography are described and the necessary apparatus considered, with emphasis on the positron camera. The first clinical applications using 55 Co bloemycine for tumor detection are presented. (C.F.)

  13. Tomography by positrons emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosconi, Sergio L.

    1999-01-01

    The tomography by positrons emission is a technology that allows to measure the concentration of positrons emission in a tri dimensional body through external measurements. Among the isotope emissions have carbon isotopes are ( 11 C), of the oxygen ( 15 O), of the nitrogen ( 13 N) that are three the element that constitute the base of the organic chemistry. Theses have on of the PET's most important advantages, since many biological interesting organic molecules can be tracer with these isotopes for the metabolism studies 'in vivo' through PET, without using organic tracers that modify the metabolism. The mentioned isotopes, also possess the characteristic of having short lifetime, that constitute on of PET's advantages from the dosimetric point of view. Among 11 C, 15 O, and 13 N, other isotopes that can be obtained of a generator as the 68 Ga and 82 Rb

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  17. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  18. Positron emission tomography. Positronemisionstomografi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolwig, T G; Haunsoe, S; Dahlgaard Hove, J; Hesse, B; Hoejgard, L; Jensen, M; Paulson, O B; Hastrup Svendsen, J; Soelvsten Soerensen, S

    1994-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a method for quantitative imaging of regional physiological and biochemical parameters. Positron emitting radioactive isotopes can be produced by a cyclotron, eg. the biologically important carbon ([sup 11]C), oxygen ([sup 15]O), and nitrogen ([sup 13]N) elements. With the tomographic principles of the PET scanner the quantitative distribution of the administered isotopes can be determined and images can be provided as well as dynamic information on blood flow, metabolism and receptor function. In neurology PET has been used for investigations on numerous physiological processes in the brain: circulation, metabolism and receptor studies. In Parkinson's disease PET studies have been able to localize the pathology specifically, and in early stroke PET technique can outline focal areas with living but non-functioning cells, and this could make it possible to intervene in this early state. With positron emission tomography a quantitative evaluation of myocardial blood flow, glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be made as well as combined assessments of blood flow and metabolism. Combined studies of blood flow and metabolism can determine whether myocardial segments with abnormal motility consist of necrotic or viable tissue, thereby delineating effects of revascularisation. In the future it will probably be possible to characterize the myocardial receptor status in different cardiac diseases. The PET technique is used in oncology for clinical as well as more basic research on tumor perfusion and metabolism. Further, tumor uptake of positron labelled cytotoxic drugs might predict the clinical benefit of treatment. (au) (19 refs.).

  19. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolwig, T.G.; Haunsoe, S.; Dahlgaard Hove, J.; Hesse, B.; Hoejgard, L.; Jensen, M.; Paulson, O.B.; Hastrup Svendsen, J.; Soelvsten Soerensen, S.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a method for quantitative imaging of regional physiological and biochemical parameters. Positron emitting radioactive isotopes can be produced by a cyclotron, eg. the biologically important carbon ( 11 C), oxygen ( 15 O), and nitrogen ( 13 N) elements. With the tomographic principles of the PET scanner the quantitative distribution of the administered isotopes can be determined and images can be provided as well as dynamic information on blood flow, metabolism and receptor function. In neurology PET has been used for investigations on numerous physiological processes in the brain: circulation, metabolism and receptor studies. In Parkinson's disease PET studies have been able to localize the pathology specifically, and in early stroke PET technique can outline focal areas with living but non-functioning cells, and this could make it possible to intervene in this early state. With positron emission tomography a quantitative evaluation of myocardial blood flow, glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be made as well as combined assessments of blood flow and metabolism. Combined studies of blood flow and metabolism can determine whether myocardial segments with abnormal motility consist of necrotic or viable tissue, thereby delineating effects of revascularisation. In the future it will probably be possible to characterize the myocardial receptor status in different cardiac diseases. The PET technique is used in oncology for clinical as well as more basic research on tumor perfusion and metabolism. Further, tumor uptake of positron labelled cytotoxic drugs might predict the clinical benefit of treatment. (au) (19 refs.)

  20. Validation of the Gate simulation platform in single photon emission computed tomography and application to the development of a complete 3-dimensional reconstruction algorithm; Validation de la plate-forme de simulation GATE en tomographie a emission monophotonique et application au developpement d'un algorithme de reconstruction 3D complete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, D

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are currently considered in nuclear medical imaging as a powerful tool to design and optimize detection systems, and also to assess reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for degrading physical effects. Among the many simulators available, none of them is considered as a standard in nuclear medical imaging: this fact has motivated the development of a new generic Monte Carlo simulation platform (GATE), based on GEANT4 and dedicated to SPECT/PET (single photo emission computed tomography / positron emission tomography) applications. We participated during this thesis to the development of the GATE platform within an international collaboration. GATE was validated in SPECT by modeling two gamma cameras characterized by a different geometry, one dedicated to small animal imaging and the other used in a clinical context (Philips AXIS), and by comparing the results obtained with GATE simulations with experimental data. The simulation results reproduce accurately the measured performances of both gamma cameras. The GATE platform was then used to develop a new 3-dimensional reconstruction method: F3DMC (fully 3-dimension Monte-Carlo) which consists in computing with Monte Carlo simulation the transition matrix used in an iterative reconstruction algorithm (in this case, ML-EM), including within the transition matrix the main physical effects degrading the image formation process. The results obtained with the F3DMC method were compared to the results obtained with three other more conventional methods (FBP, MLEM, MLEMC) for different phantoms. The results of this study show that F3DMC allows to improve the reconstruction efficiency, the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio with a satisfactory quantification of the images. These results should be confirmed by performing clinical experiments and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be applied in SPECT but also in PET. (author)

  1. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczyński, L.; Moskal, P.; Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Molenda, M.; Moskal, I.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Sharma, N. G.; Silarski, M.; Słomski, A.; Smyrski, J.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Zieliński, M.; Zoń, N.

    2014-11-01

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511 keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps (σ).

  2. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raczyński, L.; Moskal, P.; Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Molenda, M.; Moskal, I.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511 keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps (σ)

  3. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raczyński, L., E-mail: lech.raczynski@ncbj.gov.pl [Świerk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Moskal, P. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W. [Świerk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Kapłon, Ł. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland); Kochanowski, A. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Molenda, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Moskal, I.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); and others

    2014-11-11

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511 keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps (σ)

  4. Efficacy of coronary artery reconstruction in maintaining myocardial viability. Quntitative determination of local myocardial circulation with 13NH3 myocardial positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Takaba, Toshihiro; Kume, Masato; Kashima, Toshitaka; Michihata, Tetsuro.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty patients (280 areas) whose bypass grafts remained patent after surgical reconstruction of the coronary artery were examined. Before and after reconstruction, local myocardial blood circulation in infarcted regions and post-stenotic regions was measured by 13 NH 3 myocardial positron emission computed tomography (PET) at rest or during physical exercise in order to evaluate the efficacy of coronary artery reconstruction. Before operation, mean blood flow in post-stenotic regions (n=198) was 65±15 ml/min/100 g at rest and 85±23 ml/min/100 g during exercise. After coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), mean blood flow was increased to 78±21 ml/min/100 g at rest (p, 0.01) and 105±32 ml/min/100 g during exercise (p<0.01). In infarcted regions (n=82), mean blood flow before operation was 51±23 ml/min/100 g at rest and 69±23 ml/min/100 g during exercise. After CABG, it increased to 62±19 ml/min/100 g at rest (p<0.01) and 81±29 ml/min/100 g during exercise (p<0.01). Thus, significant increases in blood flow were observed in both post-stenotic and infarcted regions at rest and physical exercise after operation. The regions of infarction were divided into three groups based on local myocardial blood flow at rest before operation: Group I: greater than 45 ml/min/100 g (n=35); Group II: less than 45 ml/min/100 g (n=30) but greater than 30 ml/min/100 g; and Group III: less than 30 ml/min/100 g (n=30). The efficacy of reconstruction was compared among these groups. The group with preoperative myocardial blood flow greater than 30 ml/min/100 g had increased blood flow after operation, indicating myocardial viability. (author)

  5. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Although there are many common aspects to x-ray transmission and radionuclide emission (ECT) computerized tomography, there are added difficulties and a number of particular factors which form the basis of ECT. The relationship between the physical factors, system design, methodologic approach and assumptions of ECT is discussed. The instrumentation design and application strategies in ECT at this time are diverse and in a rapid stage of development. The approaches are divided into two major categories of Single Photon Counting (SPC) employing scanner and camera concepts with radionuclides of 99 /sup m/Tc, 201 Tl, 123 I etc., and Annihilation Coincidence Detection (ACD) of positron-emitting radionuclides. Six systems in the former and ten systems in the latter category, with examples of typical studies, illustrate the different approaches

  6. Positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, M.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regional mycardial blood flow and substrate metabolism can be non-invasively evaluated and quantified with positron emission computed tomography (Positron-CT). Tracers of exogenous glucose utilization and fatty acid metabolism are available and have been extensively tested. Specific tracer kinetic models have been developed or are being tested so that glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be measured quantitatively by Positron-CT. Tracers of amino acid and oxygen metabolism are utilized in Positron-CT studies of the brain and development of such tracers for cardiac studies are in progress. Methods to quantify regional myocardial blood flow are also being developed. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of Positron-/CT to document myocardial infarction. Experimental and clinical studies have begun to identify metabolic markers of reversibly ischemic myocardium. The potential of Positron-CT to reliably detect potentially salvageable myocardium and, hence, to identify appropriate therapeutic interventions is one of the most exciting applications of the technique

  7. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector planes positioned side-by-side around a patient area to detect radiation. Each plane includes a plurality of photomultiplier tubes and at least two rows of scintillation crystals on each photomultiplier tube extend across to adjacent photomultiplier tubes for detecting radiation from the patient area. Each row of crystals on each photomultiplier tube is offset from the other rows of crystals, and the area of each crystal on each tube in each row is different than the area of the crystals on the tube in other rows for detecting which crystal is actuated and allowing the detector to detect more inter-plane slides. The crystals are offset by an amount equal to the length of the crystal divided by the number of rows. The rows of crystals on opposite sides of the patient may be rotated 90 degrees relative to each other

  8. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector rings positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom. Each ring contains a plurality of scintillation detectors which are positioned around an inner circumference with a septum ring extending inwardly from the inner circumference along each outer edge of each ring. An additional septum ring is positioned in the middle of each ring of detectors and parallel to the other septa rings, whereby the inward extent of all the septa rings may be reduced by one-half and the number of detectors required in each ring is reduced. The additional septa reduces the costs of the positron camera and improves its performance

  9. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector rings positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom. Each detector ring or offset ring includes a plurality of photomultiplier tubes and a plurality of scintillation crystals are positioned relative to the photomultiplier tubes whereby each tube is responsive to more than one crystal. Each alternate crystal in the ring is offset by one-half or less of the thickness of the crystal such that the staggered crystals are seen by more than one photomultiplier tube. This sharing of crystals and photomultiplier tubes allows identification of the staggered crystal and the use of smaller detectors shared by larger photomultiplier tubes thereby requiring less photomultiplier tubes, creating more scanning slices, providing better data sampling, and reducing the cost of the camera. The offset detector ring geometry reduces the costs of the positron camera and improves its performance

  10. Local detection of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose comparison of filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Larson, S. M.; Coakley, F.; Akhurst, T.; Macapinlac, H. A.; Hricak, H.; Gonen, M.; Kelly, W.; Scher, H.; Leibel, S.; Humm, J.; Scardino, P.

    2001-01-01

    To compare filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction (IRSAC) in the local imaging of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). 13 patients with primary (n=7) or recurrent (n=6) prostate cancer who had increased uptake in the prostate on FDG-PET performed without urinary catheterization, contemporaneous biopsy confirming the presence of active tumor in the prostate, were retrospectively identified. Two independent nuclear medicine physicians separately rated FBP and IRSAC images for visualization of prostatic activity on a 4-point scale. Results were compared using biopsy and cross-sectional imaging findings as the standard of reference. IRSAC images were significantly better that FBP in terms of visualization of prostatic activity in 12 of 13 patients, and were equivalent in 1 patient (p<0.001, Wilcoxon signed ranks test). In particular, 2 foci of tumor activity in 2 different patients seen on IRSAC images were not visible on FBP images. In 11 patients who had a gross tumor mass evident on cross-sectional imaging, there was good agreement between PET and cross-sectional anatomic imaging with respect to tumor localization. In selected patients, cancer can be imaged within the prostate using FDG-PET, and IRSAC is superior to FBP in image reconstruction for local tumor visualization

  11. Data analysis in emission tomography using emission-count posteriors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, Arkadiusz

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to the analysis of emission tomography data using the posterior probability of the number of emissions per voxel (emission count) conditioned on acquired tomographic data is explored. The posterior is derived from the prior and the Poisson likelihood of the emission-count data by marginalizing voxel activities. Based on emission-count posteriors, examples of Bayesian analysis including estimation and classification tasks in emission tomography are provided. The application of the method to computer simulations of 2D tomography is demonstrated. In particular, the minimum-mean-square-error point estimator of the emission count is demonstrated. The process of finding this estimator can be considered as a tomographic image reconstruction technique since the estimates of the number of emissions per voxel divided by voxel sensitivities and acquisition time are the estimates of the voxel activities. As an example of a classification task, a hypothesis stating that some region of interest (ROI) emitted at least or at most r-times the number of events in some other ROI is tested. The ROIs are specified by the user. The analysis described in this work provides new quantitative statistical measures that can be used in decision making in diagnostic imaging using emission tomography. (paper)

  12. Data analysis in emission tomography using emission-count posteriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Arkadiusz

    2012-11-01

    A novel approach to the analysis of emission tomography data using the posterior probability of the number of emissions per voxel (emission count) conditioned on acquired tomographic data is explored. The posterior is derived from the prior and the Poisson likelihood of the emission-count data by marginalizing voxel activities. Based on emission-count posteriors, examples of Bayesian analysis including estimation and classification tasks in emission tomography are provided. The application of the method to computer simulations of 2D tomography is demonstrated. In particular, the minimum-mean-square-error point estimator of the emission count is demonstrated. The process of finding this estimator can be considered as a tomographic image reconstruction technique since the estimates of the number of emissions per voxel divided by voxel sensitivities and acquisition time are the estimates of the voxel activities. As an example of a classification task, a hypothesis stating that some region of interest (ROI) emitted at least or at most r-times the number of events in some other ROI is tested. The ROIs are specified by the user. The analysis described in this work provides new quantitative statistical measures that can be used in decision making in diagnostic imaging using emission tomography.

  13. single photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography - Part 1 (October 2012), Part 2 (October 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. Part 1 Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, gamma photon emitters, positon emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Gamma cameras; 4 - Quantification in emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion. Part 2 content: 1 - Positon emitters; 2 - Positons detection: Coincidence detection (electronic collimation, PET detectors with gamma cameras, dedicated PET detectors, spectrometry); PET detectors type; time-of-flight PET; 2D PET; 3D PET; 3 - Quantification in emission tomography: detected events, attenuation, scattering, fortuitous coincidences, standardisation; 4 - Common SPECT and PET problems: partial volume effect, movement, tomographic reconstruction, calibration, dead time; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  14. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography; Evaluation d'une methode de restitution de contraste basee sur le guidage anatomique de la reconstruction des images cerebrales en tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, F

    2007-04-15

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  15. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography; Evaluation d'une methode de restitution de contraste basee sur le guidage anatomique de la reconstruction des images cerebrales en tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, F

    2007-04-15

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  16. Strategies of reconstruction algorithms for computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garderet, P.

    1984-10-01

    Image reconstruction from projections has progressively spread out over all fields of medical imaging. As the mathematical aspects of the problem become more and more comprehensively explored a great variety of numerical solutions have been developed best suited to such-and-such imaging medical application and taking into account the physical phenomena related to data collection (a priori properties for signal and noise). The purpose of that survey is to present the general mathematical frame and the fundamental assumptions of various strategies; Fourier methods approximate explicit deterministic inversion formula for the Radon transform. Algebraic reconstruction techniques set up an a priori discrete model through a series expansion approach of the solution. The numerical system to be solved is huge when a fine grid of pixels is to be reconstructed; iterative solutions may then be found. Recently some least square procedures have been shown to be tractable which avoid the use of iterative methods. Finally maximum like hood approach incorporates accurately the Poisson nature of photon noise and are well adapted to emission computed tomography. The various strategies will be analysed from both aspects of theoretical assumptions needed for suitable use and of computing facilities, actual performance and cost. In the end we take a glimpse of the extension of the algorithms from two dimensional imaging to fully three dimensional volume analysis in preparation of the future medical imaging technologies

  17. Positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindback, Stig [GEMS PET Systems AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1995-07-15

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an advanced nuclear medicine technique used for research at major centres. Unique diagnostic information is obtained from tomographic measurements of the biochemistry and physiology of tissues and organs. In theory, diseases are related to biochemical changes and these can be observed with PET long before any anatomical changes are detectable. In PET the radioactive component is a positron-emitting isotope or 'tracer'. The positrons annihilate with electrons in the body to produce two gamma rays 180° apart; coincidence detection of these gammas provides a very efficient method of determining the spatial distribution of the radioisotope tracer. Because physiological measurements are usually required in a single imaging session, very short-lived isotopes are used to label the tracer molecules; isotope production and labelling is usually carried out in situ. The most commonly used radionuclides are carbon- 11 (half-life 20 minutes), nitrogen-13 (10 minutes), oxygen-15 (2 minutes), and fluorine-18 (110 minutes). A PET system has three major components: - a particle accelerator with targets for production of the positron-emitting isotopes; - chemistry modules for synthesis and labelling of the desired tracers; - and a PET camera for in-vivo measurements of the distribution of the tracer in the body.

  18. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindback, Stig

    1995-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an advanced nuclear medicine technique used for research at major centres. Unique diagnostic information is obtained from tomographic measurements of the biochemistry and physiology of tissues and organs. In theory, diseases are related to biochemical changes and these can be observed with PET long before any anatomical changes are detectable. In PET the radioactive component is a positron-emitting isotope or 'tracer'. The positrons annihilate with electrons in the body to produce two gamma rays 180° apart; coincidence detection of these gammas provides a very efficient method of determining the spatial distribution of the radioisotope tracer. Because physiological measurements are usually required in a single imaging session, very short-lived isotopes are used to label the tracer molecules; isotope production and labelling is usually carried out in situ. The most commonly used radionuclides are carbon- 11 (half-life 20 minutes), nitrogen-13 (10 minutes), oxygen-15 (2 minutes), and fluorine-18 (110 minutes). A PET system has three major components: - a particle accelerator with targets for production of the positron-emitting isotopes; - chemistry modules for synthesis and labelling of the desired tracers; - and a PET camera for in-vivo measurements of the distribution of the tracer in the body

  19. Reproducibility and quantitativity of oblique-angle reconstruction in single photon emission computed tomography using Tl-201 myocardial phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunko, Hisashi; Nanbu, Ichiro; Seki, Hiroyasu

    1984-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to evaluate reproducibility and quantitativity of oblique-angle reconstruction of myocardial phantom SPECT. Myocardial phantom with transmural and subendcardial defects, and off-axis phantom with wall thickness changing continuously from 0 to 23 mm were used. Sixty projection data in every 6 0 were aquired using dual-camera (ZLC) with high resolution collimators connected to Scintipac-2400 computer system. Oblique-angle reconstructed images were obtained by indicating the long axis of the phantom manually in the transaxial and vertical long axial tomograms. Reproducibility and quantitativity were evaluated by creating circumferential profile (CFP) of the finally reconstructed short axial images. Inter- and intra-operater reproducibility of relative counting ratio were less than 6.7% (C.V.) and 3.3% (C.V.), respectively. Both inter- and intraoperater reproducibility of absolute counts were better than that of counting ratio (less than 5.1% (C.V.) and 2.9% (C.V.), respectively). Variation of defect location in the reconstructed image and between the slices were less than 1 sampling interval of CFP (6 0 ) and 0.6 slice, respectively. Quantitativity of counts in the reconstructed images was poor in the transmulal defect, but was fair in the subendocardial defect. Counting ratio was greatly affected by wall thickness. Temporal quantitatibity or linearity of the counts in sequential SPECTs was good in non-defect area, especially when wall thickness was greater than 70% (16 mm) of maximum. In conclusion, three-dimensional oblique-angle reconstruction in Tl-201 myocardial SPECT could be applicable to relative and temporal quantitation of local myocardial activity other than defect area for the quantitative evaluation of Tl-201 myocardial wash-out. (J.P.N.)

  20. Few-view single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on a blurred piecewise constant object model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Paul A.; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Schmidt, Taly G.

    2013-01-01

    the assumed blurring model. Generally, increased values of the blurring parameter and TV weighting parameters reduced noise and streaking artifacts, while decreasing spatial resolution. As the number of views decreased from 60 to 9 the accuracy of images reconstructed using the proposed algorithm varied...

  1. ROC [Receiver Operating Characteristics] study of maximum likelihood estimator human brain image reconstructions in PET [Positron Emission Tomography] clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Veklerov, E.; Nolan, D.; Grafton, S.T.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Hawkins, R.A.; Hoh, C.K.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1990-10-01

    This paper will report on the progress to date in carrying out Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) studies comparing Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) and Filtered Backprojection (FBP) reconstructions of normal and abnormal human brain PET data in a clinical setting. A previous statistical study of reconstructions of the Hoffman brain phantom with real data indicated that the pixel-to-pixel standard deviation in feasible MLE images is approximately proportional to the square root of the number of counts in a region, as opposed to a standard deviation which is high and largely independent of the number of counts in FBP. A preliminary ROC study carried out with 10 non-medical observers performing a relatively simple detectability task indicates that, for the majority of observers, lower standard deviation translates itself into a statistically significant detectability advantage in MLE reconstructions. The initial results of ongoing tests with four experienced neurologists/nuclear medicine physicians are presented. Normal cases of 18 F -- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) cerebral metabolism studies and abnormal cases in which a variety of lesions have been introduced into normal data sets have been evaluated. We report on the results of reading the reconstructions of 90 data sets, each corresponding to a single brain slice. It has become apparent that the design of the study based on reading single brain slices is too insensitive and we propose a variation based on reading three consecutive slices at a time, rating only the center slice. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. The limitations of tissue-oxygen measurement and positron emission tomography as additional methods for postoperative breast reconstruction free-flap monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aleksi; Niemi, Tarja; Kinnunen, Ilpo; Minn, Heikki; Vahlberg, Tero; Kalliokoski, Kari; Suominen, Erkki; Grénman, Reidar; Aitasalo, Kalle

    2010-02-01

    Twelve patients who underwent breast reconstruction with a microvascular flap were monitored postoperatively with continuous partial tissue oxygenation (p(ti)O(2)) measurement. The regional blood flow (BF) of the entire flap was evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET) using oxygen-15-labelled water on the first postoperative (POP) morning to achieve data of the perfusion of the entire flap. A re-exploration was carried out if the p(ti)O(2) value remained lower than 15 mmHg for over 30 min. The mean p(ti)O(2) value of the flaps was 52.9+/-5.5 mmHg, whereas the mean BF values were 3.3+/-1.0 ml per 100 g min(-1). One false-positive result was detected by p(ti)O(2) measurement, resulting in an unnecessary re-exploration. Another re-operation suggested by the low p(ti)O(2) results was avoided due to the normal BF results assessed with PET. Totally, three flaps were re-explored. This prospective study suggests that continuous tissue-oxygen measurement with a polarographic needle probe is reliable for monitoring free breast flaps from one part of the flap, but assessing perfusion of the entire flap requires more complex monitoring methods, for example, PET. Clinical examination by experienced personnel remains important in free-breast-flap monitoring. PET could be useful in assessing free-flap perfusion in selected high-risk patients as an alternative to a re-operation when clinical examination and evaluation by other means are unreliable or present controversial results. 2008 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fast volume reconstruction in positron emission tomography: Implementation of four algorithms on a high-performance scalable parallel platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egger, M.L.; Scheurer, A.H.; Joseph, C.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of long reconstruction times in PET has been addressed from several points of view, resulting in an affordable dedicated system capable of handling routine 3D reconstruction in a few minutes per frame: on the hardware side using fast processors and a parallel architecture, and on the software side, using efficient implementations of computationally less intensive algorithms. Execution times obtained for the PRT-1 data set on a parallel system of five hybrid nodes, each combining an Alpha processor for computation and a transputer for communication, are the following (256 sinograms of 96 views by 128 radial samples): Ramp algorithm 56 s, Favor 81 s and reprojection algorithm of Kinahan and Rogers 187 s. The implementation of fast rebinning algorithms has shown our hardware platform to become communications-limited; they execute faster on a conventional single-processor Alpha workstation: single-slice rebinning 7 s, Fourier rebinning 22 s, 2D filtered backprojection 5 s. The scalability of the system has been demonstrated, and a saturation effect at network sizes above ten nodes has become visible; new T9000-based products lifting most of the constraints on network topology and link throughput are expected to result in improved parallel efficiency and scalability properties

  4. Algebraic reconstruction techniques for spectral reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, Bernhard; Ziegler, Ronny; Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) necessitates solving the diffusion equation, which is nonlinear with respect to the parameters that have to be reconstructed. Currently applied solving methods are based on the linearization of the equation. For spectral three-dimensional reconstruction, the emerging equation system is too large for direct inversion, but the application of iterative methods is feasible. Computational effort and speed of convergence of these iterative methods are crucial since they determine the computation time of the reconstruction. In this paper, the iterative methods algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and conjugated gradients (CGs) as well as a new modified ART method are investigated for spectral DOT reconstruction. The aim of the modified ART scheme is to speed up the convergence by considering the specific conditions of spectral reconstruction. As a result, it converges much faster to favorable results than conventional ART and CG methods

  5. Longitudinal emission tomography of thyroid and heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giessen, J.W. van.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis three devices are discussed for longitudinal emission tomography, one of which has been developed for myocardial imaging and the other two for thyroid imaging. Longitudinal emission tomography is a technique which enables three-dimensional reconstruction of the radioactivity distribution within an organ from two-dimensional distributions on a detector surface. In Ch. 1 a general survey is given of the clinical environment in which the devices will be used. Ch. 2 discusses a well-known technique for myocardial imaging: seven-pinhole tomography. In Ch. 3 this technique is applied to imaging of the thyroid. Three different reconstruction methods have been applied to the data collected with the system (from phantoms as well as from patients) and the results have been evaluated. Ch. 4 discusses simulation studies which were carried out in order to investigate the potentialities of a time-coded aperture (TCA) system designed for thyroid tomography. In Ch. 5 a prototype is tested of the time coded aperture in a clinical environment. The last chapter presents a comparison between the (thyroid) 7P collimator and the TCA device. (Auth.)

  6. Fully 3-D list-mode positron emission tomography image reconstruction on a multi-GPU cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jingyu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Prevrhal, Sven; Shao, Lingxiong [Philips Healthcare, San Jose, CA (United States); Pratx, Guillem [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Levin, Craig S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology, Electrical Engineering, and Physics; Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS); Stanford Univ., CA (United States). School of Medicine

    2011-07-01

    List-mode processing is an efficient way of dealing with the sparse nature of PET data sets, and is the processing method of choice for time-of-flight (ToF) PET. We present a novel method of computing line projection operations required for list-mode ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) for fully 3-D PET image reconstruction on a graphics processing unit (GPU) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) framework. Our method overcomes challenges such as compute thread divergence, and exploits GPU capabilities such as shared memory and atomic operations. When applied to line projection operations for list-mode time-of-flight PET, this new GPU-CUDA reformulation is 188X faster than a single-threaded reference CPU implementation. When embedded in a multi-process environment on a GPU-equipped small cluster, a speedup of 4X was observed over the same configuration but without GPU support. Image quality is preserved with root mean squared (RMS) deviation of 0.05% between CPU and GPU-generated images, which has negligible effect in typical clinical applications. (orig.)

  7. Physics and instrumentation of emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Links, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Transverse emission computed tomography can be divided into two distinct classes: single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). SPECT is usually accomplished with specially-adapted scintillation cameras, although dedicated SPECT scanners are available. The special SPECT cameras are standard cameras which are mounted on gantries that allow 360 degree rotation around the long axis of the head or body. The camera stops at a number of angles around the body (usually 64-128), acquiring a ''projection'' image at each stop. The data from these projections are used to reconstruct transverse images with a standard ''filtered back-projection'' algorithm, identical to that used in transmission CT. Because the scintillation camera acquires two-dimensional images, a simple 360 degree rotation around the patient results in the acquisition of data for a number of contiguous transverse slices. These slices, once reconstructed, can be ''stacked'' in computer memory, and orthogonal coronal and sagittal slices produced. Additionally, reorienting algorithms allow the generation of slices that are oblique to the long axis of the body

  8. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...... applications. This thesis takes a systematic approach toward establishing quantitative understanding of conditions for sparse reconstruction to work well in CT. A general framework for analyzing sparse reconstruction methods in CT is introduced and two sets of computational tools are proposed: 1...... contributions to a general set of computational characterization tools. Thus, the thesis contributions help advance sparse reconstruction methods toward routine use in...

  9. Increased accuracy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using iterative reconstruction of images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Filtered back projection (FBP is a common way of processing myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI studies. There are artifacts in FBP which can cause falsepositive results. Iterative reconstruction (IR is developed to reduce false positive findings in MPI studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in the number of false positive findings in MPI studies, between FBP and IR processing. Methods. We examined 107 patients with angina pectoris with MPI and coronary angiography (CAG, 77 man and 30 woman, aged 32−82. MPI studies were processed with FBP and with IR. Positive finding at MPI was visualization of the perfusion defect. Positive finding at CAG was stenosis of coronary artery. Perfusion defect at MPI without coronary artery stenosis at CAG was considered like false positive. The results were statistically analyzed with bivariate correlation, and with one sample t-test. Results. There were 20.6% normal, and 79.4% pathologic findings at FBP, 30.8% normal and 69.2% pathologic with IR and 37.4% normal and 62.6% pathologic at CAG. FBP produced 19 false-positive findings, at IR 11 false positive findings. The correlation between FBP and CAG was 0.658 (p < 0.01 and between IR and CAG 0.784 (p < 0.01. The number of false positive findings at MPI with IR was significantly lower than at FBP (p < 0.01. Conclusion. Our study shows that IR processing MPI scintigraphy has less number of false positive findings, therefore it is our choice for processing MPI studies.

  10. A wavelet phase filter for emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, E.T.; Lin, B.

    1995-01-01

    The presence of a high level of noise is a characteristic in some tomographic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Wavelet methods can smooth out noise while preserving significant features of images. Mallat et al. proposed a wavelet based denoising scheme exploiting wavelet modulus maxima, but the scheme is sensitive to noise. In this study, the authors explore the properties of wavelet phase, with a focus on reconstruction of emission tomography images. Specifically, they show that the wavelet phase of regular Poisson noise under a Haar-type wavelet transform converges in distribution to a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 2π). They then propose three wavelet-phase-based denoising schemes which exploit this property: edge tracking, local phase variance thresholding, and scale phase variation thresholding. Some numerical results are also presented. The numerical experiments indicate that wavelet phase techniques show promise for wavelet based denoising methods

  11. Positron emission tomography in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the current and potential uses of positron emission tomography in clinical medicine and research related to oncology. Assessment will be possible of metabolism and physiology of tumors and their effects on adjacent tissues. Specific probes are likely to be developed for target sites on tumors, including monoclonal antibodies and specific growth factors that recognize tumors. To date, most oncological applications of positron emission tomography tracers have been qualitative; in the future, quantitative metabolic measurements should aid in the evaluation of tumor biology and response to treatment

  12. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering....... We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which...

  13. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Bonanno, D. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Maccioni, G. [INFN – Cagliari Division, Cagliari (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E. [Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to ~1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of ~15′ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  14. Reconstructions in ultrasound modulated optical tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Allmaras, Moritz; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a mathematical model for ultrasound modulated optical tomography and present a simple reconstruction scheme for recovering the spatially varying optical absorption coefficient from scanning measurements with narrowly focused ultrasound signals. Computational results for this model show that the reconstruction of sharp features of the absorption coefficient is possible. A formal linearization of the model leads to an equation with a Fredholm operator, which explains the stability observed in our numerical experiments. © de Gruyter 2011.

  15. Instrumentation for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with a spatial resolution of 2 mm full width at half maximum for quantitation in regions of interest 4 mm in diameter will become possible with the development of detectors that achieve ultrahigh resolution. Improved resolution will be possible using solid-state photodetectors for crystal identification or photomultiplier tubes with many small electron multipliers. Temporal resolution of 2 seconds and gating of cyclic events can be accomplished if statistical requirements are met. The major physical considerations in achieving high-resolution positron emission tomography are the degradation in resolution resulting from positron range, emission angle, parallax error, detector sampling density, the sensitivity of various detector materials and packing schemes, and the tradeoff between temporal resolution and statistical accuracy. The accuracy of data required for physiological models depends primarily on the fidelity of spatial sampling independent of statistical constraints

  16. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tomography in nuclear medicine did not originate after the introduction of X-ray computerized tomography (CT). Even in the days of rectilinear scanner, tomography was attempted with multiple detector heads rotating around the patient, but the counts at each plane were never very high to obtain a satisfactory image. A high resolution focusing collimator can look at different depths but taking several slices in one projection was a time consuming process. Rectilinear scanners lose lot of counts in the collimator to look at one point, at on time, in one plane. It is true that attempts to do tomography with gamma camera really got a boost after the success of CT. By that time, algorithms for doing reconstruction of images also were highly refined and for advanced. Clinical application of SPECT has become widespread now, because of the development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals and improvement in instrumentation. The SPECT provides a direct measure of regional organ function and is performed with nuclides such as 123 I and 99 Tc m that emit a mono-image photon during their decay. SPECT is far less expensive than positron emission tomography

  17. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganatra, R D

    1993-12-31

    Tomography in nuclear medicine did not originate after the introduction of X-ray computerized tomography (CT). Even in the days of rectilinear scanner, tomography was attempted with multiple detector heads rotating around the patient, but the counts at each plane were never very high to obtain a satisfactory image. A high resolution focusing collimator can look at different depths but taking several slices in one projection was a time consuming process. Rectilinear scanners lose lot of counts in the collimator to look at one point, at on time, in one plane. It is true that attempts to do tomography with gamma camera really got a boost after the success of CT. By that time, algorithms for doing reconstruction of images also were highly refined and for advanced. Clinical application of SPECT has become widespread now, because of the development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals and improvement in instrumentation. The SPECT provides a direct measure of regional organ function and is performed with nuclides such as {sup 123}I and {sup 99}Tc{sup m} that emit a mono-image photon during their decay. SPECT is far less expensive than positron emission tomography

  18. Emission tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Williams, C.W.; Burgiss, S.G.

    1983-01-01

    In the present invention a positron emission tomographic system is provided in which the random photon coincidence background is determined for the lines of sight along which the positron annihiliations are located. The circuitry is arranged so that this background may be subtracted almost simultaneously from the total photon coincidence measurement, or may be stored in a temporary memory for latter subtraction. In this system, an appropriate coincidence resolution time is selected and coincidences of photons detected at 180 degree opposed detectors within the time resolution are recorded as the overall coincidence count. This total count includes a source(true events) count plus a background(random coincidences) count. The background count is determined by measuring photons detected at these same sets of photon detectors and employing the same coincidence resolution period, where the signals from one set of detectors are passed through a delay longer in time than this resolution period

  19. Speeding up image reconstruction in computed tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a technique for imaging cross-sections of an object using X-ray measurements taken from different angles. In last decades a significant progress has happened there: today advanced algorithms allow fast image reconstruction and obtaining high-quality images even with missing or dirty data, modern detectors provide high resolution without increasing radiation dose, and high-performance multi-core computing devices are there to help us solving such tasks even faster. I will start with CT basics, then briefly present existing classes of reconstruction algorithms and their differences. After that I will proceed to employing distinctive architectural features of modern multi-core devices (CPUs and GPUs) and popular program interfaces (OpenMP, MPI, CUDA, OpenCL) for developing effective parallel realizations of image reconstruction algorithms. Decreasing full reconstruction time from long hours up to minutes or even seconds has a revolutionary impact in diagnostic medicine and industria...

  20. Positron emission tomography. Basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Massardo, Teresa; Gonzalez, Patricio

    2001-01-01

    The basic principles of positron emission tomography (PET) technique are reviewed. lt allows to obtain functional images from gamma rays produced by annihilation of a positron, a positive beta particle. This paper analyzes positron emitters production in a cyclotron, its general mechanisms, and the various detection systems. The most important clinical applications are also mentioned, related to oncological uses of fluor-l8-deoxyglucose

  1. Geometric reconstruction methods for electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpers, Andreas, E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de [Zentrum Mathematik, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching bei München (Germany); Gardner, Richard J., E-mail: Richard.Gardner@wwu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9063 (United States); König, Stefan, E-mail: koenig@ma.tum.de [Zentrum Mathematik, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching bei München (Germany); Pennington, Robert S., E-mail: robert.pennington@uni-ulm.de [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boothroyd, Chris B., E-mail: ChrisBoothroyd@cantab.net [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Houben, Lothar, E-mail: l.houben@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E., E-mail: rdb@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Joost Batenburg, Kees, E-mail: Joost.Batenburg@cwi.nl [Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, NL-1098XG, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Vision Lab, Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2013-05-15

    Electron tomography is becoming an increasingly important tool in materials science for studying the three-dimensional morphologies and chemical compositions of nanostructures. The image quality obtained by many current algorithms is seriously affected by the problems of missing wedge artefacts and non-linear projection intensities due to diffraction effects. The former refers to the fact that data cannot be acquired over the full 180° tilt range; the latter implies that for some orientations, crystalline structures can show strong contrast changes. To overcome these problems we introduce and discuss several algorithms from the mathematical fields of geometric and discrete tomography. The algorithms incorporate geometric prior knowledge (mainly convexity and homogeneity), which also in principle considerably reduces the number of tilt angles required. Results are discussed for the reconstruction of an InAs nanowire. - Highlights: ► Four algorithms for electron tomography are introduced that utilize prior knowledge. ► Objects are assumed to be homogeneous; convexity and regularity is also discussed. ► We are able to reconstruct slices of a nanowire from as few as four projections. ► Algorithms should be selected based on the specific reconstruction task at hand.

  2. Geometric reconstruction methods for electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpers, Andreas; Gardner, Richard J.; König, Stefan; Pennington, Robert S.; Boothroyd, Chris B.; Houben, Lothar; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Joost Batenburg, Kees

    2013-01-01

    Electron tomography is becoming an increasingly important tool in materials science for studying the three-dimensional morphologies and chemical compositions of nanostructures. The image quality obtained by many current algorithms is seriously affected by the problems of missing wedge artefacts and non-linear projection intensities due to diffraction effects. The former refers to the fact that data cannot be acquired over the full 180° tilt range; the latter implies that for some orientations, crystalline structures can show strong contrast changes. To overcome these problems we introduce and discuss several algorithms from the mathematical fields of geometric and discrete tomography. The algorithms incorporate geometric prior knowledge (mainly convexity and homogeneity), which also in principle considerably reduces the number of tilt angles required. Results are discussed for the reconstruction of an InAs nanowire. - Highlights: ► Four algorithms for electron tomography are introduced that utilize prior knowledge. ► Objects are assumed to be homogeneous; convexity and regularity is also discussed. ► We are able to reconstruct slices of a nanowire from as few as four projections. ► Algorithms should be selected based on the specific reconstruction task at hand

  3. Single photon emission computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooge, P. de.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis two single-photon emission tomographic techniques are presented: (a) longitudinal tomography with a rotating slanting-hole collimator, and (b) transversal tomography with a rotating gamma camera. These methods overcome the disadvantages of conventional scintigraphy. Both detection systems and the image construction methods are explained and comparisons with conventional scintigraphy are drawn. One chapter is dedicated to the determination of system parameters like spatial resolution, contrast, detector uniformity, and size of the object, by phantom studies. In separate chapters the results are presented of detection of tumors and metastases in the liver and the liver hilus; skeletal diseases; various pathological aberrations of the brain; and myocardial perfusion. The possible use of these two ect's for other organs and body areas is discussed in the last chapter. (Auth.)

  4. Quantification in dynamic and small-animal positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disselhorst, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    This thesis covers two aspects of positron emission tomography (PET) quantification. The first section addresses the characterization and optimization of a small-animal PET/CT scanner. The sensitivity and resolution as well as various parameters affecting image quality (reconstruction settings, type

  5. Positron emission tomography takes lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, R.

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)'s ability to detect functional abnormalities before they manifest anatomically is examined and some of its most common applications are outlined. It is emphasised that when PET facility and Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization's national cyclotron are established at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, the availability of short-lived tracers such as oxygen 15, nitrogen 13 and fluorine 18 would improve the specificity of tests(e.g. for brain tumors or cardiac viability) further. Construction of the cyclotron will start shortly and is due to be completed and operating by the end of 1991

  6. Fundamentals of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostertag, H.

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is a modern radionuclide method of measuring physiological quantities or metabolic parameters in vivo. The methods is based on: (1) Radioactive labelling with positron emitters; (2) the coincidence technique for the measurement of the annihilation radiation following positron decay; (3) analysis of the data measured using biological models. The basic aspects and problems of the method are discussed. The main fields of future research are the synthesis of new labelled compounds and the development of mathematical models of the biological processes to be investigated. (orig.) [de

  7. Emission tomography for adrenal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, K.E.; Shapiro, B.; Hawkins, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography (SPET) of the adrenals was compared to convential gamma camera images. Depths of 19 adrenals were assessed by both the lateral skin-upper kidney pole method and by SPET. Eleven patients with adrenal disorders were also studied. An advantage of using SPET was that the analogue transverse section image showed improvement over the conventional posterior view because the liver activity was well separated from the adrenal. Furthermore, non-adrenal tissue background was virtually eliminated and adrenal depth determination facilitated. (U.K.)

  8. Single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Single photon tomography dates from the early 1960's when the idea of emission transverse section tomography was presented by Kuhl and Edwards. They used a rectilinear scanner and analogue back-projection methods to detect emissions from a series of sequential positions transverse to the cephaldcaudad axis of the body. This chapter presents an explanation of emission tomography by describing longitudinal and transverse section tomography. In principle all modes of tomography can be considered under the general topic of coded apertures wherein the code ranges from translation of a pinhole collimator to rotation of a parallel hole or focused collimator array

  9. Partial Volume Effects correction in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pogam, Adrien

    2010-01-01

    Partial Volume Effects (PVE) designates the blur commonly found in nuclear medicine images and this PhD work is dedicated to their correction with the objectives of qualitative and quantitative improvement of such images. PVE arise from the limited spatial resolution of functional imaging with either Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). They can be defined as a signal loss in tissues of size similar to the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the PSF of the imaging device. In addition, PVE induce activity cross contamination between adjacent structures with different tracer uptakes. This can lead to under or over estimation of the real activity of such analyzed regions. Various methodologies currently exist to compensate or even correct for PVE and they may be classified depending on their place in the processing chain: either before, during or after the image reconstruction process, as well as their dependency on co-registered anatomical images with higher spatial resolution, for instance Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The voxel-based and post-reconstruction approach was chosen for this work to avoid regions of interest definition and dependency on proprietary reconstruction developed by each manufacturer, in order to improve the PVE correction. Two different contributions were carried out in this work: the first one is based on a multi-resolution methodology in the wavelet domain using the higher resolution details of a co-registered anatomical image associated to the functional dataset to correct. The second one is the improvement of iterative deconvolution based methodologies by using tools such as directional wavelets and curvelets extensions. These various developed approaches were applied and validated using synthetic, simulated and clinical images, for instance with neurology and oncology applications in mind. Finally, as currently available PET/CT scanners incorporate more

  10. Quantitative tomography simulations and reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, H.E.; Aufderheide, M.B.; Goodman, D.; Schach von Wittenau, A.; Logan, C.; Hall, J.; Jackson, J.; Slone, D.

    2000-01-01

    X-ray, neutron and proton transmission radiography and computed tomography (CT) are important diagnostic tools that are at the heart of LLNL's effort to meet the goals of the DOE's Advanced Radiography Campaign. This campaign seeks to improve radiographic simulation and analysis so that radiography can be a useful quantitative diagnostic tool for stockpile stewardship. Current radiographic accuracy does not allow satisfactory separation of experimental effects from the true features of an object's tomographically reconstructed image. This can lead to difficult and sometimes incorrect interpretation of the results. By improving our ability to simulate the whole radiographic and CT system, it will be possible to examine the contribution of system components to various experimental effects, with the goal of removing or reducing them. In this project, we are merging this simulation capability with a maximum-likelihood (constrained-conjugate-gradient-CCG) reconstruction technique yielding a physics-based, forward-model image-reconstruction code. In addition, we seek to improve the accuracy of computed tomography from transmission radiographs by studying what physics is needed in the forward model. During FY 2000, an improved version of the LLNL ray-tracing code called HADES has been coupled with a recently developed LLNL CT algorithm known as CCG. The problem of image reconstruction is expressed as a large matrix equation relating a model for the object being reconstructed to its projections (radiographs). Using a constrained-conjugate-gradient search algorithm, a maximum likelihood solution is sought. This search continues until the difference between the input measured radiographs or projections and the simulated or calculated projections is satisfactorily small

  11. Cardiac blood pool emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itti, R.; Philippe, L.; Lorgeron, J.M.; Charbonnier, B.; Raynaud, P.; Brochier, M.

    1983-01-01

    After blood pool labeling using technetium-99m, a series of cardiac pictures is acquired during the rotation of a gamma-camera about the patient. Computer processing leads to reconstruction of various tomographic slices from the original planar projection. Electrocardiographic gating selects the different phases of the cardiac cycle. Individual slices through the left ventricular region are added in order to provide ''thick'' slices on which global and regional parameters of the left ventricular function can be determined. Due to the proportionality existing between count rates and labeled blood volumes, any geometrical model can be avoided. The delineation of regions of interest for count integration is made easier due to the absence of superimposition of structures; no correction for background is necessary. Tomography thus appears to be more consistent and more accurate than the classical methods using planar projections. In addition, right ventricular morphological and kinetic studies can be performed in the same conditions as for the left ventricle [fr

  12. Reconstruction of an InAs nanowire using geometric tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennington, Robert S.; König, Stefan; Alpers, Andreas

    Geometric tomography and conventional algebraic tomography algorithms are used to reconstruct cross-sections of an InAs nanowire from a tilt series of experimental annular dark-field images. Both algorithms are also applied to a test object to assess what factors affect the reconstruction quality....... When using the present algorithms, geometric tomography is faster, but artifacts in the reconstruction may be difficult to recognize....

  13. Image reconstruction. Application to transverse axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubry, Florent.

    1977-09-01

    A method of computerized tridimensional image reconstruction from their projection, especially in the computerized transverse axial tomography is suggested. First, the different techniques actually developped and presented in the literature are analyzed. Then, the equipment used is briefly described. The reconstruction algorithm developped is presented. This algorithm is based on the convolution method, well adapted to the real conditions of exploitation. It is an extension of SHEPP and LOGAN's algorithm. A correction of the self absorption and of the detector's response is proposed. Finally, the first results obtained which are satisfactory are given. The simplicity of the method which does not need a too long computation time makes possible the implementation of the algorithm on a mini-computer [fr

  14. Interactive reconstruction in single-photon tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.R.; Wallis, J.W.; Wilson, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    A new method is described to allow interactive selection of the reconstruction filter at the time of interpretation of images from single-photon tomography. In the filtered back projection algorithm, the only part of the reconstruction process requiring user interaction is the selection of the window function. Since the ramp and window filters have different purposes, they can be separated, placing the window at the end of the reconstruction process as a three-dimensional filter. All stages of reconstruction except the window filtering are performed before the physician begins to interpret the study. The three-dimensional filtering is performed very rapidly with use of the Chebyshev convolution algorithm. A 64 x 64 x 64 pixel cube of data is filtered in 13-33 s using filters of 3-11 lengths. Smaller volumes of image data can be filtered in less than 1 s; thus, the user can interactively choose any desired filter for a given tomographic study at the time of interpretation of the images. (orig.)

  15. Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography: Background corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, Carey E.; Sharma, Amy C.; Bender, Janelle E.; Kapadia, Anuj J.; Xia, Jessie Q.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kiser, Matthew R.; Crowell, Alexander S.; Pedroni, Ronald S.; Macri, Robert A.; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Howell, Calvin R.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is an imaging technique that provides an in-vivo tomographic spectroscopic image of the distribution of elements in a body. To achieve this, a neutron beam illuminates the body. Nuclei in the body along the path of the beam are stimulated by inelastic scattering of the neutrons in the beam and emit characteristic gamma photons whose unique energy identifies the element. The emitted gammas are collected in a spectrometer and form a projection intensity for each spectral line at the projection orientation of the neutron beam. Rotating and translating either the body or the beam will allow a tomographic projection set to be acquired. Images are reconstructed to represent the spatial distribution of elements in the body. Critical to this process is the appropriate removal of background gamma events from the spectrum. Here we demonstrate the equivalence of two background correction techniques and discuss the appropriate application of each

  16. Quantification in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this lecture is to understand the possibilities and limitations of the quantitative analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. It is also to identify the conditions to be fulfilled to obtain reliable quantitative measurements from images. Content: 1 - Introduction: Quantification in emission tomography - definition and challenges; quantification biasing phenomena; 2 - quantification in SPECT, problems and correction methods: Attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution, partial volume effect, movement, tomographic reconstruction, calibration; 3 - Synthesis: actual quantification accuracy; 4 - Beyond the activity concentration measurement

  17. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Yano, Y.; Mathis, C.A.; Moyer, B.R.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) offers the opportunity to noninvasively measure heart muscle blood perfusion, oxygen utilization, metabolism of fatty acids, sugars and amino acids. This paper reviews physiological principles which are basic to PET instrumentation for imaging the heart and gives examples of the application of positron emission tomography for measuring myocardial flow and metabolism. 33 references, 11 figures, 1 table

  18. Improved positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of rings of detectors positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom, and a plurality of scintillation crystals positioned relative to the photomultiplier tubes whereby each tube is responsive to more than one crystal. Each alternate crystal in the ring may be offset by one-half or less of the thickness of the crystal such that the staggered crystals are seen by more than one photomultiplier tube. This sharing of crystals and photomultiplier tubes allows identification of the staggered crystal and the use of smaller detectors shared by larger photomultiplier tubes thereby requiring less photomultiplier tubes, creating more scanning slices, providing better data sampling, and reducing the cost of the camera. (author)

  19. Positron emission tomography and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabriat, H.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT 2 serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET

  20. Positron emission tomography basic sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, D W; Valk, P E; Maisey, M N

    2003-01-01

    Essential for students, science and medical graduates who want to understand the basic science of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this book describes the physics, chemistry, technology and overview of the clinical uses behind the science of PET and the imaging techniques it uses. In recent years, PET has moved from high-end research imaging tool used by the highly specialized to an essential component of clinical evaluation in the clinic, especially in cancer management. Previously being the realm of scientists, this book explains PET instrumentation, radiochemistry, PET data acquisition and image formation, integration of structural and functional images, radiation dosimetry and protection, and applications in dedicated areas such as drug development, oncology, and gene expression imaging. The technologist, the science, engineering or chemistry graduate seeking further detailed information about PET, or the medical advanced trainee wishing to gain insight into the basic science of PET will find this book...

  1. Cone beam tomography of the heart using single-photon emission-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Christian, P.E.; Zeng, G.L.; Datz, F.L.; Morgan, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The authors evaluated cone beam single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) of the heart. A new cone beam reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct data collected from short scan acquisitions (of slightly more than 180 degrees) of a detector anteriorally traversing a noncircular orbit. The less than 360 degrees acquisition was used to minimize the attenuation artifacts that result from reconstructing posterior projections of 201T1 emissions from the heart. The algorithm includes a new method for reconstructing truncated projections of background tissue activity that eliminates reconstruction ring artifacts. Phantom and patient results are presented which compare a high-resolution cone beam collimator (50-cm focal length; 6.0-mm full width at half maximum [FWHM] at 10 cm) to a low-energy general purpose (LEGP) parallel hole collimator (8.2-mm FWHM at 10 cm) which is 1.33 times more sensitive. The cone beam tomographic results are free of reconstruction artifacts and show improved spatial and contrast resolution over that obtained with the LEGP parallel hole collimator. The limited angular sampling restrictions and truncation problems associated with cone beam tomography do not deter from obtaining diagnostic information. However, even though these preliminary results are encouraging, a thorough clinical study is still needed to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of cone beam tomography

  2. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd, E-mail: azhani@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Abdullah, Jaafar, E-mail: jaafar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Plant Assessment Technology (PAT) Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  3. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm

  4. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  5. Positron emission tomography with Positome, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nukui, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Feindel, W.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with Positome II using 68 Ga-EDTA was performed in cases with brain tumor and cerebral arteriovenous malformation. A significant focal uptake in static study and hemodynamic changes in dynamic study were noted in all cases except one case with intracranial lipoma. Comparing this method with sup(99m) Tc-pertechnetate cerebral image study and computerized axial tomography, the diagnostic rate for detecting brain tumor was almost equal in all of these three methods. However, detecting and localizing was easier and clearer in static positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA than in sup(99m) Tc-pertechnetate cerebral image and computerized axial tomography without infusion of contrast medium. Furthermore, static positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA was superior to computerized axial tomography without infusion of contrast medium for detecting cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Concerning dynamic positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA, semiquantitative values obtained by this method correlated well with findings of computerized axial tomography and was thought to be more precise and in detail than the findings of sup(99m) Tc-pertechnetate cerebral image study. Summation of the previous studies about dynamic positron emission tomography with 77 Kr in occlusive cerebrovascular disease is also reported. In conclusion, static positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-EDTA is a very useful diagnostic method for detecting and localizing brain tumor and cerebral arteriovenous malformation without any attendant complications. Furthermore, a good combination of static and dynamic positron emission tomography and computerized axial tomography appear to be outstandingly effective for not only detecting the lesion but also understanding the pathophysiological aspect in cases with various intracranial lesions. (author)

  6. Positron emission tomography in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, R.; Bentourkia, M.; Benard, F.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography is a sophisticated molecular imaging technique, using a special scanner, that displays the functional status of tissues in the body at the cellular level (their metabolism). It is a diagnostic scan that provides the physician with information not available with traditional anatomic studies such as CT or MRI. PET can detect changes in cell function (disease) long before they are evident as physical (anatomic) changes seen on CT or MRI. In this way PET can add important information about many diseases allowing the physician to make a diagnosis often much earlier than with anatomic imaging techniques such as CT or MRI alone. In addition, in cases where an abnormality is noted on CT or MRI, PET can help differentiate benign changes from changes due to disease. PET scanning also typically images the entire body, unlike CT/MRI which is usually broken up into specific limited body section scans. All cells use glucose as an energy source but cancer cells use much more since they are growing much faster and out of control. This is the basis of imaging with F-18 FDG glucose, the radiotracer agent use in a PET oncology study. The abnormal, accelerated glucose used by cancer cells is detected by the PET scanner that processes the emissions from the F-18 FDG glucose by abnormally high levels of metabolism (tumor)

  7. A continuation method for emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Zubal, I.G.

    1993-01-01

    One approach to improved reconstructions in emission tomography has been the incorporation of additional source information via Gibbs priors that assume a source f that is piecewise smooth. A natural Gibbs prior for expressing such constraints is an energy function E(f,l) defined on binary valued line processes l as well as f. MAP estimation leads to the difficult problem of minimizing a mixed (continuous and binary) variable objective function. Previous approaches have used Gibbs 'potential' functions, φ(f v ) and φ(f h ), defined solely on spatial derivatives, f v and f h , of the source. These φ functions implicitly incorporate line processes, but only in an approximate manner. The correct φ function, φ * , consistent with the use of line processes, leads to difficult minimization problems. In this work, the authors present a method wherein the correct φ * function is approached through a sequence of smooth φ functions. This is the essence of a continuation method in which the minimum of the energy function corresponding to one member of the φ function sequence is used as an initial condition for the minimization of the next, less approximate, stage. The continuation method is implemented using a GEM-ICM procedure. Simulation results show improvement using the continuation method relative to using φ * alone, and to conventional EM reconstructions

  8. Iterative Reconstruction Methods for Hybrid Inverse Problems in Impedance Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kristoffer; Knudsen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    For a general formulation of hybrid inverse problems in impedance tomography the Picard and Newton iterative schemes are adapted and four iterative reconstruction algorithms are developed. The general problem formulation includes several existing hybrid imaging modalities such as current density...... impedance imaging, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography, and ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography, and the unified approach to the reconstruction problem encompasses several algorithms suggested in the literature. The four proposed algorithms are implemented numerically in two...

  9. Advanced reconstruction algorithms for electron tomography: From comparison to combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goris, B. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Roelandts, T. [Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Batenburg, K.J. [Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, NL-1098XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heidari Mezerji, H. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Bals, S., E-mail: sara.bals@ua.ac.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2013-04-15

    In this work, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), the total variation minimization (TVM) reconstruction technique and the discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) for electron tomography are compared and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Furthermore, we describe how the result of a three dimensional (3D) reconstruction based on TVM can provide objective information that is needed as the input for a DART reconstruction. This approach results in a tomographic reconstruction of which the segmentation is carried out in an objective manner. - Highlights: ► A comparative study between different reconstruction algorithms for tomography is performed. ► Reconstruction algorithms that uses prior knowledge about the specimen have a superior result. ► One reconstruction algorithm can provide the prior knowledge for a second algorithm.

  10. Greedy algorithms for diffuse optical tomography reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileep, B. P. V.; Das, Tapan; Dutta, Pranab K.

    2018-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive imaging modality that reconstructs the optical parameters of a highly scattering medium. However, the inverse problem of DOT is ill-posed and highly nonlinear due to the zig-zag propagation of photons that diffuses through the cross section of tissue. The conventional DOT imaging methods iteratively compute the solution of forward diffusion equation solver which makes the problem computationally expensive. Also, these methods fail when the geometry is complex. Recently, the theory of compressive sensing (CS) has received considerable attention because of its efficient use in biomedical imaging applications. The objective of this paper is to solve a given DOT inverse problem by using compressive sensing framework and various Greedy algorithms such as orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP), and stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), regularized orthogonal matching pursuit (ROMP) and simultaneous orthogonal matching pursuit (S-OMP) have been studied to reconstruct the change in the absorption parameter i.e, Δα from the boundary data. Also, the Greedy algorithms have been validated experimentally on a paraffin wax rectangular phantom through a well designed experimental set up. We also have studied the conventional DOT methods like least square method and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) for comparison. One of the main features of this work is the usage of less number of source-detector pairs, which can facilitate the use of DOT in routine applications of screening. The performance metrics such as mean square error (MSE), normalized mean square error (NMSE), structural similarity index (SSIM), and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) have been used to evaluate the performance of the algorithms mentioned in this paper. Extensive simulation results confirm that CS based DOT reconstruction outperforms the conventional DOT imaging methods in terms of

  11. Positron emission tomography in neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, W D; Herholz, K; Pawlik, G; Wagner, R; Wienhard, K

    1986-01-01

    By positron emission tomography (PET) of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMRGl) can be measured in man. Normal values in cerebral cortex and basal ganglia range from 35 to 50 mumol/100 g/min, the values in gray matter structures of the posterior fossa were 25-30 mumol/100 g/min, the lowest LCMRGl was found in the white matter (15-20 mumol/100 g/min). During sensory stimulation by various modalities functional activation increases LCMRGl in the respective special areas, while sleep decreases metabolic rate in all cortical and basal gray matter structures. In many neurological disorders CMRGl is altered in a disease-specific pattern. In dementia of the Alzheimer type CMRGl is impaired even in early stages with accentuation in the parieto-temporal cortex, while in multi-infarct dementia glucose uptake is mainly reduced in the multifocal small infarcts. In Huntington's chorea the most conspicuous changes are found in the caudate nucleus and putamen. In cases of focal lesions (e.g. ischemic infarcts) metabolic disturbances extend far beyond the site of the primary lesion and inactivation of metabolism is found in intact brain structures far away from the anatomical lesion. Additional applications of PET include determination of the metabolism of various substrates, of protein synthesis, of function and distribution of receptors, of tumor growth and of the distribution of drugs as well as the measurement of oxygen consumption, blood flow and blood volume.

  12. Positron emission tomography in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Goto, Ikuo

    1989-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed with the 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose method on 29 patients with epilepsy (generalized epilepsy, 4; partial epilepsy, 24; undetermined type, 1). The subjects were restricted to patients with epilepsy without focal abnormality on X-CT. All the patients with generalized epilepsy showed a normal pattern on PET. Fourteen out of the 24 patients with partial epilepsy and the 1 with epilepsy of undermined type showed focal hypometabolism on PET. The hypometabolic zone was localized in areas including the temporal cortex in 11 patients, frontal in 2 and thalamus in 1. The location of hypometabolic zone and that of interictal paroxysmal activity on EEG were well correlated in most patients. The patients with poorly-controlled seizure showed a higher incidence of PET abnormality (12 out of 13) than those with well-controlled seizures (2 out of 11). The incidence of abnormality on PET and MRI and the location of both abnormality were not necessarily coincident. These results indicated that the PET examination in epilepsy provides valuable information about the location of epileptic focus, and that the findings on PET in patients with partial epilepsy may be one of the good indicators about the intractability of partial epilepsy, and that PET and MRI provide complementary information in the diagnosis of epilepsy. (author)

  13. Method of multiplanar emission tomography and apparatus therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, S.C.; Smith, K.A.; Wake, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    A method of emission tomography using a gamma camera and a rotating collimator having an array of a large number of slanted, small diameter holes. A planar projection corresponding to each angular orientation assumed by the collimator is recorded. From these series of planar projections, a three-dimensional simulation model is reconstructed by an iterative algorithm which approximates the emitting object. The simulated model comprises multiple separable planes

  14. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, PH

    Radiopharmaceutical chemistry includes the selection, preparation, and preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled compounds. This paper describes selection criteria for candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Practical aspects of nucleophilic and electrophilic

  15. Development of emission computed tomography in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, E.

    1984-01-01

    Two positron emission computed tomography (PCT) devices developed in Japan are described. One is for head and the other for wholebody. The devices show fairly quantitative images with slight modifications of the existing algorithms because they were developed based on filtered back-projection. The PCT device seems to be better than the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) since it provides adequade compensation for photon attenuation in patients. (M.A.C.) [pt

  16. Dynamic emission tomography of regional cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassen, N.A.

    1984-01-01

    The author reviews three tomographic methods for measuring the regional cerebral blood flow: single photon transmission tomography; dual photon emission tomography; and single photon emission tomography. The latter technique is discussed in detail. (Auth.)

  17. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ''ultimate'' scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length (≤ 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times ≤ 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so ≤5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ''fully-3D'' cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm

  18. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in Disseminated Cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Singhal, Abhinav; Mallick, Saumya Ranjan; Tripathi, Madhavi; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis without pulmonary involvement is a very rare phenomenon. Patterns of organ involvement in cryptococcosis resemble various other infective conditions as well as malignant conditions on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient who had disseminated cryptococcosis. The rarity of the case being noninvolvement of lungs and meninges and resembling more like lymphoma due to the diffuse involvement of the lymph nodes on both sides of the diaphragm.

  19. A genetic approach to shape reconstruction in limited data tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcanu, C.; Craciunescu, T.

    2001-01-01

    The paper proposes a new method for shape reconstruction in computerized tomography. Unlike nuclear medicine applications, in physical science problems we are often confronted with limited data sets: constraints in the number of projections or limited view angles . The problem of image reconstruction from projection may be considered as a problem of finding an image (solution) having projections that match the experimental ones. In our approach, we choose a statistical correlation coefficient to evaluate the fitness of any potential solution. The optimization process is carried out by a genetic algorithm. The algorithm has some features common to all genetic algorithms but also some problem-oriented characteristics. One of them is that a chromosome, representing a potential solution, is not linear but coded as a matrix of pixels corresponding to a two-dimensional image. This kind of internal representation reflects the genuine manifestation and slight differences between two points situated in the original problem space give rise to similar differences once they become coded. Another particular feature is a newly built crossover operator: the grid-based crossover, suitable for high dimension two-dimensional chromosomes. Except for the population size and the dimension of the cutting grid for the grid-based crossover, all the other parameters of the algorithm are independent of the geometry of the tomographic reconstruction. The performances of the method are evaluated on a phantom typical for an application with limited data sets: the determination of the neutron energy spectra with time resolution in case of short-pulsed neutron emission. A genetic reconstruction is presented. The qualitative judgement and also the quantitative one, based on some figures of merit, point out that the proposed method ensures an improved reconstruction of shapes, sizes and resolution in the image, even in the presence of noise. (authors)

  20. Attenuation Correction Strategies for Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and 4-Dimensional Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Tinsu; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses attenuation correction strategies in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and 4 dimensional PET/CT imaging. Average CT scan derived from averaging the high temporal resolution CT images is effective in improving the registration of the CT and the PET images and quantification of the PET data. It underscores list mode data acquisition in 4 dimensional PET and introduces 4 dimensional CT popular in thoracic treatment planning to 4 dimensional PET/CT. ...

  1. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanning for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although the site of nosocomial sepsis in the critically ill ventilated patient is usually identifiable, it may remain occult, despite numerous investigations. The rapid results and precise anatomical location of the septic source using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, in combination with computed ...

  2. Emission tomography: quantitative aspects in metabolic and physiopathologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yerouchalmi-Soussaline, F.

    1984-11-01

    This thesis presents instrumental and data processing studies developped in emission tomography in man, using gamma and positron emitting tracers. High contrast visualisation of volume distribution of tracers in the organs, kinetic studies and measurements of radioactive concentration or of other clinical parameters necessitate a detailed analysis of all physical factors limiting the accuracy of the measure; therefore, development of adapted imaging devices and data processing techniques, together with models describing correctly the phenomena under study are to be carried out. Thus, in single photon (gamma) emission tomography an image reconstruction strategy is elaborated, based on an analytical model for the ill-posed problem including the attenuation effect. In positron emission tomography, the time-of-flight information combined with the reconstruction technique is used in the design of a first prototype imaging device which performance is presented and evaluated in a clinical environment. Moreover, a priori or a posteriori techniques correcting for Compton diffusion events, limited statistics and limited resolutions, are proposed and discussed for the improvement of regional measurement accuracy, in metabolic and physiopathologic studies [fr

  3. Optimisation and validation of a 3D reconstruction algorithm for single photon emission computed tomography by means of GATE simulation platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bitar, Ziad

    2006-12-01

    Although time consuming, Monte-Carlo simulations remain an efficient tool enabling to assess correction methods for degrading physical effects in medical imaging. We have optimized and validated a reconstruction method baptized F3DMC (Fully 3D Monte Carlo) in which the physical effects degrading the image formation process were modelled using Monte-Carlo methods and integrated within the system matrix. We used the Monte-Carlo simulation toolbox GATE. We validated GATE in SPECT by modelling the gamma-camera (Philips AXIS) used in clinical routine. Techniques of threshold, filtering by a principal component analysis and targeted reconstruction (functional regions, hybrid regions) were used in order to improve the precision of the system matrix and to reduce the number of simulated photons as well as the time consumption required. The EGEE Grid infrastructures were used to deploy the GATE simulations in order to reduce their computation time. Results obtained with F3DMC were compared with the reconstruction methods (FBP, ML-EM, MLEMC) for a simulated phantom and with the OSEM-C method for the real phantom. Results have shown that the F3DMC method and its variants improve the restoration of activity ratios and the signal to noise ratio. By the use of the grid EGEE, a significant speed-up factor of about 300 was obtained. These results should be confirmed by performing studies on complex phantoms and patients and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be used in SPECT and also in PET. (author)

  4. Positron emission tomography studies of brain receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziere, B.; Maziere, M.

    1991-01-01

    Probing the regional distribution and affinity of receptors in the brain, in vivo, in human and non human primates has become possible with the use of selective ligands labelled with positron emitting radionuclides and positron emission tomography (PET). After describing the techniques used in positron emission tomography to characterize a ligand receptor binding and discussing the choice of the label and the limitations and complexities of the in vivo approach, the results obtained in the PET studies of various neurotransmission systems: dopaminergic, opiate, benzodiazepine, serotonin and cholinergic systems are reviewed

  5. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua

    2001-01-01

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  6. Positron emission tomography in brain function study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hua

    2006-01-01

    Little has been recognized about the advanced brain function. Recent years several new techniques such as event-related potentials, megnetoencephalography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) have been used in the study of brain function. The methodology, application study in normal people and clinical patients of PET in brain function are reviewed. (authors)

  7. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Yano, Y.; Moyer, B.R.; Mathis, C.A.; Ganz, E.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart can measure blood perfusion, metabolism of fatty acids, metabolism of sugars, uptake of amino acids and can quantitate infarction volume. The principles which are basic to PET instrumentation and procedures for quantitative studies of the heart muscle with examples of measurements of myocardial flow and metabolism, are reviewed

  8. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Yano, Y.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Moyer, B.R.; Mathis, C.A.; Ganz, E.; Knittel, B.

    1983-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart can measure blood perfusion, metabolism of fatty acids, metabolism of sugars, uptake of amino acids and can quantitate infarction volume. The principles are reviewed which are basic to PET instrumentation and procedures for quantitative studies of human physiology with examples of measurements of myocardial flow and metabolism

  9. Is positron emission tomography useful in stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeReuck, J; Leys, D; DeKeyser, J

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in the study of stroke and related cerebrovascular diseases. It has shown the various stages leading to cerebral infarction and defined the significance of the ischaemic penumbra. PET scan can predict the clinical outcome of patients with acute

  10. Positron emission tomography in malignant haematological disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, Bartholomeus Wilhelmus

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a diagnostic technique with a promising role especially in the haemato-oncology. Although its use in the management ; of malignant lymphoma seems to be established already, much about the true potential and drawbacks of FDG-PET in this disease are still unknown.

  11. Positron emission tomography applied to fluidization engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dechsiri, C; Ghione, A; van de Wiel, F; Dehling, HG; Paans, AMJ; Hoffmann, AC

    The movement of particles in a laboratory fluidized bed has been studied using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). With this non-invasive technique both pulses of various shapes and single tracer particles were followed in 3-D. The equipment and materials used made it possible to label actual bed

  12. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  13. Geometric reconstruction methods for electron tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpers, Andreas; Gardner, Richard J.; König, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Electron tomography is becoming an increasingly important tool in materials science for studying the three-dimensional morphologies and chemical compositions of nanostructures. The image quality obtained by many current algorithms is seriously affected by the problems of missing wedge artefacts...... and discuss several algorithms from the mathematical fields of geometric and discrete tomography. The algorithms incorporate geometric prior knowledge (mainly convexity and homogeneity), which also in principle considerably reduces the number of tilt angles required. Results are discussed...

  14. Bayesian image reconstruction for improving detection performance of muon tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guobao; Schultz, Larry J; Qi, Jinyi

    2009-05-01

    Muon tomography is a novel technology that is being developed for detecting high-Z materials in vehicles or cargo containers. Maximum likelihood methods have been developed for reconstructing the scattering density image from muon measurements. However, the instability of maximum likelihood estimation often results in noisy images and low detectability of high-Z targets. In this paper, we propose using regularization to improve the image quality of muon tomography. We formulate the muon reconstruction problem in a Bayesian framework by introducing a prior distribution on scattering density images. An iterative shrinkage algorithm is derived to maximize the log posterior distribution. At each iteration, the algorithm obtains the maximum a posteriori update by shrinking an unregularized maximum likelihood update. Inverse quadratic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Laplacian priors and inverse cubic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Gaussian priors. Receiver operating characteristic studies using simulated data demonstrate that the Bayesian reconstruction can greatly improve the detection performance of muon tomography.

  15. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed tomography system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect the...

  16. Positron emission tomography - a new approach to brain chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Positron emission tomography permits examination of the chemistry of the brain in living beings. Until recently, positron emission tomography had been considered a research tool, but it is rapidly moving into clinical practice. This report describes the uses and applications of positron emission tomography in examinations of patients with strokes, epilepsy, malignancies, dementias, and schizophrenia and in basic studies of synaptic neurotransmission

  17. A comparison of quantitative reconstruction techniques for PIXE-tomography analysis applied to biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, D.G., E-mail: dgbeasley@ctn.ist.utl.pt [IST/C2TN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [IST/C2TN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Barberet, Ph.; Bourret, S.; Devès, G.; Gordillo, N.; Michelet, C. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Le Trequesser, Q. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Marques, A.C. [IST/IPFN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Seznec, H. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Silva, R.C. da [IST/IPFN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal)

    2014-07-15

    The tomographic reconstruction of biological specimens requires robust algorithms, able to deal with low density contrast and low element concentrations. At the IST/ITN microprobe facility new GPU-accelerated reconstruction software, JPIXET, has been developed, which can significantly increase the speed of quantitative reconstruction of Proton Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) data. It has a user-friendly graphical user interface for pre-processing, data analysis and reconstruction of PIXE-T and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T). The reconstruction of PIXE-T data is performed using either an algorithm based on a GPU-accelerated version of the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximisation (MLEM) method or a GPU-accelerated version of the Discrete Image Space Reconstruction Algorithm (DISRA) (Sakellariou (2001) [2]). The original DISRA, its accelerated version, and the MLEM algorithm, were compared for the reconstruction of a biological sample of Caenorhabditis elegans – a small worm. This sample was analysed at the microbeam line of the AIFIRA facility of CENBG, Bordeaux. A qualitative PIXE-T reconstruction was obtained using the CENBG software package TomoRebuild (Habchi et al. (2013) [6]). The effects of pre-processing and experimental conditions on the elemental concentrations are discussed.

  18. DART: a practical reconstruction algorithm for discrete tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, Kees Joost; Sijbers, Jan

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present an iterative reconstruction algorithm for discrete tomography, called discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART). DART can be applied if the scanned object is known to consist of only a few different compositions, each corresponding to a constant gray value in the reconstruction. Prior knowledge of the gray values for each of the compositions is exploited to steer the current reconstruction towards a reconstruction that contains only these gray values. Based on experiments with both simulated CT data and experimental μCT data, it is shown that DART is capable of computing more accurate reconstructions from a small number of projection images, or from a small angular range, than alternative methods. It is also shown that DART can deal effectively with noisy projection data and that the algorithm is robust with respect to errors in the estimation of the gray values.

  19. Image Reconstruction For Bioluminescence Tomography From Partial Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, M.; Zhou, T.; Cheng, J. T.; Cong, W. X.; Wang, Ge

    2007-01-01

    The bioluminescence tomography is a novel molecular imaging technology for small animal studies. Known reconstruction methods require the completely measured data on the external surface, although only partially measured data is available in practice. In this work, we formulate a mathematical model for BLT from partial data and generalize our previous results on the solution uniqueness to the partial data case. Then we extend two of our reconstruction methods for BLT to this case. The first m...

  20. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krehl, Jonas; Lubk, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction

  1. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehl, Jonas, E-mail: Jonas.Krehl@triebenberg.de; Lubk, Axel

    2015-03-15

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction.

  2. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  3. Filter-based reconstruction methods for tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelt, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    In X-ray tomography, a three-dimensional image of the interior of an object is computed from multiple X-ray images, acquired over a range of angles. Two types of methods are commonly used to compute such an image: analytical methods and iterative methods. Analytical methods are computationally

  4. Robust statistical reconstruction for charged particle tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Larry Joe; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Morris, Christopher; Orum, John Christopher; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Sossong, Michael James; Hengartner, Nicolas W

    2013-10-08

    Systems and methods for charged particle detection including statistical reconstruction of object volume scattering density profiles from charged particle tomographic data to determine the probability distribution of charged particle scattering using a statistical multiple scattering model and determine a substantially maximum likelihood estimate of object volume scattering density using expectation maximization (ML/EM) algorithm to reconstruct the object volume scattering density. The presence of and/or type of object occupying the volume of interest can be identified from the reconstructed volume scattering density profile. The charged particle tomographic data can be cosmic ray muon tomographic data from a muon tracker for scanning packages, containers, vehicles or cargo. The method can be implemented using a computer program which is executable on a computer.

  5. Image reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, D.W.; Defrise, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-ray but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes. This report reviews the historical and physical basis of medical imaging techniques using positron-emitting radioisotopes. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimensional distributions of radioisotopes to be reconstructed from projection data (sinograms) acquired by detectors suitably positioned around the patient are discussed. The extension of conventional two-dimensional tomographic reconstruction algorithms to fully three-dimensional reconstruction is described in detail. (orig.)

  6. Adaptive multiresolution method for MAP reconstruction in electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Erman, E-mail: erman.acar@tut.fi [Department of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); BioMediTech, Tampere University of Technology, Biokatu 10, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Peltonen, Sari; Ruotsalainen, Ulla [Department of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); BioMediTech, Tampere University of Technology, Biokatu 10, 33520 Tampere (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    3D image reconstruction with electron tomography holds problems due to the severely limited range of projection angles and low signal to noise ratio of the acquired projection images. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction methods have been successful in compensating for the missing information and suppressing noise with their intrinsic regularization techniques. There are two major problems in MAP reconstruction methods: (1) selection of the regularization parameter that controls the balance between the data fidelity and the prior information, and (2) long computation time. One aim of this study is to provide an adaptive solution to the regularization parameter selection problem without having additional knowledge about the imaging environment and the sample. The other aim is to realize the reconstruction using sequences of resolution levels to shorten the computation time. The reconstructions were analyzed in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency using a simulated biological phantom and publically available experimental datasets of electron tomography. The numerical and visual evaluations of the experiments show that the adaptive multiresolution method can provide more accurate results than the weighted back projection (WBP), simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), and sequential MAP expectation maximization (sMAPEM) method. The method is superior to sMAPEM also in terms of computation time and usability since it can reconstruct 3D images significantly faster without requiring any parameter to be set by the user. - Highlights: • An adaptive multiresolution reconstruction method is introduced for electron tomography. • The method provides more accurate results than the conventional reconstruction methods. • The missing wedge and noise problems can be compensated by the method efficiently.

  7. Respiratory synchronization for lung tumors exploration by positon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotus, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a medical imaging technique that requires several minutes of acquisition to get an image. PET images are thus severely affected by the respiratory motion of the patient, which introduces a blur in the images. Techniques consisting in gating the PET acquisition as a function of the patient respiration exist and reduce the respiratory blur in the PET images. However, these techniques increase the noise in the reconstructed images. The aim of this work was to propose a method for respiratory motion compensation that would not enhance the noise in the PET images, without increasing the acquisition duration nor estimating the deformation field associated with the respiratory motion. We proposed 2 original spatio-temporal (4D) reconstruction algorithms of gated PET images. These 2 methods take advantage of the temporal correlation between the images corresponding to the different breathing phases. The performances of these techniques were evaluated and compared to classic approaches using phantom data and simulated data. The results showed that the 4D reconstructions increase the signal-to-noise ratio compared to the classic reconstructions while maintaining the reduction of the respiratory blur. For a fixed acquisition duration, the 4D reconstructions can thus yield gated images that are almost free of respiratory blur and of the same quality in terms of noise level as the ones obtained without respiratory gating. The clinical feasibility of the proposed techniques was also demonstrated. (author) [fr

  8. Emission computed tomography: methodology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Greenberg, J.; Fowler, J.; Christman, D.; Rosenquist, A.; Rintelmann, W.; Hand, P.; MacGregor, R.; Wolf, A.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for the determination of local cerebral glucose metabolism using positron emission computed tomography is described as an example of the development of use of this methodology for the study of these parameters in man. The method for the determination of local cerebral glucose metabolism utilizes 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([ 18 F]-FDG). In this method [ 18 F]-FDG is used as a tracer for the exchange of glucose between plasma and brain and its phosphorylation by hexokinase in the tissue. The labelled product of metabolism, [ 18 F]-FDG phosphate, is essentially trapped in the tissue over the time course of the measurement. The studies demonstrate the potential usefulness of emission computed tomography for the measurement of various biochemical and physiological parameters in man. (Auth.)

  9. Positron emission tomography tracers for imaging angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubner, Roland; Beer, Ambros J.; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Position emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis may provide non-invasive insights into the corresponding molecular processes and may be applied for individualized treatment planning of antiangiogenic therapies. At the moment, most strategies are focusing on the development of radiolabelled proteins and antibody formats targeting VEGF and its receptor or the ED-B domain of a fibronectin isoform as well as radiolabelled matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or α v β 3 integrin antagonists. Great efforts are being made to develop suitable tracers for different target structures. All of the major strategies focusing on the development of radiolabelled compounds for use with positron emission tomography are summarized in this review. However, because the most intensive work is concentrated on the development of radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging α v β 3 expression, which has successfully made its way from bench to bedside, these developments are especially emphasized. (orig.)

  10. Positron emission tomography in movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Positron emission tomography provides a method for the quantitation of regional function within the living human brain. Studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow in patients with Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and focal dystonia have revealed functional abnormalities within substructures of the basal ganglia. Recent developments permit assessment of both pre-synaptic and post-synaptic function ion dopaminergic pathways. These techniques are now being applied to studies of movement disorders in human subjects

  11. Positron emission tomography in movement disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, W R.W.

    1985-02-01

    Positron emission tomography provides a method for the quantitation of regional function within the living human brain. Studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow in patients with Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and focal dystonia have revealed functional abnormalities within substructures of the basal ganglia. Recent developments permit assessment of both pre-synaptic and post-synaptic function in dopaminergic pathways. These techniques are now being applied to studies of movement disorders in human subjects.

  12. Positron emission tomography imaging--technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Karp, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Positron imaging instrumentation has improved rapidly in the last few years. Scanners currently under development are beginning to approach fundamental limits set by positron range and noncolinearity effects. This report reviews the latest developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation, emphasizing the development of coding schemes that reduce the complexity and cost of high-resolution scanners. The relative benefits of using time-of-flight (TOF) information is discussed as well. 68 references

  13. Resolving ambiguities in reconstructed grain maps using discrete tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpers, A.; Knudsen, E.; Poulsen, H.F.

    2005-01-01

    reconstruct the image from diffraction data, but they are often unable to assign unambiguous values to all pixels. We present an approach that resolves these ambiguous pixels by using a Monte Carlo technique that exploits the discrete nature of the problem and utilizes proven methods of discrete tomography...

  14. ADART: an adaptive algebraic reconstruction algorithm for discrete tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Deusto, F Javier; Scavello, Giovanni; Pizarro, Joaquín; Galindo, Pedro L

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we suggest an algorithm based on the Discrete Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (DART) which is capable of computing high quality reconstructions from substantially fewer projections than required for conventional continuous tomography. Adaptive DART (ADART) goes a step further than DART on the reduction of the number of unknowns of the associated linear system achieving a significant reduction in the pixel error rate of reconstructed objects. The proposed methodology automatically adapts the border definition criterion at each iteration, resulting in a reduction of the number of pixels belonging to the border, and consequently of the number of unknowns in the general algebraic reconstruction linear system to be solved, being this reduction specially important at the final stage of the iterative process. Experimental results show that reconstruction errors are considerably reduced using ADART when compared to original DART, both in clean and noisy environments.

  15. Attenuation correction in emission tomography using the emission data—A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berker, Yannick, E-mail: berker@mail.med.upenn.edu; Li, Yusheng [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The problem of attenuation correction (AC) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) had been considered solved to a large extent after the commercial availability of devices combining PET with computed tomography (CT) in 2001; single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has seen a similar development. However, stimulated in particular by technical advances toward clinical systems combining PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), research interest in alternative approaches for PET AC has grown substantially in the last years. In this comprehensive literature review, the authors first present theoretical results with relevance to simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity. The authors then look back at the early history of this research area especially in PET; since this history is closely interwoven with that of similar approaches in SPECT, these will also be covered. We then review algorithmic advances in PET, including analytic and iterative algorithms. The analytic approaches are either based on the Helgason–Ludwig data consistency conditions of the Radon transform, or generalizations of John’s partial differential equation; with respect to iterative methods, we discuss maximum likelihood reconstruction of attenuation and activity (MLAA), the maximum likelihood attenuation correction factors (MLACF) algorithm, and their offspring. The description of methods is followed by a structured account of applications for simultaneous reconstruction techniques: this discussion covers organ-specific applications, applications specific to PET/MRI, applications using supplemental transmission information, and motion-aware applications. After briefly summarizing SPECT applications, we consider recent developments using emission data other than unscattered photons. In summary, developments using time-of-flight (TOF) PET emission data for AC have shown promising advances and open a wide range of applications. These techniques may both remedy

  16. A fast sparse reconstruction algorithm for electrical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jia; Xu, Yanbin; Tan, Chao; Dong, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Electrical tomography (ET) has been widely investigated due to its advantages of being non-radiative, low-cost and high-speed. However, the image reconstruction of ET is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem and the imaging results are easily affected by measurement noise. A sparse reconstruction algorithm based on L 1 regularization is robust to noise and consequently provides a high quality of reconstructed images. In this paper, a sparse reconstruction by separable approximation algorithm (SpaRSA) is extended to solve the ET inverse problem. The algorithm is competitive with the fastest state-of-the-art algorithms in solving the standard L 2 −L 1 problem. However, it is computationally expensive when the dimension of the matrix is large. To further improve the calculation speed of solving inverse problems, a projection method based on the Krylov subspace is employed and combined with the SpaRSA algorithm. The proposed algorithm is tested with image reconstruction of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can reduce the computational time and improve the noise robustness for the image reconstruction. (paper)

  17. Development of novel emission tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Geng

    In recent years, small animals, such as mice and rats, have been widely used as subjects of study in biomedical research while molecular biology and imaging techniques open new opportunities to investigate disease model. With the help of medical imaging techniques, researchers can investigate underlying mechanisms inside the small animal, which are useful for both early diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Based on tracer principle single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has increased popularity in small animal imaging due to its higher spatial resolution and variety of single-photon emitting radionuclides. Since the image quality strongly depends on the detector properties, both scintillation and semiconductor detectors are under active investigation for high resolution X-ray and gamma ray photon detection. The desired detector properties include high intrinsic spatial resolution, high energy resolution, and high detection efficiency. In this thesis study, we have made extensive efforts to develop novel emission tomography system, and evaluate the use of both semiconductor and ultra-high resolution scintillation detectors for small animal imaging. This thesis work includes the following three areas. Firstly, we have developed a novel energy-resolved photon counting (ERPC) detector. With the benefits of high energy resolution, high spatial resolution, flexible detection area, and a wide dynamic range of 27--200keV, ERPC detector is well-suited for small animal SPECT applications. For prototype ERPC detector excellent imaging (˜350microm) and spectroscopic performance (4keV Co-57 122keV) has been demonstrated in preliminary study. Secondly, to further improve spatial resolution to hundred-micron level, an ultra-high resolution Intensified EMCCD (I-EMCCD) detector has been designed and evaluated. This detector consists of the newly developed electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) sensor, columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, and an electrostatic de-magnifier (DM) tube

  18. Reconstruction and visualization of nanoparticle composites by transmission electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.Y. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); Lockwood, R. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada); Malac, M., E-mail: marek.malac@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); Furukawa, H. [SYSTEM IN FRONTIER INC., 2-8-3, Shinsuzuharu bldg. 4F, Akebono-cho, Tachikawa-shi, Tokyo 190-0012 (Japan); Li, P.; Meldrum, A. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-02-15

    This paper examines the limits of transmission electron tomography reconstruction methods for a nanocomposite object composed of many closely packed nanoparticles. Two commonly used reconstruction methods in TEM tomography were examined and compared, and the sources of various artefacts were explored. Common visualization methods were investigated, and the resulting 'interpretation artefacts' ( i.e., deviations from 'actual' particle sizes and shapes arising from the visualization) were determined. Setting a known or estimated nanoparticle volume fraction as a criterion for thresholding does not in fact give a good visualization. Unexpected effects associated with common built-in image filtering methods were also found. Ultimately, this work set out to establish the common problems and pitfalls associated with electron beam tomographic reconstruction and visualization of samples consisting of closely spaced nanoparticles. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron tomography limits were explored by both experiment and simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reliable quantitative volumetry using electron tomography is not presently feasible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Volume rendering appears to be better choice for visualization of composite samples.

  19. Utilisation of spatial and temporal correlations in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sureau, F.

    2008-06-01

    In this thesis we propose, implement, and evaluate algorithms improving spatial resolution in reconstructed images and reducing data noise in positron emission tomography imaging. These algorithms have been developed for a high resolution tomograph (HRRT) and applied to brain imaging, but can be used for other tomographs or studies. We first developed an iterative reconstruction algorithm including a stationary and isotropic model of resolution in image space, experimentally measured. We evaluated the impact of such a model of resolution in Monte-Carlo simulations, physical phantom experiments and in two clinical studies by comparing our algorithm with a reference reconstruction algorithm. This study suggests that biases due to partial volume effects are reduced, in particular in the clinical studies. Better spatial and temporal correlations are also found at the voxel level. However, other methods should be developed to further reduce data noise. We then proposed a maximum a posteriori de-noising algorithm that can be used for dynamic data to de-noise temporally raw data (sino-grams) or reconstructed images. The a priori modeled the coefficients in a wavelet basis of all the signals without noise (in an image or sinogram). We compared this technique with a reference de-noising method on replicated simulations. This illustrates the potential benefits of our approach of sinogram de-noising. (author)

  20. Quantifying the limitations of small animal positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, D.C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: dco@ns.ph.liv.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cooper, R.J.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Nolan, P.J.; Scraggs, D.P. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, WA4 4AD Cheshire (United Kingdom); Beveridge, T.E. [School of Materials and Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2009-06-01

    The application of position sensitive semiconductor detectors in medical imaging is a field of global research interest. The Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit GEANT4 [ (http://geant4.web.cern.ch/geant4/)] was employed to improve the understanding of detailed {gamma}-ray interactions within the small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET), high-purity germanium (HPGe) imaging system, SmartPET [A.J. Boston, et al., Oral contribution, ANL, Chicago, USA, 2006]. This system has shown promising results in the field of PET [R.J. Cooper, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A (2009), accepted for publication] and Compton camera imaging [J.E. Gillam, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 579 (2007) 76]. Images for a selection of single and multiple point, line and phantom sources were successfully reconstructed using both a filtered-back-projection (FBP) [A.R. Mather, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Liverpool, 2007] and an iterative reconstruction algorithm [A.R. Mather, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Liverpool, 2007]. Simulated data were exploited as an alternative route to a reconstructed image allowing full quantification of the image distortions introduced in each phase of the data processing. Quantifying the contribution of uncertainty in all system components from detector to reconstruction algorithm allows the areas in need of most attention on the SmartPET project and semiconductor PET to be addressed.

  1. A neural network image reconstruction technique for electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, A.; Guardo, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reconstruction of Images in Electrical Impedance Tomography requires the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem on noisy data. This problem is typically ill-conditioned and requires either simplifying assumptions or regularization based on a priori knowledge. This paper presents a reconstruction algorithm using neural network techniques which calculates a linear approximation of the inverse problem directly from finite element simulations of the forward problem. This inverse is adapted to the geometry of the medium and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) used during network training. Results show good conductivity reconstruction where measurement SNR is similar to the training conditions. The advantages of this method are its conceptual simplicity and ease of implementation, and the ability to control the compromise between the noise performance and resolution of the image reconstruction

  2. Scintillation crystals for positron emission tomography having a non reflecting band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates generally to positron emission tomography, a sub-field of the class of medical imaging techniques using ionizing radiation and image reconstruction techniques; and more particularly to devices which use an array of scintillation detectors to detect the annihilation radiation from positron disintegration and use this information to reconstruct an image of the distribution of positron emitting isotope within a body section. 6 figs

  3. Reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, C.

    1997-02-01

    Phase contrast imaging with coherent x-rays can be distinguished in outline imaging and holography, depending on the wavelength {lambda}, the object size d and the object-to-detector distance r. When r << d{sup 2}{lambda}, phase contrast occurs only in regions where the refractive index fastly changes, i.e. at interfaces and edges in the sample. With increasing object-to-detector distance we come in the area of holographic imaging. The image contrast outside the shadow region of the object is due to interference of the direct, undiffracted beam and a beam diffracted by the object, or, in terms of holography, the interference of a reference wave with the object wave. Both, outline imaging and holography, offer the possibility to obtain three dimensional information of the sample in conjunction with a tomographic technique. But the data treatment and the kind of information one can obtain from the reconstruction is different.

  4. Image-reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W; CERN. Geneva

    1993-01-01

    Physics and mathematics for medical imaging In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-rays but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes and nuclear magnetic resonance. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimentional distributions to be reconstructed from projection data acquired by radiation detectors suitably positioned around the patient will be described in detail. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simpleradiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo boichemistry. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function that are cur...

  5. Optimisation and validation of a 3D reconstruction algorithm for single photon emission computed tomography by means of GATE simulation platform; Optimisation et validation d'un algorithme de reconstruction 3D en Tomographie d'Emission Monophotonique a l'aide de la plate forme de simulation GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Bitar, Ziad [Ecole Doctorale des Sciences Fondamentales, Universite Blaise Pascal, U.F.R de Recherches Scientifiques et Techniques, 34, avenue Carnot - BP 185, 63006 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, CNRS/IN2P3, 63177 Aubiere (France)

    2006-12-15

    Although time consuming, Monte-Carlo simulations remain an efficient tool enabling to assess correction methods for degrading physical effects in medical imaging. We have optimized and validated a reconstruction method baptized F3DMC (Fully 3D Monte Carlo) in which the physical effects degrading the image formation process were modelled using Monte-Carlo methods and integrated within the system matrix. We used the Monte-Carlo simulation toolbox GATE. We validated GATE in SPECT by modelling the gamma-camera (Philips AXIS) used in clinical routine. Techniques of threshold, filtering by a principal component analysis and targeted reconstruction (functional regions, hybrid regions) were used in order to improve the precision of the system matrix and to reduce the number of simulated photons as well as the time consumption required. The EGEE Grid infrastructures were used to deploy the GATE simulations in order to reduce their computation time. Results obtained with F3DMC were compared with the reconstruction methods (FBP, ML-EM, MLEMC) for a simulated phantom and with the OSEM-C method for the real phantom. Results have shown that the F3DMC method and its variants improve the restoration of activity ratios and the signal to noise ratio. By the use of the grid EGEE, a significant speed-up factor of about 300 was obtained. These results should be confirmed by performing studies on complex phantoms and patients and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be used in SPECT and also in PET. (author)

  6. Development of Image Reconstruction Algorithms in electrical Capacitance Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Marron, J. L.; Alberdi Primicia, J.; Barcala Riveira, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) has not obtained a good development in order to be used at industrial level. That is due first to difficulties in the measurement of very little capacitances (in the range of femto farads) and second to the problem of reconstruction on- line of the images. This problem is due also to the small numbers of electrodes (maximum 16), that made the usual algorithms of reconstruction has many errors. In this work it is described a new purely geometrical method that could be used for this purpose. (Author) 4 refs

  7. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, preclinical and hybrid scanners (i.e., PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  8. Methods and instrumentation for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelkern, M.A.; Phelps, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on positron emission tomography (PET), a technique for the noninvasive measurement of local tissue concentrations of injected radioactive tracers. Tracer kinetics techniques can be applied to this information to quantify physiologic function in human tissue. In the tracer method, a pharmaceutical is labeled by a radioactive atom. When introduced into the subject that molecule follows a physiologic pathway. The space- and time-dependent distribution of the radionuclide is obtained via an imaging technique. If the radiopharmaceutical is sufficiently analogous to a natural substrate or other substance of interest, a quantitative image can be translated into a physiologic measurement

  9. Features and applications of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Mingwu

    1997-01-01

    Positron emission tomography, the so-called world's smartest camera, is based on a NaI or BGO detector and imaging of positron-emitting radioisotopes which are introduced as a tracer into the regional tissue or organ of interest. With the aid of a computer visual images of a series of these distributions can be built into a picture of the functional status of the tissue or organ being imaged. This highly accurate imaging technique is already widely used for clinical diagnostics heart disease, brain disorder, tumors and so on

  10. Contribution of positron emission tomography in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, E.; Franck, G.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a scanner technique using tracers labelled with shortlived radioisotopes which allows to study and quantify human metabolic processes or drug pharmacology in vivo. The technique is first applied in physiological studies. Sleep, normal brain metabolism or cerebral activations have been studied. The pharmacological approach concerns both drug distribution in the human brain and blood flow or metabolic variations under treatment. Main neurological applications in pathology are cerebrovascular disorders, diseases leading to dementia, epilepsy, movement disorders, and brain tumors. In each field of application, PET gives unique and frequently early informations. It nicely combines both dynamic informations and measurement precision. (author)

  11. Electrocardiographic gating in positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.J.; Phelps, M.E.; Wisenberg, G.; Schelbert, H.R.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) synchronized multiple gated data acquisition was employed with positron emission computed tomography (ECT) to obtain images of myocardial blood pool and myocardium. The feasibility and requirements of multiple gated data acquisition in positron ECT were investigated for 13NH3, ( 18 F)-2-fluoro-2-D-deoxyglucose, and ( 11 C)-carboxyhemoglobin. Examples are shown in which image detail is enhanced and image interpretation is facilitated when ECG gating is employed in the data collection. Analysis of count rate data from a series of volunteers indicates that multiple, statistically adequate images can be obtained under a multiple gated data collection format without an increase in administered dose

  12. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Cun; Xie, Qiang; Lv, Wei-Fu

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a phenotypically heterogeneous, chronic, destructive inflammatory disease of the synovial joints. A number of imaging tools are currently available for evaluation of inflammatory conditions. By targeting the upgraded glucose uptake of infiltrating granulocytes and tissue macrophages, positron emission tomography/computed tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG PET/CT) is available to delineate inflammation with high sensitivity. Recently, several studies have indicated that FDG uptake in affected joints reflects the disease activity of RA. In addition, usage of FDG PET for the sensitive detection and monitoring of the response to treatment has been reported. Combined FDG PET/CT enables the detailed assessment of disease in large joints throughout the whole body. These unique capabilities of FDG PET/CT imaging are also able to detect RA-complicated diseases. Therefore, PET/CT has become an excellent ancillary tool to assess disease activity and prognosis in RA. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Comparative study and implementation of images re processing methods for the tomography by positrons emission: interest of taking into account a priori information; Etude comparative et implementation de methodes de reconstruction d`images pour la tomographie par emission de positons: interet de la prise en compte d`informations a priori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, F.

    1996-09-25

    The tomography by positron emission has for aim to explore an organ by injection of a radiotracer and bidimensional representation with processing techniques. The most used in routine is the filtered retro projection that gives smoothed images. this work realizes a comparative study of new techniques. The methods of preservations of contours are studied here, the idea is to use NMR imaging as a priori information. Two techniques of images construction are viewed more particularly: the resolution by pseudo inverse and the Bayesian method. (N.C.).

  15. Improved specimen reconstruction by Hilbert phase contrast tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Bastian; Joos, Friederike; Schröder, Rasmus R

    2008-11-01

    The low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in images of unstained specimens recorded with conventional defocus phase contrast makes it difficult to interpret 3D volumes obtained by electron tomography (ET). The high defocus applied for conventional tilt series generates some phase contrast but leads to an incomplete transfer of object information. For tomography of biological weak-phase objects, optimal image contrast and subsequently an optimized SNR are essential for the reconstruction of details such as macromolecular assemblies at molecular resolution. The problem of low contrast can be partially solved by applying a Hilbert phase plate positioned in the back focal plane (BFP) of the objective lens while recording images in Gaussian focus. Images recorded with the Hilbert phase plate provide optimized positive phase contrast at low spatial frequencies, and the contrast transfer in principle extends to the information limit of the microscope. The antisymmetric Hilbert phase contrast (HPC) can be numerically converted into isotropic contrast, which is equivalent to the contrast obtained by a Zernike phase plate. Thus, in-focus HPC provides optimal structure factor information without limiting effects of the transfer function. In this article, we present the first electron tomograms of biological specimens reconstructed from Hilbert phase plate image series. We outline the technical implementation of the phase plate and demonstrate that the technique is routinely applicable for tomography. A comparison between conventional defocus tomograms and in-focus HPC volumes shows an enhanced SNR and an improved specimen visibility for in-focus Hilbert tomography.

  16. Cardiological applications of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.; Czernin, J.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) expands the diagnostic possibilities of nuclear medicine techniques for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and, especially, for the identification of myocardial viability. The presence of coronary artery disease can be detected by evaluation of myocardial blood flow at rest and during pharmacologically induced hyperemia with a sensitivity of 84 to 98% and a specificity of 78 to 100% according to recent studies. Comparative investigations in the same patients have demonstrated a significant gain in the diagnostic accuracy of PET as compared with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). PET has influenced even more profoundly the identification of myocardial viability. Measured against the functional outcome of regional contractile function after successful revascularization, an increase of glucose utilization relative to regional myocardial blood flow is 77 to 85% accurate in identifying reversibly injured myocardium. Conversely, PET is 78 to 92% accurate in identifying myocardium as irreversibly injured when pre-operative glucose uptake was reduced or absent. Recent studies have indicated that it is possible to predict to some extent post-revascularization improvement in left ventricular function as well as in congestive heart failure related symptoms in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, PET can identify patients with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity as a result of ischemic heart disease and, thus, stratify patients to the most appropriate and cost-effective therapeutic approach. (authors)

  17. Positron emission tomography of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography enables the distribution of positron emitting isotopes to be imaged in a transverse plane through the body and the regional concentration of the isotope to be measured quantitatively. This thesis reports some applications of positron emission tomography to studies of pulmonary pathophysiology. Measurements in lung phantoms showed that regional lung density could be measured from a transmission tomogram obtained with an external source of positron emitting isotope. The regional, fractional blood volume was measured after labelling the blood with carbon-11-monoxide. Regional extravascular lung density (lung tissue and interstitial water per unit thoracic volume) was obtained by subtracting fractional blood volume from lung density. Measurements in normal subjects revealed large regional variations in lung density and fractional blood volume in the supine posture. Extravascular lung density showed a more uniform distribution. The technique has been used to study patients with chronic interstitial pulmonary oedema, pulmonary sarcoidosis and fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension and patients with intracardiac, left-to-right shunt. Tomographic measurements of pulmonary tissue concentration of radionuclides are difficult, since corrections for the blood content and the inflation of the lung must be applied. A simultaneous measurement of lung density and fractional blood volume allows such corrections to be made and the extravascular tracer concentration to be calculated. This has been applied to measurements of the tissue penetration of carbon-11-labelled erythromycin in patients with lobar pneumonia. (author)

  18. RELIABILITY OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN EVALUATION OF TESTICULAR CARCINOMA PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoletić, Katarina; Mihailović, Jasna; Matovina, Emil; Žeravica, Radmila; Srbovan, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the reliability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in evaluation of testicular carcinoma patients. The study sample consisted of 26 scans performed in 23 patients with testicular carcinoma. According to the pathohistological finding, 14 patients had seminomas, 7 had nonseminomas and 2 patients had a mixed histological type. In 17 patients, the initial treatment was orchiectomy+chemotherapy, 2 patients had orchiectomy+chemotherapy+retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, 3 patients had orchiectomy only and one patient was treated with chemotherapy only. Abnormal computed tomography was the main cause for the oncologist to refer the patient to positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan (in 19 scans), magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in 1 scan, high level oftumor markers in 3 and 3 scans were perforned for follow-up. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging results were compared with histological results, other imaging modalities or the clinical follow-up of the patients. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans were positive in 6 and negative in 20 patients. In two patients, positron emission tomography-computed tomography was false positive. There were 20 negative positron emission omography-computed tomography scans perforned in 18 patients, one patient was lost for data analysis. Clinically stable disease was confirmed in 18 follow-up scans performed in 16 patients. The values of sensitivty, specificity, accuracy, and positive- and negative predictive value were 60%, 95%, 75%, 88% and 90.5%, respectively. A hgh negative predictive value obtained in our study (90.5%) suggests that there is a small possibility for a patient to have future relapse after normal positron emission tomography-computed tomography study. However, since the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the study ire rather low, there are limitations of positive

  19. Image reconstruction technique using projection data from neutron tomography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abd el Bar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron tomography is a very powerful technique for nondestructive evaluation of heavy industrial components as well as for soft hydrogenous materials enclosed in heavy metals which are usually difficult to image using X-rays. Due to the properties of the image acquisition system, the projection images are distorted by several artifacts, and these reduce the quality of the reconstruction. In order to eliminate these harmful effects the projection images should be corrected before reconstruction. This paper gives a description of a filter back projection (FBP technique, which is used for reconstruction of projected data obtained from transmission measurements by neutron tomography system We demonstrated the use of spatial Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT and the 2D Inverse DFT in the formulation of the method, and outlined the theory of reconstruction of a 2D neutron image from a sequence of 1D projections taken at different angles between 0 and π in MATLAB environment. Projections are generated by applying the Radon transform to the original image at different angles.

  20. F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joerg, L.; Langsteger, W.

    2002-01-01

    Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabeled glucose analog F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) is a sensitive diagnostic tool that images tumors based on increased uptake of glucose. Several recent publications have shown that F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is more sensitive than computed-tomography (CT) in detecting colorectal cancer. In patients with increasing CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) and no evidence of recurrent disease on CT F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography often detects recurrent cancer. In all, patient management seems to be changed in about 25 % of patients who undergo F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in addition to standard staging procedure. Limited reports to date on both chemotherapy and radiotherapy support the role of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in assessing treatment response. Also regarding preoperative staging of primary colorectal cancer the literature is very limited. (author)

  1. Image reconstruction in computerized tomography using the convolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Rebelo, A.M. de.

    1984-03-01

    In the present work an algoritin was derived, using the analytical convolution method (filtered back-projection) for two-dimensional or three-dimensional image reconstruction in computerized tomography applied to non-destructive testing and to the medical use. This mathematical model is based on the analytical Fourier transform method for image reconstruction. This model consists of a discontinuous system formed by an NxN array of cells (pixels). The attenuation in the object under study of a colimated gamma ray beam has been determined for various positions and incidence angles (projections) in terms of the interaction of the beam with the intercepted pixels. The contribution of each pixel to beam attenuation was determined using the weight function W ij which was used for simulated tests. Simulated tests using standard objects with attenuation coefficients in the range of 0,2 to 0,7 cm -1 were carried out using cell arrays of up to 25x25. One application was carried out in the medical area simulating image reconstruction of an arm phantom with attenuation coefficients in the range of 0,2 to 0,5 cm -1 using cell arrays of 41x41. The simulated results show that, in objects with a great number of interfaces and great variations of attenuation coefficients at these interfaces, a good reconstruction is obtained with the number of projections equal to the reconstruction matrix dimension. A good reconstruction is otherwise obtained with fewer projections. (author) [pt

  2. Vectorization with SIMD extensions speeds up reconstruction in electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulleiro, J I; Garzón, E M; García, I; Fernández, J J

    2010-06-01

    Electron tomography allows structural studies of cellular structures at molecular detail. Large 3D reconstructions are needed to meet the resolution requirements. The processing time to compute these large volumes may be considerable and so, high performance computing techniques have been used traditionally. This work presents a vector approach to tomographic reconstruction that relies on the exploitation of the SIMD extensions available in modern processors in combination to other single processor optimization techniques. This approach succeeds in producing full resolution tomograms with an important reduction in processing time, as evaluated with the most common reconstruction algorithms, namely WBP and SIRT. The main advantage stems from the fact that this approach is to be run on standard computers without the need of specialized hardware, which facilitates the development, use and management of programs. Future trends in processor design open excellent opportunities for vector processing with processor's SIMD extensions in the field of 3D electron microscopy.

  3. Matrix-based image reconstruction methods for tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Meng, J.D.

    1984-10-01

    Matrix methods of image reconstruction have not been used, in general, because of the large size of practical matrices, ill condition upon inversion and the success of Fourier-based techniques. An exception is the work that has been done at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for imaging with accelerated radioactive ions. An extension of that work into more general imaging problems shows that, with a correct formulation of the problem, positron tomography with ring geometries results in well behaved matrices which can be used for image reconstruction with no distortion of the point response in the field of view and flexibility in the design of the instrument. Maximum Likelihood Estimator methods of reconstruction, which use the system matrices tailored to specific instruments and do not need matrix inversion, are shown to result in good preliminary images. A parallel processing computer structure based on multiple inexpensive microprocessors is proposed as a system to implement the matrix-MLE methods. 14 references, 7 figures

  4. Duality reconstruction algorithm for use in electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, M.Z.; Dickin, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    A duality reconstruction algorithm for solving the inverse problem in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is described. In this method, an algorithm based on the Geselowitz compensation (GC) theorem is used first to reconstruct an approximate version of the image. It is then fed as a first guessed data to the modified Newton-Raphson (MNR) algorithm which iteratively correct the image until a final acceptable solution is reached. The implementation of the GC and MNR based algorithms using the finite element method will be discussed. Reconstructed images produced by the algorithm will also be presented. Consideration is also given to the most computationally intensive aspects of the algorithm, namely the inversion of the large and sparse matrices. The methods taken to approximately compute the inverse ot those matrices will be outlined. (author)

  5. Positron Emission Tomography imaging with the SmartPET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: cooperrj@ornl.gov; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P.; Mather, A.R. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-21

    The Small Animal Reconstruction Tomograph for Positron Emission Tomography (SmartPET) project is the development of a small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET) demonstrator based on the use of High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors and state of the art digital electronics. The experimental results presented demonstrate the current performance of this unique system. By performing high precision measurements of one of the SmartPET HPGe detectors with a range of finely collimated gamma-ray beams the response of the detector as a function of gamma-ray interaction position has been quantified, facilitating the development of parametric Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) techniques and algorithms for the correction of imperfections in detector performance. These algorithms have then been applied to data from PET imaging measurements using two such detectors in conjunction with a specially designed rotating gantry. In this paper we show how the use of parametric PSA approaches allows over 60% of coincident events to be processed and how the nature and complexity of an event has direct implications for the quality of the resulting image.

  6. Positron emission tomography: Physics, instrumentation, and image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porenta, G.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that permits reconstruction of cross-sectional images of the human body which depict the biodistribution of PET tracer substances. A large variety of physiological PET tracers, mostly based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine is available and allows the in vivo investigation of organ perfusion, metabolic pathways and biomolecular processes in normal and diseased states. PET cameras utilize the physical characteristics of positron decay to derive quantitative measurements of tracer concentrations, a capability that has so far been elusive for conventional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging techniques. Due to the short half lives of most PET isotopes, an on-site cyclotron and a radiochemistry unit are necessary to provide an adequate supply of PET tracers. While operating a PET center in the past was a complex procedure restricted to few academic centers with ample resources. PET technology has rapidly advanced in recent years and has entered the commercial nuclear medicine market. To date, the availability of compact cyclotrons with remote computer control, automated synthesis units for PET radiochemistry, high-performance PET cameras, and userfriendly analysis workstations permits installation of a clinical PET center within most nuclear medicine facilities. This review provides simple descriptions of important aspects concerning physics, instrumentation, and image analysis in PET imaging which should be understood by medical personnel involved in the clinical operation of a PET imaging center. (author)

  7. Physically corrected forward operators for induced emission tomography: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, Nicola Roberto; Solé, Vicente Armando

    2018-03-01

    X-ray emission tomography techniques over non-radioactive materials allow one to investigate different and important aspects of the matter that are usually not addressable with the standard x-ray transmission tomography, such as density, chemical composition and crystallographic information. However, the quantitative reconstruction of these investigated properties is hindered by additional problems, including the self-attenuation of the emitted radiation. Work has been done in the past, especially concerning x-ray fluorescence tomography, but this has always focused on solving very specific problems. The novelty of this work resides in addressing the problem of induced emission tomography from a much wider perspective, introducing a unified discrete representation that can be used to modify existing algorithms to reconstruct the data of the different types of experiments. The direct outcome is a clear and easy mathematical description of the implementation details of such algorithms, despite small differences in geometry and other practical aspects, but also the possibility to express the reconstruction as a minimization problem, allowing the use of variational methods, and a more flexible modeling of the noise involved in the detection process. In addition, we look at the results of a few selected simulated data reconstructions that describe the effect of physical corrections like the self-attenuation, and the response to noise of the adapted reconstruction algorithms.

  8. Application of ART to time-coded emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koral, K.F.; Rogers, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Devices for single-photon emission tomography currently take projections either in a plane over a full angular range (0-360 0 ) or in a volume with a limited angular range. The planar, pseudo-random, time-coded aperture, in conjunction with an Anger camera, is a device of the limited angular range type. It employs multiple pinholes whose transmission varies as a function of time. Previously, image reconstruction was accomplished by simple back-projection of coefficients obtained by time-correlating pinhole transmission with detector-element count rate, resulting in a low-contrast image. Using the Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) a method is introduced for division of the correlation coefficients into subsets allowing the three-dimensional reconstruction to be accomplished on a minicomputer. Results from simulations and experimental phantom data show that ART improves depth resolution compared to back-projection, that under-relaxation produces better images in the case of noisy data, and that the division of the correlation coefficients into subsets has no effect on quality. The images depict the expected resolution degradation in the direction normal to the detector plane due to the limited angular range of projections but yield quantitative results whose relative values are good, even though attenuation is neglected. (author)

  9. Physical and technical basis of positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography utilizes the annihilation of positrons, generating pairs of gamma quanta which are emitted in opposing directions. 'Electronic collimation' is performed by coincident detection of both quanta. Thus, there is no need for mechanical collimators and no limiting connection between sensitivity and spatial resolution. Transversal tomograms are reconstructed from the projection data by means of highly sophisticated data processing. The half life of the most positron emitters used in medical applications is short and of the order of some minutes. Therefore, many positron emitters have to be produced on-side by means of a cyclotron. PET is superior to SPECT with respect to physical and technical aspects, but the high costs of PET limit its wide-spread use up to now. (orig.) [de

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma ray tomography for image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Karlos A.N.; Moura, Alex; Dantas, Carlos; Melo, Silvio; Lima, Emerson, E-mail: karlosguedes@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Meric, Ilker [University of Bergen (Norway)

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo simulations of known density and shape object was validate with Gamma Ray Tomography in static experiments. An aluminum half-moon piece placed inside a steel pipe was the MC simulation test object that was also measured by means of gamma ray transmission. Wall effect of the steel pipe due to irradiation geometry in a single pair source-detector tomography was evaluated by comparison with theoretical data. MCNPX code requires a defined geometry to each photon trajectory which practically prevents this usage for tomography reconstruction simulation. The solution was found by writing a program in Delphi language to create input files automation code. Simulations of tomography data by automated MNCPX code were carried out and validated by experimental data. Working in this sequence the produced data needed a databank to be stored. Experimental setup used a Cesium-137 isotopic radioactive source (7.4 × 109 Bq), and NaI(Tl) scintillation detector of (51 × 51) × 10−3 m crystal size coupled to a multichannel analyzer. A stainless steel tubes of 0,154 m internal diameter, 0.014 m thickness wall. The results show that the MCNPX simulation code adapted to automated input file is useful for generating a matrix data M(θ,t), of a computerized gamma ray tomography for any known density and regular shape object. Experimental validation used RMSE from gamma ray paths and from attenuation coefficient data. (author)

  11. Incomplete projection reconstruction of computed tomography based on the modified discrete algebraic reconstruction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuqiang; Zhang, Dinghua; Huang, Kuidong; Gao, Zongzhao; Yang, YaFei

    2018-02-01

    Based on the discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART), this study aims to address and test a new improved algorithm applied to incomplete projection data to generate a high quality reconstruction image by reducing the artifacts and noise in computed tomography. For the incomplete projections, an augmented Lagrangian based on compressed sensing is first used in the initial reconstruction for segmentation of the DART to get higher contrast graphics for boundary and non-boundary pixels. Then, the block matching 3D filtering operator was used to suppress the noise and to improve the gray distribution of the reconstructed image. Finally, simulation studies on the polychromatic spectrum were performed to test the performance of the new algorithm. Study results show a significant improvement in the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and average gradients (AGs) of the images reconstructed from incomplete data. The SNRs and AGs of the new images reconstructed by DART-ALBM were on average 30%-40% and 10% higher than the images reconstructed by DART algorithms. Since the improved DART-ALBM algorithm has a better robustness to limited-view reconstruction, which not only makes the edge of the image clear but also makes the gray distribution of non-boundary pixels better, it has the potential to improve image quality from incomplete projections or sparse projections.

  12. On the use of successive data in the ML-EM algorithm in Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmedt, P; Lemahieu, I [University of Ghent, ELIS Department, SInt-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Gent, (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    The Maximum Likelihood-Expectation Maximization (ML-EM) algorithm is the most popular statistical reconstruction technique for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The ML-EM algorithm is however also renowned for its long reconstruction times. An acceleration technique for this algorithm is studied in this paper. The proposed technique starts the ML-EM algorithm before the measurement process is completed. Since the reconstruction is initiated during the scan of the patient, the time elapsed before a reconstruction becomes available is reduced. Experiments with software phantoms indicate that the quality of the reconstructed image using successive data is comparable to the quality of the reconstruction with the normal ML-EM algorithm. (authors). 7 refs, 3 figs.

  13. Contribution to regularizing iterative method development for attenuation correction in gamma emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, A.

    1981-07-01

    This study is concerned with the transverse axial gamma emission tomography. The problem of self-attenuation of radiations in biologic tissues is raised. The regularizing iterative method is developed, as a reconstruction method of 3 dimensional images. The different steps from acquisition to results, necessary to its application, are described. Organigrams relative to each step are explained. Comparison notion between two reconstruction methods is introduced. Some methods used for the comparison or to bring about the characteristics of a reconstruction technique are defined. The studies realized to test the regularizing iterative method are presented and results are analyzed [fr

  14. Sparsity reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography: An experimental evaluation

    KAUST Repository

    Gehre, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the potential of sparsity constraints in the electrical impedance tomography (EIT) inverse problem of inferring the distributed conductivity based on boundary potential measurements. In sparsity reconstruction, inhomogeneities of the conductivity are a priori assumed to be sparse with respect to a certain basis. This prior information is incorporated into a Tikhonov-type functional by including a sparsity-promoting ℓ1-penalty term. The functional is minimized with an iterative soft shrinkage-type algorithm. In this paper, the feasibility of the sparsity reconstruction approach is evaluated by experimental data from water tank measurements. The reconstructions are computed both with sparsity constraints and with a more conventional smoothness regularization approach. The results verify that the adoption of ℓ1-type constraints can enhance the quality of EIT reconstructions: in most of the test cases the reconstructions with sparsity constraints are both qualitatively and quantitatively more feasible than that with the smoothness constraint. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A combined reconstruction-classification method for diffuse optical tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltunen, P [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 3310, FI-02015 TKK (Finland); Prince, S J D; Arridge, S [Department of Computer Science, University College London, Gower Street London, WC1E 6B (United Kingdom)], E-mail: petri.hiltunen@tkk.fi, E-mail: s.prince@cs.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: s.arridge@cs.ucl.ac.uk

    2009-11-07

    We present a combined classification and reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography (DOT). DOT is a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, some regularization is needed. We present a mixture of Gaussians prior, which regularizes the DOT reconstruction step. During each iteration, the parameters of a mixture model are estimated. These associate each reconstructed pixel with one of several classes based on the current estimate of the optical parameters. This classification is exploited to form a new prior distribution to regularize the reconstruction step and update the optical parameters. The algorithm can be described as an iteration between an optimization scheme with zeroth-order variable mean and variance Tikhonov regularization and an expectation-maximization scheme for estimation of the model parameters. We describe the algorithm in a general Bayesian framework. Results from simulated test cases and phantom measurements show that the algorithm enhances the contrast of the reconstructed images with good spatial accuracy. The probabilistic classifications of each image contain only a few misclassified pixels.

  16. Single-photon emission tomography and cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celsis, P.; Chan, M.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Sveinsdottir, E.; Goldman, T.G.; Henriksen, L.; Paulson, O.B.; Stokely, E.M.; Lassen, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper illustrates the capabilities of single-photon emission tomography in imaging local cerebral blood flows in man. The results purport the conclusion that a fairly good improvement has been achieved when compared to stationary detectors and that single-photon emission tomography is a well-suited tool for studying cerebral hemodynamics, especially within the framework of clinical studies [fr

  17. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  18. Positron emission tomography in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Fischman, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    There are four kinds of measurements that can be carried out with positron emission tomography (PET) that can contribute significantly to the process of drug development: pharmacodynamic measurement of tissue metabolism influenced by a given drug; precise measurements of tissue blood flow; tissue pharmacokinetics of a given drug following administration of a particular dose; and the temporal course of ligand-receptor interaction. One or more of these measurements can greatly improve the decision making involved in determining the appropriate dose of a drug, the clinical situations in which a drug might be useful, and the linkage of pharmacokinetics with pharmacodynamics, which is at the heart of effective drug development. The greater the potential of a particular compound as a therapeutic agent, the greater the potential for PET to contribute to the drug development process

  19. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease

  20. Applications of positron emission tomography to psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkow, N.D.; Brodie, J.D.; Gomez-mont, F.

    1985-01-01

    The brain's inaccessibility has hampered investigation of the metabolic changes underlying the behavioral and psychological symptoms of psychiatric patients. Using positron emission transaxial tomography (PET) to study the functioning human brain opens the possibility of directly investigating the patterns of activity associated with mental illness. A major focus of present-day research in psychiatry has been to identify etiological agents that fit a medical model of psychiatric illness. Experiments seeking pathophysiological indices that would permit objective classification of psychiatric illnesses have failed to reveal consistent abnormalities. The lack of consistency is explained in part by research designs that deal with the brain as if it were a homogeneous organ. PET offers a unique technique for monitoring the regional biochemical activity that is associated with the different ''brain states'' and ''brain traits'' of normal subjects and psychiatric patients

  1. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  2. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1990-05-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs.

  3. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs

  4. Axially symmetric reconstruction of plasma emission and absorption coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lixin; Jia Hui; Yang Jiankun; Li Xiujian; Chen Shaorong; Liu Xishun

    2013-01-01

    A layered structure imaging model is developed in order to reconstruct emission coefficients and absorption coefficients simultaneously, in laser fusion core plasma diagnostics. A novel axially symmetric reconstruction method that utilizes the LM (Levenberg-Marquardt) nonlinear least squares minimization algorithm is proposed based on the layered structure. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method is sufficiently accurate to reconstruct emission coefficients and absorption coefficients, and when the standard deviation of noise is 0.01, the errors of emission coefficients and absorption coefficients are 0.17, 0.22, respectively. Furthermore, this method could perform much better on reconstruction effect compared with traditional inverse Abel transform algorithms. (authors)

  5. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV bw ) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV bw , background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake

  6. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Samuel L., E-mail: samuel.brady@stjude.org [Division of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Shulkin, Barry L. [Nuclear Medicine and Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  7. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens

  8. The Role of Synthetic Reconstruction Tests in Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, N.; Spakman, W.

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic reconstruction tests are widely used in seismic tomography as a means for assessing the robustness of solutions produced by linear or iterative non-linear inversion schemes. The most common test is the so-called checkerboard resolution test, which uses an alternating pattern of high and low wavespeeds (or some other seismic property such as attenuation). However, checkerboard tests have a number of limitations, including that they (1) only provide indirect evidence of quantitative measures of reliability such as resolution and uncertainty; (2) give a potentially misleading impression of the range of scale-lengths that can be resolved; (3) don't give a true picture of the structural distortion or smearing caused by the data coverage; and (4) result in an inverse problem that is biased towards an accurate reconstruction. The widespread use of synthetic reconstruction tests in seismic tomography is likely to continue for some time yet, so it is important to implement best practice where possible. The goal here is to provide a general set of guidelines, derived from the underlying theory and illustrated by a series of numerical experiments, on their implementation in seismic tomography. In particular, we recommend (1) using a sparse distribution of spikes, rather than the more conventional tightly-spaced checkerboard; (2) using the identical data coverage (e.g. geometric rays) for the synthetic model that was computed for the observation-based model; (3) carrying out multiple tests using anomalies of different scale length; (4) exercising caution when analysing synthetic recovery tests that use anomaly patterns that closely mimic the observation-based model; (5) investigating the trade-off between data noise levels and the minimum wavelength of recovered structure; (6) where possible, test the extent to which preconditioning (e.g. identical parameterization for input and output models) influences the recovery of anomalies.

  9. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens.

  10. Reconstruction of an InAs nanowire using geometric and algebraic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, R S; Boothroyd, C B; König, S; Alpers, A; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2011-01-01

    Geometric tomography and conventional algebraic tomography algorithms are used to reconstruct cross-sections of an InAs nanowire from a tilt series of experimental annular dark-field images. Both algorithms are also applied to a test object to assess what factors affect the reconstruction quality. When using the present algorithms, geometric tomography is faster, but artifacts in the reconstruction may be difficult to recognize.

  11. Reconstruction of an InAs nanowire using geometric and algebraic tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennington, Robert S.; König, S.; Alpers, A.

    2011-01-01

    Geometric tomography and conventional algebraic tomography algorithms are used to reconstruct cross-sections of an InAs nanowire from a tilt series of experimental annular dark-field images. Both algorithms are also applied to a test object to assess what factors affect the reconstruction quality....... When using the present algorithms, geometric tomography is faster, but artifacts in the reconstruction may be difficult to recognize....

  12. Image Reconstruction Algorithm For Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arko

    2001-01-01

    ). Most image reconstruction algorithms for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) use sensitivity maps as weighting factors. The computation is fast, involving a simple multiply-and- accumulate (MAC) operation, but the resulting image suffers from blurring due to the soft-field effect of the sensor. This paper presents a low cost iterative method employing proportional thresholding, which improves image quality dramatically. The strategy for implementation, computational cost, and achievable speed is examined when using a personal computer (PC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP). For PC implementation, Watcom C++ 10.6 and Visual C++ 5.0 compilers were used. The experimental results are compared to the images reconstructed by commercially available software. The new algorithm improves the image quality significantly at a cost of a few iterations. This technique can be readily exploited for online applications

  13. Simultaneous emission and transmission scanning in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Kazumi; Kitamura, Keishi; Amano, Masaharu; Miura, Shuichi

    2001-01-01

    Examination by PET (positron emission tomography) scanning, following the dosage of 2-deoxy- 18 F fluoro-D-glucose (FDG), is positively utilized for the diagnosis of cancers, rather than for the purpose of studies. This is because the examination by FDG-PET (PET scanning following the dosage of FDG) ensures higher efficiency in discrimination of cancers, than conventional CT and PET. The method of whole body scanning by PET scanning following the dosage of FDG is effectively utilized not only for discrimination cancers, but also for determining the degree of malignancy of tumors and evaluating the methods of treatment of cancers. In conventional methods for examining the degree of malignancy of tumors and evaluating the methods of cancer treatment, it is necessary to correct for the gamma-ray attenuation, which requires a longer time for examination, increasing the physical and psychological pains of the patients. We have installed the simultaneous emission and transmission scanning capability into the HEADTOME-V of the Shimadzu SET-2000W Series positron emission tomographic scanning instruments, to establish an instrument that permits FDG-PET whole body scanning in actual clinical fields, with minimized physical and psychological pains of patients concerned, yet ensuring an outstandingly high examination efficiency. This report also presents some data obtained by this newly developed instrument and those obtained in practical applications. (author)

  14. Optical diffraction tomography: accuracy of an off-axis reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostencka, Julianna; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    Optical diffraction tomography is an increasingly popular method that allows for reconstruction of three-dimensional refractive index distribution of semi-transparent samples using multiple measurements of an optical field transmitted through the sample for various illumination directions. The process of assembly of the angular measurements is usually performed with one of two methods: filtered backprojection (FBPJ) or filtered backpropagation (FBPP) tomographic reconstruction algorithm. The former approach, although conceptually very simple, provides an accurate reconstruction for the object regions located close to the plane of focus. However, since FBPJ ignores diffraction, its use for spatially extended structures is arguable. According to the theory of scattering, more precise restoration of a 3D structure shall be achieved with the FBPP algorithm, which unlike the former approach incorporates diffraction. It is believed that with this method one is allowed to obtain a high accuracy reconstruction in a large measurement volume exceeding depth of focus of an imaging system. However, some studies have suggested that a considerable improvement of the FBPP results can be achieved with prior propagation of the transmitted fields back to the centre of the object. This, supposedly, enables reduction of errors due to approximated diffraction formulas used in FBPP. In our view this finding casts doubt on quality of the FBPP reconstruction in the regions far from the rotation axis. The objective of this paper is to investigate limitation of the FBPP algorithm in terms of an off-axis reconstruction and compare its performance with the FBPJ approach. Moreover, in this work we propose some modifications to the FBPP algorithm that allow for more precise restoration of a sample structure in off-axis locations. The research is based on extensive numerical simulations supported with wave-propagation method.

  15. Continuous analog of multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique for computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Kiyoko; Yamaguchi, Yusaku; Abou Al-Ola, Omar M.; Kojima, Takeshi; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a hybrid dynamical system as a continuous analog to the block-iterative multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (BI-MART), which is a well-known iterative image reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography. The hybrid system is described by a switched nonlinear system with a piecewise smooth vector field or differential equation and, for consistent inverse problems, the convergence of non-negatively constrained solutions to a globally stable equilibrium is guaranteed by the Lyapunov theorem. Namely, we can prove theoretically that a weighted Kullback-Leibler divergence measure can be a common Lyapunov function for the switched system. We show that discretizing the differential equation by using the first-order approximation (Euler's method) based on the geometric multiplicative calculus leads to the same iterative formula of the BI-MART with the scaling parameter as a time-step of numerical discretization. The present paper is the first to reveal that a kind of iterative image reconstruction algorithm is constructed by the discretization of a continuous-time dynamical system for solving tomographic inverse problems. Iterative algorithms with not only the Euler method but also the Runge-Kutta methods of lower-orders applied for discretizing the continuous-time system can be used for image reconstruction. A numerical example showing the characteristics of the discretized iterative methods is presented.

  16. Model-based image reconstruction in X-ray computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zbijewski, Wojciech Bartosz

    2006-01-01

    The thesis investigates the applications of iterative, statistical reconstruction (SR) algorithms in X-ray Computed Tomography. Emphasis is put on various aspects of system modeling in statistical reconstruction. Fundamental issues such as effects of object discretization and algorithm

  17. Positron transaxial emission tomograph with computerized image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatteau, Michel.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns a positron transaxial emission tomography apparatus with computerized image reconstruction, like those used in nuclear medicine for studying the metabolism of organs, in physiological examinations and as a diagnosis aid. The operation is based on the principle of the detection of photons emitted when the positrons are annihilated by impact with an electron. The appliance is mainly composed of: (a) - a set of gamma ray detectors distributed on a polygonal arrangement around the body area to be examined, (b) - circuits for amplifying the signals delivered by the gamma ray detectors, (c) - computers essentially comprising energy integration and discrimination circuits and provided at the output of the detectors for calculating and delivering, as from the amplified signals, information on the position and energy relative to each occurrence constituted by the detections of photons, (d) - time coincidence circuits for selecting by emission of detector validation signals, only those occurrences, among the ensemble of those detected, which effectively result from the annihilation of positrons inside the area examined, (e) - a data processing system [fr

  18. Weight Multispectral Reconstruction Strategy for Enhanced Reconstruction Accuracy and Stability With Cerenkov Luminescence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongbo Guo; Xiaowei He; Muhan Liu; Zeyu Zhang; Zhenhua Hu; Jie Tian

    2017-06-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) provides a novel technique for 3-D noninvasive detection of radiopharmaceuticals in living subjects. However, because of the severe scattering of Cerenkov light, the reconstruction accuracy and stability of CLT is still unsatisfied. In this paper, a modified weight multispectral CLT (wmCLT) reconstruction strategy was developed which split the Cerenkov radiation spectrum into several sub-spectral bands and weighted the sub-spectral results to obtain the final result. To better evaluate the property of the wmCLT reconstruction strategy in terms of accuracy, stability and practicability, several numerical simulation experiments and in vivo experiments were conducted and the results obtained were compared with the traditional multispectral CLT (mCLT) and hybrid-spectral CLT (hCLT) reconstruction strategies. The numerical simulation results indicated that wmCLT strategy significantly improved the accuracy of Cerenkov source localization and intensity quantitation and exhibited good stability in suppressing noise in numerical simulation experiments. And the comparison of the results achieved from different in vivo experiments further indicated significant improvement of the wmCLT strategy in terms of the shape recovery of the bladder and the spatial resolution of imaging xenograft tumors. Overall the strategy reported here will facilitate the development of nuclear and optical molecular tomography in theoretical study.

  19. Phillips-Tikhonov regularization with a priori information for neutron emission tomographic reconstruction on Joint European Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielecki, J.; Scholz, M.; Drozdowicz, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Giacomelli, L. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Kiptily, V.; Kempenaars, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Conroy, S. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University (Sweden); Craciunescu, T. [IAP, National Institute for Laser Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    A method of tomographic reconstruction of the neutron emissivity in the poloidal cross section of the Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) tokamak was developed. Due to very limited data set (two projection angles, 19 lines of sight only) provided by the neutron emission profile monitor (KN3 neutron camera), the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem. The aim of this work consists in making a contribution to the development of reliable plasma tomography reconstruction methods that could be routinely used at JET tokamak. The proposed method is based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization and incorporates a priori knowledge of the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile. For the purpose of the optimal selection of the regularization parameters, the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile is approximated by the shape of normalized electron density profile measured by LIDAR or high resolution Thomson scattering JET diagnostics. In contrast with some previously developed methods of ill-posed plasma tomography reconstruction problem, the developed algorithms do not include any post-processing of the obtained solution and the physical constrains on the solution are imposed during the regularization process. The accuracy of the method is at first evaluated by several tests with synthetic data based on various plasma neutron emissivity models (phantoms). Then, the method is applied to the neutron emissivity reconstruction for JET D plasma discharge #85100. It is demonstrated that this method shows good performance and reliability and it can be routinely used for plasma neutron emissivity reconstruction on JET.

  20. Iterative reconstruction with boundary detection for carbon ion computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepak; Qin, Nan; Zhang, You; Kalantari, Faraz; Niu, Shanzhou; Jia, Xun; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Wang, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In heavy ion radiation therapy, improving the accuracy in range prediction of the ions inside the patient’s body has become essential. Accurate localization of the Bragg peak provides greater conformity of the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. We investigated the use of carbon ions directly for computed tomography (carbon CT) to create the relative stopping power map of a patient’s body. The Geant4 toolkit was used to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the carbon ion trajectories, to study their lateral and angular deflections and the most likely paths, using a water phantom. Geant4 was used to create carbonCT projections of a contrast and spatial resolution phantom, with a cone beam of 430 MeV/u carbon ions. The contrast phantom consisted of cranial bone, lung material, and PMMA inserts while the spatial resolution phantom contained bone and lung material inserts with line pair (lp) densities ranging from 1.67 lp cm-1 through 5 lp cm-1. First, the positions of each carbon ion on the rear and front trackers were used for an approximate reconstruction of the phantom. The phantom boundary was extracted from this approximate reconstruction, by using the position as well as angle information from the four tracking detectors, resulting in the entry and exit locations of the individual ions on the phantom surface. Subsequent reconstruction was performed by the iterative algebraic reconstruction technique coupled with total variation minimization (ART-TV) assuming straight line trajectories for the ions inside the phantom. The influence of number of projections was studied with reconstruction from five different sets of projections: 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90. Additionally, the effect of number of ions on the image quality was investigated by reducing the number of ions/projection while keeping the total number of projections at 60. An estimation of carbon ion range using the carbonCT image resulted in improved range prediction compared to the range calculated using a

  1. Detecting Metastatic Bladder Cancer Using (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron-Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the contribution of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) to detection of metastatic bladder cancer. The present study included 79 patients (69 men and 10 women) undergoing (18)F-FDG-PET/CT upon suspicion of metastatic bladder cancer between July 2007 and April 2013. The mean age was 66.1 years with a standard deviation of 10.7 years (range, 21 to 85 years). Patients were required to fast for 6 hours prior to scanning, and whole-body PET scanning from the skull base to the upper thighs was performed approximately 1 hour after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of (18)F-FDG. Whole body CT scanning was performed in the cranio-caudal direction. FDG-PET images were reconstructed using CT data for attenuation correction. Suspicious recurrent or metastatic lesions were confirmed by histopathology or clinical follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT were 89%, 78%, 90%, 75%, and 86%, respectively. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT can detect metastases with high sensitivity and positive predictive values in patients with metastatic bladder carcinoma.

  2. Development of computed tomography system and image reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairiah Yazid; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Azaman Ahmad; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Ab Razak Hamzah

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography is one of the most advanced and powerful nondestructive inspection techniques, which is currently used in many different industries. In several CT systems, detection has been by combination of an X-ray image intensifier and charge -coupled device (CCD) camera or by using line array detector. The recent development of X-ray flat panel detector has made fast CT imaging feasible and practical. Therefore this paper explained the arrangement of a new detection system which is using the existing high resolution (127 μm pixel size) flat panel detector in MINT and the image reconstruction technique developed. The aim of the project is to develop a prototype flat panel detector based CT imaging system for NDE. The prototype consisted of an X-ray tube, a flat panel detector system, a rotation table and a computer system to control the sample motion and image acquisition. Hence this project is divided to two major tasks, firstly to develop image reconstruction algorithm and secondly to integrate X-ray imaging components into one CT system. The image reconstruction algorithm using filtered back-projection method is developed and compared to other techniques. The MATLAB program is the tools used for the simulations and computations for this project. (Author)

  3. The Positron Emission Tomography. A diagnostic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, P.

    2001-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a new imaging modality, which is able to assess non-invasively the biochemical mechanisms, underlying physiological and pathophysiological processes in vivo in humans. The technique relies on the administration of radioactive tracers labeled with short-lived positron emitters, which need to be produced on site via a particle accelerator (cyclotron). Radionuclides are produced upon request and formulated into biologically active organic molecules having precise pharmacokinetics and specificity. The radiotracer can be detected by the PET scanner and represented as tomographic sections (images of body sections) showing its regional distribution and concentration. This makes it possible to address clinical questions concerning occurrence and evolution of many diseases as well as their response to therapy. The ability to image (measure) biological processes and not only anatomy enables PET to explore diseases in the very early stage, including those diseases which are not related to modifications of organ structure (e.g. psychiatric diseases, metabolic disorders, biochemical disfunction). PET plays a major role, in conjunction with the other imaging modalities, to improve diagnosis capabilities and disease mechanism understanding [it

  4. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Perez-Mendez, V. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  5. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures

  6. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, M.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters ε 2 τ's are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs

  7. Positron emission tomography (PET) in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    In the past the approach to the brain has been necessarily indirect, employing peripheral fluids to assess central and regional neurochemical processes. Blood, urine, skin and muscle biopsy, and cerebrospinal fluid are valuable reflectors of the neurochemical and neuropharmacological activity of the brain, but are removed in time and place from disordered thought processes and diluted by the products of both functional and dysfunctional brain systems. Biopsy studies have helped in studying the functional disorders of organs like the liver, but they are destructive to the brain and less useful because unlike these organs, the brain has a regional variation in its chemistry. The experimental insights from animal studies focusing on the pharmacology of individual cell groups - in striatum or locus coeruleus, for example - cannot easily or unambigiously be applied to clinical populations. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a versatile approach utilizing the mathematics of x-ray transmission scanning (CT scanning) to produce slice images of radioisotope distribution. PET makes possible a wide range of metabolic studies. Positron emitters such as carbon-11 or fluorine-18 can be used to label glucose, amino acids, drugs, neurotransmitter precursors, and many other molecules and examine their distribution and fate in discrete cell groups

  8. Method for position emission mammography image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark Frederick

    2004-10-12

    An image reconstruction method comprising accepting coincidence datat from either a data file or in real time from a pair of detector heads, culling event data that is outside a desired energy range, optionally saving the desired data for each detector position or for each pair of detector pixels on the two detector heads, and then reconstructing the image either by backprojection image reconstruction or by iterative image reconstruction. In the backprojection image reconstruction mode, rays are traced between centers of lines of response (LOR's), counts are then either allocated by nearest pixel interpolation or allocated by an overlap method and then corrected for geometric effects and attenuation and the data file updated. If the iterative image reconstruction option is selected, one implementation is to compute a grid Siddon retracing, and to perform maximum likelihood expectation maiximization (MLEM) computed by either: a) tracing parallel rays between subpixels on opposite detector heads; or b) tracing rays between randomized endpoint locations on opposite detector heads.

  9. Optimization of Bayesian Emission tomographic reconstruction for region of interest quantitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi

    2003-01-01

    Region of interest (ROI) quantitation is an important task in emission tomography (e.g., positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography). It is essential for exploring clinical factors such as tumor activity, growth rate, and the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. Bayesian methods based on the maximum a posteriori principle (or called penalized maximum likelihood methods) have been developed for emission image reconstructions to deal with the low signal to noise ratio of the emission data. Similar to the filter cut-off frequency in the filtered backprojection method, the smoothing parameter of the image prior in Bayesian reconstruction controls the resolution and noise trade-off and hence affects ROI quantitation. In this paper we present an approach for choosing the optimum smoothing parameter in Bayesian reconstruction for ROI quantitation. Bayesian reconstructions are difficult to analyze because the resolution and noise properties are nonlinear and object-dependent. Building on the recent progress on deriving the approximate expressions for the local impulse response function and the covariance matrix, we derived simplied theoretical expressions for the bias, the variance, and the ensemble mean squared error (EMSE) of the ROI quantitation. One problem in evaluating ROI quantitation is that the truth is often required for calculating the bias. This is overcome by using ensemble distribution of the activity inside the ROI and computing the average EMSE. The resulting expressions allow fast evaluation of the image quality for different smoothing parameters. The optimum smoothing parameter of the image prior can then be selected to minimize the EMSE

  10. Representation of photon limited data in emission tomography using origin ensembles

    OpenAIRE

    Sitek, A

    2008-01-01

    Representation and reconstruction of data obtained by emission tomography scanners are challenging due to high noise levels in the data. Typically, images obtained using tomographic measurements are represented using grids. In this work, we define images as sets of origins of events detected during tomographic measurements; we call these origin ensembles (OEs). A state in the ensemble is characterized by a vector of 3N parameters Y, where the parameters are the coordinates of origins of detec...

  11. A statistical analysis of count normalization methods used in positron-emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, T.J.; Ficke, D.C.; Snyder, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) reconstruction process, annihilation counts are normalized for photon absorption, detector efficiency and detector-pair duty-cycle. Several normalization methods of time-of-flight and conventional systems are analyzed mathematically for count bias and variance. The results of the study have some implications on hardware and software complexity and on image noise and distortion

  12. Positron emission tomography for the assessment of myocardial viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelbert, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    The detection of viable myocardium or ischemically injured myocardium with a reversible impairment of contractile function remains clinically important but challenging. Detection of reversible dysfunction and distinction from irreversible tissue injury by positron emission tomography is based on identification of preserved or even enhanced glucose metabolism with F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose. Regional patterns of myocardial glucose utilization and blood flow, defined as perfusion-metabolism mismatches or matches, on positron emission tomography in patients with chronic or even acute ischemic heart disease are highly accurate in predicting the functional outcome after interventional revascularization. Compared with thallium-201 redistribution scintigraphy, positron emission tomography appears to be diagnostically more accurate, especially in patients with severely impaired left ventricular function. While larger clinical trials are needed for further confirmation, positron emission tomography has already proved clinically useful for stratifying patients with poor left ventricular function to the most appropriate therapeutic approach

  13. Positron emission tomography for staging of oesophageal and gastroesophageal malignancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, AC; Plukker, JT; Nieweg, OE; Vaalburg, W

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was prospectively investigated as a means of detecting metastatic disease in patients with oesophageal tumours and compared with computerized tomography (CT), with the surgical findings as a gold standard. Twenty-six

  14. Positron emission tomography of incidentally detected small pulmonary nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Dirksen, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging of small pulmonary nodules incidentally detected by spiral computed tomography (CT) in a high-risk population. Ten patients (five females, five males, aged 54-72 years) were recruited...

  15. Positron emission tomography now and in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaalburg, W.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of positron emission tomography used in nuclear medicine. The production of positron emitting radionuclides is discussed. The development of positron detectors is described. The application of positron emission tomography in cardiology, oncology and neurology is treated. The authors conclude that PET is a unique method to examine metabolic processes, although the method is still in its infancy. 7 refs.; 1 table

  16. Representation of photon limited data in emission tomography using origin ensembles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitek, A [Radiology Department, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)], E-mail: asitek@bwh.harvard.edu

    2008-06-21

    Representation and reconstruction of data obtained by emission tomography scanners are challenging due to high noise levels in the data. Typically, images obtained using tomographic measurements are represented using grids. In this work, we define images as sets of origins of events detected during tomographic measurements; we call these origin ensembles (OEs). A state in the ensemble is characterized by a vector of 3N parameters Y, where the parameters are the coordinates of origins of detected events in a three-dimensional space and N is the number of detected events. The 3N-dimensional probability density function (PDF) for that ensemble is derived, and we present an algorithm for OE image estimation from tomographic measurements. A displayable image (e.g. grid based image) is derived from the OE formulation by calculating ensemble expectations based on the PDF using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The approach was applied to computer-simulated 3D list-mode positron emission tomography data. The reconstruction errors for a 10 000 000 event acquisition for simulated ranged from 0.1 to 34.8%, depending on object size and sampling density. The method was also applied to experimental data and the results of the OE method were consistent with those obtained by a standard maximum-likelihood approach. The method is a new approach to representation and reconstruction of data obtained by photon-limited emission tomography measurements.

  17. Representation of photon limited data in emission tomography using origin ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, A.

    2008-06-01

    Representation and reconstruction of data obtained by emission tomography scanners are challenging due to high noise levels in the data. Typically, images obtained using tomographic measurements are represented using grids. In this work, we define images as sets of origins of events detected during tomographic measurements; we call these origin ensembles (OEs). A state in the ensemble is characterized by a vector of 3N parameters Y, where the parameters are the coordinates of origins of detected events in a three-dimensional space and N is the number of detected events. The 3N-dimensional probability density function (PDF) for that ensemble is derived, and we present an algorithm for OE image estimation from tomographic measurements. A displayable image (e.g. grid based image) is derived from the OE formulation by calculating ensemble expectations based on the PDF using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The approach was applied to computer-simulated 3D list-mode positron emission tomography data. The reconstruction errors for a 10 000 000 event acquisition for simulated ranged from 0.1 to 34.8%, depending on object size and sampling density. The method was also applied to experimental data and the results of the OE method were consistent with those obtained by a standard maximum-likelihood approach. The method is a new approach to representation and reconstruction of data obtained by photon-limited emission tomography measurements.

  18. Representation of photon limited data in emission tomography using origin ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, A

    2008-01-01

    Representation and reconstruction of data obtained by emission tomography scanners are challenging due to high noise levels in the data. Typically, images obtained using tomographic measurements are represented using grids. In this work, we define images as sets of origins of events detected during tomographic measurements; we call these origin ensembles (OEs). A state in the ensemble is characterized by a vector of 3N parameters Y, where the parameters are the coordinates of origins of detected events in a three-dimensional space and N is the number of detected events. The 3N-dimensional probability density function (PDF) for that ensemble is derived, and we present an algorithm for OE image estimation from tomographic measurements. A displayable image (e.g. grid based image) is derived from the OE formulation by calculating ensemble expectations based on the PDF using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The approach was applied to computer-simulated 3D list-mode positron emission tomography data. The reconstruction errors for a 10 000 000 event acquisition for simulated ranged from 0.1 to 34.8%, depending on object size and sampling density. The method was also applied to experimental data and the results of the OE method were consistent with those obtained by a standard maximum-likelihood approach. The method is a new approach to representation and reconstruction of data obtained by photon-limited emission tomography measurements

  19. Shielding design for positron emission tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    With the recent advent of readily available tracer isotopes, there has been marked increase in the number of hospital-based and free-standing positron emission tomography (PET) clinics. PET facilities employ relatively large activities of high-energy photon emitting isotopes, which can be dangerous to the health of humans and animals. This coupled with the current dose limits for radiation worker and members of the public can result in shielding requirements. This research contributes to the calculation of the appropriate shielding to keep the level of radiation within an acceptable recommended limit. Two different methods were used including measurements made at selected points of an operating PET facility and computer simulations by using Monte Carlo Transport Code. The measurements mainly concerned the radiation exposure at different points around facility using the survey meter detectors and Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLD). Then the set of manual calculation procedures were used to estimate the shielding requirements for a newly built PEF facility. The results from the measurement and the computer simulation were compared to the results obtained from the set manual calculation procedure. In general, the estimated weekly dose at the points of interest is lower than the regulatory limits for the little company of Mary Hospital. Furthermore, the density and the HVL for normal strength concrete and clay bricks are almost similar. In conclusion, PET facilities present somewhat different design requirements and are more likely to require additional radiation shielding. Therefore, existing shields at the little Company of Mary Hospital are in general found to be adequate and satisfactory and additional shielding was found necessary at the new PET facility in the department of Nuclear Medicine of the Dr. George Mukhari Hospital. By use of appropriate design, by implying specific shielding requirements and by maintaining good operating practices, radiation doses to

  20. Positron emission tomography and cerebral metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comar, D.; Maziere, M.; Zarifian, E.; Naquet, R.

    1979-01-01

    The association of new methods of labelling with short lived radioisotopes and of visualisation 'in vivo' of these labelled molecules by emission tomography, provide the possibility of studying brain metabolism at different levels. Two examples will illustrate the possibilities of this methodology. Cerebral metabolism of methionine- 11 C in phenylketonutic patients: The cerebral uptake of methionine was measured in 24 PKU children aged 1 to 40 months on a low protein diet. Ten of them were examined twice at intervals of several months. Stopping the diet for one week leads to an increase in blood phenylalanine and to a significant important decrease in brain uptake of labelled methionine. Futhermore, for children under treatment having a low phenylalanine blood concentration, brain uptake of methionine decreases with age between 1 and 40 months. These results suggest that the treatment of this disease should be started as soon as possible after birth. Cerebral metabolism of psychoactive drugs: The study of the brain distribution and kinetics of psychoactive drugs may help in understanding their mode of action. Chlorpromazine- 11 C was administered i.v. to schyzophrenic patients not previously treated with neuroleptics. In all patients the brain uptake of the drug was high and rapid, and was localized mainly in the grey matter, probably in proportion to the blood flow. Non-specific binding of this drug to brain proteins prevented visualization of specific binding to dopaminergic or αnor-adrenergic receptors. Specific receptor binding of benzodiazepines was however visualized in the brain of baboons after injection of 11 C-flunitrazepam (specific activity = 600 Ci/μmole) and subsequent displacement of this radioactive ligand by a pharmacological dose of Lorazepam

  1. A modified discrete algebraic reconstruction technique for multiple grey image reconstruction for limited angle range tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhiting; Guan, Yong; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xiangyu; Li, Fahu; Guo, Pengfei; Tian, Yangchao

    2016-03-01

    The `missing wedge', which is due to a restricted rotation range, is a major challenge for quantitative analysis of an object using tomography. With prior knowledge of the grey levels, the discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) is able to reconstruct objects accurately with projections in a limited angle range. However, the quality of the reconstructions declines as the number of grey levels increases. In this paper, a modified DART (MDART) was proposed, in which each independent region of homogeneous material was chosen as a research object, instead of the grey values. The grey values of each discrete region were estimated according to the solution of the linear projection equations. The iterative process of boundary pixels updating and correcting the grey values of each region was executed alternately. Simulation experiments of binary phantoms as well as multiple grey phantoms show that MDART is capable of achieving high-quality reconstructions with projections in a limited angle range. The interesting advancement of MDART is that neither prior knowledge of the grey values nor the number of grey levels is necessary.

  2. Reconstructed frontal and coronal cuts in computed tomography of the trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fochem, K.; Klumair, J.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison between the original coronally cuts and the reconstructed coronal cuts yielded basic information on the loss of quality by computed reconstruction of images. As for the trunk, only comparisons between the conventional linear tomography and computed frontal of trunk cuts are possible. A few examples will demonstrate that despite a considerable loss of quality, computed frontal cuts will supply additional information in certain cases. It is also shown that the reconstructed frontal cuts cannot replace conventional tomography. (orig.) [de

  3. A Prototype for Passive Gamma Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honkamaa, T.; Levai, F.; Berndt, R.; Schwalbach, P.; Vaccaro, S.; ); Turunen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Combined efforts of multiple stakeholders of the IAEA Support Programme task JNT 1510: ''Prototype of passive gamma emission tomograph (PGET)'', resulted in the design, manufacturing and extensive testing of an advanced verification tool for partial defect testing on light water reactor spent fuel. The PGET has now reached a proven capability of detecting a single missing or substituted pin inside a BWR and VVER-440 fuel assemblies. The task started in 2004 and it is planned to be finished this year. The PGET head consists of two banks of 104 CdTe detectors each with integrated data acquisition electronics. The CdTe detectors are embedded in tungsten collimators which can be rotated around the fuel element using an integrated stepping motor mounted on a rotating table. All components are packed inside a toroid watertight enclosure. Control, data acquisition and image reconstruction analysis is fully computerized and automated. The design of the system is transportable and suitable for safeguards verifications in spent fuel ponds anywhere. Four test campaigns have been conducted. In 2009, the first test in Ringhals NPP failed collecting data but demonstrated suitability of the PGET for field deployments. Subsequent tests on fuel with increasing complexity were all successful (Ispra, Italy (2012), Olkiluoto, Finland (2013) and Loviisa, Finland (2014)). The paper will present the PGET design, results obtained from the test campaigns and mention also drawbacks that were experienced in the project. The paper also describes further tests which would allow evaluating the capabilities and limitations of the method and the algorithm used. Currently, the main technical shortcoming is long acquisition time, due to serial control and readout of detectors. With redesigned electronics it can be expected that the system would be able to verify a VVER-440 assembly in five minutes, which meets the IAEA user requirements. (author)

  4. Iterative reconstruction techniques for computed tomography Part 1: Technical principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Jong, Pim A. de; Leiner, Tim; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Heer, Linda M. de; Budde, Ricardo P.J.

    2013-01-01

    To explain the technical principles of and differences between commercially available iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms for computed tomography (CT) in non-mathematical terms for radiologists and clinicians. Technical details of the different proprietary IR techniques were distilled from available scientific articles and manufacturers' white papers and were verified by the manufacturers. Clinical results were obtained from a literature search spanning January 2006 to January 2012, including only original research papers concerning IR for CT. IR for CT iteratively reduces noise and artefacts in either image space or raw data, or both. Reported dose reductions ranged from 23 % to 76 % compared to locally used default filtered back-projection (FBP) settings, with similar noise, artefacts, subjective, and objective image quality. IR has the potential to allow reducing the radiation dose while preserving image quality. Disadvantages of IR include blotchy image appearance and longer computational time. Future studies need to address differences between IR algorithms for clinical low-dose CT. circle Iterative reconstruction technology for CT is presented in non-mathematical terms. (orig.)

  5. Superfast maximum-likelihood reconstruction for quantum tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jiangwei; Zhang, Zhengyun; Ng, Hui Khoon

    2017-06-01

    Conventional methods for computing maximum-likelihood estimators (MLE) often converge slowly in practical situations, leading to a search for simplifying methods that rely on additional assumptions for their validity. In this work, we provide a fast and reliable algorithm for maximum-likelihood reconstruction that avoids this slow convergence. Our method utilizes the state-of-the-art convex optimization scheme, an accelerated projected-gradient method, that allows one to accommodate the quantum nature of the problem in a different way than in the standard methods. We demonstrate the power of our approach by comparing its performance with other algorithms for n -qubit state tomography. In particular, an eight-qubit situation that purportedly took weeks of computation time in 2005 can now be completed in under a minute for a single set of data, with far higher accuracy than previously possible. This refutes the common claim that MLE reconstruction is slow and reduces the need for alternative methods that often come with difficult-to-verify assumptions. In fact, recent methods assuming Gaussian statistics or relying on compressed sensing ideas are demonstrably inapplicable for the situation under consideration here. Our algorithm can be applied to general optimization problems over the quantum state space; the philosophy of projected gradients can further be utilized for optimization contexts with general constraints.

  6. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@ki.au.dk; Bassler, Niels [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  7. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, David C.; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  8. Recurrent ovarian endodermal sinus tumor: demonstration by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.A.; Kim, E.E.; Tresukosol, D.; Kudelka, A.P.; Edwards, C.L.; Kavanagh, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor of the ovary that was identified and/or clearly depicted by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. The potential roles of various imaging modalities in the detection of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in evaluation of residual intramuscular myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zade, Anand; Ahire, Archana; Shetty, Shishir; Rai, Sujith; Bokka, Rajashekharrao; Velumani, Arokiaswamy; Kabnurkar, Rasika

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular myxoma (IM) is a rare benign neoplasm. In a patient diagnosed with IM of left thigh, we report the utility of a postoperative fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan in assessing the efficacy of surgical excision

  10. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography has a clinical impact for patients with cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Rikke Mulvad; Jensen, Pernille Tine; Hendel, Helle W

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have found that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has a high sensitivity and specificity in the identification of metastasis in cervical cancer. Herlev Hospital, Denmark, has been performing PET-CTs in stage I-IV cervical cancer since 1 May 2006. The present...

  11. Diffuse nesidioblastosis diagnosed on a Ga-68 DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arun, Sasikumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Shukla, Jaya; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kumar, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe a 50 days old pre-term infant with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy in whom 68 Ga DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computerized tomography scan showed diffusely increased tracer uptake in the entire pancreas with no abnormal tracer uptake anywhere else in the body, suggestive of a diffuse variant of nesidioblastosis. (author)

  12. Gallium tomoscintigraphic imaging of esophageal cancer using emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Takao; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Kan; Maeda, Hisato; Taguchi, Mitsuo

    1983-01-01

    Emission computed tomography (ECT) was clinically evaluated in 67 Ga imaging of esophageal cancer. ECT system used in this study is equipped with opposed dual large-field-of-view cameras (GCA 70A-S, Toshiba Co.). Data were acquired by rotating the two cameras 180 0 about the longitudinal axis of the patient. Total acquisition time was about 12 minutes. Multiple slices of transaxial, sagittal and coronal sections were reconstructed in a 64 x 64 matrix form using convolution algorithms. In three out of six cases studied the tumor uptake was not detected on conventional images, because the lesion was small, concentration of activity was poor or the lesion activity was overlapped with the neighbouring activities distributed to normal organs such as sternum, vertebra, liver and hilus. On ECT images, by contrast, abnormal uptake of the tumors was definitively detected in all the six cases. ECT imaging was also useful in estimating the effect of treatment by the decrease in 67 Ga concentration. We have devised a special technique to repeat ECT scan with a thin tube filled with 67 Ga solution inserted through the esophagus. By this technique, comparing paired images with and without the tube activity, exact location of the uptake against the esophagus and extraesophageal extension of the disease could be accurately evaluated in a three-dimensional field of view. ECT in gallium scanning is expected to be of great clinical value to elevate the confidence level of diagnosis in detecting, localizing and following up the diseases. (author)

  13. Emission computerized-tomography and determination of local brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.; Alavi, A.; Reivich, M.; Edwards, R.Q.; Fenton, C.A.; Zimmerman, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for the three dimensional reconstruction of /sup 99m/Tc brain scans are described. The diagnostic advantages of computerized tomography in the localization of brain tumors and in measurements of local cerebral blood flow are discussed. (U.S.)

  14. Early-Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography and PET Angiography for Endoleak Detection After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Robert; Gühne, Falk; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-06-01

    To propose a positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) protocol including early-dynamic and late-phase acquisitions to evaluate graft patency and aneurysm diameter, detect endoleaks, and rule out graft or vessel wall inflammation after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in one examination without intravenous contrast medium. Early-dynamic PET/CT of the endovascular prosthesis is performed for 180 seconds immediately after intravenous injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose. Data are reconstructed in variable time frames (time periods after tracer injection) to visualize the arterial anatomy and are displayed as PET angiography or fused with CT images. Images are evaluated in view of vascular abnormalities, graft configuration, and tracer accumulation in the aneurysm sac. Whole-body PET/CT is performed 90 to 120 minutes after tracer injection. This protocol for early-dynamic PET/CT and PET angiography has the potential to evaluate vascular diseases, including the diagnosis of complications after endovascular procedures.

  15. Hybrid Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography Sulphur Colloid Scintigraphy in Focal Nodular Hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhoil, Amit; Gayana, Shankramurthy; Sood, Ashwani; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-01-01

    It is important to differentiate focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), a benign condition of liver most commonly affecting women, from other neoplasm such as hepatic adenoma and metastasis. The functional reticuloendothelial features of FNH can be demonstrated by scintigraphy. We present a case of breast cancer in whom fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (CT) showed a homogenous hyperdense lesion in liver, which on Tc99m sulfur colloid single-photon emission computed tomography/CT was found to have increased focal tracer uptake suggestive of FNH

  16. Positron emission tomography and migraine. Tomographie par emission de positons et migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabriat, H. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1992-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT{sub 2} serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET.

  17. Reconstruction of emission coefficients for a non-axisymmetric coupling arc by algebraic reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangjun; Xiong Jun; Gao Hongming; Wu Lin

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of tomographic reconstruction of an asymmetric arc plasma has been carried out. The objective of this work aims at reconstructing emission coefficients of a non-axisymmetric coupling arc from measured intensities by means of an algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). In order to define the optimal experimental scheme for good quality with limited views, the dependence of the reconstruction quality on three configurations (four, eight, ten projection angles) are presented and discussed via a displaced Gaussian model. Then, the emission coefficients of a free burning arc are reconstructed by the ART with the ten-view configuration and an Abel inversion, respectively, and good agreement is obtained. Finally, the emission coefficient profiles of the coupling arc are successfully achieved with the ten-view configuration. The results show that the distribution of emission coefficient for the coupling arc is different from centrosymmetric shape. The ART is perfectly suitable for reconstructing emission coefficients of the coupling arc with the ten-view configuration, proving the feasibility and utility of the ART to characterize an asymmetric arc.

  18. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography--imaging protocols, artifacts, and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Antoch, Gerald; Freudenberg, Lutz S; Kühl, Hilmar; Debatin, Jörg F; Müller, Stefan P

    2004-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in fused images of anatomical information, such as that provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, with biological information obtainable by positron emission tomography (PET). The near-simultaneous data acquisition in a fixed combination of a PET and a CT scanner in a combined PET/CT imaging system minimizes spatial and temporal mismatches between the modalities by eliminating the need to move the patient in between exams. In addition, using the fast CT scan for PET attenuation correction, the duration of the examination is significantly reduced compared to standalone PET imaging with standard rod-transmission sources. The main source of artifacts arises from the use of the CT-data for scatter and attenuation correction of the PET images. Today, CT reconstruction algorithms cannot account for the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings or prostheses, properly, thus resulting in streak artifacts, which are propagated into the PET image by the attenuation correction. The transformation of attenuation coefficients at X-ray energies to those at 511 keV works well for soft tissues, bone, and air, but again is insufficient for dense CT contrast agents, such as iodine or barium. Finally, mismatches, for example, due to uncoordinated respiration result in incorrect attenuation-corrected PET images. These artifacts, however, can be minimized or avoided prospectively by careful acquisition protocol considerations. In doubt, the uncorrected images almost always allow discrimination between true and artificial finding. PET/CT has to be integrated into the diagnostic workflow for harvesting the full potential of the new modality. In particular, the diagnostic power of both, the CT and the PET within the combination must not be underestimated. By combining multiple diagnostic studies within a single examination, significant logistic advantages can be expected if the combined PET

  19. A dual-PIXE tomography setup for reconstruction of Germanium in ICF target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, N.; Lu, H. Y.; Wang, Q.; Meng, J.; Gao, D. Z.; Zhang, Y. J.; Liang, X. X.; Zhang, W.; Li, J.; Ma, X. J.; Shen, H.

    2017-08-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is one type of fusion energy research which could initiate nuclear fusion reactions through heating and compressing thermonuclear fuel. Compared to a pure plastic target, Germanium doping into the CH ablator layer by Glow Discharge Polymer (GDP) technique can increase the ablation velocity and the standoff distance between the ablation front and laser-deposition region. During target fabrication process, quantitative doping of Ge should be accurately controlled. Particle Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) can make not only quantification of the concentration, but also reconstruction of the spatial distribution of doped element. The Si (Li) detector for PIXE tomography technique had a disadvantage of low counting rate. To make up this deficiency, another detector of Si (Li) with the same configuration positioned at the opposite side with the same detective angle 135° have been implemented. Simultaneously acquired elemental maps of Ge obtained using two detectors may be different because of the X-ray absorption along the X-ray exit route in the target. In this paper, the X-ray detection efficiency is drastically improved by this dual-PIXE tomography system.

  20. Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT) images enhancement using a linear filter in the frequency domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Rodrigo S.S.; Tardelli, Tiago C.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jackowski, Marcel P., E-mail: mjack@ime.usp.b [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Computer Science

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, a new technique for in vivo spectrographic imaging of stable isotopes was presented as Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). In this technique, a fast neutrons beam stimulates stable nuclei in a sample, which emit characteristic gamma radiation. The photon energy is unique and is used to identify the emitting nuclei. The emitted gamma energy spectra can be used for reconstruction of the target tissue image and for determination of the tissue elemental composition. Due to the stochastic nature of photon emission process by irradiated tissue, one of the most suitable algorithms for tomographic reconstruction is the Expectation-Maximization (E-M) algorithm, once on its formulation are considered simultaneously the probabilities of photons emission and detection. However, a disadvantage of this algorithm is the introduction of noise in the reconstructed image as the number of iterations increases. This increase can be caused either by features of the algorithm itself or by the low sampling rate of projections used for tomographic reconstruction. In this work, a linear filter in the frequency domain was used in order to improve the quality of the reconstructed images. (author)

  1. Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT) images enhancement using a linear filter in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Rodrigo S.S.; Tardelli, Tiago C.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Jackowski, Marcel P.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a new technique for in vivo spectrographic imaging of stable isotopes was presented as Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). In this technique, a fast neutrons beam stimulates stable nuclei in a sample, which emit characteristic gamma radiation. The photon energy is unique and is used to identify the emitting nuclei. The emitted gamma energy spectra can be used for reconstruction of the target tissue image and for determination of the tissue elemental composition. Due to the stochastic nature of photon emission process by irradiated tissue, one of the most suitable algorithms for tomographic reconstruction is the Expectation-Maximization (E-M) algorithm, once on its formulation are considered simultaneously the probabilities of photons emission and detection. However, a disadvantage of this algorithm is the introduction of noise in the reconstructed image as the number of iterations increases. This increase can be caused either by features of the algorithm itself or by the low sampling rate of projections used for tomographic reconstruction. In this work, a linear filter in the frequency domain was used in order to improve the quality of the reconstructed images. (author)

  2. Weighted nonnegative tensor factorization for atmospheric tomography reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ballester, David; Trujillo-Sevilla, Juan M.; Bonaque-González, Sergio; Gómez-Cárdenes, Óscar; Rodríguez-Ramos, José M.

    2018-06-01

    Context. Increasing the area on the sky over which atmospheric turbulences can be corrected is a matter of wide interest in astrophysics, especially when a new generation of extremely large telescopes (ELT) is to come in the near future. Aims: In this study we tested if a method for visual representation in three-dimensional displays, the weighted nonnegative tensor factorization (WNTF), is able to improve the quality of the atmospheric tomography (AT) reconstruction as compared to a more standardized method like a randomized Kaczmarz algorithm. Methods: A total of 1000 different atmospheres were simulated and recovered by both methods. Recovering was computed for two and three layers and for four different constellations of laser guiding stars (LGS). The goodness of both methods was tested by means of the radial average of the Strehl ratio across the field of view of a telescope of 8m diameter with a sky coverage of 97.8 arcsec. Results: The proposed method significantly outperformed the Kaczmarz in all tested cases (p ≤ 0.05). In WNTF, three-layers configuration provided better outcomes, but there was no clear relation between different LGS constellations and the quality of Strehl ratio maps. Conclusions: The WNTF method is a novel technique in astronomy and its use to recover atmospheric turbulence profiles was proposed and tested. It showed better quality of reconstruction than a conventional Kaczmarz algorithm independently of the number and height of recovered atmospheric layers and of the constellation of laser guide star used. The WNTF method was shown to be a useful tool in highly ill-posed AT problems, where the difficulty of classical algorithms produce high Strehl value maps.

  3. Iterative reconstruction methods for Thermo-acoustic Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinesque, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    We define, study and implement various iterative reconstruction methods for Thermo-acoustic Tomography (TAT): the Back and Forth Nudging (BFN), easy to implement and to use, a variational technique (VT) and the Back and Forth SEEK (BF-SEEK), more sophisticated, and a coupling method between Kalman filter (KF) and Time Reversal (TR). A unified formulation is explained for the sequential techniques aforementioned that defines a new class of inverse problem methods: the Back and Forth Filters (BFF). In addition to existence and uniqueness (particularly for backward solutions), we study many frameworks that ensure and characterize the convergence of the algorithms. Thus we give a general theoretical framework for which the BFN is a well-posed problem. Then, in application to TAT, existence and uniqueness of its solutions and geometrical convergence of the algorithm are proved, and an explicit convergence rate and a description of its numerical behaviour are given. Next, theoretical and numerical studies of more general and realistic framework are led, namely different objects, speeds (with or without trapping), various sensor configurations and samplings, attenuated equations or external sources. Then optimal control and best estimate tools are used to characterize the BFN convergence and converging feedbacks for BFF, under observability assumptions. Finally, we compare the most flexible and efficient current techniques (TR and an iterative variant) with our various BFF and the VT in several experiments. Thus, robust, with different possible complexities and flexible, the methods that we propose are very interesting reconstruction techniques, particularly in TAT and when observations are degraded. (author) [fr

  4. Emission tomography: quantitative aspects in metabolic and physio-pathologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yerouchalmi-Soussaline, F.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis presents instrumental and data processing studies developed in emission tomography in man, using gamma and positron emitting tracers. High contrast visualisation of volume distribution of tracers in the organs, kinetic studies and measurements of radioactive concentration or of other clinical parameters necessitate a detailed analysis of all physical factors limiting the accuracy of the measure; therefore, development of adapted imaging devices and data processing techniques, together with models describing correctly the phenomena under study are to be carried out. Thus, in single photon (gamma) emission tomography an image reconstruction strategy is elaborated, based on an analytical model for the ill-posed problem including the attenuation effect. In positron emission tomography, the time-of-flight information combined with the reconstruction technique is used in the design of a first prototype imaging device which performance is presented and evaluated in a clinical environment. Moreover, a priori or a posteriori techniques correcting for Compton diffusion events, limited statistics and limited resolution, are proposed and discussed for the improvement of regional measurement accuracy, in metabolic and physio-pathologic studies. (author) [fr

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography and oth selected computer topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    This book, the proceedings of a meeting in January 1980, contains 21 papers. Thirteen are devoted to aspects of emission tomography, four to nuclear cardiology, and five to other topics. The initial set of papers consists of reviews of the single photon emission tomography process. These include transverse axial tomography using scintillation cameras and other devices, longitudinal section tomography, and pin-hole and slant-hole systems. These reviews are generally well done, but as might be expected, lack any coherence from paper to paper. The papers on nuclear cardiology include several of Fourier analysis in nuclear cardiology and one on shunt quantification. Other clinical papers are on quantifying Tc-99m glucoheptonate uptake in the brain and on iron-59 retention studies. A general criticism of the book is the poor quality of photographic reproductions

  6. Diagnostic value of sectional images obtained by emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roucayrol, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    It is now possible to obtain clear images of the various planes in and around a structure with ultra-sounds (echotomography), X-rays (computerized tomography) and recently, gamma-rays from radioactive substances (emission tomography). Axial transverse tomography, which is described here, is to conventional scintigraphy what CT scan is to radiography. It provides images of any structure capable of concentrating sufficiently a radioactive substance administered intravenously. These images are perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body. As shown by examples in the liver, lungs and myocardium, lesions which had passed unnoticed with other exploratory techniques can now be demonstrated, and the location, shape and extension of known lesions can be more accurately assessed. Emission tomography already has its place in modern diagnostic procedures side by side with echotomography and CT scan [fr

  7. Detectors for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Tomography is the technique of producing a photographic image of an opaque specimen by transmitting a beam of x-rays or gamma rays through the specimen onto an adjacent photographic film. The image results from variations in thickness, density, and chemical composition, of the specimen. This technique is used to study the metabolism of the human brain. This article examines the design of equipment used for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography. 27 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  8. Maximum entropy based reconstruction of soft X ray emissivity profiles in W7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl, K.; Linden, W. von der; Dose, V.; Weller, A.

    1996-01-01

    The reconstruction of 2-D emissivity profiles from soft X ray tomography measurements constitutes a highly underdetermined and ill-posed inversion problem, because of the restricted viewing access, the number of chords and the increased noise level in most plasma devices. An unbiased and consistent probabilistic approach within the framework of Bayesian inference is provided by the maximum entropy method, which is independent of model assumptions, but allows any prior knowledge available to be incorporated. The formalism is applied to the reconstruction of emissivity profiles in an NBI heated plasma discharge to determine the dependence of the Shafranov shift on β, the reduction of which was a particular objective in designing the advanced W7-AS stellarator. (author). 40 refs, 7 figs

  9. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  10. Diagnosis of dementia with single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Reed, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography is a practical modality for the study of physiologic cerebral activity in vivo. We utilized single photon emission computed tomography and N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine iodine 123 to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in nine patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), five healthy elderly control subjects, and two patients with multi-infarct dementia. We found that all subjects with AD demonstrated flow deficits in temporoparietal cortex bilaterally, and that the ratio of activity in bilateral temporoparietal cortex to activity in the whole slice allowed the differentiation of all patients with AD from both the controls and from the patients with multi-infarct dementia. Furthermore, this ratio showed a strong correlation with disease severity in the AD group. Single photon emission computed tomography appears to be useful in the differential diagnosis of dementia and reflects clinical features of the disease

  11. 3D reconstruction of radioactive sample utilizing gamma tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoul, David; Zháňal, Pavel

    2018-07-01

    Unique three-dimensional (3D) tomography apparatus was developed and successfully tested at Research Centre Rez, which concentrates at investigation of the degradation of microstructural and mechanical properties of structural materials of nuclear reactors components after a long-term operating exposure. The apparatus allows a 3D view into the interior of low-dimension radioactive samples with a diameter up to several centimeters and a resolution in order of cubic millimeters. It is designed to detect domains with different levels of radioactivity such as cavities, cracks or regions with different chemical composition. The unique collimator design, the use of stepper motors for fine and accurate sample scanning, along with advanced 3D image reconstruction software developed at Research Centre Rez, enables a resolution approaching 1 mm3. Devices working on a similar principle have been used for decades, e.g., in nuclear medicine for the diagnosis of malignant tumors, and are increasingly being applied in the nuclear industry. However, for the first time similar equipment is used for non-destructive testing of low-dimension radioactive samples.

  12. Theoretical evaluation of the detectability of random lesions in bayesian emission reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi

    2003-01-01

    Detecting cancerous lesion is an important task in positron emission tomography (PET). Bayesian methods based on the maximum a posteriori principle (also called penalized maximum likelihood methods) have been developed to deal with the low signal to noise ratio in the emission data. Similar to the filter cut-off frequency in the filtered backprojection method, the prior parameters in Bayesian reconstruction control the resolution and noise trade-off and hence affect detectability of lesions in reconstructed images. Bayesian reconstructions are difficult to analyze because the resolution and noise properties are nonlinear and object-dependent. Most research has been based on Monte Carlo simulations, which are very time consuming. Building on the recent progress on the theoretical analysis of image properties of statistical reconstructions and the development of numerical observers, here we develop a theoretical approach for fast computation of lesion detectability in Bayesian reconstruction. The results can be used to choose the optimum hyperparameter for the maximum lesion detectability. New in this work is the use of theoretical expressions that explicitly model the statistical variation of the lesion and background without assuming that the object variation is (locally) stationary. The theoretical results are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. The comparisons show good agreement between the theoretical predications and the Monte Carlo results

  13. Simultaneous reconstruction of outer boundary shape and conductivity distribution in electrical impedance tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Hyvö nen, Nuutti

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous retrieval of the exterior boundary shape and the interior admittivity distribution of an examined body in electrical impedance tomography is considered. The reconstruction method is built for the complete electrode model

  14. Angle Statistics Reconstruction: a robust reconstruction algorithm for Muon Scattering Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, M.; Burns, J.; Quillin, S.; Steer, C.

    2014-11-01

    Muon Scattering Tomography (MST) is a technique for using the scattering of cosmic ray muons to probe the contents of enclosed volumes. As a muon passes through material it undergoes multiple Coulomb scattering, where the amount of scattering is dependent on the density and atomic number of the material as well as the path length. Hence, MST has been proposed as a means of imaging dense materials, for instance to detect special nuclear material in cargo containers. Algorithms are required to generate an accurate reconstruction of the material density inside the volume from the muon scattering information and some have already been proposed, most notably the Point of Closest Approach (PoCA) and Maximum Likelihood/Expectation Maximisation (MLEM) algorithms. However, whilst PoCA-based algorithms are easy to implement, they perform rather poorly in practice. Conversely, MLEM is a complicated algorithm to implement and computationally intensive and there is currently no published, fast and easily-implementable algorithm that performs well in practice. In this paper, we first provide a detailed analysis of the source of inaccuracy in PoCA-based algorithms. We then motivate an alternative method, based on ideas first laid out by Morris et al, presenting and fully specifying an algorithm that performs well against simulations of realistic scenarios. We argue this new algorithm should be adopted by developers of Muon Scattering Tomography as an alternative to PoCA.

  15. New detector developments for high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, S.I.; Pichler, B.; Lorenz, E.

    1998-01-01

    The strength of quantitative, functional imaging using positron emission tomography, specially in small animals, is limited due to the spatial resolution. Therefore, various tomograph designs employing new scintillators, light sensors, or coincidence electronic are investigated to improve resolution without losses in sensitivity. Luminous scintillators with short light decay time in combination with novel readout schemes using photomultipliers or semiconductor detectors are currently tested by several groups and are implemented in tomographs for small animals. This review summarises the state of development in high resolution positron emission tomography with a detailed description of a system incorporating avalanche photodiode arrays and small scintillation crystals. (orig.) [de

  16. Positron emission tomography in oncology. Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the current and potential uses of positron emission tomography in clinical medicine and research related to oncology. Assessment will be possible of metabolism and physiology of tumors and their effects on adjacent tissues. Specific probes are likely to be developed for target sites on tumors, including monoclonal antibodies and specific growth factors that recognize tumors. To date, most oncological applications of positron emission tomography tracers have been qualitative; in the future, quantitative metabolic measurements should aid in the evaluation of tumor biology and response to treatment. 41 references

  17. Positron emission tomography in the evaluation of subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, K.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Fifteen patients with 21 subdural effusions were investigated both with transmission computer assisted tomography (CAT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The tracer in the emission studies was 68 Ga-EDTA. Twelve lesions were visualized both with CAT and PET. Five lesions that were negative or doubtful on CAT were visualized with PET, whereas four lesions negative or doubtful on PET were demonstrated by CAT. The two methods complement each other due to the fact that they are based on different mechanisms: CAT mainly on attenuation of the fluid collection. PET on isotope accumulation, particularly in the hematoma membranes

  18. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Tuberculosis: Spectrum of Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Behera, Abhishek; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an illustrative tutorial highlighting the utility of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET/CT) imaging to detect spectrum of manifestations in patients with tuberculosis (TB). FDG-PET/CT is a powerful tool for early diagnosis, measuring the extent of disease (staging), and consequently for evaluation of response to therapy in patients with TB.

  19. Tomography reconstruction methods for damage diagnosis of wood structure in construction field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qiwen; Lau, Denvid

    2018-03-01

    The structural integrity of wood building element plays a critical role in the public safety, which requires effective methods for diagnosis of internal damage inside the wood body. Conventionally, the non-destructive testing (NDT) methods such as X-ray computed tomography, thermography, radar imaging reconstruction method, ultrasonic tomography, nuclear magnetic imaging techniques, and sonic tomography have been used to obtain the information about the internal structure of wood. In this paper, the applications, advantages and disadvantages of these traditional tomography methods are reviewed. Additionally, the present article gives an overview of recently developed tomography approach that relies on the use of mechanical and electromagnetic waves for assessing the structural integrity of wood buildings. This developed tomography reconstruction method is believed to provide a more accurate, reliable, and comprehensive assessment of wood structural integrity

  20. Application of positron emission tomography in industrial research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkers, G.; van den Bergen, E.A.; Vonkeman, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    Positron Emission computed Tomography (PET) is a relatively new imaging technique, exploiting the 511 keV annihilation radiation characteristic of positron emitters. Although exclusively used till now in the field of nuclear medicine, the application of PET for the non-invasive, in-situ visualisation of processes of industrial interest is challenging, because PET can in principle be used to obtain quantitative, 2D/3D images of the flow and distribution of fluids inside process units, whose steel walls may be up to several centimeters thick. With the aid of a NeuroECAT positron tomographer the PET technique has been utilised to image important (model) processes in the petrochemical industry, using physical labelling of the phase to be imaged. First, the displacement of a brine/surfactant phase, labelled with 66 Ga-EDTA, in a piece of reservoir rock was imaged. Secondly, the dehydration of water-in-oil emulsions was monitored dynamically by labelling the water phase with 68 Ga-EDTA. The second study in particular demonstrates that in the presence of noisy data the image reconstruction method utilised strongly influences the results obtained. With the advent of PET in nuclear medicine the availability of short-lived positron emitting nuclides like 11 C (t1/2 = 20 min), 13 N (t1/2 = 10 min) and 15 0 (t1/2 = 2 min) has increased considerably, allowing the investigation of industrially important reactions by chemical labelling. Utilising the NeuroECAT in a special mode, the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide could be imaged in a model tubular reactor by using 11 C-labelled CO, providing information about the kinetics of the individual reaction steps and interactions and about the degree of occupation of catalytically active sites. (author)

  1. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments

  2. Fast automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in x-ray computed tomography images to improve fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, Marcus; Ale, Angelique; Schulz, Ralf B; Zientkowska, Marta; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of hybrid imaging scanners that integrate fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) allows the utilization of x-ray information as image priors for improving optical tomography reconstruction. To fully capitalize on this capacity, we consider a framework for the automatic and fast detection of different anatomic structures in murine XCT images. To accurately differentiate between different structures such as bone, lung, and heart, a combination of image processing steps including thresholding, seed growing, and signal detection are found to offer optimal segmentation performance. The algorithm and its utilization in an inverse FMT scheme that uses priors is demonstrated on mouse images.

  3. Positron emission tomography of malignant tumours at head and neck. Evaluation of the diagnostic value of positron emission tomography by comparison with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettler, Nele

    2011-01-01

    Imaging methods for early, accurate diagnosis and aftercare of malignant growths is currently one of the most important research topics. The objective of this thesis is to evaluate the diagnostic value of FDG-positron emission tomography by comparison with computed tomography for patients with squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma or sarcoma at head and neck. Measurement criteria are sensitivity and specificity. A retrospective evaluation of 100 examinations on 85 patients of University clinic Aachen was performed. The examination reports were supported by reports from histology, positron emission tomography and computed tomography. In each case, the histological results were assumed to provide a reliable benchmark. Sensitivity and specificity for the primary tumour site, metastatic lymphatic nodes and defined anatomic structures were compared across all patients. Comparisons were also performed on sub groups separated by gender, cancer type and the time and frequency at which tumours arose. The statistic analysis was done with MedCalc. Results: The results for sensitivity and specificity of the primary tumour site were 86.42% and 42.86%, and 64.71% and 66.07%, for positron emission tomography and computed tomography respectively. The results for the lymphatic nodes were 51.52% and 92.86% and 64.71% and 66.07%. When the constituent anatomic structures were evaluated separately, the specificity was significantly higher. The separation by gender showed no difference. Because the classification by tumor type resulted in samples that were of varying size, a comparison was difficult. For the diagnosis of primary tumours, the examination with positron emission tomography was superior, whereas computed tomography proved more effective for the diagnosis of recurrent tumours. For the diagnosis of the main tumour site, both methods were shown to be equally suitable. For the assessment of lymphatic nodes, positron emission tomography was superior to computed tomography

  4. Registration-based Reconstruction of Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christian; Hansen, David Christoffer; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for reconstruction of four-dimensional (4D) cone beam computed tomography from an undersampled set of X-ray projections. The novelty of the proposed method lies in utilizing optical flow based registration to facilitate that each temporal phase is reconstructed from the full...

  5. Radionuclide imaging with coded apertures and three-dimensional image reconstruction from focal-plane tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.T.

    1976-05-01

    Two techniques for radionuclide imaging and reconstruction have been studied;; both are used for improvement of depth resolution. The first technique is called coded aperture imaging, which is a technique of tomographic imaging. The second technique is a special 3-D image reconstruction method which is introduced as an improvement to the so called focal-plane tomography

  6. Time-of-flight positron emission tomography and associated detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacher, J.; Allemand, R.; Campagnolo, R.

    1983-04-01

    An analysis of the timing capabilities of the detectors (scintillators and photomultipliers) in time-of-flight positron emission tomography is presented. The advantages of BaF 2 compared with CsF for the futur tomographs are evaluated [fr

  7. Cobalt-55 positron emission tomography in recurrent ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Reuck, J; Santens, P; Keppens, J; De Bleecker, J; Strijckmans, K; Goethals, P; Lemahieu, [No Value; Korf, J

    The present study investigates if Cobalt-55 (Co-55) positron emission tomography (PET) allows us to distinguish and detect recent, recurrent strokes in patients who had already suffered a previous infarct in the same vascular territory. Fourteen patients with recurrent strokes underwent a Co-55 PET

  8. Measurement of absolute bone blood flow by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahmias, C.; Cockshott, W.P.; Garnett, E.S.; Belbeck, L.W.

    1986-03-01

    A method of measuring bone blood flow has been developed using /sup 18/F sodium fluoride and positron emission tomography. The blood flow levels are in line with those obtained experimentally from microsphere embolisation. This investigative method could be applied to elucidate a number of clinical questions involving bone perfusion.

  9. Positron emission tomography in drug development and drug evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ; Vaalburg, W

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an imaging modality which can determine biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation

  10. MR imaging and positron emission tomography of cortical heterotopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Theodore, W.H.; Holmes, M.D.; Dorwart, R.H.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-11-01

    Heterotopia of the gray matter is a developmental malformation in which ectopic cortex is found in the white matter of the brain. A case of a 33-year-old man with cortical heterotopia who had a lifelong history of seizures and psychomotor retardation is reported, including the results of cerebral CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography using YF-2-deoxyglucose.

  11. MR imaging and positron emission tomography of cortical heterotopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Theodore, W.H.; Holmes, M.D.; Dorwart, R.H.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Heterotopia of the gray matter is a developmental malformation in which ectopic cortex is found in the white matter of the brain. A case of a 33-year-old man with cortical heterotopia who had a lifelong history of seizures and psychomotor retardation is reported, including the results of cerebral CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography using 18 F-2-deoxyglucose

  12. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    , a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available "amyloid specific" positron emission tomography imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate...

  13. Positron Emission Tomography : background, possibilities and perspectives in neuroscience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for determining biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way. This includes the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labeled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs and/or therapy on metabolism. Also deviations of

  14. Physiopathology of ischemic strokes: the input of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinling, M.; Samson, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The tomography by positrons emissions has brought essential physiological and pathological knowledge relative to cerebral vascular accidents in the acute phase, because it is possible to measure the cerebral blood flow, the oxygen extraction rate and the local oxygen consumption. (N.C.)

  15. High resolution and high speed positron emission tomography data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgiss, S.G.; Byars, L.G.; Jones, W.F.; Casey, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution positron emission tomography (PET) requires many detectors. Thus, data collection systems for PET must have high data rates, wide data paths, and large memories to histogram the events. This design uses the VMEbus to cost effectively provide these features. It provides for several modes of operation including real time sorting, list mode data storage, and replay of stored list mode data

  16. Positron emission tomography in presurgical diagnosis of partial epilepsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Leenders, K.L.; Wieser, H.G.

    1992-01-01

    We present results of studies in which positron emission tomography was applied to the presurgical evaluation of epileptics. Emphasis is placed on results of PET studies with various tracers in partial epilepsies and on the use of PET in age-related epileptic syndromes in children. (orig.) [de

  17. Serotonin synthesis studied with positron emission tomography, (PET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Per Gustaf Hartvig; Lundquist, Pinelopi

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to study the biosynthesis and release of serotonin (5HT) at brain serotonergic neurons. PET requires probe compounds with specific attributes to enable imaging and quantification of biological processes. This section focuses on probes to measure...

  18. Recent developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors. 117 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Recent developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors. 117 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  20. A multiresolution approach to iterative reconstruction algorithms in X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, Yoni; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2010-09-01

    In computed tomography, the application of iterative reconstruction methods in practical situations is impeded by their high computational demands. Especially in high resolution X-ray computed tomography, where reconstruction volumes contain a high number of volume elements (several giga voxels), this computational burden prevents their actual breakthrough. Besides the large amount of calculations, iterative algorithms require the entire volume to be kept in memory during reconstruction, which quickly becomes cumbersome for large data sets. To overcome this obstacle, we present a novel multiresolution reconstruction, which greatly reduces the required amount of memory without significantly affecting the reconstructed image quality. It is shown that, combined with an efficient implementation on a graphical processing unit, the multiresolution approach enables the application of iterative algorithms in the reconstruction of large volumes at an acceptable speed using only limited resources.

  1. New Possibilities of Positron-Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volobuev, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    The reasons for the emergence of the angular distribution of photons generated as a result of annihilation of an electron and a positron in a positron-emission tomograph are investigated. It is shown that the angular distribution of the radiation intensity (i.e., the probability of photon emission at different angles) is a consequence of the Doppler effect in the center-of-mass reference system of the electron and the positron. In the reference frame attached to the electron, the angular distribution of the number of emitted photons does not exists but is replaced by the Doppler shift of the frequency of photons. The results obtained in this study make it possible to extend the potentialities of the positron-emission tomograph in the diagnostics of diseases and to obtain additional mechanical characteristics of human tissues, such as density and viscosity.

  2. Attenuation correction using simultaneous emission - transmission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljubenov, V.; Marinkovic, P.

    1998-01-01

    In order to reduce degrading influence of attenuation on SPECT image quality, possibility for correction, based on simultaneous emission / transmission measurements, is discussed. Numerical photon transport simulations through the phantom and acquisition of of tomographic projections are performed by using Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. Amount of contamination in transmission data due to photon Compton scattering for emission energy window is specially analyzed and appropriate spatial depending 'noise / signal' factors for three different external sources, applied with Tc-99m, are determined (author)

  3. Sparsity reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography: An experimental evaluation

    KAUST Repository

    Gehre, Matthias; Kluth, Tobias; Lipponen, Antti; Jin, Bangti; Seppä nen, Aku; Kaipio, Jari P.; Maass, Peter

    2012-01-01

    smoothness regularization approach. The results verify that the adoption of ℓ1-type constraints can enhance the quality of EIT reconstructions: in most of the test cases the reconstructions with sparsity constraints are both qualitatively and quantitatively

  4. Submillimeter medical imaging in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, C.; Thirolf, P.G. [LMU, Muenchen (Germany); Habs, D. [LMU, Muenchen (Germany); MPQ, Garching (Germany); Zoglauer, A. [SSL, Berkeley (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, capable to reach submillimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a short exposure time and a low radioactive dose compared to conventional PET. This '{gamma}-PET' technique takes advantage of specific e{sup +} sources which simultaneously with the {beta}{sup +} decay emit an additional photon. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the additional emitted {gamma}, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. Thus the spatial uncertainty introduced by the motion of the e{sup +} or by Compton scattering within the patient can be strongly reduced in the direction normal to the annihilation. MC-simulations and image reconstruction studies have been performed using the library MEGAlib, which we modified to realize an event reconstruction using the {beta}{sup +}{gamma} coincidences. The simulated geometry consists of 4 LaBr{sub 3} scintillator crystals (5 x 5 x 3 cm{sup 3}) read out by a 2D-segmented photomultiplier (64 pixels, each 6 x 6 mm{sup 2}) and 4 double-sided silicon strip detectors (each with 2 x 128 strips, active area of 5 x 5 cm{sup 2}, thickness 0.5 mm), positioned around an H{sub 2}O sphere of 6 cm diameter. Inside are two {sup 22}Na point-like test sources, placed at a distance of 0.4 mm. The resolution results in 0.2 mm (FWHM) in each direction, surpassing the performance of conventional PET by about an order of magnitude.

  5. Statistical noise with the weighted backprojection method for single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hideo; Tanaka, Eiichi; Toyama, Hinako.

    1985-01-01

    The weighted backprojection (WBP) method and the radial post-correction (RPC) method were compared with other several attenuation correction methods for single photon emission computed tomography by computer simulation. These methods are the pre-correction method with arithmetic means of opposing projections, the post-correction method with a correction matrix, and the inverse attenuated Randon transform method. Statistical mean square noise in a reconstructed image was formulated, and was displayed two-dimensionally for typical simulated phantoms. The noise image for the WBP method was dependent on several parameters, namely, size of an attenuating object, distribution of activity, the attenuation coefficient, and choise of the reconstruction index, k and position of the reconstruction origin. The noise image for the WBP method with k=0 was almost the same for the RPC method. It has been shown that position of the reconstruction origin has to be chosen appropriately in order to improve the noise properties of the reconstructed image for the WBP method as well as the RPC method. Comparision of the different attenuation correction methods accomplished by using both the reconstructed images and the statistical noise images with the same mathematical phantom and convolving function concluded that the WBP method and the RPC method were more amenable to any radioisotope distributions than the other methods, and had the advantage of flexibility to improve image noise of any local positions. (author)

  6. The role of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in resectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Stefano; Salgarello, Matteo; Laiti, Silvia; Partelli, Stefano; Castelli, Paola; Spinelli, Antonello E; Tamburrino, Domenico; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    The role of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is debated. We retrospectively assessed the value of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in addition to conventional imaging as a staging modality in pancreatic cancer. (18)Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed in 72 patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma after multi-detector computed tomography positron emission tomography was considered positive for a maximum standardized uptake value >3. Overall, 21% of patients had a maximum standardized uptake value ≤ 3, and 60% of those had undergone neoadjuvant treatment (P=0.0001). Furthermore, 11% of patients were spared unwarranted surgery since positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected metastatic disease. All liver metastases were subsequently identified with contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Sensitivity and specificity of positron emission tomography/computed tomography for distant metastases were 78% and 100%. The median CA19.9 concentration was 48.8 U/mL for the entire cohort and 292 U/mL for metastatic patients (P=0.112). The widespread application of (18)fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma seems not justified. It should be considered in selected patients at higher risk of metastatic disease (i.e. CA19.9>200 U/mL) after undergoing other imaging tests. Neoadjuvant treatment is significantly associated with low metabolic activity, limiting the value of positron emission tomography in this setting. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. AuTom: a novel automatic platform for electron tomography reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Renmin

    2017-07-26

    We have developed a software package towards automatic electron tomography (ET): Automatic Tomography (AuTom). The presented package has the following characteristics: accurate alignment modules for marker-free datasets containing substantial biological structures; fully automatic alignment modules for datasets with fiducial markers; wide coverage of reconstruction methods including a new iterative method based on the compressed-sensing theory that suppresses the “missing wedge” effect; and multi-platform acceleration solutions that support faster iterative algebraic reconstruction. AuTom aims to achieve fully automatic alignment and reconstruction for electron tomography and has already been successful for a variety of datasets. AuTom also offers user-friendly interface and auxiliary designs for file management and workflow management, in which fiducial marker-based datasets and marker-free datasets are addressed with totally different subprocesses. With all of these features, AuTom can serve as a convenient and effective tool for processing in electron tomography.

  8. Hybrid Gama Emission Tomography (HGET): FY16 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Erin A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, Leon E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wittman, Richard S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Campbell, Luke W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Deshmukh, Nikhil S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zalavadia, Mital A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Batie, Margo A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) methodologies for the verification of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies are volume-averaging methods that lack sensitivity to individual pins. Further, as fresh fuel assemblies become more and more complex (e.g., heavy gadolinium loading, high degrees of axial and radial variation in fissile concentration), the accuracy of current IAEA instruments degrades and measurement time increases. Particularly in light of the fact that no special tooling is required to remove individual pins from modern fuel assemblies, the IAEA needs new capabilities for the verification of unirradiated (i.e., fresh LEU and MOX) assemblies to ensure that fissile material has not been diverted. Passive gamma emission tomography has demonstrated potential to provide pin-level verification of spent fuel, but gamma-ray emission rates from unirradiated fuel emissions are significantly lower, precluding purely passive tomography methods. The work presented here introduces the concept of Hybrid Gamma Emission Tomography (HGET) for verification of unirradiated fuels, in which a neutron source is used to actively interrogate the fuel assembly and the resulting gamma-ray emissions are imaged using tomographic methods to provide pin-level verification of fissile material concentration.

  9. Positron emission tomography - a new technique for studies of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Lars; Dahlbom, Magnus; Widen, Lennart

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important tool to study the central nervous system. Examples of such studies are cerebral blood flow and metabolism and determination of receptor characteristics of the brain. In the following the basic principles and the physics behind PET are given. Different aspects are discussed such as detector design, image reconstruction and data analyses. Since quantification is essential in PET, data have to be corrected for absorption, scatter and random coincidences. These corrections and their influence on image data are discussed. A review of state-of-the-art PET research of the brain is given. (author)

  10. New developments in molecular imaging: positron emission tomography time-of-flight (TOF-PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, P.; Couce, B.; Iglesias, A.; Lois, C.

    2011-01-01

    Positron Emission tomography (PET) in increasingly being used in oncology for the diagnosis and staging of disease, as well as in monitoring response to therapy. One of the last advances in PET is the incorporation of Time-of-Flight (TOF) information, which improves the tomographic reconstruction process and subsequently the quality of the final image. In this work, we explain the principles of PET and the fundamentals of TOF-PET. Clinical images are shown in order to illustrate how TOF-PET improves the detectability of small lesions, particularly in patients with high body mass index. (Author) 20 refs

  11. A Superresolution Image Reconstruction Algorithm Based on Landweber in Electrical Capacitance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Deyun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the image reconstruction accuracy influenced by the “soft field” nature and ill-conditioned problems in electrical capacitance tomography, a superresolution image reconstruction algorithm based on Landweber is proposed in the paper, which is based on the working principle of the electrical capacitance tomography system. The method uses the algorithm which is derived by regularization of solutions derived and derives closed solution by fast Fourier transform of the convolution kernel. So, it ensures the certainty of the solution and improves the stability and quality of image reconstruction results. Simulation results show that the imaging precision and real-time imaging of the algorithm are better than Landweber algorithm, and this algorithm proposes a new method for the electrical capacitance tomography image reconstruction algorithm.

  12. 77 FR 21783 - Guidance on Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ...] Guidance on Media Fills for Validation of Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs... Aseptic Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' This guidance is intended to help... Preparations for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' Most PET drugs are designed for parenteral...

  13. Use of positron emission tomography in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez E, Patricio; Jofre E, Josefina; Massardo V, Teresa; Humeres, Pamela; Canessa G, Jose; Sierralta C, Paulina

    2002-01-01

    The value of PET (Positron Emission Tomography) in colorectal cancer is presented. PET is a novel technique that uses F-18-FDG (fluorodeoxiglucose) to assess glucose metabolism by whole body imaging. It has been demonstrated that malignant cells have both increase of glucose uptake and utilization. In colorectal cancer, PET is indicated for staging, assess recurrence, liver metastasis and treatment follow-up. PET is more sensitive and specific than CT (Computed Tomography) and is cost effective. In 30% of cases PET may change patient management, avoiding unnecessary procedures (au)

  14. Single photon emission computed tomography in children with idiopathic seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Masafumi; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Kojima, Akihiro; Shimomura, Osamu; Kinoshita, Rumi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Taku, Keiichi; Miike, Teruhisa

    1991-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isoprophyl-p [ 123 I]-iodoamphetamine (IMP), X-ray computed tomography (X-CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in 20 children with idiopathic seizures. In children with idiopathic seizures, SPECT could detect the abnormal sites at the highest rate (45%) compared with CT (10%) and MRI (12%), but the abnormal sites on SPECT correlated poorly with the foci on electroencephalograph (EEG). Idiopathic epilepsy with hypoperfusion on SPECT was refractory to treatment and was frequently associated with mental and/or developmental retardation. Perfusion defects on SPECT scans probably affect the development and maturation of the brain in children. (author)

  15. Positron emission tomography of FDG in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T. III; Kusubov, N.

    1986-01-01

    The use of the Donner dynamic positron emission tomograph to study fluorodeoxyglucose labelled 18 F uptake in the brain of six patients with schizophrenia is reported. The glucose metabolic rate and the local cerebral metabolic rate were calculated. The dynamic brain uptake data and the blood input function were used to calculate rate constants by an iterative least squares fitting program for all regions of interest chosen in the brain. Although the number of patients was small, differences in k3 were statistically significant in several brain regions compared with normal controls

  16. Application of reconstructive tomography to the measurement of density distribution in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, J.R.; Berggren, M.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of reconstructive tomography has been applied to the measurement of average density and density distribution in multiphase flows. The technique of reconstructive tomography provides a model independent method of obtaining flow field density information. The unique features of interest in application of a practical tomographic densitometer system are the limited number of data values and the correspondingly coarse reconstruction grid (0.5 by 0.5 cm). These features were studied both experimentally, through the use of prototype hardware on a 3-in. pipe, and analytically, through computer generation of simulated data. Prototypical data were taken on phantoms constructed of Plexiglas and laminated Plexiglas, wood, and polyurethane foam. Reconstructions obtained from prototype data were compared with reconstructions from the simulated data

  17. Voluminal modelling for the characterization of wastes packages by gamma emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettier, J.L.; Thierry, R.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to model the measurement process used for multi-photon emission computed tomography on nuclear waste drum. Our model MEPHISTO (Multi-Energy PHoton Imagery through Segmented TOmography) takes into account all phenomena influencing gamma emergent flux and high resolution spectrometric measurements using an HpGe detector through a collimator aperture. These phenomena are absorption and Compton scattering of gamma photons in waste drum, geometrical blur, spatial and energetic response of the detector. The analysis of results shows better localisation and quantification performances compared with a Ray-Driven method. It proves the importance of an accurate modelization of collimated measurements to reduce noise and stabilize iterative image reconstructions. (authors)

  18. First experiences with model based iterative reconstructions influence on quantitative plaque volume and intensity measurements in coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Broersen, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Investigate the influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and the model- based IR (Veo) reconstruction algorithm in coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) im- ages on quantitative measurements in coronary arteries for plaque volumes and intensities. Methods...

  19. Diagnostic utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in pyrexia of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nidhi; Kumar, Rakesh; Malhotra, Arun; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Uma; Sood, Rita

    2005-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the diagnostic utility of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) in patients presenting as pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO). Forty-seven patients (31 males and 16 females; mean age of 42.7 ± 19.96 years) presenting as PUO to the Department of Medicine at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi over a period of 2 years underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT. PET ⁄ CT was considered supportive when its results correlated with the final definitive diagnosis. Final diagnosis was made on the basis of combined evaluation of history, clinical findings, investigations, and response to treatment. Thirty-five PET/CT studies (74.5%) were positive. However, only 18 (38.3%) were supportive of the final diagnosis. In three patients (6.4%), PET/CT was considered diagnostic as none of the other investigations including contrast-enhanced computed tomography of chest and abdomen, and directed tissue sampling could lead to the final diagnosis. All these three patients were diagnosed as aortoarteritis. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography is an important emerging modality in the workup of PUO. It supported the final diagnosis in 38% of our patients and was diagnostic in 6.4% of patients. Thus, PET/CT should only be considered as second-line investigation for the diagnostic evaluation of PUO; especially in suspected noninfectious inflammatory disorders

  20. Applications of X-ray Computed Tomography and Emission Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seletchi, Emilia Dana; Sutac, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Computed Tomography is a non-destructive imaging method that allows visualization of internal features within non-transparent objects such as sedimentary rocks. Filtering techniques have been applied to circumvent the artifacts and achieve high-quality images for quantitative analysis. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) can be used to identify the position of the growth axis in speleothems by detecting subtle changes in calcite density between growth bands. HRXCT imagery reveals the three-dimensional variability of coral banding providing information on coral growth and climate over the past several centuries. The Nuclear Medicine imaging technique uses a radioactive tracer, several radiation detectors, and sophisticated computer technologies to understand the biochemical basis of normal and abnormal functions within the brain. The goal of Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) is to accurately determine the three-dimensional radioactivity distribution resulting from the radiopharmaceutical uptake inside the patient instead of the attenuation coefficient distribution from different tissues as obtained from X-ray Computer Tomography. ECT is a very useful tool for investigating the cognitive functions. Because of the low radiation doses associated with Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this technique has been applied in clinical research, allowing the direct study of human neurological diseases. (authors)

  1. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose

  2. Deconvolution based attenuation correction for time-of-flight positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Yong

    2017-10-01

    For an accurate quantitative reconstruction of the radioactive tracer distribution in positron emission tomography (PET), we need to take into account the attenuation of the photons by the tissues. For this purpose, we propose an attenuation correction method for the case when a direct measurement of the attenuation distribution in the tissues is not available. The proposed method can determine the attenuation factor up to a constant multiple by exploiting the consistency condition that the exact deconvolution of noise-free time-of-flight (TOF) sinogram must satisfy. Simulation studies shows that the proposed method corrects attenuation artifacts quite accurately for TOF sinograms of a wide range of temporal resolutions and noise levels, and improves the image reconstruction for TOF sinograms of higher temporal resolutions by providing more accurate attenuation correction.

  3. Direct iterative reconstruction of computed tomography trajectories (DIRECTT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, A.; Hentschel, M.P.; Schors, J.

    2004-01-01

    The direct reconstruction approach employs an iterative procedure by selection of and angular averaging over projected trajectory data of volume elements. This avoids the blur effects of the classical Fourier method due to the sampling theorem. But longer computing time is required. The reconstructed tomographic images reveal at least the spatial resolution of the radiation detector. Any set of projection angles may be selected for the measurements. Limited rotation of the object yields still good reconstruction of details. Projections of a partial region of the object can be reconstructed without additional artifacts thus reducing the overall radiation dose. Noisy signal data from low dose irradiation have low impact on spatial resolution. The image quality is monitored during all iteration steps and is pre-selected according to the specific requirements. DIRECTT can be applied independently from the measurement equipment in addition to conventional reconstruction or as a refinement filter. (author)

  4. Fast simulation of Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography using CUDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, D.G., E-mail: dgbeasley@itn.pt; Marques, A.C.; Alves, L.C.; Silva, R.C. da

    2013-07-01

    A new 3D Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T) simulation software has been developed in Java and uses NVIDIA™ Common Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) to calculate the X-ray attenuation for large detector areas. A challenge with PIXE-T is to get sufficient counts while retaining a small beam spot size. Therefore a high geometric efficiency is required. However, as the detector solid angle increases the calculations required for accurate reconstruction of the data increase substantially. To overcome this limitation, the CUDA parallel computing platform was used which enables general purpose programming of NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) to perform computations traditionally handled by the central processing unit (CPU). For simulation performance evaluation, the results of a CPU- and a CUDA-based simulation of a phantom are presented. Furthermore, a comparison with the simulation code in the PIXE-Tomography reconstruction software DISRA (A. Sakellariou, D.N. Jamieson, G.J.F. Legge, 2001) is also shown. Compared to a CPU implementation, the CUDA based simulation is approximately 30× faster.

  5. Fast simulation of Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography using CUDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beasley, D.G.; Marques, A.C.; Alves, L.C.; Silva, R.C. da

    2013-01-01

    A new 3D Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T) simulation software has been developed in Java and uses NVIDIA™ Common Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) to calculate the X-ray attenuation for large detector areas. A challenge with PIXE-T is to get sufficient counts while retaining a small beam spot size. Therefore a high geometric efficiency is required. However, as the detector solid angle increases the calculations required for accurate reconstruction of the data increase substantially. To overcome this limitation, the CUDA parallel computing platform was used which enables general purpose programming of NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) to perform computations traditionally handled by the central processing unit (CPU). For simulation performance evaluation, the results of a CPU- and a CUDA-based simulation of a phantom are presented. Furthermore, a comparison with the simulation code in the PIXE-Tomography reconstruction software DISRA (A. Sakellariou, D.N. Jamieson, G.J.F. Legge, 2001) is also shown. Compared to a CPU implementation, the CUDA based simulation is approximately 30× faster

  6. Positron Emission Tomography: Principles, Technology, and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Sibylle I.

    2005-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technique for quantitative measurement of physiologic parameters in vivo (an overview of principles and applications can be found in [P.E. Valk, et al., eds. Positron Emission Tomography. Basic Science and Clinical Practice. 2003, Springer: Heidelberg]), based on the detection of small amounts of posi-tron-emitter-labelled biologic molecules. Various radiotracers are available for neuro-logical, cardiological, and oncological applications in the clinic and in research proto-cols. This overview describes the basic principles, technology, and recent develop-ments in PET, followed by a section on the development of a tomograph with ava-lanche photodiodes dedicated for small animal imaging as an example of efforts in the domain of high resolution tomographs.

  7. Computed Tomography Image Quality Evaluation of a New Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm in the Abdomen (Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction-V) a Comparison With Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction, Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction, and Filtered Back Projection Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenberger, Martin H; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A; Gupta, Shiva; Liu, Xinming; Yap, Ramon Q; Sun, Jia; Tamm, Eric P; Jensen, Corey T

    The purpose of this study was to compare abdominopelvic computed tomography images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V (ASIR-V) with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo 3.0), ASIR, and filtered back projection (FBP). Abdominopelvic computed tomography scans for 36 patients (26 males and 10 females) were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR (80%), Veo 3.0, and ASIR-V (30%, 60%, 90%). Mean ± SD patient age was 32 ± 10 years with mean ± SD body mass index of 26.9 ± 4.4 kg/m. Images were reviewed by 2 independent readers in a blinded, randomized fashion. Hounsfield unit, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values were calculated for each reconstruction algorithm for further comparison. Phantom evaluation of low-contrast detectability (LCD) and high-contrast resolution was performed. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V 30%, ASIR-V 60%, and ASIR 80% were generally superior qualitatively compared with ASIR-V 90%, Veo 3.0, and FBP (P ASIR-V 60% with respective CNR values of 5.54 ± 2.39, 8.78 ± 3.15, and 3.49 ± 1.77 (P ASIR 80% had the best and worst spatial resolution, respectively. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V 30% and ASIR-V 60% provided the best combination of qualitative and quantitative performance. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction 80% was equivalent qualitatively, but demonstrated inferior spatial resolution and LCD.

  8. Positron emission tomography in the management of cervix cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonardel, G.; Gontier, E.; Soret, M.; Dechaud, C.; Fayolle, M.; Foehrenbach, H.; Chargari, C.; Bauduceau, O.

    2009-01-01

    Since its introduction in clinical practice in the 1990 s, positron emission tomography (PET), usually with 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-F.D.G.), has become an important imaging modality in patients with cancer. For cervix carcinoma, F.D.G.-PET is significantly more accurate than computed tomography (CT) and is recommended for loco-regional lymph node and extra pelvic staging. The metabolic dimension of the technique provides additional prognostic information. Ongoing studies now concentrate on more advanced clinical applications, such as the planning of radiotherapy, the response evaluation after the induction of therapy, the early detection of recurrence. Technical innovations, such as PET cameras with better spatial resolution and hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT), available now on the whole territory, provide both anatomic and metabolic information in the same procedure. From the point of view of biological metabolism, new radiopharmaceutical probes are being developed. Those hold promise for future refinements in this field. This article reviews the current applications of F.D.G.-PET in patients with cervix cancer. (authors)

  9. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography findings in a case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram; Shah, Hardik

    2013-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGNP) is an uncommon condition characterized by chronic suppurative renal inflammation that leads to progressive parenchymal destruction. This condition can clinically present as recurrent urinary tract infections, flank pain, hematuria, and occasionally sepsis, and weight loss. This condition is usually associated with obstructing renal calculus. We present 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18-FDG PET/CT) findings in an elderly male suffering from pyrexia and weight loss and suspected urinary tract infection. PET/CT findings in this case lead to diagnosis of XGNP. This diagnosis should be kept in mind while evaluating similar symptoms and PET/CT scan findings. PMID:24019680

  10. Position emission tomography with or without computed tomography in the primary staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Loft, Annika; Hansen, Mads

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In order to receive the most appropriate therapy, patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) must be accurately stratified into different prognostic staging groups. Computed tomography (CT) plays a pivotal role in the conventional staging. The aim of the present study...... was to investigate the value of positron emission tomography using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET) and combined FDG-PET/CT for the staging of HL patients, and the impact on the choice of treatment. DESIGN AND METHODS: Ninety-nine consecutive, prospectively included patients had FDG-PET and CT...

  11. Application of positron emission tomography in the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses experimental and clinical applications of positron emission tomography to the heart, including measurements of blood flow to the myocardium and studies of metabolism and experimental injury. Most initial clinical studies have concentrated on ischemic heart disease, but the technique also has potential for investigation of cardiomyopathies, studying the neural control of the heart, and evaluating the effects of drugs on cardiac tissues

  12. Contribution of positron emission tomography in pleural disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Duysinx, Bernard; Corhay, Jean-Louis; Larock, Marie-Paule; Withofs, Nadia; Bury, Thierry; Hustinx, Roland; Louis, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Positron emission tomography (PET) now plays a clear role in oncology, especially in chest tumours. We discuss the value of metabolic imaging in characterising pleural pathology in the light of our own experience and review the literature. BACKGROUND: PET is particularly useful in characterising malignant pleural pathologies and is a factor of prognosis in mesothelioma. Metabolic imaging also provides clinical information for staging lung cancer, in researching the primary tumou...

  13. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography–Computed Tomography in Disseminated Cryptococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Singhal, Abhinav; Mallick, Saumya Ranjan; Tripathi, Madhavi; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis without pulmonary involvement is a very rare phenomenon. Patterns of organ involvement in cryptococcosis resemble various other infective conditions as well as malignant conditions on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography–computed tomography. We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient who had disseminated cryptococcosis. The rarity of the case being noninvolvement of lungs and meninges and resembling more like lymphoma due to the diffuse involvement of the lymph nodes on both sides of the diaphragm. PMID:29142368

  14. A new liquid xenon scintillation detector for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepel, V.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    A new positron-sensitive detector of annihilation photons filled with liquid xenon is proposed for positron emission tomography. Simultaneous detection of both liquid xenon scintillation and ionization current produces a time resolution of < 1 ns and a position resolution in the tangential direction of the tomograph ring is ∼ 1 mm and in the radial direction is ∼ 5 mm. The advantages of a tomograph with new detectors are discussed. New algorithms of Compton scattering can be used. (author)

  15. Measurement of brain pH with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, R.B.; Alpert, N.M.; Ackerman, R.H.; Wechsler, L.R.; Elmaleh, D.R.; Correia, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    With positron emission tomography (PET) it is now possible to measure local brain pH noninvasively in humans. The application of PET to the determination of pH is relatively new, so only a handful of papers on the subject have appeared in print. This chapter reviews the current strategies for measuring brain pH with PET, discuss methodological problems, and present initial results

  16. Measurement of liver volume by emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, M.K.; Hopkins, G.B.

    1979-01-01

    In 22 volunteers without clinical or laboratory evidence of liver disease, liver volume was determined using single-photon emission computed tomography (ECT). This technique provided excellent object contrast between the liver and its surroundings and permitted calculation of liver volume without geometric assumptions about the liver's configuration. Reproducibility of results was satisfactory, with a root-mean-square error of less than 6% between duplicate measurements in 15 individuals. The volume measurements were validated by the use of phantoms

  17. Simultaneous reconstruction of 3D refractive index, temperature, and intensity distribution of combustion flame by double computed tomography technologies based on spatial phase-shifting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenyan; Song, Yang; Yuan, Qun; Wulan, Tuya; Chen, Lei

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a transient multi-parameter three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction method is proposed to diagnose and visualize a combustion flow field. Emission and transmission tomography based on spatial phase-shifted technology are combined to reconstruct, simultaneously, the various physical parameter distributions of a propane flame. Two cameras triggered by the internal trigger mode capture the projection information of the emission and moiré tomography, respectively. A two-step spatial phase-shifting method is applied to extract the phase distribution in the moiré fringes. By using the filtered back-projection algorithm, we reconstruct the 3D refractive-index distribution of the combustion flow field. Finally, the 3D temperature distribution of the flame is obtained from the refractive index distribution using the Gladstone-Dale equation. Meanwhile, the 3D intensity distribution is reconstructed based on the radiation projections from the emission tomography. Therefore, the structure and edge information of the propane flame are well visualized.

  18. Fast Neutron Emission Tomography of Used Nuclear Fuel Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausladen, Paul; Iyengar, Anagha; Fabris, Lorenzo; Yang, Jinan; Hu, Jianwei; Blackston, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a new capability to perform passive fast neutron emission tomography of spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of verifying their integrity for international safeguards applications. Most of the world's plutonium is contained in spent nuclear fuel, so it is desirable to detect the diversion of irradiated fuel rods from an assembly prior to its transfer to ``difficult to access'' storage, such as a dry cask or permanent repository, where re-verification is practically impossible. Nuclear fuel assemblies typically consist of an array of fuel rods that, depending on exposure in the reactor and consequent ingrowth of 244Cm, are spontaneous sources of as many as 109 neutrons s-1. Neutron emission tomography uses collimation to isolate neutron activity along ``lines of response'' through the assembly and, by combining many collimated views through the object, mathematically extracts the neutron emission from each fuel rod. This technique, by combining the use of fast neutrons -which can penetrate the entire fuel assembly -and computed tomography, is capable of detecting vacancies or substitutions of individual fuel rods. This paper will report on the physics design and component testing of the imaging system. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development within the National Nuclear Security Administration, under Contract Number DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging features of colloid adenocarcinoma of the lung: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ZhenGuang; Yu, MingMing; Chen, YueHua; Kong, Yan

    2017-07-27

    Colloid adenocarcinoma of the lung is a rare subtype of variants of invasive adenocarcinomas. We report the appearance of this unusual entity on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A 60-year-old man of Chinese Han nationality coughed with a little white sputum for 1 month. Chest computed tomography showed multiple bilateral subpleural nodules and plaques accompanied by air bronchograms, which were most concentrated in the lower lobe of his right lung. Positron emission tomography indicated increased radioactivity uptake with a maximum standardized uptake value of 3.5. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography showed a soft tissue density lesion in his left adrenal gland with a maximum standardized uptake value of 4.1. The positron emission tomography/computed tomography appearance suggested a primary colloid adenocarcinoma in the lower lobe of his right lung accompanied by intrapulmonary and left adrenal gland metastases. The diagnostic rate of colloid adenocarcinoma can be increased by combining the anatomic and metabolic information of lesions. The advantage of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of colloid adenocarcinoma, as with other cancers, is the ability to locate extrapulmonary disease, facilitating clinical staging.

  20. Imaging of the dopaminergic neurotransmission system using single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography in patients with parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booij, J.; Tissingh, G.; Winogrodzka, A.; Royen, E.A. van

    1999-01-01

    Parkinsonism is a feature of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy. The results of post-mortem studies point to dysfunction of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system in patients with parkinsonism. Nowadays, by using single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and positron emission tomography (PET) it is possible to visualise both the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and the striatal dopamine D 2 receptors in vivo. Consequently, SPET and PET imaging of elements of the dopaminergic system can play an important role in the diagnosis of several parkinsonian syndromes. This review concentrates on findings of SPET and PET studies of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system in various parkinsonian syndromes. (orig.)

  1. Edge-promoting reconstruction of absorption and diffusivity in optical tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannukainen, A.; Harhanen, Lauri Oskari; Hyvönen, N.

    2015-01-01

    In optical tomography a physical body is illuminated with near-infrared light and the resulting outward photon flux is measured at the object boundary. The goal is to reconstruct internal optical properties of the body, such as absorption and diffusivity. In this work, it is assumed that the imaged...... measurement noise model. The method is based on iteratively combining a lagged diffusivity step and a linearization of the measurement model of diffuse optical tomography with priorconditioned LSQR. The performance of the reconstruction technique is tested via three-dimensional numerical experiments...

  2. New possibilities of three-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Tarjan, Z.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scan reconstructions provide impressive and illustrative images of various parts of the human body. Such images are reconstructed from a series of basic CT scans by dedicated software. The state of the art in 3D computed tomography is demonstrated with emphasis on the imaging of soft tissues. Examples are presented of imaging the craniofacial and maxillofacial complex, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal and urogenital systems, and respiratory system, and their potential in clinical practice is discussed. Although contributing no new essential diagnostic information against conventional CT scans, 3D scans can help in spatial orientation. 11 figs., 25 refs

  3. Positron emission tomography, physical bases and comparaison with other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Fadhel; Hamza, F; Amouri, W.; Charfeddine, S.; Kallel, S.; Jardak, I.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a medical imaging technique that measures the three-dimensional distribution of molecules marked by a positron-emitting particle. PET has grown significantly in clinical fields, particularly in oncology for diagnosis and therapeutic follow purposes. The technical evolutions of this technique are fast. Among the technical improvements, is the coupling of the PET scan with computed tomography (CT). PET is obtained by intravenous injection of a radioactive tracer. The marker is usually fluorine ( 18 F) embedded in a glucose molecule forming the 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-18). This tracer, similar to glucose, binds to tissues that consume large quantities of the sugar such cancerous tissue, cardiac muscle or brain. Detection using scintillation crystals (BGO, LSO, LYSO) suitable for high energy (511keV) recognizes the lines of the gamma photons originating from the annihilation of a positron with an electron. The electronics of detection or coincidence circuit is based on two criteria: a time window, of about 6 to 15 ns, and an energy window. This system measures the true coincidences that correspond to the detection of two photons of 511 kV from the same annihilation. Most PET devices are constituted by a series of elementary detectors distributed annularly around the patient. Each detector comprises a scintillation crystal matrix coupled to a finite number (4 or 6) of photomultipliers. The electronic circuit, or the coincidence circuit, determines the projection point of annihilation by means of two elementary detectors. The processing of such information must be extremely fast, considering the count rates encountered in practice. The information measured by the coincidence circuit is then positioned in a matrix or sinogram, which contains a set of elements of a projection section of the object. Images are obtained by tomographic reconstruction by powerful computer stations equipped with a software tools allowing the analysis and

  4. Iterative reconstruction of magnetic induction using Lorentz transmission electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, C.; Gürsoy, D.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ongoing research on complex nanomagnetic structures requires a fundamental understanding of the 3D magnetization and the stray fields around the nano-objects. 3D visualization of such fields offers the best way to achieve this. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy provides a suitable combination of high resolution and ability to quantitatively visualize the magnetization vectors using phase retrieval methods. In this paper, we present a formalism to represent the magnetic phase shift of electrons as a Radon transform of the magnetic induction of the sample. Using this formalism, we then present the application of common tomographic methods particularly the iterative methods, to reconstruct the 3D components of the vector field. We present an analysis of the effect of missing wedge and the limited angular sampling as well as reconstruction of complex 3D magnetization in a nanowire using simulations. - Highlights: • We present a formalism to represent electron-optical magnetic phase shift as a Radon transform of the 3D magnetic induction of the nano-object. • We have analyzed four different tomographic reconstruction methods for vectorial data reconstruction. • Reconstruction methods were tested for varying experimental limitations such as limited tilt range and limited angular sampling. • The analysis showed that Gridrec and SIRT methods performed better with lower errors than other reconstruction methods

  5. GNSS troposphere tomography based on two-step reconstructions using GPS observations and COSMIC profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Xia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, balloon-based radiosonde soundings are used to study the spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapour. However, this approach cannot be frequently employed due to its high cost. In contrast, GPS tomography technique can obtain water vapour in a high temporal resolution. In the tomography technique, an iterative or non-iterative reconstruction algorithm is usually utilised to overcome rank deficiency of observation equations for water vapour inversion. However, the single iterative or non-iterative reconstruction algorithm has their limitations. For instance, the iterative reconstruction algorithm requires accurate initial values of water vapour while the non-iterative reconstruction algorithm needs proper constraint conditions. To overcome these drawbacks, we present a combined iterative and non-iterative reconstruction approach for the three-dimensional (3-D water vapour inversion using GPS observations and COSMIC profiles. In this approach, the non-iterative reconstruction algorithm is first used to estimate water vapour density based on a priori water vapour information derived from COSMIC radio occultation data. The estimates are then employed as initial values in the iterative reconstruction algorithm. The largest advantage of this approach is that precise initial values of water vapour density that are essential in the iterative reconstruction algorithm can be obtained. This combined reconstruction algorithm (CRA is evaluated using 10-day GPS observations in Hong Kong and COSMIC profiles. The test results indicate that the water vapor accuracy from CRA is 16 and 14% higher than that of iterative and non-iterative reconstruction approaches, respectively. In addition, the tomography results obtained from the CRA are further validated using radiosonde data. Results indicate that water vapour densities derived from the CRA agree with radiosonde results very well at altitudes above 2.5 km. The average RMS value of their

  6. Preliminary frequency-domain analysis for the reconstructed spatial resolution of muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B.; Zhao, Z.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Wu, D.; Zeng, Z.; Zeng, M.; Yi, H.; Luo, Z.; Yue, X.; Cheng, J.

    2014-11-01

    Muon tomography is an advanced technology to non-destructively detect high atomic number materials. It exploits the multiple Coulomb scattering information of muon to reconstruct the scattering density image of the traversed object. Because of the statistics of muon scattering, the measurement error of system and the data incompleteness, the reconstruction is always accompanied with a certain level of interference, which will influence the reconstructed spatial resolution. While statistical noises can be reduced by extending the measuring time, system parameters determine the ultimate spatial resolution that one system can reach. In this paper, an effective frequency-domain model is proposed to analyze the reconstructed spatial resolution of muon tomography. The proposed method modifies the resolution analysis in conventional computed tomography (CT) to fit the different imaging mechanism in muon scattering tomography. The measured scattering information is described in frequency domain, then a relationship between the measurements and the original image is proposed in Fourier domain, which is named as "Muon Central Slice Theorem". Furthermore, a preliminary analytical expression of the ultimate reconstructed spatial is derived, and the simulations are performed for validation. While the method is able to predict the ultimate spatial resolution of a given system, it can also be utilized for the optimization of system design and construction.

  7. Preliminary frequency-domain analysis for the reconstructed spatial resolution of muon tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, B.; Zhao, Z.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Wu, D.; Zeng, Z.; Zeng, M.; Yi, H.; Luo, Z.; Yue, X.; Cheng, J.

    2014-01-01

    Muon tomography is an advanced technology to non-destructively detect high atomic number materials. It exploits the multiple Coulomb scattering information of muon to reconstruct the scattering density image of the traversed object. Because of the statistics of muon scattering, the measurement error of system and the data incompleteness, the reconstruction is always accompanied with a certain level of interference, which will influence the reconstructed spatial resolution. While statistical noises can be reduced by extending the measuring time, system parameters determine the ultimate spatial resolution that one system can reach. In this paper, an effective frequency-domain model is proposed to analyze the reconstructed spatial resolution of muon tomography. The proposed method modifies the resolution analysis in conventional computed tomography (CT) to fit the different imaging mechanism in muon scattering tomography. The measured scattering information is described in frequency domain, then a relationship between the measurements and the original image is proposed in Fourier domain, which is named as M uon Central Slice Theorem . Furthermore, a preliminary analytical expression of the ultimate reconstructed spatial is derived, and the simulations are performed for validation. While the method is able to predict the ultimate spatial resolution of a given system, it can also be utilized for the optimization of system design and construction

  8. Towards a practical implementation of the MLE algorithm for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Andreae, S.; Veklerov, E.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Recognizing that the quality of images obtained by application of the Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) to Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) appears to be substantially better than those obtained by conventional methods, the authors have started to develop methods that will facilitate the necessary research for a good evaluation of the algorithm and may lead to its practical application for research and routine tomography. They have found that the non-linear MLE algorithm can be used with pixel sizes which are smaller than the sampling distance, without interpolation, obtaining excellent resolution and no noticeable increase in noise. They have studied the role of symmetry in reducing the amount of matrix element storage requirements for full size applications of the algorithm and have used that concept to carry out two reconstructions of the Derenzo phantom with data from the ECAT-III instrument. The results show excellent signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, particularly for data with low total counts, excellent sharpness, but low contrast at high frequencies when using the Shepp-Vardi model for probability matrices

  9. Novel image reconstruction algorithm for multi-phase flow tomography system using γ ray method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Kuihong; Wang Huaxiang; Gao Mei

    2007-01-01

    After analyzing the reason of image reconstructed algorithm by using the conventional back projection (IBP) is prone to produce spurious line, and considering the characteristic of multi-phase flow tomography, a novel image reconstruction algorithm is proposed, which carries out the intersection calculation using back projection data. This algorithm can obtain a perfect system point spread function, and can eliminate spurious line better. Simulating results show that the algorithm is effective for identifying multi-phase flow pattern. (authors)

  10. FIRST: Fast Iterative Reconstruction Software for (PET) tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herraiz, J L; Espana, S; Vaquero, J J; Desco, M; UdIas, J M

    2006-01-01

    Small animal PET scanners require high spatial resolution and good sensitivity. To reconstruct high-resolution images in 3D-PET, iterative methods, such as OSEM, are superior to analytical reconstruction algorithms, although their high computational cost is still a serious drawback. The higher performance of modern computers could make iterative image reconstruction fast enough to be viable, provided we are able to deal with the large number of probability coefficients for the system response matrix in high-resolution PET scanners, which is a difficult task that prevents the algorithms from reaching peak computing performance. Considering all possible axial and in-plane symmetries, as well as certain quasi-symmetries, we have been able to reduce the memory requirements to store the system response matrix (SRM) well below 1 GB, which allows us to keep the whole response matrix of the system inside RAM of ordinary industry-standard computers, so that the reconstruction algorithm can achieve near peak performance. The elements of the SRM are stored as cubic spline profiles and matched to voxel size during reconstruction. In this way, the advantages of 'on-the-fly' calculation and of fully stored SRM are combined. The on-the-fly part of the calculation (matching the profile functions to voxel size) of the SRM accounts for 10-30% of the reconstruction time, depending on the number of voxels chosen. We tested our approach with real data from a commercial small animal PET scanner. The results (image quality and reconstruction time) show that the proposed technique is a feasible solution

  11. FIRST: Fast Iterative Reconstruction Software for (PET) tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J L [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J J [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital GU Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital GU Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); UdIas, J M [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2006-09-21

    Small animal PET scanners require high spatial resolution and good sensitivity. To reconstruct high-resolution images in 3D-PET, iterative methods, such as OSEM, are superior to analytical reconstruction algorithms, although their high computational cost is still a serious drawback. The higher performance of modern computers could make iterative image reconstruction fast enough to be viable, provided we are able to deal with the large number of probability coefficients for the system response matrix in high-resolution PET scanners, which is a difficult task that prevents the algorithms from reaching peak computing performance. Considering all possible axial and in-plane symmetries, as well as certain quasi-symmetries, we have been able to reduce the memory requirements to store the system response matrix (SRM) well below 1 GB, which allows us to keep the whole response matrix of the system inside RAM of ordinary industry-standard computers, so that the reconstruction algorithm can achieve near peak performance. The elements of the SRM are stored as cubic spline profiles and matched to voxel size during reconstruction. In this way, the advantages of 'on-the-fly' calculation and of fully stored SRM are combined. The on-the-fly part of the calculation (matching the profile functions to voxel size) of the SRM accounts for 10-30% of the reconstruction time, depending on the number of voxels chosen. We tested our approach with real data from a commercial small animal PET scanner. The results (image quality and reconstruction time) show that the proposed technique is a feasible solution.

  12. Image Reconstruction of Metal Pipe in Electrical Resistance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanna RIDZUAN AW

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates a Linear Back Projection (LBP algorithm based on the reconstruction of conductivity distributions to identify different sizes and locations of bubble phantoms in a metal pipe. Both forward and inverse problems are discussed. Reconstructed images of the phantoms under test conditions are presented. From the results, it was justified that the sensitivity maps of the conducting boundary strategy can be applied successfully in identifying the location for the phantom of interest using LBP algorithm. Additionally, the number and spatial distribution of the bubble phantoms can be clearly distinguished at any location in the pipeline. It was also shown that the reconstructed images agree well with the bubble phantoms.

  13. 2-D Fused Image Reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography: a theoretical assessment using FDTD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindu, G; Semenov, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient two-dimensional fused image reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography (MWT). Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) models were created for a viable MWT experimental system having the transceivers modelled using thin wire approximation with resistive voltage sources. Born Iterative and Distorted Born Iterative methods have been employed for image reconstruction with the extremity imaging being done using a differential imaging technique. The forward solver in the imaging algorithm employs the FDTD method of solving the time domain Maxwell's equations with the regularisation parameter computed using a stochastic approach. The algorithm is tested with 10% noise inclusion and successful image reconstruction has been shown implying its robustness.

  14. Reconstruction for limited-projection fluorescence molecular tomography based on projected restarted conjugate gradient normal residual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Fei; Wang, Xin; Bai, Jing

    2011-12-01

    Limited-projection fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) can greatly reduce the acquisition time, which is suitable for resolving fast biology processes in vivo but suffers from severe ill-posedness because of the reconstruction using only limited projections. To overcome the severe ill-posedness, we report a reconstruction method based on the projected restarted conjugate gradient normal residual. The reconstruction results of two phantom experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is feasible for limited-projection FMT. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  15. Self-adapting denoising, alignment and reconstruction in electron tomography in materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Printemps, Tony, E-mail: tony.printemps@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Mula, Guido [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, S.P. 8km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato (Italy); Sette, Daniele; Bleuet, Pierre; Delaye, Vincent; Bernier, Nicolas; Grenier, Adeline; Audoit, Guillaume; Gambacorti, Narciso; Hervé, Lionel [Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2016-01-15

    An automatic procedure for electron tomography is presented. This procedure is adapted for specimens that can be fashioned into a needle-shaped sample and has been evaluated on inorganic samples. It consists of self-adapting denoising, automatic and accurate alignment including detection and correction of tilt axis, and 3D reconstruction. We propose the exploitation of a large amount of information of an electron tomography acquisition to achieve robust and automatic mixed Poisson–Gaussian noise parameter estimation and denoising using undecimated wavelet transforms. The alignment is made by mixing three techniques, namely (i) cross-correlations between neighboring projections, (ii) common line algorithm to get a precise shift correction in the direction of the tilt axis and (iii) intermediate reconstructions to precisely determine the tilt axis and shift correction in the direction perpendicular to that axis. Mixing alignment techniques turns out to be very efficient and fast. Significant improvements are highlighted in both simulations and real data reconstructions of porous silicon in high angle annular dark field mode and agglomerated silver nanoparticles in incoherent bright field mode. 3D reconstructions obtained with minimal user-intervention present fewer artefacts and less noise, which permits easier and more reliable segmentation and quantitative analysis. After careful sample preparation and data acquisition, the denoising procedure, alignment and reconstruction can be achieved within an hour for a 3D volume of about a hundred million voxels, which is a step toward a more routine use of electron tomography. - Highlights: • Goal: perform a reliable and user-independent 3D electron tomography reconstruction. • Proposed method: self-adapting denoising and alignment prior to 3D reconstruction. • Noise estimation and denoising are performed using wavelet transform. • Tilt axis determination is done automatically as well as projection alignment.

  16. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...

  17. Single photon emission computed tomography in AIDS dementia complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.; Vogl, G.; Fill, H.; Roessler, H.Z.; Zangerle, R.; Gerstenbrand, F.

    1988-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies were performed in AIDS dementia complex using IMP in 12 patients (and HM-PAO in four of these same patients). In all patients, SPECT revealed either multiple or focal uptake defects, the latter corresponding with focal signs or symptoms in all but one case. Computerized tomography showed a diffuse cerebral atrophy in eight of 12 patients, magnetic resonance imaging exhibited changes like atrophy and/or leukoencephalopathy in two of five cases. Our data indicate that both disturbance of cerebral amine metabolism and alteration of local perfusion share in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia complex. SPECT is an important aid in the diagnosis of AIDS dementia complex and contributes to the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of this disorder

  18. Diagnosis and evaluation of gastric cancer by positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Xi; Zhu, Zhao-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The diagnosis of gastric cancer has been significantly improved with the broad availability of gastrointestinal endoscopy. Effective technologies for accurate staging and quantitative evaluation are still in demand to merit reasonable treatment and better prognosis for the patients presented with advanced disease. Preoperative staging using conventional imaging tools, such as computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasonography, is inadequate. Positron emission tomography (PET), using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer and integrating CT for anatomic localization, holds a promise to detect unsuspected metastasis and has been extensively used in a variety of malignancies. However, the value of FDG PET/CT in diagnosis and evaluation of gastric cancer is still controversial. This article reviews the current literature in diagnosis, staging, response evaluation, and relapse monitoring of gastric cancer, and discusses the current understanding, improvement, and future prospects in this area. PMID:24782610

  19. Positron emission tomography with gamma camera in coincidence mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertel, A.; Hoer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using F-18 FDG has been estbalished in clinical diagnostics with first indications especially in oncology. To install a conventional PET tomography (dedicated PET) is financially costly and restricted to PET examinations only. Increasing demand for PET diagnostics on one hand and restricted financial resources in the health system on the other hand led industry to develop SPECT cameras to be operated in coincidence mode (camera PET) in order to offer nuclear medicine physicians cost-effective devices for PET diagnostic. At the same time camera PET is inferior to conventional PET regarding sensitivity and detection-efficiency for 511 keV photons. Does camera-PET offer a reliable alternative to conventional PET? The first larger comparative studies are now available, so a first apraisal about the technical clinical performance of camera-PET can be done. (orig.) [de

  20. Positron emission tomography (PET) for oncologic applications in oral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shozushima, Masanori; Terasaki, Kazunori

    2004-01-01

    A rapidly emerging clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is the detection of cancer with radionuclide tracer, because it provides information unavailable by ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The most commonly used radiotracer for PET oncologic imaging is fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Early studies show PET has potential value in viewing the region of the tumor, detecting, staging, grading, monitoring response to anticancer therapy, and differentiating recurrent or residual disease from post treatment changes. However, limitations of FDG-PET in the head and neck region, namely, physiological FDG uptake in the salivary glands and palatine tonsils, have been reported, increasing the false-positive rates in image interpretation. This review was designed to address these distinctions of oral cancer PET imaging: specialization of PET equipment, cancer cell metabolism, proliferation and tracers, clinical diagnosis of oral cancer with PET, pitfalls in oncologic diagnosis with FDG-PET imaging. (author)

  1. Positron emission tomography in a national research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinreich, R.

    1989-01-01

    The example of the Paul Scherrer Institute shows that positron emission tomography can be implanted successfully as spin-off into an appropriate environment. The adaption to the existing irradiation facilities of the technique of production of the short-lived positron emitters is complex. However, the basic necessities of a tomography programme can be covered. Moreover, the relatively high energy of the institute's injector cyclotron allows additional production of rare-used longer-lived positron emitters. The scanner exceeded the guaranteed specifications. With respect to the somewhat lower availability of beam time compared to a usual baby cyclotron, the research programme must not be very patient-intense. A strong participation of the pharmaceutical industry has directed research priorities into the pharmacological area. (orig.) [de

  2. Imaging local brain function with emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to map local cerebral glucose utilization in the study of local cerebral function. This information differs fundamentally from structural assessment by means of computed tomography (CT). In normal human volunteers, the FDG scan was used to determine the cerebral metabolic response to conrolled sensory stimulation and the effects of aging. Cerebral metabolic patterns are distinctive among depressed and demented elderly patients. The FDG scan appears normal in the depressed patient, studded with multiple metabolic defects in patients with multiple infarct dementia, and in the patients with Alzheimer disease, metabolism is particularly reduced in the parietal cortex, but only slightly reduced in the caudate and thalamus. The interictal FDG scan effectively detects hypometabolic brain zones that are sites of onset for seizures in patients with partial epilepsy, even though these zones usually appear normal on CT scans. The future prospects of PET are discussed

  3. Electrical Impedance Tomography: 3D Reconstructions using Scattering Transforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Hansen, Per Christian; Knudsen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    In three dimensions the Calderon problem was addressed and solved in theory in the 1980s. The main ingredients in the solution of the problem are complex geometrical optics solutions to the conductivity equation and a (non-physical) scattering transform. The resulting reconstruction algorithm...

  4. Linearized image reconstruction method for ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography based on power density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xizi; Xu, Yanbin; Dong, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is a promising measurement technique with important industrial and clinical applications. However, with limited effective measurements, it suffers from poor spatial resolution due to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Recently, there has been an increasing research interest in hybrid imaging techniques, utilizing couplings of physical modalities, because these techniques obtain much more effective measurement information and promise high resolution. Ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography (UMEIT) is one of the newly developed hybrid imaging techniques, which combines electric and acoustic modalities. A linearized image reconstruction method based on power density is proposed for UMEIT. The interior data, power density distribution, is adopted to reconstruct the conductivity distribution with the proposed image reconstruction method. At the same time, relating the power density change to the change in conductivity, the Jacobian matrix is employed to make the nonlinear problem into a linear one. The analytic formulation of this Jacobian matrix is derived and its effectiveness is also verified. In addition, different excitation patterns are tested and analyzed, and opposite excitation provides the best performance with the proposed method. Also, multiple power density distributions are combined to implement image reconstruction. Finally, image reconstruction is implemented with the linear back-projection (LBP) algorithm. Compared with ERT, with the proposed image reconstruction method, UMEIT can produce reconstructed images with higher quality and better quantitative evaluation results. (paper)

  5. The effect of iterative reconstruction on computed tomography assessment of emphysema, air trapping and airway dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mets, Onno M.; Willemink, Martin J.; de Kort, Freek P. L.; Mol, Christian P.; Leiner, Tim; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Prokop, Mathias; de Jong, Pim A.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the influence of iterative reconstruction (IR) on quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements of emphysema, air trapping, and airway wall and lumen dimensions, compared to filtered back-projection (FBP). Inspiratory and expiratory chest CTs of 75 patients (37 male, 38 female;

  6. Automatic Identification and Reconstruction of the Right Phrenic Nerve on Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Bamps, Kobe; Cuypers, Céline; Polmans, Pieter; Claesen, Luc; Koopman, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    An automatic computer algorithm was successfully constructed, enabling identification and reconstruction of the right phrenic nerve on high resolution coronary computed tomography scans. This could lead to a substantial reduction in the incidence of phrenic nerve paralysis during pulmonary vein isolation using ballon techniques.

  7. Automated discrete electron tomography – Towards routine high-fidelity reconstruction of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuge, Xiaodong [Computational Imaging, Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, Science park 123, 1098XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jinnai, Hiroshi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Migunov, Vadim [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Bals, Sara [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Cool, Pegie [Laboratory of Adsorption and Catalysis, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Bons, Anton-Jan [European Technology Center, ExxonMobil Chemical Europe Inc., Hermeslaan 2, B-1831 Machelen (Belgium); Batenburg, Kees Joost [Computational Imaging, Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, Science park 123, 1098XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    Electron tomography is an essential imaging technique for the investigation of morphology and 3D structure of nanomaterials. This method, however, suffers from well-known missing wedge artifacts due to a restricted tilt range, which limits the objectiveness, repeatability and efficiency of quantitative structural analysis. Discrete tomography represents one of the promising reconstruction techniques for materials science, potentially capable of delivering higher fidelity reconstructions by exploiting the prior knowledge of the limited number of material compositions in a specimen. However, the application of discrete tomography to practical datasets remains a difficult task due to the underlying challenging mathematical problem. In practice, it is often hard to obtain consistent reconstructions from experimental datasets. In addition, numerous parameters need to be tuned manually, which can lead to bias and non-repeatability. In this paper, we present the application of a new iterative reconstruction technique, named TVR-DART, for discrete electron tomography. The technique is capable of consistently delivering reconstructions with significantly reduced missing wedge artifacts for a variety of challenging data and imaging conditions, and can automatically estimate its key parameters. We describe the principles of the technique and apply it to datasets from three different types of samples acquired under diverse imaging modes. By further reducing the available tilt range and number of projections, we show that the proposed technique can still produce consistent reconstructions with minimized missing wedge artifacts. This new development promises to provide the electron microscopy community with an easy-to-use and robust tool for high-fidelity 3D characterization of nanomaterials. - Highlights: • Automated discrete electron tomography capable of consistently delivering reconstructions with significantly reduced missing wedge artifacts and requires significantly

  8. Automated discrete electron tomography – Towards routine high-fidelity reconstruction of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuge, Xiaodong; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Migunov, Vadim; Bals, Sara; Cool, Pegie; Bons, Anton-Jan; Batenburg, Kees Joost

    2017-01-01

    Electron tomography is an essential imaging technique for the investigation of morphology and 3D structure of nanomaterials. This method, however, suffers from well-known missing wedge artifacts due to a restricted tilt range, which limits the objectiveness, repeatability and efficiency of quantitative structural analysis. Discrete tomography represents one of the promising reconstruction techniques for materials science, potentially capable of delivering higher fidelity reconstructions by exploiting the prior knowledge of the limited number of material compositions in a specimen. However, the application of discrete tomography to practical datasets remains a difficult task due to the underlying challenging mathematical problem. In practice, it is often hard to obtain consistent reconstructions from experimental datasets. In addition, numerous parameters need to be tuned manually, which can lead to bias and non-repeatability. In this paper, we present the application of a new iterative reconstruction technique, named TVR-DART, for discrete electron tomography. The technique is capable of consistently delivering reconstructions with significantly reduced missing wedge artifacts for a variety of challenging data and imaging conditions, and can automatically estimate its key parameters. We describe the principles of the technique and apply it to datasets from three different types of samples acquired under diverse imaging modes. By further reducing the available tilt range and number of projections, we show that the proposed technique can still produce consistent reconstructions with minimized missing wedge artifacts. This new development promises to provide the electron microscopy community with an easy-to-use and robust tool for high-fidelity 3D characterization of nanomaterials. - Highlights: • Automated discrete electron tomography capable of consistently delivering reconstructions with significantly reduced missing wedge artifacts and requires significantly

  9. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavayssiere, Robert; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth; Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005

  10. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayssiere, Robert [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France)], E-mail: cab.lav@wanadoo.fr; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); Centre RMX, 80, avenue Felix Faure, 75105 Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); American Hospital of Paris, Nuclear Medicine, 63, boulevard Victor Hugo - BP 109, 92202 Neuilly sur Seine Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005].

  11. Contribution of positron emission tomography in pleural disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duysinx, B; Corhay, J-L; Larock, M-P; Withofs, N; Bury, T; Hustinx, R; Louis, R

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now plays a clear role in oncology, especially in chest tumours. We discuss the value of metabolic imaging in characterising pleural pathology in the light of our own experience and review the literature. PET is particularly useful in characterising malignant pleural pathologies and is a factor of prognosis in mesothelioma. Metabolic imaging also provides clinical information for staging lung cancer, in researching the primary tumour in metastatic pleurisy and in monitoring chronic or recurrent pleural pathologies. PET should therefore be considered as a useful tool in the diagnosis of liquid or solid pleural pathologies. Copyright © 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Positron emission tomography. Present status and Romanian perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Lungu, V.

    1995-01-01

    Basic principles of the positron emission tomography (PET) are summarised. The main PET methods using short-lived radioisotopes (i.e. 11 C, 13 N, 15 O, 18 F) are briefly reviewed. Three types of particle accelerators for radioisotopes production and medical uses (including radiotherapy), corresponding to the proton energy (E p p p < 200 MeV) are presented. PET imaging equipment and procedures are discussed. Main radiopharmaceuticals based on beta decay for PET studies and their role in medicine is also described. Finally, perspectives for a PET program in Romania (Cyclotron + Radiochemistry + Tomograph ) are discussed. (author)

  13. Kinetic modeling in pre-clinical positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntner, Claudia [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria). Biomedical Systems, Health and Environment Dept.

    2014-07-01

    Pre-clinical positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved in the last few years from pure visualization of radiotracer uptake and distribution towards quantification of the physiological parameters. For reliable and reproducible quantification the kinetic modeling methods used to obtain relevant parameters of radiotracer tissue interaction are important. Here we present different kinetic modeling techniques with a focus on compartmental models including plasma input models and reference tissue input models. The experimental challenges of deriving the plasma input function in rodents and the effect of anesthesia are discussed. Finally, in vivo application of kinetic modeling in various areas of pre-clinical research is presented and compared to human data.

  14. Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography with Radiofrequency Phototube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaryan, A.; Kakoyan, V.; Knyazyan, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper γ-detector, based on the radiofrequency (RF) phototube and recently developed fast and ultrafast scintillators, is considered for Time-of-Flight positron emission tomography applications. Timing characteristics of such a device has been investigated by means of a dedicated Monte Carlo code based on the single photon counting concept. Biexponential timing model for scintillators have been used. The calculations have shown that such a timing model is in a good agreement with recently measured data. The timing resolution of -detectors can be significantly improved by using the RF phototube. (authors)

  15. Low-resource synchronous coincidence processor for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, Giancarlo; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Pedro; Santos, Andres

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new FPGA-based method for coincidence detection in positron emission tomography. The method requires low device resources and no specific peripherals in order to resolve coincident digital pulses within a time window of a few nanoseconds. This method has been validated with a low-end Xilinx Spartan-3E and provided coincidence resolutions lower than 6 ns. This resolution depends directly on the signal propagation properties of the target device and the maximum available clock frequency, therefore it is expected to improve considerably on higher-end FPGAs.

  16. Functional imaging of the brain with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, A.; Reivich, M.; Jones, S.C.; Greenberg, J.H.; Wolf, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    An extensive review, with 191 references, of the development and diagnostic use of positron emission tomography (PET) of the brain is presented. An historical overview of functional studies of the brain reviews the use of nitrons oxide, 85 Kr and 133 Xe, [ 14 C]2-deoxyglucose, and [ 18 F]FDG. The [ 18 F]FDG technique allows the investigation of the effects of physiologic stimulation on the brain. Several studies using this technique are reported. The effects of stroke, seizure disorders, aging and dementia, and schizophrenia on cerebral metabolism as demosntrated by PET are explored

  17. Images to visualize the brain. PET: Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Diagnosis instrument and research tool, Positron Emission Tomography permits advanced technological developments on positron camera, on molecule labelling and principally on very complex 3D image processing. Cyceron Centre in Caen-France works on brain diseases and try to understand the mechanism of observed troubles and to assess the treatment efficiency with PET. Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot of CEA-France establishes a mapping of cognitive functions in PET as vision areas, anxiety regions, brain organization of language, different attention forms, voluntary actions and motor functions

  18. Dual-Source Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Reconstructed on Integrated Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoude Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dual-source swept-source optical coherence tomography (DS-SSOCT has two individual sources with different central wavelengths, linewidth, and bandwidths. Because of the difference between the two sources, the individually reconstructed tomograms from each source have different aspect ratio, which makes the comparison and integration difficult. We report a method to merge two sets of DS-SSOCT raw data in a common spectrum, on which both data have the same spectrum density and a correct separation. The reconstructed tomographic image can seamlessly integrate the two bands of OCT data together. The final image has higher axial resolution and richer spectroscopic information than any of the individually reconstructed tomography image.

  19. Image reconstruction with an adaptive threshold technique in electrical resistance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Seok; Khambampati, Anil Kumar; Kim, Sin; Kim, Kyung Youn

    2011-01-01

    In electrical resistance tomography, electrical currents are injected through the electrodes placed on the surface of a domain and the corresponding voltages are measured. Based on these currents and voltage data, the cross-sectional resistivity distribution is reconstructed. Electrical resistance tomography shows high temporal resolution for monitoring fast transient processes, but it still remains a challenging problem to improve the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images. In this paper, a novel image reconstruction technique is proposed to improve the spatial resolution by employing an adaptive threshold method to the iterative Gauss–Newton method. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to illustrate the superior performance of the proposed scheme in the sense of spatial resolution

  20. Research on Image Reconstruction Algorithms for Tuber Electrical Resistance Tomography System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Zili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of electrical resistance tomography (ERT technology has been expanded to the field of agriculture, and the concept of TERT (Tuber Electrical Resistance Tomography is proposed. On the basis of the research on the forward and the inverse problems of the TERT system, a hybrid algorithm based on genetic algorithm is proposed, which can be used in TERT system to monitor the growth status of the plant tubers. The image reconstruction of TERT system is different from the conventional ERT system for two phase-flow measurement. Imaging of TERT needs more precision measurement and the conventional ERT cares more about the image reconstruction speed. A variety of algorithms are analyzed and optimized for the purpose of making them suitable for TERT system. For example: linear back projection, modified Newton-Raphson and genetic algorithm. Experimental results showed that the novel hybrid algorithm is superior to other algorithm and it can effectively improve the image reconstruction quality.

  1. Accelerating image reconstruction in three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography on graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Huang, Chao; Kao, Yu-Jiun; Chou, Cheng-Ying; Oraevsky, Alexander A; Anastasio, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    Optoacoustic tomography (OAT) is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) inverse problem. However, most studies of OAT image reconstruction still employ two-dimensional imaging models. One important reason is because 3D image reconstruction is computationally burdensome. The aim of this work is to accelerate existing image reconstruction algorithms for 3D OAT by use of parallel programming techniques. Parallelization strategies are proposed to accelerate a filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and two different pairs of projection/backprojection operations that correspond to two different numerical imaging models. The algorithms are designed to fully exploit the parallel computing power of graphics processing units (GPUs). In order to evaluate the parallelization strategies for the projection/backprojection pairs, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm is implemented. Computer simulation and experimental studies are conducted to investigate the computational efficiency and numerical accuracy of the developed algorithms. The GPU implementations improve the computational efficiency by factors of 1000, 125, and 250 for the FBP algorithm and the two pairs of projection/backprojection operators, respectively. Accurate images are reconstructed by use of the FBP and iterative image reconstruction algorithms from both computer-simulated and experimental data. Parallelization strategies for 3D OAT image reconstruction are proposed for the first time. These GPU-based implementations significantly reduce the computational time for 3D image reconstruction, complementing our earlier work on 3D OAT iterative image reconstruction.

  2. General surface reconstruction for cone-beam multislice spiral computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Laigao; Liang Yun; Heuscher, Dominic J.

    2003-01-01

    A new family of cone-beam reconstruction algorithm, the General Surface Reconstruction (GSR), is proposed and formulated in this paper for multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. It provides a general framework to allow the reconstruction of planar or nonplanar surfaces on a set of rebinned short-scan parallel beam projection data. An iterative surface formation method is proposed as an example to show the possibility to form nonplanar reconstruction surfaces to minimize the adverse effect between the collected cone-beam projection data and the reconstruction surfaces. The improvement in accuracy of the nonplanar surfaces over planar surfaces in the two-dimensional approximate cone-beam reconstructions is mathematically proved and demonstrated using numerical simulations. The proposed GSR algorithm is evaluated by the computer simulation of cone-beam spiral scanning geometry and various mathematical phantoms. The results demonstrate that the GSR algorithm generates much better image quality compared to conventional multislice reconstruction algorithms. For a table speed up to 100 mm per rotation, GSR demonstrates good image quality for both the low-contrast ball phantom and thorax phantom. All other performance parameters are comparable to the single-slice 180 deg. LI (linear interpolation) algorithm, which is considered the 'gold standard'. GSR also achieves high computing efficiency and good temporal resolution, making it an attractive alternative for the reconstruction of next generation multislice spiral CT data

  3. An analysis of true- and false-positive results of vocal fold uptake in positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, N; Burkill, G; Harries, M

    2018-03-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose has a major role in the investigation of head and neck cancers. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose is not a tumour-specific tracer and can also accumulate in benign pathology. Therefore, positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan interpretation difficulties are common in the head and neck, which can produce false-positive results. This study aimed to investigate patients detected as having abnormal vocal fold uptake on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans were identified over a 15-month period where reports contained evidence of unilateral vocal fold uptake or vocal fold pathology. Patients' notes and laryngoscopy results were analysed. Forty-six patients were identified as having abnormal vocal fold uptake on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Twenty-three patients underwent positron emission tomography-computed tomography and flexible laryngoscopy: 61 per cent of patients had true-positive positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans and 39 per cent had false-positive scan results. Most patients referred to ENT for abnormal findings on positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans had true-positive findings. Asymmetrical fluorine-18 fluorodeoxy-D-glucose uptake should raise suspicion of vocal fold pathology, accepting a false-positive rate of approximately 40 per cent.

  4. Modelling the physics in iterative reconstruction for transmission computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyts, Johan; De Man, Bruno; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Beekman, Freek J.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in iterative reconstruction (IR) as a key tool to improve quality and increase applicability of X-ray CT imaging. IR has the ability to significantly reduce patient dose, it provides the flexibility to reconstruct images from arbitrary X-ray system geometries and it allows to include detailed models of photon transport and detection physics, to accurately correct for a wide variety of image degrading effects. This paper reviews discretisation issues and modelling of finite spatial resolution, Compton scatter in the scanned object, data noise and the energy spectrum. Widespread implementation of IR with highly accurate model-based correction, however, still requires significant effort. In addition, new hardware will provide new opportunities and challenges to improve CT with new modelling. PMID:23739261

  5. Efficacy of 3D-positron emission tomography/computed tomography for upper abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Koji; Nakahara, Tadaki

    2014-04-01

    Recent advancement in computed tomography (CT) enables us to obtain high spatial resolution image and made it possible to construct extensive high-definition three-dimensional (3D) images. But a lack of contrast resolution in CT alone is still remained problem. Meanwhile, as fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) can visualize tumors in high contrast, we can create 3D images fusing the accumulation in tumors on PET/CT images. Such images can play the role of a "map of body" which makes it easy to understand the anatomical information before surgery. We also try to evaluate segmental liver function by using PET/CT fusion images. By using (11) C-methionine PET/contrast-enhanced CT, superior image quality compared to single photon emission computed tomography/CT can be obtained. CT, especially with contrast enhancement for obtaining anatomical imaging information plus PET for obtaining functional imaging information is a highly compatible combination, and adding these two types information will further increase clinical usefulness. © 2014 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  6. Automated discrete electron tomography - Towards routine high-fidelity reconstruction of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Xiaodong; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Migunov, Vadim; Bals, Sara; Cool, Pegie; Bons, Anton-Jan; Batenburg, Kees Joost

    2017-04-01

    Electron tomography is an essential imaging technique for the investigation of morphology and 3D structure of nanomaterials. This method, however, suffers from well-known missing wedge artifacts due to a restricted tilt range, which limits the objectiveness, repeatability and efficiency of quantitative structural analysis. Discrete tomography represents one of the promising reconstruction techniques for materials science, potentially capable of delivering higher fidelity reconstructions by exploiting the prior knowledge of the limited number of material compositions in a specimen. However, the application of discrete tomography to practical datasets remains a difficult task due to the underlying challenging mathematical problem. In practice, it is often hard to obtain consistent reconstructions from experimental datasets. In addition, numerous parameters need to be tuned manually, which can lead to bias and non-repeatability. In this paper, we present the application of a new iterative reconstruction technique, named TVR-DART, for discrete electron tomography. The technique is capable of consistently delivering reconstructions with significantly reduced missing wedge artifacts for a variety of challenging data and imaging conditions, and can automatically estimate its key parameters. We describe the principles of the technique and apply it to datasets from three different types of samples acquired under diverse imaging modes. By further reducing the available tilt range and number of projections, we show that the proposed technique can still produce consistent reconstructions with minimized missing wedge artifacts. This new development promises to provide the electron microscopy community with an easy-to-use and robust tool for high-fidelity 3D characterization of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The metabolism of the human brain studied with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greitz, T.; Ingvar, D.H.; Widen, L.

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents coverage of the use of positron emission tomography (PET) to study the human brain. The contributors assess new developments in high-resolution positron emission tomography, cyclotrons, radiochemistry, and tracer kinetic models, and explore the use of PET in brain energy metabolism, blood flow, and protein synthesis measurements, receptor analysis, and pH determinations, In addition, they discuss the relevance and applications of positron emission tomography from the perspectives of physiology, neurology, and psychiatry

  8. Clinical applications of positron emission tomography at Montreal Neurological Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Montreal Neurological Institute occupies a leading position in positron emission tomography (PET) of the brain with the help of the following three techological gains: they have acquired a 'Therascan' positron emission tomograph manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.; also, a 'Baby Cyclotron' manufactured by Japan Steel Works Ltd.; and they have written a computer program to display the results in colour. Four short-lived isotopes are used; 11 C, 15 O, 18 F, 13 N. Studies of the oxygen uptake of tumours, their glucose metabolism (as monitored by 18 F labelled 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose), and their uptake of therapeutic agents, provide valuable research and diagnostic information. PET is also being used to study epilepsy and cerebrovascular disease

  9. Principles of image reconstruction in X-ray computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwierz, G.; Haerer, W.; Ruehrnschopf, E.P.

    1978-01-01

    The presented geometrical interpretation elucidates the convergence behavior of the classical iteration technique in X-ray computer tomography. The filter techniques nowadays used in preference are derived from a concept of linear system theory which excels due to its particular clarity. The one-dimensional form of the filtering is of decisive importance for immediate image reproduction as realized by both Siemens systems, the SIRETOM 2000 head scanner and the SOMATOM whole-body machine, as such unique to date for whole-body machines. The equivalence of discrete and continuous filtering when dealing with frequency-band-limited projections is proved. (orig.) [de

  10. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Mari Aparici

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-positron emission tomography (PET/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results.

  11. The use of cone beam computed tomography in the postoperative assessment of orbital wall fracture reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Kim; Cheng, Andrew; Goss, Alastair; Donovan, David

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the standard in postoperative evaluation of orbital wall fracture reconstruction, but cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers potential advantages including reduced radiation dose and cost. The purpose of this study is to examine objectively the image quality of CBCT in the postoperative evaluation of orbital fracture reconstruction, its radiation dose, and cost compared with CT. Four consecutive patients with orbital wall fractures in whom surgery was indicated underwent orbital reconstruction with radio-opaque grafts (bone, titanium-reinforced polyethylene, and titanium plate) and were assessed postoperatively with orbital CBCT. CBCT was evaluated for its ability to provide objective information regarding the adequacy of orbital reconstruction, radiation dose, and cost. In all patients, CBCT was feasible and provided hard tissue image quality comparable to CT with significantly reduced radiation dose and cost. However, it has poorer soft tissue resolution, which limits its ability to identify the extraocular muscles, their relationship to the reconstructive graft, and potential muscle entrapment. CBCT is a viable alternative to CT in the routine postoperative evaluation of orbital fracture reconstruction. However, in the patient who develops gaze restriction postoperatively, conventional CT is preferred over CBCT for its superior soft tissue resolution to exclude extraocular muscle entrapment.

  12. First image from a combined positron emission tomography and field-cycled MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindseil, Geron A; Gilbert, Kyle M; Scholl, Timothy J; Handler, William B; Chronik, Blaine A

    2011-07-01

    Combining positron emission tomography and MRI modalities typically requires using either conventional MRI with a MR-compatible positron emission tomography system or a modified MR system with conventional positron emission tomography. A feature of field-cycled MRI is that all magnetic fields can be turned off rapidly, enabling the use of conventional positron emission tomography detectors based on photomultiplier tubes. In this demonstration, two photomultiplier tube-based positron emission tomography detectors were integrated with a field-cycled MRI system (0.3 T/4 MHz) by placing them into a 9-cm axial gap. A positron emission tomography-MRI phantom consisting of a triangular arrangement of positron-emitting point sources embedded in an onion was imaged in a repeating interleaved sequence of ∼1 sec MRI then 1 sec positron emission tomography. The first multimodality images from the combined positron emission tomography and field-cycled MRI system show no additional artifacts due to interaction between the systems and demonstrate the potential of this approach to combining positron emission tomography and MRI. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Fasciola Hepatica Mimicking Malignancy on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sürücü, Erdem; Demir, Yusuf; Dülger, Ahmet C.; Batur, Abdüssamed; Ölmez, Şehmus; Kitapçı, Mehmet T.

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old female with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, nausea, and weight loss was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after removal of a 2 mm lesion from the stomach with endoscopic biopsy. Her magnetic resonance imaging that was performed due to on-going symptoms showed multiple linear hypointense lesions in the liver. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan was performed for differential diagnosis, which showed high fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in these lesions. Clinical and laboratory findings revealed the final diagnosis as Fasciola hepatica. The imaging features of this case is presented to aid in differentiating this infectious disease from malignancy and avoid misdiagnosis on FDG-PET/CT. PMID:27751978

  14. Prognostic Evaluation of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Endometrial Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup, Mie Holm; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Hess, Søren

    2017-01-01

    .19-8.49) and 1.93 (0.80-4.68), respectively. Whole-body cTLG of greater than or equal to 176.1 g yielded a hazard ratio of 5.70 (1.94-16.78) for OS in a multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative SUVmax and cTLG showed potential as independent prognostic markers of OS in patients with primarily high...... and a preoperative F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography before curatively intended treatment were included. The scans were evaluated using standard uptake values [maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) and partial volume corrected (c) mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean...... proportional regression models were used for prognostic evaluation. RESULTS: Eighty-three patients (median age, 69.9 y; range, 26.8-91.1) with primarily high-risk endometrial cancer or suspected high The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage were included. Mean follow-up time was 3...

  15. Fasciola Hepatica Mimicking Malignancy on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Sürücü

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old female with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, nausea, and weight loss was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after removal of a 2 mm lesion from the stomach with endoscopic biopsy. Her magnetic resonance imaging that was performed due to on-going symptoms showed multiple linear hypointense lesions in the liver. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT scan was performed for differential diagnosis, which showed high fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG uptake in these lesions. Clinical and laboratory findings revealed the final diagnosis as Fasciola hepatica. The imaging features of this case is presented to aid in differentiating this infectious disease from malignancy and avoid misdiagnosis on FDG-PET/CT.

  16. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek; Oehr, Peter

    2009-01-01

    of a number of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. J591, a monoclonal antibody, which targets the extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen, shows promising results. HER2 receptors may also have a potential as target for PET/CT imaging and RIT of advanced prostate cancer. SUMMARY: PET......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Traditional morphologically based imaging modalities are now being complemented by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in prostate cancer. Metastatic prostate cancer is an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) as no effective therapies...... are available. This review highlights the most important achievements within the last year in PET/CT and RIT of prostate cancer. RECENT FINDINGS: Conflicting results exist on the use of choline for detection of malignant disease in the prostate gland. The role of PET/CT in N-staging remains to be elucidated...

  17. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the detection of primary pulmonary angiosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Nayak, Deepika; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Majhi, Urmila

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a malignant vascular tumor that originates from the mesenchymal cells which have undergone angioblastic differentiation. Pulmonary angiosarcomas are invariably (>90%) metastatic tumors form primaries of the skin, bone, liver, breast, or heart. Primary pulmonary angiosarcomas are exceedingly rare, with just about 20 cases being reported in the literature. We report an additional case with a brief review of the literature of a primary pulmonary angiosarcoma in a 26-year-old lady who presented with intractable hemoptysis. In addition, we highlight the potential of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography as an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of this tumor and thus contribute to the existing sparse literature on this fascinating yet devastating disease

  18. F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Appearance of Extramedullary Hematopoesis in a Case of Primary Myelofibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Chandan Jyoti; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    A 44-year-old female with known primary myelofibrosis presented with shortness of breath. High Resolution Computed Tomography thorax revealed large heterogeneously enhancing extraparenchymal soft tissue density mass involving bilateral lung fields. F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography revealed mildly FDG avid soft tissue density mass with specks of calcification involving bilateral lung fields, liver, and spleen. Subsequent histopathologic evaluation from the right lung mass was suggestive of extramedullary hematopoesis. PMID:28533647

  19. Scanning transmission proton microscopy tomography of reconstruction cells from simulated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Conghua; Li Min; Hou Qing

    2011-01-01

    For scanning transmission proton microscopy tomography, to compare cell images of the proton stopping power and relative electron density, two cell phantoms are designed and simulated by code FLUKA. The cell images are reconstructed by the filtered back projection algorithm, and compared with their tomography imaging. The images of stopping power and relative electron density slightly vary with proton energies, but the internal images are of clear with high resolution. The organic glass image of relative electron density reveals the resolution power of proton tomography. Also, the simulation results reflect effects of the boundary enhancement, the weak artifacts, and the internal structure border extension by multiple scattering. So using proton tomography to analyze internal structure of a cell is a superior. (authors)

  20. Sound field reconstruction using acousto-optic tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torras Rosell, Antoni; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Jacobsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    When sound propagates through a medium, it results in pressure fluctuations that change the instantaneous density of the medium. Under such circumstances, the refractive index that characterizes the propagation of light is not constant, but influenced by the acoustic field. This kind of interaction...... the acousto-optic effect in air, and demonstrates that it can be measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer in the audible frequency range. The tomographic reconstruction is tested by means of computer simulations and measurements. The main features observed in the simulations are also recognized...

  1. Report of two cases of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography appearance of hibernoma: A rare benign tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Archi; Kembhavi, Seema; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    False-positive findings are commonly seen in positron emission tomography computed tomography imaging. One of the most common false positive finding is uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose in brown adipose tissue. Herein, we report two cases with incidentally detected hibernomas-a brown fat containing tumor with metabolic activity

  2. Unusual sites of metastatic recurrence of osteosarcoma detected on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabnurkar, Rasika; Agrawal, Archi; Rekhi, Bharat; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common nonhematolymphoid primary bone malignancy characterized by osteoid or new bone formation. Lungs and bones are the most common sites of metastases. We report a case where unusual sites of the soft tissue recurrence from OS were detected on restaging fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan done post 6 years of disease free interval

  3. The value of positron emission tomography/computed tomography for evaluating metastatic disease in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Jin; Lee, Kwang Hyuck; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lee, Jong Kyun; Ku, Bon-Ho; Oh, Cho-Rong; Heo, Jin Seok; Choi, Seong-Ho; Choi, Dong Wook

    2012-08-01

    Routine application of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for pancreatic cancer staging remains a controversial approach. The purpose of this study was to reassess the clinical impact of PET/CT for the detection of distant metastasis of pancreatic cancer. From January 2006 to June 2009, 125 patients with histologically proven pancreatic cancer that had undergone PET/CT at our hospital were retrospectively reviewed. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of PET/CT on the management plan, the post-PET/CT management plans were compared with the pre-PET/CT management plans. After the conventional staging workup, we determined that 76 patients (60.8%) had resectable lesions, whereas 48 patients had unresectable lesions. One patient underwent explorative laparotomy due to equivocal resectability. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography diagnosed distant metastasis in only 2 (2.6%) of the 76 patients with resectable lesions, and these patients did not undergo unnecessary surgical treatment. Complete resection was not performed in 8 of the 74 operative patients because they had distant metastasis detected during the operative procedure. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography diagnosed distant metastasis in 32 of the 44 patients with metastatic lesions that were histologically shown to have sensitivity of 72.7%. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography has a limited role in the evaluation of metastatic disease from pancreatic cancer.

  4. Incidental head and neck findings on 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S P; Kinshuck, A J; Williams, C; Dwivedi, R; Wieshmann, H; Jones, T M

    2015-09-01

    The overlapping risk factors for lung and head and neck cancer present a definite risk of synchronous malignant pathology. This is the first study to specifically review incidental positron emission tomography computed tomography findings in the head and neck region in lung carcinoma patients. A retrospective review was performed of all lung cancer patients who underwent positron emission tomography computed tomography imaging over a five-year period (January 2008 - December 2012), identified from the Liverpool thoracic multidisciplinary team database. Six hundred and nine patients underwent positron emission tomography computed tomography imaging over this period. In 76 (12.5 per cent) scans, incidental regions of avid 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose uptake were reported in the head and neck region. In the 28 patients who were fully investigated, there were 4 incidental findings of malignancy. In lung cancer patients undergoing investigative positron emission tomography computed tomography scanning, a significant number will also present with areas of clinically significant 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose uptake in the head and neck region. Of these, at least 5 per cent may have an undiagnosed malignancy.

  5. Extensive tumor thrombus of hepatocellular carcinoma in the entire portal venous system detected on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Puranik, Ameya; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    Detection of thrombus is usually an incidental finding on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography studies. Nevertheless this is an important finding in terms of disease prognostication and in planning the treatment strategy. We herein report a case of a 50-years-old male, a diagnosed case of hepatocellular carcinoma with extensive hypermetabolic thrombus involving the entire portal venous system. (author)

  6. Diagnosis of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome by positron emission tomography/computed tomography: report of two cases treated by defibrotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthé, Mathieu; Bozec, Laurence; Bedossa, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a potentially fatal liver injury that mainly occurs after myeloablative chemotherapy. We report two cases of SOS investigated by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with defibrotide. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  7. Clinical applications of positron emission tomography in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roemer, W.; Avril, N.; Schwaiger, M.

    1997-01-01

    Increased glucose metabolism by malignant tissue can be visualized with positron emission tomography (PET), using the radiolabeled glucose analogue F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Depending on the criteria of image interpretation FDG-PET allows detection of breast cancer with a sensitivity of 68% to 94 % and a specificity of 84 % to 97 %. However, sensitivity to visualize small tumors (< 1 cm) is limited. Positron emission tomography demonstrates tumor involvement of regional lymph nodes with high accuracy, predominantly in patients with advanced breast cancer. The sensitivity for the detection of axillary lymph node metastases was 79% with a corresponding specificity of 96 %. Lymph node metastases could not be identified in four of six patients with small primary breast cancer (stage pT1), resulting in a sensitivity of only 33% in these patients. By visualizing primary tumors and metastases in one imaging procedure, PET imaging may allow the effective staging of breast cancer patients. Further studies are needed to define the role of scintigraphic techniques for the diagnostic work-up in patients. (author)

  8. Anti-3-[(18)F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography and (111)In-capromab pendetide single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography for recurrent prostate carcinoma: results of a prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, David M; Nieh, Peter T; Jani, Ashesh B; Amzat, Rianot; Bowman, F Dubois; Halkar, Raghuveer K; Master, Viraj A; Nye, Jonathon A; Odewole, Oluwaseun A; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Alaei-Taleghani, Pooneh; Goodman, Mark M

    2014-05-01

    We prospectively evaluated the amino acid analogue positron emission tomography radiotracer anti-3-[(18)F]FACBC compared to ProstaScint® ((111)In-capromab pendetide) single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography to detect recurrent prostate carcinoma. A total of 93 patients met study inclusion criteria who underwent anti-3-[(18)F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography plus (111)In-capromab pendetide single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography for suspected recurrent prostate carcinoma within 90 days. Reference standards were applied by a multidisciplinary board. We calculated diagnostic performance for detecting disease. In the 91 of 93 patients with sufficient data for a consensus on the presence or absence of prostate/bed disease anti-3-[(18)F]FACBC had 90.2% sensitivity, 40.0% specificity, 73.6% accuracy, 75.3% positive predictive value and 66.7% negative predictive value compared to (111)In-capromab pendetide with 67.2%, 56.7%, 63.7%, 75.9% and 45.9%, respectively. In the 70 of 93 patients with a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic disease anti-3-[(18)F]FACBC had 55.0% sensitivity, 96.7% specificity, 72.9% accuracy, 95.7% positive predictive value and 61.7% negative predictive value compared to (111)In-capromab pendetide with 10.0%, 86.7%, 42.9%, 50.0% and 41.9%, respectively. Of 77 index lesions used to prove positivity histological proof was obtained in 74 (96.1%). Anti-3-[(18)F]FACBC identified 14 more positive prostate bed recurrences (55 vs 41) and 18 more patients with extraprostatic involvement (22 vs 4). Anti-3-[(18)F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography correctly up-staged 18 of 70 cases (25.7%) in which there was a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic involvement. Better diagnostic performance was noted for anti-3-[(18)F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography than for (111)In-capromab pendetide single

  9. X-ray-based attenuation correction for positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, Paul E; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Beyer, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    A synergy of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners is the use of the CT data for x-ray-based attenuation correction of the PET emission data. Current methods of measuring transmission use positron sources, gamma-ray sources, or x-ray sources. Each of the types of transmission scans involves different trade-offs of noise versus bias, with positron transmission scans having the highest noise but lowest bias, whereas x-ray scans have negligible noise but the potential for increased quantitative errors. The use of x-ray-based attenuation correction, however, has other advantages, including a lack of bias introduced from post-injection transmission scanning, which is an important practical consideration for clinical scanners, as well as reduced scan times. The sensitivity of x-ray-based attenuation correction to artifacts and quantitative errors depends on the method of translating the CT image from the effective x-ray energy of approximately 70 keV to attenuation coefficients at the PET energy of 511 keV. These translation methods are usually based on segmentation and/or scaling techniques. Errors in the PET emission image arise from positional mismatches caused by patient motion or respiration differences between the PET and CT scans; incorrect calculation of attenuation coefficients for CT contrast agents or metallic implants; or keeping the patient's arms in the field of view, which leads to truncation and/or beam-hardening (or x-ray scatter) artifacts. Proper interpretation of PET emission images corrected for attenuation by using the CT image relies on an understanding of the potential artifacts. In cases where an artifact or bias is suspected, careful inspection of all three available images (CT and PET emission with and without attenuation correction) is recommended. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A reconstruction algorithm for coherent scatter computed tomography based on filtered back-projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevendaal, U. van; Schlomka, J.-P.; Harding, A.; Grass, M.

    2003-01-01

    Coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a reconstructive x-ray imaging technique that yields the spatially resolved coherent-scatter form factor of the investigated object. Reconstruction from coherently scattered x-rays is commonly done using algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART). In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on filtered back-projection. For the first time, a three-dimensional (3D) filtered back-projection technique using curved 3D back-projection lines is applied to two-dimensional coherent scatter projection data. The proposed algorithm is tested with simulated projection data as well as with projection data acquired with a demonstrator setup similar to a multi-line CT scanner geometry. While yielding comparable image quality as ART reconstruction, the modified 3D filtered back-projection algorithm is about two orders of magnitude faster. In contrast to iterative reconstruction schemes, it has the advantage that subfield-of-view reconstruction becomes feasible. This allows a selective reconstruction of the coherent-scatter form factor for a region of interest. The proposed modified 3D filtered back-projection algorithm is a powerful reconstruction technique to be implemented in a CSCT scanning system. This method gives coherent scatter CT the potential of becoming a competitive modality for medical imaging or nondestructive testing

  11. Geneva University - The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    Geneva University École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Wednesday 14 March 2012 SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE 11.15 a.m. - Science II, Auditoire 1S081, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 The AX-PET experiment : A demonstrator for an axial Positron Emission Tomography Dr Chiara CASELLA   ETH Zurich   PET (Positron Emission Tomography) is a tool for in-vivo functional imaging, successfully used since the earliest days of nuclear medicine. It is based on the detection of the two coincident 511 keV photons from the annihilation of a positron, emitted from a radiotracer injected into the body. Tomographic analysis of the coincidence data allows for a 3D reconstructed image of the source distribution. The AX-PET experiment proposes a novel geometrical approach for a PET scanner, in which l...

  12. The use of filtering methods to compensate for constant attenuation in single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    A back projection of filtered projection (BKFIL) reconstruction algorithm is presented that is applicable to single-photon emission computed tomography (ECT) in the presence of a constant attenuating medium such as the brain. The filters used in transmission computed tomography (TCT)-comprised of a ramp multiplied by window functions-are modified so that the single-photon ECT filter is a function of the constant attenuation coefficient. The filters give good reconstruction results with sufficient angular and lateral sampling. With continuous samples the BKFIL algorithm has a point spread function that is the Hankel transform of the window function. The resolution and statistical properties of the filters are demonstrated by various simulations which assume an ideal detector response. Statistical formulas for the reconstructed image show that the square of the percent-root-mean-square (percent-rms) uncertainty of the reconstruction is inversely proportional to the total measured counts. The results indicate that constant attenuation can be compensated for by using an attenuation-dependent filter that reconstructs the transverse section reliably. Computer time requirements are two times that of conventional TCT or positron ECT and there is no increase in memory requirements

  13. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography ? computed tomography for staging lung cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Biz, Aline Navega; Caetano, Ros?ngela

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer.METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazi...

  14. A resolution-enhancing image reconstruction method for few-view differential phase-contrast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huifeng; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    It is well-known that properly designed image reconstruction methods can facilitate reductions in imaging doses and data-acquisition times in tomographic imaging. The ability to do so is particularly important for emerging modalities such as differential X-ray phase-contrast tomography (D-XPCT), which are currently limited by these factors. An important application of D-XPCT is high-resolution imaging of biomedical samples. However, reconstructing high-resolution images from few-view tomographic measurements remains a challenging task. In this work, a two-step sub-space reconstruction strategy is proposed and investigated for use in few-view D-XPCT image reconstruction. It is demonstrated that the resulting iterative algorithm can mitigate the high-frequency information loss caused by data incompleteness and produce images that have better preserved high spatial frequency content than those produced by use of a conventional penalized least squares (PLS) estimator.

  15. A three-step reconstruction method for fluorescence molecular tomography based on compressive sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Yansong; Jha, Abhinav K.; Dreyer, Jakob K.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a promising tool for real time in vivo quantification of neurotransmission (NT) as we pursue in our BRAIN initiative effort. However, the acquired image data are noisy and the reconstruction problem is ill-posed. Further, while spatial sparsity of the NT...... matrix coherence. The resultant image data are input to a homotopy-based reconstruction strategy that exploits sparsity via ℓ1 regularization. The reconstructed image is then input to a maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm that retains the sparseness of the input estimate...... and improves upon the quantitation by accurate Poisson noise modeling. The proposed reconstruction method was evaluated in a three-dimensional simulated setup with fluorescent sources in a cuboidal scattering medium with optical properties simulating human brain cortex (reduced scattering coefficient: 9.2 cm-1...

  16. An ART iterative reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography of diffraction enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhentian; Zhang Li; Huang Zhifeng; Kang Kejun; Chen Zhiqiang; Fang Qiaoguang; Zhu Peiping

    2009-01-01

    X-ray diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) has extremely high sensitivity for weakly absorbing low-Z samples in medical and biological fields. In this paper, we propose an Algebra Reconstruction Technique (ART) iterative reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI-CT). An Ordered Subsets (OS) technique is used to accelerate the ART reconstruction. Few-view reconstruction is also studied, and a partial differential equation (PDE) type filter which has the ability of edge-preserving and denoising is used to improve the image quality and eliminate the artifacts. The proposed algorithm is validated with both the numerical simulations and the experiment at the Beijing synchrotron radiation facility (BSRF). (authors)

  17. Image Reconstruction Based on Homotopy Perturbation Inversion Method for Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The image reconstruction for electrical impedance tomography (EIT mathematically is a typed nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem. In this paper, a novel iteration regularization scheme based on the homotopy perturbation technique, namely, homotopy perturbation inversion method, is applied to investigate the EIT image reconstruction problem. To verify the feasibility and effectiveness, simulations of image reconstruction have been performed in terms of considering different locations, sizes, and numbers of the inclusions, as well as robustness to data noise. Numerical results indicate that this method can overcome the numerical instability and is robust to data noise in the EIT image reconstruction. Moreover, compared with the classical Landweber iteration method, our approach improves the convergence rate. The results are promising.

  18. Astigmatic single photon emission computed tomography imaging with a displaced center of rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Smith, M.F.; Stone, C.D.; Jaszczak, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    A filtered backprojection algorithm is developed for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with an astigmatic collimator having a displaced center of rotation. The astigmatic collimator has two perpendicular focal lines, one that is parallel to the axis of rotation of the gamma camera and one that is perpendicular to this axis. Using SPECT simulations of projection data from a hot rod phantom and point source arrays, it is found that a lack of incorporation of the mechanical shift in the reconstruction algorithm causes errors and artifacts in reconstructed SPECT images. The collimator and acquisition parameters in the astigmatic reconstruction formula, which include focal lengths, radius of rotation, and mechanical shifts, are often partly unknown and can be determined using the projections of a point source at various projection angles. The accurate determination of these parameters by a least squares fitting technique using projection data from numerically simulated SPECT acquisitions is studied. These studies show that the accuracy of parameter determination is improved as the distance between the point source and the axis of rotation of the gamma camera is increased. The focal length to the focal line perpendicular to the axis of rotation is determined more accurately than the focal length to the focal line parallel to this axis. copyright 1998 American Association of Physicists in Medicine

  19. Single photon emission computed tomography using a regularizing iterative method for attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussaline, Francoise; Cao, A.; Lecoq, G.

    1981-06-01

    An analytically exact solution to the attenuated tomographic operator is proposed. Such a technique called Regularizing Iterative Method (RIM) belongs to the iterative class of procedures where a priori knowledge can be introduced on the evaluation of the size and shape of the activity domain to be reconstructed, and on the exact attenuation distribution. The relaxation factor used is so named because it leads to fast convergence and provides noise filtering for a small number of iteractions. The effectiveness of such a method was tested in the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) reconstruction problem, with the goal of precise correction for attenuation before quantitative study. Its implementation involves the use of a rotating scintillation camera based SPECT detector connected to a mini computer system. Mathematical simulations of cylindical uniformly attenuated phantoms indicate that in the range of a priori calculated relaxation factor a fast converging solution can always be found with a (contrast) accuracy of the order of 0.2 to 4% given that numerical errors and noise are or not, taken into account. The sensitivity of the (RIM) algorithm to errors in the size of the reconstructed object and in the value of the attenuation coefficient μ was studied, using the same simulation data. Extreme variations of +- 15% in these parameters will lead to errors of the order of +- 20% in the quantitative results. Physical phantoms representing a variety of geometrical situations were also studied

  20. Introduction to 2D and 3D tomographic methods based on straight line propagation: X-ray, emission and ultrasonic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrin, F.; Magnin, I.; Garnero, L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the basic principles of computerized tomography (CT), and its evolution towards three dimensional (3D) imaging. Since the modeling of CT reconstruction relies on the Radon transform, its definition and major properties are first recalled. After a brief summary on conventional 2D methods, we present the imaging principles for two modalities appropriated to this modeling: X-Ray and emission tomography. We describe the evolution of the instrumentation for these two techniques, and emphasize the approximations introduced by a modeling using the Radon transform taking into account the physics of the problem. We also describe the principles of ultrasonic tomography systems, and their major differences with the two previous techniques. At last, we formulate the general problematic of 3D image reconstruction from 2D projections. We consider four classes of reconstruction methods corresponding to the classification to the classification chosen for the synthetic presentation of methods, accompanying this paper. (authors)

  1. Electro-optical system for the high speed reconstruction of computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresp, V.

    1989-01-01

    An electro-optical system for the high-speed reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) images has been built and studied. The system is capable of reconstructing high-contrast and high-resolution images at video rate (30 images per second), which is more than two orders of magnitude faster than the reconstruction rate achieved by special purpose digital computers used in commercial CT systems. The filtered back-projection algorithm which was implemented in the reconstruction system requires the filtering of all projections with a prescribed filter function. A space-integrating acousto-optical convolver, a surface acoustic wave filter and a digital finite-impulse response filter were used for this purpose and their performances were compared. The second part of the reconstruction, the back projection of the filtered projections, is computationally very expensive. An optical back projector has been built which maps the filtered projections onto the two-dimensional image space using an anamorphic lens system and a prism image rotator. The reconstructed image is viewed by a video camera, routed through a real-time image-enhancement system, and displayed on a TV monitor. The system reconstructs parallel-beam projection data, and in a modified version, is also capable of reconstructing fan-beam projection data. This extension is important since the latter are the kind of projection data actually acquired in high-speed X-ray CT scanners. The reconstruction system was tested by reconstructing precomputed projection data of phantom images. These were stored in a special purpose projection memory and transmitted to the reconstruction system as an electronic signal. In this way, a projection measurement system that acquires projections sequentially was simulated

  2. Evaluation of iterative algorithms for tomography image reconstruction: A study using a third generation industrial tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velo, Alexandre F.; Carvalho, Diego V.; Alvarez, Alexandre G.; Hamada, Margarida M.; Mesquita, Carlos H., E-mail: afvelo@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The greatest impact of the tomography technology currently occurs in medicine. The success is due to the human body presents standardized dimensions with well-established composition. These conditions are not found in industrial objects. In industry, there is much interest in using the tomography in order to know the inner of (1) the manufactured industrial objects or (2) the machines and their means of production. In these cases, the purpose of the tomography is to (a) control the quality of the final product and (b) to optimize production, contributing to the pilot phase of the projects and analyzing the quality of the means of production. This scan system is a non-destructive, efficient and fast method for providing sectional images of industrial objects and is able to show the dynamic processes and the dispersion of the materials structures within these objects. In this context, it is important that the reconstructed image presents a great spatial resolution with a satisfactory temporal resolution. Thus the algorithm to reconstruct the images has to meet these requirements. This work consists in the analysis of three different iterative algorithm methods, such Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method (MLEM), Maximum Likelihood Transmitted Method (MLTR) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Method (SIRT. The analysis consists on measurement of the contrast to noise ratio (CNR), the root mean square error (RMSE) and the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), to know which algorithm fits better the conditions in order to optimize system. The algorithms and the image quality analysis were performed by the Matlab® 2013b. (author)

  3. Evaluation of iterative algorithms for tomography image reconstruction: A study using a third generation industrial tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velo, Alexandre F.; Carvalho, Diego V.; Alvarez, Alexandre G.; Hamada, Margarida M.; Mesquita, Carlos H.

    2017-01-01

    The greatest impact of the tomography technology currently occurs in medicine. The success is due to the human body presents standardized dimensions with well-established composition. These conditions are not found in industrial objects. In industry, there is much interest in using the tomography in order to know the inner of (1) the manufactured industrial objects or (2) the machines and their means of production. In these cases, the purpose of the tomography is to (a) control the quality of the final product and (b) to optimize production, contributing to the pilot phase of the projects and analyzing the quality of the means of production. This scan system is a non-destructive, efficient and fast method for providing sectional images of industrial objects and is able to show the dynamic processes and the dispersion of the materials structures within these objects. In this context, it is important that the reconstructed image presents a great spatial resolution with a satisfactory temporal resolution. Thus the algorithm to reconstruct the images has to meet these requirements. This work consists in the analysis of three different iterative algorithm methods, such Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method (MLEM), Maximum Likelihood Transmitted Method (MLTR) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Method (SIRT. The analysis consists on measurement of the contrast to noise ratio (CNR), the root mean square error (RMSE) and the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), to know which algorithm fits better the conditions in order to optimize system. The algorithms and the image quality analysis were performed by the Matlab® 2013b. (author)

  4. Single photon emission computed tomography study of human pulmonary perfusion: preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carratu, L; Sofia, M [Naples Univ. (Italy). Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia; Salvatore, M; Muto, P; Ariemma, G [Istituto Nazionale per la Prevenzione, Lo Studio e La Cura dei Tumori Fondazione Pascale, Naples (Italy); Lopez-Majano, V [Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL (USA). Nuclear Medicine Div.

    1984-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed with /sup 99/Tcsup(m)-albumin macroaggregates to study human pulmonary perfusion in healthy subjects and patients with respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung neoplasms. The reconstructed SPECT data was displayed in coronal, transverse, sagittal plane sections and compared to conventional perfusion scans. The SPECT data gave more complicated anatomical information about the extent of damage and morphology of the pulmonary vascular bed. In healthy subjects and COPD patients, qualitative and quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion could be obtained from serial SPECT scans with respect to distribution and relative concentration of the injected radiopharmaceutical. Furthermore, SPECT of pulmonary perfusion has been useful in detecting the extent of damage to the pulmonary circulation. This is useful for the preoperative evaluation and staging of lung cancer.

  5. Correction of head movements in positron emission tomography using point source tracking system: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarparvar, Babak; Shamsaei, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The motion of the head during brain positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions has been identified as a source of artifact in the reconstructed image. In this study, a method is described to develop an image-based motion correction technique for correcting the post-acquisition data without using external optical motion-tracking system such as POLARIS. In this technique, GATE has been used to simulate PET brain scan using point sources mounted around the head to accurately monitor the position of the head during the time frames. The measurement of head motion in each frame showed a transformation in the image frame matrix, resulting in a fully corrected data set. Using different kinds of phantoms and motions, the accuracy of the correction method is tested and its applicability to experimental studies is demonstrated as well.

  6. Diagnosis of coronary stenosis using thallium-201 myocardial emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsunaaki; Takeda, Hiroshi; Maeda, Hisato; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Nobuo; Makino, Katsutoshi; Futagami, Yasuo; Konishi, Tokuji

    1985-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial emission computed tomography (ECT) was described with respect to methods of correcting ECT data and reconstructing the images, qualitative and quantitative diagnosis in the detection of coronary stenosis. Although 201 Tl myocardial ECT (using circumferential profile method combined with washout method) has relatively high diagnostic sensitivity, the correction of absorption is not satisfactory yet. Inside absorption coefficient is considered uniform by regarding the human body as oval shape. However, the chest, including the heart, lungs, vertebrae and thoracic wall, has four different absorption coefficients. If absorption can be corrected accurately, it will be possible to completely assess the myocardial blood flow by measuring the regional myocardial uptake of thallium-201. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. A comparative study of attenuation correction algorithms in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya; Itoh, Hisao; Mogami, Hiroshi; Ishine, Masashiro; Kawamura, Masashi; Iio, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Ken

    1987-01-01

    A computer based simulation method was developed to assess the relative effectiveness and availability of various attenuation compensation algorithms in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The effect of the nonuniformity of attenuation coefficient distribution in the body, the errors in determining a body contour and the statistical noise on reconstruction accuracy and the computation time in using the algorithms were studied. The algorithms were classified into three groups: precorrection, post correction and iterative correction methods. Furthermore, a hybrid method was devised by combining several methods. This study will be useful for understanding the characteristics limitations and strengths of the algorithms and searching for a practical correction method for photon attenuation in SPECT. (orig.)

  8. BPF-type region-of-interest reconstruction for parallel translational computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiwen; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Shaoyu; Liu, Fenglin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present and test a new ultra-low-cost linear scan based tomography architecture. Similar to linear tomosynthesis, the source and detector are translated in opposite directions and the data acquisition system targets on a region-of-interest (ROI) to acquire data for image reconstruction. This kind of tomographic architecture was named parallel translational computed tomography (PTCT). In previous studies, filtered backprojection (FBP)-type algorithms were developed to reconstruct images from PTCT. However, the reconstructed ROI images from truncated projections have severe truncation artefact. In order to overcome this limitation, we in this study proposed two backprojection filtering (BPF)-type algorithms named MP-BPF and MZ-BPF to reconstruct ROI images from truncated PTCT data. A weight function is constructed to deal with data redundancy for multi-linear translations modes. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to evaluate the proposed MP-BPF and MZ-BPF algorithms for PTCT in fan-beam geometry. Qualitative and quantitative results demonstrate that the proposed BPF-type algorithms cannot only more accurately reconstruct ROI images from truncated projections but also generate high-quality images for the entire image support in some circumstances.

  9. Non-stationary reconstruction for dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography with extended kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Hongkai; Yan, Zhuangzhi

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) plays an important role in drug delivery research. However, the majority of current reconstruction methods focus on solving the stationary FMT problems. If the stationary reconstruction methods are applied to the time-varying fluorescence measurements, the reconstructed results may suffer from a high level of artifacts. In addition, based on the stationary methods, only one tomographic image can be obtained after scanning one circle projection data. As a result, the movement of fluorophore in imaged object may not be detected due to the relative long data acquisition time (typically >1 min). In this paper, we apply extended kalman filter (EKF) technique to solve the non-stationary fluorescence tomography problem. Especially, to improve the EKF reconstruction performance, the generalized inverse of kalman gain is calculated by a second-order iterative method. The numerical simulation, phantom, and in vivo experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of the method. The experimental results indicate that by using the proposed EKF-based second-order iterative (EKF-SOI) method, we cannot only clearly resolve the time-varying distributions of fluorophore within imaged object, but also greatly improve the reconstruction time resolution (~2.5 sec/frame) which makes it possible to detect the movement of fluorophore during the imaging processes.

  10. ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography for the evaluation of bone metastasis in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dae Won; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Jeon, Tae Joo; Lee, Yong Chan; Yun, Mijin; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin; Lee, Sang In

    2013-09-01

    The roles of positron emission tomography and bone scanning in identifying bone metastasis in gastric cancer are unclear. We compared the usefulness of positron emission tomography-computed tomography and scanning in detecting bone metastasis in gastric cancer. Data from 1485 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer who had undergone positron emission tomography-computed tomography and scanning were reviewed. Of 170 enrolled patients who were suspected of bone metastasis in either positron emission tomography or scanning, 81.2% were confirmed to have bone metastasis. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 93.5%, 25.0%, and 80.6%, respectively, for positron emission tomography and 93.5%, 37.5%, and 82.9%, respectively, for scanning. 87.7% of patients with bone metastasis showed positive findings on two modalities. 15.0% of solitary bone metastases were positive on positron emission tomography only. Positron emission tomography was superior to scanning for the detection of synchronous bone metastasis, but the two modalities were similar for the detection of metachronous bone metastasis. The concordance rate of response assessment after treatment between two modalities was moderate. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography may be more effective for the diagnosis of bone metastasis in the initial staging workup. Conversely, bone scanning and positron emission tomography-computed tomography may be similarly effective for the detection of metachronous bone metastasis. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Is there any role of positron emission tomography computed tomography for predicting resectability of gallbladder cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaihwan; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Chulhan; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2014-05-01

    The role of integrated (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) is uncertain in gallbladder cancer. The aim of this study was to show the role of PET-CT in gallbladder cancer patients. Fifty-three patients with gallbladder cancer underwent preoperative computed tomography (CT) and PET-CT scans. Their medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-six patients underwent resection. Based on the final outcomes, PET-CT was in good agreement (0.61 to 0.80) with resectability whereas CT was in acceptable agreement (0.41 to 0.60) with resectability. When the diagnostic accuracy of the predictions for resectability was calculated with the ROC curve, the accuracy of PET-CT was higher than that of CT in patients who underwent surgical resection (P=0.03), however, there was no difference with all patients (P=0.12). CT and PET-CT had a discrepancy in assessing curative resection in nine patients. These consisted of two false negative and four false positive CT results (11.3%) and three false negative PET-CT results (5.1%). PET-CT was in good agreement with the final outcomes compared to CT. As a complementary role of PEC-CT to CT, PET-CT tended to show better prediction about resectability than CT, especially due to unexpected distant metastasis.

  12. Nucleocapsid-like structures of Ebola virus reconstructed using electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, T.; Aoyama, K.; Sagara, H.; Kida, H.; Kawaoka, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Electron tomography (ET) is a new technique for high resolution, three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of pleiomocphic mac. n)molecular complexes, such as virus components. By employing this technique, we resolved the 3D structure of Ebola virus nucleocapsid-like (NC-like) structures in the cytoplasm of cells expressing NP, VP24, and VP35: the minimum components required to form these NC-like structures. Reconstruction of these tubular NC-like structures of Ebola virus showed them to be composed of left-handed helices spaced at short intervals, which is structurally consistent with other non-segmented negative-strand RNA viruses

  13. Convex optimization problem prototyping for image reconstruction in computed tomography with the Chambolle–Pock algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    The primal–dual optimization algorithm developed in Chambolle and Pock (CP) (2011 J. Math. Imag. Vis. 40 1–26) is applied to various convex optimization problems of interest in computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction. This algorithm allows for rapid prototyping of optimization problems...... for the purpose of designing iterative image reconstruction algorithms for CT. The primal–dual algorithm is briefly summarized in this paper, and its potential for prototyping is demonstrated by explicitly deriving CP algorithm instances for many optimization problems relevant to CT. An example application...

  14. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Bücherl, T.; Zou, Y.; Guo, Z.

    2011-09-01

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  15. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, J.; Buecherl, T.; Zou, Y.; Guo, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  16. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Buecherl, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Zou, Y., E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Guo, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-09-21

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  17. Simultaneous reconstruction of outer boundary shape and conductivity distribution in electrical impedance tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Hyvönen, Nuutti

    2016-01-05

    The simultaneous retrieval of the exterior boundary shape and the interior admittivity distribution of an examined body in electrical impedance tomography is considered. The reconstruction method is built for the complete electrode model and it is based on the Frechet derivative of the corresponding current-to-voltage map with respect to the body shape. The reconstruction problem is cast into the Bayesian framework, and maximum a posteriori estimates for the admittivity and the boundary geometry are computed. The feasibility of the approach is evaluated by experimental data from water tank measurements.

  18. A shape-based quality evaluation and reconstruction method for electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Pikkemaat, Robert; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-06-01

    Linear methods of reconstruction play an important role in medical electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and there is a wide variety of algorithms based on several assumptions. With the Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT (GREIT), a novel linear reconstruction algorithm as well as a standardized framework for evaluating and comparing methods of reconstruction were introduced that found widespread acceptance in the community. In this paper, we propose a two-sided extension of this concept by first introducing a novel method of evaluation. Instead of being based on point-shaped resistivity distributions, we use 2759 pairs of real lung shapes for evaluation that were automatically segmented from human CT data. Necessarily, the figures of merit defined in GREIT were adjusted. Second, a linear method of reconstruction that uses orthonormal eigenimages as training data and a tunable desired point spread function are proposed. Using our novel method of evaluation, this approach is compared to the classical point-shaped approach. Results show that most figures of merit improve with the use of eigenimages as training data. Moreover, the possibility of tuning the reconstruction by modifying the desired point spread function is shown. Finally, the reconstruction of real EIT data shows that higher contrasts and fewer artifacts can be achieved in ventilation- and perfusion-related images.

  19. A shape-based quality evaluation and reconstruction method for electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Pikkemaat, Robert; Leonhardt, Steffen; Malmivuo, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Linear methods of reconstruction play an important role in medical electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and there is a wide variety of algorithms based on several assumptions. With the Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT (GREIT), a novel linear reconstruction algorithm as well as a standardized framework for evaluating and comparing methods of reconstruction were introduced that found widespread acceptance in the community.In this paper, we propose a two-sided extension of this concept by first introducing a novel method of evaluation. Instead of being based on point-shaped resistivity distributions, we use 2759 pairs of real lung shapes for evaluation that were automatically segmented from human CT data. Necessarily, the figures of merit defined in GREIT were adjusted. Second, a linear method of reconstruction that uses orthonormal eigenimages as training data and a tunable desired point spread function are proposed.Using our novel method of evaluation, this approach is compared to the classical point-shaped approach. Results show that most figures of merit improve with the use of eigenimages as training data. Moreover, the possibility of tuning the reconstruction by modifying the desired point spread function is shown. Finally, the reconstruction of real EIT data shows that higher contrasts and fewer artifacts can be achieved in ventilation- and perfusion-related images. (paper)

  20. Combining Acceleration Techniques for Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, image quality in low-dose computed tomography has been greatly improved by various compressive sensing- (CS-) based reconstruction methods. However, these methods have some disadvantages including high computational cost and slow convergence rate. Many different speed-up techniques for CS-based reconstruction algorithms have been developed. The purpose of this paper is to propose a fast reconstruction framework that combines a CS-based reconstruction algorithm with several speed-up techniques. First, total difference minimization (TDM) was implemented using the soft-threshold filtering (STF). Second, we combined TDM-STF with the ordered subsets transmission (OSTR) algorithm for accelerating the convergence. To further speed up the convergence of the proposed method, we applied the power factor and the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm to OSTR and TDM-STF, respectively. Results obtained from simulation and phantom studies showed that many speed-up techniques could be combined to greatly improve the convergence speed of a CS-based reconstruction algorithm. More importantly, the increased computation time (≤10%) was minor as compared to the acceleration provided by the proposed method. In this paper, we have presented a CS-based reconstruction framework that combines several acceleration techniques. Both simulation and phantom studies provide evidence that the proposed method has the potential to satisfy the requirement of fast image reconstruction in practical CT.

  1. Direct reconstruction of pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography by the augmented Lagrangian method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yue; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) has the potential to quantify physiological or biochemical information, known as pharmacokinetic parameters, which are important for cancer detection, drug development and delivery etc. To image those parameters, there are indirect methods, which are easier to implement but tend to provide images with low signal-to-noise ratio, and direct methods, which model all the measurement noises together and are statistically more efficient. The direct reconstruction methods in dynamic FMT have attracted a lot of attention recently. However, the coupling of tomographic image reconstruction and nonlinearity of kinetic parameter estimation due to the compartment modeling has imposed a huge computational burden to the direct reconstruction of the kinetic parameters. In this paper, we propose to take advantage of both the direct and indirect reconstruction ideas through a variable splitting strategy under the augmented Lagrangian framework. Each iteration of the direct reconstruction is split into two steps: the dynamic FMT image reconstruction and the node-wise nonlinear least squares fitting of the pharmacokinetic parameter images. Through numerical simulation studies, we have found that the proposed algorithm can achieve good reconstruction results within a small amount of time. This will be the first step for a combined dynamic PET and FMT imaging in the future.

  2. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography surveillance in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma in first remission has a low positive predictive value and high costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Mylam, Karen Juul; Brown, Peter; Specht, Lena; Christiansen, Ilse; Munksgaard, Lars; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Loft, Annika; Bukh, Anne; Iyer, Victor; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Hutchings, Martin

    2012-06-01

    The value of performing post-therapy routine surveillance imaging in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma is controversial. This study evaluates the utility of positron emission tomography/computed tomography using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose for this purpose and in situations with suspected lymphoma relapse. We conducted a multicenter retrospective study. Patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma achieving at least a partial remission on first-line therapy were eligible if they received positron emission tomography/computed tomography surveillance during follow-up. Two types of imaging surveillance were analyzed: "routine" when patients showed no signs of relapse at referral to positron emission tomography/computed tomography, and "clinically indicated" when recurrence was suspected. A total of 211 routine and 88 clinically indicated positron emission tomography/computed tomography studies were performed in 161 patients. In ten of 22 patients with recurrence of Hodgkin lymphoma, routine imaging surveillance was the primary tool for the diagnosis of the relapse. Extranodal disease, interim positron emission tomography-positive lesions and positron emission tomography activity at response evaluation were all associated with a positron emission tomography/computed tomography-diagnosed preclinical relapse. The true positive rates of routine and clinically indicated imaging were 5% and 13%, respectively (P = 0.02). The overall positive predictive value and negative predictive value of positron emission tomography/computed tomography were 28% and 100%, respectively. The estimated cost per routine imaging diagnosed relapse was US$ 50,778. Negative positron emission tomography/computed tomography reliably rules out a relapse. The high false positive rate is, however, an important limitation and a confirmatory biopsy is mandatory for the diagnosis of a relapse. With no proven survival benefit for patients with a pre-clinically diagnosed relapse, the high costs and low

  3. Edge-promoting reconstruction of absorption and diffusivity in optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannukainen, A; Hyvönen, N; Majander, H; Harhanen, L

    2016-01-01

    In optical tomography a physical body is illuminated with near-infrared light and the resulting outward photon flux is measured at the object boundary. The goal is to reconstruct internal optical properties of the body, such as absorption and diffusivity. In this work, it is assumed that the imaged object is composed of an approximately homogeneous background with clearly distinguishable embedded inhomogeneities. An algorithm for finding the maximum a posteriori estimate for the absorption and diffusion coefficients is introduced assuming an edge-preferring prior and an additive Gaussian measurement noise model. The method is based on iteratively combining a lagged diffusivity step and a linearization of the measurement model of diffuse optical tomography with priorconditioned LSQR. The performance of the reconstruction technique is tested via three-dimensional numerical experiments with simulated data. (paper)

  4. Weighted expectation maximization reconstruction algorithms with application to gated megavoltage tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jin; Shi Daxin; Anastasio, Mark A; Sillanpaa, Jussi; Chang Jenghwa

    2005-01-01

    We propose and investigate weighted expectation maximization (EM) algorithms for image reconstruction in x-ray tomography. The development of the algorithms is motivated by the respiratory-gated megavoltage tomography problem, in which the acquired asymmetric cone-beam projections are limited in number and unevenly sampled over view angle. In these cases, images reconstructed by use of the conventional EM algorithm can contain ring- and streak-like artefacts that are attributable to a combination of data inconsistencies and truncation of the projection data. By use of computer-simulated and clinical gated fan-beam megavoltage projection data, we demonstrate that the proposed weighted EM algorithms effectively mitigate such image artefacts. (note)

  5. Basic principles of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standke, R.

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography uses photons to receive regional information about dynamic, physiologic, and biochemical processes in the living body. A positron decay is measured indirectly by the simultaneous registration of both gamma rays created by the annihilation. The event is counted, if two directly opposite located detectors register gamma rays in coincidence. Unfortunately the detectors of a positron emission tomography system do not register only true coincident events. There are also scattered and random coincidences. Different types of positron tomographs are presented and scintillation crystals, which are in use for positron emission tomography are discussed. The 2D- and 3D-acquisition methods are described as well as preprocessing methods, such as correction for attenuation, scatter and dead time. For quantification the relative parameter standard uptake value (SUV) is explained. Finally hybrid systems, such as combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners and the use of computed tomography data for attenuation correction are introduced. (author)

  6. 77 FR 71802 - Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance is intended to assist manufacturers of PET drugs... one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in processing your requests. See the... ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance summarizes the...

  7. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D. [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  8. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  9. Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. (National Institute of Aging, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas.

  10. Evaluation of brain tumours by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, O.; Meyer, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) for the evaluation of brain tumours has proved clinically valuable. Amino acid and FDG-glucose PET provide information on the degree of malignancy and the prognosis during the initial evaluation. After therapy, the residual tumour can be visualized and recurrence can be differentiated from necrosis. Amino acids have advantages over FDG for these clinical applications. Blood flow, oxygen extraction and metabolism and blood-brain barrier permeability are of minor relevance in clinical situations. Comparison of PET with MRI and MRS will provide new data. The quantitative information of the unique information yielded by PET will lead to a more important clinical role, as will the extrapolation of this experience to the SPECT technique. (orig.) [de

  11. Single photon emission computed tomography of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makler, P.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the liver has been introduced in order to improve sensitivity and localization of space-occupying lesions. There have been numerous reports on the usefulness of the technique, as well as extensive analyses of its technical drawbacks. In general, SPECT provides a more accurate estimation of defect size than does conventional planar scintigraphy for cases in which one wishes to evaluate changes in lesion size due to therapy. The presence of a superimposed parenchymal disease, however, remains a major problem, which will only be resolved by a scanning technique that specifically detects the disease process of concern (hot spot imaging) rather than displacement of normal tissue (cold spot imaging)

  12. Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas

  13. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  14. An automated blood sampling system used in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.; Bohm, C.; Kesselberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    Fast dynamic function studies with positron emission tomography (PET), has the potential to give accurate information of physiological functions of the brain. This capability can be realised if the positron camera system accurately quantitates the tracer uptake in the brain with sufficiently high efficiency and in sufficiently short time intervals. However, in addition, the tracer concentration in blood, as a function of time, must be accurately determined. This paper describes and evaluates an automated blood sampling system. Two different detector units are compared. The use of the automated blood sampling system is demonstrated in studies of cerebral blood flow, in studies of the blood-brain barrier transfer of amino acids and of the cerebral oxygen consumption. 5 refs.; 7 figs

  15. Positron Emission Tomography: state of the art and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays a fundamental role in medical imaging, with a wide range of applications covering, among the others, oncology, neurology and cardiology. PET has undergone a steady technological evolution since its introduction in mid 20th century, from the development of 3D PET in the late 1980s, to the invention of PET/CT in the 1990s and more recently with the introduction of PET/MR scanners. The current research topics aiming to develop the next generation of PET scanners are summarized in this paper, focusing on the efforts to increase the sensitivity of the detectors, as long as improving their timing, spatial and energy resolutions, with the final goal of reducing the amount of radioactive dose received by the patients and the duration of the exams while improving at the same time the detectability of lesions.

  16. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available

  17. Axial positrons emission tomography: from mouse to human brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brard, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Positrons emission tomography is a nuclear imaging technics using nuclear decays. It is used both in clinical and preclinical studies. The later requires the use of small animals such as the mouse. The objective is to obtain the best signal with the best spatial resolution. Yet, a weight ratio between humans and mice indicates the need of a sub-millimeter resolution. A conventional scanner is based on detection modules surrounding the object to image and arranged perpendicularly. This implies a strong relationship between efficiency and spatial resolution. This work focuses on the axial geometry in which detection modules are arranged parallel to the object. This limits the relationship between the figures of merit, leading to both high spatial resolution and efficiency. The simulations of prototypes showed great perspectives in term of sub-millimeter resolution with efficiencies of 15 or 40% according to the scanner's axial extension. These results indicate great perspectives for both clinical and preclinical imaging. (author)

  18. A Case of Corticobasal Degeneration Studied with Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nagasawa

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolism, glucose utilization, and dopamine metabolism in the brain of a patient with corticobasal degeneration using positron emission tomography (PET. The clinical picture is distinctive, comprising features referable to both cortical and basal ganglionic dysfunction. Brain imagings of glucose and dopamine metabolism can demonstrate greater abnormalities in the cerebral cortex and in the striatum contralateral to the more affected side than those of blood flow and oxygen metabolism. This unique combination study measuring both cerebral glucose utilization and dopamine metabolism in the nigrostriatal system can provide efficient information about the dysfunctions which are correlated with individual clinical symptoms, and this study is essential to diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration.

  19. Differential diagnosis of depression: relevance of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.M.; Baxter, L.R. Jr.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Gerner, R.H.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The proper differential diagnosis of depression is important. A large body of research supports the division of depressive illness into bipolar and unipolar subtypes with respect to demographics, genetics, treatment response, and neurochemical mechanisms. Optimal treatment is different for unipolar and bipolar depressions. Treating a patient with bipolar depression as one would a unipolar patient may precipitate a serious manic episode or possibly even permanent rapid cycling disorder. The clinical distinction between these disorders, while sometimes difficult, can often be achieved through an increased diagnostic suspicion concerning a personal or family history of mania. Positron emission tomography and the FDG method, which allow in vivo study of the glucose metabolic rates for discrete cerebral structures, provide new evidence that bipolar and unipolar depression are two different disorders

  20. Evaluating patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichle, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent advances in nuclear medicine imaging techniques offer an important alternative for the evaluation of therapy for ischemic cerebrovascular disease. In particular, positron emission tomography (PET), with its capacity to provide quantitative measurements of brain blood flow, metabolism and biochemistry on a truly regional basis, now offers the opportunity to evaluate therapy in terms of specific changes in these parameters. By doing this PET permits one to study the problem on an individual patient basis with each subject serving as his own control. The author has been pursuing this approach in patients considered candidates for superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis to bypass major stenotic or occlusive lesions of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery. The results indicate that PET is of considerable value in establishing much more exactly the pathophysiology of certain forms of ischemic cerebrovascular disease and evaluating a form of therapy designed to correct the basic underlying defect. (Auth./C.F.)