WorldWideScience

Sample records for emission tomographic reconstruction

  1. Positron transaxial emission tomograph with computerized image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatteau, Michel.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns a positron transaxial emission tomography apparatus with computerized image reconstruction, like those used in nuclear medicine for studying the metabolism of organs, in physiological examinations and as a diagnosis aid. The operation is based on the principle of the detection of photons emitted when the positrons are annihilated by impact with an electron. The appliance is mainly composed of: (a) - a set of gamma ray detectors distributed on a polygonal arrangement around the body area to be examined, (b) - circuits for amplifying the signals delivered by the gamma ray detectors, (c) - computers essentially comprising energy integration and discrimination circuits and provided at the output of the detectors for calculating and delivering, as from the amplified signals, information on the position and energy relative to each occurrence constituted by the detections of photons, (d) - time coincidence circuits for selecting by emission of detector validation signals, only those occurrences, among the ensemble of those detected, which effectively result from the annihilation of positrons inside the area examined, (e) - a data processing system [fr

  2. Industrial dynamic tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eric Ferreira de

    2016-01-01

    The state of the art methods applied to industrial processes is currently based on the principles of classical tomographic reconstructions developed for tomographic patterns of static distributions, or is limited to cases of low variability of the density distribution function of the tomographed object. Noise and motion artifacts are the main problems caused by a mismatch in the data from views acquired in different instants. All of these add to the known fact that using a limited amount of data can result in the presence of noise, artifacts and some inconsistencies with the distribution under study. One of the objectives of the present work is to discuss the difficulties that arise from implementing reconstruction algorithms in dynamic tomography that were originally developed for static distributions. Another objective is to propose solutions that aim at reducing a temporal type of information loss caused by employing regular acquisition systems to dynamic processes. With respect to dynamic image reconstruction it was conducted a comparison between different static reconstruction methods, like MART and FBP, when used for dynamic scenarios. This comparison was based on a MCNPx simulation as well as an analytical setup of an aluminum cylinder that moves along the section of a riser during the process of acquisition, and also based on cross section images from CFD techniques. As for the adaptation of current tomographic acquisition systems for dynamic processes, this work established a sequence of tomographic views in a just-in-time fashion for visualization purposes, a form of visually disposing density information as soon as it becomes amenable to image reconstruction. A third contribution was to take advantage of the triple color channel necessary to display colored images in most displays, so that, by appropriately scaling the acquired values of each view in the linear system of the reconstruction, it was possible to imprint a temporal trace into the regularly

  3. Correlation Reconstruction Tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Foy, Roderick; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2017-11-01

    A new volumetric Particle Image Velocimetry technique was developed that outputs accurate velocity measurements up to very high seeding densities while requiring lower computational expenditure. This technique combines the tomographic and cross-correlation steps by directly reconstructing the 3D cross-correlation volumes. Since many particles contribute to a single correlation peak, this decreases the noise contributions from ghost reconstructions, allowing accurate velocity measurements to be made at exceptionally high seeding densities. Additionally the overall computational cost is lowered by combining the reconstruction and cross-correlation steps. Results comparing the errors of the new technique applied to both simulated and experimental data will be presented.

  4. Spectrometry and emission tomographic image reconstruction stimulated by neutrons via EM algorithm and Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Rodrigo Sartorelo Salemi

    2014-01-01

    The NSECT (Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography) figures as a new spectrographic technique able to evaluate in vivo the concentration of elements using the inelastic scattering reaction (n,n'). Since its introduction, several improvements have been proposed with the aim of investigating applications for clinical diagnosis and reduction of absorbed dose associated with CT acquisition. In this context, two new diagnostic applications are presented using spectroscopic and tomographic approaches from NSECT. A new methodology has also been proposed to optimize the sinogram sampling that is directly related to the quality of the reconstruction by the irradiation protocol. The studies were developed based on simulations with MCNP5 code. Diagnosis of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and the detection of breast microcalcifications were evaluated in studies conducted using a human phantom. The obtained results demonstrate the ability of the NSECT technique to detect changes in the composition of the modeled tissues as a function of the development of evaluated pathologies. The proposed method for optimizing sinograms was able to analytically simulate the composition of the irradiated medium allowing the assessment of quality of reconstruction and effective dose in terms of the sampling rate. However, future research must be conducted to quantify the sensitivity of detection according to the selected elements. (author)

  5. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  6. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virador, Patrick R.G.

    2000-01-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  7. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  8. Distance weighting for improved tomographic reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppe, R.A.; Holden, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved method for the reconstruction of emission computed axial tomography images has been developed. The method is a modification of filtered back-projection, where the back projected values are weighted to reflect the loss of formation, with distance from the camera, which is inherent in gamma camera imaging. This information loss is a result of: loss of spatial resolution with distance, attenuation, and scatter. The weighting scheme can best be described by considering the contributions of any two opposing views to the reconstruction image pixels. The weight applied to the projections of one view is set to equal the relative amount of the original activity that was initially received in that projection, assuming a uniform attenuating medium. This yields a weighting value which is a function of distance into the image with a value of one for pixels ''near the camera'', a value of .5 at the image center, and a value of zero on the opposite side. Tomographic reconstructions produced with this method show improved spatial resolution when compared to conventional 360 0 reconstructions. The improvement is in the tangential direction, where simulations have indicated a FWHM improvement of 1 to 1.5 millimeters. The resolution in the radial direction is essentially the same for both methods. Visual inspection of the reconstructed images show improved resolution and contrast

  9. Tomographic reconstruction of quantum metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudato, Marco; Marmo, Giuseppe; Mele, Fabio M.; Ventriglia, Franco; Vitale, Patrizia

    2018-02-01

    In the framework of quantum information geometry we investigate the relationship between monotone metric tensors uniquely defined on the space of quantum tomograms, once the tomographic scheme is chosen, and monotone quantum metrics on the space of quantum states, classified by operator monotone functions, according to the Petz classification theorem. We show that different metrics can be related through a change in the tomographic map and prove that there exists a bijective relation between monotone quantum metrics associated with different operator monotone functions. Such a bijective relation is uniquely defined in terms of solutions of a first order second degree differential equation for the parameters of the involved tomographic maps. We first exhibit an example of a non-linear tomographic map that connects a monotone metric with a new one, which is not monotone. Then we provide a second example where two monotone metrics are uniquely related through their tomographic parameters.

  10. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque, S.F. A.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  11. Tomographic image reconstruction from continuous projections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Cant (Jeroen); W.J. Palenstijn (Willem Jan); G. Behiels; J. Sijbers (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractAn important design aspect in tomographic image reconstruction is the choice between a step-and-shoot protocol versus continuous X-ray tube movement for image acquisition. A step-and-shoot protocol implies a perfectly still tube during X-ray exposure, and hence involves moving the tube

  12. Segmentation-DrivenTomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas

    ), the classical reconstruction methods suffer from their inability to handle limited and/ or corrupted data. Form any analysis tasks computationally demanding segmentation methods are used to automatically segment an object, after using a simple reconstruction method as a first step. In the literature, methods...... problem. The tests showed a clear improvement for realistic materials simulations and that the one-stage method was clearly more robust toward noise. The noise-robustness result could be a step toward making this method more applicable for lab-scale experiments. We have introduced a segmentation...... that completely combine reconstruction and segmentation have been suggested, but these are often non-convex and have very high computational demand. We propose to move the computational effort from the segmentation process to the reconstruction process, and instead design reconstruction methods...

  13. Tomographic reconstruction of binary fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, Stéphane; Leclerc, Hugo; Hild, François

    2012-01-01

    A novel algorithm is proposed for reconstructing binary images from their projection along a set of different orientations. Based on a nonlinear transformation of the projection data, classical back-projection procedures can be used iteratively to converge to the sought image. A multiscale implementation allows for a faster convergence. The algorithm is tested on images up to 1 Mb definition, and an error free reconstruction is achieved with a very limited number of projection data, saving a factor of about 100 on the number of projections required for classical reconstruction algorithms.

  14. Tomographic image reconstruction using training images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2017-01-01

    the framework of sparse learning as a regularized non-negative matrix factorization. Incorporating the dictionary as a prior in a convex reconstruction problem, we then find an approximate solution with a sparse representation in the dictionary. The dictionary is applied to non-overlapping patches of the image......We describe and examine an algorithm for tomographic image reconstruction where prior knowledge about the solution is available in the form of training images. We first construct a non-negative dictionary based on prototype elements from the training images; this problem is formulated within...

  15. Bayesian tomographic reconstruction of microsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, Sofia Fekih; Vabre, Alexandre; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2007-01-01

    The microtomography by X ray transmission plays an increasingly dominating role in the study and the understanding of microsystems. Within this framework, an experimental setup of high resolution X ray microtomography was developed at CEA-List to quantify the physical parameters related to the fluids flow in microsystems. Several difficulties rise from the nature of experimental data collected on this setup: enhanced error measurements due to various physical phenomena occurring during the image formation (diffusion, beam hardening), and specificities of the setup (limited angle, partial view of the object, weak contrast).To reconstruct the object we must solve an inverse problem. This inverse problem is known to be ill-posed. It therefore needs to be regularized by introducing prior information. The main prior information we account for is that the object is composed of a finite known number of different materials distributed in compact regions. This a priori information is introduced via a Gauss-Markov field for the contrast distributions with a hidden Potts-Markov field for the class materials in the Bayesian estimation framework. The computations are done by using an appropriate Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique.In this paper, we present first the basic steps of the proposed algorithms. Then we focus on one of the main steps in any iterative reconstruction method which is the computation of forward and adjoint operators (projection and backprojection). A fast implementation of these two operators is crucial for the real application of the method. We give some details on the fast computation of these steps and show some preliminary results of simulations

  16. A Study on GPU-based Iterative ML-EM Reconstruction Algorithm for Emission Computed Tomographic Imaging Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Woo Seok; Kim, Soo Mee; Park, Min Jae; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2009-01-01

    The maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) is the statistical reconstruction algorithm derived from probabilistic model of the emission and detection processes. Although the ML-EM has many advantages in accuracy and utility, the use of the ML-EM is limited due to the computational burden of iterating processing on a CPU (central processing unit). In this study, we developed a parallel computing technique on GPU (graphic processing unit) for ML-EM algorithm. Using Geforce 9800 GTX+ graphic card and CUDA (compute unified device architecture) the projection and backprojection in ML-EM algorithm were parallelized by NVIDIA's technology. The time delay on computations for projection, errors between measured and estimated data and backprojection in an iteration were measured. Total time included the latency in data transmission between RAM and GPU memory. The total computation time of the CPU- and GPU-based ML-EM with 32 iterations were 3.83 and 0.26 sec, respectively. In this case, the computing speed was improved about 15 times on GPU. When the number of iterations increased into 1024, the CPU- and GPU-based computing took totally 18 min and 8 sec, respectively. The improvement was about 135 times and was caused by delay on CPU-based computing after certain iterations. On the other hand, the GPU-based computation provided very small variation on time delay per iteration due to use of shared memory. The GPU-based parallel computation for ML-EM improved significantly the computing speed and stability. The developed GPU-based ML-EM algorithm could be easily modified for some other imaging geometries

  17. Comparison among tomographic reconstruction with limited data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eric F.; Dantas, Carlos C.; Vasconcelos, Daniel A.A.; Cadiz, Luis F.; Melo, Silvio B.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays there is a continuing interest in applying computed tomography (CT) techniques in non-destructive testing and inspection of many industrial products. These applications of CT usually require a differentiated analysis when there are strong limitations in acquiring a sufficiently large amount of projection data. The use of a low number of tomographic data normally degrades the quality of the reconstructed image, highlighting the formation of artifacts and noise. This work investigates the reconstruction methods most commonly used (FBP, ART, SIRT, MART, SMART) and shows the performance of each one in this limited scenario. For this purpose, all methods were implemented and tested with a phantom of uniform density with well-known distribution, with measures of transmission of gamma radiation in a first generation CT scanner. The phantom is a concentric stainless steel tube coupled with a half - cylinder of aluminum. The measurements were made with an highest root mean square error, with the formation of visible artifacts. The artifacts are diminished but still visible in the ART and SIRT techniques, and the best performance was observed with the techniques MART and SMART. The technical superiority of these multiplicative methods is clearly seen in the reconstructed image quality, endorsing their application to situations of limited input data. (author)

  18. Image interface in Java for tomographic reconstruction in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, M.A.; Silva, A.M. Marques da

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to implement a software for tomographic reconstruction of SPECT data from Nuclear Medicine with a flexible interface design, cross-platform, written in Java. Validation tests were performed based on SPECT simulated data. The results showed that the implemented algorithms and filters agree with the theoretical context. We intend to extend the system by implementing additional tomographic reconstruction techniques and Java threads, in order to provide simultaneously image processing. (author)

  19. Simultaneous tomographic reconstruction and segmentation with class priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanov, Mikhail; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Dong, Yiqiu

    2015-01-01

    We consider tomographic imaging problems where the goal is to obtain both a reconstructed image and a corresponding segmentation. A classical approach is to first reconstruct and then segment the image; more recent approaches use a discrete tomography approach where reconstruction and segmentatio...... approach can produce better results than the classical two-step approach.......We consider tomographic imaging problems where the goal is to obtain both a reconstructed image and a corresponding segmentation. A classical approach is to first reconstruct and then segment the image; more recent approaches use a discrete tomography approach where reconstruction and segmentation...... are combined to produce a reconstruction that is identical to the segmentation. We consider instead a hybrid approach that simultaneously produces both a reconstructed image and segmentation. We incorporate priors about the desired classes of the segmentation through a Hidden Markov Measure Field Model, and we...

  20. Tomographic reconstruction of 3D thermal plasma systems: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceries, X.; Freton, P.; Gonzalez, J.-J.; Lago, F.; Masquère, M.

    2005-11-01

    A preliminary investigation of tomographic reconstruction of arc plasma in three dimensions has been carried out. The main goal of this work was to define both the optimal experimental scheme for tomographic measurements and the most appropriate tomographic method with minimum constraints to obtain images of good quality in real situations. Numerical calculations were developed and performed to define a test case corresponding to an experimental device. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) was applied for reconstruction of the emission profile from the acquired projections. Numerical reconstruction from two, three, four and seven projections are presented and discussed in a theoretical three-dimensional (3D) transferred arc configuration. The dependence of the reconstructed image quality on both the projection directions and the noise level was studied. Numerical simulation demonstrated that MART was perfectly suitable for reconstructing satisfactory 3D emission and temperature profiles of the arc plasma with a four-view configuration, proving the feasibility and the utility of tomography to characterize a 3D plasma medium.

  1. Tomographic reconstruction of 3D thermal plasma systems: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceries, X; Freton, P; Gonzalez, J-J; Lago, F; Masquere, M [CPAT, CNRS UMR 5002, Paul Sabatier University, 118 rte de Narbonne, Bat3R2, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2005-11-07

    A preliminary investigation of tomographic reconstruction of arc plasma in three dimensions has been carried out. The main goal of this work was to define both the optimal experimental scheme for tomographic measurements and the most appropriate tomographic method with minimum constraints to obtain images of good quality in real situations. Numerical calculations were developed and performed to define a test case corresponding to an experimental device. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) was applied for reconstruction of the emission profile from the acquired projections. Numerical reconstruction from two, three, four and seven projections are presented and discussed in a theoretical three-dimensional (3D) transferred arc configuration. The dependence of the reconstructed image quality on both the projection directions and the noise level was studied. Numerical simulation demonstrated that MART was perfectly suitable for reconstructing satisfactory 3D emission and temperature profiles of the arc plasma with a four-view configuration, proving the feasibility and the utility of tomography to characterize a 3D plasma medium.

  2. Tomographic reconstruction of 3D thermal plasma systems: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franceries, X; Freton, P; Gonzalez, J-J; Lago, F; Masquere, M

    2005-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of tomographic reconstruction of arc plasma in three dimensions has been carried out. The main goal of this work was to define both the optimal experimental scheme for tomographic measurements and the most appropriate tomographic method with minimum constraints to obtain images of good quality in real situations. Numerical calculations were developed and performed to define a test case corresponding to an experimental device. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) was applied for reconstruction of the emission profile from the acquired projections. Numerical reconstruction from two, three, four and seven projections are presented and discussed in a theoretical three-dimensional (3D) transferred arc configuration. The dependence of the reconstructed image quality on both the projection directions and the noise level was studied. Numerical simulation demonstrated that MART was perfectly suitable for reconstructing satisfactory 3D emission and temperature profiles of the arc plasma with a four-view configuration, proving the feasibility and the utility of tomography to characterize a 3D plasma medium

  3. Advances in the calibration of atom probe tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P.; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Stephenson, Leigh T.; Haley, Daniel; Ringer, Simon P.; Geuser, Frederic de; Tsafnat, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Modern wide field-of-view atom probes permit observation of a wide range of crystallographic features that can be used to calibrate the tomographic reconstruction of the analyzed volume. In this study, methodologies to determine values of the geometric parameters involved in the tomographic reconstruction of atom probe data sets are presented and discussed. The influence of the tip to electrode distance and specimen temperature on these parameters is explored. Significantly, their influence is demonstrated to be very limited, indicating a relatively wide regime of experimental parameters space for sound atom probe tomography (APT) experiments. These methods have been used on several specimens and material types, and the results indicate that the reconstruction parameters are specific to each specimen. Finally, it is shown how an accurate calibration of the reconstruction enables improvements to the quality and reliability of the microscopy and microanalysis capabilities of the atom probe

  4. Tomographic reconstruction of internal wave patterns in a paraboloid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazewinkel, J.; Maas, L.R.M.; Dalziel, S.B.

    2011-01-01

    Using tomographic synthetic schlieren, we are able to reconstruct the three-dimensional density field of internal waves. In this study, the waves are radiating from an oscillating sphere positioned eccentrically at the surface of a paraboloidal domain filled with a uniformly stratified fluid. We

  5. Dense velocity reconstruction from tomographic PTV with material derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneiders, J.F.G.; Scarano, F.

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct the instantaneous velocity field from time-resolved volumetric particle tracking velocimetry (PTV, e.g., 3D-PTV, tomographic PTV and Shake-the-Box), employing both the instantaneous velocity and the velocity material derivative of the sparse tracer particles. The

  6. Studies of the inductively coupled plasma via tomographic reconstruction: II. Experimental system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, K.A.; Monnig, C.A.; Rayson, G.D.; Hieftje, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    Spatially resolved diagnostic studies of the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) have generally relied upon the Abel inversion process to transform lateral projection data into radially resolved emission or absorption profiles. Unfortunately, Abel transformation is known to possess several significant drawbacks. The validity of the radial profiles obtained from the Abel-inversion process is significantly degraded by even small amounts of noise in the lateral emission data. In addition, the Abel-inversion technique requires a cylindrically symmetrical object in order to faithfully produce reconstructions. One method of avoiding these problems is to use the more general method of tomographic reconstruction for spatially resolved studies in the ICP. The experimental requirements of tomographic reconstruction, however, necessitate a rather elaborate experimental system. The large number of angular projections, resolution elements per projection, and the sheer volume of data collected makes tomographic reconstruction prohibitively time consuming if an automated, multi-channel collection scheme is not employed. In this study, an experimental system was designed to permit tomographic characterization of a laboratory ICP. The system employs a z-theta translation stage, a silicon intensified target vidicon detector and a laboratory computer for system automation (see figure). A typical data collection scheme is to obtain 60 projections with 100-point resolution per projection. These profiles are collected every 2 mm on the vertical axis, requiring 15 profiles over a 30 mm plasma height. This process results in approximately 90,000 data points, which can be collected within an hour on this system. Tomographic reconstruction is achieved with the use of a VAX-780 computer. The system employed is described and the operating characteristics of the apparatus are discussed

  7. Industrial dynamic tomographic reconstruction; Reconstrucao tomografica dinamica industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eric Ferreira de

    2016-07-01

    The state of the art methods applied to industrial processes is currently based on the principles of classical tomographic reconstructions developed for tomographic patterns of static distributions, or is limited to cases of low variability of the density distribution function of the tomographed object. Noise and motion artifacts are the main problems caused by a mismatch in the data from views acquired in different instants. All of these add to the known fact that using a limited amount of data can result in the presence of noise, artifacts and some inconsistencies with the distribution under study. One of the objectives of the present work is to discuss the difficulties that arise from implementing reconstruction algorithms in dynamic tomography that were originally developed for static distributions. Another objective is to propose solutions that aim at reducing a temporal type of information loss caused by employing regular acquisition systems to dynamic processes. With respect to dynamic image reconstruction it was conducted a comparison between different static reconstruction methods, like MART and FBP, when used for dynamic scenarios. This comparison was based on a MCNPx simulation as well as an analytical setup of an aluminum cylinder that moves along the section of a riser during the process of acquisition, and also based on cross section images from CFD techniques. As for the adaptation of current tomographic acquisition systems for dynamic processes, this work established a sequence of tomographic views in a just-in-time fashion for visualization purposes, a form of visually disposing density information as soon as it becomes amenable to image reconstruction. A third contribution was to take advantage of the triple color channel necessary to display colored images in most displays, so that, by appropriately scaling the acquired values of each view in the linear system of the reconstruction, it was possible to imprint a temporal trace into the regularly

  8. Spectrometry and emission tomographic image reconstruction stimulated by neutrons via EM algorithm and Monte Carlo Method; Espectrometria e reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas de emissao estimulada por neutrons via algoritmo EM e metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Rodrigo Sartorelo Salemi

    2014-07-01

    The NSECT (Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography) figures as a new spectrographic technique able to evaluate in vivo the concentration of elements using the inelastic scattering reaction (n,n'). Since its introduction, several improvements have been proposed with the aim of investigating applications for clinical diagnosis and reduction of absorbed dose associated with CT acquisition. In this context, two new diagnostic applications are presented using spectroscopic and tomographic approaches from NSECT. A new methodology has also been proposed to optimize the sinogram sampling that is directly related to the quality of the reconstruction by the irradiation protocol. The studies were developed based on simulations with MCNP5 code. Diagnosis of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and the detection of breast microcalcifications were evaluated in studies conducted using a human phantom. The obtained results demonstrate the ability of the NSECT technique to detect changes in the composition of the modeled tissues as a function of the development of evaluated pathologies. The proposed method for optimizing sinograms was able to analytically simulate the composition of the irradiated medium allowing the assessment of quality of reconstruction and effective dose in terms of the sampling rate. However, future research must be conducted to quantify the sensitivity of detection according to the selected elements. (author)

  9. Tomographic Reconstruction Methods for Decomposing Directional Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas; Dong, Yiqiu

    X-ray computed tomography technique has many different practical applications. In this paper, we propose two new reconstruction methods that can decompose objects at the same time. By incorporating direction information, the proposed methods can decompose objects into various directional components....... Furthermore we propose a method to obtain the direction information in the objects directly from the measured sinogram data. We demonstrate the proposed methods on simulated and real samples to show their practical applicability. The numerical results show the differences between the two methods...

  10. Towards a tomographic reconstruction of neutron depolarization data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael; Neubauer, Andreas; Muehlbauer, Martin; Schillinger, Burkhard; Pfleiderer, Christian; Boeni, Peter; Masalovich, Sergey; Calzada, Elbio

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show a first approach to the three dimensional reconstruction of spatially resolved neutron depolarization data. We will show measurements with a position sensitive CCD detector on a longitudinal polarization analysis setup using 3 He polarizers and analyzers installed at the radiography beamline ANTARES at FRM II, Munich. A tomographic reconstruction of data acquired with an inhomogeneous Pd 1-x Ni x sample shows that this method is a powerful tool to identify regions of different magnetic properties inside the sample.

  11. Towards a tomographic reconstruction of neutron depolarization data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Michael; Neubauer, Andreas; Muehlbauer, Martin; Schillinger, Burkhard; Pfleiderer, Christian; Boeni, Peter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, E21, James Franck Str, 85748 Garching (Germany); Masalovich, Sergey; Calzada, Elbio, E-mail: michael.schulz@frm2.tum.d [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier Leibnitz (FRM II), Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we show a first approach to the three dimensional reconstruction of spatially resolved neutron depolarization data. We will show measurements with a position sensitive CCD detector on a longitudinal polarization analysis setup using {sup 3}He polarizers and analyzers installed at the radiography beamline ANTARES at FRM II, Munich. A tomographic reconstruction of data acquired with an inhomogeneous Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} sample shows that this method is a powerful tool to identify regions of different magnetic properties inside the sample.

  12. Direct computation of harmonic moments for tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Takaaki; Ito, Nobutaka; Takamatsu, Tomonori; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    A novel algorithm to compute harmonic moments of a density function from its projections is presented for tomographic reconstruction. For projection p(r, θ), we define harmonic moments of projection by ∫ π 0 ∫ ∞ -∞ p(r,θ)(re iθ ) n drd θ and show that it coincides with the harmonic moments of the density function except a constant. Furthermore, we show that the harmonic moment of projection of order n can be exactly computed by using n+ 1 projection directions, which leads to an efficient algorithm to reconstruct the vertices of a polygon from projections.

  13. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  14. Dense velocity reconstruction from tomographic PTV with material derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct the instantaneous velocity field from time-resolved volumetric particle tracking velocimetry (PTV, e.g., 3D-PTV, tomographic PTV and Shake-the-Box), employing both the instantaneous velocity and the velocity material derivative of the sparse tracer particles. The constraint to the measured temporal derivative of the PTV particle tracks improves the consistency of the reconstructed velocity field. The method is christened as pouring time into space, as it leverages temporal information to increase the spatial resolution of volumetric PTV measurements. This approach becomes relevant in cases where the spatial resolution is limited by the seeding concentration. The method solves an optimization problem to find the vorticity and velocity fields that minimize a cost function, which includes next to instantaneous velocity, also the velocity material derivative. The velocity and its material derivative are related through the vorticity transport equation, and the cost function is minimized using the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm. The procedure is assessed numerically with a simulated PTV experiment in a turbulent boundary layer from a direct numerical simulation (DNS). The experimental validation considers a tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment in a similar turbulent boundary layer and the additional case of a jet flow. The proposed technique (`vortex-in-cell plus', VIC+) is compared to tomographic PIV analysis (3D iterative cross-correlation), PTV interpolation methods (linear and adaptive Gaussian windowing) and to vortex-in-cell (VIC) interpolation without the material derivative. A visible increase in resolved details in the turbulent structures is obtained with the VIC+ approach, both in numerical simulations and experiments. This results in a more accurate determination of the turbulent stresses distribution in turbulent boundary layer investigations. Data from a jet

  15. A maximum entropy reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilsky, A V; Lozhkin, V A; Markovich, D M; Tokarev, M P

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies a novel approach for reducing tomographic PIV computational complexity. The proposed approach is an algebraic reconstruction technique, termed MENT (maximum entropy). This technique computes the three-dimensional light intensity distribution several times faster than SMART, using at least ten times less memory. Additionally, the reconstruction quality remains nearly the same as with SMART. This paper presents the theoretical computation performance comparison for MENT, SMART and MART, followed by validation using synthetic particle images. Both the theoretical assessment and validation of synthetic images demonstrate significant computational time reduction. The data processing accuracy of MENT was compared to that of SMART in a slot jet experiment. A comparison of the average velocity profiles shows a high level of agreement between the results obtained with MENT and those obtained with SMART. (paper)

  16. Tomographic reconstruction of 2D line radiation distribution in the JET MkIIGB divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, A.; Coad, P.; Coster, D.; Ingesson, L. C.; Itami, K.; Jachmich, S.; Kirschner, A.; Lehnen, M.; Matthews, G. F.; Mertens, Ph; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Stamp, M.; Contributors to the EFDA-JET programme

    2003-03-01

    A 2D-tomographic reconstruction of D α- and C III-emission distribution in L-mode, density limit discharge has been performed and compared with results from other diagnostics (KL2, KS3). The observed emission patterns in a poloidal plane show a strong in-out asymmetry, which depends on local plasma parameter in the divertor. It is shown that the major contribution to D α-emission, under the observed conditions, lies in excitation processes and that low-energy charge-exchange reactions with neutral deuterium can influence the ionisation balance of carbon and the recorded C III-emission line. The evolution of the intrinsic hydrogen and carbon impurity profiles has been analysed with respect to its dependence on the location of methane fuelling.

  17. Tomographic reconstruction of structures using a novel GPR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeli, Alessandro; Ježová, Jana; Lambot, Sébastien; Pastorino, Matteo; Randazzo, Andrea; Pajewski, Lara

    2017-04-01

    The ever growing range of applications of ground penetrating radar (GPR) motivates the need of developing efficient measurement systems combined with effective data processing methods. On the one hand, advanced GPR measurement systems require to accurately model the physical effects occurring between the antenna structure and the medium. On the other hand, the GPR device should provide a reliable reconstruction of the properties of the targets under an inspection to a common user. In this work, a novel GPR system was tested for the imaging of buried structures. First of all, the acquired experimental data were pre-processed with a proper calibration technique for removing antenna effects. After that, a reconstruction of a hidden structure was obtained by means of both qualitative and quantitative electromagnetic inverse scattering methods. In particular, while the qualitative techniques aim at reconstructing only specific features of the targets (e.g., location, shape), the proposed quantitative method has the challenging goal of the complete electromagnetic characterization of the buried structures. The performance of the new system was evaluated in different operating conditions with promising results. Acknowledgment This work benefited from the networking activities within the EU funded COST Action TU1208, "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar". Part of this work was carried out during the Short-Term Scientific Mission STSM-TU1208-34990 "Testing of a new lightweight radar system for tomographical reconstruction of circular structures" (Alessandro Fedeli, Italy, visiting Prof. Sébastien Lambot, Belgium).

  18. Detectability in the presence of computed tomographic reconstruction noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1977-01-01

    The multitude of commercial computed tomographic (CT) scanners which have recently been introduced for use in diagnostic radiology has given rise to a need to compare these different machines in terms of image quality and dose to the patient. It is therefore desirable to arrive at a figure of merit for a CT image which gives a measure of the diagnostic efficacy of that image. This figure of merit may well be dependent upon the specific visual task being performed. It is clearly important that the capabilities and deficiencies of the human observer as well as the interface between man and machine, namely the viewing system, be taken into account in formulating the figure of merit. Since the CT reconstruction is the result of computer processing, it is possible to use this processing to alter the characteristics of the displayed images. This image processing may improve or degrade the figure of merit

  19. Few-View Tomographic Reconstruction of Technetium-99m-Sestamibi Distribution for the Detection and Differentiation of Breast Lesions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    La

    2000-01-01

    .... Because the time required by tomographic studies to acquire data useful to popular reconstruction algorithms might be excessive for SPECT SMM, we have worked to develop reconstruction algorithms...

  20. Few-View Tomographic Reconstruction of Technetium-99m- sestamibi Distribution for the Detection and Diagnosis of Breast Lesions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaRiviere, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    .... Because the time required by tomographic studies to acquire data useful to popular reconstruction algorithms might be excessive for SPECT SMM, we have worked to develop reconstruction algorithms...

  1. Acceleration of iterative tomographic reconstruction using graphics processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belzunce, M.A.; Osorio, A.; Verrastro, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Using iterative algorithms for image reconstruction in 3 D Positron Emission Tomography has shown to produce images with better quality than analytical methods. How ever, these algorithms are computationally expensive. New Graphic Processor Units (GPU) provides high performance at low cost and also programming tools that make possible to execute parallel algorithms easily in scientific applications. In this work, we try to achieve an acceleration of image reconstruction algorithms in 3 D PET by using a GPU. A parallel implementation of the algorithm ML-EM 3 D was developed using Siddon algorithm as Projector and Back-projector. Results show that accelerations of more than one order of magnitude can be achieved, keeping similar image quality. (author)

  2. Comparison of 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction algorithms for High-Resolution Research Tomograph studies: effects of randoms estimation methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velden, F.H.P.; Kloet, R.W.; van Berckel, B.N.M.; Wolfensberger, S.P.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Boellaard, R.

    2008-01-01

    The High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Recently, a 3D filtered backprojection (3D-FBP) reconstruction method has been implemented to reduce bias in short duration frames, currently observed in 3D ordinary Poisson OSEM

  3. Tomographic evaluation of a dual-head positron emission tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimiou, N; Maistros, S; Tripolitis, X; Panayiotakis, G; Samartzis, A; Loudos, G

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the performance evaluation results, in the planar and tomographic modes, of a low-cost positron emission tomography camera dedicated to small-animal imaging. The system consists of two pixelated Lu 2 SiO 5 crystals, two Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, fast amplification electronics and an FPGA-USB-based read-out system. The parameters that have been studied are (i) saturation as a function of the head distance and photon acceptance angle, (ii) effect of the number of projections and half or complete head's rotation, (iii) spatial resolution as a function of the head distance, (iv) spatial resolution as a function of acceptance angle, (v) system's sensitivity as a function of these parameters and (vi) performance in small mice imaging. Image reconstruction has been carried out using open source software developed by our group (QSPECT), which is designed mainly for SPECT imaging. The results indicate that the system has a linear response for activities up to at least 2 MBq, which are typical in small-animal imaging. Best tomographic spatial resolution was measured to be ∼2 mm. The system has been found suitable for imaging of small mice both in the planar and tomographic modes

  4. Reconstruction of tomographic image from x-ray projections of a few views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    Computer tomographs have progressed rapidly, and in the latest high performance types, the photographing time has been shortened to less than 5 sec, but the clear images of hearts have not yet been obtained. The X-ray tomographs used so far irradiate X-ray from many directions and measure the projected data, but by limiting projection direction to a small number, it was planned to shorter the X-ray photographing time and to reduce X-ray exposure as the objective of this study. In this paper, a method is proposed, by which tomographic images are reconstructed from projected data in a small number of direction by generalized inverse matrix penalty method. This method is the calculation method newly devised by the authors for this purpose. It is a kind of the nonlinear planning method added with the restrictive condition using a generalized inverse matrix, and it is characterized by the simple calculation procedure and rapid convergence. Moreover, the effect on reconstructed images when errors are included in projected data was examined. Also, the simple computer simulation to reconstruct tomographic images using the projected data in four directions was performed, and the usefulness of this method was confirmed. It contributes to the development of superhigh speed tomographs in future. (Kako, I.)

  5. Fast Tomographic Reconstruction From Limited Data Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Pelt (Daniël); K.J. Batenburg (Joost)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractImage reconstruction from a small number of projections is a challenging problem in tomography. Advanced algorithms that incorporate prior knowledge can sometimes produce accurate reconstructions, but they typically require long computation times. Furthermore, the required prior

  6. Three dimensional reconstruction of tomographic images of the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glittenberg, C.; Zeiler, F.; Falkner, C.; Binder, S.; Povazay, B.; Hermann, B.; Drexler, W.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new display system for the three-dimensional visualization of tomographic images in ophthalmology. Specifically, a system that can use stacks of B-mode scans from an ultrahigh resolution optical tomography examination to vividly display retinal specimens as three-dimensional objects. Several subroutines were programmed in the rendering and raytracing program Cinema 4D XL 9.102 Studio Bundle (Maxon Computer Inc., Friedrichsburg, Germany), which could process stacks of tomographic scans into three-dimensional objects. Ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography examinations were performed on patients with various retinal pathologies and post processed with the subroutines that had been designed. All ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomographies were performed with a titanium: sapphire based ultra broad bandwidth (160 nm) femtosecond laser system (INTEGRAL, Femtolasers Productions GmbH. Vienna Austria) with an axial resolution of 3 μm. A new three dimensional display system for tomographic images in ophthalmology was developed, which allows a highly vivid display of physiological and pathological structures of the retina. The system also distinguishes itself through its high interactivity and adaptability. This new display system allows the visualization of physiological and pathological structures of the retina in a new way, which will give us new insight into their morphology and development. (author) [de

  7. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using Training Images with Matrix and Tensor Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara

    machine learning technique (here, the dictionary learning), prototype elements from the training images are extracted and then incorporated in the tomographic reconstruction problem both with matrix and tensor representations of the training images. First, an algorithm for the tomographic image...... and robustness of the reconstruction to variations of the scale and rotation in the training images is investigated and algorithms to estimate the correct relative scale and orientation of the unknown image to the training images are suggested. Then, a third-order tensor representation for the training images...... images is used. The dictionary and image reconstruction problem are reformulated using the tensor representation. The dictionary learning problem is presented as a nonnegative tensor factorization problem with sparsity constraints and the reconstruction problem is formulated in a convex optimization...

  8. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using an Interpolation Method for Tree Decay Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailin Feng; Guanghui Li; Sheng Fu; Xiping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Stress wave velocity has been traditionally regarded as an indicator of the extent of damage inside wood. This paper aimed to detect internal decay of urban trees through reconstructing tomographic image of the cross section of a tree trunk. A grid model covering the cross section area of a tree trunk was defined with some assumptions. Stress wave data were processed...

  9. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction; Modelo conexionista para reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque, S.F. A.C. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica (FFCLRP) USP. Av. Bandeirantes, 3900- 14040- 901- Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  10. New, multi-dimensional reconstructions for the 12-detector, scanned focal point, single-photon tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, H.A.; Stoddart, H.F.

    1990-01-01

    The heuristic reconstruction process used for the highly-focused, scanned focal-point tomograph described by us in 1979 has remained unchanged until recently. This paper describes an entirely new and completely rigorous reconstruction for this unique geometry which produces dramatically improved images that are least square estimates of the objects. The handling of attenuation, scattering, and object power spectra are discussed. Reconstructions are described for 2D, 3D from three slices, time varying 3D from three slices, and 3D from a large set of slices. Reconstructions for simulated and actual clinical data are shown and the accuracy for quantitation is estimated

  11. Tensor-based Dictionary Learning for Dynamic Tomographic Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shengqi; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Ge; Mou, Xuanqin; Cao, Guohua; Wu, Zhifang; Yu, Hengyong

    2015-01-01

    In dynamic computed tomography (CT) reconstruction, the data acquisition speed limits the spatio-temporal resolution. Recently, compressed sensing theory has been instrumental in improving CT reconstruction from far few-view projections. In this paper, we present an adaptive method to train a tensor-based spatio-temporal dictionary for sparse representation of an image sequence during the reconstruction process. The correlations among atoms and across phases are considered to capture the characteristics of an object. The reconstruction problem is solved by the alternating direction method of multipliers. To recover fine or sharp structures such as edges, the nonlocal total variation is incorporated into the algorithmic framework. Preclinical examples including a sheep lung perfusion study and a dynamic mouse cardiac imaging demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms the vectorized dictionary-based CT reconstruction in the case of few-view reconstruction. PMID:25779991

  12. Reconstruction of emission coefficients for a non-axisymmetric coupling arc by algebraic reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangjun; Xiong Jun; Gao Hongming; Wu Lin

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of tomographic reconstruction of an asymmetric arc plasma has been carried out. The objective of this work aims at reconstructing emission coefficients of a non-axisymmetric coupling arc from measured intensities by means of an algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). In order to define the optimal experimental scheme for good quality with limited views, the dependence of the reconstruction quality on three configurations (four, eight, ten projection angles) are presented and discussed via a displaced Gaussian model. Then, the emission coefficients of a free burning arc are reconstructed by the ART with the ten-view configuration and an Abel inversion, respectively, and good agreement is obtained. Finally, the emission coefficient profiles of the coupling arc are successfully achieved with the ten-view configuration. The results show that the distribution of emission coefficient for the coupling arc is different from centrosymmetric shape. The ART is perfectly suitable for reconstructing emission coefficients of the coupling arc with the ten-view configuration, proving the feasibility and utility of the ART to characterize an asymmetric arc.

  13. Rapid tomographic reconstruction based on machine learning for time-resolved combustion diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Cai, Weiwei; Liu, Yingzheng

    2018-04-01

    Optical tomography has attracted surged research efforts recently due to the progress in both the imaging concepts and the sensor and laser technologies. The high spatial and temporal resolutions achievable by these methods provide unprecedented opportunity for diagnosis of complicated turbulent combustion. However, due to the high data throughput and the inefficiency of the prevailing iterative methods, the tomographic reconstructions which are typically conducted off-line are computationally formidable. In this work, we propose an efficient inversion method based on a machine learning algorithm, which can extract useful information from the previous reconstructions and build efficient neural networks to serve as a surrogate model to rapidly predict the reconstructions. Extreme learning machine is cited here as an example for demonstrative purpose simply due to its ease of implementation, fast learning speed, and good generalization performance. Extensive numerical studies were performed, and the results show that the new method can dramatically reduce the computational time compared with the classical iterative methods. This technique is expected to be an alternative to existing methods when sufficient training data are available. Although this work is discussed under the context of tomographic absorption spectroscopy, we expect it to be useful also to other high speed tomographic modalities such as volumetric laser-induced fluorescence and tomographic laser-induced incandescence which have been demonstrated for combustion diagnostics.

  14. An efficient simultaneous reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio

    2009-10-01

    To date, Tomo-PIV has involved the use of the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART), where the intensity of each 3D voxel is iteratively corrected to satisfy one recorded projection, or pixel intensity, at a time. This results in reconstruction times of multiple hours for each velocity field and requires considerable computer memory in order to store the associated weighting coefficients and intensity values for each point in the volume. In this paper, a rapid and less memory intensive reconstruction algorithm is presented based on a multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation that determines possible particle locations in the volume, followed by simultaneous iterative correction. Reconstructions of simulated images are presented for two simultaneous algorithms (SART and SMART) as well as the now standard MART algorithm, which indicate that the same accuracy as MART can be achieved 5.5 times faster or 77 times faster with 15 times less memory if the processing and storage of the weighting matrix is considered. Application of MLOS-SMART and MART to a turbulent boundary layer at Re θ = 2200 using a 4 camera Tomo-PIV system with a volume of 1,000 × 1,000 × 160 voxels is discussed. Results indicate improvements in reconstruction speed of 15 times that of MART with precalculated weighting matrix, or 65 times if calculation of the weighting matrix is considered. Furthermore the memory needed to store a large weighting matrix and volume intensity is reduced by almost 40 times in this case.

  15. Investigating Gravity Waves in Polar Mesospheric Clouds Using Tomographic Reconstructions of AIM Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, V. P.; Taylor, M. J.; Doyle, T. E.; Zhao, Y.; Pautet, P.-D.; Carruth, B. L.; Rusch, D. W.; Russell, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    This research presents the first application of tomographic techniques for investigating gravity wave structures in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) imaged by the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size instrument on the NASA AIM satellite. Albedo data comprising consecutive PMC scenes were used to tomographically reconstruct a 3-D layer using the Partially Constrained Algebraic Reconstruction Technique algorithm and a previously developed "fanning" technique. For this pilot study, a large region (760 × 148 km) of the PMC layer (altitude 83 km) was sampled with a 2 km horizontal resolution, and an intensity weighted centroid technique was developed to create novel 2-D surface maps, characterizing the individual gravity waves as well as their altitude variability. Spectral analysis of seven selected wave events observed during the Northern Hemisphere 2007 PMC season exhibited dominant horizontal wavelengths of 60-90 km, consistent with previous studies. These tomographic analyses have enabled a broad range of new investigations. For example, a clear spatial anticorrelation was observed between the PMC albedo and wave-induced altitude changes, with higher-albedo structures aligning well with wave troughs, while low-intensity regions aligned with wave crests. This result appears to be consistent with current theories of PMC development in the mesopause region. This new tomographic imaging technique also provides valuable wave amplitude information enabling further mesospheric gravity wave investigations, including quantitative analysis of their hemispheric and interannual characteristics and variations.

  16. Software development for modeling positrons emission tomograph scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner

    2013-01-01

    The Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) is an international platform recognized and used to develop Computational Model Exposure (CME) in the context of Nuclear Medicine, although currently there are dedicated modules for applications in Radiotherapy and Computed Tomography (CT). GATE uses Monte Carlo (MC) methods, and has a scripting language of its own. The writing of scripts for simulation of a PET scanner in GATE involves a number of interrelated steps, and the accuracy of the simulation is dependent on the correct setup of the geometries involved, since the physical processes depend on them, as well as the modeling of electronic detectors in module Digitizer, for example. The manual implementation of this setup can be a source of errors, especially for users without experience in the field of simulations or without any previous knowledge of a programming language, and also due to the the fact that the modeling process in GATE still remains bounded to LINUX / UNIX based systems, an environment only familiar to a few. This becomes an obstacle for beginners and prevents the use of GATE by a larger number of users interested in optimizing their experiments and/or clinical protocols through a more accessible, fast and friendly application. The objective of this work is therefore to develop a user-friendly software for the modeling of Positron Emission Tomography called GUIGATE (Graphical User Interface for GATE), with specific modules dedicated to quality control in PET scanners. The results exhibit the features available in this first version of GUIGATE, present in a set of windows that allow users to create their input files, perform and display in real time the model and analyze its output file in a single environment, allowing so intuitively access the entire architecture of the GATE simulation and to CERN's data analyzer, the ROOT. (author)

  17. Tomographic image reconstruction and rendering with texture-mapping hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Cabral, B.K.; Foran, J.

    1994-07-01

    The image reconstruction problem, also known as the inverse Radon transform, for x-ray computed tomography (CT) is found in numerous applications in medicine and industry. The most common algorithm used in these cases is filtered backprojection (FBP), which, while a simple procedure, is time-consuming for large images on any type of computational engine. Specially-designed, dedicated parallel processors are commonly used in medical CT scanners, whose results are then passed to graphics workstation for rendering and analysis. However, a fast direct FBP algorithm can be implemented on modern texture-mapping hardware in current high-end workstation platforms. This is done by casting the FBP algorithm as an image warping operation with summing. Texture-mapping hardware, such as that on the Silicon Graphics Reality Engine (TM), shows around 600 times speedup of backprojection over a CPU-based implementation (a 100 Mhz R4400 in this case). This technique has the further advantages of flexibility and rapid programming. In addition, the same hardware can be used for both image reconstruction and for volumetric rendering. The techniques can also be used to accelerate iterative reconstruction algorithms. The hardware architecture also allows more complex operations than straight-ray backprojection if they are required, including fan-beam, cone-beam, and curved ray paths, with little or no speed penalties

  18. Numerical approach for a relaxed minimization problem arising in tomographic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Srour

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to develop a numerical scheme for a system of optimality conditions for a smooth minimization problem that arises in tomographic reconstruction of binary axially symmetric objects. The density function of the object with the Lagrange multipliers is seen as a saddle point of an associated Lagrangian, then we use the Usawa scheme mixed with descent gradient method to give the corresponding numerical scheme.

  19. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shawn Q; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W; Agard, David A

    2011-07-01

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096(2) × 512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096(2) pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024(2) × 256 voxels from 122 1024(2) pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Studies of discrete symmetries in a purely leptonic system using the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskal P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Discrete symmetries such as parity (P, charge-conjugation (C and time reversal (T are of fundamental importance in physics and cosmology. Breaking of charge conjugation symmetry (C and its combination with parity (CP constitute necessary conditions for the existence of the asymmetry between matter and antimatter in the observed Universe. The presently known sources of discrete symmetries violations can account for only a tiny fraction of the excess of matter over antimatter. So far CP and T symmetries violations were observed only for systems involving quarks and they were never reported for the purely leptonic objects. In this article we describe briefly an experimental proposal for the test of discrete symmetries in the decays of positronium atom which is made exclusively of leptons. The experiments are conducted by means of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET which is constructed from strips of plastic scintillators enabling registration of photons from the positronium annihilation. J-PET tomograph together with the positronium target system enable to measure expectation values for the discrete symmetries odd operators constructed from (i spin vector of the ortho-positronium atom, (ii momentum vectors of photons originating from the decay of positronium, and (iii linear polarization direction of annihilation photons. Linearly polarized positronium will be produced in the highly porous aerogel or polymer targets, exploiting longitudinally polarized positrons emitted by the sodium 22Na isotope. Information about the polarization vector of orthopositronium will be available on the event by event basis and will be reconstructed from the known position of the positron source and the reconstructed position of the orthopositronium annihilation. In 2016 the first tests and calibration runs are planned, and the data collection with high statistics will commence in the year 2017.

  1. Evaluation of a 3D point cloud tetrahedral tomographic reconstruction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, N F; Sitek, A

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic reconstruction on an irregular grid may be superior to reconstruction on a regular grid. This is achieved through an appropriate choice of the image space model, the selection of an optimal set of points and the use of any available prior information during the reconstruction process. Accordingly, a number of reconstruction-related parameters must be optimized for best performance. In this work, a 3D point cloud tetrahedral mesh reconstruction method is evaluated for quantitative tasks. A linear image model is employed to obtain the reconstruction system matrix and five point generation strategies are studied. The evaluation is performed using the recovery coefficient, as well as voxel- and template-based estimates of bias and variance measures, computed over specific regions in the reconstructed image. A similar analysis is performed for regular grid reconstructions that use voxel basis functions. The maximum likelihood expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm is used. For the tetrahedral reconstructions, of the five point generation methods that are evaluated, three use image priors. For evaluation purposes, an object consisting of overlapping spheres with varying activity is simulated. The exact parallel projection data of this object are obtained analytically using a parallel projector, and multiple Poisson noise realizations of these exact data are generated and reconstructed using the different point generation strategies. The unconstrained nature of point placement in some of the irregular mesh-based reconstruction strategies has superior activity recovery for small, low-contrast image regions. The results show that, with an appropriately generated set of mesh points, the irregular grid reconstruction methods can out-perform reconstructions on a regular grid for mathematical phantoms, in terms of the performance measures evaluated.

  2. Positron emission mammography with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors: initial evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark F Smith; Raymond R Raylman; Stan Majewski; Andrew G Weisenberger

    2004-05-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation compared with PEM using stationary detectors. PEM tomography (PEMT) was compared with stationary PEM for point source and compressed breast phantom studies performed with a compact dual detector system. The acquisition geometries were appropriate for the target application of PEM guidance of stereotactic core biopsy. Images were reconstructed with a three-dimensional iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. PEMT eliminated blurring normal to the detectors seen with stationary PEM. Depth of interaction effects distorted the shape of the point spread functions for PEMT as the angular range from normal incidence of lines of response used in image reconstruction increased. Streak artifacts in PEMT for large detector rotation increments led to the development of an expression for the maximum rotation increment that maintains complete angular sampling. Studies with a compressed breast phantom were used to investigate contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) trade-offs for different sized spherical tumor models. PEMT and PEM both had advantages depending on lesion size and detector separation. The most appropriate acquisition method for specific detection or quantitation tasks requires additional investigation.

  3. Positron emission mammography with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors: initial evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark F; Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew G

    2004-06-07

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation compared with PEM using stationary detectors. PEM tomography (PEMT) was compared with stationary PEM for point source and compressed breast phantom studies performed with a compact dual detector system. The acquisition geometries were appropriate for the target application of PEM guidance of stereotactic core biopsy. Images were reconstructed with a three-dimensional iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. PEMT eliminated blurring normal to the detectors seen with stationary PEM. Depth of interaction effects distorted the shape of the point spread functions for PEMT as the angular range from normal incidence of lines of response used in image reconstruction increased. Streak artefacts in PEMT for large detector rotation increments led to the development of an expression for the maximum rotation increment that maintains complete angular sampling. Studies with a compressed breast phantom were used to investigate contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) trade-offs for different sized spherical tumour models. PEMT and PEM both had advantages depending on lesion size and detector separation. The most appropriate acquisition method for specific detection or quantitation tasks requires additional investigation.

  4. Positron emission mammography with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors: initial evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Mark F [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Raylman, Raymond R [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Majewski, Stan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2004-06-07

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation compared with PEM using stationary detectors. PEM tomography (PEMT) was compared with stationary PEM for point source and compressed breast phantom studies performed with a compact dual detector system. The acquisition geometries were appropriate for the target application of PEM guidance of stereotactic core biopsy. Images were reconstructed with a three-dimensional iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. PEMT eliminated blurring normal to the detectors seen with stationary PEM. Depth of interaction effects distorted the shape of the point spread functions for PEMT as the angular range from normal incidence of lines of response used in image reconstruction increased. Streak artefacts in PEMT for large detector rotation increments led to the development of an expression for the maximum rotation increment that maintains complete angular sampling. Studies with a compressed breast phantom were used to investigate contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) trade-offs for different sized spherical tumour models. PEMT and PEM both had advantages depending on lesion size and detector separation. The most appropriate acquisition method for specific detection or quantitation tasks requires additional investigation.

  5. Guideline for performance evaluation of positron emission tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This supplement presents guideline for performance evaluation of positron emission tomographies (PET). The purpose of this guideline is to define measurement methods for evaluating both the performance of PET equipment and the accuracy of various data corrections in the clinical setting. The guideline has 8 items. The first four items, consisting of spatial dose distributions, scattering fraction, sensitivity, and counting loss and accidental coincidence counting, deals with the basic performance of PET equipment. The next three items, including image uniformity, accuracy of absorption and scattering correction, and characteristics of high counting rate (accuracy of counting loss corrections and S/N ratio), are designed to provide the quantitative evaluation of images reconstructed by various data corrections for absorption, scattering, counting loss, and others. The last item is partial volume effect (recovery coefficient), which is important for the quantitative analysis of PET images, with the aim of both the measurement method of partial volume effect and the definition of phantoms required. (N.K.)

  6. Molecular-Frame 3D Photoelectron Momentum Distributions by Tomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurer, Jochen; Dimitrovski, Darko; Christensen, Lauge

    2012-01-01

    Naphthalene molecules are fixed in space by a laser field and rotated, in 2° steps, over 180°. For each orientation, they are ionized by an intense, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulse, and the 2D projection of the photoelectron momentum distribution is recorded. The molecular-frame 3D...... momentum distribution is obtained by tomographic reconstruction from all 90 projections. It reveals an anisotropic electron distribution, angularly shifted in the polarization plane, that is not accessible by the 2D momentum images. Our theoretical analysis shows that the magnitude of the angular shift...

  7. Simulation of Tomographic Reconstruction of Magnetosphere Plasma Distribution By Multi-spacecraft Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, V.; Nesterov, I.; Andreeva, E.; Zelenyi, L.; Veselov, M.; Galperin, Y.; Buchner, J.

    A satellite radiotomography method for electron density distributions was recently proposed for closely-space multi-spacecraft group of high-altitude satellites to study the physics of reconnection process. The original idea of the ROY project is to use a constellation of spacecrafts (one main and several sub-satellites) in order to carry out closely-spaced multipoint measurements and 2D tomographic reconstruction of elec- tron density in the space between the main satellite and the subsatellites. The distances between the satellites were chosen to vary from dozens to few hundreds of kilometers. The easiest data interpretation is achieved when the subsatellites are placed along the plasma streamline. Then, whenever a plasma density irregularity moves between the main satellite and the subsatellites it will be scanned in different directions and we can get 2D distribution of plasma using these projections. However in general sub- satellites are not placed exactly along the plasma streamline. The method of plasma velocity determination relative to multi-spacecraft systems is considered. Possibilities of 3D tomographic imaging using multi-spacecraft systems are analyzed. The model- ing has shown that efficient scheme for 3D tomographic imaging would be to place spacecrafts in different planes so that the angle between the planes would make not more then ten degrees. Work is supported by INTAS PROJECT 2000-465.

  8. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-01-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results

  9. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-10-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.

  10. Data-parallel tomographic reconstruction : A comparison of filtered backprojection and direct Fourier reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Westenberg, M.A

    1998-01-01

    We consider the parallelization of two standard 2D reconstruction algorithms, filtered backprojection and direct Fourier reconstruction, using the data-parallel programming style. The algorithms are implemented on a Connection Machine CM-5 with 16 processors and a peak performance of 2 Gflop/s.

  11. A high-throughput system for high-quality tomographic reconstruction of large datasets at Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Robert C; Bodey, Andrew J; Price, Stephen W T; Basham, Mark; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-06-13

    Tomographic datasets collected at synchrotrons are becoming very large and complex, and, therefore, need to be managed efficiently. Raw images may have high pixel counts, and each pixel can be multidimensional and associated with additional data such as those derived from spectroscopy. In time-resolved studies, hundreds of tomographic datasets can be collected in sequence, yielding terabytes of data. Users of tomographic beamlines are drawn from various scientific disciplines, and many are keen to use tomographic reconstruction software that does not require a deep understanding of reconstruction principles. We have developed Savu, a reconstruction pipeline that enables users to rapidly reconstruct data to consistently create high-quality results. Savu is designed to work in an 'orthogonal' fashion, meaning that data can be converted between projection and sinogram space throughout the processing workflow as required. The Savu pipeline is modular and allows processing strategies to be optimized for users' purposes. In addition to the reconstruction algorithms themselves, it can include modules for identification of experimental problems, artefact correction, general image processing and data quality assessment. Savu is open source, open licensed and 'facility-independent': it can run on standard cluster infrastructure at any institution.

  12. Statistical list-mode image reconstruction for the high resolution research tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmim, A; Lenox, M; Reader, A J; Michel, C; Burbar, Z; Ruth, T J; Sossi, V

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated statistical list-mode reconstruction applicable to a depth-encoding high resolution research tomograph. An image non-negativity constraint has been employed in the reconstructions and is shown to effectively remove the overestimation bias introduced by the sinogram non-negativity constraint. We have furthermore implemented a convergent subsetized (CS) list-mode reconstruction algorithm, based on previous work (Hsiao et al 2002 Conf. Rec. SPIE Med. Imaging 4684 10-19; Hsiao et al 2002 Conf. Rec. IEEE Int. Symp. Biomed. Imaging 409-12) on convergent histogram OSEM reconstruction. We have demonstrated that the first step of the convergent algorithm is exactly equivalent (unlike the histogram-mode case) to the regular subsetized list-mode EM algorithm, while the second and final step takes the form of additive updates in image space. We have shown that in terms of contrast, noise as well as FWHM width behaviour, the CS algorithm is robust and does not result in limit cycles. A hybrid algorithm based on the ordinary and the convergent algorithms is also proposed, and is shown to combine the advantages of the two algorithms (i.e. it is able to reach a higher image quality in fewer iterations while maintaining the convergent behaviour), making the hybrid approach a good alternative to the ordinary subsetized list-mode EM algorithm

  13. Tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric volumes from infrared limb-imager measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungermann, Joern

    2011-08-12

    State-of-the art nadir and limb-sounders, but also in situ measurements, do not offer the capability to highly resolve the atmosphere in all three dimensions. This leaves an observational gap with respect to small-scale structures that arise frequently in the atmosphere and that still lack a quantitative understanding. For instance, filaments and tropopause folds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) are crucial for its composition and variability. One way to achieve a highly resolved three-dimensional (3-D) picture of the atmosphere is the tomographic evaluation of limb-imager measurements. This thesis presents a methodology for the tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric constituents. To be able to deal with the large increase of observations and unknowns compared to conventional retrievals, great care is taken to reduce memory consumption and processing time. This method is used to evaluate the performance of two upcoming infrared limb-imager instruments and to prepare their missions. The first examined instrument is the infrared limb-imager on board of PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetrewave Emitted Radiation), one of three remaining candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer mission. Scientific goals of PREMIER are, among others, the examination of gravity waves and the quantification of processes controlling atmospheric composition in the UTLS, a region of particular importance for climate change. Simulations based on the performance requirements of this instrument deliver a vertical resolution that is slightly better than its vertical field-of-view (about 0.75 km) and a horizontal resolution of {approx}25km x 70 km. Non-linear end-to-end simulations for various gravity wave patterns demonstrate that the high 3-D resolution of PREMIER considerably extends the range of detectable gravity waves in terms of horizontal and vertical wavelength compared to previous observations. The second examined

  14. Accuracy of 3-dimensional reconstruction algorithms for the high-resolution research tomograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velden, Floris H P; Kloet, Reina W; van Berckel, Bart N M; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    The high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain PET scanner. At present, iterative reconstruction methods are preferred for reconstructing HRRT studies. However, these iterative reconstruction algorithms show bias in short-duration frames. New algorithms such as the shifted Poisson ordered-subsets expectation maximization (SP-OSEM) and ordered-subsets weighted least squares (OSWLS) showed promising results in bias reduction, compared with the recommended ordinary Poisson OSEM (OP-OSEM). The goal of this study was to evaluate quantitative accuracy of these iterative reconstruction algorithms, compared with 3-dimensional filtered backprojection (3D-FBP). The 3 above-mentioned 3D iterative reconstruction methods were implemented for the HRRT. To evaluate the various 3D iterative reconstruction techniques quantitatively, several phantom studies and a human brain study (n=5) were performed. OSWLS showed a low and almost linearly increasing coefficient of variation (SD over average activity concentration), with decreasing noise-equivalent count rates. In decay studies, OSWLS showed good agreement with the 3D-FBP gray matter (GM)-to-white matter (WM) contrast ratio (noise-equivalent count rates; this variability was much higher for other iterative methods (>92%). 3D-FBP showed the least variability (34%). Visually, OSWLS hardly showed any artifacts in parametric images and showed good agreement with 3D-FBP data for parametric images, especially in the case of reference-tissue kinetic methods (slope, 1.02; Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.99). OP-OSEM, SP-OSEM, and OSWLS showed good performance for phantom studies. In addition, OSWLS showed better results for parametric analysis of clinical studies and is therefore recommended for quantitative HRRT brain PET studies.

  15. Multi-Mode Lamb Wave Arrival Time Extraction for Improved Tomographic Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinders, Mark K.; Hou Jidong; Leonard, Kevin R.

    2005-01-01

    An ultrasonic signal processing technique is applied to multi-mode arrival time estimation from Lamb waveforms. The basic tool is a simplified time-scale projection called a dynamic wavelet fingerprint (DWFP) which enables direct observation of the variation of features of interest in non-stationary ultrasonic signals. The DWFP technique was used to automatically detect and evaluate each candidate through-transmitted Lamb mode. The area of the dynamic wavelet fingerprint was then used as a feature to distinguish false modes caused by noise and other interference from the true modes of interest. The set of estimated arrival times were then used as inputs for tomographic reconstruction. The Lamb wave tomography images generated with these estimated arrival times were able to indicate different defects in aluminum plates

  16. Tomographic apparatus and method for reconstructing planar slices from non-absorbed radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    In a tomographic apparatus and method for reconstructing two-dimensional planar slices from linear projections of non-absorbed radiation useful in the fields of medical radiology, microscopy, and non-destructive testing, a beam of radiation in the shape of a fan is passed through an object lying in the same quasi-plane as the object slice and non-absorbtion thereof is recorded on oppositely-situated detectors aligned with the source of radiation. There is relative rotation between the source-detector configuration and the object within the quasi-plane. Periodic values of the detected radiation are taken, convolved with certain functions, and back-projected to produce a two-dimensional output picture on a visual display illustrating a facsimile of the object slice. A series of two-dimensional pictures obtained simultaneously or serially can be combined to produce a three dimensional portrayal of the entire object

  17. A morphological study of the mandibular molar region using reconstructed helical computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Makoto; Noguchi, Akira; Yoshida, Keiko; Tachinami, Yasuharu

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the morphological variance in the mandibular molar region using reconstructed helical computed tomographic (CT) images. In addition, we discuss the necessity of CT scanning as part of the preoperative assessment process for dental implantation, by comparing the results with the findings of panoramic radiography. Sixty patients examined using CT as part of the preoperative assessment for dental implantation were analyzed. Reconstructed CT images were used to evaluate the bone quality and cross-sectional bone morphology of the mandibular molar region. The mandibular cortical index (MCI) and X-ray density ratio of this region were assessed using panoramic radiography in order to analyze the correlation between the findings of the CT images and panoramic radiography. CT images showed that there was a decrease in bone quality in cases with high MCI. Cross-sectional CT images revealed that the undercuts on the lingual side in the highly radiolucent areas in the basal portion were more frequent than those in the alveolar portion. This study showed that three-dimensional reconstructed CT images can help to detect variances in mandibular morphology that might be missed by panoramic radiography. In conclusion, it is suggested that CT should be included as an important examination tool before dental implantation. (author)

  18. Applicability of a set of tomographic reconstruction algorithms for quantitative SPECT on irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan, E-mail: staffan.jacobsson_svard@physics.uu.se; Holcombe, Scott; Grape, Sophie

    2015-05-21

    A fuel assembly operated in a nuclear power plant typically contains 100–300 fuel rods, depending on fuel type, which become strongly radioactive during irradiation in the reactor core. For operational and security reasons, it is of interest to experimentally deduce rod-wise information from the fuel, preferably by means of non-destructive measurements. The tomographic SPECT technique offers such possibilities through its two-step application; (1) recording the gamma-ray flux distribution around the fuel assembly, and (2) reconstructing the assembly's internal source distribution, based on the recorded radiation field. In this paper, algorithms for performing the latter step and extracting quantitative relative rod-by-rod data are accounted for. As compared to application of SPECT in nuclear medicine, nuclear fuel assemblies present a much more heterogeneous distribution of internal attenuation to gamma radiation than the human body, typically with rods containing pellets of heavy uranium dioxide surrounded by cladding of a zirconium alloy placed in water or air. This inhomogeneity severely complicates the tomographic quantification of the rod-wise relative source content, and the deduction of conclusive data requires detailed modelling of the attenuation to be introduced in the reconstructions. However, as shown in this paper, simplified models may still produce valuable information about the fuel. Here, a set of reconstruction algorithms for SPECT on nuclear fuel assemblies are described and discussed in terms of their quantitative performance for two applications; verification of fuel assemblies' completeness in nuclear safeguards, and rod-wise fuel characterization. It is argued that a request not to base the former assessment on any a priori information brings constraints to which reconstruction methods that may be used in that case, whereas the use of a priori information on geometry and material content enables highly accurate quantitative

  19. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas with computed tomographic, angiographic, and positron-emission tomographic evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Kowada, Masayoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Uemura, Kazuo.

    1986-01-01

    Ten patients with cerebellar hemangioblastomas were reviewed, and evaluations were made by computed tomography (CT), vertebral angiography, and positron-emission tomography (PET). Cerebellar hemangioblastomas were classified into three types on the basis of their CT appearances: Type I: a cystic tumor without a demonstrable mural nodule; Type II: a cystic tumor with a mural nodule, and Type III: a solid tumor without any cyst formation. All of the cystic tumors classified here as Types I and II were associated with a shift and deformity of the fourth ventricule and an enlarged lateral ventricle, and yet no low-density area in the adjacent cerebellar tissue indicating perifocal edema was demonstrated. By contrast, in the solid hemangioblastomas designated as Type III, finger-shaped, low-density areas were visualized around the enhancing mass lesion, extending to the white matter of the entire affected cerebellar hemisphere. The vertebral angiographic classification of cerebellar hemangioblastomas was also attempted as follows: Type I: an avascular tumor without a demonstrable mural nodule; Type II: an avascular tumor with a mural nodule, and Type III: a solid vascular tumor with enlarged feeding arteries and distinct draining veins. In Type II, a relatively small mural nodule was visualized, fed mostly by a single feeding artery, and the tumor stain was at its peak at the arterial phase. No draining vein was opacified in most cases. In contrast, solid tumors classified as Type III were demonstrated to be hypervascular tumors with a multiplicity of feeding arteries and draining veins. The vascular mass remained to be opacified through the venous phase with delayed blood circulation. PET was performed on a 31-year-old male with a solid hemangioblastoma. (J.P.N)

  20. Different thallium-201 single-photon emission tomographic patterns in benign and aggressive meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedeschi, E.; Soricelli, A.; Brunetti, A.; Romano, M.; Bucciero, A.; Iaconetta, G.; Alfieri, A.; Postiglione, A.; Salvatore, M.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of preoperatively obtaining an index of aggressiveness for intracranial meningiomas, we prospectively studied 22 patients with computed tomographic or magnetic resonance imaging evidence of meningeal tumour, using single-photon emission tomography (SPET) of the brain and thallium-201 ( 201 Tl). On a brain-dedicated SPET scanner, a rapid acquisition protocol with early, short scans was started simultaneously with the intravenous administration of 111 MBq 201 Tl, covering the initial intratumoral distribution of the tracer. Twenty minutes post injection, a delayed SPET scan was also obtained. On the reconstructed and attenuation-corrected images we calculated the 201 Tl concentration in tumour and normal contralateral brain tissue, and compared intratumoral tracer concentration in the initial and the final part of the rapid acquisition protocol. Benign and malignant meningiomas were classified as such based on histological examination. In malignant lesions, the ratio of the 201 Tl concentration at 2-4 min post injection to that at 14-16 min was found to be significantly higher than in non-aggressive neoplasms (mean±1 SD: 1.14±0.31 and 0.56±0.13, respectively, P 201 Tl concentration values at 2-4 and at 14-16 min. Our findings suggest that the comparative assessment of intratumoral 201 Tl concentration at 2-4 and at 14-16 min post injection could provide a fast, simple method to differentiate preoperatively intracranial meningiomas with different biological behaviour. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Real-Space x-ray tomographic reconstruction of randomly oriented objects with sparse data frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyer, Kartik; Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Elser, Veit; Gruner, Sol M

    2014-02-10

    Schemes for X-ray imaging single protein molecules using new x-ray sources, like x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), require processing many frames of data that are obtained by taking temporally short snapshots of identical molecules, each with a random and unknown orientation. Due to the small size of the molecules and short exposure times, average signal levels of much less than 1 photon/pixel/frame are expected, much too low to be processed using standard methods. One approach to process the data is to use statistical methods developed in the EMC algorithm (Loh & Elser, Phys. Rev. E, 2009) which processes the data set as a whole. In this paper we apply this method to a real-space tomographic reconstruction using sparse frames of data (below 10(-2) photons/pixel/frame) obtained by performing x-ray transmission measurements of a low-contrast, randomly-oriented object. This extends the work by Philipp et al. (Optics Express, 2012) to three dimensions and is one step closer to the single molecule reconstruction problem.

  2. Bayesian image reconstruction: Application to emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, J.; Llacer, J.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we propose a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) method of image reconstruction in the Bayesian framework for the Poisson noise case. We use entropy to define the prior probability and likelihood to define the conditional probability. The method uses sharpness parameters which can be theoretically computed or adjusted, allowing us to obtain MAP reconstructions without the problem of the grey'' reconstructions associated with the pre Bayesian reconstructions. We have developed several ways to solve the reconstruction problem and propose a new iterative algorithm which is stable, maintains positivity and converges to feasible images faster than the Maximum Likelihood Estimate method. We have successfully applied the new method to the case of Emission Tomography, both with simulated and real data. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  4. Engineering developments on the UBC-TRIUMF modified PETT VI positron emission tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, B.; Harrop, R.; Heywood, D.

    1982-10-01

    A tomograph with the PETT VI geometry has been built with improvements generally applicable to such devices. In addition to improved temperature control, the gantry features commercial CsF detectors with the newer Amperex photomultiplier tubes. Much of the coincidence support circuitry is of an original design, utilizing new 'fast' TTL family devices. A local DEC 11/23 microprocessor provides for routine diagnostic and reliability checking, gantry control, and acquisition of single detector counting rates. Image reconstruction and display is performed by a medium size VAX 11/780 computer, operating in a time-sharing environment. Some preliminary performance characteristics of the machine have been measured. The reconstructed resolution in-slice, as well as the reconstructed slice thickness, has been measured as a function of radius for both 'straight' and 'cross' slices

  5. Hybrid computing: CPU+GPU co-processing and its application to tomographic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agulleiro, J.I.; Vazquez, F.; Garzon, E.M. [Supercomputing and Algorithms Group, Associated Unit CSIC-UAL, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Fernandez, J.J., E-mail: JJ.Fernandez@csic.es [National Centre for Biotechnology, National Research Council (CNB-CSIC), Campus UAM, C/Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    Modern computers are equipped with powerful computing engines like multicore processors and GPUs. The 3DEM community has rapidly adapted to this scenario and many software packages now make use of high performance computing techniques to exploit these devices. However, the implementations thus far are purely focused on either GPUs or CPUs. This work presents a hybrid approach that collaboratively combines the GPUs and CPUs available in a computer and applies it to the problem of tomographic reconstruction. Proper orchestration of workload in such a heterogeneous system is an issue. Here we use an on-demand strategy whereby the computing devices request a new piece of work to do when idle. Our hybrid approach thus takes advantage of the whole computing power available in modern computers and further reduces the processing time. This CPU+GPU co-processing can be readily extended to other image processing tasks in 3DEM. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid computing allows full exploitation of the power (CPU+GPU) in a computer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper orchestration of workload is managed by an on-demand strategy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total number of threads running in the system should be limited to the number of CPUs.

  6. Reconstruction of computed tomographic image from a few x-ray projections by means of accelerative gradient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    A method of the reconstruction of computed tomographic images was proposed to reduce the exposure dose to X-ray. The method is the small number of X-ray projection method by accelerative gradient method. The procedures of computation are described. The algorithm of these procedures is simple, the convergence of the computation is fast, and the required memory capacity is small. Numerical simulation was carried out to conform the validity of this method. A sample of simple shape was considered, projection data were given, and the images were reconstructed from 6 views. Good results were obtained, and the method is considered to be useful. (Kato, T.)

  7. The 3D tomographic image reconstruction software for prompt-gamma measurement of the boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, Boris; Auterinen, Iiro; Kotiluoto, Petri; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2006-01-01

    A tomographic imaging system based on the spatial distribution measurement of the neutron capture reaction during Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) would be very useful for clinical purpose. Using gamma-detectors in a 2D-panel, boron neutron capture and hydrogen neutron capture gamma-rays emitted by the neutron irradiated region can be detected, and an image of the neutron capture events can be reconstructed. A 3D reconstruction software package has been written to support the development of a 3D prompt-gamma tomographic system. The package consists of three independent modules: phantom generation, reconstruction and evaluation modules. The reconstruction modules are based on algebraic approach of the iterative reconstruction algorithm (ART), and on the maximum likelihood estimation method (ML-EM). In addition to that, two subsets of the ART, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the component averaging algorithms (CAV) have been included to the package employing parallel codes for multiprocessor architecture. All implemented algorithms use two different field functions for the reconstruction of the region. One is traditional voxel function, another is, so called, blob function, smooth spherically symmetric generalized Kaiser-Bessel function. The generation module provides the phantom and projections with background by tracing the prompt gamma-rays for a given scanner geometry. The evaluation module makes statistical comparisons between the generated and reconstructed images, and provides figure-of-merit (FOM) values for the applied reconstruction algorithms. The package has been written in C language and tested under Linux and Windows platforms. The simple graphical user interface (GUI) is used for command execution and visualization purposed. (author)

  8. Real time measurement of transient event emissions of air toxics by tomographic remote sensing in tandem with mobile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaguer, Eduardo P.; Stutz, Jochen; Erickson, Matthew H.; Hurlock, Stephen C.; Cheung, Ross; Tsai, Catalina; Colosimo, Santo F.; Festa, James; Wijesinghe, Asanga; Neish, Bradley S.

    2017-02-01

    During the Benzene and other Toxics Exposure (BEE-TEX) study, a remote sensing network based on long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) was set up in the Manchester neighborhood beside the Ship Channel of Houston, Texas in order to perform Computer Aided Tomography (CAT) scans of hazardous air pollutants. On 18-19 February 2015, the CAT scan network detected large nocturnal plumes of toluene and xylenes most likely associated with railcar loading and unloading operations at Ship Channel petrochemical facilities. The presence of such plumes during railcar operations was confirmed by a mobile laboratory equipped with a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), which measured transient peaks of toluene and C2-benzenes of 50 ppb and 57 ppb respectively around 4 a.m. LST on 19 February 2015. Plume reconstruction and source attribution were performed using the 4D variational data assimilation technique and a 3D micro-scale forward and adjoint air quality model based on both tomographic and PTR-MS data. Inverse model estimates of fugitive emissions associated with railcar transfer emissions ranged from 2.0 to 8.2 kg/hr for toluene and from 2.2 to 3.5 kg/hr for xylenes in the early morning of 19 February 2015.

  9. Reconstruction of Axial Tomographic High Resolution Data from Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy: A Method for Improving 3D FISH Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Heintzmann

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy allows an improved imaging of microscopic objects in three dimensions. However, the resolution along the axial direction is three times worse than the resolution in lateral directions. A method to overcome this axial limitation is tilting the object under the microscope, in a way that the direction of the optical axis points into different directions relative to the sample. A new technique for a simultaneous reconstruction from a number of such axial tomographic confocal data sets was developed and used for high resolution reconstruction of 3D‐data both from experimental and virtual microscopic data sets. The reconstructed images have a highly improved 3D resolution, which is comparable to the lateral resolution of a single deconvolved data set. Axial tomographic imaging in combination with simultaneous data reconstruction also opens the possibility for a more precise quantification of 3D data. The color images of this publication can be accessed from http://www.esacp.org/acp/2000/20‐1/heintzmann.htm. At this web address an interactive 3D viewer is additionally provided for browsing the 3D data. This java applet displays three orthogonal slices of the data set which are dynamically updated by user mouse clicks or keystrokes.

  10. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.T.C.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a open-quotes true 3D screenclose quotes. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches

  11. List-mode maximum-likelihood reconstruction applied to positron emission mammography (PEM) with irregular sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesman, R H; Klein, G J; Moses, W W; Qi, J; Reutter, B W; Virador, P R

    2000-05-01

    We present a preliminary study of list-mode likelihood reconstruction of images for a rectangular positron emission tomograph (PET) specifically designed to image the human breast. The prospective device consists of small arrays of scintillation crystals for which depth of interaction is estimated. Except in very rare instances, the number of annihilation events detected is expected to be far less than the number of distinguishable events. If one were to histogram the acquired data, most histogram bins would remain vacant. Therefore, it seems natural to investigate the efficacy of processing events one at a time rather than processing the data in histogram format. From a reconstruction perspective, the new tomograph presents a challenge in that the rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling, and the field of view extends completely to the detector faces. Simulations are presented that indicate that the proposed tomograph can detect 8-mm-diameter spherical tumors with a tumor-to-background tracer density ratio of 3:1 using realistic image acquisition parameters. Spherical tumors of 4-mm diameter are near the limit of detectability with the image acquisition parameters used. Expressions are presented to estimate the loss of image contrast due to Compton scattering.

  12. List-mode maximum-likelihood reconstruction applied to positron emission mammography (PEM) with irregular sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Klein, Gregory J.; Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi; Reutter, Bryan W.; Virador, Patrick R.G.

    2000-02-01

    We present a preliminary study of list mode likelihood reconstruction of images for a rectangular positron emission tomograph (PET) specifically designed to image the human breast. The prospective device consists of small arrays of scintillation crystals for which depth of interaction is estimated. Except in very rare instances the number of annihilation events detected is expected to be far less than the number of distinguishable events. If one were to histogram the acquired data, most histogram bins would remain vacant. It therefore seems natural to investigate the efficacy of processing events one at a time rather than processing the data in histogram format. From a reconstruction perspective, the new tomograph presents a challenge in that the rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling, and the field of view extends completely to the detector faces. Simulations are presented which indicate that the proposed tomograph can detect 8{approximately}mm diameter spherical tumors with a tumor to background tracer density ratio of 3:1 using realistic image acquisition parameters. Spherical tumors of 4{approximately}mm diameter are near the limit of detectability with the image acquisition parameters used. Expressions are presented to estimate the loss of image contrast due to Compton scattering.

  13. Discrete tomographic reconstruction of 2D polycrystal orientation maps from X-ray diffraction projections using Gibbs priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodek, L.; Knudsen, E.; Poulsen, H.F.

    2005-01-01

    The determination of crystalline structures is a demanding and fundamental task of crystallography. This paper offers a new approach for rendering a 2D grain map of a polycrystal based on an orientation map reconstructed from X-ray diffraction patterns. The orientation map is produced by a Bayesian...... discrete tomographic algorithm, applying image-modelling Gibbs priors and a homogeneity condition. The optimization of the objective function is accomplished via the Gibbs Sampler in conjunction with simulated annealing. In order to express the structure of the orientation map, the similarity...... of orientations is defined by means of quaternions....

  14. 256-Slice coronary computed tomographic angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: optimal reconstruction phase and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Seitaro; Yuki, Hideaki; Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Chuou-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Honda, Keiichi; Yoshimura, Akira; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Minami-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Noda, Katsuo; Oshima, Shuichi [Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Minami-ku, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    To assess the optimal reconstruction phase and the image quality of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We performed CCTA in 60 patients with AF and 60 controls with sinus rhythm. The images were reconstructed in multiple phases in all parts of the cardiac cycle, and the optimal reconstruction phase with the fewest motion artefacts was identified. The coronary artery segments were visually evaluated to investigate their assessability. In 46 (76.7 %) patients, the optimal reconstruction phase was end-diastole, whereas in 6 (10.0 %) patients it was end-systole or mid-diastole, and in 2 (3.3 %) patients it was another cardiac phase. In 53 (88.3 %) of the controls, the optimal reconstruction phase was mid-diastole, whereas it was end-systole in 4 (6.7 %), and in 3 (5.0 %) it was another cardiac phase. There was a significant difference between patients with AF and the controls in the optimal phase (p < 0.01) but not in the visual image quality score (p = 0.06). The optimal reconstruction phase in most patients with AF was the end-diastolic phase. The end-systolic phase tended to be optimal in AF patients with higher average heart rates. (orig.)

  15. Development of tomographic reconstruction algorithms for the PIXE analysis of biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.T.

    2008-05-01

    The development of 3-dimensional microscopy techniques offering a spatial resolution of 1 μm or less has opened a large field of investigation in Cell Biology. Amongst them, an interesting advantage of ion beam micro-tomography is its ability to give quantitative results in terms of local concentrations in a direct way, using Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXET) combined to Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIMT) Tomography. After a brief introduction of existing reconstruction techniques, we present the principle of the DISRA code, the most complete written so far, which is the basis of the present work. We have modified and extended the DISRA algorithm by considering the specific aspects of biologic specimens. Moreover, correction procedures were added in the code to reduce noise in the tomograms. For portability purpose, a Windows graphic interface was designed to easily enter and modify experimental parameters used in the reconstruction, and control the several steps of data reduction. Results of STIMT and PIXET experiments on reference specimens and on human cancer cells will be also presented. (author)

  16. Reconstruction of tomographic images from projections of a small number of views by means of mathematical programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1985-01-01

    Fundamental studies have been made on the application of mathematical programming to the reconstruction of tomographic images from projections of a small number of views without requiring any circular symmetry nor periodicity. Linear programming and quadratic programming were applied to minimize the quadratic sum of the residue and to finally obtain optimized reconstruction images. The mathematical algorithms were verified by the method of computer simulation, and the relationship between the number of picture elements and the number of iterations necessary for convergence was also investigated. The methods of linear programming and quadratic programming require fairly simple mathematical procedures, and strict solutions can be obtained within a finite number of iterations. Their only draw back is the requirement of a large quantity of computer memory. But this problem will be desolved by the advent of large fast memory devices in the near future. (Aoki, K.)

  17. Comparison of kinetic models for data from a positron emission tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coxson, P.G.; Huesman, R.H.; Lim, S.; Klein, G.J.; Reutter, B.W.; Budinger, T.F.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare a physiological model of 82 Rb in the myocardium with two reduced order models with regard to their ability to assess physiological parameters of diagnostic significance. A three compartment physiological model of 82 Rb uptake in the myocardium was used to simulate kinetic region of interest data from a positron emission tomograph (PET). Simulations were generated for eight different blood flow rates reflecting the physiological range of interest. Two reduced order models which are commonly used with myocardial PET studies were fit to the simulated data and the parameters of the reduced order models were compared with the physiological parameters. Then all three models were fit to the simulated data with noise added. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate and compare the diagnostic utility of the reduced order models

  18. Evaluation of interpolation methods for surface-based motion compensated tomographic reconstruction for cardiac angiographic C-arm data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Kerstin; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Zheng Yefeng; Wang Yang; Lauritsch, Günter; Rohkohl, Christopher; Maier, Andreas K.; Schultz, Carl; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    experiments showed that TPS interpolation provided the best results. The quantitative results in the phantom experiments showed comparable nRMSE of ≈0.047 ± 0.004 for the TPS and Shepard's method. Only slightly inferior results for the smoothed weighting function and the linear approach were achieved. The UQI resulted in a value of ≈ 99% for all four interpolation methods. On clinical human data sets, the best results were clearly obtained with the TPS interpolation. The mean contour deviation between the TPS reconstruction and the standard FDK reconstruction improved in the three human cases by 1.52, 1.34, and 1.55 mm. The Dice coefficient showed less sensitivity with respect to variations in the ventricle boundary. Conclusions: In this work, the influence of different motion interpolation methods on left ventricle motion compensated tomographic reconstructions was investigated. The best quantitative reconstruction results of a phantom, a porcine, and human clinical data sets were achieved with the TPS approach. In general, the framework of motion estimation using a surface model and motion interpolation to a dense MVF provides the ability for tomographic reconstruction using a motion compensation technique.

  19. Positron emission tomographic images and expectation maximization: A VLSI architecture for multiple iterations per second

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.F.; Byars, L.G.; Casey, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    A digital electronic architecture for parallel processing of the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm for Positron Emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction is proposed. Rapid (0.2 second) EM iterations on high resolution (256 x 256) images are supported. Arrays of two very large scale integration (VLSI) chips perform forward and back projection calculations. A description of the architecture is given, including data flow and partitioning relevant to EM and parallel processing. EM images shown are produced with software simulating the proposed hardware reconstruction algorithm. Projected cost of the system is estimated to be small in comparison to the cost of current PET scanners

  20. GPU-based rapid reconstruction of cellular 3D refractive index maps from tomographic phase microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardikman, Gili; Shaked, Natan T.

    2016-03-01

    We present highly parallel and efficient algorithms for real-time reconstruction of the quantitative three-dimensional (3-D) refractive-index maps of biological cells without labeling, as obtained from the interferometric projections acquired by tomographic phase microscopy (TPM). The new algorithms are implemented on the graphic processing unit (GPU) of the computer using CUDA programming environment. The reconstruction process includes two main parts. First, we used parallel complex wave-front reconstruction of the TPM-based interferometric projections acquired at various angles. The complex wave front reconstructions are done on the GPU in parallel, while minimizing the calculation time of the Fourier transforms and phase unwrapping needed. Next, we implemented on the GPU in parallel the 3-D refractive index map retrieval using the TPM filtered-back projection algorithm. The incorporation of algorithms that are inherently parallel with a programming environment such as Nvidia's CUDA makes it possible to obtain real-time processing rate, and enables high-throughput platform for label-free, 3-D cell visualization and diagnosis.

  1. Determination of spatial resolution of positron emission tomograph of clear PET-XPAD3/CT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya D, H.; Martinez O, S. A. [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada y Simulacion, 150003 Tunja, Boyaca (Colombia); Morel, C. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, ImXgam Group, 13009 Marseille (France); Castro, H. F. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Physics Department, Carrera 45 No. 26-85, Bogota (Colombia)

    2016-10-15

    Based on the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (Nema), using the Amine software to construction of sinograms and using a radioactive source {sup 22}Na that emitting positrons were made calculations for determine spatial resolution of ring array system of phoswich detectors of positron emission tomograph included in the Clear PET-XPAD3/CT prototype for small animals made in the laboratories of CCPM and whose project is led by the research group ImXgam. The radioactive source {sup 22}Na approximately 9 MBq of activity, with spherical shape and diameter of 0.57 mm immersed in a plexiglas disc was located at the geometric center of tomographic system with a Field of View (Fov) of 35 mm in the axial and transverse directions. Displacements of radioactive source were performed on the three cartesian axes and was rebuilt a sinogram for each axis. The shape of sinogram allow describe the correct position and the maximum efficiency of each detector. Subsequently, was carried out a scanning in each one of three spatial axes taking an enough distance covering the dimensions of radioactive source, were recorded data for each one of phoswich detector crystals which are aligned in the axis of movement. The process was repeated for other axes and then was offsetting the radioactive source with respect to the Fov and were calculated FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) and FWTM (Full Width at Tenth Maximum) values and performing statistics of these values with parabolic fitting, the latter setting allows to obtain parameters of spatial resolution of system. (Author)

  2. Determination of spatial resolution of positron emission tomograph of clear PET-XPAD3/CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaya D, H.; Martinez O, S. A.; Morel, C.; Castro, H. F.

    2016-10-01

    Based on the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (Nema), using the Amine software to construction of sinograms and using a radioactive source 22 Na that emitting positrons were made calculations for determine spatial resolution of ring array system of phoswich detectors of positron emission tomograph included in the Clear PET-XPAD3/CT prototype for small animals made in the laboratories of CCPM and whose project is led by the research group ImXgam. The radioactive source 22 Na approximately 9 MBq of activity, with spherical shape and diameter of 0.57 mm immersed in a plexiglas disc was located at the geometric center of tomographic system with a Field of View (Fov) of 35 mm in the axial and transverse directions. Displacements of radioactive source were performed on the three cartesian axes and was rebuilt a sinogram for each axis. The shape of sinogram allow describe the correct position and the maximum efficiency of each detector. Subsequently, was carried out a scanning in each one of three spatial axes taking an enough distance covering the dimensions of radioactive source, were recorded data for each one of phoswich detector crystals which are aligned in the axis of movement. The process was repeated for other axes and then was offsetting the radioactive source with respect to the Fov and were calculated FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) and FWTM (Full Width at Tenth Maximum) values and performing statistics of these values with parabolic fitting, the latter setting allows to obtain parameters of spatial resolution of system. (Author)

  3. Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Winston Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.

  4. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundermann, E.; Lemahieu, I.; Desmedt, P.

    1994-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors)

  5. COSMIC TEC tomographic vertical density reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere: Differences between the American and African sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, P.; Moldwin, M.; Zou, S.; Yizengaw, E. K.

    2011-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation measurements have become useful in observing the ionospheric spatial electron density distribution TEC from ground-based receivers are biased by the high density around the F2 peak and therefore it is difficult to extract information about the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere. GPS measurements onboard Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites provide more detailed observations of the ionospheric electron density distribution from the orbit height of the LEO satellite to GPS orbit heights. We use GPS TEC measurements onboard COSMIC satellites to reconstruct the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density distribution for both geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions during over-flights of the American and African mid-latitude regions by the COSMIC spacecraft using algebraic tomographic reconstruction technique (ART). The reconstructions provide more detailed information of the longitudinal and vertical spatial structure of topside ionosphere and plasmasphere during both geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions, and indicate the great potential of evaluating ionospheric models in the topside ionosphere/plasmasphere altitude range.

  6. Seismic tomographic constraints on plate-tectonic reconstructions of Nazca subduction under South America since late Cretaceous (˜80 Ma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. W.; Wu, J.; Suppe, J.

    2017-12-01

    Global seismic tomography has provided new and increasingly higher resolution constraints on subducted lithospheric remnants in terms of their position, depth, and volumes. In this study we aim to link tomographic slab anomalies in the mantle under South America to Andean geology using methods to unfold (i.e. structurally restore) slabs back to earth surface and input them to globally consistent plate reconstructions (Wu et al., 2016). The Andean margin of South America has long been interpreted as a classic example of a continuous subduction system since early Jurassic or later. However, significant gaps in Andean plate tectonic reconstructions exist due to missing or incomplete geology from extensive Nazca-South America plate convergence (i.e. >5000 km since 80 Ma). We mapped and unfolded the Nazca slab from global seismic tomography to produce a quantitative plate reconstruction of the Andes back to the late Cretaceous 80 Ma. Our plate model predicts the latest phase of Nazca subduction began in the late Cretaceous subduction after a 100 to 80 Ma plate reorganization, which is supported by Andean geology that indicates a margin-wide compressional event at the mid-late Cretaceous (Tunik et al., 2010). Our Andean plate tectonic reconstructions predict the Andean margin experienced periods of strike-slip/transtensional and even divergent plate tectonics between 80 to 55 Ma. This prediction is roughly consistent with the arc magmatism from northern Chile between 20 to 36°S that resumed at 80 Ma after a magmatic gap. Our model indicates the Andean margin only became fully convergent after 55 Ma. We provide additional constraints on pre-subduction Nazca plate paleogeography by extracting P-wave velocity perturbations within our mapped slab surfaces following Wu et al. (2016). We identified localized slow anomalies within our mapped Nazca slab that apparently show the size and position of the subducted Nazca ridge, Carnegie ridge and the hypothesized Inca plateau

  7. Static and predictive tomographic reconstruction for wide-field multi-object adaptive optics systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, C; Jackson, K; Véran, J-P; Andersen, D; Lardière, O; Bradley, C

    2014-01-01

    Multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO) systems are still in their infancy: their complex optical designs for tomographic, wide-field wavefront sensing, coupled with open-loop (OL) correction, make their calibration a challenge. The correction of a discrete number of specific directions in the field allows for streamlined application of a general class of spatio-angular algorithms, initially proposed in Whiteley et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A15, 2097 (1998)], which is compatible with partial on-line calibration. The recent Learn & Apply algorithm from Vidal et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A27, A253 (2010)] can then be reinterpreted in a broader framework of tomographic algorithms and is shown to be a special case that exploits the particulars of OL and aperture-plane phase conjugation. An extension to embed a temporal prediction step to tackle sky-coverage limitations is discussed. The trade-off between lengthening the camera integration period, therefore increasing system lag error, and the resulting improvement in SNR can be shifted to higher guide-star magnitudes by introducing temporal prediction. The derivation of the optimal predictor and a comparison to suboptimal autoregressive models is provided using temporal structure functions. It is shown using end-to-end simulations of Raven, the MOAO science, and technology demonstrator for the 8 m Subaru telescope that prediction allows by itself the use of 1-magnitude-fainter guide stars.

  8. Preparation of a potential positron emission tomographic radioligand for the dopamine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, L.; Halldin, C.; Foged, C.; Karlsson, P.; Hall, H.; Swahn, C.G.; Suzdak, P.D.; Hohlweg, R.; Nielsen, E.B.; Frade, L.

    1994-01-01

    NNC 12-0722 (1-[2-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)-methoxy)ethyl]-4-methyl piperazine) is a new selective inhibitor of the dopamine transporter. [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 was prepared by N-methylation of the desmethyl compound with [ 11 C]methyl iodide. The total radiochemical yield of [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 was 40%-50% with an overall synthesis time of 30-35 min. The radiochemical purity was higher than 99% and the specific radioactivity about 1500 Ci/mmol (55 GBq/μmol). Autoradiographic examination of [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 binding on whole hemisphere cryosections from human brain post mortem demonstrated specific binding in the caudate nucleus and putamen. In a positron emission tomographic examination of [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 in a cynomolgus monkey there was a rapid uptake of radioactivity in the brain. In the striatum, a region with a high density of dopamine transporters, the radioactivity was two times higher than in the cerebellum. These results indicate that [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 may be a useful radioligand for labelling of the dopamine transporter in man. (orig.)

  9. Positron emission tomographic scan investigations of Huntington's disease: cerebral metabolic correlates of cognitive function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berent, S.; Giordani, B.; Lehtinen, S.; Markel, D.; Penney, J.B.; Buchtel, H.A.; Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Hichwa, R.; Young, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Fifteen drug-free patients with early to mid-stage Huntington's disease (HD) were evaluated with positron emission tomographic (PET) scans of 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake and quantitative measures of neurological function, learning, memory, and general intelligence. In comparison with a group of normal volunteers, the HD patients showed lower metabolism in both caudate (p less than 0.001) and putamen (p less than 0.001) on PET scans. A significant and positive relationship was found between neuropsychological measures of verbal learning and memory and caudate metabolism in the patient group but not in the normal group. Visual-spatial learning did not reflect a similar pattern, but performance intelligence quotient was positively related to both caudate and putamen metabolism in the HD group. Vocabulary level was unrelated to either brain structure. Discussion focuses on these and other observed brain-behavior relationships and on the implications of these findings for general behaviors such as those involved in coping and adaptation

  10. Advances in tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novara, M.

    2013-01-01

    This research deals with advanced developments in 3D particle image velocimetry based on the tomographic PIV technique (Tomo-PIV). The latter is a relatively recent measurement technique introduced by Elsinga et al. in 2005, which is based on the tomographic reconstruction of particle tracers in

  11. Construction of a positron emission tomograph with 2.4 mm detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, J.A.; Sprosst, R.L.; Wang, K.

    1986-01-01

    One-quarter of one ring of a positron tomograph has been constructed. The positron annihilation gamma rays are detected by polished plastic scintillators which direct scintillation light by internal reflection to optical fibers for transmission to the photo-multiplier tubes. By viewing each scintillator with four sets of optical fibers, the number of photomultipliers required for an eight ring tomograph with 1024 detectors per ring (2.4 mm wide detectors) can be reduced from 8192 to 288, and the cost of the tomograph reduced accordingly

  12. Fully 3D tomographic reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulation of the system matrix in preclinical PET with iodine 124

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Immuno-PET imaging can be used to assess the pharmacokinetic in radioimmunotherapy. When using iodine-124, PET quantitative imaging is limited by physics-based degrading factors within the detection system and the object, such as the long positron range in water and the complex spectrum of gamma photons. The objective of this thesis was to develop a fully 3D tomographic reconstruction method (S(MC)2PET) using Monte Carlo simulations for estimating the system matrix, in the context of preclinical imaging with iodine-124. The Monte Carlo simulation platform GATE was used for that respect. Several complexities of system matrices were calculated, with at least a model of the PET system response function. Physics processes in the object was either neglected or taken into account using a precise or a simplified object description. The impact of modelling refinement and statistical variance related to the system matrix elements was evaluated on final reconstructed images. These studies showed that a high level of complexity did not always improve qualitative and quantitative results, owing to the high-variance of the associated system matrices. (author)

  13. Experimental device, corresponding forward model and processing of the experimental data using wavelet analysis for tomographic image reconstruction applied to eddy current nondestructive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, P.Y.; Madaoui, N.

    1999-01-01

    In the context of eddy current non destructive evaluation using a tomographic image reconstruction process, the success of the reconstruction depends not only on the choice of the forward model and of the inversion algorithms, but also on the ability to extract the pertinent data from the raw signal provided by the sensor. We present in this paper, an experimental device designed for imaging purposes, the corresponding forward model, and a pre-processing of the experimental data using wavelet analysis. These three steps implemented with an inversion algorithm, will allow in the future to perform image reconstruction of 3-D flaws. (authors)

  14. Method for position emission mammography image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark Frederick

    2004-10-12

    An image reconstruction method comprising accepting coincidence datat from either a data file or in real time from a pair of detector heads, culling event data that is outside a desired energy range, optionally saving the desired data for each detector position or for each pair of detector pixels on the two detector heads, and then reconstructing the image either by backprojection image reconstruction or by iterative image reconstruction. In the backprojection image reconstruction mode, rays are traced between centers of lines of response (LOR's), counts are then either allocated by nearest pixel interpolation or allocated by an overlap method and then corrected for geometric effects and attenuation and the data file updated. If the iterative image reconstruction option is selected, one implementation is to compute a grid Siddon retracing, and to perform maximum likelihood expectation maiximization (MLEM) computed by either: a) tracing parallel rays between subpixels on opposite detector heads; or b) tracing rays between randomized endpoint locations on opposite detector heads.

  15. X-ray differential phase-contrast tomographic reconstruction with a phase line integral retrieval filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Li, Chen

    2015-01-01

    We report an alternative reconstruction technique for x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT). This approach is based on a new phase line integral projection retrieval filter, which is rooted in the derivative property of the Fourier transform and counteracts the differential nature of the DPC-CT projections. It first retrieves the phase line integral from the DPC-CT projections. Then the standard filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithms popular in x-ray absorption-contrast CT are directly applied to the retrieved phase line integrals to reconstruct the DPC-CT images. Compared with the conventional DPC-CT reconstruction algorithms, the proposed method removes the Hilbert imaginary filter and allows for the direct use of absorption-contrast FBP algorithms. Consequently, FBP-oriented image processing techniques and reconstruction acceleration softwares that have already been successfully used in absorption-contrast CT can be directly adopted to improve the DPC-CT image quality and speed up the reconstruction

  16. 3D fast reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egger, M.L.; Scheurer, A. Hermann; Joseph, C.; Morel, C.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of long reconstruction times in positron emission tomography (PET) has been addressed from several points of view, resulting in an affordable dedicated system capable of handling routine 3D reconstructions in a few minutes per frame : on the hardware side using fast processors and a parallel architecture, and on the software side, using efficient implementation of computationally less intensive algorithms

  17. Scanning rates for a reconstruction procedure of emission tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heike, U.

    1986-01-01

    In order to reconstruct the distribution of radioactively labelled compounds from the radiation emitted from these compounds a reconstruction procedure of emission tomography is developed. The integral equations are solved numerically by means of a generalized least-square method and the scanning rates are derived

  18. A positron emission tomograph designed for 3/4 mm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInytre, J.A.; Allen, R.D.; Aguiar, J.; Paulson, J.T.

    1995-01-01

    Two factors of the design for a positron tomograph affect the magnitude of the tomograph spatial resolution: the gamma ray detector width and the analogue measurement of the scintillator location. In the tomograph design reported here the analogue measurement is eliminated and the detector transaxial width factor is reduced to 3/4 mm. The analogue measurement is eliminated by transmitting the scintillation light from each individual scintillator through optical fibers to four photo-multipliers (PMT's); the identities of the PMT's then provide a digital address for the scintillation location. Plastic scintillators are used to provide enough scintillation light for transmission through the optical fibers. Bonuses from the use of plastic scintillators are first, the reduction of the scintillator dead time to about 10 nsec, second, a large reduction of cross-talk between neighboring scintillators, third, the reduction of resolution loss from off-axis gamma rays and, fourth, the ability to sample the axial image at one-eighth the axial resolution distance of 2.5 mm. The designed tomograph incorporates 20 rings. Two of the 32 tomograph 20-ring modules have been constructed to measure the resolution and other characteristics of the tomographs

  19. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are given of a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to a multiplexer slip ring means for receiving output from the detectors and enabling interfeed to the image reconstruction station. (U.K.)

  20. An interior-point method for total variation regularized positron emission tomography image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bing

    2012-03-01

    There has been a lot of work on total variation (TV) regularized tomographic image reconstruction recently. Many of them use gradient-based optimization algorithms with a differentiable approximation of the TV functional. In this paper we apply TV regularization in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) image reconstruction. We reconstruct the PET image in a Bayesian framework, using Poisson noise model and TV prior functional. The original optimization problem is transformed to an equivalent problem with inequality constraints by adding auxiliary variables. Then we use an interior point method with logarithmic barrier functions to solve the constrained optimization problem. In this method, a series of points approaching the solution from inside the feasible region are found by solving a sequence of subproblems characterized by an increasing positive parameter. We use preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithm to solve the subproblems directly. The nonnegativity constraint is enforced by bend line search. The exact expression of the TV functional is used in our calculations. Simulation results show that the algorithm converges fast and the convergence is insensitive to the values of the regularization and reconstruction parameters.

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL TOMOGRAPHIC RECONSTRUCTION OF FOUNDRY ARTICLES ON LIMITED MODEL AND EXPERIMENTAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Vengrinovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The ways of overcoming of lack of source information, The ways of overcoming of lack of source information, allowing to reduce energy of primary X-radiation, necessary  for radiography and to provide high quality of reconstruction, are offered.

  2. Analysis of stability of tomographic reconstruction of x-ray medical images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л. А. Булавін

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Slice reconstruction in X-ray computed tomography is reduced to the solution of integral equations, or a system of algebraic equations in discrete case. It is considered to be an ill-posed problem due to the inconsistencies in the number of equations and variables and due to errors in the experimental data. Therefore, determination of the best method of the slice reconstruction is of great interest. Furthermore, all available methods give approximate results. The aim of this article was two-fold: i to compare two methods of image reconstruction, viz. inverse projection and variation, using the numerical experiment; ii to obtain the relationship between image accuracy and experimental error. It appeared that the image obtained by inverse projection is unstable: there was no convergence of the approximate image to the accurate one, when the experimental error reached zero. In turn, the image obtained by variational method was accurate at zero experimental error. Finally, the latter showed better slice reconstruction, despite the low number of projections and the experimental errors.

  3. A tensor-based dictionary learning approach to tomographic image reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Kilmer, Misha E.; Hansen, Per Christian

    2016-01-01

    coefficients in that dictionary. Our approach differs from past approaches in that (a) we use a third-order tensor representation for our images and (b) we recast the reconstruction problem using the tensor formulation. The dictionary learning problem is presented as a non-negative tensor factorization problem...

  4. Statistical analysis of nonlinearly reconstructed near-infrared tomographic images: Part I--Theory and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W; Song, Xiaomei; Tosteson, Tor D; McBride, Troy O; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D

    2002-07-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) diffuse tomography is an emerging method for imaging the interior of tissues to quantify concentrations of hemoglobin and exogenous chromophores non-invasively in vivo. It often exploits an optical diffusion model-based image reconstruction algorithm to estimate spatial property values from measurements of the light flux at the surface of the tissue. In this study, mean-squared error (MSE) over the image is used to evaluate methods for regularizing the ill-posed inverse image reconstruction problem in NIR tomography. Estimates of image bias and image standard deviation were calculated based upon 100 repeated reconstructions of a test image with randomly distributed noise added to the light flux measurements. It was observed that the bias error dominates at high regularization parameter values while variance dominates as the algorithm is allowed to approach the optimal solution. This optimum does not necessarily correspond to the minimum projection error solution, but typically requires further iteration with a decreasing regularization parameter to reach the lowest image error. Increasing measurement noise causes a need to constrain the minimum regularization parameter to higher values in order to achieve a minimum in the overall image MSE.

  5. The robustness of two tomography reconstructing techniques with heavily noisy dynamical experimental data from a high speed gamma-ray tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Geovane Vitor; Melo, Silvio de Barros; Dantas, Carlos Costa; Moreira, Icaro Malta; Johansen, Geira; Maad, Rachid

    2013-01-01

    The PSIRT (Particle Systems Iterative Reconstructive Technique) is, just like the ART method, an iterative tomographic reconstruction technique with the recommended use in the reconstruction of catalytic density distribution in the refining process of oil in the FCC-type riser. The PSIRT is based upon computer graphics' particle systems, where the reconstructing material is initially represented as composed of particles subject to a force field emanating from the beams, whose intensities are parameterized by the differences between the experimental readings of a given beam trajectory, and the values corresponding to the current amount of particles landed in this trajectory. A dynamical process is set as the beams fields of attracting forces dispute the particles. At the end, with the equilibrium established, the particles are replaced by the corresponding regions of pixels. The High Speed Gamma-ray Tomograph is a 5-source-fan-beam device with a 17-detector deck per source, capable of producing up to a thousand complete sinograms per second. Around 70.000 experimental sinograms from this tomograph were produced simulating the move of gas bubbles in different angular speeds immersed in oil within the vessel, through the use of a two-hole-polypropylene phantom. The sinogram frames were set with several different detector integration times. This article studies and compares the robustness of both ART and PSIRT methods in this heavily noisy scenario, where this noise comes not only from limitations in the dynamical sampling, but also from to the underlying apparatus that produces the counting in the tomograph. These experiments suggest that PSIRT is a more robust method than ART for noisy data. Visual inspection on the resulting images suggests that PSIRT is a more robust method than ART for noisy data, since it almost never presents globally scattered noise. (author)

  6. The robustness of two tomography reconstructing techniques with heavily noisy dynamical experimental data from a high speed gamma-ray tomograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Geovane Vitor; Melo, Silvio de Barros; Dantas, Carlos Costa; Moreira, Icaro Malta, E-mail: geovitor@bol.com.br, E-mail: sbm@cin.ufpe.br, E-mail: ccd@ufpe.br, E-mail: ivmmoreira@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Johansen, Geira; Maad, Rachid, E-mail: geiranton.johansen@ift.uib.no [University of Bergen (UIB), Bergen, OB (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    The PSIRT (Particle Systems Iterative Reconstructive Technique) is, just like the ART method, an iterative tomographic reconstruction technique with the recommended use in the reconstruction of catalytic density distribution in the refining process of oil in the FCC-type riser. The PSIRT is based upon computer graphics' particle systems, where the reconstructing material is initially represented as composed of particles subject to a force field emanating from the beams, whose intensities are parameterized by the differences between the experimental readings of a given beam trajectory, and the values corresponding to the current amount of particles landed in this trajectory. A dynamical process is set as the beams fields of attracting forces dispute the particles. At the end, with the equilibrium established, the particles are replaced by the corresponding regions of pixels. The High Speed Gamma-ray Tomograph is a 5-source-fan-beam device with a 17-detector deck per source, capable of producing up to a thousand complete sinograms per second. Around 70.000 experimental sinograms from this tomograph were produced simulating the move of gas bubbles in different angular speeds immersed in oil within the vessel, through the use of a two-hole-polypropylene phantom. The sinogram frames were set with several different detector integration times. This article studies and compares the robustness of both ART and PSIRT methods in this heavily noisy scenario, where this noise comes not only from limitations in the dynamical sampling, but also from to the underlying apparatus that produces the counting in the tomograph. These experiments suggest that PSIRT is a more robust method than ART for noisy data. Visual inspection on the resulting images suggests that PSIRT is a more robust method than ART for noisy data, since it almost never presents globally scattered noise. (author)

  7. High-performance computing and networking as tools for accurate emission computed tomography reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Formiconi, A.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); De Cristofaro, M.T.E.R. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Pupi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy); Meldolesi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica - Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Universita` di Firenze (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    It is well known that the quantitative potential of emission computed tomography (ECT) relies on the ability to compensate for resolution, attenuation and scatter effects. Reconstruction algorithms which are able to take these effects into account are highly demanding in terms of computing resources. The reported work aimed to investigate the use of a parallel high-performance computing platform for ECT reconstruction taking into account an accurate model of the acquisition of single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) data. An iterative algorithm with an accurate model of the variable system response was ported on the MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) parallel architecture of a 64-node Cray T3D massively parallel computer. The system was organized to make it easily accessible even from low-cost PC-based workstations through standard TCP/IP networking. A complete brain study of 30 (64 x 64) slices could be reconstructed from a set of 90 (64 x 64) projections with ten iterations of the conjugate gradients algorithm in 9 s, corresponding to an actual speed-up factor of 135. This work demonstrated the possibility of exploiting remote high-performance computing and networking resources from hospital sites by means of low-cost workstations using standard communication protocols without particular problems for routine use. The achievable speed-up factors allow the assessment of the clinical benefit of advanced reconstruction techniques which require a heavy computational burden for the compensation effects such as variable spatial resolution, scatter and attenuation. The possibility of using the same software on the same hardware platform with data acquired in different laboratories with various kinds of SPET instrumentation is appealing for software quality control and for the evaluation of the clinical impact of the reconstruction methods. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The use of transport and diffusion equations in the three-dimensional reconstruction of computerized tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Sandrerley Ramos, E-mail: sandrerley@eee.ufg.br [Escola de Engenharia Eletrica e de Computacao - EEEC, Universidade Federal de Goias - UFG, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Flores, Edna Lucia; Pires, Dulcineia Goncalves F.; Carrijo, Gilberto Arantes; Veiga, Antonio Claudio Paschoarelli [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica - FEELT, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia - UFU, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Barcelos, Celia Aparecida Z. [Faculdade de Matematica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia - UFU, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    The visualization of a computerized tomographic (TC) exam in 3D increases the quality of the medical diagnosis and, consequently, the success probability in the treatment. To obtain a high quality image it is necessary to obtain slices which are close to one another. Motivated towards the goal of reaching an improved balance between quantity of slices and visualization quality, this research work presents a digital inpainting technique of 3D interpolation for CT slices used in the visualization of human body structures. The inpainting is carried out via non-linear partial differential equations (PDE). The PDE's have been used, in the image-processing context to fill in the damaged regions in a digital 2D image. Inspired by this idea, this article proposes an interpolation method for the filling in of the empty regions between the CT slices. To do it, considering the high similarity between two consecutive real slice, the first step of the proposed method is to create the virtual slices. The virtual slices contain all similarity between the intercalated slices and, when there are not similarities between real slices, the virtual slices will contain indefinite portions. In the second step of the proposed method, the created virtual slices will be used together with the real slices images, in the reconstruction of the structure in three dimensions, mapped onto the exam. The proposed method is capable of reconstructing the curvatures of the patient's internal structures without using slices that are close to one another. The experiments carried out show the proposed method's efficiency. (author)

  9. Frequency-domain optical tomographic image reconstruction algorithm with the simplified spherical harmonics (SP3) light propagation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Keol; Montejo, Ludguier D; Jia, Jingfei; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2017-06-01

    We introduce here the finite volume formulation of the frequency-domain simplified spherical harmonics model with n -th order absorption coefficients (FD-SP N ) that approximates the frequency-domain equation of radiative transfer (FD-ERT). We then present the FD-SP N based reconstruction algorithm that recovers absorption and scattering coefficients in biological tissue. The FD-SP N model with 3 rd order absorption coefficient (i.e., FD-SP 3 ) is used as a forward model to solve the inverse problem. The FD-SP 3 is discretized with a node-centered finite volume scheme and solved with a restarted generalized minimum residual (GMRES) algorithm. The absorption and scattering coefficients are retrieved using a limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm. Finally, the forward and inverse algorithms are evaluated using numerical phantoms with optical properties and size that mimic small-volume tissue such as finger joints and small animals. The forward results show that the FD-SP 3 model approximates the FD-ERT (S 12 ) solution within relatively high accuracy; the average error in the phase (<3.7%) and the amplitude (<7.1%) of the partial current at the boundary are reported. From the inverse results we find that the absorption and scattering coefficient maps are more accurately reconstructed with the SP 3 model than those with the SP 1 model. Therefore, this work shows that the FD-SP 3 is an efficient model for optical tomographic imaging of small-volume media with non-diffuse properties both in terms of computational time and accuracy as it requires significantly lower CPU time than the FD-ERT (S 12 ) and also it is more accurate than the FD-SP 1 .

  10. Three dimensional reconstruction of computed tomographic images by computer graphics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, Toru; Kimura, Kazufumi.

    1986-01-01

    A three dimensional computer reconstruction system for CT images has been developed in a commonly used radionuclide data processing system using a computer graphics technique. The three dimensional model was constructed from organ surface information of CT images (slice thickness: 5 or 10 mm). Surface contours of the organs were extracted manually from a set of parallel transverse CT slices in serial order and stored in the computer memory. Interpolation was made between a set of the extracted contours by cubic spline functions, then three dimensional models were reconstructed. The three dimensional images were displayed as a wire-frame and/or solid models on the color CRT. Solid model images were obtained as follows. The organ surface constructed from contours was divided into many triangular patches. The intensity of light to each patch was calculated from the direction of incident light, eye position and the normal to the triangular patch. Firstly, this system was applied to the liver phantom. Reconstructed images of the liver phantom were coincident with the actual object. This system also has been applied to human various organs such as brain, lung, liver, etc. The anatomical organ surface was realistically viewed from any direction. The images made us more easily understand the location and configuration of organs in vivo than original CT images. Furthermore, spacial relationship among organs and/or lesions was clearly obtained by superimposition of wire-frame and/or different colored solid models. Therefore, it is expected that this system is clinically useful for evaluating the patho-morphological changes in broad perspective. (author)

  11. Tomographic reconstruction of transient acoustic fields recorded by pulsed TV holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gren, P; Schedin, S; Li, X

    1998-02-10

    Pulsed TV holography combined with computerized tomography (CT) are used to evaluate the three-dimensional distribution of transient acoustic fields in air. Experiments are performed with an electrical discharge between two electrodes as the sound source. Holograms from several directions of the acoustic field are recorded directly onto a CCD detector by use of a double-pulsed ruby laser as the light source. Phase maps, representing projections of the acoustic field, are evaluated quantitatively from the recorded holograms. The projections are used for the CT reconstruction to evaluate the pressure-field distribution in any cross section of the measured volume of air.

  12. The Research on Accuracy Evaluation Method of the Tomographic SAR Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Urban Building Based on Terrestrial LIDAR Point Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Pang, L.; Zhang, X. D.; Liu, H.

    2017-09-01

    Muti-baseLine SAR tomography can be used on 3D reconstruction of urban building based on SAR images acquired. In the near future, it is expected to become an important technical tool for urban multi-dimensional precision monitoring. For the moment There is no effective method to verify the accuracy of tomographic SAR 3D point cloud of urban buildings. In this paper, a new method based on terrestrial Lidar 3D point cloud data to verify the accuracy of the tomographic SAR 3D point cloud data is proposed, 3D point cloud of two can be segmented into different facadeds. Then facet boundary extraction is carried out one by one, to evaluate the accuracy of tomographic SAR 3D point cloud of urban buildings. The experience select data of Pangu Plaza to analyze and compare, the result of experience show that the proposed method that evaluating the accuracy of tomographic SAR 3D point clou of urban building based on lidar 3D point cloud is validity and applicability

  13. Iterative concurrent reconstruction algorithms for emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.K.; Hasegawa, B.H.; Lang, T.F.

    1994-01-01

    Direct reconstruction techniques, such as those based on filtered backprojection, are typically used for emission computed tomography (ECT), even though it has been argued that iterative reconstruction methods may produce better clinical images. The major disadvantage of iterative reconstruction algorithms, and a significant reason for their lack of clinical acceptance, is their computational burden. We outline a new class of ''concurrent'' iterative reconstruction techniques for ECT in which the reconstruction process is reorganized such that a significant fraction of the computational processing occurs concurrently with the acquisition of ECT projection data. These new algorithms use the 10-30 min required for acquisition of a typical SPECT scan to iteratively process the available projection data, significantly reducing the requirements for post-acquisition processing. These algorithms are tested on SPECT projection data from a Hoffman brain phantom acquired with a 2 x 10 5 counts in 64 views each having 64 projections. The SPECT images are reconstructed as 64 x 64 tomograms, starting with six angular views. Other angular views are added to the reconstruction process sequentially, in a manner that reflects their availability for a typical acquisition protocol. The results suggest that if T s of concurrent processing are used, the reconstruction processing time required after completion of the data acquisition can be reduced by at least 1/3 T s. (Author)

  14. Concordance Between Different Amyloid Immunoassays and Visual Amyloid Positron Emission Tomographic Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelidze, Shorena; Pannee, Josef; Mikulskis, Alvydas; Chiao, Ping; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2017-12-01

    Visual assessment of amyloid positron emission tomographic (PET) images has been approved by regulatory authorities for clinical use. Several immunoassays have been developed to measure β-amyloid (Aβ) 42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The agreement between CSF Aβ42 measures from different immunoassays and visual PET readings may influence the use of CSF biomarkers and/or amyloid PET assessment in clinical practice and trials. To determine the concordance between CSF Aβ42 levels measured using 5 different immunoassays and visual amyloid PET analysis. The study included 262 patients with mild cognitive impairment or subjective cognitive decline from the Swedish BioFINDER (Biomarkers for Identifying Neurodegenerative Disorders Early and Reliably) cohort (recruited from September 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014) who had undergone flutemetamol F 18 ([18F]flutemetamol)-labeled PET. Levels of CSF Aβ42 were analyzed using the classic INNOTEST and the newer modified INNOTEST, fully automated Lumipulse (FL), EUROIMMUN (EI), and Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) assays. Concentrations of CSF Aβ were assessed using an antibody-independent mass spectrometry-based reference measurement procedure. The concordance of CSF Aβ42 levels and Aβ42:Aβ40 and Aβ42:tau ratios with visual [18F]flutemetamol PET status. Of 262 participants (mean [SD] age, 70.9 [5.5] years), 108 were women (41.2%) and 154 were men (58.8%). The mass spectrometry-derived Aβ42 values showed higher correlations with the modified Aβ42-INNOTEST (r = 0.97), Aβ42-FL (r = 0.93), Aβ42-EI (r = 0.93), and Aβ42-MSD (r = 0.95) assays compared with the classic Aβ42-INNOTEST assay (r = 0.88; P ≤ .01). The signal in the classic Aβ42-INNOTEST assay was partly quenched by recombinant Aβ1-40 peptide. However, the classic Aβ42-INNOTEST assay showed better concordance with visual [18F]flutemetamol PET status (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC], 0.92) compared with the

  15. Fuzzy-rule-based image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Rajan, K.

    2005-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography have revolutionized the field of medicine and biology. Penalized iterative algorithms based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation eliminate noisy artifacts by utilizing available prior information in the reconstruction process but often result in a blurring effect. MAP-based algorithms fail to determine the density class in the reconstructed image and hence penalize the pixels irrespective of the density class. Reconstruction with better edge information is often difficult because prior knowledge is not taken into account. The recently introduced median-root-prior (MRP)-based algorithm preserves the edges, but a steplike streaking effect is observed in the reconstructed image, which is undesirable. A fuzzy approach is proposed for modeling the nature of interpixel interaction in order to build an artifact-free edge-preserving reconstruction. The proposed algorithm consists of two elementary steps: (1) edge detection, in which fuzzy-rule-based derivatives are used for the detection of edges in the nearest neighborhood window (which is equivalent to recognizing nearby density classes), and (2) fuzzy smoothing, in which penalization is performed only for those pixels for which no edge is detected in the nearest neighborhood. Both of these operations are carried out iteratively until the image converges. Analysis shows that the proposed fuzzy-rule-based reconstruction algorithm is capable of producing qualitatively better reconstructed images than those reconstructed by MAP and MRP algorithms. The reconstructed images are sharper, with small features being better resolved owing to the nature of the fuzzy potential function.

  16. Fuzzy-rule-based image reconstruction for positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Partha P; Rajan, K

    2005-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography have revolutionized the field of medicine and biology. Penalized iterative algorithms based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation eliminate noisy artifacts by utilizing available prior information in the reconstruction process but often result in a blurring effect. MAP-based algorithms fail to determine the density class in the reconstructed image and hence penalize the pixels irrespective of the density class. Reconstruction with better edge information is often difficult because prior knowledge is not taken into account. The recently introduced median-root-prior (MRP)-based algorithm preserves the edges, but a steplike streaking effect is observed in the reconstructed image, which is undesirable. A fuzzy approach is proposed for modeling the nature of interpixel interaction in order to build an artifact-free edge-preserving reconstruction. The proposed algorithm consists of two elementary steps: (1) edge detection, in which fuzzy-rule-based derivatives are used for the detection of edges in the nearest neighborhood window (which is equivalent to recognizing nearby density classes), and (2) fuzzy smoothing, in which penalization is performed only for those pixels for which no edge is detected in the nearest neighborhood. Both of these operations are carried out iteratively until the image converges. Analysis shows that the proposed fuzzy-rule-based reconstruction algorithm is capable of producing qualitatively better reconstructed images than those reconstructed by MAP and MR P algorithms. The reconstructed images a resharper, with small features being better resolved owing to the nature of the fuzzy potential function.

  17. Unsupervised learning of SPECT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craciunescu, T.; Constantinescu, C.

    1998-01-01

    An approach of image reconstruction from projection in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), based on an unsupervised learning artificial neural network, is reported. A kind of random sampling technique is used to generate sensory input from tomographic projections. It is proved that an adequate interpretation and representation of the synaptic strengths of the network can be used to obtain the tomographic image. A relevant numerical experiment is reported. (author)

  18. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling

  19. Exospheric and interplanetary hydrogen sensing from a translunar CubeSat platform by the Tomographic Hydrogen Emission Observatory (THEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, L.; Sample, J. G.; Doe, R.; Noto, J.; Walsh, B.; Kamalabadi, F.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Kerr, R. B.; Immel, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The evaporation of neutral hydrogen (H) atmospheres into interplanetary space is a near-ubiquitous process in the universe that can be strongly perturbed by charge exchange coupling with ambient ions, influencing atmospheric evolution as well as the dissipation of plasma energy. Space-based observation of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation scattered by H atoms is a powerful means to infer the underlying exospheric density distribution and thus unravel the competing effects of thermal and non-thermal processes on H energization and escape. Numerous past and present NASA missions have obtained measurements of terrestrial H emission at 121.6 nm (Lyman alpha) from earth-orbiting satellite platforms. However, their separate targeting of either the optically thick emission in the lower exosphere or the optically thin emission in the outer exosphere, together with their lack of independent measurement of the interplanetary emission that constitutes a significant background contamination, renders such data insufficient to advance exospheric science beyond current understanding. Here, we describe a new nano-satellite mission concept for exospheric H investigation that overcomes these historical measurement limitations. The mission, known as the Tomographic Hydrogen Emission Observatory (THEO), is designed to provide 3-D photometric measurements of terrestrial H Lyman alpha emission from a highly autonomous, three-axis-stabilized, 6U CubeSat platform along a trans-lunar trajectory that is ideal for the unambiguous estimation of H density from the exobase to the magnetopause and beyond. In particular, we will describe the feasibility of meeting operational challenges associated with satellite navigation and communication at such large distances.

  20. Tomographic reconstruction of the refractive index with hard X-rays: an efficient method based on the gradient vector-field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasilov, Sergei; Mittone, Alberto; Brun, Emmanuel; Bravin, Alberto; Grandl, Susanne; Mirone, Alessandro; Coan, Paola

    2014-03-10

    The refractive-index gradient vector field approach establishes a connection between a tomographic data set of differential phase contrast images and the distribution of the partial spatial derivatives of the refractive index in an object. The reconstruction of the refractive index in a plane requires the integration of its gradient field. This work shows how this integration can be efficiently performed by converting the problem to the Poisson equation, which can be accurately solved even in the case of noisy and large datasets. The performance of the suggested method is discussed and demonstrated experimentally by computing the refractive index distribution in both a simple plastic phantom and a complex biological sample. The quality of the reconstruction is evaluated through the direct comparison with other commonly used methods. To this end, the refractive index is retrieved from the same data set using also (1) the filtered backprojection algorithm for gradient projections, and (2) the regularized phase-retrieval procedure. Results show that the gradient vector field approach combined with the developed integration technique provides a very accurate depiction of the sample internal structure. Contrary to the two other techniques, the considered method does not require a preliminary phase-retrieval and can be implemented with any advanced computer tomography algorithm. In this work, analyzer-based phase contrast images are used for demonstration. Results, however, are generally valid and can be applied for processing differential phase-contrast tomographic data sets obtained with other phase-contrast imaging techniques.

  1. A Nonparametric Bayesian Approach For Emission Tomography Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, Eric; Dautremer, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a PET reconstruction algorithm following a nonparametric Bayesian (NPB) approach. In contrast with Expectation Maximization (EM), the proposed technique does not rely on any space discretization. Namely, the activity distribution--normalized emission intensity of the spatial poisson process--is considered as a spatial probability density and observations are the projections of random emissions whose distribution has to be estimated. This approach is nonparametric in the sense that the quantity of interest belongs to the set of probability measures on R k (for reconstruction in k-dimensions) and it is Bayesian in the sense that we define a prior directly on this spatial measure. In this context, we propose to model the nonparametric probability density as an infinite mixture of multivariate normal distributions. As a prior for this mixture we consider a Dirichlet Process Mixture (DPM) with a Normal-Inverse Wishart (NIW) model as base distribution of the Dirichlet Process. As in EM-family reconstruction, we use a data augmentation scheme where the set of hidden variables are the emission locations for each observed line of response in the continuous object space. Thanks to the data augmentation, we propose a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm (Gibbs sampler) which is able to generate draws from the posterior distribution of the spatial intensity. A difference with EM is that one step of the Gibbs sampler corresponds to the generation of emission locations while only the expected number of emissions per pixel/voxel is used in EM. Another key difference is that the estimated spatial intensity is a continuous function such that there is no need to compute a projection matrix. Finally, draws from the intensity posterior distribution allow the estimation of posterior functionnals like the variance or confidence intervals. Results are presented for simulated data based on a 2D brain phantom and compared to Bayesian MAP-EM

  2. Ionospheric-thermospheric UV tomography: 3. A multisensor technique for creating full-orbit reconstructions of atmospheric UV emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Matthew A.; Budzien, Scott A.; Dymond, Kenneth F.; Nicholas, Andrew C.; Paxton, Larry J.; Schaefer, Robert K.; Groves, Keith M.

    2017-07-01

    We present the Volume Emission Rate Tomography (VERT) technique for inverting satellite-based, multisensor limb and nadir measurements of atmospheric ultraviolet emission to create whole-orbit reconstructions of atmospheric volume emission rate. The VERT approach is more general than previous ionospheric tomography methods because it can reconstruct the volume emission rate field irrespective of the particular excitation mechanisms (e.g., radiative recombination, photoelectron impact excitation, and energetic particle precipitation in auroras); physical models are then applied to interpret the airglow. The technique was developed and tested using data from the Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager and Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager instruments aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program F-18 spacecraft and planned for use with upcoming remote sensing missions. The technique incorporates several features to optimize the tomographic solutions, such as the use of a nonnegative algorithm (Richardson-Lucy, RL) that explicitly accounts for the Poisson statistics inherent in optical measurements, capability to include extinction effects due to resonant scattering and absorption of the photons from the lines of sight, a pseudodiffusion-based regularization scheme implemented between iterations of the RL code to produce smoother solutions, and the capability to estimate error bars on the solutions. Tests using simulated atmospheric emissions verify that the technique performs well in a variety of situations, including daytime, nighttime, and even in the challenging terminator regions. Lastly, we consider ionospheric nightglow and validate reconstructions of the nighttime electron density against Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) Long-range Tracking and Identification Radar (ALTAIR) incoherent scatter radar data.

  3. Positron Emission Tomography with Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, K.

    1996-10-01

    The development of two different low-cost scanners for positron emission tomography (PET) based on 3D acquisition are presented. The first scanner consists of two rotating scintillation cameras, and produces quantitative images, which have shown to be clinically useful. The second one is a system with two opposed sets of detectors, based on the limited angle tomography principle, dedicated for mammographic studies. The development of low-cost PET scanners can increase the clinical impact of PET, which is an expensive modality, only available at a few centres world-wide and mainly used as a research tool. A 3D reconstruction method was developed that utilizes all the available data. The size of the data-sets is considerably reduced, using the single-slice rebinning approximation. The 3D reconstruction is divided into 1D axial deconvolution and 2D transaxial reconstruction, which makes it relatively fast. This method was developed for the rotating scanner, but was also implemented for multi-ring scanners with and without inter plane septa. An iterative 3D reconstruction method was developed for the limited angle scanner, based on the new concept of `mobile pixels`, which reduces the finite pixel errors and leads to an improved signal to noise ratio. 100 refs.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of smoking-related lung disease: effect of iterative reconstruction on low-dose computed tomographic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Cameron J; Krowchuk, Natasha; Alhassan, Donya; Ho, Kevin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Sin, Don D; Mayo, John R; Coxson, Harvey O

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the role that differing levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) have on the qualitative and quantitative assessment of smoking-related lung disease. Institutional board review approval was obtained. A total of 52 patients undergoing clinically indicated low-dose computed tomographic (CT) examinations of the chest (100 kVp, 65 mAs, mean radiation dose 1.0±0.12 mSv), with reconstruction of data with different levels of blended ASIR (0%, 40%, and 100%), were consented. Qualitative assessment of CT data sets was performed by 2 trained thoracic radiologists blinded to clinical history, spirometry, and quantitative data for the presence of emphysema (%/lung zone) and the degree of respiratory bronchiolitis. Quantitative analysis was performed (Apollo Image analysis, VIDA Diagnostics) to assess emphysema and airway measures of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The application of ASIR results in alterations in both qualitative and quantitative assessment of smoking-related lung disease. As levels of ASIR increased, both readers scored more respiratory bronchiolitis (Pqualitative and quantitative assessment of smoking-related lung disease. Although a powerful tool to allow dose reduction, caution must be exercised when iterative reconstruction techniques are utilized when evaluating CT examinations for findings of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  5. Tomographic reconstruction of melanin structures of optical coherence tomography via the finite-difference time-domain simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Hao; Wang, Shiang-Jiu; Tseng, Snow H.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high resolution, cross-sectional image of internal microstructure of biological tissue. We use the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method (FDTD) to analyze the data acquired by OCT, which can help us reconstruct the refractive index of the biological tissue. We calculate the refractive index tomography and try to match the simulation with the data acquired by OCT. Specifically, we try to reconstruct the structure of melanin, which has complex refractive indices and is the key component of human pigment system. The results indicate that better reconstruction can be achieved for homogenous sample, whereas the reconstruction is degraded for samples with fine structure or with complex interface. Simulation reconstruction shows structures of the Melanin that may be useful for biomedical optics applications.

  6. Facile synthesis of ( sup 11 C)buprenorphine for positron emission tomographic studies of opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lever, J.R.; Dannals, R.F.; Wagner, H.N. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA). School of Hygiene and Public Health Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA). Dept. of Radiology); Mazza, S.M. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA). School of Hygiene and Public Health); Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a simple and rapid method for the production of buprenorphine (BPN), a potent opioid partial agonist, labelled with carbon-11 at the 6-methoxy position. The procedure uses a precursor synthesized in high yield (89%) from BPN in two steps and employs ({sup 11}C)iodomethane as the radiolabelling reagent. ({sup 11}C)BPN of 97% radiochemical purity can be prepared in high specific activity (41 GBq/{mu}mol; 1120 mCi/{mu}mol) in a radiochemical yield of 10% at end-of-synthesis (not decay corrected). The ({sup 11}C)BPN is available for use in studies of cerebral opioid receptors by positron emission tomography within 24 min from end-of-bombardment, including radiosynthesis, purification, formulation for i.v. injection and determination of specific activity. (author).

  7. Electrostatic simulations of a local electrode atom probe: the dependence of tomographic reconstruction parameters on specimen and microscope geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Gault, Baptiste; Ringer, Simon P; Larson, David J; Geiser, Brian P

    2013-09-01

    We electrostatically model a local electrode atom probe microscope using the commercial software IES LORENTZ 2D v9.0 to investigate factors affecting the reconstruction parameters. We find strong dependences on the specimen geometry and voltage, and moderate dependences on the tip-aperture separation, which confirm that the current approach to atom probe reconstruction overlooks too many factors. Based on our data, which are in excellent agreement with known trends and experimental results, we derive a set of empirical relations which predict the values of the reconstruction parameters. These may be used to advance current reconstruction protocols by enabling the parameters to be adjusted as the specimen geometry changes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  9. Neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2- and 6-fluorodopamine: false neurotransmitters for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhofer, G.; Hovevey-Sion, D.; Kopin, I.J.; Miletich, R.; Kirk, K.L.; Finn, R.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2-fluorodopamine (2F-dopamine), 6-fluorodopamine (6F-dopamine) and tritium-labeled dopamine were compared in heart, submaxillary gland and spleen of rats to assess the utility of 18F-labeled 2F- or 6F-dopamine for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues. Tritiated dopamine with and without 2F- or 6F-dopamine, or tritiated 2F-dopamine alone, were injected i.v. into rats that were or were not pretreated with desipramine to block catecholamine neuronal uptake or with reserpine to block vesicular translocation of catecholamines. Tissue and plasma samples were obtained at intervals up to 1 hr after injections. At 1 hr after injection of tritiated dopamine, tritium-labeled norepinephrine, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglucol accounted for less than 2% of the tritium in plasma but up to 92% of that in tissues; tritiated norepinephrine accounted for 70% or more of the tritium in tissues. In contrast, at 1 hr after injection of tritiated 2F-dopamine, tritiated 2F-norepinephrine accounted for 30 to 46% of the tritium in tissues. Desipramine and reserpine pretreatment blocked the tissue accumulation of tritiated and fluorinated dopamine as well as their dihydroxy-metabolites, indicating that accumulation of exogenous norepinephrine and dopamine analogs was within sympathetic storage vesicles. Relative to the doses of dopamine precursors, less 2F- and 6F-norepinephrine accumulated in tissues than tritiated norepinephrine, due largely to inefficient beta-hydroxylation of fluorinated dopamine.

  10. Neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2- and 6-fluorodopamine: false neurotransmitters for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhofer, G.; Hovevey-Sion, D.; Kopin, I.J.; Miletich, R.; Kirk, K.L.; Finn, R.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2-fluorodopamine (2F-dopamine), 6-fluorodopamine (6F-dopamine) and tritium-labeled dopamine were compared in heart, submaxillary gland and spleen of rats to assess the utility of 18F-labeled 2F- or 6F-dopamine for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues. Tritiated dopamine with and without 2F- or 6F-dopamine, or tritiated 2F-dopamine alone, were injected i.v. into rats that were or were not pretreated with desipramine to block catecholamine neuronal uptake or with reserpine to block vesicular translocation of catecholamines. Tissue and plasma samples were obtained at intervals up to 1 hr after injections. At 1 hr after injection of tritiated dopamine, tritium-labeled norepinephrine, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglucol accounted for less than 2% of the tritium in plasma but up to 92% of that in tissues; tritiated norepinephrine accounted for 70% or more of the tritium in tissues. In contrast, at 1 hr after injection of tritiated 2F-dopamine, tritiated 2F-norepinephrine accounted for 30 to 46% of the tritium in tissues. Desipramine and reserpine pretreatment blocked the tissue accumulation of tritiated and fluorinated dopamine as well as their dihydroxy-metabolites, indicating that accumulation of exogenous norepinephrine and dopamine analogs was within sympathetic storage vesicles. Relative to the doses of dopamine precursors, less 2F- and 6F-norepinephrine accumulated in tissues than tritiated norepinephrine, due largely to inefficient beta-hydroxylation of fluorinated dopamine

  11. Single-photon emission computed tomographic findings and motor neuron signs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, Shin-ichi; Sobue, Gen; Higashi, Naoki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Suga, Hidemichi; Mitsuma, Terunori

    1995-01-01

    123 I-amphetamine-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed on 16 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to investigate the correlation between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and upper motor neuron signs. Significant decreased blood flow less than 2 SDs below the mean of controls was observed in the frontal lobe in 4 patients (25%) and in the frontoparietal lobe including the cortical motor area in 4 patients, respectively. The severity of extermity muscular weakness was significantly correlate with decrease in blood flow through the frontal lobe (p<0.05) and through the frontoparietal lobe (p<0.001). A significant correlation was also noted to exist between the severity of bulbar paralysis and decrease in blood flow through the frontoparietal lobe. No correlation, however, was observed between rCBF and severity of spasticity, presence or absence of Babinski's sign and the duration of illness. Although muscular weakness in the limbs and bulbar paralysis are not pure upper motor neuron signs, the observed reduction in blood flow through the frontal or frontoparietal lobes appears to reflect extensive progression of functional or organic lesions of cortical neurons including the motor area. (author)

  12. Positron emission tomographic studies using C-11-glucose in normal aging and cerebrovascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujike, Takashi; Terashi, Akiro; Soeda, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Shin; Kato, Toshiaki; Iio, Masaaki.

    1984-01-01

    Seven normal volunteers and 11 patients with cerebrovascular dementia were studied about the relations between effect of aging, severity of dementia, cerebral glucose metabolism and metabolic response to verbal stimuli by positron emission tomography (PET) using C-11-glucose. Regional distribution of glycogenic metabolites (RDGM: mg/100 g brain), which was a semi-quantitation of the pool of glycogenic metabolites mainly amino acids, were calculated. The RDGM values in elder normal subjects were significantly low compared with young normal subjects in frontal cortex (p < 0.05). The decline in frontal cortex metabolism could have been caused by the morphological changes in the course of aging. In temporal cortex, there was no significance between two groups. RDGM increased significantly respond to the verbal stimuli in frontal and temporal cortex both young and elder normal subjects. The RDGM values in vascular dementias were significantly low (p < 0.001) compared with elder normal subjects' in frontal and temporal cortex. Significant difference existed between mild and severe dementia in frontal cortex (p < 0.05). However, there was no significance between mild and severe dementias in temporal cortex. In mild dementias, RDGM increased significantly respond to the verbal stimuli in frontal and temporal cortex. In severe dementias, metabolic response to the verbal stimuli was less or lacking. Our results suggest that the cerebral metabolic functional reserve and the ability of the cerebral cortex to function respond to psychophysiologic stimulation are preserved in young and elder normal subjects and mild cerebrovascular dementias. (J.P.N.)

  13. Preclinical Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of Acute Hyperoxia Therapy of Chronic Hypoxia during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zheleznyak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to study the efficacy of the positron emission tomography (PET tracers 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG and 64Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone ([64Cu]ATSM and in monitoring placental and fetal functional response to acute hyperoxia in late-term pregnant mice subjected to experimentally induced chronic hypoxia. E15 mice were maintained at 12% inspired oxygen for 72 hours and then imaged during oxygen inhalation with either [18F]FDG to monitor nutrient transport or 64Cu-ATSM to establish the presence of hypoxia. Computed tomography (CT with contrast allowed clear visualization of both placentas and fetuses. The average ratio of fetal to placental [18F]FDG uptake was 0.45 ± 0.1 for the hypoxic animals and 0.55 ± 0.1 for the normoxic animals, demonstrating a significant decrease (p = .0002 in placental function in dams exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions. Hypoxic placentas and fetuses retained more 64Cu-ATSM compared to normoxic placentas and fetuses. Herein we report first-in-mouse PET imaging of fetuses employing both tracers [18F]FDG (metabolism and 64Cu-ATSM (hypoxia. [18F]FDG PET/CT imaging allowed clear visualization of placental-fetal structures and supported quantification of tracer uptake, making this a sensitive tool for monitoring placental function in preclinical rodent models. These measurements illustrate the potentially irreversible damage generated by chronic exposure to hypoxia, which cannot be corrected by acute exposure to hyperoxia.

  14. Pulmonary vascular permeability during the adult respiratory distress syndrome: a positron emission tomographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrino, F S; Anderson, D J; Mintun, M A; Schuster, D P

    1988-08-01

    The natural history of change in pulmonary vascular permeability (PVP) during the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated PVP by measuring the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER) for transferrin with positron emission tomography (PET) in 15 ARDS patients, including 5 patients studied within 4 days of onset and 13 patients studied at least 7 days after onset. In 3 patients, studies were performed at both early and late stages. These results were compared to 12 non-smoking adult volunteers. Regional PTCER and extravascular lung density (EVD) were determined from a 1-h PET scan after intravenous injection of gallium-68 citrate, which binds rapidly to native transferrin. Oxygenation, radiologic score, as well as outcome were recorded for each patient. Mean PTCER was highest during the early phase of ARDS (560 +/- 275 x 10(-4) min-1) although PTCER in the late ARDS patients was also significantly higher than in normals (319 +/- 187 vs 58 +/- 33 x 10(-4) min-1; p less than .01). EVD was similar in both early and late ARDS groups (.39 +/- .08 and .37 +/- .13 g/ml lung, respectively) and markedly higher than in normals (.22 +/- .05 g/ml lung, p less than 0.01). PTCER decreased in each of the 3 serial studies. The correlation between PTCER and EVD was poor, as were correlations for either PTCER or EVD versus changes in oxygenation, radiologic score, survival, or duration of ventilator dependency. In the late ARDS patients, PTCER was usually elevated even if EVD had returned to normal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Evaluation of Positron Emission Tomographic Tracers for Imaging of Papillomavirus-Induced Tumors in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Probst

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET/magnetic resonance (MR imaging was employed to evaluate the feasibility of the PET tracers 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG, 11C-choline, and 18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT to detect papillomavirus-induced tumors in an established rabbit model system. The combined PET/MR allowed the analysis of tracer uptake of the tumors using the morphologic information acquired by MR. New Zealand White rabbits were infected with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus genomes and were imaged for up to 10 months with a simultaneous PET/MR system during the course of infection. The uptake characteristics of the PET tracers 11C-choline and 18F-FLT of tumors and reference tissues were examined relative to the clinical standard, 18F-FDG. Tracer biodistribution of various organs was measured by gamma-counting after the last PET scan and compared to the in vivo PET/MR 18F-FDG uptake. Increased tracer uptake was found 2 months postinfection in primary tumors with 18F-FDG and 11C-choline, whereas 18F-FLT failed to detect the tumors at all measured time points. Our data show that the PET tracer 18F-FDG is superior for imaging papillomavirus-induced tumors in rabbits compared to 11C-choline and 18F-FLT. However, 11C-choline imaging, which has previously been applied to detect various tumor entities in patients, appears to be an alternative to 18F-FDG.

  16. Synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON): A statistical model based iterative image reconstruction method to eliminate limited-view artifacts and to mitigate the temporal-average artifacts in time-resolved CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In x-ray computed tomography (CT), a violation of the Tuy data sufficiency condition leads to limited-view artifacts. In some applications, it is desirable to use data corresponding to a narrow temporal window to reconstruct images with reduced temporal-average artifacts. However, the need to reduce temporal-average artifacts in practice may result in a violation of the Tuy condition and thus undesirable limited-view artifacts. In this paper, the authors present a new iterative reconstruction method, synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON), to eliminate limited-view artifacts using data acquired within an ultranarrow temporal window that severely violates the Tuy condition. Methods: In time-resolved contrast enhanced CT acquisitions, image contrast dynamically changes during data acquisition. Each image reconstructed from data acquired in a given temporal window represents one time frame and can be denoted as an image vector. Conventionally, each individual time frame is reconstructed independently. In this paper, all image frames are grouped into a spatial–temporal image matrix and are reconstructed together. Rather than the spatial and/or temporal smoothing regularizers commonly used in iterative image reconstruction, the nuclear norm of the spatial–temporal image matrix is used in SMART-RECON to regularize the reconstruction of all image time frames. This regularizer exploits the low-dimensional structure of the spatial–temporal image matrix to mitigate limited-view artifacts when an ultranarrow temporal window is desired in some applications to reduce temporal-average artifacts. Both numerical simulations in two dimensional image slices with known ground truth and in vivo human subject data acquired in a contrast enhanced cone beam CT exam have been used to validate the proposed SMART-RECON algorithm and to demonstrate the initial performance of the algorithm. Reconstruction errors and temporal fidelity

  17. Are restrictions to behaviour of patients required following fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic studies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin, B.; Marsden, P.K.; O'Doherty, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET) is expanding rapidly in most European countries. It is likely therefore that patients receiving the tracer fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 FDG) will be discharged to come into contact with family members, members of the public and ward staff. There are few direct measurements on which to base any recommendations with regard to radiation protection, and so we have measured the dose rates from patients undergoing clinical PET examinations in our centre. Seventy-five patients who underwent whole-body and brain 18 FDG PET examinations were studied. Dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 m from the mid thorax on leaving the department. The median administered activity was 323 MBq with a 95th percentile value of 360 MBq. The median dose rates measured at the four distances were 90.0, 35.0, 14.0 and 5.0 μSv h -1 (the median dose rates per unit administered activity at 2 h post injection were 0.31, 0.11, 0.04 and 0.02 μSv h -1 MBq -1 ). The corresponding 95th percentile values were 174.0, 69.0, 29.0 and 7.5 μSv h -1 (0.43, 0.2, 0.08 and 0.03 μSv h -1 MBq -1 ). A number of social situations were modelled and an annual dose limit of 1 mSv was used to determine whether restrictive behavioural advice was required. In the case of nursing staff on wards a value of 6 mSv was regarded as the annual limit, which translates to a daily limit of approximately 24 μSv. There is no need for restrictive advice for patients travelling by public or private transport when they leave the department 2 h after the administration of 18 FDG. Similarly, there is no need for restrictive advice with regard to their contact with partners, work colleagues or children of any age, although it should be stressed that children should not accompany the patient to the scanning department. The only possible area of concern is in an oncology ward, where patients may be regularly referred for PET investigations and other high activity

  18. Algorithm for three dimension reconstruction of magnetic resonance tomographs and X-ray images based on Fast Fourier Transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, Josiane M.; Traina, Agma Juci M.; Cruvinel, Paulo E.

    1995-01-01

    This work presents an algorithm for three-dimensional digital image reconstruction. Such algorithms based on the combination of both a Fast Fourier Transform method with Hamming Window and the use of a tri-linear interpolation function. The algorithm allows not only the generation of three-dimensional spatial spin distribution maps for Magnetic Resonance Tomography data but also X and Y-rays linear attenuation coefficient maps for CT scanners. Results demonstrates the usefulness of the algorithm in three-dimensional image reconstruction by doing first two-dimensional reconstruction and rather after interpolation. The algorithm was developed in C++ language, and there are two available versions: one under the DOS environment, and the other under the UNIX/Sun environment. (author)

  19. A single photon emission computed tomograph based on a limited dumber of detectors for fluid flow visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legoupil, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present in this work a method for fluid flow visualization in a system using radioactive tracers. The method is based on single photon emission computed tomography techniques, applied to a limited number of discrete detectors. We propose in this work a method for the estimation of the transport matrix of photons, associated to the acquisition system. This method is based on the modelization of profiles acquired for a set of point sources located in the imaged volume. Monte Carlo simulations allow to separate scattered photons from those directly collected by the system. The influence of the energy tracer is exposed. The reconstruction method is based on the maximum likelihood - expectation maximization algorithm. An experimental device, based on 36 detectors was realised for the visualization of water circulation in a vessel. A video monitoring allows to visualize the dye water tracer. Dye and radioactive tracers are injected simultaneously in a water flow circulating in the vessel. Reconstructed and video images are compared. Quantitative and qualitative analysis show that fluid flow visualization is feasible with a limited number of detectors. This method can be applied for system involving circulations of fluids. (author)

  20. The modeling of quadratic B-splines surfaces for the tomographic reconstruction in the FCC- type-riser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Geovane Vitor; Dantas, Carlos Costa; Melo, Silvio de Barros; Pires, Renan Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The 3D tomography reconstruction has been a profitable alternative in the analysis of the FCC-type- riser (Fluid Catalytic Cracking), for appropriately keeping track of the sectional catalyst concentration distribution in the process of oil refining. The method of tomography reconstruction proposed by M. Azzi and colleagues (1991) uses a relatively small amount of trajectories (from 3 to 5) and projections (from 5 to 7) of gamma rays, a desirable feature in the industrial process tomography. Compared to more popular methods, such as the FBP (Filtered Back Projection), which demands a much higher amount of gamma rays projections, the method by Azzi et al. is more appropriate for the industrial process, where the physical limitations and the cost of the process require more economical arrangements. The use of few projections and trajectories facilitates the diagnosis in the flow dynamical process. This article proposes an improvement in the basis functions introduced by Azzi et al., through the use of quadratic B-splines functions. The use of B-splines functions makes possible a smoother surface reconstruction of the density distribution, since the functions are continuous and smooth. This work describes how the modeling can be done. (author)

  1. Improving appropriate use of echocardiography and single-photon emission computed tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging: a continuous quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas V; Rose, Geoffrey A; Fenner, Deborah J; Rozario, Nigel L

    2014-07-01

    Appropriate use criteria for cardiovascular imaging have been published, but compliance in practice has been incomplete, with persistent high rates of inappropriate use. The aim of this study was to show the efficacy of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) initiative to favorably influence the appropriate use of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography and single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in a large cardiovascular practice. In this prospective study, a multiphase CQI initiative was implemented, and its impact on ordering patterns for outpatient transthoracic echocardiography and SPECT MPI was assessed. Between November and December 2010, a baseline analysis of the application of appropriate use criteria to indications for outpatient transthoracic echocardiographic studies (n = 203) and SPECT MPI studies (n = 205) was performed, with studies categorized as "appropriate," "inappropriate," "uncertain," or "unclassified." The CQI initiative was then begun, with (1) clinician education, including didactic lectures and case-based presentations with audience participation; (2) system changes in ordering processes, with redesigned image ordering forms; and (3) peer review and feedback. A follow-up analysis was then performed between June and August 2012, with categorization of indications for transthoracic echocardiographic studies (n = 206) and SPECT MPI studies (n = 206). At baseline, 73.9% of echocardiographic studies were categorized as appropriate, 16.7% as inappropriate, 5.9% as uncertain, and 3.4% as unclassified. Similarly, for SPECT MPI studies 71.7% were categorized as appropriate, 18.5% as inappropriate, 7.8% as uncertain, and 1.9% as unclassified. Separate analysis of the two most important categories, appropriate and inappropriate, demonstrated a significant improvement after the CQI initiative, with a 63% reduction in inappropriate echocardiographic studies (18.5% vs 6.9%, P = .0010) and a 46% reduction

  2. Tomographs based on non-conventional radiation sources and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbuzza, R.; Fresno, M. del; Venere, Marcelo J.; Clausse, Alejandro; Moreno, C.

    2000-01-01

    Computer techniques for tomographic reconstruction of objects X-rayed with a compact plasma focus (PF) are presented. The implemented reconstruction algorithms are based on stochastic searching of solutions of Radon equation, using Genetic Algorithms and Monte Carlo methods. Numerical experiments using actual projections were performed concluding the feasibility of the application of both methods in tomographic reconstruction problem. (author)

  3. A Test of the Transdiagnostic Dopamine Hypothesis of Psychosis Using Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging in Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Sameer; Nour, Matthew M; Veronese, Mattia; Rogdaki, Maria; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Azis, Matilda; Turkheimer, Federico; McGuire, Philip; Young, Allan H; Howes, Oliver D

    2017-12-01

    The dopamine hypothesis suggests that dopamine abnormalities underlie psychosis, irrespective of diagnosis, implicating dopamine dysregulation in bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia, in line with the research domain criteria approach. However, this hypothesis has not been directly examined in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder with psychosis. To test whether dopamine synthesis capacity is elevated in bipolar disorder with psychosis and how this compares with schizophrenia and matched controls and to examine whether dopamine synthesis capacity is associated with psychotic symptom severity, irrespective of diagnostic class. This cross-sectional case-control positron emission tomographic study was performed in the setting of first-episode psychosis services in an inner-city area (London, England). Sixty individuals participated in the study (22 with bipolar psychosis [18 antipsychotic naive or free], 16 with schizophrenia [14 antipsychotic naive or free], and 22 matched controls) and underwent fluorodihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine ([18F]-DOPA) positron emission tomography to examine dopamine synthesis capacity. Standardized clinical measures, including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning, were administered. The study dates were March 2013 to November 2016. Dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) and clinical measures (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning). The mean (SD) ages of participants were 23.6 (3.6) years in 22 individuals with bipolar psychosis (13 male), 26.3 (4.4) years in 16 individuals with schizophrenia (14 male), and 24.5 (4.5) years in controls (14 male). There was a significant group difference in striatal dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) (F2,57 = 6.80, P = .002). Kicer was significantly elevated in both the bipolar group (mean [SD], 13.18 [1.08] × 10-3 min-1; P = .002) and the schizophrenia

  4. Homotopic non-local regularized reconstruction from sparse positron emission tomography measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alexander; Liu, Chenyi; Wang, Xiao Yu; Fieguth, Paul; Bie, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography scanners collect measurements of a patient’s in vivo radiotracer distribution. The system detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (tracer), which is introduced into the body on a biologically active molecule, and the tomograms must be reconstructed from projections. The reconstruction of tomograms from the acquired PET data is an inverse problem that requires regularization. The use of tightly packed discrete detector rings, although improves signal-to-noise ratio, are often associated with high costs of positron emission tomography systems. Thus a sparse reconstruction, which would be capable of overcoming the noise effect while allowing for a reduced number of detectors, would have a great deal to offer. In this study, we introduce and investigate the potential of a homotopic non-local regularization reconstruction framework for effectively reconstructing positron emission tomograms from such sparse measurements. Results obtained using the proposed approach are compared with traditional filtered back-projection as well as expectation maximization reconstruction with total variation regularization. A new reconstruction method was developed for the purpose of improving the quality of positron emission tomography reconstruction from sparse measurements. We illustrate that promising reconstruction performance can be achieved for the proposed approach even at low sampling fractions, which allows for the use of significantly fewer detectors and have the potential to reduce scanner costs

  5. Image reconstruction for tomographic mapping of cerebral hemodynamics using time-domain detection: simulation and phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Tanikawa, Yukari; Yamada, Yukio

    2003-10-01

    One of the primary applications of diffuse optical imaging is to localize the changes in the cerebral oxygenation during physical or mental activities. Up to now, data from an optical imager is simply presented as a two-dimensional (2-D) topographic map using the modified Beer-Lambert law that assumes the homogeneous optical properties beneath each optode. Due to the highly heterogeneous nature of the optical properties in the brain, the assumption are evidently invalid, leading to both low spatial resolution and inaccurate quantification in the assessment of hemodynamic changes. To cope with the difficulties, we propose a nonlinear image reconstruction algorithm for a two-layered slab geometry using time-resolved reflected light. The algorithm is based on the previously developed generalized pulse spectrum technique, and implemented within a semi three-dimensional (3-D) framework to conform to the topographic visualization and to reduce computational load. We demonstrate the advantages of the algorithm in quantifying simulated changes in hemoglobin concentrations and investigate its robustness to the uncertainties in the cortical structure and optical properties. The methodology is also validated with experiments on a layered phantom.

  6. A method for reconstructing tomographic images of evoked neural activity with electrical impedance tomography using intracranial planar arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristovich, Kirill Y; dos Santos, Gustavo Sato; Packham, Brett C; Holder, David S

    2014-06-01

    A method is presented for reconstructing images of fast neural evoked activity in rat cerebral cortex recorded with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and a 6 × 5 mm(2) epicortical planar 30 electrode array. A finite element model of the rat brain and inverse solution with Tikhonov regularization were optimized in order to improve spatial resolution and accuracy. The optimized FEM mesh had 7 M tetrahedral elements, with finer resolution (0.05 mm) near the electrodes. A novel noise-based image processing technique based on t-test significance improved depth localization accuracy from 0.5 to 0.1 mm. With the improvements, a simulated perturbation 0.5 mm in diameter could be localized in a region 4 × 5 mm(2) under the centre of the array to a depth of 1.4 mm, thus covering all six layers of the cerebral cortex with an accuracy of brain hippocampal or thalamic activity could be localized with an accuracy of 0.5 mm with a 256 electrode array covering the brain. Parallel studies have achieved a temporal resolution of 2 ms for imaging fast neural activity by EIT during evoked activity; this encourages the view that fast neural EIT can now resolve the propagation of depolarization-related fast impedance changes in cerebral cortex and deeper in the brain with a resolution equal or greater to the dimension of a cortical column.

  7. Visual and semiquantitative analysis of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography using a partial-ring tomograph without attenuation correction to differentiate benign and malignant pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skehan, S.J.; Coates, G.; Otero, C.; O'Donovan, N.; Pelling, M.; Nahmias, C.

    2001-01-01

    Many studies have reported the use of attenuation-corrected positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET) with full-ring tomographs to differentiate between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules. We sought to evaluate FDG PET using a partial-ring tomograph without attenuation correction. A retrospective review of PET images from 77 patients (range 38-84 years of age) with proven benign or malignant pulmonary nodules was undertaken. All images were obtained using a Siemens/CTI ECAT ART tomograph, without attenuation correction, after 185 MBq 18 F-FDG was injected. Images were visually graded on a 5-point scale from 'definitely malignant' to 'definitely benign,' and lesion-to-background (LB) ratios were calculated using region of interest analysis. Visual and semiquantitative analyses were compared using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Twenty lesions were benign and 57 were malignant. The mean LB ratio for benign lesions was 1.5 (range 1.0-5.7) and for malignant lesions 5.7 (range 1.2-14.1) (p < 0.001). The area under the ROC curve for LB ratio analysis was 0.95, and for visual analysis 0.91 (p = 0.39). The optimal cut-off ratio with LB ratio analysis was 1.8, giving a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 85%. For lesions thought to be 'definitely malignant' on visual analysis, the sensitivity was 93% and the specificity 85%. Three proven infective lesions were rated as malignant by both techniques (LB ratio 2.6-5.7). FDG PET without attenuation correction is accurate for differentiating between benign and malignant lung nodules. Results using simple LB ratios without attenuation correction compare favourably with the published sensitivity and specificity for standard uptake ratios. Visual analysis is equally accurate. (author)

  8. First results of genetic algorithm application in ML image reconstruction in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik, W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper concerns application of genetic algorithm in maximum likelihood image reconstruction in emission tomography. The example of genetic algorithm for image reconstruction is presented. The genetic algorithm was based on the typical genetic scheme modified due to the nature of solved problem. The convergence of algorithm was examined. The different adaption functions, selection and crossover methods were verified. The algorithm was tested on simulated SPECT data. The obtained results of image reconstruction are discussed. (author)

  9. Relationship between lung-to-heart uptake ratio of technetium-99m-tetrofosmin during exercise myocardial single photon emission computed tomographic imaging and the number of diseased coronary arteries in patients with effort angina pectoris without myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Toshiya; Ueshima, Kenji; Nishiyama, Osamu; Ogawa, Muneyoshi; Ohuchi, Mami; Saitoh, Masahiko; Hiramori, Katsuhiko

    2004-01-01

    Increased lung uptake of thallium-201 in exercise myocardial perfusion imaging is a reliable marker of multivessel disease in patients with ischemic heart disease. This study investigated whether the lung-to-heart uptake ratio with technetium-99m ( 99m Tc)-tetrofosmin also provides valuable information to detect patients with multivessel disease. Fifty-three consecutive patients (35 men, 18 women, mean age 66±11 years; single-vessel disease: 29, double-vessel disease: 16, triple-vessel disease: 8) with stable effort angina pectoris without prior myocardial infarction and 17 control subjects (12 men, 5 women, mean age 62±9 years) underwent exercise myocardial perfusion imaging with 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and coronary angiography in January 2000 to December 2002. The lung-to-heart uptake ratio was calculated on an anterior projection before reconstruction of the exercise single photon emission computed tomographic images. The mean lung-to-heart uptake ratio was 0.34±0.04, 0.38±0.07, 0.41±0.05, and 0.46±0.09, in patients with normal coronary, single-vessel disease, double-vessel disease, and triple-vessel disease, respectively. Significantly higher lung-to-heart uptake ratio was associated with more diseased vessels (p 99m Tc-tetrofosmin can provide clinically useful information to detect multivessel disease in patients with ischemic heart disease. (author)

  10. Image reconstruction in single photon emission computed tomography for radioactive waste testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouletaut, P.

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study is to reconstruct by tomography the spatial distribution of the activity of an object which emits photons. First, an analysis of the imaging qualities of a tomograph in terms of physical parameters related to the measurement process is proposed. Then, an algorithm which evaluates, the self-attenuation of the emitted photons and corrects for the collimator aperture angle is developed; this computation corresponds to a subdivision of the object into voxels and to a parallel geometry of the projections. Two algebraic reconstruction methods have been studied; one using a regularized least-squares technique, the other using a bayesian approach. We show by computer simulations the dependence of the reconstruction on the condition number of the self-attenuation matrix and on the estimation errors of this matrix. Then, the reconstruction is tested on experimental data; the images we reconstruct on a square grid of ten by ten voxels from one hundred twenty measurements show an accurate location of the sources; their activities are efficiently estimated when the collimator aperture angle is well taken into account in the self-attenuation matrix

  11. Myocardial infarction in rats: High-resolution single-photon emission tomographic imaging with a pinhole collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukihiro, Masashi; Inoue, Tomio; Iwasaki, Tsutomu; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi; Erlandsson, K.; Endo, Keigo

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of myocardial imaging by means of high-resolution single-photon emission tomography (SPET) with a pinhole collimator in rats with experimental infarction. Myocardial infarctions were induced in male Wistar rats by ligation of the left coronary artery for 30 min, followed by reperfusion. Two days after the reperfusion, pinhole SPET was performed after the intravenous administration of 111 MBq of thallium-201 chloride, using a rotating gamma camera equipped with a pinhole insert (2.0-mm aperature) in a low-energy pinhole collimator. SPET projection data were collected at 6 increments over 360 using a 4-cm radius of rotation to reconstruct the short- and long-axis images. Projection data were acquired in 15 or 30 s, the SPET imaging being accomplished within 40 min after the injection of 201 Tl. After SPET, the rats were sacrificed to remove the hearts for autoradiography (ARG) and nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) staining as a visual correlative study. Quantitative correlative studies between pinhole SPET and ARG were performed with linear regression analysis for infarct size and distribution properties (relative counts on SPET images and relative density on autoradiographs) on the short-axis sections. All infarcts (4 mm in minimum diameter) in seven rats were detected by pinhole SPET. The SPET images in rats with or without myocardial infarction were consistent within the findings of ARG and NBT staining. There were significant correlations between pinhole SPET and ARG with respect to the infarct size (r=0.933, P<0.001; n=15) and the relative radiotracer distribution (r=0.931, P<0.001; n=68). This study therefore confirmed the accuracy of myocardial pinhole SPET imaging in rats with myocardial infarction. This method may partially substitute for ARG and prove useful for assessing new myocardial imaging agents in vivo in small laboratory animals. (orig.)

  12. Tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Tomographic images of an object or scene are produced by an analysis of two or more stereographic images of the scene including shifting one image laterally with respect to another and logically summing the image data sets. Several image processing, edge enhancement and edge extraction algorithms may be applied to the images in digitised video data form to provide wire-frame or skeleton type representations of each of the original images. Tomographic images of planes not parallel with the image plane (or normal to the camera axes) may be produced by changing the magnification of one image prior to logical summing. The images may be generated by three video cameras arranged on two orthogonal axes for elimination of spurious coincidences. The images are preferably produced using X-rays. (author)

  13. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczyński, L.; Moskal, P.; Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Molenda, M.; Moskal, I.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Sharma, N. G.; Silarski, M.; Słomski, A.; Smyrski, J.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Zieliński, M.; Zoń, N.

    2014-11-01

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511 keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps (σ).

  14. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raczyński, L.; Moskal, P.; Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Molenda, M.; Moskal, I.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511 keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps (σ)

  15. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raczyński, L., E-mail: lech.raczynski@ncbj.gov.pl [Świerk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Moskal, P. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W. [Świerk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock-Świerk (Poland); Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Kapłon, Ł. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science of Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland); Kochanowski, A. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Molenda, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Moskal, I.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); and others

    2014-11-11

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511 keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps (σ)

  16. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  17. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  18. Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography at 80 kVp and Knowledge-Based Iterative Model Reconstruction Is Non-Inferior to that at 100 kVp with Iterative Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joohee Lee

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to compare the image noise and quality of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA at 80 kVp with knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR to those of CCTA at 100 kVp with hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR, and to evaluate the feasibility of a low-dose radiation protocol with IMR. Thirty subjects who underwent prospective electrocardiogram-gating CCTA at 80 kVp, 150 mAs, and IMR (Group A, and 30 subjects with 100 kVp, 150 mAs, and hybrid IR (Group B were retrospectively enrolled after sample-size calculation. A BMI of less than 25 kg/m2 was required for inclusion. The attenuation value and image noise of CCTA were measured and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR were calculated at the proximal right coronary artery and left main coronary artery. The image noise was analyzed using a non-inferiority test. The CCTA images were qualitatively evaluated using a four-point scale. The radiation dose was significantly lower in Group A than Group B (0.69 ± 0.08 mSv vs. 1.39 ± 0.15 mSv, p < 0.001. The attenuation values were higher in Group A than Group B (p < 0.001. The SNR and CNR in Group A were higher than those of Group B. The image noise of Group A was non-inferior to that of Group B. Qualitative image quality of Group A was better than that of Group B (3.6 vs. 3.4, p = 0.017. CCTA at 80 kVp with IMR could reduce the radiation dose by about 50%, with non-inferior image noise and image quality than those of CCTA at 100 kVp with hybrid IR.

  19. Tomographic visualization of stress corrosion cracks in tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.A.; Kruger, R.P.; Wecksung, G.W.

    1979-06-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine the possibility of detecting and sizing cracks in reactor cooling water tubes using tomographic techniques. Due to time and financial constraints, only one tomographic reconstruction using the best technique available was made. The results indicate that tomographic reconstructions can, in fact, detect cracks in the tubing and might possibly be capable of measuring the depth of the cracks. Limits of detectability and sensitivity have not been determined but should be investigated in any future work

  20. Introduction to 2D and 3D tomographic methods based on straight line propagation: X-ray, emission and ultrasonic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrin, F.; Magnin, I.; Garnero, L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the basic principles of computerized tomography (CT), and its evolution towards three dimensional (3D) imaging. Since the modeling of CT reconstruction relies on the Radon transform, its definition and major properties are first recalled. After a brief summary on conventional 2D methods, we present the imaging principles for two modalities appropriated to this modeling: X-Ray and emission tomography. We describe the evolution of the instrumentation for these two techniques, and emphasize the approximations introduced by a modeling using the Radon transform taking into account the physics of the problem. We also describe the principles of ultrasonic tomography systems, and their major differences with the two previous techniques. At last, we formulate the general problematic of 3D image reconstruction from 2D projections. We consider four classes of reconstruction methods corresponding to the classification to the classification chosen for the synthetic presentation of methods, accompanying this paper. (authors)

  1. Statistical image reconstruction methods for simultaneous emission/transmission PET scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogan, H.; Fessler, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Transmission scans are necessary for estimating the attenuation correction factors (ACFs) to yield quantitatively accurate PET emission images. To reduce the total scan time, post-injection transmission scans have been proposed in which one can simultaneously acquire emission and transmission data using rod sources and sinogram windowing. However, since the post-injection transmission scans are corrupted by emission coincidences, accurate correction for attenuation becomes more challenging. Conventional methods (emission subtraction) for ACF computation from post-injection scans are suboptimal and require relatively long scan times. We introduce statistical methods based on penalized-likelihood objectives to compute ACFs and then use them to reconstruct lower noise PET emission images from simultaneous transmission/emission scans. Simulations show the efficacy of the proposed methods. These methods improve image quality and SNR of the estimates as compared to conventional methods

  2. An introduction to emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report includes salient features of the theory and an examination of practical considerations for someone who is using or introducing tomography, selecting equipment for it or wishing to develop a clinical application. Emphasis is on gamma camera tomography. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: emission computed and gamma camera tomography and the relationship to other medical imaging techniques, the tomographic reconstruction technique theory, rotating gamma camera tomography, attenuation correction and quantitative reconstruction, other single photon tomographic techniques, positron tomography, image display, clinical application of single photon and positron tomography, and commercial systems for SPECT. Substantial bibliography. (U.K.)

  3. Computer Reconstruction of Plant Growth and Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emission in Three Spatial Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Olejníčková, Julie; Tesař, Radek; Šebela, David; Nedbal, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    Plant leaves grow and change their orientation as well their emission of chlorophyll fluorescence in time. All these dynamic plant properties can be semi-automatically monitored by a 3D imaging system that generates plant models by the method of coded light illumination, fluorescence imaging and computer 3D reconstruction. Here, we describe the essentials of the method, as well as the system hardware. We show that the technique can reconstruct, with a high fidelity, the leaf size, the leaf angle and the plant height. The method fails with wilted plants when leaves overlap obscuring their true area. This effect, naturally, also interferes when the method is applied to measure plant growth under water stress. The method is, however, very potent in capturing the plant dynamics under mild stress and without stress. The 3D reconstruction is also highly effective in correcting geometrical factors that distort measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence emission of naturally positioned plant leaves. PMID:22368511

  4. Tomographic capabilities of the new GEM based SXR diagnostic of WEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, A.; Mazon, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Mlynar, J.; Loffelmann, V.; Imrisek, M.; Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Kasprowicz, G.; Wojenski, A.; Bourdelle, C.; Malard, P.

    2016-07-01

    The tokamak WEST (Tungsten Environment in Steady-State Tokamak) will start operating by the end of 2016 as a test bed for the ITER divertor components in long pulse operation. In this context, radiative cooling of heavy impurities like tungsten (W) in the Soft X-ray (SXR) range [0.1 keV; 20 keV] is a critical issue for the plasma core performances. Thus reliable tools are required to monitor the local impurity density and avoid W accumulation. The WEST SXR diagnostic will be equipped with two new GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) based poloidal cameras allowing to perform 2D tomographic reconstructions in tunable energy bands. In this paper tomographic capabilities of the Minimum Fisher Information (MFI) algorithm developed for Tore Supra and upgraded for WEST are investigated, in particular through a set of emissivity phantoms and the standard WEST scenario including reconstruction errors, influence of noise as well as computational time.

  5. 99mTc-DMSA renal uptake in urological diseases measured from renal tomographic images using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Yukihiko; Tashiro, Kazuya; Kishimoto, Koichi; Wada, Tetsuro; Torii, Shinichiro; Yoshigoe, Fukuo; Machida, Toyohei; Yamada, Hideo; Toyama, Hinako.

    1987-01-01

    To determine renal function, 99m Tc-DMSA renal uptake was measured from renal tomographic images obtained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A total of 77 tests was conducted on 73 patients with various diseases in the kidneys and urinary tract to determine renal uptake. The correlation coefficient(r) between total renal volume and total renal uptake was 0.3509 and that between renal volume and uptake of 143 kidneys was 0.5433. In 62 patients whose creatinine clearance could be measured, the correlation coefficient between creatinine clearance and total renal volume was 0.2352, and that between creatinine clearance and total renal uptake was 0.8854, that is, creatinine clearance correlated well with renal uptake. Renal volume and uptake determined in 10 normal male and 10 normal female adults were 220 ml and 26.8 % for the right kidney and 239 ml and 27.6 % for the left kidney for the males and 206 ml and 26.4 % (right) and 237 ml and 27.9 % (left) for the females. This method, which requires no blood or urine collection, is very useful as an individual kidney function test to evaluate individual kidney function and to understand kidney function before and after operation in patients with renal and urinary diseases. (author)

  6. Tomographic examination table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redington, R.W.; Henkes, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Equipment is described for positioning and supporting patients during tomographic mammography using X-rays. The equipment consists of a table and fabric slings which permit the examination of a downward, pendant breast of a prone patient by allowing the breast to pass through a aperture in the table into a fluid filled container. The fluid has an X-ray absorption coefficient similar to that of soft human tissue allowing high density resolution radiography and permitting accurate detection of breast tumours. The shape of the equipment and the positioning of the patient allow the detector and X-ray source to rotate 360 0 about a vertical axis through the breast. This permits the use of relatively simple image reconstruction algorithms and a divergent X-ray geometry. (UK)

  7. LERFCM: a computer code for spatial reconstruction of volume emission from chord measurements in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, A.P.; Pare, V.K.; Dunlap, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Local Emissivity Reconstruction from Chord Measurements (LERFCM) is a package of computer programs used to determine the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the emission intensity of radiation in a plasma from line integral data, which represents signals from arrays of collimated detectors looking through the plasma along different chords in a plane. The method requires data from only a few detector arrays and assumes that the emission distribution in the plane of observation has a smooth angular dependence that can be represented by a few low-order harmonics. The intended application is a reconstruction of plasma shape and MHD instabilities, using data from arrays of soft x-ray detectors on Impurity Study Experiment Tokamak

  8. Interictal "patchy" regional cerebral blood flow patterns in migraine patients. A single photon emission computerized tomographic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1994-01-01

    In 92 migraine patients and 44 healthy control subjects we recorded regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with single photon emission computerized tomography and (133) Xe inhalation or with i.v. (99m) Tc-HMPAO. Migraine patients were studied interictally. A quantitated analysis of right-left asymme......In 92 migraine patients and 44 healthy control subjects we recorded regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with single photon emission computerized tomography and (133) Xe inhalation or with i.v. (99m) Tc-HMPAO. Migraine patients were studied interictally. A quantitated analysis of right...... rCBF images is insufficient to pick up abnormalities; (2) almost 50% of the migraine sufferers had abnormal rCBF/asymmetries. However, these are discrete compared with those typically seen during the aura phase of a migraine attack. One explanation to the patchy rCBF patterns might...

  9. Tomographic intensity mapping versus galaxy surveys: observing the Universe in H α emission with new generation instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, B. Marta; Zaroubi, Saleem; Kooistra, Robin; Cooray, Asantha

    2018-04-01

    The H α line emission is an important probe for a number of fundamental quantities in galaxies, including their number density, star formation rate (SFR), and overall gas content. A new generation of low-resolution intensity mapping (IM) probes, e.g. SPHEREx and CDIM, will observe galaxies in H α emission over a large fraction of the sky from the local Universe till a redshift of z ˜ 6 - 10, respectively. This will also be the target line for observations by the high-resolution Euclid and WFIRST instruments in the z ˜ 0.7-2 redshift range. In this paper, we estimate the intensity and power spectra of the H α line in the z ˜ 0-5 redshift range using observed line luminosity functions (LFs), when possible, and simulations, otherwise. We estimate the significance of our predictions by accounting for the modelling uncertainties (e.g. SFR, extinction, etc.) and observational contamination. We find that IM surveys can make a statistical detection of the full H α emission between z ˜ 0.8 and 5. Moreover, we find that the high-frequency resolution and the sensitivity of the planned CDIM surveys allow for the separation of H α emission from several interloping lines. We explore ways to use the combination of these line intensities to probe galaxy properties. As expected, our study indicates that galaxy surveys will only detect bright galaxies that contribute up to a few per cent of the overall H α intensity. However, these surveys will provide important constraints on the high end of the H α LF and put strong constraints on the active galactic nucleus LF.

  10. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, April 15, 1992--October 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  11. Iodine-123 N-methyl-4-iododexetimide: a new radioligand for single-photon emission tomographic imaging of myocardial muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Kassiou, M.; Eu, P.; Katsifis, A.G.; Garra, M.; Power, J.; Najdovski, L.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Cardiac muscarinic receptor ligands suitable for positron emission tomography have previously been characterised. Attempts to develop radioligands of these receptors suitable for single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) imaging have not been successful due to high lung retention and high non-specific binding of previously investigated potential tracers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution and in vivo imaging characteristics of a new radiopharmaceutical, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide. Biodistribution studies performed in rats showed high cardiac uptake (2.4% ID/g) 10 min after injection with a heart to lung activity ratio of 5:1. Specificity and stereoselectivity of cardiac binding were demonstrated using blocking experiments in rats. Dynamic imaging studies in anaesthetised greyhounds demonstrated rapid and high myocardial uptake and low lung binding with stable heart to lung activity ratios of >2.5:1 between 10 and 30 min, making SPET imaging feasible. Administration of an excess of an unlabelled muscarinic antagonist, methyl-quinuclidinyl benzylate rapidly displaced myocardial activity to background levels and the pharmacologically inactive enantiomer, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iodolevetimide, had no detectable cardiac uptake, indicating specific and stereoselective muscarinic receptor binding. SPET revealed higher activity in the inferior than in the anterior wall, this being consistent with previously described regional variation of cardiac parasympathetic innervation. [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide shows promise as an imaging agent for muscarinic receptor distribution in the heart and may be helpful in evaluating diverse cardiac diseases associated with altered muscarinic receptor function, including heart failure and diabetic heart disease. (orig.)

  12. 40 CFR Table 2a to Subpart Zzzz of... - Emission Limitations for New and Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... with the following emission limitations for new and reconstructed lean burn and new and reconstructed... commenced construction or reconstruction between December 19, 2002 and June 15, 2004, you may limit...

  13. Theoretical evaluation of the detectability of random lesions in bayesian emission reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi

    2003-01-01

    Detecting cancerous lesion is an important task in positron emission tomography (PET). Bayesian methods based on the maximum a posteriori principle (also called penalized maximum likelihood methods) have been developed to deal with the low signal to noise ratio in the emission data. Similar to the filter cut-off frequency in the filtered backprojection method, the prior parameters in Bayesian reconstruction control the resolution and noise trade-off and hence affect detectability of lesions in reconstructed images. Bayesian reconstructions are difficult to analyze because the resolution and noise properties are nonlinear and object-dependent. Most research has been based on Monte Carlo simulations, which are very time consuming. Building on the recent progress on the theoretical analysis of image properties of statistical reconstructions and the development of numerical observers, here we develop a theoretical approach for fast computation of lesion detectability in Bayesian reconstruction. The results can be used to choose the optimum hyperparameter for the maximum lesion detectability. New in this work is the use of theoretical expressions that explicitly model the statistical variation of the lesion and background without assuming that the object variation is (locally) stationary. The theoretical results are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. The comparisons show good agreement between the theoretical predications and the Monte Carlo results

  14. A new iterative reconstruction technique for attenuation correction in high-resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knesaurek, K.; Machac, J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Buchsbaum, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    A new interative reconstruction technique (NIRT) for positron emission computed tomography (PET), which uses transmission data for nonuniform attenuation correction, is described. Utilizing the general inverse problem theory, a cost functional which includes a noise term was derived. The cost functional was minimized using a weighted-least-square maximum a posteriori conjugate gradient (CG) method. The procedure involves a change in the Hessian of the cost function by adding an additional term. Two phantoms were used in a real data acquisition. The first was a cylinder phantom filled with uniformly distributed activity of 74 MBq of fluorine-18. Two different inserts were placed in the phantom. The second was a Hoffman brain phantom filled with uniformly distributed activity of 7.4 MBq of 18 F. Resulting reconstructed images were used to test and compare a new interative reconstruction technique with a standard filtered backprojection (FBP) method. The results confirmed that NIRT, based on the conjugate gradient method, converges rapidly and provides good reconstructed images. In comaprison with standard results obtained by the FBP method, the images reconstructed by NIRT showed better noise properties. The noise was measured as rms% noise and was less, by a factor of 1.75, in images reconstructed by NIRT than in the same images reconstructed by FBP. The distance between the Hoffman brain slice created from the MRI image was 0.526, while the same distance for the Hoffman brain slice reconstructed by NIRT was 0.328. The NIRT method suppressed the propagation of the noise without visible loss of resolution in the reconstructed PET images. (orig.)

  15. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain capillary permeability following high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: a positron emission tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, P.C.; Dhawan, V.; Strother, S.C.; Sidtis, J.J.; Evans, A.C.; Allen, J.C.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rate constants and blood-to-brain transport of rubidium were estimated using positron emission tomography in an adolescent patient with a brain tumor, before and after chemotherapy with intravenous high-dose methotrexate. Widespread depression of cerebral glucose metabolism was apparent 24 hours after drug administration, which may reflect reduced glucose phosphorylation, and the influx rate constant for /sup 82/Rb was increased, indicating a drug-induced alteration in blood-brain barrier function. Associated changes in neuropsychological performance, electroencephalogram, and plasma amino acid concentration were identified in the absence of evidence of systemic methotrexate toxicity, suggesting primary methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  16. Image reconstruction using three-dimensional compound Gauss-Markov random field in emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shuichi; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Saito, Tsuneo

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new reconstruction algorithm based on MAP (maximum a posteriori probability) estimation principle for emission tomography. To improve noise suppression properties of the conventional ML-EM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) algorithm, direct three-dimensional reconstruction that utilizes intensity correlations between adjacent transaxial slices is introduced. Moreover, to avoid oversmoothing of edges, a priori knowledge of RI (radioisotope) distribution is represented by using a doubly-stochastic image model called the compound Gauss-Markov random field. The a posteriori probability is maximized by using the iterative GEM (generalized EM) algorithm. Computer simulation results are shown to demonstrate validity of the proposed algorithm. (author)

  17. Positron emission tomography/computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging in a murine model of progressive atherosclerosis using (64)Cu-labeled glycoprotein VI-Fc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Boris; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Andia, Marcelo E; Cooper, Margaret S; Schuster, Andreas; Schönberger, Tanja; Griessinger, Christoph M; Wurster, Thomas; Onthank, David; Ungerer, Martin; Gawaz, Meinrad; Nagel, Eike; Botnar, Rene M

    2013-11-01

    Plaque erosion leads to exposure of subendothelial collagen, which may be targeted by glycoprotein VI (GPVI). We aimed to detect plaque erosion using (64)Cu-labeled GPVI-Fc (fragment crystallized). Four-week-old male apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice (n=6) were fed a high-fat diet for 12 weeks. C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice served as controls (n=6). Another group of WT mice received a ligation injury of the left carotid artery (n=6) or sham procedure (n=4). All mice received a total activity of ≈12 MBq (64)Cu-GPVI-Fc by tail vein injection followed by delayed (24 hours) positron emission tomography using a NanoPET/computed tomographic scanner (Mediso, Hungary; Bioscan, USA) with an acquisition time of 1800 seconds. Seventy-two hours after positron emission tomography/computed tomography, all mice were scanned 2 hours after intravenous administration of 0.2 mmol/kg body weight of a gadolinium-based elastin-specific MR contrast agent. MRI was performed on a 3-T clinical scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands). In ApoE(-/-) mice, the (64)Cu-GPVI-Fc uptake in the aortic arch was significantly higher compared with WT mice (ApoE(-/-): 13.2±1.5 Bq/cm(3) versus WT mice: 5.1±0.5 Bq/cm(3); P=0.028). (64)Cu-GPVI-Fc uptake was also higher in the injured left carotid artery wall compared with the intact right carotid artery of WT mice and as a trend compared with sham procedure (injured: 20.7±1.3 Bq/cm(3) versus intact: 2.3±0.5 Bq/cm(3); P=0.028 versus sham: 12.7±1.7 Bq/cm(3); P=0.068). Results were confirmed by ex vivo histology and in vivo MRI with elastin-specific MR contrast agent that measures plaque burden and vessel wall remodeling. Higher R1 relaxation rates were found in the injured carotid wall with a T1 mapping sequence (injured: 1.44±0.08 s(-1) versus intact: 0.91±0.02 s(-1); P=0.028 versus sham: 0.97±0.05 s(-1); P=0.068) and in the aortic arch of ApoE(-/-) mice compared with WT mice (ApoE(-/-): 1.49±0.05 s(-1) versus WT: 0.92±0.04 s

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  19. A positron emission tomograph based on LSO-APD modules with a sampling ADC read-out system for a students' advanced laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Florian R; Mann, Alexander B; Konorov, Igor; Delso, Gaspar; Paul, Stephan; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2012-06-01

    A one-day laboratory course on positron emission tomography (PET) for the education of physics students and PhD students in medical physics has been set up. In the course, the physical background and the principles of a PET scanner are introduced. Course attendees set the system in operation, calibrate it using a (22)Na point source and reconstruct different source geometries filled with (18)F. The PET scanner features an individual channel read-out of 96 lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator crystals coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APD). The analog data of each APD are digitized by fast sampling analog to digital converters (SADC) and processed within field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) to extract amplitudes and time stamps. All SADCs are continuously sampling with a precise rate of 80MHz, which is synchronous for the whole system. The data is transmitted via USB to a Linux PC, where further processing and the image reconstruction are performed. The course attendees get an insight into detector techniques, modern read-out electronics, data acquisition and PET image reconstruction. In addition, a short introduction to some common software applications used in particle and high energy physics is part of the course. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Evaluation of reconstruction errors and identification of artefacts for JET gamma and neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunescu, Teddy, E-mail: teddy.craciunescu@jet.uk; Tiseanu, Ion; Zoita, Vasile [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Murari, Andrea [Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy); Kiptily, Vasily; Sharapov, Sergei [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lupelli, Ivan [CCFE Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Roma (Italy); Fernandes, Ana [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    The Joint European Torus (JET) neutron profile monitor ensures 2D coverage of the gamma and neutron emissive region that enables tomographic reconstruction. Due to the availability of only two projection angles and to the coarse sampling, tomographic inversion is a limited data set problem. Several techniques have been developed for tomographic reconstruction of the 2-D gamma and neutron emissivity on JET, but the problem of evaluating the errors associated with the reconstructed emissivity profile is still open. The reconstruction technique based on the maximum likelihood principle, that proved already to be a powerful tool for JET tomography, has been used to develop a method for the numerical evaluation of the statistical properties of the uncertainties in gamma and neutron emissivity reconstructions. The image covariance calculation takes into account the additional techniques introduced in the reconstruction process for tackling with the limited data set (projection resampling, smoothness regularization depending on magnetic field). The method has been validated by numerically simulations and applied to JET data. Different sources of artefacts that may significantly influence the quality of reconstructions and the accuracy of variance calculation have been identified.

  1. Radioiodinated diacylglycerol analogue: a potential imaging agent for single-photon emission tomographic investigations of cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohmori, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Imahori, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Ueda, S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, R. [Nishijin Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Wakita, K. [Nishijin Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Inoue, M. [Daiichi Radioisotope Laboratories, Chiba (Japan); Tazawa, S. [Daiichi Radioisotope Laboratories, Chiba (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is closely related to membrane perturbation in cerebral ischaemia. We investigated in vivo topographical lipid metabolism using an iodine-123-labelled diacylglycerol analogue, (1-(15-(4-iodine-123-iodophenyl)-pentadecanoyl)-2-stearoyl-rac-glycerol) ({sup 123}I-labelled DAG), in a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model with the aim of positive imaging of ischaemic insult. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent coagulation of the MCA to induce permanent occlusion. MCA occlusion times prior to injection of {sup 123}I-labelled DAG ranged from 15 min to 14 days. Each rat was injected with 11-37 MBq of {sup 123}I-labelled DAG. After 30 min, in vivo autoradiographs were reconstructed. Scanning of the living rat brain in this MCA occlusion model was performed. Cerebral infarctions were recognized in the frontal cortex, the parietal cortex and the lateral portion of the caudate-putamen by 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium hydrochloride staining. In infarcted regions (region 1), {sup 123}I-labelled DAG incorporation showed a decrease up to 12 h; it then increased up to 6 days and decreased thereafter. In peri-infarcted regions (region 2), the incorporation showed almost no change up to 12 h, then increased up to 5-6 days and decreased thereafter. In other regions (region 3), the incorporation showed no change. Lipid analysis showed that {sup 123}I-labelled DAG was metabolized to 15-(4-iodine-123-iodophenyl)-pentadecanoic acid by DAG lipase and to {sup 123}I-labelled phosphatidylcholine. Scanning of the ischaemic region showed higher accumulation than on the non-lesioned side. We established a method to visualize ischaemic foci as positive images. The early changes in {sup 123}I-labelled DAG incorporation were related to DAG lipase, which degraded the accumulated intrinsic DAG, and increased {sup 123}I-labelled DAG incorporation in the chronic stage involves several aspects of neural destruction in the process of autolysis.

  2. Sparse representation and dictionary learning penalized image reconstruction for positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuhang; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-21

    Accurate and robust reconstruction of the radioactivity concentration is of great importance in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Given the Poisson nature of photo-counting measurements, we present a reconstruction framework that integrates sparsity penalty on a dictionary into a maximum likelihood estimator. Patch-sparsity on a dictionary provides the regularization for our effort, and iterative procedures are used to solve the maximum likelihood function formulated on Poisson statistics. Specifically, in our formulation, a dictionary could be trained on CT images, to provide intrinsic anatomical structures for the reconstructed images, or adaptively learned from the noisy measurements of PET. Accuracy of the strategy with very promising application results from Monte-Carlo simulations, and real data are demonstrated.

  3. Sparse representation and dictionary learning penalized image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuhang; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and robust reconstruction of the radioactivity concentration is of great importance in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Given the Poisson nature of photo-counting measurements, we present a reconstruction framework that integrates sparsity penalty on a dictionary into a maximum likelihood estimator. Patch-sparsity on a dictionary provides the regularization for our effort, and iterative procedures are used to solve the maximum likelihood function formulated on Poisson statistics. Specifically, in our formulation, a dictionary could be trained on CT images, to provide intrinsic anatomical structures for the reconstructed images, or adaptively learned from the noisy measurements of PET. Accuracy of the strategy with very promising application results from Monte-Carlo simulations, and real data are demonstrated.

  4. Tomographic-spectral approach for dark matter detection in the cross-correlation between cosmic shear and diffuse γ-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camera, S.; Fornasa, M.; Fornengo, N.; Regis, M.

    2015-01-01

    We recently proposed to cross-correlate the diffuse extragalactic γ-ray background with the gravitational lensing signal of cosmic shear. This represents a novel and promising strategy to search for annihilating or decaying particle dark matter (DM) candidates. In the present work, we demonstrate the potential of a tomographic-spectral approach: measuring the cross-correlation in separate bins of redshift and energy significantly improves the sensitivity to a DM signal. Indeed, the technique proposed here takes advantage of the different scaling of the astrophysical and DM components with redshift and, simultaneously of their different energy spectra and different angular extensions. The sensitivity to a particle DM signal is extremely promising even when the DM-induced emission is quite faint. We first quantify the prospects of detecting DM by cross-correlating the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) diffuse γ-ray background with the cosmic shear expected from the Dark Energy Survey. Under the hypothesis of a significant subhalo boost, such a measurement can deliver a 5σ detection of DM, if the DM particle is lighter than 300 GeV and has a thermal annihilation rate. We then forecast the capability of the European Space Agency Euclid satellite (whose launch is planned for 2020), in combination with an hypothetical future γ-ray detector with slightly improved specifications compared to current telescopes. We predict that the cross-correlation of their data will allow a measurement of the DM mass with an uncertainty of a factor of 1.5–2, even for moderate subhalo boosts, for DM masses up to few hundreds of GeV and thermal annihilation rates

  5. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with whole-body computed tomographic angiography in critically ill patients with suspected severe sepsis with no definite diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandry, Damien [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Tatopoulos, Alexis; Lemarie, Jeremie; Bollaert, Pierre-Edouard; Gibot, Sebastien [University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); CHU de Nancy - Hopital Central, Service de Reanimation Medicale, Nancy (France); INSERM, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); Chevalier-Mathias, Elodie [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); INSERM, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep, Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Roch, Veronique [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep, Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Olivier, Pierre [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep, Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU Nancy, Pole d' imagerie, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep, Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France)

    2014-10-15

    Timely identification of septic foci is critical in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock of unknown origin. This prospective pilot study aimed to assess {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), combined with whole-body computed tomographic angiography (CTA), in patients with suspected severe sepsis and for whom the prior diagnostic workup had been inconclusive. Patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit with a suspected severe sepsis but no definite diagnosis after 48 h of extensive investigations were prospectively included and referred for a whole body FDG-PET/CTA. Results from FDG-PET/CTA were assessed according to the final diagnosis obtained after follow-up and additional diagnostic workup. Seventeen patients were prospectively included, all on mechanical ventilation and 14 under vasopressor drugs. The FDG-PET/CTA exam 1) was responsible for only one desaturation and one hypotension, both quickly reversible under treatment; 2) led to suspect 16 infectious sites among which 13 (81 %) could be confirmed by further diagnostic procedures; and 3) triggered beneficial changes in the medical management of 12 of the 17 study patients (71 %). The FDG-PET/CTA images showed a single or predominant infectious focus in two cases where CTA was negative and in three cases where CTA exhibited multiple possible foci. Whole-body FDG-PET/CTA appears to be feasible, relatively safe, and provides reliable and useful information, when prospectively planned in patients with suspected severe sepsis and for whom prior diagnostic workup had been inconclusive. The FDG-PET images are particularly helpful when CTA exhibits no or multiple possible sites. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of Amino Acid Positron Emission Tomographic Radiotracers for Molecular Imaging of Primary and Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Juhász

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an imaging technology that can detect and characterize tumors based on their molecular and biochemical properties, such as altered glucose, nucleoside, or amino acid metabolism. PET plays a significant role in the diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment of various cancers, including brain tumors. In this article, we compare uptake mechanisms and the clinical performance of the amino acid PET radiotracers (L-[methyl-11C]methionine [MET], 18F-fluoroethyl-tyrosine [FET], 18F-fluoro-L- dihydroxy-phenylalanine [FDOPA], and 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan [AMT] most commonly used for brain tumor imaging. First, we discuss and compare the mechanisms of tumoral transport and accumulation, the basis of differential performance of these radioligands in clinical studies. Then we summarize studies that provided direct comparisons among these amino acid tracers and to clinically used 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose [FDG] PET imaging. We also discuss how tracer kinetic analysis can enhance the clinical information obtained from amino acid PET images. We discuss both similarities and differences in potential clinical value for each radioligand. This comparative review can guide which radiotracer to favor in future clinical trials aimed at defining the role of these molecular imaging modalities in the clinical management of brain tumor patients.

  7. Simultaneous reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution from TOF data, acquired with external transmission source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panin, V Y; Aykac, M; Casey, M E

    2013-01-01

    The simultaneous PET data reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution is presented, where the attenuation image is constrained by exploiting an external transmission source. Data are acquired in time-of-flight (TOF) mode, allowing in principle for separation of emission and transmission data. Nevertheless, here all data are reconstructed at once, eliminating the need to trace the position of the transmission source in sinogram space. Contamination of emission data by the transmission source and vice versa is naturally modeled. Attenuated emission activity data also provide additional information about object attenuation coefficient values. The algorithm alternates between attenuation and emission activity image updates. We also proposed a method of estimation of spatial scatter distribution from the transmission source by incorporating knowledge about the expected range of attenuation map values. The reconstruction of experimental data from the Siemens mCT scanner suggests that simultaneous reconstruction improves attenuation map image quality, as compared to when data are separated. In the presented example, the attenuation map image noise was reduced and non-uniformity artifacts that occurred due to scatter estimation were suppressed. On the other hand, the use of transmission data stabilizes attenuation coefficient distribution reconstruction from TOF emission data alone. The example of improving emission images by refining a CT-based patient attenuation map is presented, revealing potential benefits of simultaneous CT and PET data reconstruction. (paper)

  8. Multitracer Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of Exogenous Gene Expression Mediated by a Universal Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Amplicon Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Kummer

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available To develop efficient and safe gene therapy approaches, the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (HSV-1-tk has been shown to function as a marker gene for the direct noninvasive in vivo localization of thymidine kinase (TK expression by positron emission tomography (PET using radiolabeled nucleoside analogues as specific TK substrates. Moreover, the gene encoding dopamine type 2 receptor (d2r could be used as a PET marker gene using specific radiolabeled receptor binding compounds. Here we describe the quantitative colocalization of d2r and HSV-1-tk gene expression mediated from a universal HSV-1 amplicon vector in a subcutaneous human Gli36dEGFR glioma model by PET. The HSV-1 amplicon vector was constructed using a bicistronic gene cassette to contain (1 the d2r80A mutant, which is able to bind its ligand racloprid but unable to activate downstream signal transduction pathways, and (2 the tk39 mutant with enhanced enzymatic activity toward guanosine analogues fused to the green fluorescent protein gene (tk39gfp serving as a marker gene in cell culture. After infection of human Gli36dEGFR glioma cells with the HSV-d2r80AIREStk39gfp (HSV-DITG amplicon vector in cell culture, D2 receptor expression and its targeting to the cell surface were determined by Western blotting and immunolabeling. Vector application in vivo served for quantitative colocalization of d2r80A- and tk39gfp-derived PET signals employing the specific D2 receptor binding compound [11C]racloprid and the specific TK39 substrate 9-(4-[18F]fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutylguanine. Our results demonstrate that for the range of gene expression studied in vivo, both enzymatic and receptor binding assays give comparable quantitative information on the level of vector-mediated gene expression in vivo. The d2r80A in combination with a specific binding compound passing the intact blood-brain barrier might be an alternative marker gene for the noninvasive assessment of vector

  9. Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of the Serotonergic System and Prediction of Risk and Lethality of Future Suicidal Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo, Maria A; Galfalvy, Hanga; Sullivan, Gregory M; Miller, Jeffrey M; Milak, Matthew M; Sublette, M Elizabeth; Cisneros-Trujillo, Sebastian; Burke, Ainsley K; Parsey, Ramin V; Mann, J John

    2016-10-01

    Biomarkers that predict suicidal behavior, especially highly lethal behavior, are urgently needed. In cross-sectional studies, individuals with depression who attempt suicide have lower midbrain serotonin transporter binding potential compared with those who do not attempt suicide, and higher serotonin1A binding potential in the raphe nuclei (RN) is associated with greater lethality of past suicide attempts and suicidal intent and ideation. To determine whether serotonin transporter binding potential in the lower midbrain predicts future suicide attempts and whether higher RN serotonin1A binding potential predicts future suicidal ideation and intent and lethality of future suicide attempts. In this prospective 2-year observational study, a well-characterized cohort of 100 patients presenting for treatment of a major depressive episode of at least moderate severity underwent positron emission tomography using carbon 11-labeled N-(2-(1-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl))-N-(2-pyridyl)-cyclohexanecarboxamide ([11C]WAY-100635), a serotonin1A antagonist; a subset of 50 patients also underwent imaging with carbon 11-labeled 3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)- benzonitrile ([11C]DASB), a serotonin transporter radioligand. Imaging was performed at Columbia University Medical Center from May 3, 1999, to March 11, 2008. Follow-up was completed on May 28, 2010, and data were analyzed from August 1, 2013, to March 1, 2016. Patients were treated naturalistically in the community and followed up for 2 years with documentation of suicidal behavior, its lethality, and suicidal ideation and intent. Suicide attempt or suicide. Of the 100 patients undergoing follow-up for more than 2 years (39 men; 61 women; mean [SD] age, 40.2 [11.2] years), 15 made suicide attempts, including 2 who died by suicide. Higher RN serotonin1A binding potential predicted more suicidal ideation at 3 (b = 0.02; t = 3.45; P = .001) and 12 (b = 0.02; t = 3.63; P

  10. Semi-automatic segmentation of gated blood pool emission tomographic images by watersheds: application to the determination of right and left ejection fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano-Goulart, D.; Collet, H.; Kotzki, P.-O.; Zanca, M.; Rossi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Tomographic multi-gated blood pool scintigraphy (TMUGA) is a widely available method which permits simultaneous assessment of right and left ventricular ejection fractions. However, the widespread clinical use of this technique is impeded by the lack of segmentation methods dedicated to an automatic analysis of ventricular activities. In this study we evaluated how a watershed algorithm succeeds in providing semi-automatic segmentation of ventricular activities in order to measure right and left ejection fractions by TMUGA. The left ejection fractions of 30 patients were evaluated both with TMUGA and with planar multi-gated blood pool scintigraphy (PMUGA). Likewise, the right ejection fractions of 25 patients were evaluated with first-pass scintigraphy (FP) and with TMUGA. The watershed algorithm was applied to the reconstructed slices in order to group together the voxels whose activity came from one specific cardiac cavity. First, the results of the watershed algorithm were compared with manual drawing around left and right ventricles. Left ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA with the watershed procedure were not significantly different (p=0.30) from manual outlines whereas a small but significant difference was found for right ejection fractions (p=0.004). Then right and left ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA (with the semi-automatic segmentation procedure) were compared with the results obtained by FP or PMUGA. Left ventricular ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA showed an excellent correlation with those evaluated by PMUGA (r=0.93; SEE=5.93%; slope=0.99; intercept = 4.17%). The measurements of these ejection fractions were significantly higher with TMUGA than with PMUGA (P<0.01). The interoperator variability for the measurement of left ejection fractions by TMUGA was 4.6%. Right ventricular ejection fractions evaluated by TMUGA showed a good correlation with those evaluated by FP (r = 0.81; SEE = 6.68%; slope = 1.00; intercept = 0.85%) and were not

  11. A NMR Tomographic System for image visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, M.S.V. de; Slaets, J.F.W.; Almeida, L.O.B. de

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents some characteristics of a graphics system that is being constructed in the Electronics Instrumentation and Computation Laboratory (LIE) of IFQSC. This system will be used in reconstruction and interpretation of MR tomographic images. A minimum system is at moment being used at our laboratory to visualize MR images. (author) [pt

  12. A new ionospheric tomographic algorithm – constrained ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the above algorithms. Finally, the new method is applied to reconstruct the IED distributions using the regional GNSS observation (i.e., GPS) over. China. 2. Tomographic formulation. As is well known, one measurable parameter of the ionosphere is the total electron content (TEC), which is the line integral of IED along ray ...

  13. Pre-clinical Positron Emission Tomography Reconstruction Algorithm Effect on Cu-64 ATSM Lesion Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Sanghera

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Application of distinct positron emission tomography (PET scan reconstruction algorithms can lead to statistically significant differences in measuring lesion functional properties. We looked at the influence of two-dimensional filtered back projection (2D FBP, two-dimensional ordered subset expectation maximization (2D OSEM, three-dimensional ordered subset expectation maximization (3D OSEM without 3D maximum a posteriori and with (3D OSEM MAP on lesion hypoxia tracer uptake using a pre-clinical PET scanner. Methods: Reconstructed images of a rodent tumor model bearing P22 carcinosarcoma injected with hypoxia tracer Copper- 64-Diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone (i.e. Cu-64 ATSM were analyzed at 10 minute intervals till 60 minute post injection. Lesion maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmax/background SUVmean (T/B were recorded and investigated after application of multiple algorithm and reconstruction parameters to assess their influence on Cu-64 ATSM measurements and associated trends over time. Results: SUVmax exhibited convergence for OSEM reconstructions while ANOVA results showed a significant difference in SUVmax or T/B between 2D FBP, 2D OSEM, 3D OSEM and 3D OSEM MAP reconstructions across all time frames. SUVmax and T/B were greatest in magnitude for 2D OSEM followed by 3D OSEM MAP, 3D OSEM and then 2D FBP at all time frames respectively. Similarly SUVmax and T/B standard deviations (SD were lowest for 2D OSEM in comparison with other algorithms. Conclusion: Significantly higher magnitude lesion SUVmax and T/B combined with lower SD were observed using 2D OSEM reconstruction in comparison with 2D FBP, 3D OSEM and 3D OSEM MAP algorithms at all time frames. Results are consistent with other published studies however more specimens are required for full validation.

  14. Comments on "hydrodynamic and dispersion behavior in a non-porous silica monolith through fluid dynamic study of a computational mimic reconstructed from sub-micro-tomographic scans".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Höltzel, Alexandra; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2013-08-09

    We comment on a recently published paper by Loh and Vasudevan [J. Chromatogr. A 1274 (2013) 65], which reported the physical reconstruction of the bulk macropore space of an analytical silica monolith by X-ray computed microtomography and the subsequent computational fluid dynamics simulations of flow and mass transport in the reconstructed monolith model. Loh and Vasudevan claim that their combined reconstruction and simulation approach offers a significant reduction of computational expenses without significant loss in accuracy in characterizing the macropore space heterogeneity of the monolith and predicting its transport properties. We challenge their claim and question the validity and validation of their results by discussing the employed scanning resolution, the characterization of macropore space heterogeneities, the interpretation of the simulated dispersion data, as well as the comparison of computational expenses with previous work. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Combining ART and FBP for improved fidelity of tomographic BOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Ulrich; Seume, Joerg R.

    2016-09-01

    Engine component defects along the hot-gas path (HGP) of jet engines influence the density distribution of the flow, and thus result in characteristic patterns in the exhaust jet. These characteristic patterns can be reconstructed with the optical background-oriented schlieren (BOS) method in a tomographic set-up, which in turn allows the identification of defects inside the engine through an exhaust jet analysis. The quality of the tomographic reconstruction strongly influences how easily defects can be detected inside the jet engine. In particular, the presence of high gradients in the reconstruction area has a strong impact on the reconstruction quality. An algebraic reconstruction algorithm (ART) is implemented and compared to a filtered-back projection (FBP) algorithm in terms of the capability of performing high-gradient tomographic BOS reconstructions. A combination of both algorithms is presented which significantly improves the reconstruction quality of high-gradient tomographic BOS in terms of artifact reduction. The combination of both algorithms is applied to both synthetic and real measurement data in this paper, in order to show possible applications and the achievable improvement of high-gradient tomographic BOS reconstructions.

  16. Pinhole single-photon emission tomography reconstruction based on median root prior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohlberg, Antti; Kuikka, Jyrki T.; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    The maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (ML-EM) algorithm can be used to reduce reconstruction artefacts produced by filtered backprojection (FBP) methods in pinhole single-photon emission tomography (SPET). However, ML-EM suffers from noise propagation along iterations, which leads to quantitatively unpleasant reconstruction results. To avoid this increase in noise, the median root prior (MRP) algorithm for pinhole SPET was implemented. Projection data of a line source and Picker's thyroid phantom were collected using a single-head gamma camera with a pinhole collimator. MRP was added to existing pinhole ML-EM reconstruction algorithm and the phantom studies were reconstructed using MRP, ML-EM and FBP for comparison. Coefficients of variation, contrasts and full-widths at half-maximum were calculated and showed a clear reduction in noise without significant loss of resolution or decrease in contrast when MRP was applied. MRP also produced visually pleasing images even with high iteration numbers, free of the checkerboard-type noise patterns which are typical of ML-EM images. (orig.)

  17. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Krishnendu; Straus, Kenneth J.; Glick, Stephen J.; Chen, Yu.

    2014-01-01

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction

  18. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Krishnendu [Ohio Medical Physics Consulting, Dublin, Ohio 43017 (United States); Straus, Kenneth J.; Glick, Stephen J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Chen, Yu. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  19. Suprathermal electron studies in the TCV tokamak: Design of a tomographic hard-x-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnesin, S.; Coda, S.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance heating and electron cyclotron current drive, disruptive events, and sawtooth activity are all known to produce suprathermal electrons in fusion devices, motivating increasingly detailed studies of the generation and dynamics of this suprathermal population. Measurements have been performed in the past years in the tokamak a configuration variable (TCV) tokamak using a single pinhole hard-x-ray (HXR) camera and electron-cyclotron-emission radiometers, leading, in particular, to the identification of the crucial role of spatial transport in the physics of ECCD. The observation of a poloidal asymmetry in the emitted suprathermal bremsstrahlung radiation motivates the design of a proposed new tomographic HXR spectrometer reported in this paper. The design, which is based on a compact modified Soller collimator concept, is being aided by simulations of tomographic reconstruction. Quantitative criteria have been developed to optimize the design for the greatly variable shapes and positions of TCV plasmas.

  20. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  1. Tomographic imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, T.; Horiba, I.; Kohno, H.; Nakaya, C.; Sekihara, K.; Shiono, H.; Tomura, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yanaka, S.

    1980-01-01

    A tomographic imaging system comprising: irradiating means for irradating a cross-section of an object under consideration with radiation rays from plural directions; detector means for detecting the radiation rays transmitted through the cross-section of said object to produce an output signal; first memory means for storing the output signal of said detector means; and an image jreconstructing section for performing a convolution integral operation on the contents of said first memory means by means of a first weighting function to reconstruct a three-dimensional image of the cross-section of said object, said image reconstructing section including (I) second memory means for storing a second weighting function, said second weighting function being provided with a predetermined positive and negative (N-1)th order when the output signal of said detector means produced by the irradiation of the cross-section of said object from one of said plural directions is sampled by N points, the value of the (N-1)th order of said second weighting function being an integration of said first weighting function from the (N-1)th order to positive infinity and the value of -(N-1)th order of said second weighting function being an integration of said first weighting function from the -(N-1)th order to negative infinity, (II) control means for successively reading out the contents of said first and second memory means, and (III) operational means for performing multiplying and summing operations on the read-out contents of said first and second memory means, said operational means producing the product of the values fo the (N-1)th and -(N-1)th orders of said second weighting function and a component of the output signal of said detector means relating to the radiation rays free from the absorption thereof by said object

  2. Tomographic PIV: principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarano, F

    2013-01-01

    A survey is given of the major developments in three-dimensional velocity field measurements using the tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The appearance of tomo-PIV dates back seven years from the present review (Elsinga et al 2005a 6th Int. Symp. PIV (Pasadena, CA)) and this approach has rapidly spread as a versatile, robust and accurate technique to investigate three-dimensional flows (Arroyo and Hinsch 2008 Topics in Applied Physics vol 112 ed A Schröder and C E Willert (Berlin: Springer) pp 127–54) and turbulence physics in particular. A considerable number of applications have been achieved over a wide range of flow problems, which requires the current status and capabilities of tomographic PIV to be reviewed. The fundamental aspects of the technique are discussed beginning from hardware considerations for volume illumination, imaging systems, their configurations and system calibration. The data processing aspects are of uppermost importance: image pre-processing, 3D object reconstruction and particle motion analysis are presented with their fundamental aspects along with the most advanced approaches. Reconstruction and cross-correlation algorithms, attaining higher measurement precision, spatial resolution or higher computational efficiency, are also discussed. The exploitation of 3D and time-resolved (4D) tomographic PIV data includes the evaluation of flow field pressure on the basis of the flow governing equation. The discussion also covers a-posteriori error analysis techniques. The most relevant applications of tomo-PIV in fluid mechanics are surveyed, covering experiments in air and water flows. In measurements in flow regimes from low-speed to supersonic, most emphasis is given to the complex 3D organization of turbulent coherent structures. (topical review)

  3. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sætre, C.; Johansen, G.A.; Tjugum, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. - Highlights: ► Multiphase flow gas-fraction and flow regime measurements by multi gamma ray beams. ► High-speed gamma ray tomograph as reference for the flow pattern and gas fraction. ► Dual modality

  4. Comparative study of reconstruction filters for cranio examinations of the Philips system and its influence on the quality of the tomographic image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, V.C.; Kodlulovich, S.; Delduck, R.S.; Oliveira, L.C.G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate different reconstruction algorithm (kernels) applied for head examinations. The research was carried out using 40-slice MDCT (Philips, Brilliance 40 CT scanner) and an ACR Phantoms to evaluate the image quality. The doses were estimated applying the coefficients obtained by IMPACT .The study showed that independently of the filter used the values of CT number have no change. The low contrast showed that the choice of correct filter might result a decrease of 9% of doses values. For special resolution, the sharp filter showed a better response for low m As. The noise value of image to certain filters smooth has no changed, even by reducing the m As values. (author)

  5. Detector response restoration in image reconstruction of high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical method was studied to model the detector response of high spatial-resolution positron emission tomography systems consisting of close-packed small crystals, and to restore the resolution deteriorated due to crystal penetration and/or nonuniform sampling across the field-of-view (FOV). The simulated detector system had 600 bismuth germanate crystals of 3.14 mm width and 30 mm length packed on a single ring of 60 cm diameter. The space between crystal was filled up with lead. Each crystal was in coincidence with 200 opposite crystals so that the FOV had a radius of 30 cm. The detector response was modeled based on the attenuating properties of the crystals and the septa, as well as the geometry of the detector system. The modeled detector-response function was used to restore the projections from the sinogram of the ring-detector system. The restored projections had a uniform sampling of 1.57 mm across the FOV. The crystal penetration and/or the nonuniform sampling were compensated in the projections. A penalized maximum-likelihood algorithm was employed to accomplish the restoration. The restored projections were then filtered and backprojected to reconstruct the image. A chest phantom with a few small circular ''cold'' objects located at the center and near the periphery of FOV was computer generated and used to test the restoration. The reconstructed images from the restored projections demonstrated resolution improvement off the FOV center, while preserving the resolution near the center

  6. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are presented of a tomographic scanning apparatus, its rotational assembly, and the control and circuit elements, with particular reference to the amplifier and multiplexing circuits enabling detector signal calibration. (U.K.)

  7. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification relates to a tomographic scanning apparatus using a fan beam and digital output signal, and particularly to the design of the gas-pressurized ionization detection system. (U.K.)

  8. Fast 3D-EM reconstruction using Planograms for stationary planar positron emission mammography camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, A; Guerra, A Del; Belcari, N; Moehrs, S; Panetta, D; Righi, S; Valentini, D

    2005-12-01

    At the University of Pisa we are building a PEM prototype, the YAP-PEM camera, consisting of two opposite 6 x 6 x 3 cm3 detector heads of 30 x 30 YAP:Ce finger crystals, 2 x 2 x 30 mm3 each. The camera will be equipped with breast compressors. The acquisition will be stationary. Compared with a whole body PET scanner, a planar Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera allows a better, easier and more flexible positioning around the breast in the vicinity of the tumor: this increases the sensitivity and solid angle coverage, and reduces cost. To avoid software rejection of data during the reconstruction, resulting in a reduced sensitivity, we adopted a 3D-EM reconstruction which uses all of the collected Lines Of Response (LORs). This skips the PSF distortion given by data rebinning procedures and/or Fourier methods. The traditional 3D-EM reconstruction requires several times the computation of the LOR-voxel correlation matrix, or probability matrix {p(ij)}; therefore is highly time-consuming. We use the sparse and symmetry properties of the matrix {p(ij)} to perform fast 3D-EM reconstruction. Geometrically, a 3D grid of cubic voxels (FOV) is crossed by several divergent 3D line sets (LORs). The symmetries occur when tracing different LORs produces the same p(ij) value. Parallel LORs of different sets cross the FOV in the same way, and the repetition of p(ij) values depends on the ratio between the tube and voxel sizes. By optimizing this ratio, the occurrence of symmetries is increased. We identify a nucleus of symmetry of LORs: for each set of symmetrical LORs we choose just one LOR to be put in the nucleus, while the others lie outside. All of the possible p(ij) values are obtainable by tracking only the LORs of this nucleus. The coordinates of the voxels of all of the other LORs are given by means of simple translation rules. Before making the reconstruction, we trace the LORs of the nucleus to find the intersecting voxels, whose p(ij) values are computed and

  9. 40 CFR Table 1a to Subpart Zzzz of... - Emission Limitations for Existing, New, and Reconstructed Spark Ignition, 4SRB Stationary RICE...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and Reconstructed Spark Ignition, 4SRB Stationary RICE >500 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP... Limitations for Existing, New, and Reconstructed Spark Ignition, 4SRB Stationary RICE >500 HP Located at a... emission limitations for existing, new and reconstructed 4SRB stationary RICE at 100 percent load plus or...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Oooo of... - Emission Limits for New or Reconstructed and Existing Affected Sources in the Printing, Coating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reconstructed and Existing Affected Sources in the Printing, Coating and Dyeing of Fabrics and Other Textiles... SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Printing, Coating, and Dyeing...—Emission Limits for New or Reconstructed and Existing Affected Sources in the Printing, Coating and Dyeing...

  11. Few-view single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on a blurred piecewise constant object model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Paul A.; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Schmidt, Taly G.

    2013-01-01

    A sparsity-exploiting algorithm intended for few-view Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) reconstruction is proposed and characterized. The algorithm models the object as piecewise constant subject to a blurring operation. To validate that the algorithm closely approximates the true...

  12. Tomographic PIV: particles versus blobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champagnat, Frédéric; Cornic, Philippe; Besnerais, Guy Le; Plyer, Aurélien; Cheminet, Adam; Leclaire, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We present an alternative approach to tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) that seeks to recover nearly single voxel particles rather than blobs of extended size. The baseline of our approach is a particle-based representation of image data. An appropriate discretization of this representation yields an original linear forward model with a weight matrix built with specific samples of the system’s point spread function (PSF). Such an approach requires only a few voxels to explain the image appearance, therefore it favors much more sparsely reconstructed volumes than classic tomo-PIV. The proposed forward model is general and flexible and can be embedded in a classical multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) or a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (SMART) inversion procedure. We show, using synthetic PIV images and by way of a large exploration of the generating conditions and a variety of performance metrics, that the model leads to better results than the classical tomo-PIV approach, in particular in the case of seeding densities greater than 0.06 particles per pixel and of PSFs characterized by a standard deviation larger than 0.8 pixels. (paper)

  13. Positron emission tomographic imaging with 11C-choline in differential diagnosis of head and neck tumors. Comparison with 18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, N.; Oriuchi, Noboru; Ninomiya, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Kamada, Hideo; Endo, Keigo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) with 11 C-labeled choline (CHOL) for the differential diagnosis of malignant head and neck tumors from benign lesions as compared with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET. We studied 45 patients (28 males, 17 females, age range, 29-84 years) with suspected lesions in the head and neck region using both CHOL and FDG PET within a 2-week period on each patient. All patients fasted for at least 6 hours for both the CHOL and FDG studies. PET imaging was performed 5 min and 50-60 min after intravenous injection of CHOL and FDG, respectively. After data acquisition, PET images were corrected for attenuation, and the reconstructed images were analyzed by visual interpretation. Then, the standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated for semiquantitative evaluation of tumor tracer uptake. Finally the results of PET scans were compared with the histological diagnoses from surgical specimens or biopsies. With CHOL PET, malignant tumors were correctly detected in 24 (96%) of 25 patients, and benign lesions in 14 (70%) of 20 patients with an accuracy of 84.4%. With FDG PET, malignancy was correctly diagnosed in 23 (92%) of 25 patients, and benign lesions in 13 (65%) of 20 patients resulting an accuracy of 80%. A significant positive correlation between CHOL and FDG SUVs was found for all lesions (r=0.677, p=0.004, n=45). Malignant tumors showed significantly higher tracer accumulation than the benign lesions in both CHOL and FDG studies (5.69±1.61, n=25 vs. 2.98±2.13, n=20, p<0.0001; 9.21±4.23, n=25 vs. 3.60±2.57, n=20, p<0.0001). The cutoff SUV for differentiating malignant and benign lesions was 3.5 for CHOL and 3.9 for FDG. CHOL showed slightly better differentiation between malignant and benign lesions than FDG although some overlap existed on both studies. But the difference was not statistically significant. The results of this study indicate that CHOL PET may be feasible clinically

  14. Tomographic techniques for safeguards measurements of nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist Saleh, Tobias

    2007-10-15

    Nuclear power is currently experiencing increased interest over the world. New nuclear reactors are being built and techniques for taking care of the nuclear waste are being developed. This development puts new demands and standards to safeguards, i.e. the international efforts for ensuring the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. New measuring techniques and devices are continuously being developed for enhancing the ability to detect diversion of fissile material. In this thesis, tomographic techniques for application in safeguards are presented. Tomographic techniques can non-destructively provide information of the inner parts of an object and may thus be used to control that no material is missing from a nuclear fuel assembly. When using the tomographic technique described in this thesis, the radiation field around a fuel assembly is first recorded. In a second step, the internal source distribution is mathematically reconstructed based on the recorded data. In this work, a procedure for tomographic safeguards measurements is suggested and the design of a tomographic measuring device is presented. Two reconstruction algorithms have been specially developed and evaluated for the application on nuclear fuel; one algorithm for image reconstruction and one for reconstructing conclusive data on the individual fuel rod level. The combined use of the two algorithms is suggested. The applicability for detecting individual removed or replaced rods has been demonstrated, based on experimental data

  15. Simulation, image reconstruction and SiPM characterisation for a novel endoscopic positron emission tomography detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvolsky, Milan

    2017-12-01

    In the scope of the EndoTOFPET-US project, a novel multimodal device for ultrasound (US) endoscopy and positron emission tomography (PET) is being developed. The project aims at detecting and quantifying morphologic and functional biomarkers and developing new biomarkers for pancreas and prostate oncology. The detector system comprises a small detector probe mounted on an ultrasound endoscope and an external detector plate. The detection of the gamma rays is realised by scintillator crystals with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) read-out. For the characterisation of over 4000 SiPMs for the external plate, an automatised measurement and data analysis procedure is established. The key properties of the SiPMs like breakdown voltage and dark count rate (DCR) are extracted. This knowledge is needed both as a quality assurance as well as for the calibration of the detector. The spread between minimum and maximum breakdown voltage within a SiPM array of 4 x 4 is at maximum 0.43 V with a mean of 0.15 V and an RMS of 0.06 V. This assures the optimal biasing of each SiPM at its individual operating voltage. The mean DCR amounts to 1.49 MHz with an RMS of 0.54 MHz and is thus well below the acceptable threshold of 3 MHz. Two spare modules from the external plate are re-measured and analysed several years after the module assembly, revealing a potential alteration of the SiPM noise properties over time. For the characterisation of SiPMs from different vendors, a software framework for the automatic extraction of performance parameters from pulseheight spectra, including a t of the entire spectrum, is developed and tested. In order to facilitate the modelling of the response of the EndoTOFPET-US detector, a framework is developed which is built around the Geant4-based simulation toolkit GAMOS, to simulate and reconstruct realistic imaging scenarios with this asymmetric PET detector. The simulation studies are used to compare different possible detector designs, guide the

  16. Conditional probability distribution associated to the E-M image reconstruction algorithm for neutron stimulated emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, R.S.; Yoriyaz, H.; Santos, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Expectation-Maximization (E-M) algorithm is an iterative computational method for maximum likelihood (M-L) estimates, useful in a variety of incomplete-data problems. Due to its stochastic nature, one of the most relevant applications of E-M algorithm is the reconstruction of emission tomography images. In this paper, the statistical formulation of the E-M algorithm was applied to the in vivo spectrographic imaging of stable isotopes called Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). In the process of E-M algorithm iteration, the conditional probability distribution plays a very important role to achieve high quality image. This present work proposes an alternative methodology for the generation of the conditional probability distribution associated to the E-M reconstruction algorithm, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and with the application of the reciprocity theorem. (author)

  17. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veit, R.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi, N.; Mannweiler, E.; Drexler, G.; Williams, G.

    1989-01-01

    The first generation of heterogenoeous anthropomorphic mathematical models to be used in dose calculations was the MIRD-5 adult phantom, followed by the pediatric MIRD-type phantoms and by the GSF sex-specific phantoms ADAM and EVA. A new generation of realistic anthropomorphic models is now introduced. The organs and tissues of these models consist of a well defined number of volume elements (voxels), derived from computer tomographic (CT) data; consequently, these models were named voxel or tomographic models. So far two voxel models of real patients are available: one of an 8 week old baby and of a 7 year old child. For simplicity, the model of the baby will be referred to as BABY and that of the child as CHILD. In chapter 1 a brief literature review is given on the existing mathematical models and their applications. The reasons that lead to the construction of the new CT models is discussed. In chapter 2 the technique is described which allows to convert any physical object into computer files to be used for dose calculations. The technique which produces three dimensional reconstructions of high resolution is discussed. In chapter 3 the main characteristics of the models of the baby and child are given. Tables of organ masses and volumes are presented together with three dimensional images of some organs and tissues. A special mention is given to the assessment of bone marrow distribution. Chapter 4 gives a short description of the Monte Carlo code used in conjunction with the models to calculate organ and tissue doses resulting from photon exposures. Some technical details concerning the computer files which describe the models are also given. (orig./HP)

  18. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. This report deals specifically with the atmospheric transport model, Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET is a major rework of the MESOILT2 model used in the first phase of the HEDR Project; only the bookkeeping framework escaped major changes. Changes to the code include (1) significant changes in the representation of atmospheric processes and (2) incorporation of Monte Carlo methods for representing uncertainty in input data, model parameters, and coefficients. To a large extent, the revisions to the model are based on recommendations of a peer working group that met in March 1991. Technical bases for other portions of the atmospheric transport model are addressed in two other documents. This report has three major sections: a description of the model, a user`s guide, and a programmer`s guide. These sections discuss RATCHET from three different perspectives. The first provides a technical description of the code with emphasis on details such as the representation of the model domain, the data required by the model, and the equations used to make the model calculations. The technical description is followed by a user`s guide to the model with emphasis on running the code. The user`s guide contains information about the model input and output. The third section is a programmer`s guide to the code. It discusses the hardware and software required to run the code. The programmer`s guide also discusses program structure and each of the program elements.

  19. Tomographic diffractive microscopy with agile illuminations for imaging targets in a noisy background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Godavarthi, C; Chaumet, P C; Maire, G; Giovannini, H; Talneau, A; Prada, C; Sentenac, A; Belkebir, K

    2015-02-15

    Tomographic diffractive microscopy is a marker-free optical digital imaging technique in which three-dimensional samples are reconstructed from a set of holograms recorded under different angles of incidence. We show experimentally that, by processing the holograms with singular value decomposition, it is possible to image objects in a noisy background that are invisible with classical wide-field microscopy and conventional tomographic reconstruction procedure. The targets can be further characterized with a selective quantitative inversion.

  20. Performance characteristics of iterative image reconstruction techniques for routine use in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Ludwig G; Kontaxakis, George; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2001-01-01

    The iterative image reconstruction (IIR) is a promising approach to achieve a better image quality in PET. However, limitations exist with respect to the required computation time and the influence of reconstruction parameters on quantitative PET data. We implemented different reconstruction algorithms in a PC based reconstruction program and evaluated the effect of the reconstruction algorithms as well as reconstruction parameters on the quantitative PET results. The following IIR algorithms were implemented: maximum likelihood expectation maximization (LMEM), weighted least squares (WLS), image space reconstruction algorithm (ISRA), space alternating generalized expectation maximization (SAGE). The ordered subsets (OS) method and the median root prior (MRP) correction were provided and can be used in combination with each reconstruction algorithm. A dynamic PET study, showing small liver metastases, was used for the evaluation of the properties of the reconstruction parameters. Regions-of-Interest (ROI) were placed in a small high uptake area as well as in a larger low uptake region for quantification purpose using standardized uptake values (SUV). The 128x128 image matrix was generally not sufficient to detect the metastases as separate lesions and a 256x256 matrix was required for the delineation of the lesions. Furthermore, the use of the iterative attenuation correction improved the image quality significantly...(Au)

  1. The accuracy of computed tomographic angiography for mapping the perforators of the DIEA: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Warren M; Ashton, Mark W; Stella, Damien L; Phillips, Timothy J; Taylor, G Ian

    2008-08-01

    The deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flap is increasingly used for breast reconstruction, with preoperative imaging sought as a means of improving operative outcome. Computed tomographic angiography has been recently described as the preferred imaging modality; however, formal evaluation of computed tomographic angiography has not been described. A cadaveric study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of computed tomographic angiography for perforator mapping. Ten cadaveric hemiabdominal walls from five fresh cadavers underwent contrast injection of each DIEA and subsequent computed tomographic scanning, with each DIEA and all perforating branches documented. Dissection was then performed, with the recording of the course of the DIEA and the course of all perforators in each specimen. The concordance of computed tomographic angiography with dissection findings was evaluated. Cadaveric computed tomographic angiography identified 154 perforators in 10 hemiabdominal walls. Computed tomographic angiography was highly accurate, with eight false-positives and six false-negatives on cadaveric computed tomographic angiography, establishing an overall sensitivity of 96 percent and a positive predictive value of 95 percent for mapping perforators. For perforators greater than 1 mm in diameter, the sensitivity was 100 percent and the positive predictive value was 100 percent. Computed tomographic angiography is a highly accurate tool for identifying the perforators of the DIEA before DIEA perforator flaps for breast reconstruction. Preoperative identification of these vessels can aid planning for the preferred hemiabdomen for dissection, and may save operative time, angst, and potentially complications.

  2. A new ionospheric tomographic algorithm–constrained multiplicative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For the limitation of the conventional multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART), a constrained MART (CMART) is proposed in this paper. In the new tomographic algorithm, a popular two-dimensional multi-point finite difference approximation of the second order Laplacian operator is used to smooth the ...

  3. Tomographic method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    A tomographic x-ray machine has a camera and film-plane section which move about a primary axis for imaging a selected cross-section of an anatomical member onto the film. A ''scout image'' of the member is taken at right angles to the plane of the desired cross-section to indicate the cross-section's angle with respect to the primary axis. The film plane is then located at the same angle with respect to a film cassette axis as the selected cross-section makes with the primary axis. The film plane and the cross-section are then maintained in parallel planes throughout motion of the camera and film plane during tomographic radiography. (author)

  4. Axial tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    An axial tomographic system is described comprising axial tomographic means for collecting sets of data corresponding to the transmission or absorption of a number of beams of penetrating radiation through a planar slice of an object. It includes means to locate an object to be analyzed, a source and detector for directing one or more beams of penetrating radiation through the object from the source to the detector, and means to rotate (and optionally translate) the source as well as means to process the collected sets of data. Data collection, data processing, and data display can each be conducted independently of each other. An additional advantage of the system described is that the raw data (i.e., the originally collected data) are not destroyed by the data processing but instead are retained intact for further reference or use, if needed

  5. Intravenous volume tomographic pulmonary angiography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ruola; Strang, John G.; Chen, Biao; Conover, David L.; Yu, Rongfeng

    1999-05-01

    This study presents a new intravenous (IV) tomographic angiography imaging technique, called intravenous volume tomographic digital angiography (VTDA) for cross sectional pulmonary angiography. While the advantages of IV-VTDA over spiral CT in terms of volume scanning time and resolution have been validated and reported in our previous papers for head and neck vascular imaging, the superiority of IV-VTDA over spiral CT for cross sectional pulmonary angiography has not been explored yet. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantage of isotropic resolution of IV-VTDA in the x, y and z directions through phantom and animal studies, and to explore its clinical application for detecting clots in pulmonary angiography. A prototype image intensifier-based VTDA imaging system has been designed and constructed by modifying a GE 8800 CT scanner. This system was used for a series of phantom and dog studies. A pulmonary vascular phantom was designed and constructed. The phantom was scanned using the prototype VTDA system for direct 3D reconstruction. Then the same phantom was scanned using a GE CT/i spiral CT scanner using the routine pulmonary CT angiography protocols. IV contrast injection and volume scanning protocols were developed during the dog studies. Both VTDA reconstructed images and spiral CT images of the specially designed phantom were analyzed and compared. The detectability of simulated vessels and clots was assessed as the function of iodine concentration levels, oriented angles, and diameters of the vessels and clots. A set of 3D VTDA reconstruction images of dog pulmonary arteries was obtained with different IV injection rates and isotropic resolution in the x, y and z directions. The results of clot detection studies in dog pulmonary arteries have also been shown. This study presents a new tomographic IV angiography imaging technique for cross sectional pulmonary angiography. The results of phantom and animal studies indicate that IV-VTDA is

  6. Optimization of pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (pinhole SPECT) reconstruction; Optimisation de la reconstruction en tomographie d'emission monophotonique avec colimateur stenope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel-Jost, V

    2006-11-15

    In SPECT small animal imaging, it is highly recommended to accurately model the response of the detector in order to improve the low spatial resolution. The volume to reconstruct is thus obtained both by back-projecting and de-convolving the projections. We chose iterative methods, which permit one to solve the inverse problem independently from the model's complexity. We describe in this work a Gaussian model of point spread function (PSF) whose position, width and maximum are computed according to physical and geometrical parameters. Then we use the rotation symmetry to replace the computation of P projection operators, each one corresponding to one position of the detector around the object, by the computation of only one of them. This is achieved by choosing an appropriate polar discretization, for which we control the angular density of voxels to avoid over-sampling the center of the field of view. Finally, we propose a new family of algorithms, the so-called frequency adapted algorithms, which enable to optimize the reconstruction of a given band in the frequency domain on both the speed of convergence and the quality of the image. (author)

  7. Quantitative reconstruction of PIXE-tomography data for thin samples using GUPIX X-ray emission yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelet, C., E-mail: michelet@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Barberet, Ph., E-mail: barberet@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Devès, G., E-mail: deves@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bouguelmouna, B., E-mail: bbouguel@gmail.com [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bourret, S., E-mail: bourret@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Delville, M.-H., E-mail: delville@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Le Trequesser, Q., E-mail: letreque@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Gordillo, N., E-mail: nuri.gordillo@gmail.com [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Beasley, D.G., E-mail: d.beasley@ucl.ac.uk [Center of Medical Imaging Computing (CMIC), Department of Medical Physics & Bioengineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-04-01

    We present here a new development of the TomoRebuild software package, to perform quantitative Particle Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXET) reconstruction. X-ray yields are obtained from the GUPIX code. The GUPIX data base is available for protons up to 5 MeV and also in the 20–100 MeV energy range, deuterons up to 6 MeV, {sup 3}He and alphas up to 12 MeV. In this version, X-ray yields are calculated for thin samples, i.e. without simulating X-ray attenuation. PIXET data reconstruction is kept as long as possible independent from Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIMT). In this way, the local mass distribution (in g/cm{sup 3}) of each X-ray emitting element is reconstructed in all voxels of the analyzed volume, only from PIXET data, without the need of associated STIMT data. Only the very last step of data analysis requires STIMT data, in order to normalize PIXET data to obtain concentration distributions, in terms of normalized mass fractions (in μg/g). For this, a noise correction procedure has been designed in ImageJ. Moreover sinogram or image misalignment can be corrected, as well as the difference in beam size between the two experiments. The main features of the TomoRebuild code, user friendly design and modular C++ implementation, were kept. The software package is portable and can run on Windows and Linux operating systems. An optional user-friendly graphic interface was designed in Java, as a plugin for the ImageJ graphic software package. Reconstruction examples are presented from biological specimens of Caenorhabditis elegans – a small nematode constituting a reference model for biology studies. The reconstruction results are compared between the different codes TomoRebuild, DISRA and JPIXET, and different reconstruction methods: Filtered BackProjection (FBP) and Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM)

  8. Addition of Tomographic Capabilities to NMIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullens, J.A.

    2003-03-11

    This paper describes tomographic capabilities for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). The tomographic capabilities add weapons component spatial and material properties information that result in a more detailed item signature (template) and provide more information for physical attributes analyses. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) is used routinely to confirm the identity of HEU components in sealed containers. It does this through a radiation signature acquired by shining a {sup 252}Cf source through the container and measuring the radiation at four detectors stacked vertically on the other side. This measurement gives a gamma and neutron radiation transmission profile of the weapons component, mixed with the radiation production due to the induced fissions in the fissile materials. This information is sufficient to match an ''unknown'' weapons component signature to a template signature from a reference item when measuring under controlled conditions. Tomography measures the interior of an item by making transmission measurements from all angles around the item, whereas NMIS makes the measurements from a single angle. Figure 1 is a standard example of tomographic reconstruction, the Shepp-Logan human brain phantom. The measured quantity is attenuation so high values (white) are highly attenuating areas.

  9. First tomographic image of ionospheric outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Dyson, P. L.; Fraser, B. J.; Morley, S.

    2006-10-01

    An image of the dayside low-energy ion outflow event that occurred on 16 December 2003 was constructed with ground- and space-based GPS (Global Positioning System) Total Electron Content (TEC) data and ion drift meter data from the DMSP (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program). A tomographic reconstruction technique has been applied to the GPS TEC data obtained from the GPS receiver on the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite FedSat. The two dimensional tomographic image of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere reveals a spectacular beam-like dayside ion outflow emanating from the cusp region. The transverse components of the magnetic field in FedSat's NewMag data show the presence of field aligned current (FAC) sheets, indicating the existence of low-energy electron precipitation in the cusp region. The DMSP ion drift data show upward ion drift velocities and upward fluxes of low-energy ions and electrons at the orbiting height of the DMSP spacecraft in the cusp region. This study presents the first tomographic image of the flux tube structure of ionospheric ion outflows from 0.13 Re up to 3.17 Re altitude.

  10. Partial-volume effect correction in positron emission tomography brain scan image using super-resolution image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meechai, T; Tepmongkol, S; Pluempitiwiriyawej, C

    2015-02-01

    The partial-volume effect (PVE) is a consequence of limited (i.e. finite) spatial resolution. PVE can lead to quantitative underestimation of activity concentrations in reconstructed images, which may result in misinterpretation of positron emission tomography (PET) scan images, especially in the brain. The PVE becomes significant when the dimensions of a source region are less than two to three times the full width at half maximum spatial resolution of the imaging system. In the present study, the ability of super-resolution (SR) image reconstruction to compensate for PVE in PET was characterized. The ability of SR image reconstruction technique to recover activity concentrations in small structures was evaluated by comparing images before and after image reconstruction in the NEMA/IEC phantom (Washington, DC), in the Hoffman brain phantom and in four human brain subjects (three normal subjects and one atrophic brain subject) in terms of apparent recovery coefficient (ARC) and percentage yield. Both the ARC and percentage yield are improved after SR implementation in NEMA/IEC phantom and Hoffman brain phantom. When tested in normal subjects, SR implementation can improve the intensity and justify SR efficiency to correct PVE. SR algorithm can be used to effectively correct PVE in PET images. The current research focused on brain PET scanning exclusively; future work will extend to whole-body imaging.

  11. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, F.

    2007-04-01

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  12. Comparison of collisional radiative models for edge electron density reconstruction from Li I (2s-2p) emission profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoschus, H.; Hudson, B.; Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Thomas, D. M.; Schweinzer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Four collisional radiative models (CRMs) for reconstruction of the edge electron density profile from the measured Li I (2s-2p) emission profile of an accelerated lithium beam are compared using experimental data from DIII-D. It is shown for both L- and H-mode plasmas that edge density profiles reconstructed with the CRMs DDD2, ABSOLUT, [Sasaki et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1699 (1993)] and a new model developed at DIII-D agree in a density scan from n e ped = (2.0–6.5) × 10 19 m −3 within 20%, 20%, eff = 1–6 up to a factor of two but agree with Thomson data for Z eff = 1–2 within the error bars.

  13. Optical tomograph optimized for tumor detection inside highly absorbent organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Jérôme; Koenig, Anne; Hervé, Lionel; Berger, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a tomograph for small animal fluorescence imaging. The compact and cost-effective system described in this article was designed to address the problem of tumor detection inside highly absorbent heterogeneous organs, such as lungs. To validate the tomograph's ability to detect cancerous nodules inside lungs, in vivo tumor growth was studied on seven cancerous mice bearing murine mammary tumors marked with Alexa Fluor 700. They were successively imaged 10, 12, and 14 days after the primary tumor implantation. The fluorescence maps were compared over this time period. As expected, the reconstructed fluorescence increases with the tumor growth stage.

  14. 11C-Methionine Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of Biologic Activity of a Recurrent Glioblastoma Treated with Stereotaxy-Guided Laser-Induced Interstitial Thermotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Galldiks

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, local minimally invasive treatment modalities have gained increasing interest recently because they are associated with fewer side effects than open surgery. For example, local tumor coagulation by laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT is such a minimally invasive technique. We monitored the metabolic effects of stereotaxy-guided LITT in a patient with a recurrent GBM using amino acid positron emission tomography (PET. Serial 11C-methyl-L-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT were performed using a hybrid PET/CT system in a patient with recurrent GBM before and after LITT. To monitor the biologic activity of the effects of stereotaxy-guided LITT, a threshold-based volume of interest analysis of the metabolically active tumor volume (MET uptake index of ≥ 1.3 was performed. A continuous decline in metabolically active tumor volume after LITT could be observed. MET-PET seems to be useful for monitoring the short-term therapeutic effects of LITT, especially when patients have been pretreated with a multistep therapeutic regimen. MET-PET seems to be an appropriate tool to monitor and guide experimental LITT regimens and should be studied in a larger patient group to confirm its clinical value.

  15. Use of scanner characteristics in iterative image reconstruction for high-resolution positron emission tomography studies of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Doll, J.; Bellemann, M.E.; Trojan, H.; Haberkorn, U.; Schmidlin, P.; Ostertag, H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve of the spatial resolution of a whole-body PET system for experimental studies of small animals by incorporation of scanner characteristics into the process of iterative image reconstruction. The image-forming characteristics of the PET camera were characterized by a spatially variant line-spread function (LSF), which was determined from 49 activated copper-64 line sources positioned over a field of view (FOV) of 21.0 cm. During the course of iterative image reconstruction, the forward projection of the estimated image was blurred with the LSF at each iteration step before the estimated projections were compared with the measured projections. Moreover, imaging studies of a rat and two nude mice were performed to evaluate the imaging properties of our approach in vivo. The spatial resolution of the scanner perpendicular to the direction of projection could be approximated by a one-dimensional Gaussian-shaped LSF with a full-width at half-maximum increasing from 6.5 mm at the centre to 6.7 mm at a radial distance of 10.5 cm. The incorporation of this blurring kernel into the iteration formula resulted in a significantly improved spatial resolution of about 3.9 mm over the examined FOV. As demonstrated by the phantom and the animal experiments, the high-resolution algorithm not only led to a better contrast resolution in the reconstructed emission scans but also improved the accuracy for quantitating activity concentrations in small tissue structures without leading to an amplification of image noise or image mottle. The presented data-handling strategy incorporates the image restoration step directly into the process of algebraic image reconstruction and obviates the need for ill-conditioned ''deconvolution'' procedures to be performed on the projections or on the reconstructed image. In our experience, the proposed algorithm is of special interest in experimental studies of small animals. (orig./AJ). With 9 figs

  16. Use of scanner characteristics in iterative image reconstruction for high-resolution positron emission tomography studies of small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, G. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Doll, J. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Bellemann, M.E. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Trojan, H. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schmidlin, P. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Ostertag, H. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve of the spatial resolution of a whole-body PET system for experimental studies of small animals by incorporation of scanner characteristics into the process of iterative image reconstruction. The image-forming characteristics of the PET camera were characterized by a spatially variant line-spread function (LSF), which was determined from 49 activated copper-64 line sources positioned over a field of view (FOV) of 21.0 cm. During the course of iterative image reconstruction, the forward projection of the estimated image was blurred with the LSF at each iteration step before the estimated projections were compared with the measured projections. Moreover, imaging studies of a rat and two nude mice were performed to evaluate the imaging properties of our approach in vivo. The spatial resolution of the scanner perpendicular to the direction of projection could be approximated by a one-dimensional Gaussian-shaped LSF with a full-width at half-maximum increasing from 6.5 mm at the centre to 6.7 mm at a radial distance of 10.5 cm. The incorporation of this blurring kernel into the iteration formula resulted in a significantly improved spatial resolution of about 3.9 mm over the examined FOV. As demonstrated by the phantom and the animal experiments, the high-resolution algorithm not only led to a better contrast resolution in the reconstructed emission scans but also improved the accuracy for quantitating activity concentrations in small tissue structures without leading to an amplification of image noise or image mottle. The presented data-handling strategy incorporates the image restoration step directly into the process of algebraic image reconstruction and obviates the need for ill-conditioned ``deconvolution`` procedures to be performed on the projections or on the reconstructed image. In our experience, the proposed algorithm is of special interest in experimental studies of small animals. (orig./AJ). With 9 figs.

  17. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abele, M.

    1983-01-01

    A computerized tomographic scanning apparatus suitable for diagnosis and for improving target identification in stereotactic neurosurgery is described. It consists of a base, a source of penetrating energy, a detector which produces scanning signals and detector positioning means. A frame with top and bottom arms secures the detector and source to the top and bottom arms respectively. A drive mechanism rotates the frame about an axis along which the frame may also be moved. Finally, the detector may be moved relative to the bottom arm in a direction contrary to the rotation of the frame. (U.K.)

  18. Accelerated median root prior reconstruction for pinhole single-photon emission tomography (SPET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohlberg, Antti [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777 FIN-70211, Kuopio (Finland); Ruotsalainen, Ulla [Institute of Signal Processing, DMI, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 553 FIN-33101, Tampere (Finland); Watabe, Hiroshi [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujisihro-dai, Suita City, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Iida, Hidehiro [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujisihro-dai, Suita City, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Kuikka, Jyrki T [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777 FIN-70211, Kuopio (Finland)

    2003-07-07

    Pinhole collimation can be used to improve spatial resolution in SPET. However, the resolution improvement is achieved at the cost of reduced sensitivity, which leads to projection images with poor statistics. Images reconstructed from these projections using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithms, which have been used to reduce the artefacts generated by the filtered backprojection (FBP) based reconstruction, suffer from noise/bias trade-off: noise contaminates the images at high iteration numbers, whereas early abortion of the algorithm produces images that are excessively smooth and biased towards the initial estimate of the algorithm. To limit the noise accumulation we propose the use of the pinhole median root prior (PH-MRP) reconstruction algorithm. MRP is a Bayesian reconstruction method that has already been used in PET imaging and shown to possess good noise reduction and edge preservation properties. In this study the PH-MRP algorithm was accelerated with the ordered subsets (OS) procedure and compared to the FBP, OS-EM and conventional Bayesian reconstruction methods in terms of noise reduction, quantitative accuracy, edge preservation and visual quality. The results showed that the accelerated PH-MRP algorithm was very robust. It provided visually pleasing images with lower noise level than the FBP or OS-EM and with smaller bias and sharper edges than the conventional Bayesian methods.

  19. Computerized tomographic in non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    The process of computerized tomography has been developed for medical imaging purposes using tomographs with X-ray, and little attention has been given to others possibles applications of technique, because of its cost. As an alternative for the problem, we constructed a Tomographic System (STAC-1), using gamma-rays, for nonmedical applications. In this work we summarize the basic theory of reconstructing images using computerized tomography and we describe the considerations leading to the development of the experimental system. The method of reconstruction image implanted in the system is the filtered backprojection or convolution, with a digital filters system to carried on a pre-filtering in the projections. The experimental system is described, with details of control and the data processing. An alternative and a complementary system, using film as a detector is shown in preliminary form . This thesis discuss and shows the theorical and practical aspects, considered in the construction of the STAC-1, and also its limitations and apllications [pt

  20. Unsupervised learning of spect reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craciunescu, T.; Constantinescu, C.

    1999-01-01

    An approach of image reconstruction from projection in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), based on an unsupervised learning artificial Kohonen neural network, is developed. A kind of random sampling technique is used to generate sensory input from tomographic projections. It is proved that an adequate interpretation and representation of the synaptic strengths of the network can be used to obtain the tomographic image. A relevant numerical experiment is reported. To validate the method tests were performed using a typical phantom (simulated object) used in limited data sets tomography. At the end of the self-organizing process the synaptic strengths can be shown on x-y plane as a map of points. The density of points gives the reconstructed image. In order to obtain a usual representation of the image a grid of 32 x 32 pixels was superimposed on the map and the number of points in each pixel was counted in order to form the image function. As the number of points in each pixel (especially for pixels corresponding to the background of the phantom) is relatively small, the image function is spoiled by noise. Noise filtering was used to improve the quality of the image. The final result is presented as a 3D-surface plot and as a corresponding 8-level gray map. It can be concluded that a good reconstruction of sizes and shapes was obtained. Some artifacts spoil the region located around the spikes. This artifact can be reduced if an increased number of external stimuli are presented to the network. The price paid for this improvement is the increase of computation time. (authors)

  1. Automatic detection of patient position for incorporation in exact 3D reconstruction for emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyme, A.; Hutton, B.; Hatton, R.; Skerrett, D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: SPECT involves acquiring a set of projection images using one or more rotating gamma cameras. The projections are then reconstructed to create transverse slices. Patient motion during the scan can introduce inconsistencies into the data leading to artifacts. There remains a need for robust and effective motion correction. One approach uses the (corrupt) data itself to derive the patient position at each projection angle. Corrected data is periodically incorporated into a 3-D reconstruction. Fundamental aspects of the algorithm mechanics, particularly performance in the presence of Poisson noise, have been examined. Brain SPECT studies were simulated using a digital version of the Huffman brain phantom. Projection datasets with Poisson noise imposed, generated for different positions of the phantom, were combined and reconstructed to produce motion-corrupted reconstructions. To examine the behaviour of the cost function as the object position was changed, the corrupted re-construction was forward projected and the mean square difference (MSD) between the resulting re-projections and corresponding original projections was calculated. The ability to detect mis-positioned projections for different degrees of freedom, the importance of using dual-head camera geometry, and the effect of smoothing the original projections prior to the MSD calculation were assessed. Re-projection of the corrupt reconstruction was able to correctly identify mis-positioned projection data. The degree of movement as defined by MSD was more easily identified for translations than for rotations. Noise resulted in an increasing bias that made it difficult to distinguish the minimum MSD, particularly for z-axis rotations. This was improved by median filtering of projections. Right-angled dual-head geometry is necessary to provide stability to the algorithm and to better identify motion in all 6 degrees of freedom. These findings will assist the optimisation of a fully automated motion

  2. Tomographic extreme-ultraviolet spectrographs: TESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Stephan, A; Cook, T; Vickers, J; Taylor, V; Chakrabarti, S

    2000-08-01

    We describe the system of Tomographic Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) SpectrographS (TESS) that are the primary instruments for the Tomographic Experiment using Radiative Recombinative Ionospheric EUV and Radio Sources (TERRIERS) satellite. The spectrographs were designed to make high-sensitivity {80 counts/s)/Rayleigh [one Rayleigh is equivalent to 10(6) photons/(4pi str cm(2)s)}, line-of-sight measurements of the oi 135.6- and 91.1-nm emissions suitable for tomographic inversion. The system consists of five spectrographs, four identical nightglow instruments (for redundancy and added sensitivity), and one instrument with a smaller aperture to reduce sensitivity and increase spectral resolution for daytime operation. Each instrument has a bandpass of 80-140 nm with approximately 2- and 1-nm resolution for the night and day instruments, respectively. They utilize microchannel-plate-based two-dimensional imaging detectors with wedge-and-strip anode readouts. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and calibrated at Boston University, and the TERRIERS satellite was launched on 18 May 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

  3. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...

  4. A tomograph VMEbus parallel processing data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, N.A.; Rogers, J.G.; Atkins, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a VME based data acquisition system suitable for the development of Positron Volume Imaging tomographs which use 3-D data for improved image resolution over slice-oriented tomographs. the data acquisition must be flexible enough to accommodate several 3-D reconstruction algorithms; hence, a software-based system is most suitable. Furthermore, because of the increased dimensions and resolution of volume imaging tomographs, the raw data event rate is greater than that of slice-oriented machines. These dual requirements are met by our data acquisition system. Flexibility is achieved through an array of processors connected over a VMEbus, operating asynchronously and in parallel. High raw data throughput is achieved using a dedicated high speed data transfer device available for the VMEbus. The device can attain a raw data rate of 2.5 million coincidence events per second for raw events which are 64 bits wide

  5. In Vivo Evaluation of 1-O-(4-(2-Fluoroethyl-Carbamoyloxymethyl-2-Nitrophenyl-O-β-D-Glucopyronuronate: A Positron Emission Tomographic Tracer for Imaging β-Glucuronidase Activity in a Tumor/Inflammation Rodent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iněs F. Antunes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available β-Glucuronidase (β-GUS plays an important role in inflammation and degenerative processes. The enzyme has also been investigated as a target in prodrug therapy for cancer. To investigate the role of β-GUS in pathologies and to optimize β-GUS-based prodrug therapies, we recently developed a positron emission tomographic (PET tracer, 1-O-(4-(2-fluoroethyl-carbamoyloxymethyl-2-nitrophenyl-O-β-D>-glucopyronuronate ([18F]FEAnGA, which proved to be selectively cleaved by β-GUS. Here we present the in vivo evaluation of [18F]FEAnGA for imaging of β-GUS in a tumor/inflammation model. Ex vivo biodistribution of [18F]FEAnGA was conducted in healthy rats. PET imaging and pharmacokinetic modeling were performed in Wistar rats bearing C6 tumors of different sizes and sterile inflammation. The biodistribution studies of [18F]FEAnGA indicated low uptake in major organs and rapid excretion through the renal pathway. MicroPET studies revealed three times higher uptake in the viable part of larger C6 gliomas than in smaller C6 gliomas. Uptake in inflamed muscle was significantly higher than in control muscle. The distribution volume of [18F]FEAnGA in the viable part of the tumor correlated well with the cleavage of the tracer to [18F]fluoroethylamine and the spacer 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzyl alcohol. [18F]FEAnGA is a PET tracer able to detect increased activity of β-GUS in large solid tumors and in inflamed tissues.

  6. Characterization of some modern scintillators recommended for use on large fusion facilities in γ-ray spectroscopy and tomographic measurements of γ-emission profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibczynski Pawel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available LaBr3:Ce,CeBr3 and GAGG:Ce scintillators were investigated and the determined characteristics were compared with those obtained for the well-known and widely used CsI:Tl and NaI:Tl crystals. All the detectors were of the same size of 10 × 10 × 5 mm3. The aim of this test study was to single out scintillation detectors most suitable for γ-ray spectrometry and γ-ray emission radial profile measurements in high-temperature plasma experiments. Decay time, energy resolution, non-proportionality and full energy peak detection efficiency ere measured for γ-ray energies up to 1770 keV. Due to their good energy resolution, short decay time and high detection efficiency for MeV gamma rays, LaBr3:Ce and CeBr3 scintillators are proposed as the best candidates for use especially under conditions of high count rates, which are expected in the forthcoming DT experiments.

  7. Development of a technique for three-dimensional image reconstruction from emission computed tomograms (ECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerischer, R.

    1987-01-01

    The described technique for three-dimensional image reconstruction from ECT sections is based on a simple procedure, which can be carried out with the aid of any standard-type computer used in nuclear medicine and requires no sophisticated arithmetic approach. (TRV) [de

  8. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments

  9. Ictal technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission tomographic findings and propagation of epileptic seizure activity in patients with extratemporal epilepsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noachtar, S.; Arnold, S.; Werhahn, K.J.; Yousry, T.A.; Tatsch, K.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the propagation of extratemporal epileptic seizure activity on the regional increase in cerebral blood flow, which is usually associated with epileptic seizure activity. Forty-two consecutive patients with extratemporal epilepsies were prospectively evaluated. All patients underwent ictal SPET studies with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and video recordings of habitual seizures and imaging studies including cranial magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography with 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2 deoxy-d-glucose. Propagation of epilptic seizure activity (PESA) was defined as the absence of hyperperfusion on ictal ECD SPET in the lobe of seizure onset, but its presence in another ipsilateral or contralateral lobe. Observers analysing the SPET images were not informed of the other results. PESA was observed in 8 of the 42 patients (19%) and was ipsilateral to the seizure onset in five (63%) of these eight patients. The time between clinical seizure onset and injection of the ECD tracer ranged from 14 to 61 s (mean 34 s). Seven patients (88%) with PESA had parieto-occipital epilepsy and one patient had a frontal epilepsy. PESA was statistically more frequent in patients with parieto-occipital lobe epilepsies (58%) than in the remaining extratemporal epilepsy syndromes (3%) (P<0.0002). These findings indicate that ictal SPET studies require simultaneous EEG-video recordings in patients with extratemporal epilepsies. PESA should be considered when interpreting ictal SPET studies in these patients. Patients with PESA are more likely to have parieto-occipital lobe epilepsy than seizure onset in other extratemporal regions. (orig./MG) (orig.)

  10. Parametric images via dynamic {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic data acquisition in predicting midterm outcome of liver metastases secondary to gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolopoulos, Dimitris J. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Patras Medical School, University of Patras, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Patras, Rion, Patras (Greece); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Roumia, Safwan; Strauss, Ludwig G. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Hohenberger, Peter [University of Heidelberg, Division of Surgical Oncology and Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) may underestimate viable tumour tissue in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) treated with molecular targeted agents. The aim of the present study was to investigate the value of parametric images generated after dynamic data acquisition for the detection of active liver metastases. The analysis included 65 dynamic FDG PET studies in 34 patients with liver metastases from GIST who were treated with imatinib or sunitinib. Parametric images of intercept and slope were calculated by dedicated software using a voxel-based linear regression of time-activity data. Intercept images represent the tracer's distribution volume and the slope its overall metabolic turnover. All images were assessed visually and semi-quantitatively. Liver disease status was established 12 months after each PET study. Dichotomous variables of visual interpretation and various quantitative parameters were entered in a statistical model of linear discriminant analysis. Visual analysis of slope images was more sensitive than the standard 1-h FDG uptake evaluation (70.6 vs 51.0%, p = 0.016) in detecting cases with liver disease progression (n = 51). Specificity did not differ. Combination of all variables in the discriminant analysis model correctly classified 87.7% of cases as progressive or non-progressive disease. Sensitivity was raised to 88.2%. Parametric images of intercept and slope add a new dimension to the interpretation of FDG PET studies, by isolating visually and quantifying the perfusion and phosphorylation-dependent part of tracer uptake. In treated GIST patients, integration of this information with the 1-h uptake data achieves better characterization of hepatic lesions with respect to disease activity. (orig.)

  11. Tomographic phase analysis to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Tada, A.; Tonami, N.; Taki, J.; Nanbu, I.; Hisada, K.; Misaki, T.; Iwa, T.

    1984-01-01

    Phase analysis has been applied to Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway (ACP); however, there was a limitation to estimate the precise location of ACP by planar phase analysis. In this study, the authors applied phase analysis to gated blood pool tomography. Twelve patients with WPW who underwent epicardial mapping and surgical division of ACP were studied by both of gated emission computed tomography (GECT) and routine gated blood pool study (GBPS). The GBPS was performed with Tc-99m red blood cells in multiple projections; modified left anterior oblique, right anterior oblique and/or left lateral views. In GECT, short axial, horizontal and vertical long axial blood pool images were reconstructed. Phase analysis was performed using fundamental frequency of the Fourier transform in both GECT and GBPS images, and abnormal initial contractions on both the planar and tomographic phase analysis were compared with the location of surgically confirmed ACPs. In planar phase analysis, abnormal initial phase was identified in 7 out of 12 (58%) patients, while in tomographic phase analysis, the localization of ACP was predicted in 11 out of 12 (92%) patients. Tomographic phase analysis is superior to planar phase images in 8 out of 12 patients to estimate the location of ACP. Phase analysis by GECT can avoid overlap of blood pool in cardiac chambers and has advantage to identify the propagation of phase three-dimensionally. Tomographic phase analysis is a good adjunctive method for patients with WPW to estimate the site of ACP

  12. Computerized tomographic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbarsen, R.; Barrett, D.M.; Garrott, P.M.; Foley, L.E.; Redington, R.W.; Lambert, T.W.; Edelheit, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized tomographic system for examining human breasts is described in detail. Conventional X-ray scanning apparatus has difficulty in achieving the levels of image definition and examination speeds required for mass screening. A novel method of scanning successive layers of the breast with a rotating X-ray beam is discussed and details of the control circuitry and sequence steps are given. The method involves immersing the breast in an inner fluid (e.g. water) filled container which is stationary during an examination and is surrounded by a large outer container which is also filled with the fluid; the inner and outer containers are always maintained at a constant height and the X-ray absorption across the fan-shaped beam is as close as possible to constant. (U.K.)

  13. Tomographic Scanning Imaging Seeker

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hovland, Harald

    2005-01-01

    .... Simulation results are provided to show the reconstruction quality. The concept, using a single pixel and a simple rotating axis scan mechanism, allows for a simple, low-cost, software-driven imaging sensor...

  14. Computer Reconstruction of Plant Growth and Chlorophyll Fluorescence Emission in Three Spatial Dimensions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bellasio, Ch.; Olejníčková, Julie; Tesař, R.; Šebela, David; Nedbal, Ladislav

    Roč. 12, č. 1 ( 2012 ), s. 1052-1071 ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/09/1565; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : 3D reconstruction * chlorophyll fluorescence imaging * leaf area * leaf angle * plant growth * coded light Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.953, year: 2012

  15. Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography: Background corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, Carey E.; Sharma, Amy C.; Bender, Janelle E.; Kapadia, Anuj J.; Xia, Jessie Q.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kiser, Matthew R.; Crowell, Alexander S.; Pedroni, Ronald S.; Macri, Robert A.; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Howell, Calvin R.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is an imaging technique that provides an in-vivo tomographic spectroscopic image of the distribution of elements in a body. To achieve this, a neutron beam illuminates the body. Nuclei in the body along the path of the beam are stimulated by inelastic scattering of the neutrons in the beam and emit characteristic gamma photons whose unique energy identifies the element. The emitted gammas are collected in a spectrometer and form a projection intensity for each spectral line at the projection orientation of the neutron beam. Rotating and translating either the body or the beam will allow a tomographic projection set to be acquired. Images are reconstructed to represent the spatial distribution of elements in the body. Critical to this process is the appropriate removal of background gamma events from the spectrum. Here we demonstrate the equivalence of two background correction techniques and discuss the appropriate application of each

  16. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, Ram [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Smith, Susan [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. M. [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  17. A fast multi-resolution approach to tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discetti, Stefano; Astarita, Tommaso

    2012-03-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) is a recently developed three-component, three-dimensional anemometric non-intrusive measurement technique, based on an optical tomographic reconstruction applied to simultaneously recorded images of the distribution of light intensity scattered by seeding particles immersed into the flow. Nowadays, the reconstruction process is carried out mainly by iterative algebraic reconstruction techniques, well suited to handle the problem of limited number of views, but computationally intensive and memory demanding. The adoption of the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) has become more and more accepted. In the present work, a novel multi-resolution approach is proposed, relying on the adoption of a coarser grid in the first step of the reconstruction to obtain a fast estimation of a reliable and accurate first guess. A performance assessment, carried out on three-dimensional computer-generated distributions of particles, shows a substantial acceleration of the reconstruction process for all the tested seeding densities with respect to the standard method based on 5 MART iterations; a relevant reduction in the memory storage is also achieved. Furthermore, a slight accuracy improvement is noticed. A modified version, improved by a multiplicative line of sight estimation of the first guess on the compressed configuration, is also tested, exhibiting a further remarkable decrease in both memory storage and computational effort, mostly at the lowest tested seeding densities, while retaining the same performances in terms of accuracy.

  18. Identification of the stimulated-emission threshold in high-β nanoscale lasers through phase-space reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachair, X.; Elvira, D.; Le Gratiet, L.; Lemaitre, A.; Abram, I.; Sagnes, I.; Robert-Philip, I.; Beveratos, A.; Braive, R.; Lippi, G. L.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoscale lasers sustain a few optical modes so that the fraction of spontaneous emission β funnelled into the useful (lasing) mode is high (of the order of 10 -1 ) and the threshold, which traditionally corresponds to an abrupt kink in the light-in-light-out curve, becomes ill defined. We propose an alternative definition of the threshold that is based on the dynamical response of the laser and is valid even for β=1 lasers. The laser dynamics is analyzed through a reconstruction of its phase-space trajectory for pulsed excitations. Crossing the threshold, brings about a change in the shape of the trajectory and in the area contained in it. An unambiguous determination of the threshold in terms of this change is shown theoretically and illustrated experimentally in a photonic-crystal laser.

  19. A general purpose tomographic program with combined inversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenbin; Dong Jiafu; Li Fanzhu

    1996-01-01

    A general tomographic program has been developed by combining the Bessel expansion with the Zernicke expansion. It is useful for studying of the magnetic island structure of the tearing mode and in reconstructing the density profiles of impurities in tokamak plasmas. This combined method have the advantages of both expansions, i.e. there will be no spurious images in the edge and it will be of high inverse precision in the center of plasma

  20. High resolution acoustic measurement system and beam pattern reconstruction method for bat echolocation emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, Jason E; Kloepper, Laura N; Warnecke, Michaela; Simmons, James A

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the transmit beam patterns emitted by echolocating bats have previously been limited to cross-sectional planes or averaged over multiple signals using sparse microphone arrays. To date, no high-resolution measurements of individual bat transmit beams have been reported in the literature. Recent studies indicate that bats may change the time-frequency structure of their calls depending on the task, and suggest that their beam patterns are more dynamic than previously thought. To investigate beam pattern dynamics in a variety of bat species, a high-density reconfigurable microphone array was designed and constructed using low-cost ultrasonic microphones and custom electronic circuitry. The planar array is 1.83 m wide by 1.42 m tall with microphones positioned on a 2.54 cm square grid. The system can capture up to 228 channels simultaneously at a 500 kHz sampling rate. Beam patterns are reconstructed in azimuth, elevation, and frequency for visualization and further analysis. Validation of the array measurement system and post-processing functions is shown by reconstructing the beam pattern of a transducer with a fixed circular aperture and comparing the result with a theoretical model. To demonstrate the system in use, transmit beam patterns of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, are shown.

  1. Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrakis, George [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rannou, Fernando R [Departamento de Ingenieria Informatica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3659, Santiago (Chile); Chatziioannou, Arion F [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    The feasibility and limits in performing tomographic bioluminescence imaging with a combined optical-PET (OPET) system were explored by simulating its image formation process. A micro-MRI based virtual mouse phantom was assigned appropriate tissue optical properties to each of its segmented internal organs at wavelengths spanning the emission spectrum of the firefly luciferase at 37 deg. C. The TOAST finite-element code was employed to simulate the diffuse transport of photons emitted from bioluminescence sources in the mouse. OPET measurements were simulated for single-point, two-point and distributed bioluminescence sources located in different organs such as the liver, the kidneys and the gut. An expectation maximization code was employed to recover the intensity and location of these simulated sources. It was found that spectrally resolved measurements were necessary in order to perform tomographic bioluminescence imaging. The true location of emission sources could be recovered if the mouse background optical properties were known a priori. The assumption of a homogeneous optical property background proved inadequate for describing photon transport in optically heterogeneous tissues and led to inaccurate source localization in the reconstructed images. The simulation results pointed out specific methodological challenges that need to be addressed before a practical implementation of OPET-based bioluminescence tomography is achieved.

  2. Mesooptical microscope as a tomographical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroko, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that there are at least four regions which are common for the mesooptical microscopes, on the one hand, and for the reconstructed tomography, on the other hand. The following characteristics of the mesooptical microscope show the tomographical properties: the structure of the output data concerning the orientation and the position in space of the straight-line objects going at small angles with the perpendicular to the given tomographic plane, the behaviour of the two-dimensional fourier-transform of the straight-line object in the course of the rotation of this object with respect to the specified axis in space, the scanning algorithm of the nuclear emulsion volume by the fence-like illuminated region in the mesooptical microscope for searching for particle tracks going parallel to the optical axis of the microscope, and, finally, the fact that the mesooptical images of the straight-line particle tracks with a common vertex in the nuclear emulsion lie on the sinogram. 12 refs.; 16 figs

  3. The radio emission pattern of air showers as measured with LOFAR—a tool for the reconstruction of the energy and the shower maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelles, A.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Trinh, Gia

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of the radio emission of air showers is finely sampled with the Low-Frequency ARray (LOFAR). A set of 382 measured air showers is used to test a fast, analytic parameterization of the distribution of pulse powers. Using this parameterization we are able to reconstruct the shower axis and

  4. Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT) images enhancement using a linear filter in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Rodrigo S.S.; Tardelli, Tiago C.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Jackowski, Marcel P.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a new technique for in vivo spectrographic imaging of stable isotopes was presented as Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). In this technique, a fast neutrons beam stimulates stable nuclei in a sample, which emit characteristic gamma radiation. The photon energy is unique and is used to identify the emitting nuclei. The emitted gamma energy spectra can be used for reconstruction of the target tissue image and for determination of the tissue elemental composition. Due to the stochastic nature of photon emission process by irradiated tissue, one of the most suitable algorithms for tomographic reconstruction is the Expectation-Maximization (E-M) algorithm, once on its formulation are considered simultaneously the probabilities of photons emission and detection. However, a disadvantage of this algorithm is the introduction of noise in the reconstructed image as the number of iterations increases. This increase can be caused either by features of the algorithm itself or by the low sampling rate of projections used for tomographic reconstruction. In this work, a linear filter in the frequency domain was used in order to improve the quality of the reconstructed images. (author)

  5. Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT) images enhancement using a linear filter in the frequency domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Rodrigo S.S.; Tardelli, Tiago C.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jackowski, Marcel P., E-mail: mjack@ime.usp.b [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Computer Science

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, a new technique for in vivo spectrographic imaging of stable isotopes was presented as Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT). In this technique, a fast neutrons beam stimulates stable nuclei in a sample, which emit characteristic gamma radiation. The photon energy is unique and is used to identify the emitting nuclei. The emitted gamma energy spectra can be used for reconstruction of the target tissue image and for determination of the tissue elemental composition. Due to the stochastic nature of photon emission process by irradiated tissue, one of the most suitable algorithms for tomographic reconstruction is the Expectation-Maximization (E-M) algorithm, once on its formulation are considered simultaneously the probabilities of photons emission and detection. However, a disadvantage of this algorithm is the introduction of noise in the reconstructed image as the number of iterations increases. This increase can be caused either by features of the algorithm itself or by the low sampling rate of projections used for tomographic reconstruction. In this work, a linear filter in the frequency domain was used in order to improve the quality of the reconstructed images. (author)

  6. Amplitude-based data selection for optimal retrospective reconstruction in micro-SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuilly, M.; Malandain, G.; Guglielmi, J.; Marsault, R.; Pourcher, T.; Franken, P. R.; Darcourt, J.

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory motion can blur the tomographic reconstruction of positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images, which subsequently impair quantitative measurements, e.g. in the upper abdomen area. Respiratory signal phase-based gated reconstruction addresses this problem, but deteriorates the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and other intensity-based quality measures. This paper proposes a 3D reconstruction method dedicated to micro-SPECT imaging of mice. From a 4D acquisition, the phase images exhibiting motion are identified and the associated list-mode data are discarded, which enables the reconstruction of a 3D image without respiratory artefacts. The proposed method allows a motion-free reconstruction exhibiting both satisfactory count statistics and accuracy of measures. With respect to standard 3D reconstruction (non-gated 3D reconstruction) without breathing motion correction, an increase of 14.6% of the mean standardized uptake value has been observed, while, with respect to a gated 4D reconstruction, up to 60% less noise and an increase of up to 124% of the SNR have been demonstrated.

  7. single photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography - Part 1 (October 2012), Part 2 (October 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. Part 1 Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, gamma photon emitters, positon emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Gamma cameras; 4 - Quantification in emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion. Part 2 content: 1 - Positon emitters; 2 - Positons detection: Coincidence detection (electronic collimation, PET detectors with gamma cameras, dedicated PET detectors, spectrometry); PET detectors type; time-of-flight PET; 2D PET; 3D PET; 3 - Quantification in emission tomography: detected events, attenuation, scattering, fortuitous coincidences, standardisation; 4 - Common SPECT and PET problems: partial volume effect, movement, tomographic reconstruction, calibration, dead time; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  8. Small animal positron emission tomography with gas detectors. Simulations, prototyping, and quantitative image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernekohl, Don

    2014-04-15

    plain surfaces, predicted by simulations, was observed. Third, as the production of photon converters is time consuming and expensive, it was investigated whether or not thin gas detectors with single-lead-layer-converters would be an alternative to the HIDAC converter design. Following simulations, those concepts potentially offer impressive coincidence sensitivities up to 24% for plain lead foils and up to 40% for perforated lead foils. Fourth, compared to other PET scanner systems, the HIDAC concept suffers from missing energy information. Consequently, a substantial amount of scatter events can be found within the measured data. On the basis of image reconstruction and correction techniques the influence of random and scatter events and their characteristics on several simulated phantoms were presented. It was validated with the HIDAC simulator that the applied correction technique results in perfectly corrected images. Moreover, it was shown that the simulator is a credible tool to provide quantitatively improved images. Fifth, a new model for the non-collinearity of the positronium annihilation was developed, since it was observed that the model implemented in the GATE simulator does not correspond to the measured observation. The input parameter of the new model was trimmed to match to a point source measurement. The influence of both models on the spatial resolution was studied with three different reconstruction methods. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the reduction of converter depth, proposed for increased sensitivity, also has an advantage on the spatial resolution and that a reduction of the FOV from 17 cm to 4 cm (with only 2 detector heads) results in a remarkable sensitivity increase of 150% and a substantial increase in spatial resolution. The presented simulations for the spatial resolution analysis used an intrinsic detector resolution of 0.125 x 0.125 x 3.2 mm{sup 3} and were able to reach fair resolutions down to 0.9-0.5 mm, which is an

  9. Computer tomographic diagnosis of echinococcosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertel, M.; Fretz, C.; Fuchs, W.A.

    1980-08-01

    The computer tomographic appearances and differential diagnosis in 22 patients with echinococcosis are described; of these, twelve were of the cystic and ten of the alveolar type. The computer tomographic appearances are characterised by the presence of daughter cysts (66%) within the sharply demarkated parasitic cyst of water density. In the absence of daughter cysts, a definite aetiological diagnosis cannot be made, although there is a tendency to clasification of the occassionally multiple echinococcus cysts. The computer tomographic appearances of advanced alveolar echinococcosis are characterised by partial collequative necrosis, with clacification around the necrotic areas (90%). The absence of CT evidence of partial necrosis and calsification of the pseudotumour makes it difficult to establish a specific diagnosis. The conclusive and non-invasive character of the procedure and its reproducibility makes computer tomography the method of choice for the diagnosis and follow-up of echinococcosis.

  10. Reconstructing Methane Emission Events in the Arctic Ocean: Observations from the Past to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panieri, G.; Mienert, J.; Fornari, D. J.; Torres, M. E.; Lepland, A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrates are ice-like crystals that are present along continental margins, occurring in the pore space of deep sediments or as massive blocks near the seafloor. They form in high pressure and low temperature environments constrained by thermodynamic stability, and supply of methane. In the Arctic, gas hydrates are abundant, and the methane released by their destabilization can affect local to global carbon budgets and cycles, ocean acidification, and benthic community survival. With the aim to locate in space and time the periodicity of methane venting, CAGE is engaged in a vast research program in the Arctic, a component of which comprises the analyses of numerous sediment cores and correlative geophysical and geochemical data from different areas. Here we present results from combined analyses of biogenic carbonate archives along the western Svalbard Margin, which reveal past methane venting events in this region. The reconstruction of paleo-methane discharge is complicated by precipitation of secondary carbonate on foraminifera shells, driven by an increase in alkalinity during anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The biogeochemical processes involved in methane cycling and processes that drive methane migration affect the depth where AOM occurs, with relevance to secondary carbonate formation. Our results show the value and complexity of separating primary vs. secondary signals in bioarchives with relevance to understanding fluid-burial history in methane seep provinces. Results from our core analyses are integrated with observations made during the CAGE15-2 cruise in May 2015, when we deployed a towed vehicle equipped with camera, multicore and water sampling capabilities. The instrument design was based on the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) MISO TowCam sled equipped with a deep-sea digital camera and CTD real-time system. Sediment sampling was visually-guided using this system. In one of the pockmarks along the Vestnesa Ridge where high

  11. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Mehranian, A.; Zaidi, H.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic parameter estimation in dynamic PET suffers from reduced accuracy and precision when parametric maps are estimated using kinetic modelling following image reconstruction of the dynamic data. Direct approaches to parameter estimation attempt to directly estimate the kinetic parameters from the measured dynamic data within a unified framework. Such image reconstruction methods have been shown to generate parametric maps of improved precision and accuracy in dynamic PET. However, due to the interleaving between the tomographic and kinetic modelling steps, any tomographic or kinetic modelling errors in certain regions or frames, tend to spatially or temporally propagate. This results in biased kinetic parameters and thus limits the benefits of such direct methods. Kinetic modelling errors originate from the inability to construct a common single kinetic model for the entire field-of-view, and such errors in erroneously modelled regions could spatially propagate. Adaptive models have been used within 4D image reconstruction to mitigate the problem, though they are complex and difficult to optimize. Tomographic errors in dynamic imaging on the other hand, can originate from involuntary patient motion between dynamic frames, as well as from emission/transmission mismatch. Motion correction schemes can be used, however, if residual errors exist or motion correction is not included in the study protocol, errors in the affected dynamic frames could potentially propagate either temporally, to other frames during the kinetic modelling step or spatially, during the tomographic step. In this work, we demonstrate a new strategy to minimize such error propagation in direct 4D image reconstruction, focusing on the tomographic step rather than the kinetic modelling step, by incorporating time-of-flight (TOF) within a direct 4D reconstruction framework. Using ever improving TOF resolutions (580 ps, 440 ps, 300 ps and 160 ps), we demonstrate that direct 4D TOF image

  12. Formation of tomographic images with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, A.; Tenreiro, C; Valencia, J; Steinman, G.; Henriquez, C

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of having a non-destructive method of analysis for archaeological and paleontological samples is of interest. A special group of fossil samples has come to our attention, which because of their value should be preserved and, therefore, the availability of an indirect, non-destructive, non contaminating analytical technique is important. The strong absorption of usual kinds of radiation by a fossilized sample restricts the application of conventional methods of analysis. A type of radiation that is not completely attenuated by thick samples, in sizes that are typical in paleontology, is necessary. Neutrons may be considered as an ideal non-invasive probe with the possibility of developing a technique for the formation and analysis of images. A technique has been developed for the spatial reconstruction of the contents of a fossilized sample (tomography) with neutrons, without touching or altering the sample in any way. The neutron beam was extracted from the RECH-1 reactor belonging to the CCHEN, La Reina. The tomographic images of the contents of a fossilized egg are presented for the first time and represent views or cuts of the content as well as a set that permits the three dimensional reconstruction of the inside of the object and its subsequent animation in graphic format. This project developed a technique for taking neutron radiographs of this kind of sample including the numerical algorithms and the treatment and formation of the images (CW)

  13. A feasibility study on a tomograph for radioactive waste examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montigon, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    A feasibility study on a high-energy tomograph for radioactive waste examination has been carried out by CEA/SEDFMA (Cadarache, France). After describing the scope of the research (radiation source, detector system, data processing, station mechanics), this final report deals with the work programme which has been followed and gives the results of the research. The conclusion is that such a tomograph is feasible, and its preliminary design is shown. The main points are that: - the detector material will be BGO, - the transmission of gamma rays through concrete (up to 1 625 mm thick) has been measured and a calculation code has been validated, - the radiation source will be an accelerator which has to be carefully optimized, - the system configuration has been determined and the data processors have been chosen, - the algorithms for image reconstruction have been validated through taking a tomogram on a concrete sample

  14. Original circuitry for TOHR tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzon, J.C.; Pinot, L.

    1999-01-01

    Having industrialization in mind, a specific electronics for a high resolution tomograph is designed out of the usual standards of nuclear physics. All the information are converted in the time domain and a fast processor, in front of the data acquisition, carries out the time and energy coincidences. (authors)

  15. The effect of scatter correction on planar and tomographic semiquantitative 123I cardiac imaging. A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Emmanouil; Moralidis, Efstratios; Siountas, Anastasios

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac I-123 ( 123 I) imaging downscatter from high energy emissions degrades the image and introduces distortion of semi-quantitative analysis when using a low energy collimator. The effect of a triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction technique, using windows immediately above and below the principal window centered on 159keV, was examined. A hemispherical cardiac phantom was inserted into a cylindrical phantom and both were filled with radioactive 123 I water solutions. Phantoms were submitted to planar and tomographic scintigraphy under various acquisition and processing conditions, including the use of medium energy (ME) and low energy (LE) collimation. In planar imaging, there was a distance dependent count loss with the LEHR collimator which was partly restored with TEW correction. There was minimal dependence of count rate with distance in using ME collimation. Conversely, the heart to background (H/B) ratio increased with increasing distance with the LEHR collimator, but in applying the TEW correction that ratio paralleled the minimally affected values obtained with the ME collimation. In tomographic imaging the acquired H/B ratio was lower with LE collimation alone, in comparison to the ME collimator, but it was raised significantly when applying the TEW scatter correction. Quantitative measurements also depended on the background method and the reconstruction algorithm applied. In cardiac 123 I imaging with a LE collimator the use of TEW scatter correction provides a semi-quantitative assessment comparable to that attained with ME collimation and may moderate inter-institutional inconsistencies.

  16. Tomographic patient registration and conformal avoidance tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Jennifer Stacy

    Development of tomotherapy has led to the emergence of several processes, providing the basis for many unique investigative opportunities. These processes include setup verification, tomographic verification, megavoltage dose reconstruction, and conformal avoidance tomotherapy. Setup verification and conformal avoidance tomotherapy, in particular, are two closely intertwined matters. In order to avoid critical structures located within or adjacent to indistinct tumor regions, accurate patient positioning from fraction to fraction must be ensured. With tomographic patient registration, a higher level of assurance is offered than with traditional positioning methods. Translational and rotational offsets are calculated directly from projection data using cross- correlation or fast Fourier transforms. Experiments assessing the algorithm's ability to calculate individual offsets were conducted using the University of Wisconsin's Tomotherapy Benchtop. These experiments indicate statistical errors within +/-1 mm for offsets up to approximately 20 mm, with maximum offset errors of about +/-2 mm for displacements up to 35 mm. The angular offset component is within +/-2°. To evaluate the registration process as a whole, experimental results from a few multi-parameter examples are also analyzed. With the development of tomographic patient registration in projection space, efforts to promote further sparing of critical structures are justified. Conformal avoidance tomotherapy has as its objective to treat an indistinct tumor region while conformally avoiding any normal critical structures in that region. To demonstrate the advantages of conformal avoidance tomotherapy, conventional and tomotherapy treatments are contrasted for both nasopharyngeal and breast carcinoma cases. For initial research efforts, computed tomography data sets of a human male and female were obtained via the ``Visible Human Project''. Since these data sets are on the order of hundreds of megabytes, both

  17. Clinical evaluation of iterative reconstruction (ordered-subset expectation maximization) in dynamic positron emission tomography: quantitative effects on kinetic modeling with N-13 ammonia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens D; Rasmussen, Rune; Freiberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    emission tomography (PET) studies from 20 normal volunteers at rest and during dipyridamole stimulation were analyzed. Image data were reconstructed with either FBP or OSEM. FBP- and OSEM-derived input functions and tissue curves were compared together with the myocardial blood flow and spillover values....... The late area under the OSEM input functions during dipyridamole is overestimated by 30% (P ... and input functions cause the resting myocardial blood flow to be underestimated by 15% (P

  18. Dual matrix ordered subsets reconstruction for accelerated 3D scatter compensation in single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamphuis, C.; Beekman, F.J.; Van Rijk, P.P.; Viergever, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithms for single-photon emission tomography (SPET) are capable of correcting image-degrading effects of non-uniform attenuation, distance-dependent camera response and patient shape-dependent scatter. However, the resulting improvements in quantitation, resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are obtained at the cost of a huge computational burden. This paper presents a new acceleration method for ML-EM: dual matrix ordered subsets (DM-OS). DM-OS combines two acceleration methods: (a) different matrices for projection and back-projection and (b) ordered subsets of projections. DM-OS was compared with ML-EM on simulated data and on physical thorax phantom data, for both 180 and 360 orbits. Contrast, normalized standard deviation and mean squared error were calculated for the digital phantom experiment. DM-OS resulted in similar image quality to ML-EM, even for speed-up factors of 200 compared to ML-EM in the case of 120 projections. The thorax phantom data could be reconstructed 50 times faster (60 projections) using DM-OS with preservation of image quality. ML-EM and DM-OS with scatter compensation showed significant improvement of SNR compared to ML-EM without scatter compensation. Furthermore, inclusion of complex image formation models in the computer code is simplified in the case of DM-OS. It is thus shown that DM-OS is a fast and relatively simple algorithm for 3D iterative scatter compensation, with similar results to conventional ML-EM, for both 180 and 360 acquired data. (orig.)

  19. Determination of pressure and load characteristics of flexible revolving wings by means of tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Meerendonk, R.; Perçin, M.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the flow field and fluid-dynamic loads generated by revolving low-aspect-ratio wings. The pressure field and load characteristics are successfully reconstructed from the phase-locked tomographic measurements in three independently measured volumes along the span of the wing. The

  20. Processing of acquisition data for a time of flight positron tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, G.

    1987-10-01

    After a review of basic principles concerning the time of flight positron tomography, the LETI positron tomograph is briefly described. For performance optimization (acquisition, calibration, image reconstruction), various specialized operators have been designed: the realization of the acquisition system is presented [fr

  1. A comparison of quantitative reconstruction techniques for PIXE-tomography analysis applied to biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, D.G., E-mail: dgbeasley@ctn.ist.utl.pt [IST/C2TN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [IST/C2TN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Barberet, Ph.; Bourret, S.; Devès, G.; Gordillo, N.; Michelet, C. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Le Trequesser, Q. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Marques, A.C. [IST/IPFN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Seznec, H. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Silva, R.C. da [IST/IPFN, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal)

    2014-07-15

    The tomographic reconstruction of biological specimens requires robust algorithms, able to deal with low density contrast and low element concentrations. At the IST/ITN microprobe facility new GPU-accelerated reconstruction software, JPIXET, has been developed, which can significantly increase the speed of quantitative reconstruction of Proton Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) data. It has a user-friendly graphical user interface for pre-processing, data analysis and reconstruction of PIXE-T and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T). The reconstruction of PIXE-T data is performed using either an algorithm based on a GPU-accelerated version of the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximisation (MLEM) method or a GPU-accelerated version of the Discrete Image Space Reconstruction Algorithm (DISRA) (Sakellariou (2001) [2]). The original DISRA, its accelerated version, and the MLEM algorithm, were compared for the reconstruction of a biological sample of Caenorhabditis elegans – a small worm. This sample was analysed at the microbeam line of the AIFIRA facility of CENBG, Bordeaux. A qualitative PIXE-T reconstruction was obtained using the CENBG software package TomoRebuild (Habchi et al. (2013) [6]). The effects of pre-processing and experimental conditions on the elemental concentrations are discussed.

  2. Utilisation of spatial and temporal correlations in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sureau, F.

    2008-06-01

    In this thesis we propose, implement, and evaluate algorithms improving spatial resolution in reconstructed images and reducing data noise in positron emission tomography imaging. These algorithms have been developed for a high resolution tomograph (HRRT) and applied to brain imaging, but can be used for other tomographs or studies. We first developed an iterative reconstruction algorithm including a stationary and isotropic model of resolution in image space, experimentally measured. We evaluated the impact of such a model of resolution in Monte-Carlo simulations, physical phantom experiments and in two clinical studies by comparing our algorithm with a reference reconstruction algorithm. This study suggests that biases due to partial volume effects are reduced, in particular in the clinical studies. Better spatial and temporal correlations are also found at the voxel level. However, other methods should be developed to further reduce data noise. We then proposed a maximum a posteriori de-noising algorithm that can be used for dynamic data to de-noise temporally raw data (sino-grams) or reconstructed images. The a priori modeled the coefficients in a wavelet basis of all the signals without noise (in an image or sinogram). We compared this technique with a reference de-noising method on replicated simulations. This illustrates the potential benefits of our approach of sinogram de-noising. (author)

  3. Impact of attenuation correction strategies on the quantification of High Resolution Research Tomograph PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velden, Floris H P van; Kloet, Reina W; Berckel, Bart N M van; Molthoff, Carla F M; Jong, Hugo W A M de; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the quantitative accuracy of different attenuation correction strategies presently available for the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) was investigated. These attenuation correction methods differ in reconstruction and processing (segmentation) algorithms used for generating a μ-image from measured 2D transmission scans, an intermediate step in the generation of 3D attenuation correction factors. Available methods are maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction (MAP-TR), unweighted OSEM (UW-OSEM) and NEC-TR, which transforms sinogram values back to their noise equivalent counts (NEC) to restore Poisson distribution. All methods can be applied with or without μ-image segmentation. However, for MAP-TR a μ-histogram is a prior during reconstruction. All possible strategies were evaluated using phantoms of various sizes, simulating preclinical and clinical situations. Furthermore, effects of emission contamination of the transmission scan on the accuracy of various attenuation correction strategies were studied. Finally, the accuracy of various attenuation corrections strategies and its relative impact on the reconstructed activity concentration (AC) were evaluated using small animal and human brain studies. For small structures, MAP-TR with human brain priors showed smaller differences in μ-values for transmission scans with and without emission contamination (<8%) than the other methods (<26%). In addition, it showed best agreement with true AC (deviation <4.5%). A specific prior designed to take into account the presence of small animal fixation devices only very slightly improved AC precision to 4.3%. All methods scaled μ-values of a large homogeneous phantom to within 4% of the water peak, but MAP-TR provided most accurate AC after reconstruction. However, for clinical data MAP-TR using the default prior settings overestimated the thickness of the skull, resulting in overestimations of μ-values in regions near the skull and thus in incorrect

  4. Computer tomographic findings in neurosyphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithran K

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer tomographic features of the brain in 2 cases of neurosyphilis are described. Less prominence of the cortical sulci suggesting cortical atrophy was the predominant feature in a case of general paralysis of insane. Diffuse, irregular, non-enhancing, low-attenuated area in the cortical and subcortical region of the right temporoparietal lobe of a patient with vascular syphilis, suggested infarction of the brain.

  5. Development of the Shimadzu computed tomographic scanner SCT-200N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    The Shimadzu Computed Tomographic Scanner SCT-200N has been developed as an ideal CT scanner for diagnosing the head and spine. Due to the large aperture, moderate scan time and the Zoom Scan Mode, any part of the body can be scanned. High quality image can be obtained by adopting the precisely stabilized X-ray unit and densely packed array of 64-detectors. As for its operation, capability of computed radiography (CR) prior to patient positioning and real time reconstruction ensure efficient patient through-put. Details of the SCT-200N are described in this paper. (author)

  6. Preoperative imaging for DIEA perforator flaps: a comparative study of computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, Warren M; Phillips, Timothy J; Ashton, Mark W; Stella, Damien L; Gibson, Robert N; Taylor, G Ian

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal donor-site flaps, including the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) and deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flaps, are standard in autologous breast reconstruction. With significant variation in the vascular anatomy of the abdominal wall, preoperative imaging is essential for preoperative planning and reducing intraoperative error. Doppler and color duplex sonography have been used with varying results, and the quest continues for optimal preoperative assessment. Computed tomographic angiography has recently been proposed as a noninvasive modality for this purpose. This is the first study to formally compare preoperative Doppler ultrasound with computed tomographic angiography for imaging the DIEA. Eight consecutive patients undergoing DIEA perforator flap surgery for breast reconstruction underwent both computed tomographic angiography and Doppler ultrasound preoperatively. All investigations and procedures were performed at the same institution with the same primary and assisting surgeons and the same radiology team. Computed tomographic angiography was superior to Doppler ultrasound at identifying the course of the DIEA and its branching pattern, and in visualizing its perforators. Preoperative computed tomographic angiography was highly specific (100 percent) and more sensitive in mapping and visualizing perforators (p = 0.0078). It was also proficient at identifying the superficial epigastric arterial system and for effectively displaying the results intraoperatively. It was substantially quicker and removed the interobserver error associated with Doppler ultrasonography. The study was ceased after eight patients because of the overwhelming benefit of computed tomographic angiography over Doppler ultrasonography. Computed tomographic angiography is a valuable imaging modality for the preoperative assessment of the donor-site vascular supply for TRAM and DIEA perforator flaps.

  7. A preliminary design study for improving performance in tomographic assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estep, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    The authors recently introduced the tomographic-gamma-scanner (TGS) method for assaying transuranic (TRU) waste and special nuclear material (SNM) in 55-gal drums. The TGS combines low-resolution emission and transmission tomography to obtain attenuation-corrected images of the radionuclide distribution inside a drum. In a low-resolution tomographic assay device, it is desirable to have as flat an efficiency profile as possible. Using computer simulations, they have demonstrated that a flat response in the vertical direction can be obtained by using a diamond-shaped collimator, and that this flatness of response translates into improved assay accuracy. Similarly, they have shown that the use of a continuous-motion scan protocol reduces horizontal efficiency variations

  8. A tomograph VMEbus parallel processing data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, M.S.; Wilkinson, N.A.; Rogers, J.G.

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes a VME based data acquisition system suitable for the development of Positron Volume Imaging tomographs which use 3-D data for improved image resolution over slice-oriented tomographs. The data acquisition must be flexible enough to accommodate several 3-D reconstruction algorithms; hence, a software-based system is most suitable. Furthermore, because of the increased dimensions and resolution of volume imaging tomographs, the raw data event rate is greater than that of slice-oriented machines. These dual requirements are met by our data acquisition systems. Flexibility is achieved through an array of processors connected over a VMEbus, operating asynchronously and in parallel. High raw data throughput is achieved using a dedicated high speed data transfer device available for the VMEbus. The device can attain a raw data rate of 2.5 million coincidence events per second for raw events per second for raw events which are 64 bits wide. Real-time data acquisition and pre-processing requirements can be met by about forty 20 MHz Motorola 68020/68881 processors

  9. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Alarfaj, Meshal K.

    2016-02-01

    Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging by Meshal K Alarfaj, Master of Science King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, 2015 Tomographic Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a recent PIV method capable of reconstructing the full 3D velocity field of complex flows, within a 3-D volume. For nearly the last decade, it has become the most powerful tool for study of turbulent velocity fields and promises great advancements in the study of fluid mechanics. Among the early published studies, a good number of researches have suggested enhancements and optimizations of different aspects of this technique to improve the effectiveness. One major aspect, which is the core of the present work, is related to reducing the cost of the Tomographic PIV setup. In this thesis, we attempt to reduce this cost by using an experimental setup exploiting 4 commercial digital still cameras in combination with low-cost Light emitting diodes (LEDs). We use two different colors to distinguish the two light pulses. By using colored shadows with red and green LEDs, we can identify the particle locations within the measurement volume, at the two different times, thereby allowing calculation of the velocities. The present work tests this technique on the flows patterns of a jet ejected from a tube in a water tank. Results from the images processing are presented and challenges discussed.

  10. A wavelet phase filter for emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, E.T.; Lin, B.

    1995-01-01

    The presence of a high level of noise is a characteristic in some tomographic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Wavelet methods can smooth out noise while preserving significant features of images. Mallat et al. proposed a wavelet based denoising scheme exploiting wavelet modulus maxima, but the scheme is sensitive to noise. In this study, the authors explore the properties of wavelet phase, with a focus on reconstruction of emission tomography images. Specifically, they show that the wavelet phase of regular Poisson noise under a Haar-type wavelet transform converges in distribution to a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 2π). They then propose three wavelet-phase-based denoising schemes which exploit this property: edge tracking, local phase variance thresholding, and scale phase variation thresholding. Some numerical results are also presented. The numerical experiments indicate that wavelet phase techniques show promise for wavelet based denoising methods

  11. Techniques of noninvasive optical tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Joseph; Abookasis, David; Gokhler, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Recently invented methods of optical tomographic imaging through scattering and absorbing media are presented. In one method, the three-dimensional structure of an object hidden between two biological tissues is recovered from many noisy speckle pictures obtained on the output of a multi-channeled optical imaging system. Objects are recovered from many speckled images observed by a digital camera through two stereoscopic microlens arrays. Each microlens in each array generates a speckle image of the object buried between the layers. In the computer each image is Fourier transformed jointly with an image of the speckled point-like source captured under the same conditions. A set of the squared magnitudes of the Fourier-transformed pictures is accumulated to form a single average picture. This final picture is again Fourier transformed, resulting in the three-dimensional reconstruction of the hidden object. In the other method, the effect of spatial longitudinal coherence is used for imaging through an absorbing layer with different thickness, or different index of refraction, along the layer. The technique is based on synthesis of multiple peak spatial degree of coherence. This degree of coherence enables us to scan simultaneously different sample points on different altitudes, and thus decreases the acquisition time. The same multi peak degree of coherence is also used for imaging through the absorbing layer. Our entire experiments are performed with a quasi-monochromatic light source. Therefore problems of dispersion and inhomogeneous absorption are avoided.

  12. Computer tomographic imaging of rabbit bulbourethral glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to utilize the obtained data for differentiation of normal and pathologically altered bulbourethral glands in rabbits with regard to using this animal species as a model for studying diseases in this organ in humans. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten sexually mature healthy male white New Zealand rabbits, 12 months old, weighed 2.8−3.2 kg were investigated. The animals were anesthetized. Scans were done at 2 mm intervals and the image reconstruction was three-dimensional. RESULTS: Rabbit bulbourethral glands were observed as a transversely oval homogeneous, relatively hyperdense structure against the surrounding soft tissues. They are visualized in the transverse cut of the pelvic outlet in the plane through the cranial part of cg2, the body of ischium, cranially to tuber ischiadicum and dorsally to the caudal part of symphysis pubis –sciatic arch. The glandular margins are adequately distinguished from the adjacent soft tissue structures. The density of the rabbit bulbourethral glands was similar to this of the soft tissues. CONCLUSION: The data obtained by the computed tomographic imaging of the rabbit bulbourethral glands could be used as an anatomical reference in the diagnosis and interpretation of imaging findings of various pathological states of the gland in this species, as well as in utilization of the rabbit as an animal model for studying diseases of this organ in humans, particularly diverticula, stenosis, lithiasis and valves

  13. Robust statistical reconstruction for charged particle tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Larry Joe; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Morris, Christopher; Orum, John Christopher; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Sossong, Michael James; Hengartner, Nicolas W

    2013-10-08

    Systems and methods for charged particle detection including statistical reconstruction of object volume scattering density profiles from charged particle tomographic data to determine the probability distribution of charged particle scattering using a statistical multiple scattering model and determine a substantially maximum likelihood estimate of object volume scattering density using expectation maximization (ML/EM) algorithm to reconstruct the object volume scattering density. The presence of and/or type of object occupying the volume of interest can be identified from the reconstructed volume scattering density profile. The charged particle tomographic data can be cosmic ray muon tomographic data from a muon tracker for scanning packages, containers, vehicles or cargo. The method can be implemented using a computer program which is executable on a computer.

  14. 3D velocity measurements in a premixed flame by tomographic PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarev, M P; Sharaborin, D K; Lobasov, A S; Chikishev, L M; Dulin, V M; Markovich, D M

    2015-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) has become a standard tool for 3D velocity measurements in non-reacting flows. However, the majority of the measurements in flows with combustion are limited to small resolved depth compared to the size of the field of view (typically 1 : 10). The limitations are associated with inhomogeneity of the volume illumination and the non-uniform flow seeding, the optical distortions and errors in the 3D calibration, and the unwanted flame luminosity. In the present work, the above constraints were overcome for the tomographic PIV experiment in a laminar axisymmetric premixed flame. The measurements were conducted for a 1 : 1 depth-to-size ratio using a system of eight CCD cameras and a 200 mJ pulsed laser. The results show that camera calibration based on the triangulation of the tracer particles in the non-reacting conditions provided reliable accuracy for the 3D image reconstruction in the flame. The modification of the tomographic reconstruction allowed a posteriori removal of unwanted bright objects, which were located outside of the region of interest but affected the reconstruction quality. This study reports on a novel experience for the instantaneous 3D velocimetry in laboratory-scale flames by using tomographic PIV. (paper)

  15. A single photon emission computed tomograph based on a limited dumber of detectors for fluid flow visualization; Tomographie d'emission gamma a partir d'un nombre limite de detecteurs appliquee a la visualisation d'ecoulements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legoupil, S

    1999-07-01

    We present in this work a method for fluid flow visualization in a system using radioactive tracers. The method is based on single photon emission computed tomography techniques, applied to a limited number of discrete detectors. We propose in this work a method for the estimation of the transport matrix of photons, associated to the acquisition system.This method is based on the modelization of profiles acquired for a set of point sources located in the imaged volume. Monte Carlo simulations allow to separate scattered photons from those directly collected by the system. The influence of the energy tracer is exposed. The reconstruction method is based on the maximum likelihood - expectation maximization algorithm. An experimental device, based on 36 detectors was realised for the visualization of water circulation in a vessel. A video monitoring allows to visualize the dye water tracer. Dye and radioactive tracers are injected simultaneously in a water flow circulating in the vessel. Reconstructed and video images are compared. Quantitative and qualitative analysis show that fluid flow visualization is feasible with a limited number of detectors. This method can be applied for system involving circulations of fluids. (author)

  16. Development of gamma-ray tomographic system for industrial plant inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Bum

    2011-02-01

    Gamma-ray has been widely used in process diagnosis because of its deep penetration ability. Gamma column scanning, radioisotope tracer and gamma radiography are examples of gamma-ray applications in industries. Recently there have been growing studies on gamma-ray tomography for process diagnosis in addition to conventional gamma-ray technologies. In those studies, multi-phase flow measurement, process flow visualization and CFD validation have been achieved by gamma-ray tomographic system. There are many case studies on gamma-ray tomographic systems used in laboratories and pilot plants but few cases for real scale industrial system. The main objective of this work is to develop a movable gamma-ray tomographic system for real scale industrial plants. To develop the movable gamma-ray tomographic system, some preliminary reviews has been made on the status of industrial process tomographic techniques such as electrical impedance tomography, X-ray tomography and gamma-ray tomography. From review results, it is considered that a fixed detection system with a gamma-ray source is suitable for movable tomographic system. To actualize the fixed detection and rotating source system, 4 th generation scheme by instant installation with a gamma-ray source and portable clamp-on gamma-ray tomographic system are proposed. As for 4 th generation system, multiple discrete detectors are installed around large scale object and a source is designed to rotate inside detector circle. The general configuration is similar to medical 4 th generation CT. But unlike a same type of a medical system, this system has adopted a gamma ray source and portable detection system. This system is aiming for large scale plants whose size is too big to be scanned by conventional tomographic systems. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to validate this method by generating virtual experimental data. The source and detector are simulated as 137 Cs and 1/2 inch NaI detector. Image reconstructions are

  17. Computer tomographic examinations in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Villiers, J.F.K.

    1984-01-01

    Epileptic patients that was examined at the Universitas Hospital (Bloemfontein) by means of computerized tomography for the period July 1978 - December 1980, are divided into two groups: a) Patients with general epilepsy of convulsions - 507; b) Patients with vocal or partial epilepsy - 111. The method of examination and the results for both general and vocal epilepsy are discussed. A degenerative state was found in 35% of the positive computer tomographic examinations in general epilepsy and 22% of the positive examinations for vocal epilepsy. The purpose of the article was to explain the circumstances that can be expected when a epileptic patient is examined by means of computerized tomography

  18. 3D flame topography obtained by tomographic chemiluminescence with direct comparison to planar Mie scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjiang; Wickersham, A J; Wu, Yue; He, Fan; Ma, Lin

    2015-03-20

    This work reports the measurements of 3D flame topography using tomographic chemiluminescence and its validation by direct comparison against planar Mie scattering measurements. Tomographic measurements of the 3D topography of various well-controlled laboratory flames were performed using projections measured by seven cameras, and a simultaneous Mie scattering measurement was performed to measure a 2D cross section of the 3D flame topography. The tomographic measurements were based on chemiluminescence emissions from the flame, and the Mie scattering measurements were based on micrometer-size oil droplets seeded into the flow. The flame topography derived from the 3D tomographic and the Mie scattering measurement was then directly compared. The results show that the flame topography obtained from tomographic chemiluminescence and the Mie measurement agreed qualitatively (i.e., both methods yielded the same profile of the flame fronts), but a quantitative difference on the order of millimeters was observed between these two methods. These results are expected to be useful for understanding the capabilities and limitations of the 3D tomographic and Mie scattering techniques in combustion diagnostics.

  19. Motion tracking-enhanced MART for tomographic PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novara, Matteo; Scarano, Fulvio; Batenburg, Kees Joost

    2010-01-01

    A novel technique to increase the accuracy of multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) reconstruction from tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) recordings at higher seeding density than currently possible is presented. The motion tracking enhancement (MTE) method is based on the combined utilization of images from two or more exposures to enhance the reconstruction of individual intensity fields. The working principle is first introduced qualitatively, and the mathematical background is given that explains how the MART reconstruction can be improved on the basis of an improved first guess object obtained from the combination of non-simultaneous views reduced to the same time instant deforming the 3D objects by an estimate of the particle motion field. The performances of MTE are quantitatively evaluated by numerical simulation of the imaging, reconstruction and image correlation processes. The cases of two or more exposures obtained from time-resolved experiments are considered. The iterative application of MTE appears to significantly improve the reconstruction quality, first by decreasing the intensity of the ghost images and second, by increasing the intensity and the reconstruction precision for the actual particles. Based on computer simulations, the maximum imaged seeding density that can be dealt with is tripled with respect to the MART analysis applied to a single exposure. The analysis also illustrates that the maximum effect of the MTE method is comparable to that of doubling the number of cameras in the tomographic system. Experiments performed on a transitional jet at Re = 5000 apply the MTE method to double-frame recordings. The velocity measurement precision is increased for a system with fewer views (two or three cameras compared with four cameras). The ghost particles' intensity is also visibly reduced although to a lesser extent with respect to the computer simulations. The velocity and vorticity field obtained from a three

  20. A feasibility study on gamma-ray tomography by Monte Carlo simulation for development of portable tomographic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongbum; Jung, Sunghee; Moon, Jinho; Cho, Gyuseong

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam X-ray tomographic scanner has been used in industrial and medical field since it was developed two decades ago. However, X-ray electron beam tomography has remained as indoor equipment because of its bulky hardware of X-ray generation devices. By replacing X-ray devices of electron beam CT with a gamma-ray source, a tomographic system can be a portable device. This paper introduces analysis and simulation results on industrial gamma-ray tomographic system with scanning geometry similar to electron beam CT. The gamma-ray tomographic system is introduced through the geometrical layout and analysis on non-uniformly distributed problem. The proposed system adopts clamp-on type device to actualize portable industrial system. MCNPx is used to generate virtual experimental data. Pulse height spectra from F8 tally of MCNPx are obtained for single channel counting data of photo-peak and gross counting. Photo-peak and gross counting data are reconstructed for the cross-sectional image of simulation phantoms by ART, Total Variation algorithm and ML-EM. Image reconstruction results from Monte Carlo simulation show that the proposed tomographic system can provide the image solution for industrial objects. Those results provide the preliminary data for the tomographic scanner, which will be developed in future work. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lamb-Wave-Based Tomographic Imaging Techniques for Hole-Edge Corrosion Monitoring in Plate Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengjiang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel monitoring method for hole-edge corrosion damage in plate structures based on Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques. An experimental procedure with a cross-hole layout using 16 piezoelectric transducers (PZTs was designed. The A0 mode of the Lamb wave was selected, which is sensitive to thickness-loss damage. The iterative algebraic reconstruction technique (ART method was used to locate and quantify the corrosion damage at the edge of the hole. Hydrofluoric acid with a concentration of 20% was used to corrode the specimen artificially. To estimate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the real corrosion damage was compared with the predicted corrosion damage based on the tomographic method. The results show that the Lamb-wave-based tomographic method can be used to monitor the hole-edge corrosion damage accurately.

  2. Reproducibility and quantitativity of oblique-angle reconstruction in single photon emission computed tomography using Tl-201 myocardial phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunko, Hisashi; Nanbu, Ichiro; Seki, Hiroyasu

    1984-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to evaluate reproducibility and quantitativity of oblique-angle reconstruction of myocardial phantom SPECT. Myocardial phantom with transmural and subendcardial defects, and off-axis phantom with wall thickness changing continuously from 0 to 23 mm were used. Sixty projection data in every 6 0 were aquired using dual-camera (ZLC) with high resolution collimators connected to Scintipac-2400 computer system. Oblique-angle reconstructed images were obtained by indicating the long axis of the phantom manually in the transaxial and vertical long axial tomograms. Reproducibility and quantitativity were evaluated by creating circumferential profile (CFP) of the finally reconstructed short axial images. Inter- and intra-operater reproducibility of relative counting ratio were less than 6.7% (C.V.) and 3.3% (C.V.), respectively. Both inter- and intraoperater reproducibility of absolute counts were better than that of counting ratio (less than 5.1% (C.V.) and 2.9% (C.V.), respectively). Variation of defect location in the reconstructed image and between the slices were less than 1 sampling interval of CFP (6 0 ) and 0.6 slice, respectively. Quantitativity of counts in the reconstructed images was poor in the transmulal defect, but was fair in the subendocardial defect. Counting ratio was greatly affected by wall thickness. Temporal quantitatibity or linearity of the counts in sequential SPECTs was good in non-defect area, especially when wall thickness was greater than 70% (16 mm) of maximum. In conclusion, three-dimensional oblique-angle reconstruction in Tl-201 myocardial SPECT could be applicable to relative and temporal quantitation of local myocardial activity other than defect area for the quantitative evaluation of Tl-201 myocardial wash-out. (J.P.N.)

  3. Determination of radon emission rate with regard to energetic reconstruction of buildings; Bestimmung der Radonquellstaerke im Zusammenhang mit Massnahmen zur energetischen Sanierung von Gebaeuden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugebauer, Thomas; Grund, A.L.; Hingmann, H.; Buermeyer, J.; Grimm, V.; Breckow, J. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM), Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS)

    2015-07-01

    In frame of a project funded by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) the influence of meteorological and room climate parameters and energetic reconstruction on the radon concentration inside buildings has been investigated. For this purpose parameters like temperature, air pressure, relative humidity and carbon dioxide concentration have been measured. The daily and seasonal variations of the radon concentration were influenced by the behaviour of the residents. A parameter less influenced by this behaviour is the radon emission rate. Complementary to the above mentioned project the method of determination of the radon emission rate has been developed in frame of a project funded by the Ministry of the Environment of Hesse (HMUKLV). With the improved method, it is possible to determine the radon emission rate on a continuous base. Therefore both, the radon concentration and the air exchange rate of a building have to be determined. For the verification of the method simulations and measurements have been performed. Additionally meteorological parameters have been recorded in order to evaluate possible influences on the radon emission rate.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of a 3D one-step late reconstruction algorithm for 3D positron emission tomography brain studies using median root prior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettinardi, V.; Pagani, E.; Gilardi, M.C.; Fazio, F.; Alenius, S.; Teras, M.

    2002-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D) one-step late (OSL), maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction algorithm based on the median root prior (MRP) was implemented and evaluated for the reconstruction of 3D positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The algorithm uses the ordered subsets (OS) scheme for convergence acceleration and data update during iterations. The algorithm was implemented using the software package developed within the EU project PARAPET (www.brunel.ac.uk/ masrppet). The MRP algorithm was evaluated using experimental phantom and real 3D PET brain studies. Various experimental set-ups in terms of activity distribution and counting statistics were considered. The performance of the algorithm was assessed by calculating figures of merit such as: contrast, coefficient of variation, activity ratio between two regions and full width at half of maximum for resolution measurements. The performance of MRP was compared with that of 3D ordered subsets-expectation maximisation (OSEM) and 3D re-projection (3DRP) algorithms. In all the experimental situations considered, MRP showed: (1) convergence to a stable solution, (2) effectiveness in noise reduction, particularly for low statistics data, (3) good preservation of spatial details. Compared with the OSEM and 3DRP algorithms, MRP provides comparable or better results depending on the parameters used for the reconstruction of the images. (orig.)

  5. Implementation and evaluation of a 3D one-step late reconstruction algorithm for 3D positron emission tomography brain studies using median root prior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinardi, V; Pagani, E; Gilardi, M C; Alenius, S; Thielemans, K; Teras, M; Fazio, F

    2002-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D) one-step late (OSL), maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction algorithm based on the median root prior (MRP) was implemented and evaluated for the reconstruction of 3D positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The algorithm uses the ordered subsets (OS) scheme for convergence acceleration and data update during iterations. The algorithm was implemented using the software package developed within the EU project PARAPET (www.brunel.ac.uk/~masrppet). The MRP algorithm was evaluated using experimental phantom and real 3D PET brain studies. Various experimental set-ups in terms of activity distribution and counting statistics were considered. The performance of the algorithm was assessed by calculating figures of merit such as: contrast, coefficient of variation, activity ratio between two regions and full width at half of maximum for resolution measurements. The performance of MRP was compared with that of 3D ordered subsets-expectation maximisation (OSEM) and 3D re-projection (3DRP) algorithms. In all the experimental situations considered, MRP showed: (1) convergence to a stable solution, (2) effectiveness in noise reduction, particularly for low statistics data, (3) good preservation of spatial details. Compared with the OSEM and 3DRP algorithms, MRP provides comparable or better results depending on the parameters used for the reconstruction of the images.

  6. A feasibility study on gamma-ray tomography by Monte Carlo simulation for development of portable tomographic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongbum; Jung, Sunghee; Moon, Jinho; Cho, Gyuseong

    2012-01-01

    The electron beam X-ray tomographic scanner has been used in industrial and medical field since it was developed two decades ago. However, X-ray electron beam tomography has remained as indoor equipment because of its bulky hardware of X-ray generation devices. By replacing X-ray devices of electron beam CT with a gamma-ray source, a tomographic system can be a portable device. This paper introduces analysis and simulation results on industrial gamma-ray tomographic system with scanning geometry similar to electron beam CT. The gamma-ray tomographic system is introduced through the geometrical layout and analysis on non-uniformly distributed problem. The proposed system adopts clamp-on type device to actualize portable industrial system. MCNPx is used to generate virtual experimental data. Pulse height spectra from F8 tally of MCNPx are obtained for single channel counting data of photo-peak and gross counting. Photo-peak and gross counting data are reconstructed for the cross-sectional image of simulation phantoms by ART, Total Variation algorithm and ML-EM. Image reconstruction results from Monte Carlo simulation show that the proposed tomographic system can provide the image solution for industrial objects. Those results provide the preliminary data for the tomographic scanner, which will be developed in future work. - Highlights: ► We carried out feasibility study on gamma-ray tomography with electron beam CT scanning geometry. ► Gamma ray tomographic system is introduced through geometrical layout and analysis on non-uniformly distributed problem. ► We carried out MCNPx simulation for proposed geometry. ► Results show that this system can be used for transportable tomographic system.

  7. First tomographic image of neutron capture rate in a BNCT facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minsky, D.M., E-mail: minsky@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, , UNSAM, M. de Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Conicet, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, A.A. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, , UNSAM, M. de Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina); Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, , UNSAM, M. de Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Conicet, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Green, S.; Wojnecki, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, B15 2 TT (United Kingdom)] [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TH (United Kingdom); Ghani, Z. [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TH (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    This work discusses the development of online dosimetry of the boron dose via Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) during a BNCT treatment irradiation. Such a system will allow the online computation of boron dose maps without the large current uncertainties in the assessment of the boron concentration in different tissues. The first tomographic boron dose image with a SPECT prototype is shown.

  8. Efficacy of coronary artery reconstruction in maintaining myocardial viability. Quntitative determination of local myocardial circulation with 13NH3 myocardial positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Takaba, Toshihiro; Kume, Masato; Kashima, Toshitaka; Michihata, Tetsuro.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty patients (280 areas) whose bypass grafts remained patent after surgical reconstruction of the coronary artery were examined. Before and after reconstruction, local myocardial blood circulation in infarcted regions and post-stenotic regions was measured by 13 NH 3 myocardial positron emission computed tomography (PET) at rest or during physical exercise in order to evaluate the efficacy of coronary artery reconstruction. Before operation, mean blood flow in post-stenotic regions (n=198) was 65±15 ml/min/100 g at rest and 85±23 ml/min/100 g during exercise. After coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), mean blood flow was increased to 78±21 ml/min/100 g at rest (p, 0.01) and 105±32 ml/min/100 g during exercise (p<0.01). In infarcted regions (n=82), mean blood flow before operation was 51±23 ml/min/100 g at rest and 69±23 ml/min/100 g during exercise. After CABG, it increased to 62±19 ml/min/100 g at rest (p<0.01) and 81±29 ml/min/100 g during exercise (p<0.01). Thus, significant increases in blood flow were observed in both post-stenotic and infarcted regions at rest and physical exercise after operation. The regions of infarction were divided into three groups based on local myocardial blood flow at rest before operation: Group I: greater than 45 ml/min/100 g (n=35); Group II: less than 45 ml/min/100 g (n=30) but greater than 30 ml/min/100 g; and Group III: less than 30 ml/min/100 g (n=30). The efficacy of reconstruction was compared among these groups. The group with preoperative myocardial blood flow greater than 30 ml/min/100 g had increased blood flow after operation, indicating myocardial viability. (author)

  9. Validation of the Gate simulation platform in single photon emission computed tomography and application to the development of a complete 3-dimensional reconstruction algorithm; Validation de la plate-forme de simulation GATE en tomographie a emission monophotonique et application au developpement d'un algorithme de reconstruction 3D complete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, D

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are currently considered in nuclear medical imaging as a powerful tool to design and optimize detection systems, and also to assess reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for degrading physical effects. Among the many simulators available, none of them is considered as a standard in nuclear medical imaging: this fact has motivated the development of a new generic Monte Carlo simulation platform (GATE), based on GEANT4 and dedicated to SPECT/PET (single photo emission computed tomography / positron emission tomography) applications. We participated during this thesis to the development of the GATE platform within an international collaboration. GATE was validated in SPECT by modeling two gamma cameras characterized by a different geometry, one dedicated to small animal imaging and the other used in a clinical context (Philips AXIS), and by comparing the results obtained with GATE simulations with experimental data. The simulation results reproduce accurately the measured performances of both gamma cameras. The GATE platform was then used to develop a new 3-dimensional reconstruction method: F3DMC (fully 3-dimension Monte-Carlo) which consists in computing with Monte Carlo simulation the transition matrix used in an iterative reconstruction algorithm (in this case, ML-EM), including within the transition matrix the main physical effects degrading the image formation process. The results obtained with the F3DMC method were compared to the results obtained with three other more conventional methods (FBP, MLEM, MLEMC) for different phantoms. The results of this study show that F3DMC allows to improve the reconstruction efficiency, the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio with a satisfactory quantification of the images. These results should be confirmed by performing clinical experiments and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be applied in SPECT but also in PET. (author)

  10. New method to analyze internal disruptions with tomographic reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanzi, C. P.; de Blank, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Sawtooth crashes have been investigated on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) [N. J. Lopes Cardozo ed al., Proceedings of the 14th international Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Wurzburg, 1992 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1993), Vol. 1, p. 271].

  11. Plasma tomographic reconstruction from tangentially viewing camera with background subtraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Odstrčil, M.; Mlynář, Jan; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Háček, Pavel; Odstrčil, T.; Verdoolaege, G.; Berta, M.; Szabolics, T.; Bencze, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2014), 013509-013509 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : X-ray tomography * edge turbulence * tokamak * NSTX * TCV * COMPASS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.614, year: 2014 http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/rsi/85/1/10.1063/1.4862652

  12. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational

  13. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  14. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  15. 3D reconstruction of scintillation light emission from proton pencil beams using limited viewing angles—a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, CheukKai; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    An accurate and high-resolution quality assurance (QA) method for proton radiotherapy beams is necessary to ensure correct dose delivery to the target. Detectors based on a large volume of liquid scintillator have shown great promise in providing fast and high-resolution measurements of proton treatment fields. However, previous work with these detectors has been limited to two-dimensional measurements, and the quantitative measurement of dose distributions was lacking. The purpose of the current study is to assess the feasibility of reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) scintillation light distributions of spot scanning proton beams using a scintillation system. The proposed system consists of a tank of liquid scintillator imaged by charge-coupled device cameras at three orthogonal viewing angles. Because of the limited number of viewing angles, we developed a profile-based technique to obtain an initial estimate that can improve the quality of the 3D reconstruction. We found that our proposed scintillator system and profile-based technique can reconstruct a single energy proton beam in 3D with a gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm local) of 100.0%. For a single energy layer of an intensity modulated proton therapy prostate treatment plan, the proposed method can reconstruct the 3D light distribution with a gamma pass rate (3%/3 mm local) of 99.7%. In addition, we also found that the proposed method is effective in detecting errors in the treatment plan, indicating that it can be a very useful tool for 3D proton beam QA. (paper)

  16. On the feasibility of tomographic-PIV with low pulse energy illumination in a lifted turbulent jet flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxx, I.; Carter, C. D.; Meier, W.

    2014-08-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomographic-PIV) is a recently developed measurement technique used to acquire volumetric velocity field data in liquid and gaseous flows. The technique relies on line-of-sight reconstruction of the rays between a 3D particle distribution and a multi-camera imaging system. In a turbulent flame, however, index-of-refraction variations resulting from local heat-release may inhibit reconstruction and thereby render the technique infeasible. The objective of this study was to test the efficacy of tomographic-PIV in a turbulent flame. An additional goal was to determine the feasibility of acquiring usable tomographic-PIV measurements in a turbulent flame at multi-kHz acquisition rates with current-generation laser and camera technology. To this end, a setup consisting of four complementary metal oxide semiconductor cameras and a dual-cavity Nd:YAG laser was implemented to test the technique in a lifted turbulent jet flame. While the cameras were capable of kHz-rate image acquisition, the laser operated at a pulse repetition rate of only 10 Hz. However, use of this laser allowed exploration of the required pulse energy and thus power for a kHz-rate system. The imaged region was 29 × 28 × 2.7 mm in size. The tomographic reconstruction of the 3D particle distributions was accomplished using the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique. The results indicate that volumetric velocimetry via tomographic-PIV is feasible with pulse energies of 25 mJ, which is within the capability of current-generation kHz-rate diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

  17. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography; Evaluation d'une methode de restitution de contraste basee sur le guidage anatomique de la reconstruction des images cerebrales en tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, F

    2007-04-15

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  18. Optimization and reconstruction technology of SCR flue gas denitrification ultra low emission in coal fired power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinhao

    2017-09-01

    In recent decades, nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from thermal power plant increased year by year in China. A large number of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions caused by the growing environmental problems have been widely attached importance to people. SCR denitrification technology has the advantages of cleanliness and high efficiency. At present, it has been the major technology to control NOx emission because of its high denitrification efficiency, reliable operation, no by-products and simple structure of the device. The denitrification efficiency can be stabilized at 70%. In this paper, three different denitrification methods are compared. The factors influencing the denitrification efficiency, the system arrangement and the key factors of the denitrification system are discussed in detail. And the numerical simulation of how to use this calculation software in the SCR reactor flue, baffle, reactor, spray ammonia grille and spray ammonia, mixer, etc. are reviewed, as well as the effect of system operation control on the deoxidation performance.

  19. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huber, Jennifer S

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to construct a functioning compact positron tomograph, whose geometry is optimized for detecting prostate tumors with molecular tracers such as 11Ccholine (carbon-11 choline...

  20. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huber, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project is to construct a functioning compact positron tomograph, whose geometry is optimized for detecting prostate tumors with molecular tracers such as 11Ccholine (carbon-11 choline...

  1. Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Mandibular Ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Eswar

    2003-01-01

    Five interesting cases of mandibular ameloblastoma are presented here, each case showing different histological pattern and corresponding computer tomographic appearance. Also an attempt is made to establish CT pattern in these histological varieties of ameloblastoma.

  2. Computed tomographic findings of intracranial gliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisberg, L.

    1981-08-01

    The clinical and computed tomographic (CT) findings in eight patients with pathological evidence of cerebral gliosis are analyzed. CT findings do not permit differentiation of gliosis from other neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions.

  3. Computer tomographic findings of intracranial gliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, L

    1981-01-01

    The clinical and computer tomographic (CT) findings in eight patients with pathological evidence of cerebral gliosis and analyzed. CT findings do not permit differentiation of gliosis from other neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions.

  4. Tomographic and planar radionuclide imaging in patients suspected meniscal injury: Arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajman, W.A.; Diehl, M.; Dunaway, E.; Stephenson, R.; Eisner, R.; Riggins, R.S.; Berger, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    In patients (pts) with knee pain which may be related to meniscal tears, clinical judgment is used to determine whether medical management or arthroscopy is indicated. Based on the assumption that meniscal injury will result in adjacent changes in Tc-99m MDP bone images, studies using both planar and tomographic techniques were performed in 12 pts referred for arthroscopy. Planar imaging was performed in the anterior, posterior, and posterior medial and lateral oblique positions of the symptomatic knee. Single photon emission computed tomography was performed using a 64 view 360/sup 0/ acquisition of both knees. In this series, both imaging techniques were accurate in identifying abnormality, but analysis of transaxial tomographic data showed greater contrast and facilitated localization because of the better spatial orientation provided by this method. Thus, tomographic bone imaging appears valuable in defining areas of localized abnormality in the knees of pts with meniscal injury.

  5. Regional assessment of myocardial metabolic integrity in vivo by positron-emission tomography with 11C-labeled palmitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Klein, M.S.; Markham, J.; Roberts, R.; Sobel, B.E.

    1980-01-01

    To determine whether positron emission tomography (PET) after the combined administration of 11 C-palmitate intravenously to image myocardium and 11 CO by inhalation to image the cardiac blood pool with 11 CO-hemoglobin provides quantitative delineation of the locus and extent of myocardial infarction, 28 patients with suspected myocardial infarction were studied. Twenty-one patients had electrocardiographically documented transmural infarction and in seven, the diagnosis of infarction was ultimately excluded based on enzymatic and electrocardiographic criteria. To assess reproducibility, four patients were studied on two occasions 1 month apart. Inferior and apical infarcts were readily localized with sagittal and coronal as opposed to transaxial reconstructions. Complete electrocardiographic and tomographic concordance was observed for the locus of all transmural infarcts. Reproducibility of tomographic estimates was within 10%. Tomographic estimation of the extent of infarction with 11 C-palmitate in a subset of patients in whom right ventricular contributions to overall enzyme release could be excluded was facilitated by delineation of the endocardial border with the 11 CO-hemoglobin cardiac blood pool image in the same plane. The correlaion between enzymatic (serial plasma MB-CK method) and tomographic estimates of infarct size was close (r = 0.92). Thus, as has been shown in experimental animals, PET with 11 C-palmitate permits quantification and localization of myocardial infarcts in patients

  6. Iterative Reconstruction for Differential Phase Contrast Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, T.; Brendel, B.; Roessl, E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to combine two areas of active research in tomographic x-ray imaging. The first one is the use of iterative reconstruction techniques. The second one is differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI). Method: We derive an SPS type maximum likelihood (ML)

  7. Initial results from the Donner 600 crystal positron tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.; Uber, D.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-10-01

    We describe a positron tomograph using a single ring of 600 close-packed 3 mm wide bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to 14 mm phototubes. The phototube preamplifier circuit derives a timing pulse from the first photoelectron, and sends it to address and coincidence circuits only if the integrated pulse height is within a pre-set window. The timing delays and pulse height windows for all 600 detectors and the coincidence timing windows are computer adjustable. An orbiting positron source is used for transmission measurements and a look-up table is used to reject scattered and random coincidences that do not pass through the source. Data can be acquired using a stationary mode for 1.57 mm lateral sampling or the two-position clam sampling mode for 0.79 mm lateral sampling. High maximum data rates are provided by 45 parallel coincidence circuits and 4 parallel histogram memory units. With two-position sampling and 1.57 mm bins, the reconstructed point spread function (PSF) of a 0.35 mm diam 22 Na wire source at the center of the tomograph is circular with 2.9 mm full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) and the PSF at a distance of 8 cm from the center is elliptical with a radial fwhm of 4.0 mm and tangential fwhm of 3.0 mm. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Local detection of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose comparison of filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Larson, S. M.; Coakley, F.; Akhurst, T.; Macapinlac, H. A.; Hricak, H.; Gonen, M.; Kelly, W.; Scher, H.; Leibel, S.; Humm, J.; Scardino, P.

    2001-01-01

    To compare filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction (IRSAC) in the local imaging of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). 13 patients with primary (n=7) or recurrent (n=6) prostate cancer who had increased uptake in the prostate on FDG-PET performed without urinary catheterization, contemporaneous biopsy confirming the presence of active tumor in the prostate, were retrospectively identified. Two independent nuclear medicine physicians separately rated FBP and IRSAC images for visualization of prostatic activity on a 4-point scale. Results were compared using biopsy and cross-sectional imaging findings as the standard of reference. IRSAC images were significantly better that FBP in terms of visualization of prostatic activity in 12 of 13 patients, and were equivalent in 1 patient (p<0.001, Wilcoxon signed ranks test). In particular, 2 foci of tumor activity in 2 different patients seen on IRSAC images were not visible on FBP images. In 11 patients who had a gross tumor mass evident on cross-sectional imaging, there was good agreement between PET and cross-sectional anatomic imaging with respect to tumor localization. In selected patients, cancer can be imaged within the prostate using FDG-PET, and IRSAC is superior to FBP in image reconstruction for local tumor visualization

  9. Local detection of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose comparison of filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turlakow, A.; Larson, S. M.; Coakley, F.; Akhurst, T.; Macapinlac, H. A.; Hricak, H. [Memorial Sloab-Kettering Cancer Center, Dept. of Radiology, New York (United States); Gonen, M. [Memorial Sloab-Kettering Cancer Center, Dept. of Biostatics, New York (United States); Kelly, W.; Scher, H. [Memorial Sloab-Kettering Cancer Center, Dept. of Medical Oncology, New York (United States); Leibel, S. [Memorial Sloab-Kettering Cancer Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, New York (United States); Humm, J. [Memorial Sloab-Kettering Cancer Center, Dept. of Medical Physics, New York (United States); Scardino, P. [Memorial Sloab-Kettering Cancer Center, Dept. of Urology, New York (United States)

    2001-09-01

    To compare filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction with segmented attenuation correction (IRSAC) in the local imaging of prostate cancer by positron emission tomography with 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). 13 patients with primary (n=7) or recurrent (n=6) prostate cancer who had increased uptake in the prostate on FDG-PET performed without urinary catheterization, contemporaneous biopsy confirming the presence of active tumor in the prostate, were retrospectively identified. Two independent nuclear medicine physicians separately rated FBP and IRSAC images for visualization of prostatic activity on a 4-point scale. Results were compared using biopsy and cross-sectional imaging findings as the standard of reference. IRSAC images were significantly better that FBP in terms of visualization of prostatic activity in 12 of 13 patients, and were equivalent in 1 patient (p<0.001, Wilcoxon signed ranks test). In particular, 2 foci of tumor activity in 2 different patients seen on IRSAC images were not visible on FBP images. In 11 patients who had a gross tumor mass evident on cross-sectional imaging, there was good agreement between PET and cross-sectional anatomic imaging with respect to tumor localization. In selected patients, cancer can be imaged within the prostate using FDG-PET, and IRSAC is superior to FBP in image reconstruction for local tumor visualization.

  10. Cone beam tomography of the heart using single-photon emission-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Christian, P.E.; Zeng, G.L.; Datz, F.L.; Morgan, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The authors evaluated cone beam single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) of the heart. A new cone beam reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct data collected from short scan acquisitions (of slightly more than 180 degrees) of a detector anteriorally traversing a noncircular orbit. The less than 360 degrees acquisition was used to minimize the attenuation artifacts that result from reconstructing posterior projections of 201T1 emissions from the heart. The algorithm includes a new method for reconstructing truncated projections of background tissue activity that eliminates reconstruction ring artifacts. Phantom and patient results are presented which compare a high-resolution cone beam collimator (50-cm focal length; 6.0-mm full width at half maximum [FWHM] at 10 cm) to a low-energy general purpose (LEGP) parallel hole collimator (8.2-mm FWHM at 10 cm) which is 1.33 times more sensitive. The cone beam tomographic results are free of reconstruction artifacts and show improved spatial and contrast resolution over that obtained with the LEGP parallel hole collimator. The limited angular sampling restrictions and truncation problems associated with cone beam tomography do not deter from obtaining diagnostic information. However, even though these preliminary results are encouraging, a thorough clinical study is still needed to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of cone beam tomography

  11. Positron emission tomographical studies of 1-11C-acetoacetate, 2-18F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose, and L-1-11C-tyrosine uptake by cat brain with an experimental lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prenen, G H; Go, K G; Paans, A M; Zuiderveen, F; Vaalburg, W; Kamman, R L; Molenaar, W M; Zijlstra, S; Elsinga, P H; Sebens, J B; Korf, J

    1989-01-01

    In cat brain with a freezing injury, the uptake of 1-11C-acetoacetate (11C-ACAC), 2-18F-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (18FDG), and L-1-11C-tyrosine (11C-TYR) was monitored by positron emission tomography following intravenous administration of the tracers, at 1 day, and 1-3 weeks after the injury. The

  12. TomoBank: a tomographic data repository for computational x-ray science

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carlo, Francesco; Gürsoy, Doğa; Ching, Daniel J.; Joost Batenburg, K.; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Mancini, Lucia; Marone, Federica; Mokso, Rajmund; Pelt, Daniël M.; Sijbers, Jan; Rivers, Mark

    2018-03-01

    There is a widening gap between the fast advancement of computational methods for tomographic reconstruction and their successful implementation in production software at various synchrotron facilities. This is due in part to the lack of readily available instrument datasets and phantoms representative of real materials for validation and comparison of new numerical methods. Recent advancements in detector technology have made sub-second and multi-energy tomographic data collection possible (Gibbs et al 2015 Sci. Rep. 5 11824), but have also increased the demand to develop new reconstruction methods able to handle in situ (Pelt and Batenburg 2013 IEEE Trans. Image Process. 22 5238-51) and dynamic systems (Mohan et al 2015 IEEE Trans. Comput. Imaging 1 96-111) that can be quickly incorporated in beamline production software (Gürsoy et al 2014 J. Synchrotron Radiat. 21 1188-93). The x-ray tomography data bank, tomoBank, provides a repository of experimental and simulated datasets with the aim to foster collaboration among computational scientists, beamline scientists, and experimentalists and to accelerate the development and implementation of tomographic reconstruction methods for synchrotron facility production software by providing easy access to challenging datasets and their descriptors.

  13. Fast volume reconstruction in positron emission tomography: Implementation of four algorithms on a high-performance scalable parallel platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egger, M.L.; Scheurer, A.H.; Joseph, C.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of long reconstruction times in PET has been addressed from several points of view, resulting in an affordable dedicated system capable of handling routine 3D reconstruction in a few minutes per frame: on the hardware side using fast processors and a parallel architecture, and on the software side, using efficient implementations of computationally less intensive algorithms. Execution times obtained for the PRT-1 data set on a parallel system of five hybrid nodes, each combining an Alpha processor for computation and a transputer for communication, are the following (256 sinograms of 96 views by 128 radial samples): Ramp algorithm 56 s, Favor 81 s and reprojection algorithm of Kinahan and Rogers 187 s. The implementation of fast rebinning algorithms has shown our hardware platform to become communications-limited; they execute faster on a conventional single-processor Alpha workstation: single-slice rebinning 7 s, Fourier rebinning 22 s, 2D filtered backprojection 5 s. The scalability of the system has been demonstrated, and a saturation effect at network sizes above ten nodes has become visible; new T9000-based products lifting most of the constraints on network topology and link throughput are expected to result in improved parallel efficiency and scalability properties

  14. Tomographic PIV measurements in a turbulent lifted jet flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinkauff, J.; Michaelis, D.; Dreizler, A.; Böhm, B.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of instantaneous volumetric flow fields are required for an improved understanding of turbulent flames. In non-reacting flows, tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV) is an established method for three-dimensional (3D) flow measurements. In flames, the reconstruction of the particles location becomes challenging due to a locally varying index of refraction causing beam-steering. This work presents TPIV measurements within a turbulent lifted non-premixed methane jet flame. Solid seeding particles were used to provide the 3D flow field in the vicinity of the flame base, including unburned and burned regions. Four cameras were arranged in a horizontal plane around the jet flame. Following an iterative volumetric self-calibration procedure, the remaining disparity caused by the flame was less than 0.2 pixels. Comparisons with conventional two-component PIV in terms of mean and rms values provided additional confidence in the TPIV measurements.

  15. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a modified tomographic PIV technique using four high-speed video cameras and a scanning pulsed laser-volume. By rapidly illuminating adjacent subvolumes onto separate video frames, we can resolve a larger total volume of velocity vectors, while retaining good spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by performing time-resolved measurements of the turbulent structure of a round jet, using up to 9 adjacent volume slices. In essence this technique resolves more velocity planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise image planes, showing time-resolved evolution of the large-scale vortical structures for a turbulent jet of Re up to 10 000.

  16. Optimization and Application of Surface Segmentation Technique for Tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liuyang; Adrian, Ronald; Wilson, Brandon; Prestridge, Kathy; Team

    2014-11-01

    Tomographic PIV is a widely used 3D flow measurement technique. It utilizes images recorded by multiple cameras to reconstruct the intensity distribution of a measured volume. The 3D3C velocity field is then computed by 3D cross-correlation. Surface segmentation aims to reduce computational cost. It extracts from a cloud of particles an image of those particles that lie on a mathematically prescribed surface. 2D2C velocity fields are computed on stacks of orthogonal surfaces, then assembled to construct the full 3D3C velocity field. We investigate the reconstruction of adaptive surfaces aligned with the main flow direction minimizing the out-of-plane motion. Numerical assessment is performed on curved-surface reconstruction for Taylor-Couette flow. An optimizing 2D interrogation scheme involving volumetric deformation is proposed to improve the accuracy of the 3D3C velocity field. The numerical test is performed on a synthetic vortex ring showing good measurement accuracy. Experimental results measuring the shock-driven turbulent mixing will also be presented. References

  17. Sensitivity study of poisson corruption in tomographic measurements for air-water flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munshi, P. (Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing, Saarbrucken (Germany)); Vaidya, M.S. (Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India))

    1993-01-01

    An application of computerized tomography (CT) for measuring void fraction profiles in two-phase air-water flows was reported earlier. Those attempts involved some special radial methods for tomographic reconstruction and the popular convolution backprojection (CBP) method. The CBP method is capable of reconstructing void profiles for nonsymmetric flows also. In this paper, we investigate the effect of corrupted CT data for gamma-ray sources and aCBP algorithm. The corruption in such a case is due to the statistical (Poisson) nature of the source.

  18. Sensitivity study of poisson corruption in tomographic measurements for air-water flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munshi, P.; Vaidya, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    An application of computerized tomography (CT) for measuring void fraction profiles in two-phase air-water flows was reported earlier. Those attempts involved some special radial methods for tomographic reconstruction and the popular convolution backprojection (CBP) method. The CBP method is capable of reconstructing void profiles for nonsymmetric flows also. In this paper, we investigate the effect of corrupted CT data for gamma-ray sources and aCBP algorithm. The corruption in such a case is due to the statistical (Poisson) nature of the source

  19. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  20. On the regularization for nonlinear tomographic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jinghang; Yu, Tao; Xu, Lijun; Cai, Weiwei

    2018-02-01

    Tomographic absorption spectroscopy (TAS) has attracted increased research efforts recently due to the development in both hardware and new imaging concepts such as nonlinear tomography and compressed sensing. Nonlinear TAS is one of the emerging modality that bases on the concept of nonlinear tomography and has been successfully demonstrated both numerically and experimentally. However, all the previous demonstrations were realized using only two orthogonal projections simply for ease of implementation. In this work, we examine the performance of nonlinear TAS using other beam arrangements and test the effectiveness of the beam optimization technique that has been developed for linear TAS. In addition, so far only smoothness prior has been adopted and applied in nonlinear TAS. Nevertheless, there are also other useful priors such as sparseness and model-based prior which have not been investigated yet. This work aims to show how these priors can be implemented and included in the reconstruction process. Regularization through Bayesian formulation will be introduced specifically for this purpose, and a method for the determination of a proper regularization factor will be proposed. The comparative studies performed with different beam arrangements and regularization schemes on a few representative phantoms suggest that the beam optimization method developed for linear TAS also works for the nonlinear counterpart and the regularization scheme should be selected properly according to the available a priori information under specific application scenarios so as to achieve the best reconstruction fidelity. Though this work is conducted under the context of nonlinear TAS, it can also provide useful insights for other tomographic modalities. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Emerging tomographic methods within the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Geir Anton

    2013-01-01

    Since industrial process tomography was introduced as a concept almost two decades ago, the considerable progress within a large variety of sensing modalities has to a large extent been technology driven. Industrial tomography applications may be divided into three categories: 1) Laboratory systems, 2) Field equipment for diagnostics and mapping purposes, and 3) Permanently installed systems. Examples on emerging methods on all categories will be presented, either from R and D at the University of Bergen and/or our industrial partners. Most developments are within the first category, where tomographs are used to provide better understanding of various processes such as pipe flow, separators, mixers and reactors. Here tomographic data is most often used to provide better process knowledge, for reference measurements and validation and development of process models, and finally for development for instruments and process equipment. The requirement here may be either high spatial resolution or high temporal resolution, or combinations of these. Tomographic field measurements are applied to either to inspect processes or equipment on a regular base or at faulty or irregular operation, or to map multicomponent systems such petroleum reservoirs, their structure and the distribution gas, oil and water within them. The latter will only be briefly touched upon here. Tomographic methods are increasingly being used for process and equipment diagnostics. The requirements vary and solutions based on repetition of single measurements, such as in column scanning, to full tomographic systems where there is sufficiently space or access. The third category is tomographic instruments that are permanently installed in situ in a process. These need not provide full tomographic images and instruments with fewer views are often preferred to reduce complexity and increase the instrument reliability. (author)

  2. Emerging tomographic methods within the petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Geir Anton, E-mail: geir.johansen@ift.uib.no [University of Bergen (UiB), Bergen, (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    Since industrial process tomography was introduced as a concept almost two decades ago, the considerable progress within a large variety of sensing modalities has to a large extent been technology driven. Industrial tomography applications may be divided into three categories: 1) Laboratory systems, 2) Field equipment for diagnostics and mapping purposes, and 3) Permanently installed systems. Examples on emerging methods on all categories will be presented, either from R and D at the University of Bergen and/or our industrial partners. Most developments are within the first category, where tomographs are used to provide better understanding of various processes such as pipe flow, separators, mixers and reactors. Here tomographic data is most often used to provide better process knowledge, for reference measurements and validation and development of process models, and finally for development for instruments and process equipment. The requirement here may be either high spatial resolution or high temporal resolution, or combinations of these. Tomographic field measurements are applied to either to inspect processes or equipment on a regular base or at faulty or irregular operation, or to map multicomponent systems such petroleum reservoirs, their structure and the distribution gas, oil and water within them. The latter will only be briefly touched upon here. Tomographic methods are increasingly being used for process and equipment diagnostics. The requirements vary and solutions based on repetition of single measurements, such as in column scanning, to full tomographic systems where there is sufficiently space or access. The third category is tomographic instruments that are permanently installed in situ in a process. These need not provide full tomographic images and instruments with fewer views are often preferred to reduce complexity and increase the instrument reliability. (author)

  3. Emission computer tomography of the left ventricle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, W.; Felix, R.; Calder, D.; Golde, G.; Botsch, H.

    1983-10-01

    Tomographic studies and time-dependent tomograms on phantoms and patients were carried out using a 7-pinhole collimator in order to study the clinical value of ECG-triggered tomographic radionuclid ventriculography. A suitable computer programme has been developed. The results have shown that it is possible to evaluate local contraction abnormalities by this method. Using a left oblique position of the collimator (LAO (45/sup 0/) - cranial (15/sup 0/)), emission computer tomography is aligned with the longitudinal axis for the heart. In this way, a single projection is sufficient to show the montility of the anterior and posterior walls and of the septum. Hypokinesis, akinesis or dyskinesis can be recognised visually. The localisation and extent of the defect can be determined through the 7-pinhole collimator. Reconstructed images of the triggered radionuclide scintigrams show excellent marginal definition. In the RAO projection the left ventricle can be seen without superimposition and images obtained which equal those of a first-pass technique.

  4. 3D tomographic imaging with the γ-eye planar scintigraphic gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, H.; Georgiou, M.; Loudos, G. K.; Simcox, A.; Tsoumpas, C.

    2017-11-01

    γ-eye is a desktop planar scintigraphic gamma camera (100 mm × 50 mm field of view) designed by BET Solutions as an affordable tool for dynamic, whole body, small-animal imaging. This investigation tests the viability of using γ-eye for the collection of tomographic data for 3D SPECT reconstruction. Two software packages, QSPECT and STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction), have been compared. Reconstructions have been performed using QSPECT’s implementation of the OSEM algorithm and STIR’s OSMAPOSL (Ordered Subset Maximum A Posteriori One Step Late) and OSSPS (Ordered Subsets Separable Paraboloidal Surrogate) algorithms. Reconstructed images of phantom and mouse data have been assessed in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity to varying activity levels and uniformity. The effect of varying the number of iterations, the voxel size (1.25 mm default voxel size reduced to 0.625 mm and 0.3125 mm), the point spread function correction and the weight of prior terms were explored. While QSPECT demonstrated faster reconstructions, STIR outperformed it in terms of resolution (as low as 1 mm versus 3 mm), particularly when smaller voxel sizes were used, and in terms of uniformity, particularly when prior terms were used. Little difference in terms of sensitivity was seen throughout.

  5. Reconstruction of hit time and hit position of annihilation quanta in the J-PET detector using the Mahalanobis distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Neha Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The J-PET detector being developed at the Jagiellonian University is a positron emission tomograph composed of the long strips of polymer scintillators. At the same time, it is a detector system that will be used for studies of the decays of positronium atoms. The shape of photomultiplier signals depends on the hit time and hit position of the gamma quantum. In order to take advantage of this fact, a dedicated sampling front-end electronics that enables to sample signals in voltage domain with the time precision of about 20 ps and novel reconstruction method based on the comparison of examined signal with the model signals stored in the library has been developed. As a measure of the similarity, we use the Mahalanobis distance. The achievable position and time resolution depend on the number and values of the threshold levels at which the signal is sampled. A reconstruction method as well as preliminary results are presented and discussed.

  6. Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of the Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor System with [11C]OMAR ([11C]JHU75528: Improvements in Image Quantification Using Wild-Type and Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Herance

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we assessed the feasibility of using positron emission tomography (PET and the tracer [11C]OMAR ([11C]JHU75528, an analogue of rimonabant, to study the brain cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor system. Wild-type (WT andCB1 knockout (KO animals were imaged at baseline and after pretreatment with blocking doses of rimonabant. Brain uptake in WT animals was higher (50% than in KO animals in baseline conditions. After pretreatment with rimonabant, WT uptake lowered to the level of KO animals. The results of this study support the feasibility of using PET with the radiotracer [11C]JHU75528 to image the brain CB1 receptor system in mice. In addition, this methodology can be used to assess the effect of new drugs in preclinical studies using genetically manipulated animals.

  7. An original acquisition chain for the TOHR High Resolution Tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinot, Laurent

    1999-01-01

    The framework of this work is part of a new approach of emission tomography adapted to small animals. The principle of our tomographic system TOHR (French acronym for High Resolution Tomograph) is based on the use of large solid angle and high resolution focusing collimators each mounted in front of a detection module of high efficiency. With a first-generation acquisition chain we were able to characterize TOHR, however, to take fully advantage of the TOHR possibilities, a completely new acquisition scheme had to be designed. This system, being the main topic of this work, makes use of temporal information. The detection of a particle that entered the detector is translated into temporal logical signals. These signals pass into a time coding circuitry and the coded results are transferred in a digital processor. According to the initial terms of delivery, the developed acquisition chain steers the detection of events dependent on the deposited energy and time of arrival. The latter is done by coincidence measurements. All elements are mounted on a special board included into a PC unit and a dedicated program controls the whole system. First experiments showed up the interest of the new acquisition unit for other application in physics or medical imaging

  8. Image reconstructions from super-sampled data sets with resolution modeling in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2014-12-01

    Spatial resolution in positron emission tomography (PET) is still a limiting factor in many imaging applications. To improve the spatial resolution for an existing scanner with fixed crystal sizes, mechanical movements such as scanner wobbling and object shifting have been considered for PET systems. Multiple acquisitions from different positions can provide complementary information and increased spatial sampling. The objective of this paper is to explore an efficient and useful reconstruction framework to reconstruct super-resolution images from super-sampled low-resolution data sets. The authors introduce a super-sampling data acquisition model based on the physical processes with tomographic, downsampling, and shifting matrices as its building blocks. Based on the model, we extend the MLEM and Landweber algorithms to reconstruct images from super-sampled data sets. The authors also derive a backprojection-filtration-like (BPF-like) method for the super-sampling reconstruction. Furthermore, they explore variant methods for super-sampling reconstructions: the separate super-sampling resolution-modeling reconstruction and the reconstruction without downsampling to further improve image quality at the cost of more computation. The authors use simulated reconstruction of a resolution phantom to evaluate the three types of algorithms with different super-samplings at different count levels. Contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) versus background variability, as an image-quality metric, is calculated at each iteration for all reconstructions. The authors observe that all three algorithms can significantly and consistently achieve increased CRCs at fixed background variability and reduce background artifacts with super-sampled data sets at the same count levels. For the same super-sampled data sets, the MLEM method achieves better image quality than the Landweber method, which in turn achieves better image quality than the BPF-like method. The authors also demonstrate

  9. The limitations of tissue-oxygen measurement and positron emission tomography as additional methods for postoperative breast reconstruction free-flap monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aleksi; Niemi, Tarja; Kinnunen, Ilpo; Minn, Heikki; Vahlberg, Tero; Kalliokoski, Kari; Suominen, Erkki; Grénman, Reidar; Aitasalo, Kalle

    2010-02-01

    Twelve patients who underwent breast reconstruction with a microvascular flap were monitored postoperatively with continuous partial tissue oxygenation (p(ti)O(2)) measurement. The regional blood flow (BF) of the entire flap was evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET) using oxygen-15-labelled water on the first postoperative (POP) morning to achieve data of the perfusion of the entire flap. A re-exploration was carried out if the p(ti)O(2) value remained lower than 15 mmHg for over 30 min. The mean p(ti)O(2) value of the flaps was 52.9+/-5.5 mmHg, whereas the mean BF values were 3.3+/-1.0 ml per 100 g min(-1). One false-positive result was detected by p(ti)O(2) measurement, resulting in an unnecessary re-exploration. Another re-operation suggested by the low p(ti)O(2) results was avoided due to the normal BF results assessed with PET. Totally, three flaps were re-explored. This prospective study suggests that continuous tissue-oxygen measurement with a polarographic needle probe is reliable for monitoring free breast flaps from one part of the flap, but assessing perfusion of the entire flap requires more complex monitoring methods, for example, PET. Clinical examination by experienced personnel remains important in free-breast-flap monitoring. PET could be useful in assessing free-flap perfusion in selected high-risk patients as an alternative to a re-operation when clinical examination and evaluation by other means are unreliable or present controversial results. 2008 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Methods and clinical applications of positron emission tomography in endocrinology. Methodologie et applications cliniques en endocrinologie de la tomographie a emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsheere, C. de; Lamotte, D. (Liege Univ. (BE))

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows to detect in coincidence photons issued from annihilation between positrons and electrons nearby situated. Tomographic detection (plane by plane) and tomographic reconstruction will lead to the quantitation of radioactive distribution per voxel, in the organ of interest. Recent tomographs can acquire simultaneously several transaxial slices, with a high sensitivity and a spatial resolution of 3-5 mm. Commonly used positron emitters have a short half-life: 2, 10, 20 and 110 min for {sup 15}0, {sup 13}N, {sup 11}C and {sup 18}F, respectively. The use of these isotopes requires on line production of radionuclides and synthesis of selected molecules. In endocrinology, PET allows among others to study noninvasively the receptor density of hormonodependent neoplasms such as breast, uterus, prostate tumors and prolactinomas. These last tumors represent a particular entity because of several combined characteristics: high turnover rate of amino acids, high density of dopaminergic receptors and response to bromocriptine (analogue of dopamine inhibiting the secretion of prolactine) in relation to the level of receptors. Because PET permits to evaluate the density of dopaminergic receptors and the metabolism of amino acids, theoretical response of the prolactinoma to bromocriptin can be predicted, the achieved therapeutic efficacy can be estimated and the long-term follow up of tumor growth can be assessed. This example illustrates the clinical value of PET in endocrinology.

  11. Increased accuracy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using iterative reconstruction of images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Filtered back projection (FBP is a common way of processing myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI studies. There are artifacts in FBP which can cause falsepositive results. Iterative reconstruction (IR is developed to reduce false positive findings in MPI studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in the number of false positive findings in MPI studies, between FBP and IR processing. Methods. We examined 107 patients with angina pectoris with MPI and coronary angiography (CAG, 77 man and 30 woman, aged 32−82. MPI studies were processed with FBP and with IR. Positive finding at MPI was visualization of the perfusion defect. Positive finding at CAG was stenosis of coronary artery. Perfusion defect at MPI without coronary artery stenosis at CAG was considered like false positive. The results were statistically analyzed with bivariate correlation, and with one sample t-test. Results. There were 20.6% normal, and 79.4% pathologic findings at FBP, 30.8% normal and 69.2% pathologic with IR and 37.4% normal and 62.6% pathologic at CAG. FBP produced 19 false-positive findings, at IR 11 false positive findings. The correlation between FBP and CAG was 0.658 (p < 0.01 and between IR and CAG 0.784 (p < 0.01. The number of false positive findings at MPI with IR was significantly lower than at FBP (p < 0.01. Conclusion. Our study shows that IR processing MPI scintigraphy has less number of false positive findings, therefore it is our choice for processing MPI studies.

  12. Ictal technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission tomographic findings in epileptic patients with polymicrogyria syndromes: A subtraction of ictal-interictal SPECT coregistered to MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichert-Ana, Lauro [University of Sao Paulo, Center for Epilepsy Surgery, Department of Neurology, Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Hospital das Clinicas, USP, Centro de Cirurgia de Epilepsia, CIREP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Mazzoncini de Azevedo-Marques, Paulo; Santos, Antonio C.; Araujo, David [University of Sao Paulo, Center for Imaging Science and Medical Physics, Department of Internal Medicine, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Ferrari Oliveira, Lucas [Federal University of Pelotas, Informatics Department, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Fernandes, Regina M.F.; Velasco, Tonicarlo R.; Sakamoto, Americo C. [University of Sao Paulo, Center for Epilepsy Surgery, Department of Neurology, Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Kato, Mery [University of Sao Paulo, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine from the Ribeirao Preto Medical School, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Muxfeldt Bianchin, Marino [Rio Grande do Sul Federal University, Neurology Division, HCPA, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2008-06-15

    To describe the ictal technetium-99 m-ECD SPECT findings in polymicrogyria syndromes (PMG) during epileptic seizures. We investigated 17 patients with PMG syndromes during presurgical workup, which included long-term video-electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring, neurological and psychiatry assessments, invasive EEG, and the subtraction of ictal-interictal SPECT coregistered to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (SISCOM). The analysis of the PMG cortex, using SISCOM, revealed intense hyperperfusion in the polymicrogyric lesion during epileptic seizures in all patients. Interestingly, other localizing investigations showed heterogeneous findings. Twelve patients underwent epilepsy surgery, three achieved seizure-freedom, five have worthwhile improvement, and four patients remained unchanged. Our study strongly suggests the involvement of PMG in seizure generation or early propagation. Both conventional ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and SISCOM appeared as the single contributive exam to suggest the localization of the epileptogenic zone. Despite the limited number of resective epilepsy surgery in our study (n = 9), we found a strong prognostic role of SISCOM in predicting surgical outcome. This result may be of great value on surgical decision-making of whether or not the whole or part of the PMG lesion should be surgically resected. (orig.)

  13. On a novel low cost high accuracy experimental setup for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discetti, Stefano; Ianiro, Andrea; Astarita, Tommaso; Cardone, Gennaro

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the critical aspects related to cost reduction of a Tomo PIV setup and to the bias errors introduced in the velocity measurements by the coherent motion of the ghost particles. The proposed solution consists of using two independent imaging systems composed of three (or more) low speed single frame cameras, which can be up to ten times cheaper than double shutter cameras with the same image quality. Each imaging system is used to reconstruct a particle distribution in the same measurement region, relative to the first and the second exposure, respectively. The reconstructed volumes are then interrogated by cross-correlation in order to obtain the measured velocity field, as in the standard tomographic PIV implementation. Moreover, differently from tomographic PIV, the ghost particle distributions of the two exposures are uncorrelated, since their spatial distribution is camera orientation dependent. For this reason, the proposed solution promises more accurate results, without the bias effect of the coherent ghost particles motion. Guidelines for the implementation and the application of the present method are proposed. The performances are assessed with a parametric study on synthetic experiments. The proposed low cost system produces a much lower modulation with respect to an equivalent three-camera system. Furthermore, the potential accuracy improvement using the Motion Tracking Enhanced MART (Novara et al 2010 Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 035401) is much higher than in the case of the standard implementation of tomographic PIV. (paper)

  14. 90Y microsphere (TheraSphere) treatment for unresectable colorectal cancer metastases of the liver: response to treatment at targeted doses of 135-150 Gy as measured by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Robert J; Thurston, Kenneth G; Goin, James E; Wong, Ching-Yee O; Gates, Vanessa L; Van Buskirk, Mark; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Salem, Riad

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this phase II study was to determine the safety and efficacy of TheraSphere treatment (90Y microspheres) in patients with liver-dominant colorectal metastases in whom standard therapies had failed or were judged to be inappropriate. Twenty-seven patients with unresectable hepatic colorectal metastases were treated at a targeted absorbed dose of 135-150 Gy. Safety and toxicity were assessed according to the National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Response was assessed with use of computed tomography (CT) and was correlated with response on [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Survival from first treatment was estimated with use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Tumor response measured by FDG PET imaging exceeded that measured by CT imaging for the first (88% vs 35%) and second (73% vs 36%) treated lobes. Tumor replacement of 25% or less (vs >25%) was associated with a statistically significant increase in median survival (339 days vs 162 days; P = .002). Treatment-related toxicities included mild fatigue (n = 13; 48%), nausea (n = 4; 15%), and vague abdominal pain (n = 5; 19%). There was one case of radiation-induced gastritis from inadvertent deposition of microspheres to the gastrointestinal tract (n = 1; 4%). Three patients (11%) experienced ascites/pleural effusion after treatment with TheraSphere as a consequence of liver failure in advanced-stage metastatic disease. With the exception of these three patients whose sequelae were not considered to be related to treatment, all observed toxicities were transient and resolved without medical intervention. TheraSphere administration appears to provide stabilization of liver disease with minimal toxicity in patients in whom standard systemic chemotherapy regimens have failed.

  15. An iterative reconstruction from truncated projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Various methods have been proposed for tomographic reconstruction from truncated projection data. In this paper, a reconstructive method is discussed which consists of iterations of filtered back-projection, reprojection and some nonlinear processings. First, the method is so constructed that it converges to a fixed point. Then, to examine its effectiveness, comparisons are made by computer experiments with two existing reconstructive methods for truncated projection data, that is, the method of extrapolation based on the smooth assumption followed by filtered back-projection, and modified additive ART

  16. Computed Tomographic Angiography-Based Planning of Bipedicled DIEP Flaps with Intraflap Crossover Anastomosis: An Anatomical and Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Lee, Kyeong-Tae; Mun, Goo-Hyun

    2016-09-01

    When using deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps in breast reconstruction, harvesting bipedicled flaps can be a valuable option in cases requiring the transfer of a large portion of harvested flaps. Connecting the bilateral deep inferior epigastric arteries (DIEAs) by intraflap crossover anastomosis is one of the most popular methods of constructing bipedicled DIEP flaps. Planning the primary and secondary pedicle configurations for reliable intraflap crossover anastomosis is crucial. To achieve this, detailed anatomical DIEA information might be helpful. However, meticulous planning of bipedicled DIEP flaps based on computed tomographic angiography has not been reported. Detailed anatomical investigation of DIEA branches was conducted using computed tomographic angiographs of 100 hemiabdomens. Thirty-eight prospectively collected patients who underwent breast reconstruction using bipedicled DIEP flaps with intraflap crossover under computed tomographic angiography-based planning were reviewed. Three intramuscular DIEA branching patterns with distinct branch point topography, branch diameters, and superior continuations cranial to sizable perforators were observed. In the prospective clinical study, a primary pedicle with a recipient branch for intraflap crossover anastomosis could be specified preoperatively using computed tomographic angiography-based anatomical data of the pedicles, including size of DIEA branches or their superior continuation and size of perforators. In all cases, the bipedicle configuration was easily achieved as planned on computed tomographic angiography, and secure perfusion of the entire flap was achieved. The authors' results suggest that computed tomographic angiography provides detailed anatomical DIEA information, and comprehensive analysis of these data allows precise planning of bipedicle configurations with intraflap crossover anastomosis in DIEP flaps. Therapeutic, IV.

  17. Line-scanning tomographic optical microscope with isotropic transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajdátsy, Gábor; Dudás, László; Erdélyi, Miklós; Szabó, Gábor

    2010-01-01

    An imaging method and optical system, referred to as a line-scanning tomographic optical microscope (LSTOM) using a combination of line-scanning technique and CT reconstruction principle, is proposed and studied theoretically and experimentally. In our implementation a narrow focus line is scanned over the sample and the reflected light is measured in a confocal arrangement. One such scan is equivalent to a transverse projection in tomography. Repeating the scanning procedure in several directions, a number of transverse projections are recorded from which the image can be obtained using conventional CT reconstruction algorithms. The resolution of the image is independent of the spatial dimensions and structure of the applied detector; furthermore, the transfer function of the system is isotropic. The imaging performance of the implemented confocal LSTOM was compared with a point-scanning confocal microscope, based on recorded images. These images demonstrate that the resolution of the confocal LSTOM exceeds (by 15%) the resolution limit of a point-scanning confocal microscope

  18. Resolving vorticity and dissipation in a turbulent boundary layer by tomographic PTV and VIC+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio; Elsinga, Gerrit E.

    2017-04-01

    The existing time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements by Jodai and Elsinga (J Fluid Mech 795:611-633; Jodai, Elsinga, J Fluid Mech 795:611-633, 2016) in a turbulent boundary layer ( Re θ = 2038) are reprocessed using tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) and vortex-in-cell-plus (VIC+). The resulting small-scale flow properties, i.e. vorticity and turbulence dissipation, are compared. The VIC+ technique was recently proposed and uses the concept of pouring time into space to increase reconstruction quality of instantaneous velocity. The tomographic PTV particle track measurements are interpolated using VIC+ to a dense grid, making use of both particle velocity and Lagrangian acceleration. Comparison of the vortical structures by visualization of isosurfaces of vorticity magnitude shows that the two methods return similar coherent vortical structures, but their strength in terms of vorticity magnitude is increased when using VIC+, which suggests an improvement in spatial resolution. Further statistical evaluation shows that the root mean square (rms) of vorticity fluctuations from tomographic PIV is approximately 40% lower in comparison to a reference profile available from a DNS simulation, while the VIC+ technique returns rms vorticity fluctuations to within 10% of the reference. The dissipation rate is heavily underestimated by tomographic PIV with approximately 50% damping, whereas the VIC+ analysis yields a dissipation rate to within approximately 5% for y + > 25. The fact that dissipation can be directly measured by a volumetric experiment is novel. It differs from existing approaches that involve 2d measurements combined with isotropic turbulence assumptions or apply corrections based on sub-grid scale turbulence modelling. Finally, the study quantifies the spatial response of VIC+ with a sine-wave lattice analysis. The results indicate a twofold increase of spatial resolution with respect to cross

  19. Preliminary study of an angiographic and angio-tomographic technique based on K-edge filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golosio, Bruno; Brunetti, Antonio [Dipartimento POLCOMING, Istituto di Matematica e Fisica, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Cagliari (Italy); Oliva, Piernicola; Carpinelli, Massimo [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Cagliari (Italy); Luca Masala, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Meloni, Francesco [Unità operativa di Diagnostica per immagini Asl n. 1, Ospedale Civile SS Annunziata, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Battista Meloni, Giovanni [Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Università di Sassari, 07100 Sassari (Italy)

    2013-08-14

    Digital Subtraction Angiography is commonly affected by artifacts due to the patient movements during the acquisition of the images without and with the contrast medium. This paper presents a preliminary study on an angiographic and angio-tomographic technique based on the quasi-simultaneous acquisition of two images, obtained using two different filters at the exit of an X-ray tube. One of the two filters (K-edge filter) contains the same chemical element used as a contrast agent (gadolinium in this study). This filter absorbs more radiation with energy just above the so called K-edge energy of gadolinium than the radiation with energy just below it. The other filter (an aluminium filter in this study) is simply used to suppress the low-energy contribution to the spectrum. Using proper calibration curves, the two images are combined to obtain an image of the contrast agent distribution. In the angio-tomographic application of the proposed technique two images, corresponding to the two filter types, are acquired for each viewing angle of the tomographic scan. From the two tomographic reconstructions, it is possible to obtain a three-dimensional map of the contrast agent distribution. The technique was tested on a sample consisting of a rat skull placed inside a container filled with water. Six small cylinders with 4.7 mm internal diameter containing the contrast medium at different concentrations were placed inside the skull. In the plain angiographic application of the technique, five out of six cylinders were visible, with gadolinium concentration down to 0.96%. In the angio-tomographic application, all six cylinders were visible, with gadolinium concentration down to 0.49%. This preliminary study shows that the proposed technique can provide images of the contrast medium at low concentration without most of the artifacts that are present in images produced by conventional techniques. The results encourage further investigation on the feasibility of a clinical

  20. Case Report: Unusual computed tomographic features of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case report of a 57-year old woman who presented with signs and symptoms of intracranial mass. Computed tomographic (CT) and clinical features were unusual and suggestive of a parasaggital Meningioma. However an accurate diagnosis of a tuberculoma was made at surgery and histopathological examination.

  1. Quantum probability measures and tomographic probability densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amosov, GG; Man'ko, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Using a simple relation of the Dirac delta-function to generalized the theta-function, the relationship between the tomographic probability approach and the quantum probability measure approach with the description of quantum states is discussed. The quantum state tomogram expressed in terms of the

  2. The bar coil for NMR tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogorodzki, P.; Piatkowski, A.; Wasielewski, J.

    1995-01-01

    The bar coil (bi-planar) for the NMR tomograph, designed for medical diagnostics, has been described. The tests of coil shown that it generates good homogenous magnetic field in a big volume what results in improving of the signal-to-noise ratio

  3. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, P.J.; Violato, D.; Scarano, F.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured threedimensional flow fields have

  4. Advanced reconstruction algorithms for electron tomography: From comparison to combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goris, B. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Roelandts, T. [Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Batenburg, K.J. [Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, NL-1098XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heidari Mezerji, H. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Bals, S., E-mail: sara.bals@ua.ac.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2013-04-15

    In this work, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), the total variation minimization (TVM) reconstruction technique and the discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) for electron tomography are compared and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Furthermore, we describe how the result of a three dimensional (3D) reconstruction based on TVM can provide objective information that is needed as the input for a DART reconstruction. This approach results in a tomographic reconstruction of which the segmentation is carried out in an objective manner. - Highlights: ► A comparative study between different reconstruction algorithms for tomography is performed. ► Reconstruction algorithms that uses prior knowledge about the specimen have a superior result. ► One reconstruction algorithm can provide the prior knowledge for a second algorithm.

  5. Advanced reconstruction algorithms for electron tomography: From comparison to combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goris, B.; Roelandts, T.; Batenburg, K.J.; Heidari Mezerji, H.; Bals, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), the total variation minimization (TVM) reconstruction technique and the discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) for electron tomography are compared and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Furthermore, we describe how the result of a three dimensional (3D) reconstruction based on TVM can provide objective information that is needed as the input for a DART reconstruction. This approach results in a tomographic reconstruction of which the segmentation is carried out in an objective manner. - Highlights: ► A comparative study between different reconstruction algorithms for tomography is performed. ► Reconstruction algorithms that uses prior knowledge about the specimen have a superior result. ► One reconstruction algorithm can provide the prior knowledge for a second algorithm

  6. Influence of arm positioning on tomographic thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging and the effect of attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prvulovich, E.M.; Jarritt, P.H.; Vorontsova, E.; Bomanji, J.B.; Ell, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Lateral attenuation in single-photon emission tomography (SPET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has been attributed to the left arm if it is held by the patient's side during data acquisition. As a result MPI data are conventionally acquired with the arms held above the head. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of imaging arms down on reconstructed tomographic images depicting regional myocardial thallium-201 distribution and to assess whether attenuation-corrected (AC) myocardial perfusion images acquired arms down could replace uncorrected (NC) images acquired arms up for routine clinical service. Twenty-eight patients referred for routine MPI underwent sequential 180 emission/transmission imaging for attenuation correction using an L-shaped dual-headed gamma camera (GE Optima) fitted with two gadolinium-153 scanning line sources. Delay data were acquired twice: once supine with the arms up and then supine with the arms down. Detector radius of rotation (ROR) for arms up and arms-down studies was recorded. For each data set, count density was measured in 17 segments of a polar plot and segmental uptake expressed relative to study maximum. Oblique images were assessed qualitatively by two observers blinded to study type for tracer distribution and overall quality. Transmission maps were assessed for truncation. Mean detector ROR was 190 mm for arms-up studies and 232 mm for arms-down studies (P 201 Tl distribution, particularly anterolaterally. There is lateral undercorrection in approximately 10% of AC arms-down studies, possibly because of attenuation map truncation. Image quality is reduced in about one-third of AC arms-down studies compared with NC arms-up studies. These data suggest that this attenuation correction method is not sufficiently robust to allow routine acquisition of MPI data with the arms down. (orig.)

  7. Tomotherapy: IMRT and tomographic verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    continuously translating through the bore of a CT-like ring gantry. The ring gantry will also make it possible to acquire CT scans of the patient in treatment position so that the delivery can be accurately verified. Megavoltage verification allows several new procedures including dose reconstruction. Dose reconstruction results in the dose delivered that day superimposed on a CT representation of the patient in treatment position allowing a direct comparison with the treatment plan. Dose reconstruction will enable adaptive radiotherapy whereby subsequent fractions can be modified to take into account some deviations in delivery. The first clinical helical tomotherapy system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin (UW) and will be installed in the UW Radiotherapy Clinic in November 2000. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  8. Study, development and validation of a dead-timeless electronic architecture concept for highly sensitive PET (Positron Emission Tomograph); Etude, developpement et validation d'un concept d'architecture electronique sans temps mort pour TEP de haute sensibilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vert, P.E

    2007-03-15

    Positron emission tomographs (PET) are fitted with highly capable reading electronics, which owns qualities and drawbacks. Highly accused at first as an explanation of the poor sensitivity of these imagers, the present study points out that the dead-times shared along the chains contribute to only 16 % in the data losses at a typical activity of 10 {mu}Ci/ml. The gross acquisition rates could thus be raised by 20 % through a suppression of these saturations. Looking in details at the philosophy of the acquisition procedure, a property appears to circumscribe the sensitivity even more: the timing resolution. The latter conditions, to the first order, the rejection capabilities of random events, part of the scattered ones and hence noise which is finally rated to the true coincidences the signal is made up of. Minimizing the resolving time goes through the suppression of the unneeded actors along with the adoption of a well adapted time-stamping method (optimal filtering). In doing so, the intrinsic channel resolution appears to be possibly lowered by a factor 7, reducing to 350 ps. The bottom value of the coincidence window may be narrowed as a consequence, leading to an increase of the NECR (noise equivalent count rate) by 50 per cent. At this stage, a time of flight (TOF) algorithms can be implemented. As an opportunist, it promises a reduction of the noise variance by 430 %, a gain that echoes on the NECR figure. Finally merging all these ideas allows to expect an improvement close to an order of magnitude on the NECR, with the hope of routine exams shortened by the same amount. In this context, it appeared logical to imagine a new electronics acquisition synoptic dedicated to fully pixelized PET. The number of channels blows up by the way when compared to the existing, this statement being partially balanced by the decision to fully integrate the electronics. The measures of the energy and time are planned to be performed with a single channel, with a continuous

  9. Simultaneous high-speed 3D flame front detection and tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebi, Dominik; Clemens, Noel T.

    2016-03-01

    A technique capable of detecting the instantaneous, time-resolved, 3D flame topography is successfully demonstrated in a lean-premixed swirl flame undergoing flashback. A simultaneous measurement of the volumetric velocity field is possible without the need for additional hardware. Droplets which vaporize in the preheat zone of the flame serve as the marker for the flame front. The droplets are illuminated with a laser and imaged from four different views followed by a tomographic reconstruction to obtain the volumetric particle field. Void regions in the reconstructed particle field, which correspond to regions of burnt gas, are detected with a series of image processing steps. The interface separating the void region from regions filled with particles is defined as the flame surface. The velocity field in the unburnt gas is measured using tomographic PIV. The resulting data include the simultaneous 3D flame front and 3D volumetric velocity field at 5 kHz. The technique is applied to a lean-premixed (ϕ  =  0.8), swirling methane-air flame and validated against simultaneously acquired planar measurements. The mean error associated with the reconstructed 3D flame topography is about 0.4 mm, which is smaller than the flame thickness under the studied conditions. The mean error associated with the volumetric velocity field is about 0.2 m s-1.

  10. Simultaneous high-speed 3D flame front detection and tomographic PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebi, Dominik; Clemens, Noel T

    2016-01-01

    A technique capable of detecting the instantaneous, time-resolved, 3D flame topography is successfully demonstrated in a lean-premixed swirl flame undergoing flashback. A simultaneous measurement of the volumetric velocity field is possible without the need for additional hardware. Droplets which vaporize in the preheat zone of the flame serve as the marker for the flame front. The droplets are illuminated with a laser and imaged from four different views followed by a tomographic reconstruction to obtain the volumetric particle field. Void regions in the reconstructed particle field, which correspond to regions of burnt gas, are detected with a series of image processing steps. The interface separating the void region from regions filled with particles is defined as the flame surface. The velocity field in the unburnt gas is measured using tomographic PIV. The resulting data include the simultaneous 3D flame front and 3D volumetric velocity field at 5 kHz. The technique is applied to a lean-premixed (ϕ  =  0.8), swirling methane-air flame and validated against simultaneously acquired planar measurements. The mean error associated with the reconstructed 3D flame topography is about 0.4 mm, which is smaller than the flame thickness under the studied conditions. The mean error associated with the volumetric velocity field is about 0.2 m s −1 . (paper)

  11. Development of a X-ray micro-tomograph and its application to reservoir rocks characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira de Paiva, R.

    1995-10-01

    We describe the construction and application to studies in three dimensions of a laboratory micro-tomograph for the characterisation of heterogeneous solids at the scale of a few microns. The system is based on an electron microprobe and a two dimensional X-ray detector. The use of a low beam divergence for image acquisition allows use of simple and rapid reconstruction software whilst retaining reasonable acquisition times. Spatial resolutions of better than 3 microns in radiography and 10 microns in tomography are obtained. The applications of microtomography in the petroleum industry are illustrated by the study of fibre orientation in polymer composites, of the distribution of minerals and pore space in reservoir rocks, and of the interaction of salt water with a model porous medium. A correction for X-ray beam hardening is described and used to obtain improved discrimination of the phases present in the sample. In the case of a North Sea reservoir rock we show the possibility to distinguish quartz, feldspar and in certain zone kaolinite. The representativeness of the tomographic reconstruction is demonstrated by comparing the surface of the reconstructed specimen with corresponding images obtained in scanning electron microscopy. (author). 58 refs., 10 tabs., 71 photos

  12. Monitoring of health of trees by gamma-ray tomographic scanners and the first Kanpur error theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Ruchi; Razdan, Mayuri; Quraishi, A.M.; Munshi, Prabhat

    2004-01-01

    CT scanners produce nondestructively images of a given cross-section with the help of radiation source-detector system and a suitable tomographic reconstruction algorithm. These CT images have inherent error associated with them and for unknown objects it is not possible to calculate it directly. Careful application of the first Kanpur theorem, however, gives an indirect estimate of the inaccuracy of these images. An interesting outcome of this theorem is monitoring of health of trees. (author)

  13. Recombination dominated hydrogenic emission from the detached plasmas in W7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasubramanian, N.; Koenig, R.; Wenzel, U.; Thomsen, H.; McCormick, K.; Grigull, P.; Feng, Y.; Klinger, T.; John, A.

    2003-01-01

    Beyond a certain threshold average density in the High-Density H-Mode the island divertor plasma in the stellarator W7-AS undergoes partial detachment. The tomographic reconstruction of the radiated power density from the detached pulses show that the radiation profile in the triangular plane is also asymmetric. In the detached phase, the spectrometer viewing tangentially to the target tiles in the top divertor region manifests that the impurity radiation layer is close to the X-points. The spectral analysis also demonstrates the presence of a hydrogen radiation zone dominated by recombination emission close to the target tiles. This papers presents the emission from the deeply detached locations including the volume recombination in a stable discharge. (orig.)

  14. Present state and development of positron tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, R.; Gariod, R.; Laval, M.; Tournier, F.

    1979-01-01

    This document presents the main characteristics of positron tomographs and analyses the relative importance of the parameters to be taken into consideration in the design of a tomograph: on the one hand, the physical parameters linked to the measurement of the annihilation photons by time coincidence and, on the other, the geometrical and technological parameters of prime importance in minimizing the many spurious effects. The last part endeavours to show this sort of instrumentation has evolved. Using the results obtained in our laboratory by mathematical simulation, the expected advantages are presented on the picture quality of the time of flight measurement of annihilation photons. Where the physical aspects of this method are concerned, the advantage of using cesium fluoride as scintillator is demonstrated [fr

  15. Tomographic Techniques for Radar Ice Sounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik

    challenge. This dissertation deals with tomographic techniques based on multiphase-center radars that represent state-of-the-art technology within thefield of ice sounding. The use of advanced tomographic processing forclutter suppression is investigated, which up to this point has beenlargely unexplored...... in the literature. The investigation also includes atheoretical study of beamforming and direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimationtechniques. In addition to the primary treatment of clutter suppression,additional novel applications of tomography are also explored. Based on an experimental multi-phase-center dataset...... discrimination of the desired bed return from strong surface clutter ispresented. The technique is applied to data from the channel of the challengingJakobshavn Glacier acquired with the Multi-channel CoherentiiiRadar Depth Sounder/Imager (MCoRDS/I), where it is shown how thetechnique can be used to close some...

  16. Addition of Tomographic Capabilities to NMIS

    CERN Document Server

    Mullens, J A

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes tomographic capabilities for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). The tomographic capabilities add weapons component spatial and material properties information that result in a more detailed item signature (template) and provide more information for physical attributes analyses. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) is used routinely to confirm the identity of HEU components in sealed containers. It does this through a radiation signature acquired by shining a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source through the container and measuring the radiation at four detectors stacked vertically on the other side. This measurement gives a gamma and neutron radiation transmission profile of the weapons component, mixed with the radiation production due to the induced fissions in the fissile materials. This information is sufficient to match an ''unknown'' weapons component signature to a template signature from a reference item when measuring under controlled conditions. Tomography m...

  17. Total Variation and Tomographic Imaging from Projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide

    2011-01-01

    or 3D reconstruction from noisy projections. We demonstrate that for a small signal-to-noise ratio, this new approach allows us to compute better (i.e., more reliable) reconstructions than those obtained by classical methods. This is possible due to the use of the TV reconstruction model, which...

  18. 3D flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry for vortex breakdown over a non-slender delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ChengYue; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Li, Tian; Wang, JinJun

    2016-06-01

    Volumetric measurement for the leading-edge vortex (LEV) breakdown of a delta wing has been conducted by three-dimensional (3D) flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). The 3D flow visualization is employed to show the vortex structures, which was recorded by four cameras with high resolution. 3D dye streaklines of the visualization are reconstructed using a similar way of particle reconstruction in TPIV. Tomographic PIV is carried out at the same time using same cameras with the dye visualization. Q criterion is employed to identify the LEV. Results of tomographic PIV agree well with the reconstructed 3D dye streaklines, which proves the validity of the measurements. The time-averaged flow field based on TPIV is shown and described by sections of velocity and streamwise vorticity. Combining the two measurement methods sheds light on the complex structures of both bubble type and spiral type of breakdown. The breakdown position is recognized by investigating both the streaklines and TPIV velocity fields. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to extract a pair of conjugated helical instability modes from TPIV data. Therefore, the dominant frequency of the instability modes is obtained from the corresponding POD coefficients of the modes based on wavelet transform analysis.

  19. Development of a portable computed tomographic scanner for on-line imaging of industrial piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaafar Abdullah; Mohd Arif Hamzah; Mohd Soyapi Mohd Yusof; Mohd Fitri Abdul Rahman; Fadil IsmaiI; Rasif Mohd Zain

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) technology is being increasingly developed for industrial application. This paper presents the development of a portable computed tomographic scanner for on?line imaging of industrial piping systems. The theoretical approach, the system hardware, the data acquisition system and the adopted algorithm for image reconstruction are discussed. The scanner has large potential to be used to determine the extent of corrosion under insulation (CUI), to detect blockages, to measure the thickness of deposit/materials built-up on the walls and to improve understanding of material flow in pipelines. (Author)

  20. Reconstruction of electron beam distribution in phase space by using parallel maximum entropy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajima, R.; Hirotsu, T.; Kondo, S.

    1997-01-01

    Reconstruction of electron beam distribution in six-dimensional phase space by tomographic approach is presented. Maximum entropy method (MENT) is applied to the reconstruction and compared with filtered back-projection. Finally, MENT is adapted to parallel computing environment with PVM. (orig.)

  1. Noise robustness of a combined phase retrieval and reconstruction method for phase-contrast tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2016-01-01

    Classical reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography consist of two stages: phase retrieval and tomographic reconstruction. A novel algebraic method combining the two was suggested by Kostenko et al. [Opt. Express 21, 12185 (2013) [CrossRef], and preliminary results demonstrated improve...

  2. Same day injections of Tc-99m methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (hexamibi) for myocardial tomographic imaging: Comparison between rest-stress and stress-rest injection sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taillefer, R.; Gagnon, A.; Laflamme, L.; Leveille, J.; Phaneuf, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that both rest and stress 99m Tc-hexamibi myocardial perfusion imaging can be performed on the same day using two different doses injected within few h (the first one at rest followed by a second at stress). In order to evaluate and compare 2 sequences (rest-stress and stress-rest) of 99m Tc-hexamibi injections performed the same day, 18 patients with either abnormal 201 Tl myocardial scan or abnormal coronary angiography were studied with 2 99m Tc-hexamibi injections protocols. The rest-stress study was performed as follows: 7 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi was injected at rest. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 60 min later. Immediately after the rest study, patients were injected at peak stress with 25 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi. Tomographic imaging was repeated 1 h later. Patients were submitted to the stress-rest protocol within 3 days. Tomographic imaging was done 1 h after a 7 mCi injection at stress. This study was followed by an injection of 25 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi at rest, a tomographic study was performed 60 min later. Myocardial sections were reconstructed in horizontal long, vertical long, and short axes. Data analysis also included polar map representation. A total of 324 segments were interpreted blind by 3 observers, there was an agreement in 283/324 (87.3%) segments between the 2 protocols. However, 24 segments (7.4%) judged ischemic on rest-stress were called scars on stress-rest. In three patients, myocardial segments were judged normal on the rest image of the rest-stress protocol while they were found abnormal (false positive images) on the stress-rest sequence. Stress images from both protocols were judged similar in 17 patients. In conclusion, when using a short time interval (less than 2 h) between two 99m Tc-hexamibi injections, it is preferable to do a rest-stress sequence since the rest image performed initially represents a true rest study, which is not necessarily the case with the stress-rest sequence

  3. Interior tomographic imaging for x-ray coherent scattering (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Sean; Zhu, Zheyuan

    2017-05-01

    Conventional computed tomography reconstructs the attenuation only high-dimensional images. Coherent scatter computed tomography, which reconstructs the angular dependent scattering profiles of 3D objects, can provide molecular signatures that improves the accuracy of material identification and classification. Coherent scatter tomography are traditionally acquired by setups similar to x-ray powder diffraction machine; a collimated source in combination with 2D or 1D detector collimation in order to localize the scattering point. In addition, the coherent scatter cross-section is often 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the absorption cross-section for the same material. Coded aperture and structured illumination approaches has been shown to greatly improve the collection efficiency. In many applications, especially in security imaging and medical diagnosis, fast and accurate identification of the material composition of a small volume within the whole object would lead to an accelerated imaging procedure and reduced radiation dose. Here, we report an imaging method to reconstruct the material coherent scatter profile within a small volume. The reconstruction along one radial direction can reconstruct a scalar coherent scattering tomographic image. Our methods takes advantage of the finite support of the scattering profile in small angle regime. Our system uses a pencil beam setup without using any detector side collimation. Coherent scatter profile of a 10 mm scattering sample embedded in a 30 mm diameter phantom was reconstructed. The setup has small form factor and is suitable for various portable non-destructive detection applications.

  4. Strategies for source space limitation in tomographic inverse procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.S.; Lewis, P.S.; Schlitt, H.A.; Kaplan, L.; Gorodnitsky, I.; Wood, C.C.

    1994-02-01

    The use of magnetic recordings for localization of neural activity requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse problem: i.e. the determination of the spatial configuration, orientation, and timecourse of the currents that give rise to a particular observed field distribution. In its general form, this inverse problem has no unique solution; due to superposition and the existence of silent source configurations, a particular magnetic field distribution at the head surface could be produced by any number of possible source configurations. However, by making assumptions concerning the number and properties of neural sources, it is possible to use numerical minimization techniques to determine the source model parameters that best account for the experimental observations while satisfying numerical or physical criteria. In this paper the authors describe progress on the development and validation of inverse procedures that produce distributed estimates of neuronal currents. The goal is to produce a temporal sequence of 3-D tomographic reconstructions of the spatial patterns of neural activation. Such approaches have a number of advantages, in principle. Because they do not require estimates of model order and parameter values (beyond specification of the source space), they minimize the influence of investigator decisions and are suitable for automated analyses. These techniques also allow localization of sources that are not point-like; experimental studies of cognitive processes and of spontaneous brain activity are likely to require distributed source models.

  5. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows

    KAUST Repository

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.

    2017-06-12

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets of differently-colored pulsed LEDs. Each set of Red, Green & Blue LEDs is shone on a diffuser screen facing each of the cameras. We thereby record the RGB-colored shadows of opaque suspended particles, rather than the conventionally used scattered light. We subsequently separate the RGB color channels, to represent the separate times, with preprocessing to minimize noise and cross-talk. We use commercially available Tomo-PIV software for the calibration, 3-D particle reconstruction and particle-field correlations, to obtain all three velocity components in a volume. Acceleration estimations can be done thanks to the triple pulse illumination. Our test flow is a vortex ring produced by forcing flow through a circular orifice, using a flexible membrane, which is driven by a pressurized air pulse. Our system is compared to a commercial stereoscopic PIV system for error estimations. We believe this proof of concept experiment will make this technique available for education, industry and scientists for a fraction of the hardware cost needed for traditional Tomo-PIV.

  6. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A; Alarfaj, Meshal K; Li, Er Qiang; Hernández-Sánchez, J F; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-06-16

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets of differently-colored pulsed LEDs. Each set of Red, Green & Blue LEDs is shone on a diffuser screen facing each of the cameras. We thereby record the RGB-colored shadows of opaque suspended particles, rather than the conventionally used scattered light. We subsequently separate the RGB color channels, to represent the separate times, with preprocessing to minimize noise and cross-talk. We use commercially available Tomo-PIV software for the calibration, 3-D particle reconstruction and particle-field correlations, to obtain all three velocity components in a volume. Acceleration estimations can be done thanks to the triple pulse illumination. Our test flow is a vortex ring produced by forcing flow through a circular orifice, using a flexible membrane, which is driven by a pressurized air pulse. Our system is compared to a commercial stereoscopic PIV system for error estimations. We believe this proof of concept experiment will make this technique available for education, industry and scientists for a fraction of the hardware cost needed for traditional Tomo-PIV.

  7. The research of clinical application of computed tomographic virtual gastroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Pan Zhenyu; Zhai Xiaoli; Gu Hua; Wang Yajie; Ding Yi; Wang Li; Liang Ying; Zhai Renyou

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the values, methods and findings of computed tomographic virtual gastroscopy (CTVG). Methods: Sixty-nine patients underwent the examination of spiral CT after charged air into stomachs in different cubage. The CT scan conditions were collimating width 3 mm, pitch 1.2 - 2.5, scanning speed 0.8 s/360 degree, the raw data of CT volume scan was reconstructed in overlapping rate 33% - 67%. Then the images of CTVG were built using navigator software (GE AG, USA). Results: The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of CTVG were 92.8%, 96.4%, and 78.6%, respectively. CTVG corresponded well with fibrous gastroscopy and specimens in demonstrating the gastric lesions. CTVG was provided with the ability of revealing the tiny lesions of chronic atrophic gastritis, chronic erosive gastritis, chronic proliferative gastritis, and acute hemorrhagic gastritis in some degree. The high quality imaging of CTVG could be obtained in condition of collimating width 3 mm, pitch 1.2 - 1.5, overlapping 50% - 67%, well hold-breath, gastric cubage in full and feasible scan positions. Conclusion: CTVG is a rising means of gastric examination and has great value in clinic applications

  8. Strategies for source space limitation in tomographic inverse procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Lewis, P.S.; Schlitt, H.A.; Kaplan, L.; Gorodnitsky, I.; Wood, C.C.

    1994-01-01

    The use of magnetic recordings for localization of neural activity requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse problem: i.e. the determination of the spatial configuration, orientation, and timecourse of the currents that give rise to a particular observed field distribution. In its general form, this inverse problem has no unique solution; due to superposition and the existence of silent source configurations, a particular magnetic field distribution at the head surface could be produced by any number of possible source configurations. However, by making assumptions concerning the number and properties of neural sources, it is possible to use numerical minimization techniques to determine the source model parameters that best account for the experimental observations while satisfying numerical or physical criteria. In this paper the authors describe progress on the development and validation of inverse procedures that produce distributed estimates of neuronal currents. The goal is to produce a temporal sequence of 3-D tomographic reconstructions of the spatial patterns of neural activation. Such approaches have a number of advantages, in principle. Because they do not require estimates of model order and parameter values (beyond specification of the source space), they minimize the influence of investigator decisions and are suitable for automated analyses. These techniques also allow localization of sources that are not point-like; experimental studies of cognitive processes and of spontaneous brain activity are likely to require distributed source models

  9. Quantification of tomographic PIV uncertainty using controlled experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wu, Yue; Ma, Lin

    2018-01-20

    The goal of this work was to experimentally quantify the uncertainty of three-dimensional (3D) and three-component (3C) velocity measurements using tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV). Controlled measurements were designed using tracer particles embedded in a solid sample, and tomo-PIV measurements were performed on the sample while it was moved both translationally and rotationally to simulate various known displacement fields, so the 3D3C displacements measured by tomo-PIV can be directly compared to the known displacements created by the sample. The results illustrated that (1) the tomo-PIV technique was able to reconstruct the 3D3C velocity with an averaged error of 0.8-1.4 voxels in terms of magnitude and 1.7°-1.9° in terms of orientation for the velocity fields tested; (2) view registration (VR) plays a significant role in tomo-PIV, and by reducing VR error from 0.6° to 0.1°, the 3D3C measurement accuracy can be improved by at least 2.5 times in terms of both magnitude and orientation; and (3) the use of additional cameras in tomo-PIV can extend the 3D3C velocity measurement to a larger volume, while maintaining acceptable accuracy. These results obtained from controlled tests are expected to aid the error analysis and the design of tomo-PIV measurements.

  10. Voxel-based model construction from colored tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    2002-07-01

    This work presents a new approach in the construction of voxel-based phantoms that was implemented to simplify the segmentation process of organs and tissues reducing the time used in this procedure. The segmentation process is performed by painting tomographic images and attributing a different color for each organ or tissue. A voxel-based head and neck phantom was built using this new approach. The way as the data are stored allows an increasing in the performance of the radiation transport code. The program that calculates the radiation transport also works with image files. This capability allows image reconstruction showing isodose areas, under several points of view, increasing the information to the user. Virtual X-ray photographs can also be obtained allowing that studies could be accomplished looking for the radiographic techniques optimization assessing, at the same time, the doses in organs and tissues. The accuracy of the program here presented, called MCvoxEL, that implements this new approach, was tested by comparison to results from two modern and well-supported Monte Carlo codes. Dose conversion factors for parallel X-ray exposure were also calculated. (author)

  11. Unfolding and smoothing applied to the quality enhancement of neutron tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Silvani, Maria I.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2008-01-01

    Resolution and contrast are the major parameters defining the quality of a computer-aided tomographic image. These parameters depend upon several features of the image acquisition system, such as detector resolution, geometrical arrangement of the source-object-detector, beam divergence, source strength, detector efficiency and counting time. Roughly, the detector finite resolution is the main source of systematic errors affecting the separation power of the image acquisition system, while the electronic noise and statistical fluctuation are responsible for the data dispersion, which spoils the contrast. An algorithm has been developed in this work aiming at the improvement of the image quality through the minimization of both types of errors. The systematic ones are reduced by a mathematical unfolding of the position spectra - used as projections to reconstruct the 2D-images - using the Line Spread Function - LSF of the neutron tomographic system. The principle behind this technique is that every single channel contains information about all channels of the spectrum, but it is concealed due to the automatic integration carried out by the detector. Therefore, knowing the shape of this curve, it is possible to retrieve the original spectra. These spectra are unfortunately corrupted by the unavoidable statistical fluctuation, and by oscillations arising from the unfolding process, which strongly affects the quality of the final unfolded image. In order to reduce this impact, the spectra have been filtered by a Fourier transform technique or smoothed with a least square fitting procedure. The algorithm has been applied to spectra of some test-bodies generated by an earlier developed tomographic simulator, which reproduces the spectra furnished by a thermal neutron tomographic system employing a position sensitive detector. The obtained results have shown that the unfolded spectra produce final images capable to resolve features otherwise not achievable with the

  12. TOMOGRAPHIC MAMMOGRAPHY AND TOMOSYNTHESIS USING OPENGL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Zolotarev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography is still being intensively studied and widely used to solve a number of industrial and medical applications. The simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART and Bayesian inference reconstruction (BIR are considered as advantageous iteration methods that are most suitable for improving the quality of the reconstructed 3D-images. The paper deals with the parallel iterative algorithms to ensure the reconstruction of threedimensional images of the breast, recovered from a limited set of noisy X-ray projections. Algebraic method of reconstruction with simultaneous iterations – SART and iterative method for statistical reconstruction of BIR are deemed to be the most preferred iterative methods. We believe that these methods are particularly useful for improving the quality of breast reconstructed image. We use the graphics processor (GPU to accelerate the process of reconstruction. Preliminary results show that all investigated methods are useful in breast reconstruction layered images. However, it was found that the method of classical tomosynthesis SAA is less efficient than iterative methods SART and BIR as the worst suppress the anatomical noise. Despite the fact that the estimated ratio of the contrast / noise ratio in the presence of internal structures with low contrast is higher for classical tomosynthesis method the SAA, its effectiveness in the presence of highly structured background is low. In our opinion the best results can be achieved using statistical iterative reconstruction BIR.

  13. Apparatus for tomography in which signal profiles gathered from divergent radiation can be reconstructed in signal profiles, each corresponding with a beam of parallel rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomograph which is capable of gathering divergent radiations and reconstruct them in signal profiles or images each corresponding with a beam of parallel rays is discussed which may eliminate the interfering point dispersion function which normally occurs

  14. Iterative reconstruction of volumetric particle distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieneke, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    For tracking the motion of illuminated particles in space and time several volumetric flow measurement techniques are available like 3D-particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) recording images from typically three to four viewing directions. For higher seeding densities and the same experimental setup, tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) reconstructs voxel intensities using an iterative tomographic reconstruction algorithm (e.g. multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique, MART) followed by cross-correlation of sub-volumes computing instantaneous 3D flow fields on a regular grid. A novel hybrid algorithm is proposed here that similar to MART iteratively reconstructs 3D-particle locations by comparing the recorded images with the projections calculated from the particle distribution in the volume. But like 3D-PTV, particles are represented by 3D-positions instead of voxel-based intensity blobs as in MART. Detailed knowledge of the optical transfer function and the particle image shape is mandatory, which may differ for different positions in the volume and for each camera. Using synthetic data it is shown that this method is capable of reconstructing densely seeded flows up to about 0.05 ppp with similar accuracy as Tomo-PIV. Finally the method is validated with experimental data. (paper)

  15. Original circuitry for TOHR tomograph; Une electronique originale pour le tomographe TOHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuzon, J.C.; Pinot, L. [Services Techniques, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    Having industrialization in mind, a specific electronics for a high resolution tomograph is designed out of the usual standards of nuclear physics. All the information are converted in the time domain and a fast processor, in front of the data acquisition, carries out the time and energy coincidences. (authors) 2 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Computed Tomographic Perfusion Improves Diagnostic Power of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography in Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penagaluri, Ashritha; Higgins, Angela Y.; Vavere, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Background-Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP) is a validated approach for detection and exclusion of flow-limiting coronary artery disease (CAD), but little data are available on gender-specific performance of these modalities. In this study, we...

  17. On the impact of neutron beam divergence and scattering on the quality of transmission acquired tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, Maria Ines; Lopes, Ricardo T.; de Almeida, Gevaldo L.; Gonçalves, Marcelo José; Furieri, Rosanne C. A. A.

    2007-10-01

    The impact of the divergence of a thermal neutron beam and the scattered neutrons on the quality of tomographic images acquired by transmission have been evaluated by using a third generation tomographic system incorporating neutron collimators under several different arrangements. The system equipped with a gaseous position sensitive detector has been placed at the main channel outlet of the Argonauta Research Reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (CNEN-Brazil) which furnishes a thermal neutron flux of 2.3 × 105 n cm-2 s-1. Experiments have then been conducted using test-objects with well-known inner structure and composition to assess the influence of the collimators arrangement on the quality of the acquired images. Both, beam divergence and scattering - expected to spoil the image quality - have been reduced by using properly positioned collimators between the neutron source and the object, and in the gap between the object and the detector, respectively. The shadow cast by this last collimator on the projections used to reconstruct the tomographic images has been eliminated by a proper software specifically written for this purpose. Improvement of the tomographic images has been observed, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach to improve their quality by using properly positioned collimators.

  18. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor.

  19. Algorithm for three dimension reconstruction of magnetic resonance tomographs and X-ray images based on Fast Fourier Transform; Algoritmo para reconstrucao tridimensional de imagens de tomografos de ressonancia magnetica e de raio-X baseado no uso de Transformada Rapida de Fourier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Josiane M.; Traina, Agma Juci M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Matematicas; Cruvinel, Paulo E. [EMBRAPA, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). CNPDIA

    1995-12-31

    This work presents an algorithm for three-dimensional digital image reconstruction. Such algorithms based on the combination of both a Fast Fourier Transform method with Hamming Window and the use of a tri-linear interpolation function. The algorithm allows not only the generation of three-dimensional spatial spin distribution maps for Magnetic Resonance Tomography data but also X and Y-rays linear attenuation coefficient maps for CT scanners. Results demonstrates the usefulness of the algorithm in three-dimensional image reconstruction by doing first two-dimensional reconstruction and rather after interpolation. The algorithm was developed in C++ language, and there are two available versions: one under the DOS environment, and the other under the UNIX/Sun environment. (author) 10 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Three-Dimensional Image Fusion of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography for Computer-Assisted Planning of Maxillectomy of Recurrent Maxillary Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Defect Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Guo, Chuan-Bin; Yu, Guang-Yan; Peng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe new technology assisted by 3-dimensional (3D) image fusion of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for computer planning of a maxillectomy of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma and defect reconstruction. Treatment of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma usually includes tumor resection and free flap reconstruction. FDG-PET/CT provided images of regions of abnormal glucose uptake and thus showed metabolic tumor volume to guide tumor resection. CECT data were used to create 3D reconstructed images of vessels to show the vascular diameters and locations, so that the most suitable vein and artery could be selected during anastomosis of the free flap. The data from preoperative maxillofacial CECT scans and FDG-PET/CT imaging were imported into the navigation system (iPlan 3.0; Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany). Three-dimensional image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was accomplished using Brainlab software according to the position of the 2 skulls simulated in the CECT image and PET/CT image, respectively. After verification of the image fusion accuracy, the 3D reconstruction images of the metabolic tumor, vessels, and other critical structures could be visualized within the same coordinate system. These sagittal, coronal, axial, and 3D reconstruction images were used to determine the virtual osteotomy sites and reconstruction plan, which was provided to the surgeon and used for surgical navigation. The average shift of the 3D image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was less than 1 mm. This technique, by clearly showing the metabolic tumor volume and the most suitable vessels for anastomosis, facilitated resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. We used 3D image fusion of FDG-PET/CT and CECT to successfully accomplish resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma

  1. Tomographic Heating Holder for In Situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel C.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Fernández, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    A tomographic heating holder for transmission electron microscopy that can be used to study supported catalysts at temperatures of up to ~1,500°C is described. The specimen is placed in direct thermal contact with a tungsten filament that is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the holder without...... distributions and changes in active surface area are quantified from tilt series of images acquired after subjecting the specimens to increasing temperatures. The porosity of the alumina support and the sintering mechanisms of the catalysts are shown to depend on distance from the heating filament....

  2. E-learn Computed Tomographic Angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havsteen, Inger; Christensen, Anders; Nielsen, Jens K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is widely available in emergency rooms to assess acute stroke patients. To standardize readings and educate new readers, we developed a 3-step e-learning tool based on the test-teach-retest methodology in 2 acute stroke scenarios: vascular...... the teaching segment; the test size was 40% of the teaching segment size. We assessed diagnostic accuracy and readers' confidence. Results were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. RESULTS: Four neurologic consultants and four radiologic residents completed the program. The vascular occlusion teaching...

  3. An intragastric trichobezoar: computerised tomographic appearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris B

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old lady presented with a history of abdominal pain and distension since two months. The ultrasound examination showed an epigastric mass, which was delineated as a filling defect in the stomach on barium studies. The computerised tomographic scan showed a gastric mass with pockets of air in it, without post-contrast enhancement. This case highlights the characteristic appearance on computerised tomography of a bezoar within the stomach, a feature that is not commonly described in medical literature.

  4. Computed tomographic study in children with microcephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masatoshi; Okuno, Takehiko; Mikawa, Haruki

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) brain scanning was performed on fifty-eight infants and children with microcephaly. CT scans were useful for detecting unsuspected brain lesions and for diagnosing underlying diseases. The head size did not correlate with the CT findings, the degree of mental retardation, or the existence of motor disturbance or epilepsy. On the other hand, the CT findings were correlated with the degree of mental retardation, and the existence of motor disturbance or epilepsy. CT scans were useful for determining the prognosis of the microcephaly. (author)

  5. Automated angular and translational tomographic alignment and application to phase-contrast imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunha Ramos, Tiago Joao; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2017-01-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (CT) is a 3D imaging technique that makes use of x-ray illumination and image reconstruction techniques to reproduce the internal cross-sections of a sample. Tomographic projection data usually require an initial relative alignment or knowledge of the exact object...... algorithm for wrapped phase projection data and an alignment algorithm that automatically takes 5 degrees of freedom, including the possible linear and angular motion errors, into consideration. The presented concepts are applied to simulated and real measured phase-contrast data, exhibiting a possible...... improvement in the reconstruction resolution. A MATLAB implementation is made publicly available and will allow robust analysis of large volumes of phase-contrast tomography data....

  6. Numerical characterization of a tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, D. M.; Valda, A. A.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    A tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) based on the measurement of a specific 478 keV γ-ray emitted after the neutron capture in boron is being developed. In the present work we study by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations the effects of the finite spatial resolution and the limited number of counts, i. e. the statistical noise, on the reconstructed image contrast of numerical phantoms. These phantoms, of simple geometry, mimic the tumor (specific) and the normal tissue (non specific) boron concentrations. The simulated projection data were reconstructed using the expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood algorithm. These studies will help in the improvement of BNCT dosimetry

  7. Effect of Shot Noise on Simultaneous Sensing in Frequency Division Multiplexed Diffuse Optical Tomographic Imaging Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hansol; Lim, Gukbin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Cho, Jaedu; Gulsen, Gultekin; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2017-11-28

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been studied for use in the detection of breast cancer, cerebral oxygenation, and cognitive brain signals. As optical imaging studies have increased significantly, acquiring imaging data in real time has become increasingly important. We have developed frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) DOT systems to analyze their performance with respect to acquisition time and imaging quality, in comparison with the conventional time-division multiplexing (TDM) DOT. A large tomographic area of a cylindrical phantom 60 mm in diameter could be successfully reconstructed using both TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems. In our experiment with 6 source-detector (S-D) pairs, the TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems required 6.18 and 1 s, respectively, to obtain a single tomographic data set. While the absorption coefficient of the reconstruction image was underestimated in the case of the FDM DOT, we experimentally confirmed that the abnormal region can be clearly distinguished from the background phantom using both methods.

  8. Effect of Shot Noise on Simultaneous Sensing in Frequency Division Multiplexed Diffuse Optical Tomographic Imaging Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansol Jang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT has been studied for use in the detection of breast cancer, cerebral oxygenation, and cognitive brain signals. As optical imaging studies have increased significantly, acquiring imaging data in real time has become increasingly important. We have developed frequency-division multiplexing (FDM DOT systems to analyze their performance with respect to acquisition time and imaging quality, in comparison with the conventional time-division multiplexing (TDM DOT. A large tomographic area of a cylindrical phantom 60 mm in diameter could be successfully reconstructed using both TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems. In our experiment with 6 source-detector (S-D pairs, the TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems required 6.18 and 1 s, respectively, to obtain a single tomographic data set. While the absorption coefficient of the reconstruction image was underestimated in the case of the FDM DOT, we experimentally confirmed that the abnormal region can be clearly distinguished from the background phantom using both methods.

  9. Application of tomographic inversion in studying airglow in the mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nygrén

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that observations of periodic nightglow structures give excellent information on atmospheric gravity waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The periods, the horizontal wavelengths and the phase speeds of the waves can be determined from airglow images and, using several cameras, the approximate altitude of the luminous layer can also be determined by triangulation. In this paper the possibility of applying tomographic methods for reconstructing the airglow structures is investigated using numerical simulations. A ground-based chain of cameras is assumed, two-dimensional airglow models in the vertical plane above the chain are constructed, and simulated data are calculated by integrating the models along a great number of rays with different elevation angles for each camera. After addition of random noise, these data are then inverted to obtain reconstructions of the models. A tomographic analysis package originally designed for satellite radiotomography is used in the inversion. The package is based on a formulation of stochastic inversion which allows the input of a priori information to the solver in terms of regularization variances. The reconstruction is carried out in two stages. In the first inversion, constant regularization variances are used within a wide altitude range. The results are used in determining the approximate altitude range of the airglow structures. Then, in the second inversion, constant non-zero regularization variances are used inside this region and zero variances outside it. With this method reliable reconstructions of the models are obtained. The number of cameras as well as their separations are varied in order to find out the limitations of the method.

    Key words. Tomography · Airglow · Mesopause · Gravity waves

  10. Ghost hunting—an assessment of ghost particle detection and removal methods for tomographic-PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsinga, G E; Tokgoz, S

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses and compares several methods, which aim to remove spurious peaks, i.e. ghost particles, from the volume intensity reconstruction in tomographic-PIV. The assessment is based on numerical simulations of time-resolved tomographic-PIV experiments in linear shear flows. Within the reconstructed volumes, intensity peaks are detected and tracked over time. These peaks are associated with particles (either ghosts or actual particles) and are characterized by their peak intensity, size and track length. Peak intensity and track length are found to be effective in discriminating between most ghosts and the actual particles, although not all ghosts can be detected using only a single threshold. The size of the reconstructed particles does not reveal an important difference between ghosts and actual particles. The joint distribution of peak intensity and track length however does, under certain conditions, allow a complete separation of ghosts and actual particles. The ghosts can have either a high intensity or a long track length, but not both combined, like all the actual particles. Removing the detected ghosts from the reconstructed volume and performing additional MART iterations can decrease the particle position error at low to moderate seeding densities, but increases the position error, velocity error and tracking errors at higher densities. The observed trends in the joint distribution of peak intensity and track length are confirmed by results from a real experiment in laminar Taylor–Couette flow. This diagnostic plot allows an estimate of the number of ghosts that are indistinguishable from the actual particles. (paper)

  11. Computed tomographic features of canine nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shoko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Robertson, Ian D; Oshima, Fukiko; Fukazawa, Eri; Nakano, Yuko; Ono, Shin; Thrall, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe pre- and postcontrast computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of confirmed nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma in a group of dogs. Medical records were searched during the period of July 2003 and October 2011 and dogs with histologically confirmed nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma and pre- and postcontrast CT images were recruited. Two observers recorded a consensus opinion for the following CT characteristics for each dog: largest transverse tumor diameter, number of masses, general tumor shape, character of the tumor margin, precontrast appearance, presence of dystrophic calcification, presence of postcontrast enhancement, pattern of postcontrast enhancement, presence of regional lymphadenopathy, and presence of associated cavitary fluid. A total of 17 dogs met inclusion criteria. Tumors were located in the nasal cavity, muscle, mandible, mesentery, subcutaneous tissue, and retroperitoneal space. Computed tomographic features of nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma were similar to those of other soft tissue sarcomas, with most tumors being heterogeneous in precontrast images, invasive into adjacent tissue, and heterogeneously contrast enhancing. One unexpected finding was the presence of intense foci of contrast enhancement in 13 of the 17 tumors (76%). This appearance, which is not typical of other soft tissue sarcomas, was consistent with contrast medium residing in vascular channels. Findings indicated that there were no unique distinguishing CT characteristics for nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma in dogs; however, the presence of highly attenuating foci of contrast enhancement may warrant further investigation in prospective diagnostic sensitivity and treatment outcome studies. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  12. Unusual tomographic findings of complicated necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Silveira Sigrist

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potential life-threatening disease, which originates from inflammatory involvement of the pancreas and surrounding tissues. Serious complications eventuate and treatment is difficult. AP is classified in both interstitial edematous pancreatitis, which occurs in 70-80% of patients, and necrotizing pancreatitis, which occurs in 20-30% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the presence of two of the following criteria: abdominal pain, increased serum determination of amylase and/or lipase more than three times the reference value, and characteristic tomographic findings. Among the latter, there is the pancreatic and surrounding tissue damage as well as that related to distant organ involvement. This case report shows the fatal case of a male patient with a history of heavy alcoholic abuse admitted with the diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis. The authors call attention to the unusual tomographic findings; namely, a huge duodenal hematoma and a large hemoperitoneum, ischemic involvement of the spleen and kidneys, as well as pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis.

  13. Assessment in dogs tympanic bulla, through virtual tomographic endoscopy; Avaliacao de bulas timpanicas em caes, por meio da endoscopia tomografica virtual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luciana Carandina da; Sabino, Emanuelle Guidugli, E-mail: lucianacarandina@uol.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria. Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Dogs usually have problems related to the auditory canal. For the diagnosis of these pathologies, it is necessary a physical examination and, in some cases radiographic examination and computed tomography. The tympanic bulla is not easily visualized radiographically, since there is many structures of the brain overlaying the image obtained. The computed tomography has been the technique of choice to assess this structure faithfully. A new alternative assessment of the tympanic bulla is tomographic virtual endoscopy, which allows an improvement of the image obtained through the virtual tomographic technique. This paper provides information on the use of computed tomography, and a new technique, tomographic virtual endoscopy, in order to make the improvement of these techniques, and prove the reliability of these changes in the diagnosis of ear canals of dogs. Therefore, we performed the computed tomography of the tympanic bulla on healthy animals, and later performed image reconstruction in three-dimensional (3D) mode for virtual endoscopy. (author)

  14. Comparative study of the macroscopic finding, conventional tomographic imaging, and computed tomographic imaging in locating the mandibular canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Moon; You, Dong Soo

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was comparison of conventional tomography with reformatted computed tomography for dental implant in locating the mandibular canal. Five dogs were used and after conventional tomographs and fitted computed tomographs were taken, four dentist traced all films. Mandibles were sectioned with 2 mm slice thickness and the sections were then radiographed (contact radiography). Each radiograpic image was traced and linear measurements were made from mandibular canal to alveolar crest, buccal cortex, lingual cortex, and inferior border. The following results were obtained; 1. Reformatted computed tomographs were exacter than conventional tomography by alveolar crest to canal length of -0.6 mm difference between real values and radiographs 2. The average measurements of buccal cortex to mandibular canal width and lingual cortex to mandibular canal width of conventional tomographs were exacter than reformatted computed tomographs, but standard deviations were higher than reformatted computed tomographs. 3. Standard deviations of reformatted computed tomographs were lower than conventional tomographs at all comparing sites 4. At reformatted computed tomography 62.5% of the measurements performed were within ±1 mm of the true value, and at conventional tomography 24.1% were. 5. Mandibular canal invisibility was 0.8% at reformatted computed tomography and 9.2% at conventional tomography. Reformatted computed tomography has been shown to be more useful radiographic technique for assessment of the mandibular canal than conventional tomography.

  15. Linear analysis of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huesmann, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to analyze the linear imaging characteristics of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems using singular value decomposition (SVD). When the projection measurements from such a system are assumed to be samples from independent and identically distributed multi-normal random variables, the best estimate of the emission intensity is given by the unweighted least squares estimator. The noise amplification of this estimator is inversely proportional to the singular values of the normal matrix used to model projection and backprojection. After choosing an acceptable noise amplification, the new method can determine the number of parameters and hence the number of pixels that should be estimated from data acquired from an existing system with a fixed number of angles and projection bins. Conversely, for the design of a new system, the number of angles and projection bins necessary for a given number of pixels and noise amplification can be determined. In general, computing the SVD of the projection normal matrix has cubic computational complexity. However, the projection normal matrix for this class of rotationally invariant, radially variant systems has a block circulant form. A fast parallel algorithm to compute the SVD of this block circulant matrix makes the singular value analysis practical by asymptotically reducing the computation complexity of the method by a multiplicative factor equal to the number of angles squared

  16. Visual cortex activation recorded by dynamic emission computed tomography of inhaled xenon 133

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L; Paulson, O B; Lassen, N A

    1981-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied tomographically with 133Xe administered by inhalation over a 1-min period at a concentration of 10 mCi/l. A fast rotating ("dynamic') single-photon emission computed tomograph with four detector heads was used, an instrument that has been found to be...

  17. Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography: a potentially useful tool for safer free tissue transfer to complicated regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirtas, Yener; Cifci, Mehmet; Kelahmetoglu, Osman

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (3D-MSCTA) is a minimally invasive method of vascular mapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of this imaging technique in delineating the recipient vessels for safer free tissue transfer to compli......Three-dimensional multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (3D-MSCTA) is a minimally invasive method of vascular mapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of this imaging technique in delineating the recipient vessels for safer free tissue transfer...... be kept in mind, especially inthe patients with peripheral vascular disease. 3D-MSCTA has the potential to replace digital subtraction angiography for planning of microvascular reconstructions and newer devices with higher resolutions will probably increase the reliability of this technique. (c) 2009...

  18. SPICE benchmark for global tomographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Lebedev, Sergei; Beucler, Eric

    2008-11-01

    The existing global tomographic methods result in different models due to different parametrization, scale resolution and theoretical approach. To test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage, it is necessary to perform a global-scale benchmark to understand the resolving properties of each specific imaging algorithm. In the framework of the Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network (SPICE) project, it was decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global inversion algorithms. First, a preliminary benchmark with a simple isotropic model is carried out to check the feasibility in terms of acquisition geometry and numerical accuracy. Then, to fully validate tomographic schemes with a challenging synthetic data set, we constructed one complex anisotropic global model, which is characterized by 21 elastic constants and includes 3-D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy (radial and azimuthal anisotropy), attenuation, density, as well as surface topography and bathymetry. The intermediate-period (>32 s), high fidelity anisotropic modelling was performed by using state-of-the-art anisotropic anelastic modelling code, that is, coupled spectral element method (CSEM), on modern massively parallel computing resources. The benchmark data set consists of 29 events and three-component seismograms are recorded by 256 stations. Because of the limitation of the available computing power, synthetic seismograms have a minimum period of 32 s and a length of 10 500 s. The inversion of the benchmark data set demonstrates several well-known problems of classical surface wave tomography, such as the importance of crustal correction to recover the shallow structures, the loss of resolution with depth, the smearing effect, both horizontal and vertical, the inaccuracy of amplitude of isotropic S-wave velocity variation, the difficulty of retrieving the magnitude of azimuthal

  19. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm

  20. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd, E-mail: azhani@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Abdullah, Jaafar, E-mail: jaafar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Plant Assessment Technology (PAT) Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  1. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  2. Critical examination of the uniformity requirements for single-photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, M K; Vermeersch, C

    1991-01-01

    It is generally recognized that single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imposes very stringent requirements on gamma camera uniformity to prevent the occurrence of ring artifacts. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between nonuniformities in the planar data and the magnitude of the consequential ring artifacts in the transaxial data, and how the perception of these artifacts is influenced by factors such as reconstruction matrix size, reconstruction filter, and image noise. The study indicates that the relationship between ring artifact magnitude and image noise is essentially independent of the acquisition or reconstruction matrix sizes, but is strongly dependent upon the type of smoothing filter applied during the reconstruction process. Furthermore, the degree to which a ring artifact can be perceived above image noise is dependent on the size and location of the nonuniformity in the planar data, with small nonuniformities (1-2 pixels wide) close to the center of rotation being less perceptible than those further out (8-20 pixels). Small defects or nonuniformities close to the center of rotation are thought to cause the greatest potential corruption to tomographic data. The study indicates that such may not be the case. Hence the uniformity requirements for SPECT may be less demanding than was previously thought.

  3. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paans, A.M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals have special applications in in-vivo studies of biochemical processes. The combination of a cyclotron for the production of radionuclides and a positron emission tomograph for the registration of the distribution of radioactivity in the body enables the measurement of local radioactivity concentration in tissues, and opens up new possibilities in the diagnosis and examination of abnormalities in the metabolism. The principles and procedures of positron emission tomography are described and the necessary apparatus considered, with emphasis on the positron camera. The first clinical applications using 55 Co bloemycine for tumor detection are presented. (C.F.)

  4. A generalized reconstruction framework for unconventional PET systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, Aswin John, E-mail: amathews@wustl.edu; Li, Ke; O’Sullivan, Joseph A. [Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Ravindranath, Bosky; Tai, Yuan-Chuan [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Quantitative estimation of the radionuclide activity concentration in positron emission tomography (PET) requires precise modeling of PET physics. The authors are focused on designing unconventional PET geometries for specific applications. This work reports the creation of a generalized reconstruction framework, capable of reconstructing tomographic PET data for systems that use right cuboidal detector elements positioned at arbitrary geometry using a regular Cartesian grid of image voxels. Methods: The authors report on a variety of design choices and optimization for the creation of the generalized framework. The image reconstruction algorithm is maximum likelihood-expectation–maximization. System geometry can be specified using a simple script. Given the geometry, a symmetry seeking algorithm finds existing symmetry in the geometry with respect to the image grid to improve the memory usage/speed. Normalization is approached from a geometry independent perspective. The system matrix is computed using the Siddon’s algorithm and subcrystal approach. The program is parallelized through open multiprocessing and message passing interface libraries. A wide variety of systems can be modeled using the framework. This is made possible by modeling the underlying physics and data correction, while generalizing the geometry dependent features. Results: Application of the framework for three novel PET systems, each designed for a specific application, is presented to demonstrate the robustness of the framework in modeling PET systems of unconventional geometry. Three PET systems of unconventional geometry are studied. (1) Virtual-pinhole half-ring insert integrated into Biograph-40: although the insert device improves image quality over conventional whole-body scanner, the image quality varies depending on the position of the insert and the object. (2) Virtual-pinhole flat-panel insert integrated into Biograph-40: preliminary results from an investigation into a

  5. Multicore Performance of Block Algebraic Iterative Reconstruction Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik B.; Hansen, Per Christian

    2014-01-01

    Algebraic iterative methods are routinely used for solving the ill-posed sparse linear systems arising in tomographic image reconstruction. Here we consider the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and the simultaneous iterative reconstruction techniques (SIRT), both of which rely...... on semiconvergence. Block versions of these methods, based on a partitioning of the linear system, are able to combine the fast semiconvergence of ART with the better multicore properties of SIRT. These block methods separate into two classes: those that, in each iteration, access the blocks in a sequential manner...

  6. Interval-based reconstruction for uncertainty quantification in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharczak, Florentin; Loquin, Kevin; Buvat, Irène; Strauss, Olivier; Mariano-Goulart, Denis

    2018-02-01

    A new directed interval-based tomographic reconstruction algorithm, called non-additive interval based expectation maximization (NIBEM) is presented. It uses non-additive modeling of the forward operator that provides intervals instead of single-valued projections. The detailed approach is an extension of the maximum likelihood—expectation maximization algorithm based on intervals. The main motivation for this extension is that the resulting intervals have appealing properties for estimating the statistical uncertainty associated with the reconstructed activity values. After reviewing previously published theoretical concepts related to interval-based projectors, this paper describes the NIBEM algorithm and gives examples that highlight the properties and advantages of this interval valued reconstruction.

  7. Airborne Tomographic Swath Ice Sounding Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Freeman, Anthony; Jezek, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets modulate global sea level by storing water deposited as snow on the surface, and discharging water back into the ocean through melting. Their physical state can be characterized in terms of their mass balance and dynamics. To estimate the current ice mass balance, and to predict future changes in the motion of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, it is necessary to know the ice sheet thickness and the physical conditions of the ice sheet surface and bed. This information is required at fine resolution and over extensive portions of the ice sheets. A tomographic algorithm has been developed to take raw data collected by a multiple-channel synthetic aperture sounding radar system over a polar ice sheet and convert those data into two-dimensional (2D) ice thickness measurements. Prior to this work, conventional processing techniques only provided one-dimensional ice thickness measurements along profiles.

  8. Synthetic Dataset To Benchmark Global Tomographic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul

    2006-11-01

    A new set of global synthetic seismograms calculated in a three-dimensional (3-D), heterogeneous, anisotropic, anelastic model of the Earth using the spectral element method has been released by the European network SPICE (Seismic Wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex Media: a European Network). The set consists of 7424 three-component records with a minimum period of 32 seconds, a sampling rate of one second, and a duration of 10,500 seconds. The aim of this synthetic data set is to conduct a blind test of existing global tomographic methods based on long-period data, in order to test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage.

  9. Computed tomographic investigations on intraventricular hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laber-Szillat, S.

    1982-01-01

    This work investigated in 106 patients with intraventricular hematomas all the known factors which can have an influence on prognosis: age, sex, anamnesis of the patients, size, extent and localization of the intracranial bleeding, underlying angiopathy and differences between arterial and venous and spontaneous and traumatic bleedings. It was shown that the state of mind was the deciding prognostic factor, whereby viligance was the cumulative expression of all other investigated influences. A computed tomography (CT) examination is deciding in the question of operative hydrocephalus care. In 13 patients it was further shown, how clearly CT results and brain dissection allowed themselves to be compared. The computed tomographic examination method is best suited to achieve even physiological and more extensive prognostic possibilities. (orig.) [de

  10. Collimated trans-axial tomographic scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The objects of this invention are first to reduce the time required to obtain statistically significant data in trans-axial tomographic radioisotope scanning using a scintillation camera. Secondly, to provide a scintillation camera system to increase the rate of acceptance of radioactive events to contribute to the positional information obtainable from a known radiation source without sacrificing spatial resolution. Thirdly to reduce the scanning time without loss of image clarity. The system described comprises a scintillation camera detector, means for moving this in orbit about a cranial-caudal axis relative to a patient and a collimator having septa defining apertures such that gamma rays perpendicular to the axis are admitted with high spatial resolution, parallel to the axis with low resolution. The septa may be made of strips of lead. Detailed descriptions are given. (U.K.)

  11. Collimated trans-axial tomographic scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The principal problem in trans-axial tomographic radioisotope scanning is the length of time required to obtain meaningful data. Patient movement and radioisotope migration during the scanning period can cause distortion of the image. The object of this invention is to reduce the scanning time without degrading the images obtained. A system is described in which a scintillation camera detector is moved to an orbit about the cranial-caudal axis relative to the patient. A collimator is used in which lead septa are arranged so as to admit gamma rays travelling perpendicular to this axis with high spatial resolution and those travelling in the direction of the axis with low spatial resolution, thus increasing the rate of acceptance of radioactive events to contribute to the positional information obtainable without sacrificing spatial resolution. (author)

  12. Computer tomographic and sonographic diagnosis of echinococcus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, K.; Huebener, K.H.; Klott, K.; Jenss, H.; Baehr, R. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinisches Strahleninstitut und Roentgenabteilung; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinische Klinik; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1980-05-01

    In 33 patients (18 cystic echinococci, 15 alveolar) both methods produced the following findings which could be correlated with the pathological results: single or multi-centric lesions, sharp or indefinite demarkation and abnormalities in the shape and size of the liver. The sonographic findings were analysed with respect to the echo characteristics, whereas the computer tomographically demonstrated lesions were examined densitometrically in order to show calcification. Both methods demonstrate the pathological changes satisfactorily. Computer tomography is more effective in alveolar echinococcus lesions by showing the different types of calcification, whereas sonography provides a more accurate picture of the internal structure of the cysts in cystic echinococcus. Comparison of the methods in 19 patients examined by both showed a high accuracy in each method, but sonography was relatively poor in demonstrating lesions in the spleen.

  13. Computed tomographic findings of intracranial acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Weon Don; Kim, Jong Sung; Koh, Byung Hee; Jeon, Seok Chol; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in the brain were retrospectively analyzed in 16 of 103 patients with acute leukemia confirmed by CSF cytology or combined surgery at Hanyang University Hospital, from August 1980 to August 1989. The results were as follows : 1. With FAB classification, the most frequent pathologic type was L1 : 8 cases (50%) 2. The range of age distribution showed typical pattern that ALL occurred below the 15 years old, and AML, over 15 years old. 3. Abnormal CT findings were ; Meningitis(2 cases), Mass(3), Thrombosis(1), Infarction(2), Edema(1), Hemorrhage(7), Hydrocephalus(2), Atrophy(2). 4. Most of infracranial hemorrhage were seen in M{sub 2} and M{sub 3} type.

  14. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral arterial ectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Ko, Young Ho; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1987-01-01

    The computed tomographic findings of cerebral arterial ectasia in 8 patients, of which 5 cases were angiographically documented, are reported. The ecstatic arteries, located predominantly in the suprasellar and interpeduncular cisterns, appeared as serpignous, tubular structures on the unenhanced scan. The enhanced CT scan demonstrated dense, sharply defined, homogeneous intraluminal enhancement. Until recently, the diagnosis of cerebral arterial ectasia was usually established by angiography. With introduction of CT it has become possible to noninvasively identify and characterize this vascular disorder and its associated intracranial complications. The vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia may be diagnosed by CT as an extra-axial lesion in the cerebellopontine angle. It enhances in a tubular fashion after intravenous injection of contrast.

  15. Advanced Ultrasonic Tomograph of Children's Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasaygues, Philippe; Lefebvre, Jean-Pierre; Guillermin, Régine; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Pithioux, Martine; Petit, Philippe

    This study deals with the development of an experimental device for performing ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT) on bone in pediatric degrees. The children's bone tomographs obtained in this study, were based on the use of a multiplexed 2-D ring antenna (1 MHz and 3 MHz) designed for performing electronic and mechanical scanning. Although this approach is known to be a potentially valuable means of imaging objects with similar acoustical impedances, problems arise when quantitative images of more highly contrasted media such as bones are required. Various strategies and various mathematical procedures for modeling the wave propagation based on Born approximations have been developed at our laboratory, which are suitable for use with pediatric cases. Inversions of the experimental data obtained are presented.

  16. Some principles in choosing parameters of magnetic resonance tomographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volobuev, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of amplifying the signal that ensures the visualization of internal organs in the magnetic resonance tomograph due to the optimal selection of some of its parameters has been considered. The operating principle of the tomograph has been analyzed. The relation between the angle of the magnetic moment precession in hydrogen nuclei in an organism, the frequency of the ac magnetic field exciting this precession, and the constant magnetic field used has been determined using quantum-mechanical concepts. This relation makes it possible to determine the optimal parameters for tomograph operation.

  17. Optimisation and validation of a 3D reconstruction algorithm for single photon emission computed tomography by means of GATE simulation platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bitar, Ziad

    2006-12-01

    Although time consuming, Monte-Carlo simulations remain an efficient tool enabling to assess correction methods for degrading physical effects in medical imaging. We have optimized and validated a reconstruction method baptized F3DMC (Fully 3D Monte Carlo) in which the physical effects degrading the image formation process were modelled using Monte-Carlo methods and integrated within the system matrix. We used the Monte-Carlo simulation toolbox GATE. We validated GATE in SPECT by modelling the gamma-camera (Philips AXIS) used in clinical routine. Techniques of threshold, filtering by a principal component analysis and targeted reconstruction (functional regions, hybrid regions) were used in order to improve the precision of the system matrix and to reduce the number of simulated photons as well as the time consumption required. The EGEE Grid infrastructures were used to deploy the GATE simulations in order to reduce their computation time. Results obtained with F3DMC were compared with the reconstruction methods (FBP, ML-EM, MLEMC) for a simulated phantom and with the OSEM-C method for the real phantom. Results have shown that the F3DMC method and its variants improve the restoration of activity ratios and the signal to noise ratio. By the use of the grid EGEE, a significant speed-up factor of about 300 was obtained. These results should be confirmed by performing studies on complex phantoms and patients and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be used in SPECT and also in PET. (author)

  18. Image reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, D.W.; Defrise, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-ray but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes. This report reviews the historical and physical basis of medical imaging techniques using positron-emitting radioisotopes. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimensional distributions of radioisotopes to be reconstructed from projection data (sinograms) acquired by detectors suitably positioned around the patient are discussed. The extension of conventional two-dimensional tomographic reconstruction algorithms to fully three-dimensional reconstruction is described in detail. (orig.)

  19. High-throughput full-automatic synchrotron-based tomographic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mader, Kevin; Marone, Federica; Hintermueller, Christoph; Mikuljan, Gordan; Isenegger, Andreas; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-01-01

    At the TOMCAT (TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs) beamline of the Swiss Light Source with an energy range of 8-45 keV and voxel size from 0.37 (micro)m to 7.4 (micro)m, full tomographic datasets are typically acquired in 5 to 10 min. To exploit the speed of the system and enable high-throughput studies to be performed in a fully automatic manner, a package of automation tools has been developed. The samples are automatically exchanged, aligned, moved to the correct region of interest, and scanned. This task is accomplished through the coordination of Python scripts, a robot-based sample-exchange system, sample positioning motors and a CCD camera. The tools are suited for any samples that can be mounted on a standard SEM stub, and require no specific environmental conditions. Up to 60 samples can be analyzed at a time without user intervention. The throughput of the system is dependent on resolution, energy and sample size, but rates of four samples per hour have been achieved with 0.74 (micro)m voxel size at 17.5 keV. The maximum intervention-free scanning time is theoretically unlimited, and in practice experiments have been running unattended as long as 53 h (the average beam time allocation at TOMCAT is 48 h per user). The system is the first fully automated high-throughput tomography station: mounting samples, finding regions of interest, scanning and reconstructing can be performed without user intervention. The system also includes many features which accelerate and simplify the process of tomographic microscopy.

  20. Optical tomographic imaging for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Intes, Xavier; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse optical breast imaging utilizes near-infrared (NIR) light propagation through tissues to assess the optical properties of tissues for the identification of abnormal tissue. This optical imaging approach is sensitive, cost-effective, and does not involve any ionizing radiation. However, the image reconstruction of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a nonlinear inverse problem and suffers from severe illposedness due to data noise, NIR light scattering, and measurement incompleteness. An image reconstruction method is proposed for the detection of breast cancer. This method splits the image reconstruction problem into the localization of abnormal tissues and quantification of absorption variations. The localization of abnormal tissues is performed based on a well-posed optimization model, which can be solved via a differential evolution optimization method to achieve a stable reconstruction. The quantification of abnormal absorption is then determined in localized regions of relatively small extents, in which a potential tumor might be. Consequently, the number of unknown absorption variables can be greatly reduced to overcome the underdetermined nature of DOT. Numerical simulation experiments are performed to verify merits of the proposed method, and the results show that the image reconstruction method is stable and accurate for the identification of abnormal tissues, and robust against the measurement noise of data.

  1. Radiographic test phantom for computed tomographic lung nodule analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerhouni, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a method for evaluating a computed tomograph scan of a nodule in a lung of a human or non-human animal. The method comprises generating a computer tomograph of a transverse section of the animal containing lung and nodule tissue, and generating a second computer tomograph of a test phantom comprising a device which simulates the transverse section of the animal. The tissue simulating portions of the device are constructed of materials having radiographic densities substantially identical to those of the corresponding tissue in the simulated transverse section of the animal and have voids therein which simulate, in size and shape, the lung cavities in the transverse section and which contain a test reference nodule constructed of a material of predetermined radiographic density which simulates in size, shape and position within a lung cavity void of the test phantom the nodule in the transverse section of the animal and comparing the respective tomographs

  2. Computed tomographic determination of tracheal dimensions in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griscom, N.T.

    1982-01-01

    A computed tomographic system for determining the internal diameters, cross-sectional area, and length of the trachea in children and adolescents was developed. Intraluminal volumes were calculated from these measurements.The results of 18 analyses are reported

  3. Effects of small variations of speed of sound in optoacoustic tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel, E-mail: dr@tum.de [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Center Munich, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Speed of sound difference in the imaged object and surrounding coupling medium may reduce the resolution and overall quality of optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained by assuming a uniform acoustic medium. In this work, the authors investigate the effects of acoustic heterogeneities and discuss potential benefits of accounting for those during the reconstruction procedure. Methods: The time shift of optoacoustic signals in an acoustically heterogeneous medium is studied theoretically by comparing different continuous and discrete wave propagation models. A modification of filtered back-projection reconstruction is subsequently implemented by considering a straight acoustic rays model for ultrasound propagation. The results obtained with this reconstruction procedure are compared numerically and experimentally to those obtained assuming a heuristically fitted uniform speed of sound in both full-view and limited-view optoacoustic tomography scenarios. Results: The theoretical analysis showcases that the errors in the time-of-flight of the signals predicted by considering the straight acoustic rays model tend to be generally small. When using this model for reconstructing simulated data, the resulting images accurately represent the theoretical ones. On the other hand, significant deviations in the location of the absorbing structures are found when using a uniform speed of sound assumption. The experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms and a mouse postmortem are found to be consistent with the numerical simulations. Conclusions: Accurate analysis of effects of small speed of sound variations demonstrates that accounting for differences in the speed of sound allows improving optoacoustic reconstruction results in realistic imaging scenarios involving acoustic heterogeneities in tissues and surrounding media.

  4. Effects of small variations of speed of sound in optoacoustic tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speed of sound difference in the imaged object and surrounding coupling medium may reduce the resolution and overall quality of optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained by assuming a uniform acoustic medium. In this work, the authors investigate the effects of acoustic heterogeneities and discuss potential benefits of accounting for those during the reconstruction procedure. Methods: The time shift of optoacoustic signals in an acoustically heterogeneous medium is studied theoretically by comparing different continuous and discrete wave propagation models. A modification of filtered back-projection reconstruction is subsequently implemented by considering a straight acoustic rays model for ultrasound propagation. The results obtained with this reconstruction procedure are compared numerically and experimentally to those obtained assuming a heuristically fitted uniform speed of sound in both full-view and limited-view optoacoustic tomography scenarios. Results: The theoretical analysis showcases that the errors in the time-of-flight of the signals predicted by considering the straight acoustic rays model tend to be generally small. When using this model for reconstructing simulated data, the resulting images accurately represent the theoretical ones. On the other hand, significant deviations in the location of the absorbing structures are found when using a uniform speed of sound assumption. The experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms and a mouse postmortem are found to be consistent with the numerical simulations. Conclusions: Accurate analysis of effects of small speed of sound variations demonstrates that accounting for differences in the speed of sound allows improving optoacoustic reconstruction results in realistic imaging scenarios involving acoustic heterogeneities in tissues and surrounding media

  5. Design and performance of a new positron computed tomograph (P.C.T.) using the time-of-flight (T.O.F.) information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, M.; Allemand, R.; Bouvier, A.

    1982-09-01

    A new tomograph for positron imaging using the time of flight measurement is described. Fast CsF crystals are used in this first prototype. Compared to the classical reconstruction method, the results of adding this information is a substantial increase of sensitivity, a reduced random coincidence count rate, and slight decrease of a scatter contribution in the images. Further improvements in the T.O.F. accuracy can be expected in using faster crystals

  6. A new liquid xenon scintillation detector for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepel, V.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    A new positron-sensitive detector of annihilation photons filled with liquid xenon is proposed for positron emission tomography. Simultaneous detection of both liquid xenon scintillation and ionization current produces a time resolution of < 1 ns and a position resolution in the tangential direction of the tomograph ring is ∼ 1 mm and in the radial direction is ∼ 5 mm. The advantages of a tomograph with new detectors are discussed. New algorithms of Compton scattering can be used. (author)

  7. From tomographic images to fault heterogeneities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Amato

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Local Earthquake Tomography (LET is a useful tool for imaging lateral heterogeneities in the upper crust. The pattern of P- and S-wave velocity anomalies, in relation to the seismicity distribution along active fault zones. can shed light on the existence of discrete seismogenic patches. Recent tomographic studies in well monitored seismic areas have shown that the regions with large seismic moment release generally correspond to high velocity zones (HVZ's. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between the seismogenic behavior of faults and the velocity structure of fault zones as inferred from seismic tomography. First, we review some recent tomographic studies in active strike-slip faults. We show examples from different segments of the San Andreas fault system (Parkfield, Loma Prieta, where detailed studies have been carried out in recent years. We also show two applications of LET to thrust faults (Coalinga, Friuli. Then, we focus on the Irpinia normal fault zone (South-Central Italy, where a Ms = 6.9 earthquake occurred in 1980 and many thousands of attershock travel time data are available. We find that earthquake hypocenters concentrate in HVZ's, whereas low velocity zones (LVZ’ s appear to be relatively aseismic. The main HVZ's along which the mainshock rupture bas propagated may correspond to velocity weakening fault regions, whereas the LVZ's are probably related to weak materials undergoing stable slip (velocity strengthening. A correlation exists between this HVZ and the area with larger coseismic slip along the fault, according to both surface evidence (a fault scarp as high as 1 m and strong ground motion waveform modeling. Smaller wave-length, low-velocity anomalies detected along the fault may be the expression of velocity strengthening sections, where aseismic slip occurs. According to our results, the rupture at the nucleation depth (~ 10-12 km is continuous for the whole fault lenoth (~ 30 km, whereas at shallow depth

  8. Gamma Ray Tomographic Scan Method for Large Scale Industrial Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jin Ho; Jung, Sung Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Park, Jang Geun

    2011-01-01

    The gamma ray tomography systems have been used to investigate a chemical process for last decade. There have been many cases of gamma ray tomography for laboratory scale work but not many cases for industrial scale work. Non-tomographic equipment with gamma-ray sources is often used in process diagnosis. Gamma radiography, gamma column scanning and the radioisotope tracer technique are examples of gamma ray application in industries. In spite of many outdoor non-gamma ray tomographic equipment, the most of gamma ray tomographic systems still remained as indoor equipment. But, as the gamma tomography has developed, the demand on gamma tomography for real scale plants also increased. To develop the industrial scale system, we introduced the gamma-ray tomographic system with fixed detectors and rotating source. The general system configuration is similar to 4 th generation geometry. But the main effort has been made to actualize the instant installation of the system for real scale industrial plant. This work would be a first attempt to apply the 4th generation industrial gamma tomographic scanning by experimental method. The individual 0.5-inch NaI detector was used for gamma ray detection by configuring circular shape around industrial plant. This tomographic scan method can reduce mechanical complexity and require a much smaller space than a conventional CT. Those properties make it easy to get measurement data for a real scale plant

  9. Comparative study of reconstruction filters for cranio examinations of the Philips system and its influence on the quality of the tomographic image; Estudo comparativo dos filtros de reconstrucao para exames de cranio do sistema Philips e sua influencia na qualidade da imagem tomografica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, V.C.; Kodlulovich, S.; Delduck, R.S., E-mail: simone@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, L.C.G. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (CT/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate different reconstruction algorithm (kernels) applied for head examinations. The research was carried out using 40-slice MDCT (Philips, Brilliance 40 CT scanner) and an ACR Phantoms to evaluate the image quality. The doses were estimated applying the coefficients obtained by IMPACT .The study showed that independently of the filter used the values of CT number have no change. The low contrast showed that the choice of correct filter might result a decrease of 9% of doses values. For special resolution, the sharp filter showed a better response for low m As. The noise value of image to certain filters smooth has no changed, even by reducing the m As values. (author)

  10. ASSESSMENT OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC UROGRAPHY IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    Scintigraphy, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography. (SPECT) and angiography. In our centre, CTU, IVU and ultrasonography are the available modalities that are used to evaluate the urinary tract. In our 160 patients with clinical manifestations of urinary tract disorders that had.

  11. Achievement report for fiscal 1998. Optical tomographic system; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Hikari danso imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    Evaluations were given on spatial resolution and measurement time of an optical tomographic system by using the developed 64-channel time-resolved spectroscopy and an image reconstruction algorithm. With respect to the spatial resolution, the target value of 1 cm was verified from tomographic images of a phantom with a diameter of 10cm, simulating a neonate. The measurement time achieved 20 minutes, being one third of the target value. In installing the equipment at Hokkaido University, speeds of the optical switches and attenuators were increased to have reduced the measurement time to one minute. For installation at Kanagawa Rehabilitation Center, development has been made on a nano-second light pulser, whose average beam quantity has been increased to 40 times, and improvement has been given on the optical switches, the attenuators, and the indication software, by which the measurement time was decreased further by 30 seconds than that at Hokkaido University. In performing the clinical evaluation, the evaluation protocol resolved by the Experiment Evaluation Special Committee was submitted for deliberation at the Medical Welfare Device Clinical Evaluation Committee. Upon having been authorized by the Committee, the clinical evaluations were performed at Hokkaido University and the Kanagawa Rehabilitation Center. (NEDO)

  12. Characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction by positron-emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geltman, E.M.; Biello, D.; Welch, M.J.; Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Roberts, R.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether positron emission tomography (PET) performed after i.v. 11C-palmitate permits detection and characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction. PET was performed after the i.v. injection of 11C-palmitate in 10 normal subjects, 24 patients with initial nontransmural myocardial infarction (defined electrocardiographically), and 22 patients with transmural infarction. Depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate was detected with sagittal, coronal and transverse reconstructions, and quantified based on 14 contiguous transaxial reconstructions. Defects with homogeneously intense depression of accumulation of tracer were detected in all 22 patients with transmural infarction (100%). Abnormalities of the distribution of 11C-palmitate in the myocardium were detected in 23 patients with nontransmural infarction (96%). Thallium scintigrams were abnormal in only 11 of 18 patients with nontransmural infarction (61%). Tomographically estimated infarct size was greater among patients with transmural infarction (50.4 +/- 7.8 PET-g-Eq/m2 [+/- SEM SEM]) compared with those with nontransmural infarction (19 +/- 4 PET-g-Eq, p less than 0.01). Residual accumulation of 11C-palmitate within regions of infarction was more intensely depressed among patients with transmural compared to nontransmural infarction (33 +/- 1 vs 39 +/- 1% maximal myocardial radioactivity, p less than 0.01). Thus, PET and metabolic imaging with 11C-palmitate is a sensitive means of detecting, quantifying and characterizing nontransmural and transmural myocardial infarction

  13. Monte Carlo Study of the Effect of Collimator Thickness on T-99m Source Response in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Zakavi, Seyyed Rasoul; Sadeghi, Ramin; Ljungberg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the collimator is a crucial element of the imaging chain and controls the noise resolution tradeoff of the collected data. The current study is an evaluation of the effects of different thicknesses of a low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) collimator on tomographic spatial resolution in SPECT. In the present study, the SIMIND Monte Carlo program was used to simulate a SPECT equipped with an LEHR collimator. A point source of 99m Tc and an acrylic cylindrical Jaszczak phantom, with cold spheres and rods, and a human anthropomorphic torso phantom (4D-NCAT phantom) were used. Simulated planar images and reconstructed tomographic images were evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. According to the tabulated calculated detector parameters, contribution of Compton scattering, photoelectric reactions, and also peak to Compton (P/C) area in the obtained energy spectrums (from scanning of the sources with 11 collimator thicknesses, ranging from 2.400 to 2.410 cm), we concluded the thickness of 2.405 cm as the proper LEHR parallel hole collimator thickness. The image quality analyses by structural similarity index (SSIM) algorithm and also by visual inspection showed suitable quality images obtained with a collimator thickness of 2.405 cm. There was a suitable quality and also performance parameters’ analysis results for the projections and reconstructed images prepared with a 2.405 cm LEHR collimator thickness compared with the other collimator thicknesses

  14. Clinical evaluation of iterative reconstruction (ordered-subset expectation maximization) in dynamic positron emission tomography: quantitative effects on kinetic modeling with N-13 ammonia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens Dahlgaard; Rasmussen, R.; Freiberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the quantitative properties of ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) on kinetic modeling with nitrogen 13 ammonia compared with filtered backprojection (FBP) in healthy subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac N-13 ammonia positron...... and OSEM flow values were observed with a flow underestimation of 45% (rest/dipyridamole) in the septum and of 5% (rest) and 15% (dipyridamole) in the lateral myocardial wall. CONCLUSIONS: OSEM reconstruction of myocardial perfusion images with N-13 ammonia and PET produces high-quality images for visual...

  15. Computed Tomographic Artifacts in Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Arita, Emiko Saito; Pinheiro, Lucas Rodrigues; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; Watanabe, Plauto Christopher Aranha; Cortes, Arthur Rodriguez Gonzalez

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to present 4 cases and to undertake a systematic review on the current knowledge of the impact of cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) artifacts on oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up. The MEDLINE (PubMed) database was searched for the period from February 2004 to February 2017, for studies on the impact of CBCT artifacts on surgical planning of oral and maxillofacial surgeries. The PRISMA statement was followed during data assessment and extraction. As a result, data extraction included information regarding: the use of CBCT to plan or follow-up oral and maxillofacial surgeries, presence and type identification of a CBCT artifact, and details on the impact of artifacts on image quality and/or surgical planning. Four cases were selected to illustrate the topic. The search strategy yielded 408 publications in MEDLINE (PubMed). An initial screening of the publications was performed using abstracts and key words. After application of exclusion criteria, a total of 11 studies were finally identified as eligible to be discussed. Studies revealed 3 main types of artifact: beam hardening, streak, and motion artifacts. Most of the studies suggest that artifacts significantly affect oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up, despite of allowing for identification of metal projectiles in cases of maxillofacial trauma. CBCT artifacts have a significant impact on oral and maxillofacial surgical planning and follow-up.

  16. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Nak Kwan; Nam, Kyung Jin; Park, Churl Min; Eun, Chung Kie; Lee, Sun Wha

    1983-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is widely distributed in Far East and Southeast Asia, particularly in Korea. The central nervous system is the most frequent location for paragonimiasis outside the lungs. We analyzed the computed tomographic findings of 17 cases which were diagnosed pathologically and clinically as cerebral paragonimiasis. The results were as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female was 10 : 7 and about 88% of cases were under the age of 40 years. 2. The common locations of cerebral paragonimiasis were the occipital (12 cases) and temporal (11 cases) lobes. 3. Precontrast CT findings of cerebral paragonimiasis were low density with calcifications in 6 cases, low and isodensities in 4 cases, mixed densities in 3 cases, only low density in 2 cases and only calcification in 2 cases. Hydrocephalus (7 cases), mass effect (6 cases), atrophic change (6 cases) and cyst formation (3 cases) were associated. 4. The shape of calcifications in CT scan were soap-bubble or ring in 6 cases, nodular or oval in 6 cases, stipple in 4 cases and amorphous conglomerated in 2 cases. 5. The contrast -enhanced 8 cases were 5 ring or rim like, 2 nodular and 1 irregular enhancements, while 9 cases were not enhanced

  17. Collimator trans-axial tomographic scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, Ronald J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved collimator is provided for a scintillation camera system that employs a detector head for transaxial tomographic scanning. One object of this invention is to significantly reduce the time required to obtain statistically significant data in radioisotope scanning using a scintillation camera. Another is to increase the rate of acceptance of radioactive events to contribute to the positional information obtainable from a radiation source of known strength without sacrificing spatial resolution. A further object is to reduce the necessary scanning time without degrading the images obtained. The collimator described has apertures defined by septa of different radiation transparency. The septa are aligned to provide greater radiation shielding from gamma radiation travelling within planes perpendicular to the cranial-caudal axis and less radiation shielding from gamma radiation travelling within other planes. Septa may also define apertures such that the collimator provides high spatial resolution of gamma rays traveling within planes perpendicular to the cranial-caudal axis and directed at the detector and high radiation sensitivity to gamma radiation travelling other planes and indicated at the detector. (LL)

  18. Computed tomographic findings of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, In Su; Jong, Woo Yung; Lee, Jong Yul; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Ki

    1987-01-01

    With Development of Computed Tomography, detection of the Hepatocellular Carcinoma are easily performed and frequently used in the world. During 15 months, from December 1985 to February 1987, 59 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were evaluated with computed tomography in department of radiology at Wallace Memorial Baptist Hospital. The results were as follow: 1. The most prevalent age group was 5th to 7th decades, male to female ratio was 4.9:1. 2. Classification with incidence of computed tomographic appearance of the hepatocellular carcinoma were solitary type 28 cases (48%), multinodular type 24 cases (40%), and diffuse type 7 cases (12%), Association with liver cirrhosis was noted in 22 cases (38%). 3. Inhomogenous internal consistency of hepatocellular carcinoma due to central necrosis were 35 cases (60%). Portal vein invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma was noted in 15 cases (25%), and particularly most common in diffuse type 4 cases (55%). 4. On precontrast scan, all hepatocellular carcinoma were seen as area of low density except for 3 cases(0.5%) of near isodensity which turned out to be remarkable low density on postcontrast scan. 5. In solitary type, posterior segment of right lobe was most common site of involvement 12 cases (43%). In diffuse type, bilobar involvement was most common, 6 cases (85%)

  19. A tomographic approach to intravenous coronary arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritman, E.L.; Bove, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Coronary artery anatomy can be visualized using high speed, volume scanning X-ray CT. A single scan during a bolus injection of contrast medium provides image data for display of all angles of view of the opacified coronary arterial tree. Due to the tomographic nature of volume image data the superposition of contrast filled cardiac chambers, such as would occur in the levophase of an intravenous injection of contrast agent, can be eliminated. Data are presented which support these statements. The Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) was used to scan a life-like radiologic phantom of an adult human thorax in which the left atrial and ventricular chambers and the major epicardial coronary arteries were opacified so as to simulate the levophase of an intravenous injection of contrast agent. A catheter filled with diluted contrast agent and with regions of luminal narrowing (i.e. 'stenoses') was advanced along a tract equivalent to a right ventricular catheterization. Ease of visualization of the catheter 'stenoses' and the accuracy with which they can be measured are presented. (Auth.)

  20. Computed tomographic findings of intracerebral cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Ho Kyun; Ahn, Chi Yul [School of Medicine, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Cysticercosis is a parasitic disease in which man serves as the intermediate host of Taenia Solium, the pork tapeworm. The computed tomographic findings of 25 cases of intracerebral cysticercosis proven by pathologic and/or clinical findings during past 2 years were analysed. The results were as follows; 1. The sex was 19 males and 6 females, and 56 percent of the patients were seen in fourth and fifth decades. The most common symptom was epilepsy (72%). 2. The C. T. findings in precontrast study were varied; such as ill defined low density (48%), cystic low density (20%), dilated ventricles (20%), ill defined low density with isodense nodule (18%), cystic low density with isodense mural nodule (12%) and calcification (8%). 3. The areas of involvement were 20 cases (80%) of parenchymal form, 3 cases (12%) of ventricular form and 2 cases (8%) of mixed form. 4. The contrast-enhanced 13 cases were 5 nodular, 5 ring or rim-like and 3 mixed type enhancements, while 12 cases were not enhanced. 5. C.T. scan demonstrated more precise location and extents of cerebral cysticercosis, especially in parenchymal form. It was considered to be important in determination of surgical feasibility and its approach.

  1. A note on tiling under tomographic constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrobak, Marek; Couperus, Peter; Dürr, Christoph; Woeginger, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    Given a tiling of a 2D grid with several types of tiles, we can count for every row and column how many tiles of each type it intersects. These numbers are called the projections. We are interested in the problem of reconstructing a tiling which has given projections. Some simple variants of this

  2. GPU-accelerated iterative reconstruction from Compton scattered data using a matched pair of conic projector and backprojector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang; Lee, Soo-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Iterative reconstruction from Compton scattered data is known to be computationally more challenging than that from conventional line-projection based emission data in that the gamma rays that undergo Compton scattering are modeled as conic projections rather than line projections. In conventional tomographic reconstruction, to parallelize the projection and backprojection operations using the graphics processing unit (GPU), approximated methods that use an unmatched pair of ray-tracing forward projector and voxel-driven backprojector have been widely used. In this work, we propose a new GPU-accelerated method for Compton camera reconstruction which is more accurate by using exactly matched pair of projector and backprojector. To calculate conic forward projection, we first sample the cone surface into conic rays and accumulate the intersecting chord lengths of the conic rays passing through voxels using a fast ray-tracing method (RTM). For conic backprojection, to obtain the true adjoint of the conic forward projection, while retaining the computational efficiency of the GPU, we use a voxel-driven RTM which is essentially the same as the standard RTM used for the conic forward projector. Our simulation results show that, while the new method is about 3 times slower than the approximated method, it is still about 16 times faster than the CPU-based method without any loss of accuracy. The net conclusion is that our proposed method is guaranteed to retain the reconstruction accuracy regardless of the number of iterations by providing a perfectly matched projector-backprojector pair, which makes iterative reconstruction methods for Compton imaging faster and more accurate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Design considerations for a time-resolved tomographic diagnostic at DARHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris I. Kaufman, Daniel Frayer, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Alfred Meidinger

    2006-08-01

    An instrument has been developed to acquire time-resolved tomographic data from the electron beam at the DARHT [Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test] facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument contains four optical lines of sight that view a single tilted object. The lens design optically integrates along one optical axis for each line of sight. These images are relayed via fiber optic arrays to streak cameras, and the recorded streaks are used to reconstruct the original two-dimensional data. Installation of this instrument into the facility requires automation of both the optomechanical adjustments and calibration of the instrument in a constrained space. Additional design considerations include compound tilts on the object and image planes.

  4. Work in progress. Flashing tomosynthesis: a tomographic technique for quantitative coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelke, H; Hanrath, P; Schlueter, M; Bleifeld, W; Klotz, E; Weiss, H; Waller, D; von Weltzien, J

    1982-11-01

    Flashing tomosynthesis, a procedure that consists of a recording step and a reconstruction step, facilitates the tomographic imaging of coronary arteries. In a comparative study 10 postmortem coronary arteriograms were examined with 35-mm cine technique and with flashing tomosynthesis. The degrees of stenosis found with both of these techniques were compared with morphometrically obtained values. A higher correlation coefficient existed for the degrees of stenosis obtained with tomosynthesis and morphometry (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001, SEE = 9%) than for those obtained with cine technique and morphometry (r = 0.82, p less than 0.001, SEE = 16%). The technique has also been successfully carried out in 5 patients with coronary artery disease.

  5. Iterative reconstruction of magnetic induction using Lorentz transmission electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, C.; Gürsoy, D.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ongoing research on complex nanomagnetic structures requires a fundamental understanding of the 3D magnetization and the stray fields around the nano-objects. 3D visualization of such fields offers the best way to achieve this. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy provides a suitable combination of high resolution and ability to quantitatively visualize the magnetization vectors using phase retrieval methods. In this paper, we present a formalism to represent the magnetic phase shift of electrons as a Radon transform of the magnetic induction of the sample. Using this formalism, we then present the application of common tomographic methods particularly the iterative methods, to reconstruct the 3D components of the vector field. We present an analysis of the effect of missing wedge and the limited angular sampling as well as reconstruction of complex 3D magnetization in a nanowire using simulations. - Highlights: • We present a formalism to represent electron-optical magnetic phase shift as a Radon transform of the 3D magnetic induction of the nano-object. • We have analyzed four different tomographic reconstruction methods for vectorial data reconstruction. • Reconstruction methods were tested for varying experimental limitations such as limited tilt range and limited angular sampling. • The analysis showed that Gridrec and SIRT methods performed better with lower errors than other reconstruction methods

  6. Video-rate processing in tomographic phase microscopy of biological cells using CUDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardikman, Gili; Habaza, Mor; Waller, Laura; Shaked, Natan T

    2016-05-30

    We suggest a new implementation for rapid reconstruction of three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) maps of biological cells acquired by tomographic phase microscopy (TPM). The TPM computational reconstruction process is extremely time consuming, making the analysis of large data sets unreasonably slow and the real-time 3-D visualization of the results impossible. Our implementation uses new phase extraction, phase unwrapping and Fourier slice algorithms, suitable for efficient CPU or GPU implementations. The experimental setup includes an external off-axis interferometric module connected to an inverted microscope illuminated coherently. We used single cell rotation by micro-manipulation to obtain interferometric projections from 73 viewing angles over a 180° angular range. Our parallel algorithms were implemented using Nvidia's CUDA C platform, running on Nvidia's Tesla K20c GPU. This implementation yields, for the first time to our knowledge, a 3-D reconstruction rate higher than video rate of 25 frames per second for 256 × 256-pixel interferograms with 73 different projection angles (64 × 64 × 64 output). This allows us to calculate additional cellular parameters, while still processing faster than video rate. This technique is expected to find uses for real-time 3-D cell visualization and processing, while yielding fast feedback for medical diagnosis and cell sorting.

  7. Climate Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program archives reconstructions of past climatic conditions derived from paleoclimate proxies, in addition to the Program's large holdings...

  8. The SRT reconstruction algorithm for semiquantification in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastis, George A.; Gaitanis, Anastasios; Samartzis, Alexandros P.; Fokas, Athanasios S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The spline reconstruction technique (SRT) is a new, fast algorithm based on a novel numerical implementation of an analytic representation of the inverse Radon transform. The mathematical details of this algorithm and comparisons with filtered backprojection were presented earlier in the literature. In this study, the authors present a comparison between SRT and the ordered-subsets expectation–maximization (OSEM) algorithm for determining contrast and semiquantitative indices of 18 F-FDG uptake. Methods: The authors implemented SRT in the software for tomographic image reconstruction (STIR) open-source platform and evaluated this technique using simulated and real sinograms obtained from the GE Discovery ST positron emission tomography/computer tomography scanner. All simulations and reconstructions were performed in STIR. For OSEM, the authors used the clinical protocol of their scanner, namely, 21 subsets and two iterations. The authors also examined images at one, four, six, and ten iterations. For the simulation studies, the authors analyzed an image-quality phantom with cold and hot lesions. Two different versions of the phantom were employed at two different hot-sphere lesion-to-background ratios (LBRs), namely, 2:1 and 4:1. For each noiseless sinogram, 20 Poisson realizations were created at five different noise levels. In addition to making visual comparisons of the reconstructed images, the authors determined contrast and bias as a function of the background image roughness (IR). For the real-data studies, sinograms of an image-quality phantom simulating the human torso were employed. The authors determined contrast and LBR as a function of the background IR. Finally, the authors present plots of contrast as a function of IR after smoothing each reconstructed image with Gaussian filters of six different sizes. Statistical significance was determined by employing the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: In both simulated and real studies, SRT

  9. Single photon emission computed tomography using a regularizing iterative method for attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussaline, Francoise; Cao, A.; Lecoq, G.

    1981-06-01

    An analytically exact solution to the attenuated tomographic operator is proposed. Such a technique called Regularizing Iterative Method (RIM) belongs to the iterative class of procedures where a priori knowledge can be introduced on the evaluation of the size and shape of the activity domain to be reconstructed, and