WorldWideScience

Sample records for emission spectrometry detection

  1. Ion detection in mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolbach, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    This course aims at providing some elements for a better understanding of ion detectors used in mass spectrometers, of their operations, and of their limitations. A first part addresses the functions and properties of an ideal detector, how to detect ions in gas phase, and particle detectors and ion detectors used in mass spectrometry. The second part proposes an overview of currently used detectors with respect to their operation principle: detection from the ion charge (Faraday cylinder), detection by inductive effects (FTICR, Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance), and detection by secondary electron emission. The third part discusses the specificities of secondary electron emission. The fourth one addresses operating modes and parameters related to detectors. The sixth part proposes a prospective view on future detectors by addressing the following issues: cryo-detector, inductive effect and charge detectors, ion detection and nano materials

  2. Dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma emission spectrometry for the detection of acetone in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Dong-Xue; Yu, Yong-Liang; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is a predominant volatile organic compound (VOC) in the exhaled breath and a promising biomarker for diabetes and ketoacidosis. A non-thermal micro-plasma generated in a planar dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used as a radiation source for the excitation of gaseous acetone followed by its quantification with optical emission spectrometry (OES). Gaseous acetone can be directly sampled, while liquid acetone is evaporated by heated tungsten coil and then introduced into the DBD micro-plasma by a helium carrier flow for performing optical emission and detection at a 519 nm emission line. In the present study, the exhaled breath is collected and transferred into aqueous medium for sampling. With a sampling volume of 7 μL in a micro-drop, a linear range of 40-1600 mg L(-1) is obtained along with a detection limit of 44 ng and a precision of 5.7% RSD. The present system is successfully applied to the determination of breath acetone for both diabetic patients and healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Flame emission, atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlick, G.

    1980-01-01

    Six hundred and thirty references are cited in this review. The information in the review is divided into 12 major areas: books, reviews, and bibliographies; fundamental studies in flames; developments in instrumentation; measurement techniques and procedure; flame emission spectrometry; flame atomic absorption spectrometry; flame molecular absorption spectrometry; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy; hydride generation techniques; graphite furnace atomic emission spectrometry; atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and analytical comparisons

  4. Determination of aluminium, scandium and rare earth elements by emission flame spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otruba, V.; Sommer, L.

    1989-01-01

    Emission spectrometry in nitrous oxide-acetylene flames in combination with a highly resolving double monochromator and sensitive detecting system enables simple, sensitive and selective determinations of aluminium, scandium and all rare earth elements with exception of cerium in complicated matrices. Calibration plots are linear for a large concentration interval (≤ 100 μgxml -1 ), detection limits are in ngxml -1 level and RSD does not exceed 3% on the optimal concentration level of the particular element. The determination of Al, Sc, Eu and Yb showed particular advantages as to methods using ICP-spectrometry. (orig.)

  5. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George C. Y. [Bloomington, IN; Hieftje, Gary M [Bloomington, IN

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  6. New developments in glow discharge optical emission and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Volker; Dorka, Roland; Wilken, Ludger; Wetzig, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes new developments in flow discharge optical emission (GD-OES) and mass spectrometry (GD-MS) at IFW and presents corresponding new applications (analysis of microelectronic multi-layer system by radio frequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (RF-GD-OES) and analysis of pure iron by a new Grimm-type GD-MS source)

  7. Detection of negative ions in glow discharge mass spectrometry for analysis of solid specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Molchan, Igor S.; Tauziede, C.

    2010-01-01

    A new method is presented for elemental and molecular analysis of halogen-containing samples by glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry, consisting of detection of negative ions from a pulsed RF glow discharge in argon. Analyte signals are mainly extracted from the afterglow regime...... be used to study the distribution of a tantalum fluoride layer within the anodized tantala layer. Further, comparison is made with data obtained using glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, where elemental fluorine can only be detected using a neon plasma. The ionization mechanisms responsible...... for the formation of negative ions in glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry are briefly discussed....

  8. Alpha and beta detection and spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saro, S.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of alpha and beta radioactive decay, the interaction of alpha and beta particles with matter, and their detection and spectrometry are dealt with in seven chapters: 1. Alpha transformation of atomic nuclei; 2. Basic properties of detectors and statistics of detection; 3. Alpha detectors and spectrometers; 4. Applications of alpha detection and spectrometry; 5. Beta transformation of atomic nuclei; 6. Beta particle detectors and spectrometers; 7. Detection of low energy beta particles. Chapter 8 is devoted to sampling and preparation of samples for radiometry. (E.F.)

  9. Gas chromatography of organic microcontaminants using atomic emission and mass spectrometric detection combined in one instrument (GC-AED/MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, H.G.J.; Hankemeier, T.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the coupling of an atomic-emission detector and mass-spectrometric detector to a single gas chromatograph. Splitting of the column effluent enables simultaneous detection by atomic-emission detection (AED) and mass spectrometry (MS) and yields a powerful system for the target

  10. The Determination of Composite Elements in Zircaloy-2 by X-Ray Fluorescence and Emission Spectrometry Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dian Anggraini; Rosika Kriswarini; Yusuf N

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of composing elements in zircaloy-2 has been done by Emission Spectrometry method and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). The aim of the analysis is to verify conformity between composing elements in zircaloy-2 and the material certificate. Spectrometry Emission method has higher sensitivity in element determination of a material than that of XRF method, so can be estimated that emission spectrometry method has higher accuracy than that of XRF method. The result of qualitative analysis by Emission Spectrometry indicate that the composing elements in zircaloy-2 were Sn, Cr and Ni. However, the qualitative analysis result by XRF method indicated that the composing elements in zircaloy 2 were Sn, Cr, Ni and Fe. Fe element can not be analysed by Emission Spectrometry method because Emission Spectrometer did not equipped with Fe detector. The quantitative analysis result of the composing elements in the material with both methods showed that Sn, Cr and Ni concentration of zircaloy 2 existed in concentration ranges of the material certificate. Result of statistical test (F and t-test) of analysis result of both methods can be used for analyzing composing elements in zircaloy 2. Emission Spectrometry method was more sensitive and accurate for determining Cr and Ni element in zircaloy 2 than that of emission Spectrometry method but both methods had same accuracy. The precision of measurement of Sn, Cr and Ni element using XRF method was better than that of Emission spectrometry method. (author)

  11. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  12. Determination of trace elements in soy milk using ICP atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoko; Chayama, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the optimal method for the multi-element quantification of 9 elements in soy milk: calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc. Results obtained using ICP atomic emission spectrometry were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry, which is the standard method. The same sample was measured using both ICP atomic emission spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. The percentage of minerals recovered by ICP atomic emission spectrometry ranged from 99.3% to 102%, which was equivalent to that by atomic absorption spectrometry. Therefore, a good result with standard deviation was obtained. The mineral contents of 16 samples of commercially-available soy milk products were measured. The Cu content was significantly proportional to the amount of soybean solids (P < 0.001). Moreover, although relation-ships did not attain statistical significance, the consents of Fe, Zn, K, Mg and P were proportional to the amount of soybean solids, and were highest in soy milk, followed by prepared soy milk and so milk beverage. The Ca content of modified soy milk was significantly higher than that of soy milk and soy milk-based beverages (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the Na content in soy milk was significantly lower. (author)

  13. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometric detection of simulated high performance liquid chromatographic peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraley, D.M.; Yates, D.; Manahan, S.E.

    1979-01-01

    Because of its multielement capability, element-specificity, and low detection limits, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP) is a very promising technique for the detection of specific elemental species separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This paper evaluated ICP as a detector for HPLC peaks containing specific elements. Detection limits for a number of elements have been evaluated in terms of the minimum detectable concentration of the element at the chromatographic peak maximum. The elements studies were Al, As, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn. In addition, ICP was compared with atomic absorption spectrometry for the detection of HPLC peaks composed of EDTA and NTA chelates of copper. Furthermore, ICP was compared to uv solution absorption for the detection of copper chelates. 6 figures, 4 tables

  14. Plant trait detection with multi-scale spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamon, J. A.; Wang, R.

    2017-12-01

    Proximal and remote sensing using imaging spectrometry offers new opportunities for detecting plant traits, with benefits for phenotyping, productivity estimation, stress detection, and biodiversity studies. Using proximal and airborne spectrometry, we evaluated variation in plant optical properties at various spatial and spectral scales with the goal of identifying optimal scales for distinguishing plant traits related to photosynthetic function. Using directed approaches based on physiological vegetation indices, and statistical approaches based on spectral information content, we explored alternate ways of distinguishing plant traits with imaging spectrometry. With both leaf traits and canopy structure contributing to the signals, results exhibit a strong scale dependence. Our results demonstrate the benefits of multi-scale experimental approaches within a clear conceptual framework when applying remote sensing methods to plant trait detection for phenotyping, productivity, and biodiversity studies.

  15. Phonon-assisted field emission in silicon nanomembranes for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghoo; Aksamija, Zlatan; Shin, Hyun-Cheol; Kim, Hyunseok; Blick, Robert H

    2013-06-12

    Time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry has been considered as the method of choice for mass analysis of large intact biomolecules, which are ionized in low charge states by matrix-assisted-laser-desorption/ionization (MALDI). However, it remains predominantly restricted to the mass analysis of biomolecules with a mass below about 50,000 Da. This limitation mainly stems from the fact that the sensitivity of the standard detectors decreases with increasing ion mass. We describe here a new principle for ion detection in TOF mass spectrometry, which is based upon suspended silicon nanomembranes. Impinging ion packets on one side of the suspended silicon nanomembrane generate nonequilibrium phonons, which propagate quasi-diffusively and deliver thermal energy to electrons within the silicon nanomembrane. This enhances electron emission from the nanomembrane surface with an electric field applied to it. The nonequilibrium phonon-assisted field emission in the suspended nanomembrane connected to an effective cooling of the nanomembrane via field emission allows mass analysis of megadalton ions with high mass resolution at room temperature. The high resolution of the detector will give better insight into high mass proteins and their functions.

  16. Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution of thin-sample field-emission electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Yugo; Hamada, Kotaro; Urano, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The minimum detection limit and spatial resolution for a thinned semiconductor sample were determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) using a Schottky field emission (FE) electron gun and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Comparison of the FE-EPMA results with those obtained using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry in conjunction with scanning transmission electron microscopy, confirmed that FE-EPMA is largely superior in terms of detection sensitivity. Thin-sample FE-EPMA is demonstrated as a very effective method for high resolution, high sensitivity analysis in a laboratory environment because a high probe current and high signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved. - Highlights: • Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution determined for FE-EPMA. • Detection sensitivity of FE-EPMA greatly superior to that of STEM-EDX. • Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution controllable by probe current

  17. Simple, sensitive nitrogen analyzer based on pulsed miniplasma source emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Zhe; Duan Yixiang

    2003-01-01

    The development of pulsed miniplasma source emission spectrometry for trace nitrogen determination in inert gases is described in this article. The instrument consists of a pulsed miniplasma source generated by an in-house fabricated portable high-voltage supply, an optical beam collection system, an integrated small spectrometer with a charge-coupled-device detector, an interface card, and a notebook computer for controlling spectrometer parameters and signal processing. Trace nitrogen in the inert gases, such as helium and argon, was determined by monitoring the emission intensities from nitrogen molecules at 357 and 337 nm. The analytical performance was examined under various experimental conditions. The system has a detection limit of about 15 ppb (v/v) for nitrogen in helium with a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The newly developed instrument offers a simple, low-cost, and sensitive method for continuously monitoring trace nitrogen in high-purity inert gases

  18. Use of oxidative and reducing vapor generation for reducing the detection limits of iodine in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vtorushina, Eh.A.; Saprykin, A.I.; Knapp, G.

    2009-01-01

    Procedures of microwave combustion in an oxygen flow and microwave acid decomposition of biological samples were optimized for the subsequent determination of iodine. A new method was proposed for the generation of molecular iodine from periodate iona using hydrogen peroxide as a reductant. Procedures were developed for determining iodine in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) using oxidative and reducing vapor generation; these allowed the detection limit for iodine to be lowered by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The developed procedures were used to analyze certified reference materials of milk (Skim Milk Powder BCR 150) and seaweed (Sea Lettuce BCR 279) and a Supradyn vitamin complex

  19. An improved microstrip plasma for optical emission spectrometry of gaseous species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schermer, Susanne; Bings, Nicolas H.; Bilgic, Attila M.; Stonies, Robert; Voges, Edgar; Broekaert, Jose A.C. E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de

    2003-09-26

    A modified compact 2.45 GHz microstrip plasma (MSP) operated with Ar as working gas at atmospheric pressure has been characterized and examined for its suitability for the determination of Hg as gaseous species by optical emission spectrometry. As a formerly described MSP the new device is provided on a sapphire substrate. The areas of plasma stability in terms of gas flow rates and microwave power for both MSPs with respect to plasma form and reflected power were investigated. Power levels of 5-40 W and Ar flow rates of 15-60 l/h were used. The modified MSP, which extends out of the channel in the sapphire substrate, was used for the recording of emission spectra for Hg vapor at different working conditions. Using optimized parameters a detection limit for Hg of less than 10 ng Hg/l Ar is obtained. The attainable excitation temperatures in the modified MSP at different microwave power were determined under the use of Fe as thermometric species and introducing ferrocene into the plasma. They were found to be at the order of 6000-7000 K for a power of 10-40 W and a gas flow of 15 l/h. It was shown that the modified MSP source can be combined with both a conventional monochromator with photomultiplier detection and a miniaturized spectrometer with CCD detection, whereby space-angle limitations are not stringent.

  20. Chemical analysis of steel by optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, M.O.; Kajita, T.; Jeszensky, G.

    1981-01-01

    The development of the chemical analysis for special steels by optical emission spectrometry direct reading method with computer, at the Siderurgica N.S. Aparecida S.A. is presented. Results are presented for the low alloy steels and high speed steel. Also, the contribution of this method to the special steel preparation is commented. (Author) [pt

  1. Alpha-particle emission probabilities of ²³⁶U obtained by alpha spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouli, M; Pommé, S; Jobbágy, V; Van Ammel, R; Paepen, J; Stroh, H; Benedik, L

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry was performed with an ion-implanted silicon detector in vacuum on a homogeneously electrodeposited (236)U source. The source was measured at different solid angles subtended by the detector, varying between 0.8% and 2.4% of 4π sr, to assess the influence of coincidental detection of alpha-particles and conversion electrons on the measured alpha-particle emission probabilities. Additional measurements were performed using a bending magnet to eliminate conversion electrons, the results of which coincide with normal measurements extrapolated to an infinitely small solid angle. The measured alpha emission probabilities for the three main peaks - 74.20 (5)%, 25.68 (5)% and 0.123 (5)%, respectively - are consistent with literature data, but their precision has been improved by at least one order of magnitude in this work. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Analysis of zirconium alloys using inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, G.F.; Pickford, C.J.

    1982-06-01

    As part of an interlaboratory collaborative exercise, certain trace and minor elements have been determined in a proposed zircaloy reference material using inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrometry. A dissolution procedure involving hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids was used for determination of Hf, Cr, Fe and Sn. Data have also been obtained for Ni, Cu and Mn. Use of a high resolution monochromator in a scanning mode was found necessary for measurement of the emission intensities in order to resolve the spectral lines of interest from the intense and complex emission from the zirconium matrix. (author)

  3. Mass and emission spectrometry in the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.H. (ed.)

    1978-11-01

    The capabilities of the Mass and Emission Spectrometry Section of the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described. Many different areas of mass spectrometric expertise are represented in the section: gas analysis, high abundance sensitivity measurements, high- and low-resolution organic analyses, spark source trace constituent analysis, and ion microprobe analysis of surfaces. These capabilities are complemented by emission spectrometry. The instruments are described along with a few applications, some of which are unique.

  4. Mass and emission spectrometry in the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.

    1978-11-01

    The capabilities of the Mass and Emission Spectrometry Section of the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described. Many different areas of mass spectrometric expertise are represented in the section: gas analysis, high abundance sensitivity measurements, high- and low-resolution organic analyses, spark source trace constituent analysis, and ion microprobe analysis of surfaces. These capabilities are complemented by emission spectrometry. The instruments are described along with a few applications, some of which are unique

  5. Urinary nickel: measurement of exposure by inductively coupled plasma argon emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Chisato; Usuda, Kan; Hayashi, Satsuki; Dote, Tomotaro; Kono, Koichi

    2004-09-01

    Nickel is a rare earth metal and is widely used in modern industry. Its overexposure in human beings can provoke significant effects including lung, cardiovascular and kidney diseases. As an index of occupational exposure, urine is widely used for the monitoring of nickel concentration because it is a minimally invasive method. Recent studies have used atomic absorption spectrometry to measure nickel concentration. In this study, we introduced novel inductively coupled plasma argon emission spectrometry (ICPAES) which enables us to measure multiple elements simultaneously with smaller volume and with lower detection limits compared to conventional atomic absorption emission spectrometry, and we established the new measuring method by determining the appropriate wavelengths for nickel concentration. Furthermore, using the established new measuring method, we investigated the correlation between a single oral administration of nickel and urine elimination in rats. As a result, different concentrations of nickel standard solutions were measured by ICPAES, and among five specific wavelengths of nickel, 221.647 and 231.604 nm were chosen because they had the highest inclines of both signal to background ratio and emission intensity in simple linear regression analysis. Next, by using healthy human urine samples that had not been exposed to nickel, 231.604 nm was determined to be the most appropriate wavelength because it did not present abnormal intensity due to obstacle wavelength. Male Wistar rats received an oral administration of nickel ranging from 0.025 to 250 mg/kg, which is equivalent to 0.0015 - 15% of LD50, and during the following 24 h, urine samples were collected and the nickel concentration was measured by ICPAES. With a single oral administration of nickel, there was an increase in urine nickel concentration in a dose-dependent manner and the appropriate equation was developed. Acute renal failure was not observed in this dosage of oral nickel

  6. Tin Content Determination in Canned Fruits and Vegetables by Hydride Generation Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Rončević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tin content in samples of canned fruits and vegetables was determined by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-OES, and it was compared with results obtained by standard method of flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. Selected tin emission lines intensity was measured in prepared samples after addition of tartaric acid and followed by hydride generation with sodium borohydride solution. The most favorable line at 189.991 nm showed the best detection limit (1.9 μg L−1 and limit of quantification (6.4 μg kg−1. Good linearity and sensitivity were established from time resolved analysis and calibration tests. Analytical accuracy of 98–102% was obtained by recovery study of spiked samples. Method of standard addition was applied for tin determination in samples from fully protected tinplate. Tin presence at low-concentration range was successfully determined. It was shown that tenth times less concentrations of Sn were present in protected cans than in nonprotected or partially protected tinplate.

  7. Quantitative determination of total cesium in highly active liquid waste by using liquid electrode plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Van-Khoai; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Taguchi, Shigeo; Takamura, Yuzuru; Surugaya, Naoki; Kuno, Takehiko

    2018-06-01

    A sensitive analytical method for determination of total cesium (Cs) in highly active liquid waste (HALW) by using modified liquid electrode plasma optical emission spectrometry (LEP-OES) is developed in this study. The instrument is modified to measure radioactive samples in a glove box. The effects of important factors, including pulsed voltage sequence and nitric acid concentration, on the emission of Cs are investigated. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) are 0.005 mg/L and 0.02 mg/L, respectively. The achieved LOD is one order lower than that of recently developed spectroscopic methods using liquid discharge plasma. The developed method is validated by subjecting a simulated HALW sample to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The recoveries obtained from a spike-and-recovery test are 96-102%, implying good accuracy. The method is successfully applied to the quantification of Cs in a real HALW sample at the Tokai reprocessing plant in Japan. Apart from dilution and filtration of the HALW sample, no other pre-treatment process is required. The results agree well with the values obtained using gamma spectrometry. The developed method offers a reliable technique for rapid analysis of total Cs in HALW samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cold excitation and determination of hydrogen sulfide by dielectric barrier discharge molecular emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongchen; Jiang, Jie; Li, Na

    2015-11-01

    A low-temperature microplasma generated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was used as a radiation source for the excitation of hydrogen sulfide and its determination by molecular emission spectrometry (MES). The excitation/emission chamber was enclosed to eliminate spectral interference from ambient air. The spectral emission lines of hydrogen sulfide were clearly discriminated from the background spectrum, and the emission line at 365.06 nm was selected for parameter optimization and quantitative analysis. The S(2-) ions in aqueous samples were reacted with acid to generate hydrogen sulfide and then determined. The experimental parameters affecting the determination of hydrogen sulfide and S(2-) were optimized. The limits of detection were 1.4 mg m(-3) for H2S and 11.2 mg L(-1) for S(2-). The repeatability of the method was satisfactory, as the RSD values were 2.3% for H2S and 1.8% for S(2-). The enclosed DBD-MES system was demonstrated to be a useful tool for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in gas samples and S(2-) in aqueous samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multielement determination of rare earth elements by liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawatari, Hideyuki; Asano, Takaaki; Hu, Xincheng; Saizuka, Tomoo; Itoh, Akihide; Hirose, Akio; Haraguchi, Hiroki

    1995-01-01

    The rapid determination of rare earth elements (REEs) has been investigated by an on-line system of high performance liquid chromatography/multichannel inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. In the present system, all REEs could be detected simultaneously in a single chromatographic measurement without spectral interferences. Utilizing a cation exchange column and 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanoic acid aqueous solution as the mobile phase, the detection limits of 0.4-30 ng ml -1 for all REEs were obtained. The system was applied to the determination of REEs in geological standard rock samples and rare earth impurities in high purity rare earth oxides. The REEs in standard rocks could be determined by the present HPLC/ICP-AES system without pretreatment after acid digestion, although the detection limits were not sufficient for the analysis of rare earth oxides. (author)

  10. Major constituent quantitative determination in uranium alloys by coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and X ray fluorescence wavelength dispersive spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Luis Claudio de; Silva, Adriana Mascarenhas Martins da; Gomide, Ricardo Goncalves; Silva, Ieda de Souza

    2013-01-01

    A wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) spectrometric method for determination of major constituents elements (Zr, Nb, Mo) in Uranium/Zirconium/Niobium and Uranium/Molybdenum alloy samples were developed. The methods use samples taken in the form of chips that were dissolved in hot nitric acid and precipitate particles melted with lithium tetraborate and dissolved in hot nitric acid and finally analyzed as a solution. Studies on the determination by inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectrometry (ICP OES) using matched matrix in calibration curve were developed. The same samples solution were analyzed in both methods. The limits of detection (LOD), linearity of the calibrations curves, recovery study, accuracy and precision of the both techniques were carried out. The results were compared. (author)

  11. Determination of trace amounts of cerium in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of Ce in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is described, and the detection limit of ICP-OES of 0.0004 ppM is compared with that of other methods. The effects of the major elemental components of paint, Si, Pb, Cr, and Na on the ICP-OES determination of Ce were studied. The interference of 400 ppM of the other ions on the determination of 10 ppM Ce was small (0 to 3% error). The method is applicable to the range of 0.2 to 700 ppM Ce

  12. Janus probe, a detection system for high energy reactor gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Kaiser, B.J.

    1980-03-01

    In reactor environments, gamma-ray spectra are continuous and the absolute magnitude as well as the general shape of the gamma continuum are of paramount importance. Consequently, conventional methods of gamma-ray detection are not suitable for in-core gamma-ray spectrometry. To meet these specific needs, a method of continuous gamma-ray spectrometry, namely Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry, was developed for in-situ observations of reactor environments. A new gamma-ray detection system has been developed which extends the applicability of Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry up to roughly 7 MeV. This detection system is comprised of two separate Si(Li) detectors placed face-to-face. Hence this new detection system is called the Janus probe. Also shown is the block diagram of pulse processing instrumentation for the Janus probe. This new gamma probe not only extends the upper energy limit of in-core gamma-ray spectrometry, but in addition possesses other fundamental advantages

  13. Matrix digestion of soil and sediment samples for extraction of lead, cadmium and antimony and their direct determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, P.; Fisher, A.S.; Henon, D.N.; Hill, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    An environmentally friendly and simple method has been developed for complete digestion of lead, cadmium and antimony from soil samples using a magnesium nitrate assisted dry ashing procedure. Statistical data for a series of experiments with standard reference materials are presented, and precision values are found to be comparable for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and for inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. From a single digest solution all analytes are quantified without involving any preconcentration routes. Inter-method comparison of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) shows that the probability of the results being different is less than 99 %. (author)

  14. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  15. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Allman, S.L.; Sammartano, L.J.; Isola, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications

  16. Improvement of the detection limits in radio-frequency-powered glow discharge optical emission spectrometry associated with bias-current conduction method; Jiko bias denryu donyuho ni yoru koshuha glow hoden hakko bunseki ni okeru kenshutsu genkai no kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagatsuma, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Research Institute for Materials

    1999-01-01

    A d.c. bias current driven by the self-bias voltage which is conducted through the r.f.-powered glow discharge plasma varies the emission characteristics drastically, leading to improvement of the detection power in the optical emission spectrometry. By conducting the bias currents of 20-30 mA, the emission intensities of the atomic resonance lines were 10-20 times larger than those obtained with conventional r.t.- powered plasmas. The detection limits for determination of alloyed elements in the re-based binary alloy samples were estimated to be l.6 x 10{sup -3}% Cr for CrI 425.43nm, 7 x 10{sup -4}% Mn for MnI 403.10nm, 1.9>10{sup -3}% Cu for CuI 327.40nm, 1.1 x 10{sup -3}% Al for AlI 396.16nm, and 6.6 x 10{sup -3}% Ni for NiI 352.45 nm. (author)

  17. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dancsak, Stacia E.; Silva, Sidnei G.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Jones, Bradley T.; Donati, George L.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Direct analysis of biodiesel on a tungsten coil atomizer. •Determination of Na, K, Cr and V by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. •Sample dilution with methanol or ethanol. •Ten-microliter sample aliquots and limits of detection between 20 and 90 μg kg −1 . •Low consumption of reagents, samples and gases in a 140 s per run procedure. -- Abstract: High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg −1 for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg −1 for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg −1 for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated. Powers of detection are

  18. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancsak, Stacia E. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Silva, Sidnei G.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Donati, George L., E-mail: georgedonati@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States)

    2014-01-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Direct analysis of biodiesel on a tungsten coil atomizer. •Determination of Na, K, Cr and V by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. •Sample dilution with methanol or ethanol. •Ten-microliter sample aliquots and limits of detection between 20 and 90 μg kg{sup −1}. •Low consumption of reagents, samples and gases in a 140 s per run procedure. -- Abstract: High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg{sup −1} for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg{sup −1} for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg{sup −1} for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated

  19. Analysis of iron-base alloys by low-wattage glow discharge emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagatsuma, K.; Hirokawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    Several iron-base alloys were investigated by low-wattage glow discharge emission spectrometry. The emission intensity principally depended on the sputtering parameters of constituent elements in the alloy. However, in the case of chromium, stable and firm oxides formed on the surface influencing the yield of ejected atoms. This paper discusses the relation between the sputtering parameters in Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr, and Fe-Co alloys and their relative emission intensities. Additionally, quantitative analysis was performed for some ternary iron-base alloys and commercial stainless steels with the calibration factors of binary alloy systems

  20. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombaba, Jackson M.

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The device exhibits a stable signal because the plasma is self-seeding and reignites itself every half cycle. A tesla coil is not required to commence generation of the plasma if the ac voltage applied is greater than the breakdown voltage of the plasma-supporting gas. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (Mvutilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienyl manganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer (common room humidifier) was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were also considered. Figures of merits of selected elements both in absorption and emission modes are reported. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using

  1. Pyrolysis gas chromatographic atomic emission detection for sediments, coals and other petrochemical precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, J.A.; Zeng, Y.D.; Uden, P.C.; Eglinton, T.I.; Ericson, I. (Massachusetts University, Amherst, MA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-09-01

    On-line flash pyrolysis coupled to a capillary gas chromatograph for the characterization of marine sediments, coals and other heterogeneous solid samples is described. A helium microwave-induced plasma is used for chromatographic detection by atomic emission spectrometry. Simultaneous multi-element detection is achieved with a photodiode array detector. The optical path of the gas chromatographic atomic emission detector is purged with helium, allowing simultaneous, sensitive detection of atomic emission from sulfur 181 nm, phosphorous 186 nm, arsenic 189 nm, selenium 196 nm and carbon 193 nm. Several sediment and coal samples have been analysed for their carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, oxygen, phosphorous, arsenic and selenium content. Qualitative information indicating the occurrence and distribution of these elements in the samples can be used to gauge the relative stage of diagenetic evolution of the samples and provide information on their depositional environment. In some instances the chromatographic behaviour of the compounds produced upon pyrolysis is improved through on-line alkylation. This on-line derivatization is achieved by adding liquid reagents to the pyrolysis probe or by adding liquid reagents to the pyrolysis probe or by adding solid reagents either to the solid sample or by packing the reagent in the injection port of the chromatograph.

  2. Metal carbonyl vapor generation coupled with dielectric barrier discharge to avoid plasma quench for optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Li, Shao-Hua; Dou, Shuai; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-20

    The scope of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) microplasma as a radiation source for optical emission spectrometry (OES) is extended by nickel carbonyl vapor generation. We proved that metal carbonyl completely avoids the extinguishing of plasma, and it is much more suitable for matching the DBD excitation and OES detection with respect to significant DBD quenching by concomitant hydrogen when hydride generation is used. A concentric quartz UV reactor allows sample solution to flow through the central channel wherein to efficiently receive the uniformly distributed UV irradiation in the confined cylindrical space between the concentric tubes, which facilitates effective carbonyl generation in a nickel solution. The carbonyl is transferred into the DBD excitation chamber by an argon stream for nickel excitation, and the characteristic emission of nickel at 232.0 nm is detected by a charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. A 1.0 mL sample solution results in a linear range of 5-100 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.3 μg L(-1) and a precision of 2.4% RSD at 50 μg L(-1). The present DBD-OES system is validated by nickel in certified reference materials.

  3. Simultaneous determination of Cr, Ga, In and V in soil and water samples by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donati, George L.; Kron, Benjamin E. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States)], E-mail: jonesbt@wfu.edu

    2009-06-15

    Tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry is employed for the simultaneous determination of Cr, Ga, In, and V. Both V and In are detected by this technique for the first time. The atomizer is a simple, inexpensive tungsten filament extracted from a mass-produced, commercially-available 150 W, 15 V microscope bulb. A 25 {mu}l sample aliquot is placed directly on the coil and a small constant-current power source is used to carefully dry, ash and atomize the sample. Analytical signals are detected with a Czerny-Turner spectrograph and a charge coupled device detector. Multiple emission lines from all 4 elements are monitored simultaneously in a 54 nm spectral window. Concentration limits of detection are in the {mu}g l{sup - 1} range for all elements, and the absolute limits of detection are 0.2, 2, 0.5, and 10 ng for Cr, Ga, In, and V, respectively. Even lower values may be obtained by combining the signals for the multiple emission lines of a single element. The method precision is typically better than 5.0% relative standard deviation, and sometimes as good as 0.95% (Ga). Standard reference materials of soil and water are used to check the method accuracy. After a simple acid extraction, the values determined by the method presented no significant difference from the reported values at the 95% confidence level.

  4. Liquid electrode plasma-optical emission spectrometry combined with solid-phase preconcentration for on-site analysis of lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Suman; Rahman, Ismail M M; Alam, Iftakharul; Miyaguchi, Maho; Sawai, Hikaru; Maki, Teruya; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2017-08-15

    A relatively rapid and precise method is presented for the determination of lead in aqueous matrix. The method consists of analyte quantitation using the liquid electrode plasma-optical emission spectrometry (LEP-OES) coupled with selective separation/preconcentration by solid-phase extraction (SPE). The impact of operating variables on the retention of lead in SPEs such as pH, flow rate of the sample solution; type, volume, flow rate of the eluent; and matrix effects were investigated. Selective SPE-separation/preconcentration minimized the interfering effect due to manganese in solution and limitations in lead-detection in low-concentration samples by LEP-OES. The LEP-OES operating parameters such as the electrical conductivity of sample solution; applied voltage; on-time, off-time, pulse count for applied voltage; number of measurements; and matrix effects have also been optimized to obtain a distinct peak for the lead at λ max =405.8nm. The limit of detection (3σ) and the limit of quantification (10σ) for lead determination using the technique were found as 1.9 and 6.5ng mL -1 , respectively. The precision, as relative standard deviation, was lower than 5% at 0.1μg mL -1 Pb, and the preconcentration factor was found to be 187. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of lead contents in the natural aqueous matrix (recovery rate:>95%). The method accuracy was verified using certified reference material of wastewaters: SPS-WW1 and ERM-CA713. The results from LEP-OES were in good agreement with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry measurements of the same samples. The application of the method is rapid (≤5min, without preconcentration) with a reliable detection limit at trace levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of the Detection Characteristics of Trace Species Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Breakdown Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid and precise element measurement of trace species, such as mercury, iodine, strontium, cesium, etc. is imperative for various applications, especially for industrial needs. The elements mercury and iodine were measured by two detection methods for comparison of the corresponding detection features. A laser beam was focused to induce plasma. Emission and ion signals were detected using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LB-TOFMS. Multi-photon ionization and electron impact ionization in the plasma generation process can be controlled by the pressure and pulse width. The effect of electron impact ionization on continuum emission, coexisting molecular and atomic emissions became weakened in low pressure condition. When the pressure was less than 1 Pa, the plasma was induced by laser dissociation and multi-photon ionization in LB-TOFMS. According to the experimental results, the detection limits of mercury and iodine in N2 were 3.5 ppb and 60 ppb using low pressure LIBS. The mercury and iodine detection limits using LB-TOFMS were 1.2 ppb and 9.0 ppb, which were enhanced due to different detection features. The detection systems of LIBS and LB-TOFMS can be selected depending on the condition of each application.

  6. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  7. Detection of fission fragments by secondary emission; Detection des fragments de fission par emission secondaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audias, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    This fission fragment detecting apparatus is based on the principle that fragments traversing a thin foil will cause emission of secondary electrons. These electrons are then accelerated (10 kV) and directly detected by means of a plastic scintillator and associated photomultiplier. Some of the advantages of such a detector are, its rapidity, its discriminating power between alpha particles and fission fragments, its small energy loss in detecting the fragments and the relatively great amount of fissionable material which it can contain. This paper is subdivided as follows: a) theoretical considerations b) constructional details of apparatus and some experimental details and c) a study of the secondary emission effect itself. (author) [French] Le detecteur de fragments de fission que nous avons realise est base sur le principe de l'emission secondaire produite par les fragments de fission traversant une feuille mince: les electrons secondaires emis sont acceleres a des tensions telles (de l'ordre de 10 kV), qu'ils soient directement detectables par un scintillateur plastique associe a un photomultiplicateur. L'interet d'un tel detecteur reside: dans sa rapidite, sa tres bonne discrimination alpha, fission, la possibilite de detecter les fragments de fission avec une perte d'energie pouvant rester relativement faible, et la possibilite d'introduire des quantites de matiere fissile plus importantes que dans les autres types de detecteurs. Ce travail comporte: -) un apercu bibliographique de la theorie du phenomene, -) realisation et mise au point du detecteur avec etude experimentale de quelques parametres intervenant dans l'emission secondaire, -) etude de l'emission secondaire (sur la face d'emergence des fragments de fission) en fonction de l'energie du fragment et en fonction de l'epaisseur de matiere traversee avant emission secondaire, et -) une etude comparative de l'emission secondaire sur la face d'incidence et sur la face d'emergence des fragments de

  8. Quenching of the OH and nitrogen molecular emission by methane addition in an Ar capacitively coupled plasma to remove spectral interference in lead determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentiu, T., E-mail: ftibi@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ponta, M., E-mail: mponta@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mihaltan, A.I., E-mail: alinblaj2005@yahoo.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Darvasi, E., E-mail: edarvasi@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Frentiu, M., E-mail: frentiu.maria@yahoo.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordos, E., E-mail: emilcordos@gmail.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2010-07-15

    A new method is proposed to remove the spectral interference on elements in atomic fluorescence spectrometry by quenching of the molecular emission of the OH radical (A{sup 2{Sigma}+} {yields} X{sup 2{Pi}}) and N{sub 2} second positive system (C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} {yields} B{sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}) in the background spectrum of medium power Ar plasmas. The experiments were carried out in a radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma (275 W, 27.12 MHz) by CH{sub 4} addition. The quenching is the result of the high affinity of OH radical for a hydrogen atom from the CH{sub 4} molecule and the collisions of the second kind between nitrogen excited molecules and CH{sub 4}, respectively. The decrease of the emission of N{sub 2} second positive system in the presence of CH{sub 4} is also the result of the deactivation of the metastable argon atoms that could excite the nitrogen molecules. For flow rates of 0.7 l min{sup -1} Ar with addition of 7.5 ml min{sup -1} CH{sub 4}, the molecular emission of OH and N{sub 2} was completely removed from the plasma jet spectrum at viewing heights above 60 mm. The molecular emission associated to CH and CH{sub 2} species was not observed in the emission spectrum of Ar/CH{sub 4} plasma in the ultraviolet range. The method was experimented for the determination of Pb at 283.31 nm by atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrodeless discharge lamp and a multichannel microspectrometer. The detection limit was 35 ng ml{sup -1}, 2-3 times better than in atomic emission spectrometry using the same plasma source, and similar to that in hollow cathode lamp microwave plasma torch atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  9. Comparison of 15N analysis by optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry for clinical studies during total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragon, A.; Reynier, J.P.; Guiraud, G.

    1985-01-01

    During total and stable parenteral nutrition, a branched chain amino acid enriched solution containing [ 15 N]leucine was infused into a patient to determine the fate of the nitrogen administered through this formulation. Measurements of 15 N isotopic enrichments were performed on the same biological samples (urinary urea, total plasma proteins and albumin) by optical emission spectrometry (OES) and mass spectrometry (MS) to determine if OES with its specific advantages (cost, handling maintenance) constituted even with low enrichments a useful alternative technique to MS considered as the reference method. The results show that OES constituted a very useful analytical technique to obtain reliable information in clinical metabolic studies when low 15 N enrichments must be determined. (Auth.)

  10. Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES): Theoretical Introduction, General Aspects, and its Applications within the Framework of the Technofusion Programs; Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES): Introduccion Teorica, Aspectos Generales y Aplicabilidad en el Marco del Programa Technofusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Rojo, A. B.; Gonzalez, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2013-02-01

    The demand by material research groups for the direct composition analysis of solids is increasing as a solution to the time-consuming problems and errors inherent to classical chemical analysis, where the attack and solubilisation of the starting material is mandatory, often producing the introduction of impurities and component loss of the initial matrix. From the existing solid analysis techniques the present work is focused on the Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES), a fast, simply-executed technique, for which quantitative, high resolution depth profile determination of any element in the periodic table can be performed with a high sensibility and detection limit. The theoretical concepts, the required instrumentation and the basic analytic applications are revised, giving especial attention to the issues related to the analysis of materials for fusion applications. Finally, a comparative study with a more advanced spectroscopic technique (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS)) is performed and the concomitance of both techniques to correct limitations such as the spatial resolution and the quantification of the analysis, important factors that are required in the chemical analysis of the complex materials used in Fusion, is addressed. (Author) 41 refs.

  11. Decreasing of the detection limit for gamma-ray Spectrometry with the influence of sample treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, M.; Sadighzadeh, A.; Asgharizadeh, F.; Sardari, D.; Tavassoli, A.; Arbabi, A.; Hochaghani, O.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: In this study the ash method has been applied for environmental sample treatment in order to decrease of the detection limit in gamma-ray spectrometry for low level radioactivity measurements. Detection limit in gamma ray spectrometry is the smallest expectation value of the net counting rate that can be detected on given probabilities. The environmental test samples have been changed into ash using a suitable oven. The heating were made under controlled temperature to avoid the escape of some radionuclides such as radiocaesium. The ash samples were measured by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry system. (author)

  12. Thermoluminescence emission spectrometry of glass display in mobile phones and resulting evaluation of the dosimetric properties of a specific type of display glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discher, Michael; Woda, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Glass displays of mobile phones are sensitive to ionizing radiation and can be used for retrospective dosimetry for the purpose of triage after a radiological accident or attack. In this study the two main types of glass display that are used in modern mobile phones were investigated using thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectrometry. A different TL spectrum was observed for the glass display of category A (lime-aluminosilicate glass) and category B (boron-silicate glass). Based on the spectral measurements an optimized detection window was chosen to re-evaluate the dosimetric properties (dose response, optical and long-term stability) of glass display category B. - Highlights: • Two display glass types show similar TL emission peaks but with strongly different relative intensities. • The intrinsic background TL signal peaks at similar wavelengths as the radiation induced signal. • Dosimetric properties of one display glass type were re-evaluated using an optimized detection window

  13. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1991-12-24

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a solid material (16, 42) by applying energy from an energy source (20, 70) top a surface region of the solid material sufficient to cause transient heating in a thin surface layer portion of the solid material (16, 42) so as to enable transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion, and by detecting with a spectrometer/detector (28, 58) substantially only the transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion of the solid material. The detected transient thermal emission of infrared radiation is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the solid material of emitted infrared radiation, so as to be indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the solid material.

  14. Determination of rare earth elements by liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Haraguchi, H.

    1984-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) interfaced with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been applied to the determination of rare earth elements. ICP-AES was used as an element-selective detector for HPLC. The separation of rare earth elements with HPLC helped to avoid erroneous analytical results due to spectral interferences. Fifteen rare earth elements (Y and 14 lanthanides) were determined selectively with the HPLC/ICP-AES system using a concentration gradient method. The detection limits with the present HPLC/ICP-AES system were about 0.001-0.3 μg/mL with a 100-μL sample injection. The calibration curves obtained by the peak height measurements showed linear relationships in the concentration range below 500 μg/mL for all rare earth elements. A USGS rock standard sample, rare earth ores, and high-purity lanthanide reagents (>99.9%) were successfully analyzed without spectral interferences

  15. An evaluation of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using electrothermal atomisation sample introduction and photographic plate detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khathing, D.T.; Pickford, C.J.

    1984-05-01

    A photographic radiation measurement approach has been used with an inductively coupled plasma source to evaluate and tabulate the more prominent optical emission lines of 66 elements. Compared with the more common sample introduction technique using nebulisation, increased sensitivity for multielement analysis of small samples was achieved by using a simple graphite electrothermal atomisation system. This was constructed to serve as a dual purpose atomiser ie both for Atomic Absorption and for Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission spectroscopy. The system offers the advantage of a wide multi-elemental coverage, but sensitivities achieved with photographic detection are poorer than those obtained photoelectrically. (author)

  16. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams

  17. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D. [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); DeYoung, Paul A. [Department of Physics, Hope College, 27 Graves Place, Holland, MI 49423 (United States); Blum, Arlene [Green Science Policy Institute, Box 5455, Berkeley, CA 94705 (United States); Stapleton, Heather M. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, LSRC Box 90328, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Peaslee, Graham F., E-mail: peaslee@hope.edu [Department of Chemistry, Hope College, 35 E. 12th Street, Holland, MI 49423 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC–MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  18. Flow injection analysis in inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosias, Maria F.G.G.

    1995-10-01

    The main features of flow injection analysis (FIA) as contribution to the inductively coupled plasma (Icp) spectrometry are described. A systematic review of researches using the combined FIA-Icp and the benefits of this association are presented. Flow systems were proposed to perform on-line Icp solution management for multielemental determination by atomic emission spectrometry (Icp-AES) or mass spectrometry. The inclusion of on-line ion exchangers in flow systems for matrix separation and/or analyte preconcentration are presented. Together with those applications the new advent of instruments with facilities for multielement detection on flow injection signals are described. (author). 75 refs., 19 figs

  19. single photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography - Part 1 (October 2012), Part 2 (October 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. Part 1 Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, gamma photon emitters, positon emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Gamma cameras; 4 - Quantification in emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion. Part 2 content: 1 - Positon emitters; 2 - Positons detection: Coincidence detection (electronic collimation, PET detectors with gamma cameras, dedicated PET detectors, spectrometry); PET detectors type; time-of-flight PET; 2D PET; 3D PET; 3 - Quantification in emission tomography: detected events, attenuation, scattering, fortuitous coincidences, standardisation; 4 - Common SPECT and PET problems: partial volume effect, movement, tomographic reconstruction, calibration, dead time; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  20. Semi-automatic determination of tin in marine materials by continuous flow hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yonglai; Narasaki, Hisataki; Chen Hongyuan; Tian Liching

    1997-01-01

    A semi-automated continuous flow hydride generation system with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used for the determination of tin in marine materials. The effects of acids (H 2 SO 4 and HCl) were studied. The analytical parameters were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit is 0.4 ng/ml. Interferences from transition elements were investigated and seven masking reagents were tested. L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate (1%) was used to mask the interferences from foreign ions. Finally, the accuracy, checked with a marine standard reference material obtained from the National Research Council (NRC), was within the certified value. (orig.). With 6 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Comparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for the determination of rare earth elements in Greek bauxites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochsenkuehn-Petropoulou, Maria; Luck, Joachim

    1991-01-01

    Fore the determination of rare earth elements (REE) in bauxitic materials the techniques of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) were compared. In the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) bauxites SRM 697 Dominican, and SRM 69 b Arkansas, the concentration of some REEs were determined. With the reference bauxite BX-N of the ARNT (Association Nationale de la Recherche Technique) the precision and accuracy of ICP-AES for the determination of REEs in bauxites was tested. Furthermore, Greek bauxites of the Parnassos-Giona area were investigated. In a comparison of the three methods it was possible to calculate from the data series the precision of each method, which showed that the tendency found in the deviations for the different REEs is in accordance with published values. Also the limits of detection for REEs in bauxites were calculated and found to be in the same range as those in the literature. (author)

  2. Volatile organo-selenium speciation in biological matter by solid phase microextraction-moderate temperature multicapillary gas chromatography with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, C.; Sanz Landaluze, J.; Ximenez-Embun, P.; Madrid-Albarran, Y.; Camara, C

    2004-01-16

    Microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) in combination with multicapillary (MC) gas chromatography could be proven to be useful for element specific detection of volatile species. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used for preconcentration and sample-matrix separation. The fiber desorption unit as well as the heating control for the MC column were in-house developed and multicapillary column was operated at moderate temperatures (30-100 deg. C). The method was optimized for organo-selenium species (dimethylselenide (DMSe), diethylselenide (DEtSe) and dimethyldiselenide (DMDSe)), using a chemometric approach. Stationary phases for the separation column were optimized using a conventional GC and contrasted with the results obtained with the MC. Application was focussed on selenium accumulating biological matter, such as lupine, yeast, Indian mustard and garlic. These samples were grown in hydroponic solution containing inorganic selenium (Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}). SPME sampling was carried out in fixed volume flow boxes in headspace above the living plants and in vials using treated samples. Results demonstrate inorganic selenium transformation into volatile organic species during metabolism. Separation is fast, a chromatogram can be obtained in less than 3 min and detection limits were at sub-ppb level for all investigated species. The system is independent from the use of a conventional gas chromatographic oven and can be used as a versatile alternative to highly cost intensive methods such as GC-ICP-MS.

  3. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. PECAN: library-free peptide detection for data-independent acquisition tandem mass spectrometry data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, Ying S.; Egertson, Jarrett D.; Bollinger, James G.; Searle, Brian C.; Payne, Samuel H.; Noble, William Stafford; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2017-08-07

    Data-independent acquisition (DIA) is an emerging mass spectrometry (MS)-based technique for unbiased and reproducible measurement of protein mixtures. DIA tandem mass spectrometry spectra are often highly multiplexed, containing product ions from multiple cofragmenting precursors. Detecting peptides directly from DIA data is therefore challenging; most DIA data analyses require spectral libraries. Here we present PECECAN (http://pecan.maccosslab.org), a library-free, peptide-centric tool that robustly and accurately detects peptides directly from DIA data. PECECAN reports evidence of detection based on product ion scoring, which enables detection of low-abundance analytes with poor precursor ion signal. We demonstrate the chromatographic peak picking accuracy and peptide detection capability of PECECAN, and we further validate its detection with data-dependent acquisition and targeted analyses. Lastly, we used PECECAN to build a plasma proteome library from DIA data and to query known sequence variants.

  5. Speciation analysis of organomercurial compounds in Fish Tissue by capillary gas chromatography coupled to microwave-induced plasma atomic emission detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorfe Díaz

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel approach for analysis of mercury speciation in fish using gas chromatography coupled with microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (GC-MIP-OES in surfatron resonant cavity. Sample treatment was based on quantitative leaching of mercury species from fish tissue with ultrasound-assisted acid-toluene extraction. The extracted mercury species analyzed with GC-MIP-OES attained detection limits of 5 and 9 pg for methylmercury (MeHg and ethylmercury (EtHg, respectively. A complete chromatogram could be completed in 1.5 min. MeHg values obtained with GC-MIP-OES were matched with organic mercury values obtained with selective reduction cold vapour- atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS.

  6. Comparison in the analytical performance between krypton and argon glow discharge plasmas as the excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-04-01

    The emission characteristics of ionic lines of nickel, cobalt, and vanadium were investigated when argon or krypton was employed as the plasma gas in glow discharge optical emission spectrometry. A dc Grimm-style lamp was employed as the excitation source. Detection limits of the ionic lines in each iron-matrix alloy sample were compared between the krypton and the argon plasmas. Particular intense ionic lines were observed in the emission spectra as a function of the discharge gas (krypton or argon), such as the Co II 258.033 nm for krypton and the Co II 231.707 nm for argon. The explanation for this is that collisions with the plasma gases dominantly populate particular excited levels of cobalt ion, which can receive the internal energy from each gas ion selectively, for example, the 3d(7)4p (3)G(5) (6.0201 eV) for krypton and the 3d(7)4p (3)G(4) (8.0779 eV) for argon. In the determination of nickel as well as cobalt in iron-matrix samples, more sensitive ionic lines could be found in the krypton plasma rather than the argon plasma. Detection limits in the krypton plasma were 0.0039 mass% Ni for the Ni II 230.299-nm line and 0.002 mass% Co for the Co II 258.033-nm line. However, in the determination of vanadium, the argon plasma had better analytical performance, giving a detection limit of 0.0023 mass% V for the V II 309.310-nm line.

  7. Proton Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) applied in the environmental sample analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Ion V.; Iordan, M.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Busuioc, G.; Ciupina, V.; Belc, M.; Badica, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the elemental composition of tree leaves using Proton-Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) methods. By PIXE Spectrometry we identified and determined the concentration of S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu Zn, As, Br, Sr and by AAS method the concentration of elements: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd. Pb was identified in only 2 samples from 29. For tree leave samples collected at a large distance to the polluting source the Sr concentration decreased and the Mg, Ca, Se, Zn and Fe concentrations increased. Also, we can observe a small affinity of these leaves for the environmental Pb which was detected for two samples at a small distance to polluting source. (authors)

  8. Solid phase microextraction capillary gas chromatography combined with furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry for speciation of mercury in fish tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinberg, Patricia; Campos, Reinaldo C.; Mester, Zoltan; Sturgeon, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The use of solid phase microextraction in conjunction with tandem gas chromatography-furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry (SPME-GC-FAPES) was evaluated for the determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in fish tissue. Samples were digested with methanolic potassium hydroxide, derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate and extracted by SPME. After the SPME extraction, species were separated by GC and detected by FAPES. All experimental parameters were optimized for best separation and analytical response. A repeatability precision of typically 2% can be achieved with long-term (3 months) reproducibility precision of 4.3%. Certified Reference Materials DORM-2, DOLT-2 and TORT-2 from the National Research Council of Canada were analyzed to verify the accuracy of this technique. Detection limits of 1.5 ng g -1 for methylmercury and 0.7 ng g -1 for inorganic mercury in biological tissues were obtained

  9. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A new atomization cell for trace metal determinations by tungsten coil atomic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donati, G.L., E-mail: georgedonati@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Wildman, R.B.; Jones, B.T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States)

    2011-02-28

    A new metallic atomization cell is used for trace metal determinations by tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry and tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. Different protecting gas mixtures are evaluated to improve atomic emission signals. Ar, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and He are used as solvents, and H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as solutes. A H{sub 2}/Ar mixture provided the best results. Parameters such as protecting gas flow rate and atomization current are also optimized. The optimal conditions are used to determine the figures of merit for both methods and the results are compared with values found in the literature. The new cell provides a better control of the radiation reaching the detector and a small, more isothermal environment around the atomizer. A more concentrated atomic cloud and a smaller background signal result in lower limits of detection using both methods. Cu (324.7 nm), Cd (228.8 nm) and Sn (286.3 nm) determined by tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry presented limits of detection as low as 0.6, 0.1, and 2.2 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. For Cr (425.4 nm), Eu (459.4 nm) and Sr (460.7 nm) determined by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry, limits of detection of 4.5, 2.5, and 0.1 {mu}g L{sup -1} were calculated. The method is used to determine Cu, Cd, Cr and Sr in a water standard reference material. Results for Cu, Cd and Cr presented no significant difference from reported values in a 95% confidence level. For Sr, a 113% recovery was obtained.

  11. Ionizing radiations, detection, dosimetry, spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, D.

    1997-10-01

    A few works in French language are devoted to the detection of radiations. The purpose of this book is to fill a gap.The five first chapters are devoted to the properties of ionizing radiations (x rays, gamma rays, leptons, hadrons, nuclei) and to their interactions with matter. The way of classification of detectors is delicate and is studied in the chapter six. In the chapter seven are studied the statistics laws for counting and the spectrometry of particles is treated. The chapters eight to thirteen study the problems of ionization: charges transport in a gas, ionization chambers (theory of Boag), counters and proportional chambers, counters with 'streamers', chambers with derive, spark detectors, ionization chambers in liquid medium, Geiger-Mueller counters. The use of a luminous signal is the object of the chapters 14 to 16: conversion of a luminous signal in an electric signal, scintillators, use of the Cerenkov radiation. Then, we find the neutron detection with the chapter seventeen and the dosimetry of particles in the chapter eighteen. This book does not pretend to answer to specialists questions but can be useful to physicians, engineers or physics teachers. (N.C.)

  12. Improved documentation of spectral lines for inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doidge, Peter S.

    2018-05-01

    An approach to improving the documentation of weak spectral lines falling near the prominent analytical lines used in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is described. Measurements of ICP emission spectra in the regions around several hundred prominent lines, using concentrated solutions (up to 1% w/v) of some 70 elements, and comparison of the observed spectra with both recent published work and with the output of a computer program that allows calculation of transitions between the known energy levels, show that major improvements can be made in the coverage of spectral atlases for ICP-OES, with respect to "classical" line tables. It is argued that the atomic spectral data (wavelengths, energy levels) required for the reliable identification and documentation of a large majority of the weak interfering lines of the elements detectable by ICP-OES now exist, except for most of the observed lines of the lanthanide elements. In support of this argument, examples are provided from a detailed analysis of a spectral window centered on the prominent Pb II 220.353 nm line, and from a selected line-rich spectrum (W). Shortcomings in existing analyses are illustrated with reference to selected spectral interferences due to Zr. This approach has been used to expand the spectral-line library used in commercial ICP-ES instruments (Agilent 700-ES/5100-ES). The precision of wavelength measurements is evaluated in terms of the shot-noise limit, while the absolute accuracy of wavelength measurement is characterised through comparison with a small set of precise Ritz wavelengths for Sb I, and illustrated through the identification of Zr III lines; it is further shown that fractional-pixel absolute wavelength accuracies can be achieved. Finally, problems with the wavelengths and classifications of certain Au I lines are discussed.

  13. A differential mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry platform for the rapid detection and quantitation of DNA adduct dG-ABP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Amol; Klaene, Joshua; Hall, Adam B; Glick, James; Coy, Stephen L; Vouros, Paul

    2013-07-15

    There is continued interest in exploring new analytical technologies for the detection and quantitation of DNA adducts, biomarkers which provide direct evidence of exposure and genetic damage in cells. With the goal of reducing clean-up steps and improving sample throughput, a Differential Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (DMS/MS) platform has been introduced for adduct analysis. A DMS/MS platform has been utilized for the analysis of dG-ABP, the deoxyguanosine adduct of the bladder carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP). After optimization of the DMS parameters, each sample was analyzed in just 30 s following a simple protein precipitation step of the digested DNA. A detection limit of one modification in 10^6 nucleosides has been achieved using only 2 µg of DNA. A brief comparison (quantitative and qualitative) with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry is also presented highlighting the advantages of using the DMS/MS method as a high-throughput platform. The data presented demonstrate the successful application of a DMS/MS/MS platform for the rapid quantitation of DNA adducts using, as a model analyte, the deoxyguanosine adduct of the bladder carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Multi-elemental analysis of aqueous geological samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Todor I.; Wolf, Ruth E.; Adams, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Typically, 27 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in natural waters, acid mine drainage, extraction fluids, and leachates of geological and environmental samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). At the discretion of the analyst, additional elements may be determined after suitable method modifications and performance data are established. Samples are preserved in 1–2 percent nitric acid (HNO3) at sample collection or as soon as possible after collection. The aqueous samples are aspirated into the ICP-OES discharge, where the elemental emission signals are measured simultaneously for 27 elements. Calibration is performed with a series of matrix-matched, multi-element solution standards.

  15. Semi-automated technique for the separation and determination of barium and strontium in surface waters by ion exchange chromatography and atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, F.D.; Brown, H.R.

    1977-01-01

    A semi-automated method for the separation and the analysis of barium and strontium in surface waters by atomic emission spectrometry is described. The method employs a semi-automated separation technique using ion exchange and an automated aspiration-analysis procedure. Forty specimens can be prepared in approximately 90 min and can be analyzed for barium and strontium content in 20 min. The detection limits and sensitivities provided by the described technique are 0.003 mg/l and 0.01 mg/l respectively for barium and 0.00045 mg/l and 0.003 mg/l respectively for strontium

  16. Selection of an analytical line for determining lithium in aluminum alloys by laser induced breakdown spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lednev, V.N.; Yakovlev, A.V.; Labutin, T.A.; Popov, A.M.; Zorov, N.B.

    2007-01-01

    Possibilities for determining lithium in aluminum alloys by laser spark spectrometry are studied. The optimum conditions for registering the emission signal of lithium at which the effect of the continuous background radiation of the laser plasma attains a minimum are found. The possibility of determining lithium by laser spark spectrometry using the spectral line at 610 nm is studied for the first time. A comparison of the detection limits and sensitivities of determining lithium by emission its lines at 610 and 671 nm has indicated the advisability of using the line 610 nm for the studied alloys. The detection limit calculated using the 3σ test was found to be 230 ppm (610 nm) and 870 ppm (671 nm) [ru

  17. Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES): Theoretical Introduction, General Aspects, and its Applications within the Framework of the Technofusion Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Rojo, A. B.; Gonzalez, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2013-01-01

    The demand by material research groups for the direct composition analysis of solids is increasing as a solution to the time-consuming problems and errors inherent to classical chemical analysis, where the attack and solubilisation of the starting material is mandatory, often producing the introduction of impurities and component loss of the initial matrix. From the existing solid analysis techniques the present work is focused on the Glow Discharge Emission Spectrometry (GDOES), a fast, simply-executed technique, for which quantitative, high resolution depth profile determination of any element in the periodic table can be performed with a high sensibility and detection limit. The theoretical concepts, the required instrumentation and the basic analytic applications are revised, giving especial attention to the issues related to the analysis of materials for fusion applications. Finally, a comparative study with a more advanced spectroscopic technique (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS)) is performed and the concomitance of both techniques to correct limitations such as the spatial resolution and the quantification of the analysis, important factors that are required in the chemical analysis of the complex materials used in Fusion, is addressed. (Author) 41 refs.

  18. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  19. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montaser, A.

    1993-01-01

    In this research, new high-temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. During the period January 1993--December 1993, emphasis was placed on (a) analytical investigations of atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasma (He ICP) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies; (b) simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources to predict their structure and fundamental and analytical properties without incurring the enormous cost of experimental studies; (c) spectrosopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high-temperature plasmas; (d) fundamental studies of He ICP discharges and argon-nitrogen plasma by high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometry; and (e) fundamental and analytical investigation of new, low-cost devices as sample introduction systems for atomic spectrometry and examination of new diagnostic techniques for probing aerosols. Only the most important achievements are included in this report to illustrate progress and obstacles. Detailed descriptions of the authors' investigations are outlined in the reprints and preprints that accompany this report. The technical progress expected next year is briefly described at the end of this report

  20. On-line system for preconcentration and determination of metals in vegetables by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Marcos A.; Santos, Walter N.L. dos; Lemos, Valfredo A.; Korn, Maria das Gracas A.; Ferreira, Sergio L.C.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel and lead in digested vegetable samples. The method involves solid-phase extraction of the metals using a minicolumn of Amberlite XAD-4 modified with dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and detection by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The elution of the metals from minicolumn was performed with 1.0 mol L -1 hydrochloric acid. Variables associated with flow preconcentration system performance, such as pH, buffer concentration, eluent concentration and sampling flow rate, were optimized. The developed procedure provides enrichment factors of 100, 72, 16, 91 and 53, for cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel and lead, respectively. Detection limits (3σ B ) were 0.02 (Cd), 0.23 (Cu), 0.58 (Cr), 0.060 (Ni) and 0.54 (Pb) μg L -1 . The procedure was applied for determination of metals in samples of guarana and cabbage. The accuracy of the method was checked by the analysis of a certified reference material (NIST 1571, Orchard leaves). Results found were in agreement with certified values

  1. Detection of sputtered molecular doubly charged anions: a comparison of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Golser, Robin; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2004-01-01

    The detection of small molecular dianions by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is compared. In SIMS, the existence of these dianions can be identified safely if the total mass number of the molecule is odd and the dianion is hence detected at a half-integral mass number. The occurrence of fragmentation processes which may interfere with this scheme, is illustrated by means of the energy spectra of singly and doubly charged negative cluster ions. As compared to SIMS, AMS can rely, in addition, on the break-up of molecular species in the stripping process: this allows to monitor the simultaneous arrival of several atomic constituents with a clear energetic pattern in coincidence at the detector. This feature is exemplified for the C 10 2- dianion

  2. Desalting by crystallization: detection of attomole biomolecules in picoliter buffers by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoyun; Xiong, Xingchuang; Wang, Song; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Sichun; Fang, Xiang; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-10-06

    Sensitive detection of biomolecules in small-volume samples by mass spectrometry is, in many cases, challenging because of the use of buffers to maintain the biological activities of proteins and cells. Here, we report a highly effective desalting method for picoliter samples. It was based on the spontaneous separation of biomolecules from salts during crystallization of the salts. After desalting, the biomolecules were deposited in the tip of the quartz pipet because of the evaporation of the solvent. Subsequent detection of the separated biomolecules was achieved using solvent assisted electric field induced desorption/ionization (SAEFIDI) coupled with mass spectrometry. It allowed for direct desorption/ionization of the biomolecules in situ from the tip of the pipet. The organic component in the assistant solvent inhibited the desorption/ionization of salts, thus assured successful detection of biomolecules. Proteins and peptides down to 50 amol were successfully detected using our method even if there were 3 × 10(5) folds more amount of salts in the sample. The concentration and ion species of the salts had little influence on the detection results.

  3. In-situ optical emission spectrometry during galvanostatic aluminum anodising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, D.; Van Overmeere, Q.; Santoro, R.; Proost, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report on the use of optical emission spectrometry (OES) for the online detection of changes in the Al concentration ejected in a 1.0 mol dm -3 sulphuric acid electrolyte during galvanostatic anodising of Al thin film substrates. The technique relies on the coupling of an Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometer to a specially designed electrochemical flow cell. This has allowed to correlate, for the first time, the kinetics of Al dissolution to well-established morphological changes related to porous anodic oxide formation and growth. A deconvolution algorithm was first developed in order to decompose the experimental ICP/OES signal into elementary distributions, each one characteristic for a specific kinetic regime. The highest dissolution rate systematically occurred during the first step, associated with barrier oxide formation. This is followed by a systematic decrease in the rate of Al dissolution during pore formation. During steady-state porous oxide growth, the Al dissolution rate increases again, but still remains below the level established during barrier oxide growth. In each of these three kinetic regimes, a linear variation of the Al dissolution rate with current density was observed in the range 0.5-5.0 mA cm -2 , with slope values of, respectively, 35 ± 2, 24 ± 2 and 28 ± 1 μg C -1 . Regarding the temporal transitions between the different regimes, a desynchronisation was observed between the kinetic (dissolution) and morphological transitions, the time offset going in opposite directions for barrier and steady-state porous oxide growth. Finally, using the measured Al dissolution rates, the current density dependence of the film formation efficiency for both porous and barrier oxide growth has been established.

  4. Bayesian Peptide Peak Detection for High Resolution TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianqiu; Zhou, Xiaobo; Wang, Honghui; Suffredini, Anthony; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Yufei; Wong, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of peptide ion peak detection for high resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) data. A novel Bayesian peptide ion peak detection method is proposed for TOF data with resolution of 10 000-15 000 full width at half-maximum (FWHW). MS spectra exhibit distinct characteristics at this resolution, which are captured in a novel parametric model. Based on the proposed parametric model, a Bayesian peak detection algorithm based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling is developed. The proposed algorithm is tested on both simulated and real datasets. The results show a significant improvement in detection performance over a commonly employed method. The results also agree with expert's visual inspection. Moreover, better detection consistency is achieved across MS datasets from patients with identical pathological condition.

  5. Trends in tungsten coil atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, George L.

    Renewed interest in electrothermal atomic spectrometric methods based on tungsten coil atomizers is a consequence of a world wide increasing demand for fast, inexpensive, sensitive, and portable analytical methods for trace analysis. In this work, tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry (WCAAS) and tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) are used to determine several different metals and even a non-metal at low levels in different samples. Improvements in instrumentation and new strategies to reduce matrix effects and background signals are presented. Investigation of the main factors affecting both WCAAS and WCAES analytical signals points to the importance of a reducing, high temperature gas phase in the processes leading to atomic cloud generation. Some more refractory elements such as V and Ti were determined for the first time by double tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (DWCAES). The higher temperatures provided by two atomizers in DWCAES also allowed the detection of Ag, Cu and Sn emission signals for the first time. Simultaneous determination of several elements by WCAES in relatively complex sample matrices was possible after a simple acid extraction. The results show the potential of this method as an alternative to more traditional, expensive methods for fast, more effective analyses and applications in the field. The development of a new metallic atomization cell is also presented. Lower limits of detection in both WCAAS and WCAES determinations were obtained due to factors such as better control of background signal, smaller, more isothermal system, with atomic cloud concentration at the optical path for a longer period of time. Tungsten coil-based methods are especially well suited to applications requiring low sample volume, low cost, sensitivity and portability. Both WCAAS and WCAES have great commercial potential in fields as diverse as archeology and industrial quality control. They are simple, inexpensive, effective

  6. Detection of Stimulants and Narcotics by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Sports Doping Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Brian D; Kucherova, Yulia; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Sports drug testing laboratories are required to detect several classes of compounds that are prohibited at all times, which include anabolic agents, peptide hormones, growth factors, beta-2 agonists, hormones and metabolic modulators, and diuretics/masking agents. Other classes of compounds such as stimulants, narcotics, cannabinoids, and glucocorticoids are also prohibited, but only when an athlete is in competition. A single class of compounds can contain a large number of prohibited substances and all of the compounds should be detected by the testing procedure. Since there are almost 70 stimulants on the prohibited list it can be a challenge to develop a single screening method that will optimally detect all the compounds. We describe a combined liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) testing method for detection of all the stimulants and narcotics on the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Urine for LC-MS/MS testing does not require sample pretreatment and is a direct dilute and shoot method. Urine samples for the GC-MS method require a liquid-liquid extraction followed by derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride.

  7. On-line preconcentration and determination of chromium in parenteral solutions by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, R.A.; Cerutti, S.; Gasquez, J.A.; Olsina, R.A.; Martinez, L.D.

    2005-01-01

    A method for the preconcentration and speciation of chromium was developed. On-line preconcentration and determination were obtained using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) coupled with flow injection. To determinate the chromium (III) present in parenteral solutions, chromium was retained on activated carbon at pH 5.0. On the other hand, a step of reduction was necessary in order to determine total chromium content. The Cr(VI) concentration was then determined by difference between the total chromium concentration and that of Cr(III). A sensitivity enrichment factor of 70-fold was obtained with respect to the chromium determination by ICP-OES without preconcentration. The detection limit for the preconcentration of 25 ml of sample was 29 ng l -1 . The precision for the 10 replicate determinations at the 5 μg l -1 Cr level was 2.3% relative standard deviation, calculated with the peak heights. The calibration graph using the preconcentration method for chromium species was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 60 μg l -1 . The method can be applied to the determination and speciation of chromium in parenteral solutions

  8. Simultaneous mass detection for direct inlet mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.L.

    1979-05-01

    The evolution of analytical techniques for application in trace analysis has led to interest in practical methods for real-time monitoring. Direct inlet mass spectrometry (DIMS) has been the subject of considerable activity in recent years. A DIMS instrument is described which consists of an inlet system designed to permit particles entrained in the inlet air stream to strike a hot, oxidized rhenium filament which serves as a surface ionization source. A mass analyzer and detection system then permits identification of the elemental composition of particulates which strike the filament

  9. A novel ion imager for secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuya; Miyata, Kenji; Nakamura, Tsutomu

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new area detector for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) ion microscope, and its performance. The operational principle is based on detecting the change in potential of a floating photodiode caused by the ion-induced secondary-electron emission and the incoming ion itself. The experiments demonstrated that 10 1 -10 5 aluminum ions per pixel can be detected with good linear response. Moreover, relative ion sensitivities from hydrogen to lead were constant within a factor of 2. The performance of this area detector provides the potential for detection of kiloelectronvolt ion images with current ion microscopy

  10. Inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry: trace elements in oil matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Charlie Albert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1977-12-01

    The simultaneous determination of up to 20 trace elements in various oil matrices by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry is reported. The oil matrices investigated were lubricating oils (for wear metals), fuel oil, centrifuged coal liquefaction product, crude soybean oil, and commercial edible oils. The samples were diluted with appropriate organic solvents and injected into the plasma as an aerosol generated by a pneumatic nebulization technique. Detection limits of the 28 elements studied ranged from 0.0006 to 9 μg/g with the majority falling in the 0.01 to 0.1 μg/g range. Analytical calibration curves were linear over at least two orders of magnitude and for some elements this linearity extended over 4.5 orders of magnitude. Relevant data on precision and accuracy are included. Because metals often occur as particles in lubricating oil and coal liquefaction products, the effect of particles on the analytical results was examined. Wear metal particles in used oil did not appear to affect the analytical results. However, incomplete recovery relative to organometallic reference solutions was obtained for iron particles with a nominal mean diameter of 3.0 μm suspended in oil. It was shown that the following factors contributed to incomplete recovery for the particles: settling of the suspended particles in the flask, a difference in nebulization efficiency between particle suspensions and organometallic solutions, and indications of incomplete vaporization of the larger particles in the plasma.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) single particle analysis of metallurgy plant emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, J; Deboudt, K; Anderson, A; Blondel, A; Eliet, S; Flament, P; Fourmentin, M; Healy, R M; Savary, V; Setyan, A; Wenger, J C

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition of single particles deposited on industrial filters located in three different chimneys of an iron-manganese (Fe-Mn) alloy manufacturing plant have been compared using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). Very similar types of particles were observed using both analytical techniques. Calcium-containing particles dominated in the firing area of the sintering unit, Mn and/or Al-bearing particles were observed at the cooling area of the sintering unit, while Mn-containing particles were dominant at the smelting unit. SEM-EDX analysis of particles collected downstream of the industrial filters showed that the composition of the particles emitted from the chimneys is very similar to those collected on the filters. ATOFMS analysis of ore samples was also performed to identify particulate emissions that could be generated by wind erosion and manual activities. Specific particle types have been identified for each emission source (chimneys and ore piles) and can be used as tracers for source apportionment of ambient PM measured in the vicinity of the industrial site. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lithium determination in whole blood by flame atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Khalid, N.; Nasimullah; Iqbal, M.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of lithium in whole blood using Flame atomic emission spectrometry is described. No sample preparation was required apart from dilution with 0.02 N HNO/sub 3/. The reliability of the method was determined by analyzing Standard Reference Material (SRM) under identical experimental conditions and comparing the determined lithium concentration with the reported value. These were in good agreement with each other. The determined range of lithium in the whole blood of fifty-six healthy adult volunteers (28 males and 28 females) were 13.1 - 47.8 mg L-1. The determined average concentration of lithium in whole blood was compared with the reported values of other countries. The data was statistically analyzed with respect to sex and different age groups. (author)

  13. REVIEW ARTICLE: Emission measurement techniques for advanced powertrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Masayuki

    2000-10-01

    Recent developments in high-efficiency low-emission powertrains require the emission measurement technologies to be able to detect regulated and unregulated compounds with very high sensitivity and a fast response. For example, levels of a variety of nitrogen compounds and sulphur compounds should be analysed in real time in order to develop aftertreatment systems to decrease emission of NOx for the lean burning powertrains. Also, real-time information on the emission of particulate matter for the transient operation of diesel engines and direct injection gasoline engines is invaluable. The present paper reviews newly introduced instrumentation for such emission measurement that is demanded for the developments in advanced powertrain systems. They include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and fast response flame ionization detection. In addition, demands and applications of the fuel reformer developments for fuel cell electric vehicles are discussed. Besides the detection methodologies, sample handling techniques for the measurement of concentrations emitted from low emission vehicles for which the concentrations of the pollutants are significantly lower than the concentrations present in ambient air, are also described.

  14. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Mann, Grace

    2010-12-28

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  15. Direct isotope ratio measurement of uranium metal by emission spectrometry on a laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, W.; Petit, A.; Briand, A.

    1995-01-01

    The method of Optical Emission Spectrometry on a Laser-Produced Plasma (OES/LPP) at reduced pressure has been studied for the determination of the uranium isotope ratio ( 235 U/ 238 U). Spectral profiles of the investigated transition U-II 424.437 nm show the possibility to obtain an isotopic spectral resolution in a laser-produced plasma under exactly defined experimental conditions. Spectroscopic data and results are presented. (author)

  16. Determination of trace elements in maifanite by outer cover electrode atomic emission spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jianqiang; LU Yiqiang; JIANG Wei

    2005-01-01

    Maifanite is a nature medicinal stone used in many fields for long time. The research on it showed that there are many trace elements in maifanite. In this paper, 36 trace elements in maifanite were determined by outer cover electrode atomic emission spectrometry, and the determination conditions were studied systematically. The results show that the concentrafions of elements, which are beneficial to human health, are higher, and the elements harmful to people health such as As, Cd, Hg, Cr, and Pb are tiny in maifanite. The precision and the accuracy were also discussed.

  17. Method for predicting peptide detection in mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Lars [West Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA; Petritis, Konstantinos [Richland, WA

    2010-07-13

    A method of predicting whether a peptide present in a biological sample will be detected by analysis with a mass spectrometer. The method uses at least one mass spectrometer to perform repeated analysis of a sample containing peptides from proteins with known amino acids. The method then generates a data set of peptides identified as contained within the sample by the repeated analysis. The method then calculates the probability that a specific peptide in the data set was detected in the repeated analysis. The method then creates a plurality of vectors, where each vector has a plurality of dimensions, and each dimension represents a property of one or more of the amino acids present in each peptide and adjacent peptides in the data set. Using these vectors, the method then generates an algorithm from the plurality of vectors and the calculated probabilities that specific peptides in the data set were detected in the repeated analysis. The algorithm is thus capable of calculating the probability that a hypothetical peptide represented as a vector will be detected by a mass spectrometry based proteomic platform, given that the peptide is present in a sample introduced into a mass spectrometer.

  18. Anti-theft device staining on banknotes detected by mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Deleon Nascimento; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Augusti, Rodinei; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Vendramini, Pedro Henrique

    2016-03-01

    We describe the identification and limits of detection of ink staining by mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), as used in anti-theft devices (ATDs). Such ink staining is applied to banknotes during automated teller machine (ATM) explosions. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) coupled with high-resolution and high-accuracy orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) and a moving stage device were applied to obtain 2D molecular images of the major dyes used for staining, that is, 1-methylaminoanthraquinone (MAAQ), rhodamine B (RB) and rhodamine 6G (R6G). MAAQ could not be detected because of its inefficient desorption by DESI from the banknote cellulose surface. By contrast, ATD staining on banknotes is perceptible by the human naked eye only at concentrations higher than 0.2 μg cm(-2), whereas both RB and R6G at concentrations 200 times lower (as low as 0.001 μg cm(-2)) could be easily detected and imaged by DESI-MSI, with selective and specific identification of each analyte and their spatial distribution on samples from suspects. This technique is non-destructive, and no sample preparation is required, which ensures sample preservation for further forensic investigations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Reliability of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spectrometry as alternative method for trace analysis of ... Purpose: To evaluate the comparative efficiency of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry .... Methods comparison and validation .... plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

  20. Detecting and Understanding Changing Arctic Carbon Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhwiler, L.

    2017-12-01

    Warming in the Arctic has proceeded faster than anyplace on Earth. Our current understanding of biogeochemistry suggests that we can expect feedbacks between climate and carbon in the Arctic. Changes in terrestrial fluxes of carbon can be expected as the Arctic warms, and the vast stores of organic carbon frozen in Arctic soils could be mobilized to the atmosphere, with possible significant impacts on global climate. Quantifying trends in Arctic carbon exchanges is important for policymaking because greater reductions in anthropogenic emissions may be required to meet climate goals. Observations of greenhouse gases in the Arctic and globally have been collected for several decades. Analysis of this data does not currently support significantly changed Arctic emissions of CH4, however it is difficult to detect changes in Arctic emissions because of transport from lower latitudes and large inter-annual variability. Unfortunately, current space-based remote sensing systems have limitations at Arctic latitudes. Modeling systems can help untangle the Arctic budget of greenhouse gases, but they are dependent on underlying prior fluxes, wetland distributions and global anthropogenic emissions. Also, atmospheric transport models may have significant biases and errors. For example, unrealistic near-surface stability can lead to underestimation of emissions in atmospheric inversions. We discuss our current understanding of the Arctic carbon budget from both top-down and bottom-up approaches. We show that current atmospheric inversions agree well on the CH4 budget. On the other hand, bottom-up models vary widely in their predictions of natural emissions, with some models predicting emissions too large to be accommodated by the budget implied by global observations. Large emissions from the shallow Arctic ocean are also inconsistent with atmospheric observations. We also discuss the sensitivity of the current atmospheric network to what is likely small, gradual increases in

  1. The microwave induced plasma with optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) in 23 elements determination in geological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, P; Kozak, L; Wachelka, M; Jakubowski, K; Wybieralska, J

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the optimisation, validation and application of the microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) dedicated for a routine determination of Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl, Zn, in the geological samples. The three procedures of sample preparation has been proposed: sample digestion with the use of hydrofluoric acid for determination of total concentration of elements, extraction by aqua regia for determination of the quasi-total element concentration and extraction by hydrochloric acid solution to determine contents of the elements in acid leachable fraction. The detection limits were on the level 0.001-0.121 mg L(-1) (from 0.010-0.10 to 1.2-12 mg kg(-1) depend on the samples preparation procedure); the precision: 0.20-1.37%; accuracy 85-115% (for recovery for certified standards materials analysis and parallel analysis by independent analytical techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS)). The conformity of the results obtained by MIP-OES analytical procedures with the results obtained by XRF and FAAS analysis allows to propose the procedures for studies of elemental composition of the fraction of the geological samples. Additionally, the MIP-OES technique is much less expensive than ICP techniques and much less time-consuming than AAS techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of Cr, Mn, Si, and Ni in carbon steels by optical emission spectrometry with spark source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Gonzalez, M.A.; Pomares Alfonso, M.; Mora Lopez, L.

    1995-01-01

    Elemental composition of steels determines some important of his characteristic moreover it is necessary to obtain their quality certification. Analytical procedure has performed for determination of Cr, Mn, Si and Ni in carbon steels by optical emission spectrometry with spark source. reproducibility of results is 5-11 %. Exactitude has tested with results that have obtained by internationally recognised methods-

  3. Rapid Detection of Ricin in Serum Based on Cu-Chelated Magnetic Beads Using Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-Qiang; Song, Jian; Wang, Hong-Li; Xu, Bin; Liu, Feng; He, Kun; Wang, Na

    2016-04-01

    The protein toxin ricin obtained from castor bean plant (Ricinus communis) seeds is a potent biological warfare agent due to its ease of availability and acute toxicity. In this study, we demonstrated a rapid and simple method to detect ricin in serum in vitro. The ricin was mixed with serum and digested by trypsin, then all the peptides were efficiently extracted using Cu-chelated magnetic beads and were detected with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The specific ricin peptides were identified by Nanoscale Ultra Performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry according to their sequences. The assay required 2.5 hours, and a characteristic peptide could be detected down to 4 ng/μl and used as a biomarker to detect ricin in serum. The high sensitivity and simplicity of the procedure makes it valuable in clinical practice.

  4. An intelligent detection method for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Yu, Jianwen; Ruan, Zhiming; Chen, Chilai; Chen, Ran; Wang, Han; Liu, Youjiang; Wang, Xiaozhi; Li, Shan

    2018-04-01

    In conventional high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry signal acquisition, multi-cycle detection is time consuming and limits somewhat the technique's scope for rapid field detection. In this study, a novel intelligent detection approach has been developed in which a threshold was set on the relative error of α parameters, which can eliminate unnecessary time spent on detection. In this method, two full-spectrum scans were made in advance to obtain the estimated compensation voltage at different dispersion voltages, resulting in a narrowing down of the whole scan area to just the peak area(s) of interest. This intelligent detection method can reduce the detection time to 5-10% of that of the original full-spectrum scan in a single cycle.

  5. Characterizing Methane Emissions at Local Scales with a 20 Year Total Hydrocarbon Time Series, Imaging Spectrometry, and Web Facilitated Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Eliza Swan

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas for which uncertainty in local emission strengths necessitates improved source characterizations. Although CH4 plume mapping did not motivate the NASA Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) design and municipal air quality monitoring stations were not intended for studying marine geological seepage, these assets have capabilities that can make them viable for studying concentrated (high flux, highly heterogeneous) CH4 sources, such as the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field (˜0.015 Tg CH4 yr-1) offshore Santa Barbara, California. Hourly total hydrocarbon (THC) data, spanning 1990 to 2008 from an air pollution station located near COP, were analyzed and showed geologic CH4 emissions as the dominant local source. A band ratio approach was developed and applied to high glint AVIRIS data over COP, resulting in local-scale mapping of natural atmospheric CH4 plumes. A Cluster-Tuned Matched Filter (CTMF) technique was applied to Gulf of Mexico AVIRIS data to detect CH4 venting from offshore platforms. Review of 744 platform-centered CTMF subsets was facilitated through a flexible PHP-based web portal. This dissertation demonstrates the value of investigating municipal air quality data and imaging spectrometry for gathering insight into concentrated methane source emissions and highlights how flexible web-based solutions can help facilitate remote sensing research.

  6. The research of sub-picogram plutonium's quantitative analysis by isotope mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lei; Long Kaiming; Yang Tianli; Liu Xuemei

    2005-10-01

    By using active carbon powder as emission matter, the detect sensitivity of 239 Pu was 0.5 pg (1 ± 0.15, 95% confidence level), improved 20 times compared with the sensitivity 10 pg (1 ± 0.5) of the tradition method. The sub-picogram plutonium sample was determined quantatively by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). (authors)

  7. Direct Detection of Biotinylated Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric strategies to identify protein subpopulations involved in specific biological functions rely on covalently tagging biotin to proteins using various chemical modification methods. The biotin tag is primarily used for enrichment of the targeted subpopulation for subsequent mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. A limitation of these strategies is that MS analysis does not easily discriminate unlabeled contaminants from the labeled protein subpopulation under study. To solve this problem, we developed a flexible method that only relies on direct MS detection of biotin-tagged proteins called “Direct Detection of Biotin-containing Tags” (DiDBiT). Compared with conventional targeted proteomic strategies, DiDBiT improves direct detection of biotinylated proteins ∼200 fold. We show that DiDBiT is applicable to several protein labeling protocols in cell culture and in vivo using cell permeable NHS-biotin and incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid, azidohomoalanine (AHA), into newly synthesized proteins, followed by click chemistry tagging with biotin. We demonstrate that DiDBiT improves the direct detection of biotin-tagged newly synthesized peptides more than 20-fold compared to conventional methods. With the increased sensitivity afforded by DiDBiT, we demonstrate the MS detection of newly synthesized proteins labeled in vivo in the rodent nervous system with unprecedented temporal resolution as short as 3 h. PMID:25117199

  8. Diamond for Actinide Traces Detection and Spectrometry in Liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomorski, Michal; Mer, Christine; Sanoit, Jacques-de; Tran, Thuan-Quang; Bergonzo, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    We describe here a new approach for the detection and identification of actinides (Am, Pu, Cm etc) at very low activity levels in aqueous solution. The measurement consists at first in the electro-precipitation of the actinides ions as insoluble hydroxides directly onto a boron doped nanocrystalline diamond (BNCD) electrode deposited on an α-particle detector (Si or Si-PIN diode), followed by α-particles detection using front-end nuclear electronics. After α-particles counting, spectrometry, the detector can be easily decontaminated using anodization in aqueous solution to be able to be reused at once. The detection limit of the described prototype system can be estimated as low as a few mBq=L (for one day counting) to several mBq=L for 5 h counting and currently achieved energy resolution amounts to ΔE FW HM /E α = 2.3% for pulse height spectra of 5.486 MeV α-particles emitted by 241 Am, measured directly in water. (authors)

  9. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  10. Prediction, Detection, and Validation of Isotope Clusters in Mass Spectrometry Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Treutler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a key analytical platform for metabolomics. The precise quantification and identification of small molecules is a prerequisite for elucidating the metabolism and the detection, validation, and evaluation of isotope clusters in LC-MS data is important for this task. Here, we present an approach for the improved detection of isotope clusters using chemical prior knowledge and the validation of detected isotope clusters depending on the substance mass using database statistics. We find remarkable improvements regarding the number of detected isotope clusters and are able to predict the correct molecular formula in the top three ranks in 92 % of the cases. We make our methodology freely available as part of the Bioconductor packages xcms version 1.50.0 and CAMERA version 1.30.0.

  11. Experimental evidence of state-selective charge transfer in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    State-selective charge-transfer behavior was observed for Fe, Cr, Mn and Cu in inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-atomic emission spectrometry. Charge transfer from Ar + to Fe, Cr and Mn is state-selective because of inefficient collisional mixing of the quasiresonant charge-transfer energy levels with nearby levels. This low efficiency is the consequence of differences in electronic configuration of the core electrons. The reason for state-selective charge-transfer behavior to Cu is not clear, although a tentative explanation based on efficiency of intramultiplet and intermultiplet mixing for this special case is offered

  12. Characterization of direct current He-N{sub 2} mixture plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, O.; Castillo, F.; Martinez, H. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Villa, M.; Reyes, P. G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Estado de México (Mexico); Villalobos, S. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    This study analyses the glow discharge of He and N{sub 2} mixture at the pressure of 2.0 Torr, power of 10 W, and flow rate of 16.5 l/min, by using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The emission bands were measured in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm. The principal species observed were N{sub 2}{sup +} (B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub u}→X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub g}), N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}Π{sub u}→B{sup 3}Π{sub g}), and He, which are in good agreement with the results of mass spectrometry. Besides, the electron temperature and ion density were determined by using a double Langmuir probe. Results indicate that the electron temperature is in the range of 1.55–2.93 eV, and the electron concentration is of the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The experimental results of electron temperature and ion density for pure N{sub 2} and pure He are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature.

  13. Partial microwave-assisted wet digestion of animal tissue using a baby-bottle sterilizer for analyte determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Wladiana O.; Menezes, Eveline A.; Gonzalez, Mario H.; Costa, Leticia M.; Trevizan, Lilian C.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.

    2009-01-01

    A procedure for partial digestion of bovine tissue is proposed using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) micro-vessels inside a baby-bottle sterilizer under microwave radiation for multi-element determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Samples were directly weighed in laboratory-made polytetrafluoroethylene vessels. Nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide were added to the uncovered vessels, which were positioned inside the baby-bottle sterilizer, containing 500 mL of water. The hydrogen peroxide volume was fixed at 100 μL. The system was placed in a domestic microwave oven and partial digestion was carried out for the determination of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The single-vessel approach was used in the entire procedure, to minimize contamination in trace analysis. Better recoveries and lower residual carbon content (RCC) levels were obtained under the conditions established through a 2 4-1 fractional factorial design: 650 W microwave power, 7 min digestion time, 50 μL nitric acid and 50 mg sample mass. The digestion efficiency was ascertained according to the residual carbon content determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was checked against two certified reference materials.

  14. Comparison of Cocaine Detections in Corona Discharge Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry and in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Seen; Kim, Yun Ki; Kim, Ok Bae; An, Seung Geon; Shin, Myung Won; Maeng, Seug Jin; Choi, Gyu Seop

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we determined the detection limit and reproducibility of the new IMS equipped with corona discharge ionization source using cocaine. The sample was injected with liquid solution to compare the results of APCI-MS. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was a technique originally applied for the detection of trace compounds. IMS has been widely used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives, and illegal drugs since it combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng/L range to pg/L range, ppb range and ppt range) and relatively low technical expenditure with high-speed data acquisition. The time required to acquire a single spectrum is in the range of several tens ms. The working principle is based on the drift of ions at ambient pressure under the influence of an external electric field

  15. Comparison of Cocaine Detections in Corona Discharge Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry and in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sung Seen; Kim, Yun Ki; Kim, Ok Bae [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Seung Geon; Shin, Myung Won; Maeng, Seug Jin; Choi, Gyu Seop [Wooju Communication and Technology Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    In this study, we determined the detection limit and reproducibility of the new IMS equipped with corona discharge ionization source using cocaine. The sample was injected with liquid solution to compare the results of APCI-MS. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was a technique originally applied for the detection of trace compounds. IMS has been widely used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives, and illegal drugs since it combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng/L range to pg/L range, ppb range and ppt range) and relatively low technical expenditure with high-speed data acquisition. The time required to acquire a single spectrum is in the range of several tens ms. The working principle is based on the drift of ions at ambient pressure under the influence of an external electric field.

  16. Detection of intact megadalton protein assemblies of vanillyl-alcohol oxidase by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel, van W.J.H.; Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Versluis, C.; Heck, A.

    2000-01-01

    Well-resolved ion signals of intact large protein assemblies, with molecular masses extending above one million Dalton, have been detected and mass analyzed using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with an uncertainty in mass of <0.2&Eth;The mass spectral data seem to reflect known

  17. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-10-15

    A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min(-1) Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl(2) reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4) mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml(-1) or 0.08 μg g(-1) in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg(-1), while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A mechanical nanomembrane detector for time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghoo; Qin, Hua; Scalf, Mark; Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M; Blick, Robert H

    2011-09-14

    We describe here a new principle for ion detection in time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry in which an impinging ion packet excites mechanical vibrations in a silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) nanomembrane. The nanomembrane oscillations are detected by means of time-varying field emission of electrons from the mechanically oscillating nanomembrane. Ion detection is demonstrated in the MALDI-TOF analysis of proteins varying in mass from 5729 (insulin) to 150,000 (Immunoglobulin G) daltons. The detector response agrees well with the predictions of a thermomechanical model in which the impinging ion packet causes a nonuniform temperature distribution in the nanomembrane, exciting both fundamental and higher order oscillations.

  19. Detection of Bacteriocins by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Natisha L.; Sporns, Peter; McMullen, Lynn M.

    1999-01-01

    The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the detection of bacteriocins was investigated. A 30-s water wash of the sample on the MALDI-TOF MS probe was effective in removing contaminants of the analyte. This method was used for rapid detection of nisin, pediocin, brochocin A and B, and enterocin A and B from culture supernatants and for detection of enterocin B throughout its purification.

  20. Diesel Engine Valve Clearance Detection Using Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Elamin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated, using experimental method, the suitability of acoustic emission (AE technique for the condition monitoring of diesel engine valve faults. The clearance fault was adjusted experimentally in an exhaust valve and successfully detected and diagnosed in a Ford FSD 425 four-cylinder, four-stroke, in-line OHV, direct injection diesel engine. The effect of faulty exhaust valve clearance on engine performance was monitored and the difference between the healthy and faulty engine was observed from the recorded AE signals. The measured results from this technique show that using only time domain and frequency domain analysis of acoustic emission signals can give a superior measure of engine condition. This concludes that acoustic emission is a powerful and reliable method of detection and diagnosis of the faults in diesel engines and this is considered to be a unique approach to condition monitoring of valve performance.

  1. Determination of the mineral compositions of in six beans by microwave digestion with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Q.; Yang, L.; Chen, S.; Liu, X.; Ma, X.

    2012-01-01

    In the study, microwave digestion procedure optimized was applied for digesting beans. Nineteen mineral element concentrations were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The result indicated detection limits for the 19 elements were less than 0.0998, and relative standard deviations were 1.01% - 5.02% for all the elements, and recoveries were 90.89% - 104.55% by adding standard recovery experiment. The study showed the beans selected were abundant in mineral element contents in human nutrition, determination mineral element contents by ICP-AES with microwave digestion technology were a lot of merits of small environmental pollution, fast and accurate determination result, which could satisfy the examination request of bean samples. The results provided evidence that the six beans were a good source of K, P, Mg and Ca. This study is to give important reference value to people due to individual differences by adjusting the dietary to complement the different mineral elements. (author)

  2. Sample Preprocessing For Atomic Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Tae

    2004-08-01

    This book gives descriptions of atomic spectrometry, which deals with atomic absorption spectrometry such as Maxwell-Boltzmann equation and Beer-Lambert law, atomic absorption spectrometry for solvent extraction, HGAAS, ETASS, and CVAAS and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer, such as basic principle, generative principle of plasma and device and equipment, and interferences, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry like device, pros and cons of ICP/MS, sample analysis, reagent, water, acid, flux, materials of experiments, sample and sampling and disassembling of sample and pollution and loss in open system and closed system.

  3. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulou, D.N.; Zachariadis, G.A.; Anthemidis, A.N.; Tsirliganis, N.C.; Stratis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level)

  4. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, D.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Zachariadis, G.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Anthemidis, A.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsirliganis, N.C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, Tsimiski 58, GR-67100, Xanthi (Greece); Stratis, J.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)]. E-mail: jstratis@chem.auth.gr

    2004-12-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level)

  5. Elemental analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Choi, Kwang Soon; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Lim, Jong Myoung; Kim, Young Jin; Quraishi, Shamshad Begum

    2003-05-01

    Elemental analyses for certified reference materials were carried out using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Five Certified Reference Materials (CRM) were selected for the study on comparative analysis of environmental samples. The CRM are Soil (NIST SRM 2709), Coal fly ash (NIST SRM 1633a), urban dust (NIST SRM 1649a) and air particulate on filter media (NIST SRM 2783 and human hair (GBW 09101)

  6. Non-polar lipids characterization of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization/mass spectrometry detection and non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanali, Chiara; Beccaria, Marco; Salivo, Simona; Tranchida, Peter; Tripodo, Giusy; Farnetti, Sara; Dugo, Laura; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-08

    A chemical characterization of major lipid components, namely, triacylglycerols, fatty acids and the unsaponifiable fraction, in a Quinoa seed lipids sample is reported. To tackle such a task, non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was employed. The latter was interfaced with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the analysis of triacylglycerols. The main triacylglycerols (>10%) were represented by OLP, OOL and OLL (P = palmitoyl, O = oleoyl, L = linoleoyl); the latter was present in the oil sample at the highest percentage (18.1%). Furthermore, fatty acid methyl esters were evaluated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. 89% of the total fatty acids was represented by unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters with the greatest percentage represented by linoleic and oleic acids accounting for approximately 48 and 28%, respectively. An extensive characterization of the unsaponifiable fraction of Quinoa seed lipids was performed for the first time, by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. Overall, 66 compounds of the unsaponifiable fraction were tentatively identified, many constituents of which (particularly sterols) were confirmed by using gas chromatography with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Determination of Ra-226 by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Lobo, A.

    1988-01-01

    This work deals with the method of determination of 226 Ra by low energy photon spectrometry. For this purpose, the interference due to 235 U, that emits a photon with a close energy, has to be considered. The contribution of 235 U to the 186 KeV photopeak is studied through the 63 KeV 234 Th and the 144 KeV 235 U emissions. From the minimum detectable activity of 226 Ra it is discussed the applicability of this method to several kind of samples. (Author)

  8. Physicochemical properties determining the detection probability of tryptic peptides in Fourier transform mass spectrometry. A correlation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael L; Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Sequence verification and mapping of posttranslational modifications require nearly 100% sequence coverage in the "bottom-up" protein analysis. Even in favorable cases, routine liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detects from protein digests peptides covering 50-90% of the sequence. Here we...... investigated the reasons for limited peptide detection, considering various physicochemical aspects of peptide behavior in liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS). No overall correlation was found between the detection probability and peptide mass. In agreement with literature data...... between pI and signal response. An explanation of this paradoxal behavior was found through the observation that more acidic tryptic peptide lengths tend to be longer. Longer peptides tend to acquire higher average charge state in positive mode electrospray ionization than more basic but shorter...

  9. Small sample analysis using sputter atomization/resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, W.H.; Goeringer, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    We have used secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to investigate the emission of ions via argon sputtering from U metal, UO 2 , and U 3 O 8 samples. We have also used laser resonance ionization techniques to study argon-sputtered neutral atoms and molecules emitted from these same samples. For the case of U metal, a significant enhancement in detection sensitivity for U is obtained via SA/RIMS. For U in the fully oxidized form (U 3 O 8 ), SA/RIMS offers no improvement in U detection sensitivity over conventional SIMS when sputtering with argon. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. Measurement of electro-sprayed 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes using 4π-alpha spectrometry. Application to environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmoille-Roblot, M.

    1999-01-01

    A new protocol for plutonium deposition using the electro-spray technique coupled with 4π-α spectrometry is proposed to improve the detection limit, shorten the counting time. In order to increase the detection efficiency, it was proposed to measure 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes electro-sprayed deposit simultaneously on both sides of the source support, that must be as transparent as possible to alpha-emissions, in a two-alpha detectors chamber. A radiochemical protocol was adapted to electro-spray constraints and a very thin carbon foil was selected for 4π -alpha spectrometry. The method was applied to a batch of sediment samples and gave the same results as an electrodeposited source measured using conventional alpha spectrometry with a 25 % gain on counting time and 10 % on plutonium 238 detection limit. Validation and application of the technique have been made on reference samples. (author)

  11. Comparison of public peak detection algorithms for MALDI mass spectrometry data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; He, Zengyou; Yu, Weichuan

    2009-01-06

    In mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomic data analysis, peak detection is an essential step for subsequent analysis. Recently, there has been significant progress in the development of various peak detection algorithms. However, neither a comprehensive survey nor an experimental comparison of these algorithms is yet available. The main objective of this paper is to provide such a survey and to compare the performance of single spectrum based peak detection methods. In general, we can decompose a peak detection procedure into three consequent parts: smoothing, baseline correction and peak finding. We first categorize existing peak detection algorithms according to the techniques used in different phases. Such a categorization reveals the differences and similarities among existing peak detection algorithms. Then, we choose five typical peak detection algorithms to conduct a comprehensive experimental study using both simulation data and real MALDI MS data. The results of comparison show that the continuous wavelet-based algorithm provides the best average performance.

  12. Efficient high-resolution X-ray emission spectrometry using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unterumsberger, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to get access to high-resolution X-Ray Emission Spectrometry (XES) at nanoscaled materials, consisting of light elements and transition metals, by the increase of the sensitivity of a Wavelength-Dispersive Spectrometer (WDS) in the soft X-Ray range. The increase of the sensitivity was achieved by a refocusing of the incident radiation. With the increased sensitivity of the WDS, it was possible to determine the chemical species of different, nominal 100 nm thin titanium oxides. The combination of the refocusing optic and calibrated spectrometer enabled the detection and deconvolution of the L-fluorescence radiation of these nanoscaled titanium oxides. Due to the calibration of the spectrometer, a reliable determination of the transition probabilities of the titanium La- and Ll-fluorescence lines as a function of the chemical state is possible. To the best of my knowledge, the determination of the transition probabilities as a function of the chemical state in the soft X-Ray range has not been investigated yet. The quality of the refocusing was characterized using different diagnostic tools. Vertical full width at half maximum (FWHM) values of the focused beam between 10 μm to 20 μm and horizontal FWHM values between 12 μm and 25 μm could be achieved over an energy range of 180 eV to 1310 eV. Using calibrated photodiodes, it was possible to determine the absolute transmission of the used single bounce monocapillary as well as to monitor the absolute photon flux. By means of the refocusing, it was possible to increase the photon flux by a factor of 4.9 experimentally. The increase of the photon flux enables the analysis of nanoscaled materials with the used spectrometer. This could be shown based on the determination of the lower limit of detection of boron Ka and titanium La. In both cases, the lower limit of detection of 0.4 nm equivalent layer thickness was achieved (about 1.10 -7 g/cm 2 to 2.10 -7 g/cm 2 or 3.10 15 atoms/cm 2 to

  13. X-ray fluorescence analysis and optical emission spectrometry of an roman mirror from Tomis, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belc, M.; Bogoi, M.; Ionescu, D.; Guita, D.; Caiteanu, S.; Caiteanu, D.

    2000-01-01

    The miscellaneous population of Roman Empire, their diverse cultural tradition, their ability to assimilate the roman civilization spirits, had determined a permanent reassessment superimposed upon the roman contribution. Analysis was undertaken using optical emission spectrometry and non-destructive X-ray fluorescence. X-ray fluorescence analysis is a well-established method and is often used in archaeometry and other work dealing with valuable objects pertaining to the history of art and civilization. Roman mirror analysed has been found not to be made of speculum (a high tin bronze). (authors)

  14. The detectability of radio emission from exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C. R.; Murphy, Tara; Lenc, E.; Kaplan, D. L.

    2018-05-01

    Like the magnetised planets in our Solar System, magnetised exoplanets should emit strongly at radio wavelengths. Radio emission directly traces the planetary magnetic fields and radio detections can place constraints on the physical parameters of these features. Large comparative studies of predicted radio emission characteristics for the known population of exoplanets help to identify what physical parameters could be key for producing bright, observable radio emission. Since the last comparative study, many thousands of exoplanets have been discovered. We report new estimates for the radio flux densities and maximum emission frequencies for the current population of known exoplanets orbiting pre-main sequence and main-sequence stars with spectral types F-M. The set of exoplanets predicted to produce observable radio emission are Hot Jupiters orbiting young stars. The youth of these system predicts strong stellar magnetic fields and/or dense winds, which are key for producing bright, observable radio emission. We use a new all-sky circular polarisation Murchison Widefield Array survey to place sensitive limits on 200 MHz emission from exoplanets, with 3σ values ranging from 4.0 - 45.0 mJy. Using a targeted Giant Metre Wave Radio Telescope observing campaign, we also report a 3σ upper limit of 4.5 mJy on the radio emission from V830 Tau b, the first Hot Jupiter to be discovered orbiting a pre-main sequence star. Our limit is the first to be reported for the low-frequency radio emission from this source.

  15. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  16. Cosmic ray radio emission as air shower detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curutiu, Alexandru; Rusu, Mircea; Isar, Gina; Zgura, Sorin

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of radio-detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (within the 10 to 100 MHz range) are discussed. Currently, air showers are detected by various methods, mainly based on particle detectors (KASCADE, Auger) or optical detection (Cerenkov radiation). Recently,to detect radio emission from cosmic ray air showers a method using electromagnetic radiation in low frequency domain (LOFAR) was proposed. We are investigating this possibility, using simulation codes created to investigate electromagnetic radiation of intricate antennae structure, for example fractal antennas. Some of the preliminary results will be communicated in this session. (authors)

  17. Chemical characterization of freshly emitted particulate matter from aircraft exhaust using single particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegglen, Manuel; Brem, B. T.; Ellenrieder, M.; Durdina, L.; Rindlisbacher, T.; Wang, J.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.

    2016-06-01

    Non-volatile aircraft engine emissions are an important anthropogenic source of soot particles in the upper troposphere and in the vicinity of airports. They influence climate and contribute to global warming. In addition, they impact air quality and thus human health and the environment. The chemical composition of non-volatile particulate matter emission from aircraft engines was investigated using single particle time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The exhaust from three different aircraft engines was sampled and analyzed. The soot particulate matter was sampled directly behind the turbine in a test cell at Zurich Airport. Single particle analyses will focus on metallic compounds. The particles analyzed herein represent a subset of the emissions composed of the largest particles with a mobility diameter >100 nm due to instrumental restrictions. A vast majority of the analyzed particles was shown to contain elemental carbon, and depending on the engine and the applied thrust the elemental carbon to total carbon ratio ranged from 83% to 99%. The detected metallic compounds were all internally mixed with the soot particles. The most abundant metals in the exhaust were Cr, Fe, Mo, Na, Ca and Al; V, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Mg, Mn, Si, Ti and Zr were also detected. We further investigated potential sources of the ATOFMS-detected metallic compounds using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The potential sources considered were kerosene, engine lubrication oil and abrasion from engine wearing components. An unambiguous source apportionment was not possible because most metallic compounds were detected in several of the analyzed sources.

  18. Detection of ductile crack initiation by acoustic emission testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.; Boehmert, J.; Viehrig, H.W.

    1998-08-01

    A Charpy impact test equipment is described permitting simultaneous measurement of impact force, crack tip opening, acoustic emissions and magnetic emissions. The core of the equipment is an inverted pendulum ram impact testing machine and the tests have been performed with laterally notched, pre-fatigue ISO-V specimens made of steels of various strength and toughness properties. The tests are intended to ascertain whether the acoustic emission method is suitable for detecting steady crack initiation in highly ductile steels. (orig./CB) [de

  19. Flagging and correcting non-spectral matrix interferences with spatial emission profiles and gradient dilution in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix interference remains one of the most daunting challenges commonly encountered in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In the present study, a method is described that enables identification and correction of matrix interferences in axial-viewed ICP-AES through a combination of spatial mapping and on-line gradient dilution. Cross-sectional emission maps of the plasma are used to indicate the presence of non-spectral (plasma-related and sample-introduction-related) matrix interferences. In particular, apparent concentrations of an analyte species determined at various radial locations in the plasma differ in the presence of a matrix interference, which allows the interference to be flagged. To correct for the interference, progressive, on-line dilution of the sample, performed by a gradient high-performance liquid-chromatograph pump, is utilized. The spatially dependent intensities of analyte emission are monitored at different levels of sample dilution. As the dilution proceeds, the matrix-induced signal variation is reduced. At a dilution where the determined concentrations become independent of location in the plasma, the matrix interference is minimized. - Highlights: • Non-spectral matrix interference in ICP-AES is flagged and minimized. • Emission from different locations of the plasma are collected simultaneously. • Spatially dependent determined concentrations indicate the presence of interference. • Gradient dilution is performed on both calibration standards and sample. • Optimal dilution factor to minimize interference is found as dilution increases

  20. Flagging and correcting non-spectral matrix interferences with spatial emission profiles and gradient dilution in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M., E-mail: hieftje@indiana.edu

    2015-08-01

    Matrix interference remains one of the most daunting challenges commonly encountered in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In the present study, a method is described that enables identification and correction of matrix interferences in axial-viewed ICP-AES through a combination of spatial mapping and on-line gradient dilution. Cross-sectional emission maps of the plasma are used to indicate the presence of non-spectral (plasma-related and sample-introduction-related) matrix interferences. In particular, apparent concentrations of an analyte species determined at various radial locations in the plasma differ in the presence of a matrix interference, which allows the interference to be flagged. To correct for the interference, progressive, on-line dilution of the sample, performed by a gradient high-performance liquid-chromatograph pump, is utilized. The spatially dependent intensities of analyte emission are monitored at different levels of sample dilution. As the dilution proceeds, the matrix-induced signal variation is reduced. At a dilution where the determined concentrations become independent of location in the plasma, the matrix interference is minimized. - Highlights: • Non-spectral matrix interference in ICP-AES is flagged and minimized. • Emission from different locations of the plasma are collected simultaneously. • Spatially dependent determined concentrations indicate the presence of interference. • Gradient dilution is performed on both calibration standards and sample. • Optimal dilution factor to minimize interference is found as dilution increases.

  1. Rapid and High-Throughput Detection and Quantitation of Radiation Biomarkers in Human and Nonhuman Primates by Differential Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhidan; Coy, Stephen L.; Pannkuk, Evan L.; Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Hall, Adam B.; Fornace, Albert J.; Vouros, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Radiation exposure is an important public health issue due to a range of accidental and intentional threats. Prompt and effective large-scale screening and appropriate use of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate radiation injury requires rapid methods for determining the radiation dose. In a number of studies, metabolomics has identified small-molecule biomarkers responding to the radiation dose. Differential mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) has been used for similar compounds for high-throughput small-molecule detection and quantitation. In this study, we show that DMS-MS can detect and quantify two radiation biomarkers, trimethyl-L-lysine (TML) and hypoxanthine. Hypoxanthine is a human and nonhuman primate (NHP) radiation biomarker and metabolic intermediate, whereas TML is a radiation biomarker in humans but not in NHP, which is involved in carnitine synthesis. They have been analyzed by DMS-MS from urine samples after a simple strong cation exchange-solid phase extraction (SCX-SPE). The dramatic suppression of background and chemical noise provided by DMS-MS results in an approximately 10-fold reduction in time, including sample pretreatment time, compared with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). DMS-MS quantitation accuracy has been verified by validation testing for each biomarker. Human samples are not yet available, but for hypoxanthine, selected NHP urine samples (pre- and 7-d-post 10 Gy exposure) were analyzed, resulting in a mean change in concentration essentially identical to that obtained by LC-MS (fold-change 2.76 versus 2.59). These results confirm the potential of DMS-MS for field or clinical first-level rapid screening for radiation exposure.

  2. Urinary detection of conjugated and unconjugated anabolic steroids by dilute-and-shoot liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, Eva; Deventer, Koen; Geldof, Lore; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are an important class of doping agents. The metabolism of these substances is generally very extensive and includes phase-I and phase-II pathways. In this work, a comprehensive detection of these metabolites is described using a 2-fold dilution of urine and subsequent analysis by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The method was applied to study 32 different metabolites, excreted free or conjugated (glucuronide or sulfate), which permit the detection of misuse of at least 21 anabolic steroids. The method has been fully validated for 21 target compounds (8 glucuronide, 1 sulfate and 12 free steroids) and 18 out of 21 compounds had detection limits in the range of 1-10 ng mL(-1) in urine. For the conjugated compounds, for which no reference standards are available, metabolites were synthesized in vitro or excretion studies were investigated. The detection limits for these compounds ranged between 0.5 and 18 ng mL(-1) in urine. The simple and straightforward methodology complements the traditional methods based on hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The Diagnosis of Plasma Parameters in Surface Alloying Technique by Optical Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yabo; Zhang Yuefei; Chen Qiang; Zhang Guangqiu; Gao Yuan; Wang Jianzhong; Kui Xiaoyun

    2006-01-01

    Electron density (Ne) in a glow discharge plasma for the surface alloying technique is diagnosed by optical emission spectrometry (OES). With CH 4 as the feeding gas, Ne is obtained by comparing the Hβ spectrum according to the Stark broadening effect. It is noticed that Ne varies with the working pressures (30 Pa to 70 Pa) and cathode voltages (500 V to 1000 V), respectively. Due to an abnormal glow discharge, Ne is between 1.71x10 15 /cm 3 to 6.64x10 15 /cm 3 and increases rapidly with working gas pressures and cathode voltages. The results show that OES is a useful method to measure the plasma parameters in a surface alloying glow discharge plasma

  4. Comparison of ultra-violet and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry for the on-line quantification of selenium species after their separation by reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsopelas, Fotios N.; Ochsenkuehn-Petropoulou, Maria Th.; Mergias, Ioannis G.; Tsakanika, Lambrini V.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical approach for selenium speciation using liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with ultra-violet (UV) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was developed. The separation of the investigated selenium species, selenites, selenates, selenomethionine, selenocystine, selenocystamine and dimethyldiselenide was accomplished in less than 6 min on a BIO Wide Pore RP-18 column using sodium salt of n-octanesulfonic acid as ion-pairing modifier. The on-line detection of the separated selenium species was performed using UV spectrometry at the optimum wavelength of 192 nm, obtained by the UV spectra of the investigated individual selenium species. ICP-AES was also used as element specific on-line detector, after its coupling with the chromatographic system. The UV and ICP-AES detectors were compared for their suitability, including sensitivity and detection limits, for the on-line quantification of the six selenium species. The developed LC-UV as well as LC-ICP-AES techniques were successfully applied to a selenized yeast candidate reference material, after its enzymatic extraction with protease XIV. It was found that the described LC-UV technique is suitable for the determination of selenomethionine, the main selenium compound in the yeast, with an accuracy of 5%, although the UV detector is not element specific and it is rarely used for selenium speciation. This finding can prove valuable for routine laboratories to perform selenium speciation in such materials

  5. Possibilities of High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry in the Determination of Trace Elements in Environmental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaya Velitchkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new quantitative data for the spectral interferences obtained by high resolution 40.68 MHz radial viewing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (HR-ICP-OES in the determination of Zn, Cd, Sb, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sn, Cr, U, and Ba in environmental materials in the presence of a complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Ti. The -concept for quantification of spectral interferences was used. The optimum line selection for trace analysis of a variety of multicomponent matrices requires the choice of prominent lines, which are free or negligibly influenced by line interference problems. The versatility of -concept as basic methodology was experimentally demonstrated in the determination of trace of elements in soil and drinking water. The detection limits are lower in comparison with corresponding threshold concentration levels for soil and drinking water in accordance with environmental regulations. This paper shows the possibilities of present day ICP-OES equipment in the direct determination of trace elements (without preconcentration of impurities in environmental samples.

  6. Improved sensitivity using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for detection of propyl chloroformate derivatised β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in cyanobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Esterhuizen-Londt, M; Downing, S; Downing, TG

    2011-01-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a difficult molecule to detect, primarily due to its presence in low concentrations in complex matrices. This has resulted in contradictory reports on the presence of BMAA in cyanobacteria. We report improved sensitivity of detection using propyl chloroformate derivatisation, liquid chromatographic (LC) separation, and single quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS) detection. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to confirm the identity of BMAA in ...

  7. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  8. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) single particle analysis of metallurgy plant emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, J.; Deboudt, K.; Anderson, A.; Blondel, A.; Eliet, S.; Flament, P.; Fourmentin, M.; Healy, R.M.; Savary, V.; Setyan, A.; Wenger, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of single particles deposited on industrial filters located in three different chimneys of an iron-manganese (Fe–Mn) alloy manufacturing plant have been compared using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) and scanning electron microscopy–energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). Very similar types of particles were observed using both analytical techniques. Calcium-containing particles dominated in the firing area of the sintering unit, Mn and/or Al-bearing particles were observed at the cooling area of the sintering unit, while Mn-containing particles were dominant at the smelting unit. SEM-EDX analysis of particles collected downstream of the industrial filters showed that the composition of the particles emitted from the chimneys is very similar to those collected on the filters. ATOFMS analysis of ore samples was also performed to identify particulate emissions that could be generated by wind erosion and manual activities. Specific particle types have been identified for each emission source (chimneys and ore piles) and can be used as tracers for source apportionment of ambient PM measured in the vicinity of the industrial site. - Highlights: • Similar composition for emitted particles as those collected on the chimney filters. • Emitted particles dominated by Ca-, Mn and/or Al-containing particles. • Identification of specific particle types emitted by the different process units. - The particles emitted by metallurgy activities are fully described by ATOFMS and SEM-EDX, enabling the identification of specific particle types from the different units of the process.

  9. Properties, performance and emissions of biofuels in blends with gasoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Farshad

    The emission performance of fuels and their blends in modern combustion systems have been studied with the purpose of reducing regulated and unregulated emissions, understanding of exhaust products of fuels such as gasoline, ethanol and 2,5-dimethylfuran and comparison of results. A quantitative analysis of individual hydrocarbon species from exhaust emissions of these three fuels were carried out with direct injects spark ignition (DISI) single cylinder engine. The analysis of hydrocarbon species were obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) connected on-line to SI engine. During this project, novel works have been done including the set up of on-line exhaust emission measurement device for detection and quantification of individual volatile hydrocarbons. Setting of a reliable gas chromatography mass spectrometry measurement system required definition and development of a precise method. Lubricity characteristics of biofuels and gasoline were investigated using High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR). Results showed great enhancing lubricity characteristics of biofuels when added to conventional gasoline. 2,5-dimenthylfuran was found to be the best among the fuels used, addition of this fuel to gasoline also showed better result compared with ethanol addition.

  10. Working with Detection Limits in X-Ray and Nuclear Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Espen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text: Detection limits are important in many measurement procedures. Especially in analytical work we often need to take a decision about the presence or absence of a compound, or we need to guarantee that or instrument can detect the compound. Especially in regulatory work the concept of detection limits plays a crucial role. Data acquisition in x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry is done by counting events for a preset time; hence the fluctuations in the observed spectra are governed by Poisson (counting) statistics. This makes the calculation of detection limits in principle very easy. However it is observed that there exists a great deal of confusion concerning the definition(s) and especially concerning the practical calculation and reporting of detection limits. In this contribution a simple but rigorous treatment of the concept of detection limits will be given, emphasizing on aspects such as a-priori and a-posterior i limits and on the effect of sample blank and instrumental blank in the calculation of the true detection limit. The problem of near zero background as observed in e.g. total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis (T-XRF) and some low level counting applications will also be discussed. In this case Poisson statistics might not be applicable, affecting the decision limits with respect to the presence of absence of a signal. Finally handling data sets that contain detection limit values next to normal measured values, the so called problem of missing data will be discussed. Some suggestions to deal with this frequently occurring situation will be given

  11. Spectral interferences in atomic absorption spectrometry, (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daidoji, Hidehiro

    1979-01-01

    Spectral interferences were observed in trace element analysis of concentrated solutions by atomic absorption spectrometry. Molecular absorption and emission spectra for strontium chloride and nitrate, barium chloride and nitrate containing 12 mg/ml of metal ion in airacetylene flame were measured in the wavelength range from 200 to 700 nm. The absorption and emission spectra of SrO were centered near 364.6 nm. The absorption spectra of SrOH around 606.0, 671.0 and 682.0 nm were very strong. And, emission spectrum of BaOH in the wavelength range from 480 to 550 nm was stronger. But, the absorption of this band spectrum was very weak. In the wavelength range from 200 to 400 nm, some unknown bands of absorption were observed for strontium and barium. Absorption spectra of SrCl and BaCl were observed in the argon-hydrogen flame. Also, in the carbon tube atomizer, the absorption spectra of SrCl and BaCl were detected clearly in the wavelength range from 185 to 400 nm. (author)

  12. Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2006-06-01

    A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

  13. Deuterium measurement by emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, E.G.; Heilig, K.; Dumke, I.

    1978-01-01

    The method makes it possible to determine the relative deuterium content of enriched water samples. For this, the relative intensities of the Hα and Dα lines are measured which are emitted by a high-frequency discharge in water vapour. Although the method is not as exact as mass spectrometry, it has the following advantages: - Easy sample preparation (no reduction necessary); - samples of highly different enrichment can be measured one after the other without the danger of memory effects; - much lower apparatus and cost expenditure. The necessary sample size is about the same in both methods. (orig.) [de

  14. Virtual Prototyping for Construction Site Co2 Emissions and Hazard Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Kwok Wai Wong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The need for an efficient means of managing emissions and identifying potential hazard black spots in construction processes effectively and at the lowest cost possible has been highlighted in the construction sector. This study illustrates an integrated 5D model developed for quantifying carbon emissions and simulating the pattern of emissions of construction processes as a whole using virtual prototyping technologies. The predicted construction emissions data for each activity is generated and plotted to visually demonstrate the emission rates alongside the integrated four-dimensional VP framework of the construction project. The model also consists of a pro-active construction management system (PCMS, which assist the project team to detect sources of danger to on-site workers and provide pro-active warnings to them so as to avoid fatal accidents that are often caused by falling from heights and being struck by moving objects. A Hong Kong high-rise housing development project is used to exhibit the application of the carbon emission visualisation and potential accident detection system. This tool aims to encourage construction industry practitioners to become more environmentally conscious and pro-active in carbon mitigation and safety performance.

  15. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Ponta, Michaela; Hategan, Raluca

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94-106% in atomic absorption and 97-103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6-5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9-6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference between the two spectrometric

  16. Detection of trace organics in Mars analog samples containing perchlorate by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Danell, Ryan M; Brinckerhoff, William B; Pinnick, Veronica T; van Amerom, Friso; Arevalo, Ricardo D; Getty, Stephanie A; Mahaffy, Paul R; Steininger, Harald; Goesmann, Fred

    2015-02-01

    Evidence from recent Mars missions indicates the presence of perchlorate salts up to 1 wt % level in the near-surface materials. Mixed perchlorates and other oxychlorine species may complicate the detection of organic molecules in bulk martian samples when using pyrolysis techniques. To address this analytical challenge, we report here results of laboratory measurements with laser desorption mass spectrometry, including analyses performed on both commercial and Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) breadboard instruments. We demonstrate that the detection of nonvolatile organics in selected spiked mineral-matrix materials by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry is not inhibited by the presence of up to 1 wt % perchlorate salt. The organics in the sample are not significantly degraded or combusted in the LDI process, and the parent molecular ion is retained in the mass spectrum. The LDI technique provides distinct potential benefits for the detection of organics in situ on the martian surface and has the potential to aid in the search for signs of life on Mars.

  17. Detection of 59Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Freimann, K.; Hellborg, R.; Stenstroem, K.; Larsson, Ragnar; Skog, G.

    1999-02-01

    The aims of this project were to develop a method to measure the amount of 59 Ni in stainless steel and to determine the detection limit for this method. 59 Ni is produced by neutron activation in the construction material close to the core in a nuclear reactor and it is important to know the amount of 59 Ni present as it governs the classification of the waste. If the amount of 59 Ni is known at different locations in relation to the core, it is also possible to refine the calculation models of the neutron flux in the reactor. Accelerator mass spectrometry, an ultra-sensitive method for measuring small concentrations of radionuclides as well as stable nuclides, has been used in this investigation to determine the concentration of 59 Ni (and thereby the activity) in stainless steel. As the cobalt content in stainless steel is the main contributor to the background in a measurement of 59 Ni, a method for the chemical extraction of nickel from stainless steel, including a purification step to reduce the cobalt content in the sample, has been developed. The detection limit for 59 Ni has been determined to 100±30 Bq per gram nickel (100±30 Bq/g) with the present status of the system

  18. Measurement of electro-sprayed 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes using 4{pi}-alpha spectrometry. Application to environmental samples; Spectrometrie alpha 4{pi} de sources d'actinides realisees par electronebulisation. Developpement et optimisation d'un protocole applique au mesurage des isotopes 238 et 239+240 du plutonium dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charmoille-Roblot, M. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dept. de Protection de l' Environnement (DPRE), 92 (France)]|[Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-07-01

    A new protocol for plutonium deposition using the electro-spray technique coupled with 4{pi}-{alpha} spectrometry is proposed to improve the detection limit, shorten the counting time. In order to increase the detection efficiency, it was proposed to measure 238 and 239+240 plutonium isotopes electro-sprayed deposit simultaneously on both sides of the source support, that must be as transparent as possible to alpha-emissions, in a two-alpha detectors chamber. A radiochemical protocol was adapted to electro-spray constraints and a very thin carbon foil was selected for 4{pi} -alpha spectrometry. The method was applied to a batch of sediment samples and gave the same results as an electrodeposited source measured using conventional alpha spectrometry with a 25 % gain on counting time and 10 % on plutonium 238 detection limit. Validation and application of the technique have been made on reference samples. (author)

  19. Determination of Pb in river water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation with manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa Bispo, Marcia; Santos da Boa Morte, Elane; Korn das Gracas Andrade, Maria; Sena Gomes Teixeira, Leonardo; Korn, Mauro; Costa, Antonio Celso Spinola

    2005-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for separation and pre-concentration using ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation with manganese dioxide was developed for Pb determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). The optimization process was carried out using a two-level factorial design and a Doehlert matrix. Three variables (i.e. concentration of oxidizing solution-KMnO 4 , concentration of MnSO 4 solution and time of ultrasonic irradiation) were used as factors in the optimization. The recoveries, based on the analysis of spiked samples, were between 90% and 105%, and the precision was ≤ 5%. The detection limit and quantification limit for Pb determination were 3.2 and 10.7 μg L -1 , respectively. The proposed method was applied for the determination of Pb in water samples from a river heavily polluted by industrial effluents. The recovery measured by analyte addition technique showed that the proposed pre-concentration method had good accuracy

  20. Curve resolution and figures of merit estimation for determination of trace elements in geological materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorber, A.; Harel, A.; Goldbart, Z.; Brenner, I.B.

    1987-01-01

    In geochemical analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), spectral interferences and background enhancement in response to sample concomitants are the main cause of deterioration of the limit of detection (LOD) and inaccuracy of the determination at the trace and minor element levels. In this account, the authors describe the chemometric procedure of curve resolution for compensating for these sources of error. A newly developed method for calculating figures of merit is used to evaluate the correction procedure, test the statistical significance of the determined concentration, and determine LODs for each sample. The technique involves scanning the vicinity of the spectral line of the analyte. With prior knowledge of potential spectral interferences, deconvolution of the overlapped response is possible. Analytical data for a wide range of geological standard reference materials demonstrate the effectiveness of the chemometric techniques. Separation of 0.002 nm spectral coincidence, employing a 0.02 nm resolution spectrometer, is demonstrated

  1. FeO "Orange Arc" Emission Detected in Optical Spectrum of Leonid Persistent Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Lacey, Matt; Allan, Beverly J.; Self, Daniel E.; Plane, John M. C.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report the detection of a broad continuum emission dominating the visual spectrum of a Leonid persistent train. A comparison with laboratory spectra of FeO 1 "orange arc" emission at I mbar shows a general agreement of the band position and shape. The detection of FeO confirms the classical mechanism of metal atom catalyzed recombination of ozone and oxygen atoms as the driving force behind optical emission from persistent trains. Sodium and iron atoms are now confirmed catalysts.

  2. Comparison of 4 analytical techniques based on atomic spectrometry for the determination of total tin in canned foodstuffs

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Different techniques for the determination of total tin in beverage and canned food by atomic spectrometry were compared. The performance characteristics of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Hydride Generation Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES), Electrothermal Atomization Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETA-AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) were determined in term of linearity, ...

  3. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I.; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Use of a miniaturized analytical system with microtorch plasma for Hg determination. → Determination of Hg in non- and biodegradable materials using cold vapor generation. → Figures of merit and advantages of the miniaturized system for Hg determination. - Abstract: A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min -1 Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl 2 reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO 3 -H 2 SO 4 mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml -1 or 0.08 μg g -1 in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg -1 , while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  4. Spectrometry techniques for radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anilkumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    The energy of the radiation emission following the nuclear decay is unique and the characteristic of the radio nuclide which undergoes decay. Thus measurement of the energy of the radiation offers a method of identifying the radio nuclides. The prime requirement of the energy measurement is a suitable detector which shows response proportional to the energy of the radiation rather than the presence of the radiation. The response from such detectors are suitably processed and distributed with respect to the signal strength which is proportional to incident energy. This distribution is normally referred as energy spectrum and is recorded in the multichannel analyser. The measurement of energy and intensity of radiation from the spectrum is called radiation spectrometry. Thus the radiation spectrometry allows the identification and quantification of radioactive isotopes in variety of matrices. The radiation spectrometry has now become a popular radioanalytical technique in wide area of nuclear fuel cycle programs. The popular spectrometry techniques commonly used for the radioactivity measurement and analysis are Alpha spectrometry, Gamma ray spectrometry and Beta spectrometry

  5. Reducing health risk assigned to organic emissions from a chemical weapons incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, David M; Weiler, B Douglas; Skeen, Rodney S

    2013-03-01

    Organic emissions from a chemical weapons incinerator have been characterized with an improved set of analytical methods to reduce the human health risk assigned to operations of the facility. A gas chromatography/mass selective detection method with substantially reduced detection limits has been used in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared microscopy to improve the speciation of semi-volatile and non-volatile organics emitted from the incinerator. The reduced detection limits have allowed a significant reduction in the assumed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and aminobiphenyl (ABP) emission rates used as inputs to the human health risk assessment for the incinerator. A mean factor of 17 decrease in assigned human health risk is realized for six common local exposure scenarios as a result of the reduced PAH and ABP detection limits.

  6. Comparative study of injection into a pneumatic nebuliser and tungsten coil electrothermal vaporisation for the determination of rare earth elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, K.

    1988-01-01

    Injection into a pneumatic nebuliser and vaporisation using a tungsten coil electrothermal vaporisation system, with a 3-kW argon-nitrogen inductively coupled plasma (ICP), are compared for the determination of the rare earth elements. The sampling efficiency and thus also the absolute power of detection of the tungsten coil ICP optical emission spectrometric (ICP-OES) technique are better by two orders of magnitude, than the injection technique. The absolute detection limits for the rare earth elements are at the pg level; for the refractory rare earth elements (Er, La, Lu and Y), they are lower than those obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, whereas for the other rare earth elements (Eu, Sc, Tm and Yb), the detection limits are comparable. With injection of samples into a pneumatic nebuliser and ICP-OES, matrix effects are low and absolute amounts of the order of mg of the rare earth matrix can be tolerated, giving relative detection limits down to 1 μg g -1 . The amount of rare earth matrix that can be tolerated with the tungsten-coil atomiser is two orders of magnitude lower. Thus the relatively detection limits of the two methods are of the same order, although the matrix effects are considerably higher with the tungsten coil. (author)

  7. Detection of chlorinated and brominated byproducts of drinking water disinfection using electrospray ionization-high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ells, B; Barnett, D A; Froese, K; Purves, R W; Hrudey, S; Guevremont, R

    1999-10-15

    The lower limit of detection for low molecular weight polar and ionic analytes using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is often severely compromised by an intense background that obscures ions of trace components in solution. Recently, a new technique, referred to as high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), has been shown to separate gas-phase ions at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. A FAIMS instrument is an ion filter that may be tuned, by control of electrical voltages, to continuously transmit selected ions from a complex mixture. This capability offers significant advantages when FAIMS is coupled with ESI, a source that generates a wide variety of ions, including solvent clusters and salt adducts. In this report, the tandem arrangement of ESI-FAIMS-MS is used for the analysis of haloacetic acids, a class of disinfection byproducts regulated by the US EPA. FAIMS is shown to effectively discriminate against background ions resulting from the electrospray of tap water solutions containing the haloacetic acids. Consequently, mass spectra are simplified, the selectivity of the method is improved, and the limits of detection are lowered compared with conventional ESI-MS. The detection limits of ESI-FAIMS-MS for six haloacetic acids ranged between 0.5 and 4 ng/mL in 9:1 methanol/tap water (5 and 40 ng/mL in the original tap water samples) with no preconcentration, derivatization, or chromatographic separation prior to analysis.

  8. Simultaneous determination of 13 carbohydrates using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Feng, Feng; Yuan, Fei; Su, Jin; Cheng, Yan; Wu, Hanqiu; Song, Kun; Nie, Bo; Yu, Lian; Zhang, Feng

    2017-04-01

    A simple, accurate, and highly sensitive method was developed for the determination of 13 carbohydrates in polysaccharide of Spirulina platensis based on high-performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection and mass spectrometry. Samples were extracted with deionized water using ultrasonic-assisted extraction, and the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions were optimized by Box-Behnken design. Then the extracted polysaccharide was hydrolyzed by adding 1 mol/L trifluoroacetic acid before determination by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection and confirmed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The high-performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection method was performed on a CarboPac PA20 column by gradient elution using deionized water, 0.1 mol/L sodium hydroxide solution, and 0.4 mol/L sodium acetate solution. Excellent linearity was observed in the range of 0.05-10 mg/L. The average recoveries ranged from 80.7 to 121.7%. The limits of detection and limits of quantification for 13 carbohydrates were 0.02-0.10 and 0.2-1.2  μg/kg, respectively. The developed method has been successfully applied to ambient samples, and the results indicated that high-performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection and mass spectrometry could provide a rapid and accurate method for the simultaneous determination of carbohydrates. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Direct rare earth determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, Sergio; Cornejo, Silvia; Rojas, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    In the present work, the use of the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), for the sequential determination of Rare Earth elements in the metallurgical process samples is described. In the first place, the optimum parameters for the determination of the elements in study are established, like instrumental calibration, wavelengths spectral selection and interference of matrix. Next, the methodology for the digestion of solid samples (system of digestion with pressure) and the recovery of the interest elements are presented. Two material rocks as of reference Syenite SY3 are used. In order to assure the validity of the obtained data, the reference materials SY2 and SY3 were analyzed by means of two different techniques, ICP-OES and ICP-Mass, this last one was made by an international laboratory and a fusion with lithium metaborate was used with digestion method. Finally, the obtained results demonstrate that the reproducibility in the recovery of rare earth analyzed by both techniques is comparable, and that the methodology of digestion used for these elements is statistically valid (author)

  10. Autopiquer - a Robust and Reliable Peak Detection Algorithm for Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, David P A; Hughes, Sam; Kilgour, Samantha L; Mackay, C Logan; Palmblad, Magnus; Tran, Bao Quoc; Goo, Young Ah; Ernst, Robert K; Clarke, David J; Goodlett, David R

    2017-02-01

    We present a simple algorithm for robust and unsupervised peak detection by determining a noise threshold in isotopically resolved mass spectrometry data. Solving this problem will greatly reduce the subjective and time-consuming manual picking of mass spectral peaks and so will prove beneficial in many research applications. The Autopiquer approach uses autocorrelation to test for the presence of (isotopic) structure in overlapping windows across the spectrum. Within each window, a noise threshold is optimized to remove the most unstructured data, whilst keeping as much of the (isotopic) structure as possible. This algorithm has been successfully demonstrated for both peak detection and spectral compression on data from many different classes of mass spectrometer and for different sample types, and this approach should also be extendible to other types of data that contain regularly spaced discrete peaks. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-01-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ≥2). 14 N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (C n+ → C - ) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14 N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14 C in enriched samples of CO 2 gas with 14 C/ 12 C isotopic ratio down to the 10 -9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14 C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development

  12. DETECTING LOW-LEVEL SYNTHESIS IMPURITIES IN MODIFIED PHOSPHOROTHIOATE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY – HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikcevic, Irena; Wyrzykiewicz, Tadeusz K.; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary An LC-MS method based on the use of high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS) for profiling oligonucleotides synthesis impurities is described. Oligonucleotide phosphorothioatediesters (phosphorothioate oligonucleotides), in which one of the non-bridging oxygen atoms at each phosphorus center is replaced by a sulfur atom, are now one of the most popular oligonucleotide modifications due to their ease of chemical synthesis and advantageous pharmacokinetic properties. Despite significant progress in the solid-phase oligomerization chemistry used in the manufacturing of these oligonucleotides, multiple classes of low-level impurities always accompany synthetic oligonucleotides. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for the identification of these synthesis impurities. However, impurity profiling, where the entire complement of low-level synthetic impurities is identified in a single analysis, is more challenging. Here we present an LC-MS method based the use of high resolution-mass spectrometry, specifically Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS or FTMS). The optimal LC-FTMS conditions, including the stationary phase and mobile phases for the separation and identification of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, were found. The characteristics of FTMS enable charge state determination from single m/z values of low-level impurities. Charge state information then enables more accurate modeling of the detected isotopic distribution for identification of the chemical composition of the detected impurity. Using this approach, a number of phosphorothioate impurities can be detected by LC-FTMS including failure sequences carrying 3′-terminal phosphate monoester and 3′-terminal phosphorothioate monoester, incomplete backbone sulfurization and desulfurization products, high molecular weight impurities, and chloral, isobutyryl, and N3 (2-cyanoethyl) adducts

  13. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH 4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l −1 and 1.0 ng l −1 , respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l −1

  14. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschner, Karel, E-mail: karel.marschner@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Albertov 8, 128 43 Prague (Czech Republic); Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH{sub 4} in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l{sup −1} and 1.0 ng l{sup −1}, respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l{sup −1}.

  15. Volatile organic compound analysis in wood combustion and meat cooking emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, B.; McDonald, J.

    1999-01-01

    Residential wood combustion and meat cooking emissions were each analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Emissions were diluted 60--100 times, cooled to ambient temperature, and allowed 80 seconds for condensation prior to collection with the aid of a DRI-constructed dilution stack sampler. Fireplace and wood-stove emissions testing was conducted at the DRI facilities. Wood type, wood moisture, burn rate, and fuel load were varied for different experiments. Meat emissions testing was conducted at the CE-CERT stationary emissions lab, University of California, Riverside. Meat type, fat content, and cooking appliance were changed in different tests. VOCs were collected using stainless-steel 6 L canisters and Tenax cartridges, whereas for carbonyl compound collection 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-impregnated C 18 SepPack cartridges were used. Analysis of VOC collected with canisters and Tenax cartridges was conducted by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and by GC/FID/ECD (flame ionization detection/electron capture detection). DNPH-impregnated cartridges were analyzed for fourteen C 1 --C 7 carbonyl compounds, using the HPLC method. The results of these measurements are discussed

  16. DETECTION OF POLARIZED QUASI-PERIODIC MICROSTRUCTURE EMISSION IN MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, Kishalay; Sharma, Prateek [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Gupta, Yashwant, E-mail: kde@caltech.edu [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 3, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-12-10

    Microstructure emission, involving short timescale, often quasi-periodic, intensity fluctuations in subpulse emission, is well known in normal period pulsars. In this Letter, we present the first detections of quasi-periodic microstructure emission from millisecond pulsars (MSPs), from Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of two MSPs at 325 and 610 MHz. Similar to the characteristics of microstructure observed in normal period pulsars, we find that these features are often highly polarized and exhibit quasi-periodic behavior on top of broader subpulse emission, with periods of the order of a few μ s. By measuring their widths and periodicities from single pulse intensity profiles and their autocorrelation functions, we extend the microstructure timescale–rotation period relationship by more than an order of magnitude down to rotation periods ∼5 ms, and find it to be consistent with the relationship derived earlier for normal pulsars. The similarity of behavior is remarkable, given the significantly different physical properties of MSPs and normal period pulsars, and rules out several previous speculations about the possible different characteristics of microstructure in MSP radio emission. We discuss the possible reasons for the non-detection of these features in previous high time resolution MSP studies along with the physical implications of our results, both in terms of a geometric beam sweeping model and temporal modulation model for micropulse production.

  17. Preconcentration of heavy metals on activated carbon and their determination in fruits by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Barbara; Mikula, Barbara

    2014-03-15

    A method of separation and preconcentration of cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc at trace level using activated carbon is proposed. Activated carbon with the adsorbed trace metals was mineralised using a high-pressure microwave mineraliser. The heavy metals were determined after preconcentration by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The influence of several parameters, such as pH, sorbent mass, shaking time was examined. Moreover, effects of inorganic matrix on recovery of the determined elements were studied. The experiment shows that foreign ions did not influence recovery of the determined elements. The detection limits (DL) of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were 0.17, 0.19, 1.60, 2.60, 0.92 and 1.50 μg L(-)(1), respectively. The recovery of the method for the determined elements was better than 95% with relative standard deviation from 1.3% to 3.7%. The preconcentration factor was 80. The proposed method was applied for determination of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in fruits materials. Accuracy of the proposed method was verified using certified reference material (NCS ZC85006 Tomato). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of sodium leak detection technology using laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry. Design and functional test using prototype sodium detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takafumi; Ito, Chikara; Harano, Hideki; Okazaki, Koki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor, highly sensitive technology is required to detect small amounts of sodium leaking from the cooling system piping or components. The conventional sodium leak detectors have a fundamental difficulty in improving the detection sensitivity for a sodium leak because of the presence of salinity ( 23 NaCl) in the atmosphere around the components and piping of cooling systems. In order to overcome this problem, an innovative technology has been developed to selectively detect the radioactive sodium ( 22 Na) produced by a neutron reaction in the primary cooling system using Laser Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS). In this method, sodium ions produced with the two processes of (1) atomization of sodium aerosols and (2) resonance ionization of sodium atom, are detected selectively using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The 22 Na can be distinguished from the stable isotope ( 23 Na) by mass spectrometry, which is the advantage of RIMS comparing to the other methods. The design and the construction of the prototype system based on fundamental experiments are shown in the paper. The aerodynamic lens was newly introduced, which can transfer aerosols at atmospheric pressure into a vacuum chamber while increasing the aerosol density at the same time. Furthermore, the ionization process was applied by using the external electric field after resonance exciting from the ground level to the Rydberg level in order to increase the ionization efficiency. The preliminary test results using the stable isotope ( 23 Na) showed that prototype system could easily detect sodium aerosol of 100 ppb, equivalent to the sensitivity of the conventional detectors. (author)

  19. Potential of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid detection technique in plant pathology: identification of plant-associated microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faheem; Babalola, Olubukola O; Tak, Hamid I

    2012-09-01

    Plant diseases caused by plant pathogens substantially reduce crop production every year, resulting in massive economic losses throughout the world. Accurate detection and identification of plant pathogens is fundamental to plant pathogen diagnostics and, thus, plant disease management. Diagnostics and disease-management strategies require techniques to enable simultaneous detection and quantification of a wide range of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms. Over the past decade, rapid development of matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) techniques for characterization of microorganisms has enabled substantially improved detection and identification of microorganisms. In the biological sciences, MALDI-TOF MS is used to analyze specific peptides or proteins directly desorbed from intact bacteria, fungal spores, nematodes, and other microorganisms. The ability to record biomarker ions, in a broad m/z range, which are unique to and representative of individual microorganisms, forms the basis of taxonomic identification of microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have initiated new research, i.e. analysis of more complex microbial communities. Such studies are just beginning but have great potential for elucidation not only of the interactions between microorganisms and their host plants but also those among different microbial taxa living in association with plants. There has been a recent effort by the mass spectrometry community to make data from large scale mass spectrometry experiments publicly available in the form of a centralized repository. Such a resource could enable the use of MALDI-TOF MS as a universal technique for detection of plant pathogens and non-pathogens. The effects of experimental conditions are sufficiently understood, reproducible spectra can be obtained from computational database search, and microorganisms can be rapidly characterized by genus, species

  20. Rapid detection of undesired cosmetic ingredients by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jie; An, Dongli; Chen, Tengteng; Lin, Zhiwei

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, cosmetic industry profits soared due to the widespread use of cosmetics, which resulted in illicit manufacturers and products of poor quality. Therefore, the rapid and accurate detection of the composition of cosmetics has become crucial. At present, numerous methods, such as gas chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, were available for the analysis of cosmetic ingredients. However, these methods present several limitations, such as failure to perform comprehensive and rapid analysis of the samples. Compared with other techniques, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry offered the advantages of wide detection range, fast speed and high accuracy. In this article, we briefly summarized how to select a suitable matrix and adjust the appropriate laser energy. We also discussed the rapid identification of undesired ingredients, focusing on antibiotics and hormones in cosmetics.

  1. Comparison of mass-spectrometry and α-counting in analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopes in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irleweck, K.; Pichlmayer, F.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of trace amounts of U and Pu isotopes is of interest in environmental and personal monitoring programmes. Commonly after preconcentration and separation of the radionuclides a proper sample is prepared electrolytically and the measurements are performed by alpha spectrometry. Some investigations on uranium isotopic abundances and on plutonium fallout deposition in soil have been carried out in this way. It is impossible to distinguish between the isotopes 239 Pu and 240 Pu by alpha spectrometry, however, because their α-energies are too close together. Such determinations can only be carried out by mass spectrometry. Specific Pu emissions, e.g. from nuclear production plants, can be discriminated from the global fallout level. Mass spectrometry is the more sensitive method for measuring long-lived nuclides compared with α-spectrometry. In the case of soil analysis, however, Pu detection is obstructed by the high natural uranium content, usually in the range 0.2 to 2.0 ppm which exceeds the trace amounts of plutonium by several orders of magnitude. This work describes a chemical procedure which separates U/Pu sufficiently for alpha spectrometry as well as for mass spectrometry, and compares results of environmental analysis applying both methods. (author)

  2. Determination of Hg(2+) by on-line separation and pre-concentration with atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Zheng

    2014-10-03

    A simple and sensitive method to determine Hg(2+) was developed by combining solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry (SCGD-AES) with flow injection (FI) based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE). We synthesized l-cysteine-modified mesoporous silica and packed it in an SPE microcolumn, which was experimentally determined to possess a good mercury adsorption capacity. An enrichment factor of 42 was achieved under optimized Hg(2+) elution conditions, namely, an FI flow rate of 2.0 mL min(-1) and an eluent comprised of 10% thiourea in 0.2 mol L(-1) HNO3. The detection limit of FI-SCGD-AES was determined to be 0.75 μg L(-1), and the precision of the 11 replicate Hg(2+) measurements was 0.86% at a concentration of 100 μg L(-1). The proposed method was validated by determining Hg(2+) in certified reference materials such as human hair (GBW09101b) and stream sediment (GBW07310). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Detection limits should be a thing of the past in gamma-ray spectrometry in general as well as in neutron activation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, Menno

    2016-01-01

    In gamma-ray spectrometry with high-resolution detectors, full-energy peaks are often to be detected by a peak-search algorithm, with a threshold for detection. Detection limits can be derived from this. Detection limits are often computed along with measured activities or concentrations. When an

  4. Determination of ifosfamide, 2-and 3-dechloroethyifosfamide using gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus or mass spectrometry detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerbusch, T; Jeuken, MJ; Derraz, J; van Putten, JWG; Huitema, ADR; Beijnen, JH

    2000-01-01

    A comparison was made between methods for determining ifosfamide (IF), 2- (2DCE) and 3-dechloroethylifosfamide (3DCE) using gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (GC-NPD) versus positive ion electron-impact ion-trap mass spectrometry (GC-MS'). Sample pretreatment involved

  5. Detection efficiencies in nano- and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelle, M.; Koch, J.; Flamigni, L.; Heiroth, S.; Lippert, T.; Hartung, W.; Guenther, D.

    2009-01-01

    Detection efficiencies of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), defined as the ratio of ions reaching the detector and atoms released by LA were measured. For this purpose, LA of silicate glasses, zircon, and pure silicon was performed using nanosecond (ns) as well as femtosecond (fs) LA. For instance, ns-LA of silicate glass using helium as in-cell carrier gas resulted in detection efficiencies between approximately 1E-7 for low and 3E-5 for high mass range elements which were, in addition, almost independent on the laser wavelength and pulse duration chosen. In contrast, the application of argon as carrier gas was found to suppress the detection efficiencies systematically by a factor of up to 5 mainly due to a less efficient aerosol-to-ion conversion and ion transmission inside the ICP-MS

  6. Selective Iron(III ion uptake using CuO-TiO2 nanostructure by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Mohammed M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CuO-TiO2 nanosheets (NSs, a kind of nanomaterials is one of the most attracting class of transition doped semiconductor materials due to its interesting and important optical, electrical, and structural properties and has many technical applications, such as in metal ions detection, photocatalysis, Chemi-sensors, bio-sensors, solar cells and so on. In this paper the synthesis of CuO-TiO2 nanosheets by the wet-chemically technique is reported. Methods CuO-TiO2 NSs were prepared by a wet-chemical process using reducing agents in alkaline medium and characterized by UV/vis., FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM etc. Results The structural and optical evaluation of synthesized NSs were measured by XRD pattern, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and UV–vis spectroscopy, respectively which confirmed that the obtained NSs are well-crystalline CuO-TiO2 and possessing good optical properties. The morphological analysis of CuO-TiO2 NSs was executed by FE-SEM, which confirmed that the doped products were sheet-shaped and growth in large quantity. Here, the analytical efficiency of the NSs was applied for a selective adsorption of iron(III ion prior to detection by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. The selectivity of NSs towards various metal ions, including Au(III, Cd(II, Co(II, Cr(III, Fe(III, Pd(II, and Zn(II was analyzed. Conclusions Based on the selectivity study, it was confirmed that the selectivity of doped NSs phase was the most towards Fe(III ion. The static adsorption capacity for Fe(III was calculated to be 110.06 mgg−1. Results from adsorption isotherm also verified that the adsorption process was mainly monolayer-adsorption onto a surface containing a finite number of CuO-TiO2 NSs adsorption sites.

  7. Determination of Hg{sup 2+} by on-line separation and pre-concentration with atmospheric-pressure solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qing [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Zhen [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Wang, Zheng, E-mail: wangzheng@mail.sic.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • A modified SBA-15 mesoporous silica (SH-SBA-15) was synthesized as a sorbent. • On-line SPE combined with SCGD-AES based on FIA was used to detect Hg{sup 2+} firstly. • A simple, low-cost Hg{sup 2+} analysis in a complex matrix was established. • The sensitive detection of Hg{sup 2+} was achieved with a detection limit of 0.75 μg L{sup −1}. - Abstract: A simple and sensitive method to determine Hg{sup 2+} was developed by combining solution-cathode glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry (SCGD-AES) with flow injection (FI) based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE). We synthesized L-cysteine-modified mesoporous silica and packed it in an SPE microcolumn, which was experimentally determined to possess a good mercury adsorption capacity. An enrichment factor of 42 was achieved under optimized Hg{sup 2+} elution conditions, namely, an FI flow rate of 2.0 mL min{sup −1} and an eluent comprised of 10% thiourea in 0.2 mol L{sup −1} HNO{sub 3}. The detection limit of FI–SCGD-AES was determined to be 0.75 μg L{sup −1}, and the precision of the 11 replicate Hg{sup 2+} measurements was 0.86% at a concentration of 100 μg L{sup −1}. The proposed method was validated by determining Hg{sup 2+} in certified reference materials such as human hair (GBW09101b) and stream sediment (GBW07310)

  8. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming; Bings, Nicolas H.; Broekaert, Jose A.C.

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS TM spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm -2 and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower μg g -1 range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 μg g -1

  9. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Bings, Nicolas H. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: bings@chemie.uni-hamburg.de; Broekaert, Jose A.C. [Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS{sup TM} spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm{sup -2} and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower {mu}g g{sup -1} range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 {mu}g g{sup -1}.

  10. Some metals determination in beers by atomic emission spectrometry of induced argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushige, I.

    1990-01-01

    It was made the identification and determination of metals in brazilian bottled and canned beer, using atomic emission spectrometry with d.c. are and argon coupled plasma excitation sources. The elements Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were determined in beer samples, after treatment with HNO sub(3) conc. /H sub(2) O sub(2) (30%). In the determination of Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn and alternative method using HNO sub(3) conc. /O sub(3) was proved be useful. The results obtained for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were below the limits established by brazilian legislation, showing the good quality of the beer concerning the metals. The results of this work were requested by the previous Ministerio do Meio Ambiente e Urbanismo in order to contribute to review the brazilian legislation in foods and beverages about metals contents. (author)

  11. Peptide Peak Detection for Low Resolution MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jingwen; Utsunomiya, Shin-Ichi; Kajihara, Shigeki; Tabata, Tsuyoshi; Aoshima, Ken; Oda, Yoshiya; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A new peak detection method has been developed for rapid selection of peptide and its fragment ion peaks for protein identification using tandem mass spectrometry. The algorithm applies classification of peak intensities present in the defined mass range to determine the noise level. A threshold is then given to select ion peaks according to the determined noise level in each mass range. This algorithm was initially designed for the peak detection of low resolution peptide mass spectra, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra. But it can also be applied to other type of mass spectra. This method has demonstrated obtaining a good rate of number of real ions to noises for even poorly fragmented peptide spectra. The effect of using peak lists generated from this method produces improved protein scores in database search results. The reliability of the protein identifications is increased by finding more peptide identifications. This software tool is freely available at the Mass++ home page (http://www.first-ms3d.jp/english/achievement/software/).

  12. Application of EPR spectrometry, thermoluminescence, analyses of DNA damage and germination power for detection of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malec-Czechowska, K.; Stachowicz, W.; Dancewicz, A.M.; Szot, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The results of our own detection of irradiation in various foods: meat, poultry, fishes, spices, dried fruits, mushrooms, crops, fresh fruits and food additives are presented. The techniques for detection whether foods have been irradiated or not, such as EPR spectrometry, thermoluminescence (TL), DNA damage by ''comet'' method and ability for germination of grains has been discussed. The applicability of particular technique to specific foodstuffs has been indicated. (author)

  13. Proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry advancement in detection of hazardous substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, B.

    2012-01-01

    Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a mass spectrometric technique based on chemical ionization, which provides very rapid measurements (within seconds) of volatile organic compounds in air, usually without special sample preparation, and with a very low detection limit. The detection and study of product ion patterns of threat agents such as explosives and drugs and some major environmental pollutants (isocyanates and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)) is explored in detail here using PTR-MS, specifically Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS). The proton transfer reaction (PTR) principle works on the detection of the compound in the vapor phase. For some compounds, which have extremely low vapor pressures, both sample and inlet line heating were needed. Generally, the protonated parent molecule (MH+) is found to be the dominant product ion, which therefore provides us with a higher level of confidence in the assignment of a trace compound. However, for several compounds, dissociative proton transfer can occur at various degrees resulting in other product ions. Analysis of other compounds, such as the presence of taggants and impurities were carried out, and in certain compounds unusual E/N anomalies were discovered (E/N is an instrumental set of parameters, where E is the electric field strength and N is the number density). Head space measurements above four different drinks (plain water, tea, red wine and white wine) spiked with four different 'date rape' drugs were also conducted. (author)

  14. Coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Nikola; Roos, Per; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2017-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors is often the technique of choice in an environmental radioactivity laboratory. When measuring environmental samples associated activities are usually low so an important parameter that describes the performance of the spectrometer...... for a nuclide of interest is the minimum detectable activity (MDA). There are many ways for lowering the MDAs in gamma spectrometry. Recently, developments of fast and compact digital acquisition systems have led to growing number of multiple HPGe detector spectrometers. In these applications all detected...

  15. Classification of Antarctic algae by applying Kohonen neural network with 14 elements determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbinot, L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica-Instituto de Quimica-Unicamp, PO Box 6154, CEP: 13083-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Smichowski, P. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Unidad de Actividad Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Av. Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Farias, S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Unidad de Actividad Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Av. Gral Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Arruda, M.A.Z. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica-Instituto de Quimica-Unicamp, PO Box 6154, CEP: 13083-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Vodopivez, C. [Instituto Antartico Argentino, Cerrito 1010, C1248AAZ, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Poppi, R.J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica-Instituto de Quimica-Unicamp, PO Box 6154, CEP: 13083-971, Campinas, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: ronei@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-06-30

    Optical emission spectrometers can generate results, which sometimes are not easy to interpret, mainly when the analyses involve classifications. To make simultaneous data interpretation possible, the Kohonen neural network is used to classify different Antarctic algae according to their taxonomic groups from the determination of 14 analytes. The Kohonen neural network architecture used was 5x5 neurons, thus reducing 14-dimension input data to two-dimensional space. The input data were 14 analytes (As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Sr, Zn, Cd, Cr, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, V) with their concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry in 11 different species of algae. Three taxonomic groups (Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Cholorophyta) can be differentiated and classified through only their Cu content.

  16. Classification of Antarctic algae by applying Kohonen neural network with 14 elements determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbinot, L.; Smichowski, P.; Farias, S.; Arruda, M.A.Z.; Vodopivez, C.; Poppi, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical emission spectrometers can generate results, which sometimes are not easy to interpret, mainly when the analyses involve classifications. To make simultaneous data interpretation possible, the Kohonen neural network is used to classify different Antarctic algae according to their taxonomic groups from the determination of 14 analytes. The Kohonen neural network architecture used was 5x5 neurons, thus reducing 14-dimension input data to two-dimensional space. The input data were 14 analytes (As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Sr, Zn, Cd, Cr, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, V) with their concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry in 11 different species of algae. Three taxonomic groups (Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Cholorophyta) can be differentiated and classified through only their Cu content

  17. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu, E-mail: ftibi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mihaltan, Alin I., E-mail: alinblaj2005@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ponta, Michaela, E-mail: mponta@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Darvasi, Eugen, E-mail: edarvasi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Frentiu, Maria, E-mail: frentiu.maria@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordos, Emil, E-mail: emilcordos@gmail.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Use of a miniaturized analytical system with microtorch plasma for Hg determination. {yields} Determination of Hg in non- and biodegradable materials using cold vapor generation. {yields} Figures of merit and advantages of the miniaturized system for Hg determination. - Abstract: A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min{sup -1} Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl{sub 2} reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml{sup -1} or 0.08 {mu}g g{sup -1} in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg{sup -1}, while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 {+-} 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  18. Ultra-sensitive radionuclide spectrometry. Radiometrics and mass spectrometry synergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in radiometrics and mass spectrometry techniques for ultra-sensitive analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment are reviewed. In the radiometrics sector the dominant development has been the utilization of large HPGe detectors in underground laboratories with anti-cosmic or anti-Compton shielding for the analysis of short and medium-lived radionuclides in the environment. In the mass spectrometry sector, applications of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for the analysis of long-lived radionuclides in the environment are the most important recent achievements. The recent developments do not only considerably decrease the detection limits for several radionuclides (up to several orders of magnitude), but they also enable to decrease sample volumes so that sampling, e.g., of the water column can be much easier and more effective. A comparison of radiometrics and mass spectrometry results for the analysis of radionuclides in the marine environment shows a reasonable agreement - within quoted uncertainties, for wide range of activities and different sample matrices analyzed. (author)

  19. Trace metal analysis of road dust by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, M.J.; Liu, L.; Gnanalingham, N.; Peters, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dust from roads in an air impingement zone close to anthropogenic sources of air pollutants can be a concern for people living in the immediate vicinity. The Ministry of the Environment (MOE) has conducted a case study to monitor the concentration of uranium, strontium, thorium and arsenic in road dust from one such area. A method for the analysis of road dust by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been developed with detection limits in the ng/1 range. A digestion technique has been developed by conducting experiments using single and combinations of acids in open-vessel wet digestions. Accuracy has been determined by the use of matrix representative certified reference materials (CRMs). Digestion precision was determined by elemental concentration measurements of the most representative CRM through replicates. Spike recovery data were from 95% to 110% for all elements, and inter-method comparison studies between hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and ICP-MS for arsenic and strontium show good agreement. (author)

  20. Problems, possibilities and limitations of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in samples with different matrix composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrova, P.; Velichkov, S. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str. bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Velitchkova, N. [Geological Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str., bl.24, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Havezov, I. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str. bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Daskalova, N., E-mail: das15482@svr.igic.bas.b [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bontchev Str. bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-02-15

    The economic and geological importance of platinum group of elements has led to the development of analytical methods to quantify them in different types of samples. In the present paper the quantitative information for spectral interference in radial viewing 40.68 MHz inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in the presence of complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and Ti as matrix constituents was obtained. The database was used for optimum line selections. By using the selected analysis lines the following detection limits in ng g{sup -1} were obtained: Pt 1700, Pd-1440, Rh-900. The reached detection limits determine the possibilities and limitation of the direct ICP-AES method in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in geological and environmental materials. The database for spectral interferences in the presence of aluminum can be used for the determination of platinum group of elements in car catalysts. The accuracy of the analytical results was experimentally demonstrated by two certified reference materials that were analyzed: SARM 7, Pt ore and recycled auto-catalyst certified reference material SRM 2556.

  1. Dual modal ultra-bright nanodots with aggregation-induced emission and gadolinium-chelation for vascular integrity and leakage detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guangxue; Li, Jackson Liang Yao; Claser, Carla; Balachander, Akhila; Tan, Yingrou; Goh, Chi Ching; Kwok, Immanuel Weng Han; Rénia, Laurent; Tang, Ben Zhong; Ng, Lai Guan; Liu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    The study of blood brain barrier (BBB) functions is important for neurological disorder research. However, the lack of suitable tools and methods has hampered the progress of this field. Herein, we present a hybrid nanodot strategy, termed AIE-Gd dots, comprising of a fluorogen with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics as the core to provide bright and stable fluorescence for optical imaging, and gadolinium (Gd) for accurate quantification of vascular leakage via inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In this report, we demonstrate that AIE-Gd dots enable direct visualization of brain vascular networks under resting condition, and that they form localized punctate aggregates and accumulate in the brain tissue during experimental cerebral malaria, indicative of hemorrhage and BBB malfunction. With its superior detection sensitivity and multimodality, we hereby propose that AIE-Gd dots can serve as a better alternative to Evans blue for visualization and quantification of changes in brain barrier functions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Positron emission tomography of incidentally detected small pulmonary nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Dirksen, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging of small pulmonary nodules incidentally detected by spiral computed tomography (CT) in a high-risk population. Ten patients (five females, five males, aged 54-72 years) were recruited...

  3. Macro- and micro-element analysis in milk samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Sanja M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the determination of Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl and Zn, as well as total fat content of milk samples, originated from different sources. The analyzed milk samples were: human milk, fresh cow milk, pasteurized cow milk from a local market, and reconstituted powder milk. The milk samples were obtained from Jablanica District (Serbia territory. Preparation of samples for macro- and micro-analyses was done by wet digestion. Concentrations of the elements after digestion were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. Total fat content of milk samples was determinate by the Weibull and Stoldt method. The results showed that potassium and calcium concentrations were the highest in all samples: 1840.64 - 2993.26 mg/L and 456.05 - 1318.08 mg/L, respectively. Of all heavy metals from the examined milk samples (copper, zinc, manganese, nickel, cadmium, and lead, the most common were zinc and copper, with approximately similar content in the range of 5 - 12 mg/l, while cadmium nickel and manganese were not detected at all. Samples of fresh cow milk and human milk showed the highest fat content of 3.6 and 4.2 %, respectively. Results for total fat and macro- and micro-analyses showed that fresh cow milk has the highest contents of fat and calcium, making it the most nutritious. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34012

  4. Improvement of LOD in Fluorescence Detection with Spectrally Nonuniform Background by Optimization of Emission Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2017-10-17

    The limit-of-detection (LOD) in analytical instruments with fluorescence detection can be improved by reducing noise of optical background. Efficiently reducing optical background noise in systems with spectrally nonuniform background requires complex optimization of an emission filter-the main element of spectral filtration. Here, we introduce a filter-optimization method, which utilizes an expression for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of (i) all noise components (dark, shot, and flicker), (ii) emission spectrum of the analyte, (iii) emission spectrum of the optical background, and (iv) transmittance spectrum of the emission filter. In essence, the noise components and the emission spectra are determined experimentally and substituted into the expression. This leaves a single variable-the transmittance spectrum of the filter-which is optimized numerically by maximizing SNR. Maximizing SNR provides an accurate way of filter optimization, while a previously used approach based on maximizing a signal-to-background ratio (SBR) is the approximation that can lead to much poorer LOD specifically in detection of fluorescently labeled biomolecules. The proposed filter-optimization method will be an indispensable tool for developing new and improving existing fluorescence-detection systems aiming at ultimately low LOD.

  5. Speciation of four selenium compounds using high performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1997-01-01

    An analytical method for the speciation of selenomethionine, selenocystine, selenite and selenate by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with atomic spectrometric detection is presented. An organic polymeric strong anion exchange column was used as the stationary phase in combination...... spectrometry (ICP-MS). The signal-to-noise ratio of the FAAS detector was optimized using a hydrogen-argon entrained-air flame and a slotted-tube atom trap (STAT) in the flame. The limit of detection (3 sigma) achieved by the HPLC-FAAS system was 1 mg L-1 of selenium (100 mu L injections) for each of the four...

  6. Lesion detection and quantitation of positron emission mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2001-01-01

    A Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) scanner dedicated to breast imaging is being developed at our laboratory. We have developed a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm for this scanner. Here we theoretically study the lesion detection and quantitation. The lesion detectability is studied theoretically using computer observers. We found that for the zero-order quadratic prior, the region of interest observer can achieve the performance of the prewhitening observer with a properly selected smoothing parameter. We also study the lesion quantitation using the test statistic of the region of interest observer. The theoretical expressions for the bias, variance, and ensemble mean squared error of the quantitation are derived. Computer simulations show that the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo results for both lesion detection and quantitation

  7. Detection of Low Molecular Weight Adulterants in Beverages by Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisco, Edward; Dake, Jeffrey

    2016-04-14

    Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS) has been used to detect the presence of non-narcotic adulterants in beverages. The non-narcotic adulterants that were examined in this work incorporated a number low molecular weight alcohols, acetone, ammonium hydroxide, and sodium hypochlorite. Analysis of the adulterants was completed by pipetting 1 µL deposits onto glass microcapillaries along with an appropriate dopant species followed by introduction into the DART gas stream. It was found that detection of these compounds in the complex matrices of common beverages (soda, energy drinks, etc.) was simplified through the use of a dopant species to allow for adduct formation with the desired compound(s) of interest. Other parameters that were investigated included DART gas stream temperature, in source collision induced dissociation, ion polarity, and DART needle voltage. Sensitivities of the technique were found to range from 0.001 % volume fraction to 0.1 % volume fraction, comparable to traditional analyses completed using headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS). Once a method was established using aqueous solutions, , fifteen beverages were spiked with each of the nine adulterants, to simulate real world detection, and in nearly all cases the adulterant could be detected either in pure form, or complexed with the added dopant species. This technique provides a rapid way to directly analyze beverages believed to be contaminated with non-narcotic adulterants at sensitivities similar to or exceeding those of traditional confirmatory analyses.

  8. Detection of nicotine as an indicator of tobacco smoke by direct analysis in real time (DART) tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuki, Ákos; Nagy, Lajos; Nagy, Tibor; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    The residual tobacco smoke contamination (thirdhand smoke, THS) on the clothes of a smoker was examined by direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry. DART-MS enabled sensitive and selective analysis of nicotine as the indicator of tobacco smoke pollution. Tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) experiments were also performed to confirm the identification of nicotine. Transferred thirdhand smoke originated from the fingers of a smoker onto other objects was also detected by DART mass spectrometry. DART-MS/MS was utilized for monitoring the secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) in the air of the laboratory using nicotine as an indicator. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the application of DART-MS and DART-MS/MS to the detection of thirdhand smoke and to the monitoring of secondhand smoke.

  9. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder: detecting multidimensional liquid chromatography, ion mobility and mass spectrometry features in complex datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Kevin L; Slysz, Gordon W; Baker, Erin S; LaMarche, Brian L; Monroe, Matthew E; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Payne, Samuel H; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2013-11-01

    The addition of ion mobility spectrometry to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry experiments requires new, or updated, software tools to facilitate data processing. We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder is available as a command-line tool for download at http://omics.pnl.gov/software/LC-IMS-MS_Feature_Finder.php. The Microsoft.NET Framework 4.0 is required to run the software. All other dependencies are included with the software package. Usage of this software is limited to non-profit research to use (see README). rds@pnnl.gov. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Dual emission fluorescent silver nanoclusters for sensitive detection of the biological coenzyme NAD+/NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yufeng; Huang, Kehan; Chang, Mengfang; Qin, Cuifang; Zhang, Sanjun; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) displaying dual-excitation and dual-emission properties have been developed for the specific detection of NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form). With the increase of NAD(+) concentrations, the longer wavelength emission (with the peak at 550 nm) was gradually quenched due to the strong interactions between the NAD(+) and Ag NCs, whereas the shorter wavelength emission (peaking at 395 nm) was linearly enhanced. More important, the dual-emission intensity ratio (I395/I550), fitting by a single-exponential decay function, can efficiently detect various NAD(+) levels from 100 to 4000 μM, as well as label NAD(+)/NADH (reduced form of NAD) ratios in the range of 1-50. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acoustic Emission Beamforming for Detection and Localization of Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Joshua Callen

    The aerospace industry is a constantly evolving field with corporate manufacturers continually utilizing innovative processes and materials. These materials include advanced metallics and composite systems. The exploration and implementation of new materials and structures has prompted the development of numerous structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation techniques for quality assurance purposes and pre- and in-service damage detection. Exploitation of acoustic emission sensors coupled with a beamforming technique provides the potential for creating an effective non-contact and non-invasive monitoring capability for assessing structural integrity. This investigation used an acoustic emission detection device that employs helical arrays of MEMS-based microphones around a high-definition optical camera to provide real-time non-contact monitoring of inspection specimens during testing. The study assessed the feasibility of the sound camera for use in structural health monitoring of composite specimens during tensile testing for detecting onset of damage in addition to nondestructive evaluation of aluminum inspection plates for visualizing stress wave propagation in structures. During composite material monitoring, the sound camera was able to accurately identify the onset and location of damage resulting from large amplitude acoustic feedback mechanisms such as fiber breakage. Damage resulting from smaller acoustic feedback events such as matrix failure was detected but not localized to the degree of accuracy of larger feedback events. Findings suggest that beamforming technology can provide effective non-contact and non-invasive inspection of composite materials, characterizing the onset and the location of damage in an efficient manner. With regards to the nondestructive evaluation of metallic plates, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot measurement. This is a significant improvement over

  12. X-ray spectrometry with synchrotron radiation; Roentgenspektrometrie mit Synchrotronstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Matthias [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Roentgen- und IR-Spektrometrie' ; Gerlach, Martin; Holfelder, Ina; Hoenicke, Philipp; Lubeck, Janin; Nutsch, Andreas; Pollakowski, Beatrix; Streeck, Cornelia; Unterumsberger, Rainer; Weser, Jan; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    2014-12-15

    The X-ray spectrometry of the PTB at the BESSY II storage ring with radiation in the range from 78 eV to 10.5 keV is described. After a description of the instrumentation development reference-sample free X-ray fluorescence analysis, the determination of fundamental atomic parameters, X-ray fluorescence analysis under glance-angle incidence, highly-resolving absorption spectrometry, and emission spectrometry are considered. Finally liquid cells and in-situ measurement techniques are described. (HSI)

  13. 15N-urea tracing emission spectroscopy for detecting the infection of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yayi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study a noninvasive and nonradioactive method, 15 N-urea tracing emission spectroscopy, for detecting the Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection. Methods: A group of 26 patients was tested with a method of 15 N-urea tracing emission spectroscopy for detecting the Hp infection. Results: Taking the bacterial culture or (and) Gram stain as a standard, the specificity, sensitivity and positive predicting rate of the test were 81%, 89% and 84%, respectively. Conclusion: The method could be considered useful for clinical practice

  14. Detection of BK virus in urine from renal transplant subjects by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konietzny Rebecca

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis and management of BK virus (BKV reactivation following renal transplantation continues to be a significant clinical problem. Following reactivation of latent virus, impaired cellular immunity enables sustained viral replication to occur in urothelial cells, which potentially leads to the development of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN. Current guidelines recommend regular surveillance for BKV reactivation through the detection of infected urothelial cells in urine (decoy cells or viral nucleic acid in urine or blood. However, these methods have variable sensitivity and cannot routinely distinguish between different viral subtypes. We therefore asked whether mass spectrometry might be able to overcome these limitations and provide an additional non-invasive technique for the surveillance of BKV and identification of recipients at increased risk of BKVAN. Results Here we describe a mass spectrometry (MS-based method for the detection of BKV derived proteins directly isolated from clinical urine samples. Peptides detected by MS derived from Viral Protein 1 (VP1 allowed differentiation between subtypes I and IV. Using this approach, we observed an association between higher decoy cell numbers and the presence of the VP1 subtype Ib-2 in urine samples derived from a cohort of 20 renal transplant recipients, consistent with the hypothesis that certain viral subtypes may be associated with more severe BKVAN. Conclusions This is the first study to identify BK virus proteins in clinical samples by MS and that this approach makes it possible to distinguish between different viral subtypes. Further studies are required to establish whether this information could lead to stratification of patients at risk of BKVAN, facilitate distinction between BKVAN and acute rejection (AR, and ultimately improve patient treatment and outcomes.

  15. Detection of over 100 selenium metabolites in selenized yeast by liquid chromatography electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Dernovics, Mihaly; Moreno-González, David; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F

    2017-08-15

    The characterization of the selenometabolome of Selenized(Se)-yeast, that is the fraction of water soluble low-molecular weight Se-metabolites produced in Se-yeast is of paramount interest to expand the knowledge on the composition of this food supplement. In this work, we have applied liquid chromatography electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS) to search for Se-species from the low molecular weight range fraction of the selenized yeast used for food supplements. Prior to LC-TOFMS, sample treatment consisted of ultrasound assisted water extraction followed by size exclusion fractionation assisted with off-line inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection of isotope 82 Se. The fraction corresponding to low-molecular weight species was subjected to LC-TOFMS using electrospray ionization in the positive ion mode. The detection of the suspected selenized species has been based on the information obtained from accurate mass measurements of both the protonated molecules and fragments from in-source CID fragmentation; along with the characteristic isotope pattern exhibited by the presence of Se. The approach enables the detection of 103 selenized species, most of them not previously reported, in the range from ca. 300-650Da. Besides the detection of selenium species, related sulphur derivate metabolites were detected based on the accurate mass shift due to the substitution of sulphur and selenium. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Effects of airflow on odorants' emissions in a model pig house — A laboratory study using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Chayan Kumer; Feilberg, Anders; Zhang, Guoqiang; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of different factors that affect emissions of gasses, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is necessary to develop emission abatement technology. The objectives of this research were to quantify and study temporal variation of gas emissions from a model pig house under varying ventilation rates. The used model was a 1:12.5 scale of a section of a commercial finishing pig house. The VOC concentrations at inlet, outlet, and slurry pit of the model space were measured using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). PTR-MS can measure the temporal variations of odor compounds' emission from the slurry pit in real time. The emissions of H 2 S and 14 VOCs were lower compared to real pig buildings except for ammonia, which indicated possible other sources of those compounds than the slurry in the slurry pit. The ventilation rate affected significantly on ammonia and trimethylamine emission (p 2 S) emission was independent of the ventilation rate. VFAs' emission dependency on ventilation rate increased with the increase of carbon chain. Phenols, indoles and ketones showed the positive correlation with ventilation rate to some extent. Generally, compounds with high solubility (low Henry's constant) showed stronger correlation with ventilation rates than the compounds with high Henry's constant.

  17. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of opiates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanov, D.T.

    2009-07-01

    Key words: surface ionization, adsorption, heterogeneous reactions, surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy, thermoemitter, opiates, extracts of biosamples. Subjects of study. The mass - spectrometric study of thermal - ion emission: surface ionization of opiates by on the surface of oxidized refractory metals. Purpose of work is to establish the regularities of surface ionization (SI) of multi-atomic molecule opiates and their mixtures develop the scientific base of SI methods for high sensitive and selective detection and analysis of these substances in the different objects, including biosamples. Methods of study: surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy. The results obtained and their novelty. For the first time, SI of molecule opiates on the oxidized tungsten surface has been studied and their SI mass-spectra and temperature dependences of ion currents have been obtained, the characteristic heterogeneous reactions of an adsorbed molecules and the channels of monomolecular decays vibrationally-excited ions on their way in mass-spectrometry have been revealed, sublimation energy has been defined, the activation energy of E act , of these decays has been estimated for given period of time. Additivity of the SI mass-spectra of opiate mixtures of has been established under conditions of joint opiate adsorption. High selectivity of SI allows the extracts of biosamples to be analyzed without their preliminary chromatographic separation. The opiates are ionized by SI with high efficiency (from 34 C/mol to 112 C/mol), which provides high sensitivity of opiate detection by SI/MS and APTDSIS methods from - 10 -11 g in the samples under analysis. Practical value. The results of these studies create the scientific base for novel SI methods of high sensitive detection and analysis of the trace amounts of opiates in complicated mixtures, including biosamples without their preliminary

  18. Gas chromatography--inductively coupled plasma--time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the speciation analysis of organolead compounds in environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisterkamp, M; Adams, F C

    2001-07-01

    The application of inductively coupled plasma--time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the speciation analysis of organolead compounds in environmental waters is described. Construction of the transfer line was achieved by means of a relatively simple and rapid coupling procedure. Derivatization of the ionic lead species was achieved by in-situ propylation with sodium tetrapropylborate; simultaneous extraction of the derivatized compounds in hexane was followed by separation and detection by capillary gas chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Detection limits for the different organolead species ranged from 10 to 15 fg (as Pb), corresponding to procedural detection limits between 50 and 75 ng L(-1), on the basis of a 50 mL snow sample, extraction with 200 microL hexane, and subsequent injection of 1 microL of the organic extract on to the column. The accuracy of the system was confirmed by additional analysis of the water samples by capillary gas chromatography coupled with microwave-induced plasma-atomic-emission spectrometry and the analysis of a standard reference material CRM 605 (road dust) with a certified content of trimethyllead.

  19. Detection of {sup 59}Ni by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Freimann, K.; Hellborg, R.; Stenstroem, K. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Larsson, Ragnar [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Chemical Engineering II; Skog, G. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Quaternary Geology

    1999-02-01

    The aims of this project were to develop a method to measure the amount of {sup 59}Ni in stainless steel and to determine the detection limit for this method. {sup 59}Ni is produced by neutron activation in the construction material close to the core in a nuclear reactor and it is important to know the amount of {sup 59}Ni present as it governs the classification of the waste. If the amount of {sup 59}Ni is known at different locations in relation to the core, it is also possible to refine the calculation models of the neutron flux in the reactor. Accelerator mass spectrometry, an ultra-sensitive method for measuring small concentrations of radionuclides as well as stable nuclides, has been used in this investigation to determine the concentration of {sup 59}Ni (and thereby the activity) in stainless steel. As the cobalt content in stainless steel is the main contributor to the background in a measurement of {sup 59}Ni, a method for the chemical extraction of nickel from stainless steel, including a purification step to reduce the cobalt content in the sample, has been developed. The detection limit for {sup 59}Ni has been determined to 100{+-}30 Bq per gram nickel (100{+-}30 Bq/g) with the present status of the system 14 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  20. [Applications of atomic emission spectrum from liquid electrode discharge to metal ion detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiu-Ling; Wu, Jian; Ying, Yi-Bin

    2010-02-01

    The fast and precise detection of metal ion is an important research project concerning studies in diverse academic fields and different kinds of detecting technologies. In the present paper, the authors review the research on atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge and its applications in the detection of metal ion. In the first part of this paper the principles and characteristics of the methods based on electrochemistry and spectroscopy were introduced. The methods of ion-selective electrode (ISE), anodic stripping voltammetry, atomic emission spectrum and atomic absorption spectrum were included in this part and discussed comparatively. Then the principles and characteristics of liquid electrode spectra for metal ion detection were introduced. The mechanism of the plasma production and the characteristics of the plasma spectrum as well as its advantages compared with other methods were discussed. Secondly, the authors divided the discharge system into two types and named them single liquid-electrode discharge and double-liquid electrode respectively, according to the number of the liquid electrode and the configuration of the discharge system, and the development as well as the present research status of each type was illustrated. Then the characteristics and configurations of the discharge systems including ECGD, SCGD, LS-APGD and capillary discharge were discussed in detail as examples of the two types. By taking advantage of the technology of atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge, the detecting limit of heavy metals such as copper, mercury and argent as well as active metal ions including sodium, potass and magnesium can achieve microg x L(-1). Finally, the advantages and problems of the liquid-electrode discharge applied in detection of metal ion were discussed. And the applications of the atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge were prospected.

  1. Detection of Alkynes via Click Chemistry with a Brominated Coumarin Azide by Simultaneous Fluorescence and Isotopic Signatures in Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Chumsae, Chris; Kaplan, Jenifer B; Moulton, Kevin Ryan; Wang, Dongdong; Lee, David H; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2017-09-20

    Alkynes are a key component of click chemistry and used for a wide variety of applications including bioconjugation, selective tagging of protein modifications, and labeling of metabolites and drug targets. However, challenges still exist for detecting alkynes because most 1,2,3-triazole products from alkynes and azides do not possess distinct intrinsic properties that can be used for their facile detection by either fluorescence or mass spectrometry. To address this critical need, a novel brominated coumarin azide was used to tag alkynes and detect alkyne-conjugated biomolecules. This tag has several useful properties: first, it is fluorogenic and the click-chemistry products are highly fluorescent and quantifiable; second, its distinct isotopic pattern facilitates identification by mass spectrometry; and third, its click-chemistry products form a unique pair of reporter ions upon fragmentation that can be used for the quick screening of data. Using a monoclonal antibody conjugated with alkynes, a general workflow has been developed and examined comprehensively.

  2. HIGH-ENERGY NON-THERMAL AND THERMAL EMISSION FROM GRB 141207A DETECTED BY FERMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto, Makoto [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan); Asano, Katsuaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8582 (Japan); Ohno, Masanori [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Veres, Péter [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Axelsson, Magnus [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawai, Nobuyuki, E-mail: m.arimoto@aoni.waseda.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan)

    2016-12-20

    A bright long gamma-ray burst GRB 141207A was observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and detected by both instruments onboard. The observations show that the spectrum in the prompt phase is not well described by the canonical empirical Band function alone, and that an additional power-law component is needed. In the early phase of the prompt emission, a modified blackbody with a hard low-energy photon index ( α  = +0.2 to +0.4) is detected, which suggests a photospheric origin. In a finely time-resolved analysis, the spectra are also well fitted by the modified blackbody combined with a power-law function. We discuss the physical parameters of the photosphere such as the bulk Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow and the radius. We also discuss the physical origin of the extra power-law component observed during the prompt phase in the context of different models such as leptonic and hadronic scenarios in the internal shock regime and synchrotron emission in the external forward shock. In the afterglow phase, the temporal and spectral behaviors of the temporally extended high-energy emission and the fading X-ray emission detected by the X-Ray Telescope on-board Swift are consistent with synchrotron emission in a radiative external forward shock.

  3. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry — NICE-AAS — A technique for detection of elements down to zeptogram amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axner, Ove; Ehlers, Patrick; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang

    2014-01-01

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) is a powerful technique for detection of molecular compounds in gas phase that is based on a combination of two important concepts: frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) for reduction of noise, and cavity enhancement, for prolongation of the interaction length between the light and the sample. Due to its unique properties, it has demonstrated unparalleled detection sensitivity when it comes to detection of molecular constituents in the gas phase. However, despite these, it has so far not been used for detection of atoms, i.e. for elemental analysis. The present work presents an assessment of the expected performance of Doppler-broadened (Db) NICE-OHMS for analytical atomic spectrometry, then referred to as noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry (NICE-AAS). After a description of the basic principles of Db-NICE-OHMS, the modulation and detection conditions for optimum performance are identified. Based on a previous demonstrated detection sensitivity of Db-NICE-OHMS of 5 × 10 −12 cm −1 Hz −1∕2 (corresponding to a single-pass absorbance of 7 × 10 −11 over 10 s), the expected limits of detection (LODs) of Hg and Na by NICE-AAS are estimated. Hg is assumed to be detected in gas phase directly while Na is considered to be atomized in a graphite furnace (GF) prior to detection. It is shown that in the absence of spectral interferences, contaminated sample compartments, and optical saturation, it should be feasible to detect Hg down to 10 zg/cm 3 (10 fg/m 3 or 10 −5 ng/m 3 ), which corresponds to 25 atoms/cm 3 , and Na down to 0.5 zg (zg = zeptogram = 10 −21 g), representing 50 zg/mL (parts-per-sextillion, pps, 1:10 21 ) in liquid solution (assuming a sample of 10 μL) or solely 15 atoms injected into the GF, respectively. These LODs are several orders of magnitude lower (better) than any previous laser-based absorption technique previously demonstrated

  4. System for detecting acoustic emissions in multianvil experiments: Application to deep seismicity in the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Haemyeong; Fei Yingwei; Silver, Paul G.; Green, Harry W.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major goals in the experimental study of deep earthquakes is to identify slip instabilities at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) that might be responsible for the occurrence of earthquakes. Detecting acoustic emissions from a specimen during faulting provides unique constraints on the instability process. There are few experimental studies reporting acoustic emissions under HPHT conditions, due to technical challenges. And those studies have used only one or at most two acoustic sensors during the experiments. Such techniques preclude the accurate location of the acoustic emission source region and thus the ability to distinguish real signal from noise that may be coming from outside the sample. We have developed a system for detecting acoustic emissions at HPHT. Here we present a four-channel acoustic emission detecting system working in the HPHT octahedral multianvil apparatus. Each channel has high resolution (12 bits) and a sampling rate of 30 MHz. In experiments at the pressures up to 6 GPa and temperatures up to 770 deg. C, we have observed acoustic emissions under various conditions. Analyzing these signals, we are able to show that this system permits us to distinguish between signal and noise, locate the source of the acoustic emission, and obtain reliable data on the radiation pattern. This system has greatly improved our ability to study faulting instabilities under high pressure and high temperature

  5. Determination of ultratrace elements in natural waters by solid-phase extraction and atomic spectrometry methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotti, Marco; Abelmoschi, Maria Luisa; Soggia, Francesco; Frache, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A study was carried out on the preconcentration of ultratrace amounts of cadmium, lead, manganese, copper and iron from high-salinity aqueous samples and determination by atomic spectrometry methods. Sample volume, amount of resin, loading flow rate, and elution volume were optimized in order to obtain the simultaneous preconcentration of all the analytes. Quantitative recoveries were obtained by using 200 mg of iminodiacetic resin with a loading flow rate of 2 mL min(-1), elution volume of 3 mL and sample volume of 50-450 mL. Only copper in seawater samples was not completely retained by the resin (60-70% recovery), due to unfavorable competition of iminodiacetic-active groups with organically bound metal.To quantify the metals in the eluates, two atomic spectrometry techniques were compared: electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) with simultaneous CCD detection system. Both techniques are suitable for sample analysis with detection limits of 1.0, 4.7, 3.3, 6.8, and 53 ng L(-1) using ETAAS and 12, 122, 3.4, 17, and 21 ng L(-1) using ICP-OES for Cd, Pb, Mn, Cu, and Fe, respectively. Relative standard deviations of the procedures ranged from 1.7 to 14% at the sub-microg L(-1) concentration level. The accuracy of both methods was verified by analyzing various certified reference materials (river water, estuarine water, coastal and off-shore seawater).

  6. Determination of ultratrace elements in natural waters by solid-phase extraction and atomic spectrometry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotti, Marco; Abelmoschi, Maria Luisa; Soggia, Francesco; Frache, Roberto [Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso, 31-16146, Genoa (Italy)

    2003-01-01

    A study was carried out on the preconcentration of ultratrace amounts of cadmium, lead, manganese, copper and iron from high-salinity aqueous samples and determination by atomic spectrometry methods. Sample volume, amount of resin, loading flow rate, and elution volume were optimized in order to obtain the simultaneous preconcentration of all the analytes. Quantitative recoveries were obtained by using 200 mg of iminodiacetic resin with a loading flow rate of 2 mL min{sup -1}, elution volume of 3 mL and sample volume of 50-450 mL. Only copper in seawater samples was not completely retained by the resin (60-70% recovery), due to unfavorable competition of iminodiacetic-active groups with organically bound metal.To quantify the metals in the eluates, two atomic spectrometry techniques were compared: electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) with simultaneous CCD detection system. Both techniques are suitable for sample analysis with detection limits of 1.0, 4.7, 3.3, 6.8, and 53 ng L{sup -1} using ETAAS and 12, 122, 3.4, 17, and 21 ng L{sup -1} using ICP-OES for Cd, Pb, Mn, Cu, and Fe, respectively. Relative standard deviations of the procedures ranged from 1.7 to 14% at the sub-{mu}g L{sup -1} concentration level. The accuracy of both methods was verified by analyzing various certified reference materials (river water, estuarine water, coastal and off-shore seawater). (orig.)

  7. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry analysis of lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium oxides for rare earths impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reino, L.C.P.; Lordello, A.R.

    1990-09-01

    An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry method is described for the determination of Sm, Eu, La, Gd, Dy, Pr, Ho, Nd, Tb and Y in purified oxides of lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium. The method enables a simple, precise and readily available determination. Dissolution of the samples is achieved with diluted hydrochloric acid (1:1). The solutions are diluted to volume for a concentration of 1mg/ml. The lowest determination limit is 0,01% for most elements and 0,05 or 0,1% for a few rare earths in samarium and gadolinium matrices. Lanthanum, Samarium and Gadolinium concentrates with purity grade of 99,9%, 99,6% and 99,8%, respectively, can be analysed by this procedure. (author)

  8. Sulfur dioxide emissions from Peruvian copper smelters detected by the ozone monitoring instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carn, S.A.; Krueger, A.J.; Krotkov, N.A.; Yang, Kai; Levelt, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first daily observations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from copper smelters by a satellite-borne sensor - the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA's EOS/Aura spacecraft. Emissions from two Peruvian smelters (La Oroya and Ilo) were detected in up to 80% of OMI overpasses

  9. Application of Cathodoluminescence to The Study of Feldspars: Imaging and Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rute; Couto, Helena

    2017-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies were carried out on polished thin sections of different feldspar samples (from migmatites, granites, aplite-pegmatites and granitic aggregates) using a hot cathode CL equipment HC3-LM coupled to an optical microscope and to a spectrometer (SpectraPro 2300i and a CCD Pixis 400B detector and the software Winspec32) from the Faculty of Sciences of University of Porto. The system was operated at 14kV and a filament current of 0.18 mA. The samples were coated with a thin gold film using a Cressington 108 Auto device. Luminescence images were acquired during the CL analysis with an adapted digital video-camera (KAPPA PS 40C-285 (DX) with dual stage Peltier cooling) and an acquisition time between 351ms and 3,52s. The CL study, including imaging and spectrometry, proved to be an important tool to complement the feldspar petrography as it contributes to the identification of features not observed under optical microscope. The application of the Cathodoluminescence to feldspar allows distinguishing between potassic feldspar and plagioclase, differentiating generations of feldspar and displaying internal zoning and growth areas, among other. The spectrometry complements the CL imaging. It allows obtaining a qualitative level of emission intensity, which permits the interpretation of the nature of this luminescence in each feldspar. Bands shown in the spectra are related to the existing activator elements. In the present study, it was found an association of each feldspar to different spectra and respective colour. The plagioclases exhibit yellow or green luminescence. The activator element is Mn2+, showing a broad emission band between 550 - 570 nm specially detected on this type of feldspars, due to the replacement of K+ for Mn2+. The potassium feldspars have more or less intense blue colour associated with various activators elements: the activator element is Cu2+ showing a broad emission band between 420±5 nm. This emission band can be

  10. Determination of lead in bone tissues by axially viewed inductively coupled plasma multichannel-based emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotti, Marco; Abelmoschi, Maria Luisa; Dalla Riva, Simona; Soggia, Francesco; Frache, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    A new procedure for determining low levels of lead in bone tissues has been developed. After wet acid digestion in a pressurized microwave-heated system, the solution was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma multichannel-based emission spectrometry. Internal standardization using the Co 228.615 nm reference line was chosen as the optimal method to compensate for the matrix effects from the presence of calcium and nitric acid at high concentration levels. The detection limit of the procedure was 0.11 microg Pb g(-1) dry mass. Instrumental precision at the analytical concentration of approximately 10 microg l(-1) ranged from 6.1 to 9.4%. Precision of the sample preparation step was 5.4%. The concentration of lead in SRM 1486 (1.32+/-0.04 microg g(-1)) found using the new procedure was in excellent agreement with the certified level (1.335+/-0.014 microg g(-1)). Finally, the method was applied to determine the lead in various fish bone tissues, and the analytical results were found to be in good agreement with those obtained through differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. The method is therefore suitable for the reliable determination of lead at concentration levels of below 1 microg g(-1) in bone samples. Moreover, the multi-element capability of the technique allows us to simultaneously determine other major or trace elements in order to investigate inter-element correlation and to compute enrichment factors, making the proposed procedure particularly useful for investigating lead occurrence and pathways in fish bone tissues in order to find suitable biomarkers for the Antarctic marine environment.

  11. The Detectability of Radio Auroral Emission from Proxima b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Loeb, Abraham [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Magnetically active stars possess stellar winds whose interactions with planetary magnetic fields produce radio auroral emission. We examine the detectability of radio auroral emission from Proxima b, the closest known exosolar planet orbiting our nearest neighboring star, Proxima Centauri. Using the radiometric Bode’s law, we estimate the radio flux produced by the interaction of Proxima Centauri’s stellar wind and Proxima b’s magnetosphere for different planetary magnetic field strengths. For plausible planetary masses, Proxima b could produce radio fluxes of 100 mJy or more in a frequency range of 0.02–3 MHz for planetary magnetic field strengths of 0.007–1 G. According to recent MHD models that vary the orbital parameters of the system, this emission is expected to be highly variable. This variability is due to large fluctuations in the size of Proxima b’s magnetosphere as it crosses the equatorial streamer regions of dense stellar wind and high dynamic pressure. Using the MHD model of Garraffo et al. for the variation of the magnetosphere radius during the orbit, we estimate that the observed radio flux can vary nearly by an order of magnitude over the 11.2-day period of Proxima b. The detailed amplitude variation depends on the stellar wind, orbital, and planetary magnetic field parameters. We discuss observing strategies for proposed future space-based observatories to reach frequencies below the ionospheric cutoff (∼10 MHz), which would be required to detect the signal we investigate.

  12. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: a tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-07-23

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review, Electrothermal Vaporization and Laser Ablation will also be shortly described. The second issue is devoted to the analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices, with particular insight into the isotope dilution technique, particularly used in speciation analysis by ICP-coupled separation techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. End point detection in ion milling processes by sputter-induced optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.; Dorian, M.; Tabei, M.; Elsea, A.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristic optical emission from the sputtered material during ion milling processes can provide an unambiguous indication of the presence of the specific etched species. By monitoring the intensity of a representative emission line, the etching process can be precisely terminated at an interface. Enhancement of the etching end point is possible by using a dual-channel photodetection system operating in a ratio or difference mode. The installation of the optical detection system to an existing etching chamber has been greatly facilitated by the use of optical fibers. Using a commercial ion milling system, experimental data for a number of etching processes have been obtained. The result demonstrates that sputter-induced optical emission spectroscopy offers many advantages over other techniques in detecting the etching end point of ion milling processes

  14. Improved detection of hydrophilic phosphopeptides using graphite powder microcolumns and mass spectrometry: evidence for in vivo doubly phosphorylated dynamin I and dynamin III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Graham, Mark E; Robinson, Phillip J

    2004-01-01

    A common strategy in proteomics to improve the number and quality of peptides detected by mass spectrometry (MS) is to desalt and concentrate proteolytic digests using reversed phase (RP) chromatography prior to analysis. However, this does not allow for detection of small or hydrophilic peptides...... a large improvement in the detection of small amounts of phosphopeptides by MS and the approach has major implications for both small- and large-scale projects in phosphoproteomics.......A common strategy in proteomics to improve the number and quality of peptides detected by mass spectrometry (MS) is to desalt and concentrate proteolytic digests using reversed phase (RP) chromatography prior to analysis. However, this does not allow for detection of small or hydrophilic peptides......, or peptides altered in hydrophilicity such as phosphopeptides. We used microcolumns to compare the ability of RP resin or graphite powder to retain phosphopeptides. A number of standard phosphopeptides and a biologically relevant phosphoprotein, dynamin I, were analyzed. MS revealed that some phosphopeptides...

  15. Quasi-dynamic mode of nanomembranes for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghoo; Kim, Hyunseok; Blick, Robert H

    2012-04-21

    Mechanical resonators realized on the nano-scale by now offer applications in mass-sensing of biomolecules with extraordinary sensitivity. The general idea is that perfect mechanical biosensors should be of extremely small size to achieve zeptogram sensitivity in weighing single molecules similar to a balance. However, the small scale and long response time of weighing biomolecules with a cantilever restrict their usefulness as a high-throughput method. Commercial mass spectrometry (MS) such as electro-spray ionization (ESI)-MS and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF)-MS are the gold standards to which nanomechanical resonators have to live up to. These two methods rely on the ionization and acceleration of biomolecules and the following ion detection after a mass selection step, such as time-of-flight (TOF). Hence, the spectrum is typically represented in m/z, i.e. the mass to ionization charge ratio. Here, we describe the feasibility and mass range of detection of a new mechanical approach for ion detection in time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the principle of which is that the impinging ion packets excite mechanical oscillations in a silicon nitride nanomembrane. These mechanical oscillations are henceforth detected via field emission of electrons from the nanomembrane. Ion detection is demonstrated in MALDI-TOF analysis over a broad range with angiotensin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and an equimolar protein mixture of insulin, BSA, and immunoglobulin G (IgG). We find an unprecedented mass range of operation of the nanomembrane detector.

  16. Simultaneous detection of six urinary pteridines and creatinine by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for clinical breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Casey; Shi, Honglan; Ma, Yinfa

    2013-11-19

    Recent preliminary studies have implicated urinary pteridines as candidate biomarkers in a growing number of malignancies including breast cancer. While the developments of capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) pteridine urinalyses among others have helped to enable these findings, limitations including poor pteridine specificity, asynchronous or nonexistent renal dilution normalization, and a lack of information regarding adduct formation in mass spectrometry techniques utilizing electrospray ionization (ESI) have prevented application of these techniques to a larger clinical setting. In this study, a simple, rapid, specific, and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method has been developed and optimized for simultaneous detection of six pteridines previously implicated in breast cancer and creatinine as a renal dilution factor in urine. In addition, this study reports cationic adduct formation of urinary pteridines under ESI-positive ionization for the first time. This newly developed technique separates and detects the following six urinary pteridines: 6-biopterin, 6-hydroxymethylpterin, d-neopterin, pterin, isoxanthopterin, and xanthopterin, as well as creatinine. The method detection limit for the pteridines is between 0.025 and 0.5 μg/L, and for creatinine, it is 0.15 μg/L. The method was also validated by spiked recoveries (81-105%), reproducibility (RSD: 1-6%), and application to 25 real urine samples from breast cancer positive and negative samples through a double-blind study. The proposed technique was finally compared directly with a previously reported CE-LIF technique, concluding that additional or alternative renal dilution factors are needed for proper investigation of urinary pteridines as breast cancer biomarkers.

  17. Accuracy and Precision in Elemental Analysis of Environmental Samples using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quraishi, Shamsad Begum; Chung, Yong-Sam; Choi, Kwang Soon

    2005-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry followed by micro-wave digestion have been performed on different environmental Certified Reference Materials (CRMs). Analytical results show that accuracy and precision in ICP-AES analysis were acceptable and satisfactory in case of soil and hair CRM samples. The relative error of most of the elements in these two CRMs is within 10% with few exceptions and coefficient of variation is also less than 10%. Z-score as an analytical performance was also within the acceptable range (±2). ICP-AES was found as an inadequate method for Air Filter CRM due to incomplete dissolution, low concentration of elements and very low mass of the sample. However, real air filter sample could have been analyzed with high accuracy and precision by increasing sample mass during collection. (author)

  18. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  19. Internal standardization in atomic-emission spectrometry using inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The principle of internal standardization has been used in quantitative analytical emission spectroscopy since 1925 to minimize the errors arising from fluctuations in sample preparation, excitation-source conditions, and detection parameters. Although modern spectroscopic excitation sources are far more stable and electronic detection methods are more precise than before, the system for the introduction of the sample in spectrometric analysis using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) introduces significant errors, and internal standardization can still play a useful role in improving the overall precision of the analytical results. The criteria for the selection of the elements to be used as internal standards in arc and spark spectrographic analysis apply to a much lesser extent in ICP-spectrometric analysis. Internal standardization is recommended for use in routine ICP-simultaneous spectrometric analysis to improve its accuracy and precision and to provide a monitor for the reassurance of the analyst. However, the selection of an unsuitable reference element can result in misuse of the principle of internal standardization and, although internal standardization can be applied when a sequential monochromator is used, the main sources of error will not be minimized

  20. Scientists Detect Radio Emission from Rapidly Rotating Cosmic Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Astronomers have made the first tentative observations of a long-speculated, but never before detected, source of natural radio waves in interstellar space. Data from the National Science Foundation's 140 Foot Radio Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, W.Va., show the faint, tell-tale signals of what appear to be dust grains spinning billions of times each second. This discovery eventually could yield a powerful new tool for understanding the interstellar medium - the immense clouds of gas and dust that populate interstellar space. The NRAO 140 Foot Radio Telescope The NRAO 140-Foot Radio Telescope "What we believe we have found," said Douglas P. Finkbeiner of Princeton University's Department of Astrophysics, "is the first hard evidence for electric dipole emission from rapidly rotating dust grains. If our studies are confirmed, it will be the first new source of continuum emission to be conclusively identified in the interstellar medium in nearly the past 20 years." Finkbeiner believes that these emissions have the potential in the future of revealing new and exciting information about the interstellar medium; they also may help to refine future studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The results from this study, which took place in spring 1999, were accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal. Other contributors to this paper include David J. Schlegel, department of astrophysics, Princeton University; Curtis Frank, department of astronomy, University of Maryland; and Carl Heiles, department of astronomy, University of California at Berkeley. "The idea of dust grains emitting radiation by rotating is not new," comments Finkbeiner, "but to date it has been somewhat speculative." Scientists first proposed in 1957 that dust grains could emit radio signals, if they were caused to rotate rapidly enough. It was believed, however, that these radio emissions would be negligibly small - too weak to be of any impact to

  1. Detection of Metastatic Breast and Thyroid Cancer in Lymph Nodes by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jialing; Feider, Clara L.; Nagi, Chandandeep; Yu, Wendong; Carter, Stacey A.; Suliburk, James; Cao, Hop S. Tran; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-06-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has been widely applied to image lipids and metabolites in primary cancer tissues with the purpose of detecting and understanding metabolic changes associated with cancer development and progression. Here, we report the use of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to image metastatic breast and thyroid cancer in human lymph node tissues. Our results show clear alterations in lipid and metabolite distributions detected in the mass spectra profiles from 42 samples of metastatic thyroid tumors, metastatic breast tumors, and normal lymph node tissues. 2D DESI-MS ion images of selected molecular species allowed discrimination and visualization of specific histologic features within tissue sections, including regions of metastatic cancer, adjacent normal lymph node, and fibrosis or adipose tissues, which strongly correlated with pathologic findings. In thyroid cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of ceramides and glycerophosphoinisitols were observed. In breast cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of various fatty acids and specific glycerophospholipids were seen. Trends in the alterations in fatty acyl chain composition of lipid species were also observed through detailed mass spectra evaluation and chemical identification of molecular species. The results obtained demonstrate DESI-MSI as a potential clinical tool for the detection of breast and thyroid cancer metastasis in lymph nodes, although further validation is needed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Development of an incipient rotor crack detection method by acoustic emission techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Reverend, D.; Massouri, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the program presented is to develop a method of detection and monitoring of crack growth in machine rotor by application of acoustic emission techniques. This program is performed by R and D Division of Electricite de France, jointly with INSA de Lyon. The first task of the program is relative to the characterization of acoustic emission during a progressive tensile test performed on a NCT specimen. The second task of the program deals with the experimentation of acoustic emission techniques for the monitoring of a specimen during cycling bending tests. The last task of the program is relative to evaluation of application of acoustic emission techniques for a small rotor integrity monitoring during fatigue rotation tests [fr

  3. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Thallium and manganese complexes involved in the luminescence emission of potassium-bearing aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel A., E-mail: miguel.gomez@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, Javier, E-mail: guinea@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Garrido, Fernando, E-mail: fernando.garrido@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Townsend, Peter D., E-mail: pdtownsend@gmail.com [School of Science and Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Marco, Jose-Francisco, E-mail: jfmarco@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química-Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Calle Serrano 119, Madrid E-28006 (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    The luminescence emission at 285 nm in natural K-feldspar has been studied by Russian groups and associated with thallium ions in structural positions of K{sup +} sites as artificially thallium-doped feldspars display the same emission band. Here attention is focussed on spectra of CL emission bands centered near 285 and 560 nm from paragenetic adularia, moscovite and quartz micro-inclusions. With accesorial thallium they show clear resemblances to each other. Associated sedimentary and hydrothermal aluminosilicate samples collected from Guadalix (Madrid, Spain) were analyzed with a wide range of experimental techniques including Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) with an attached X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and a cathodoluminescence probe (CL) and Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA), X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES), Differential and Thermogravimetric Analyses (DTA-TG), radioluminescence (RL), Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS). The luminescence emission bands at 285 and 560 nm seem to be associated with hydrous thallium–manganese complexes bonded to potassium-bearing aluminosilicates since various minerals such as K-feldspar, moscovite and quartz micro-inclusions display similar CL spectra, accesorial thallium and hydroxyl groups. The presence of iron introduces a brown color which is attributed to submicroscopic iron oxides detectable in the optical and chemical microanalysis, but this does not contribute to the luminescence emission. The XPS Mn 2p spectrum of the adularia sample at room temperature is composed of a spin–orbit doublet plus clear shake-up satellite structure ∼4 eV above the main photoemision lines and is consistent with Mn{sup 2+} in good agreement with the observed luminescence emission at 560 nm for aluminosilicates produced by a {sup 4}T1({sup 4}G)→{sup 6}A1({sup 6}S) transition in tetrahedrally

  5. Peak tree: a new tool for multiscale hierarchical representation and peak detection of mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Houqiang; Wang, Honghui; Wong, Stephen T C; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    Peak detection is one of the most important steps in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. However, the detection result is greatly affected by severe spectrum variations. Unfortunately, most current peak detection methods are neither flexible enough to revise false detection results nor robust enough to resist spectrum variations. To improve flexibility, we introduce peak tree to represent the peak information in MS spectra. Each tree node is a peak judgment on a range of scales, and each tree decomposition, as a set of nodes, is a candidate peak detection result. To improve robustness, we combine peak detection and common peak alignment into a closed-loop framework, which finds the optimal decomposition via both peak intensity and common peak information. The common peak information is derived and loopily refined from the density clustering of the latest peak detection result. Finally, we present an improved ant colony optimization biomarker selection method to build a whole MS analysis system. Experiment shows that our peak detection method can better resist spectrum variations and provide higher sensitivity and lower false detection rates than conventional methods. The benefits from our peak-tree-based system for MS disease analysis are also proved on real SELDI data.

  6. Detection of Unexploded Ordnance Using Airborne LWIR Emissivity Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    glass and wood, are spectrally distinct and would not appear as false alarms. Index Terms— Hyperspectral, Long Wave Infrared , Emissivity, Target...hyperspectral; radar). Because of previous successes using thermal infrared bands for UXO [3, 4] and landmine detection [5], this paper aims at...potential false alarms. They included materials made of rubber , cardboard, metal, wood, glass and plastic (Figure 1). 2.2. Laboratory LWIR signature

  7. Early biotic stress detection in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) by BVOC emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasal-Slavik, Tina; Eschweiler, Julia; Kleist, Einhard; Mumm, Roland; Goldbach, Heiner E; Schouten, Alexander; Wildt, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    We investigated impacts of early and mild biotic stress on Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) emissions from tomato in order to test their potential for early (biotic) stress detection. Tomato plants were exposed to two common fungal pathogens, Botrytis cinerea and Oidium neolycopesici and the sap-sucking aphid Myzus persicae. Furthermore, plants were exposed to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) in order to identify BVOC emissions related to activation of jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathway. These emissions where then used as a reference for identifying active JA signalling pathway in plants at early stages of biotic stress. After infection by the necrotrophic fungus B. cinerea, changes in BVOC emissions indicated that tomato plants had predominantly activated the jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathway. The plants were able to modify their defence pathways in order to overcome fungal infection. When tomato plants were infected with the biotrophic fungus O. neolycopersici, only minor changes in BVOC emissions were observed with additional emissions of the sesquiterpene α-copaene. α-copaene emissions allowed the identification of general biotic stress in the plants, without pinpointing the actual triggered defence pathway. BVOC emissions during M. persicae attack had changed before the occurrence of visual symptoms. Despite low infestation rates, plants emitted methyl salicylate indicating activation of the SA-mediated defence pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Selectivity improvement of positive photoionization ion mobility spectrometry for rapid detection of organophosphorus pesticides by switching dopant concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Jia; Wang, Bin; Wang, Shuang; Li, Haiyang; Chen, Jinyuan

    2018-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) opened a potential avenue for the rapid detection of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), though an improved selectivity of stand-alone IMS was still in high demand. In this study, a stand-alone positive photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (PP-IMS) apparatus was constructed for the rapid detection of OPPs with acetone as dopant. The photoionization of acetone molecules was induced by the ultraviolet irradiation to produce the reactant ions (Ac) 2 H + , which were employed to ionize the OPPs including fenthion, imidan, phosphamidon, dursban, dimethoate and isocarbophos via the proton transfer reaction. Due to the difference in proton affinity, the tested OPPs exhibited the different dopant-dependent manners. Based on this observation, the switching of dopant concentration was implemented to improve the selectivity of PP-IMS for OPPs detection. For instance, a mixture of fenthion, dursban and dimethoate was tested. By switching the concentration of doped acetone from 0.07 to 2.33 to 19.94mgL -1 , the ion peaks of fenthion and dursban were inhibited in succession, achieving the selective detection of dimethoate at last. In addition, another mixture of imidan and phosphamidon was initially detected by PP-IMS with a dose of 0.07mgL -1 acetone, indicating that their ion peaks were severely overlapped; when the concentration of doped acetone was switched to 19.94mgL -1 , the inhibition of imidan signals promised the accurate identification of phosphamidon in mixture. Finally, the PP-IMS in combination of switching dopant concentration was applied to detect the mixed fenthion, dursban and dimethoate in Chinese cabbage, demonstrating the applicability of proposed method to real samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Non-methane organic gas emissions from biomass burning: identification, quantification, and emission factors from PTR-ToF during the FIREX 2016 laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Abigail R.; Sekimoto, Kanako; Gilman, Jessica B.; Selimovic, Vanessa; Coggon, Matthew M.; Zarzana, Kyle J.; Yuan, Bin; Lerner, Brian M.; Brown, Steven S.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Krechmer, Jordan; Roberts, James M.; Warneke, Carsten; Yokelson, Robert J.; de Gouw, Joost

    2018-03-01

    Volatile and intermediate-volatility non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) released from biomass burning were measured during laboratory-simulated wildfires by proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF). We identified NMOG contributors to more than 150 PTR ion masses using gas chromatography (GC) pre-separation with electron ionization, H3O+ chemical ionization, and NO+ chemical ionization, an extensive literature review, and time series correlation, providing higher certainty for ion identifications than has been previously available. Our interpretation of the PTR-ToF mass spectrum accounts for nearly 90 % of NMOG mass detected by PTR-ToF across all fuel types. The relative contributions of different NMOGs to individual exact ion masses are mostly similar across many fires and fuel types. The PTR-ToF measurements are compared to corresponding measurements from open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR), broadband cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (ACES), and iodide ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (I- CIMS) where possible. The majority of comparisons have slopes near 1 and values of the linear correlation coefficient, R2, of > 0.8, including compounds that are not frequently reported by PTR-MS such as ammonia, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), nitrous acid (HONO), and propene. The exceptions include methylglyoxal and compounds that are known to be difficult to measure with one or more of the deployed instruments. The fire-integrated emission ratios to CO and emission factors of NMOGs from 18 fuel types are provided. Finally, we provide an overview of the chemical characteristics of detected species. Non-aromatic oxygenated compounds are the most abundant. Furans and aromatics, while less abundant, comprise a large portion of the OH reactivity. The OH reactivity, its major contributors, and the volatility distribution of emissions can change considerably over the course of a fire.

  10. Non-methane organic gas emissions from biomass burning: identification, quantification, and emission factors from PTR-ToF during the FIREX 2016 laboratory experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Koss

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Volatile and intermediate-volatility non-methane organic gases (NMOGs released from biomass burning were measured during laboratory-simulated wildfires by proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF. We identified NMOG contributors to more than 150 PTR ion masses using gas chromatography (GC pre-separation with electron ionization, H3O+ chemical ionization, and NO+ chemical ionization, an extensive literature review, and time series correlation, providing higher certainty for ion identifications than has been previously available. Our interpretation of the PTR-ToF mass spectrum accounts for nearly 90 % of NMOG mass detected by PTR-ToF across all fuel types. The relative contributions of different NMOGs to individual exact ion masses are mostly similar across many fires and fuel types. The PTR-ToF measurements are compared to corresponding measurements from open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR, broadband cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (ACES, and iodide ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (I− CIMS where possible. The majority of comparisons have slopes near 1 and values of the linear correlation coefficient, R2, of  >  0.8, including compounds that are not frequently reported by PTR-MS such as ammonia, hydrogen cyanide (HCN, nitrous acid (HONO, and propene. The exceptions include methylglyoxal and compounds that are known to be difficult to measure with one or more of the deployed instruments. The fire-integrated emission ratios to CO and emission factors of NMOGs from 18 fuel types are provided. Finally, we provide an overview of the chemical characteristics of detected species. Non-aromatic oxygenated compounds are the most abundant. Furans and aromatics, while less abundant, comprise a large portion of the OH reactivity. The OH reactivity, its major contributors, and the volatility distribution of emissions can change considerably over the course of a fire.

  11. Determination of Micro minerals in Milk from Farm and Pasture-reared Cow, Goat and Camel; using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    SirelkhatimBalla Elhardallou; Ashraf Yehia El-naggar

    2016-01-01

    This study covers raw fresh milk of cow, goat and camel (farm and pasture-reared),in addition to two brands of commercial milk samples, liquid milk of powder origin and drinking yoghurt samples. Camel milk showed a relatively lower pH range (6.15 - 6.46) compared cow, goat and commercial milk. The pH of drinking yoghurt was found (4.35 - 4.47).Microwave digestion, was selected followed by mineral analysis using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry. Micro minerals; Cd, Cr...

  12. Segmentation of Multi-Isotope Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data for Semi-Automatic Detection of Regions of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poczatek, J. Collin; Turck, Christoph W.; Lechene, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) associates secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with detection of several atomic masses, the use of stable isotopes as labels, and affiliated quantitative image-analysis software. By associating image and measure, MIMS allows one to obtain quantitative information about biological processes in sub-cellular domains. MIMS can be applied to a wide range of biomedical problems, in particular metabolism and cell fate [1], [2], [3]. In order to obtain morphologically pertinent data from MIMS images, we have to define regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs are drawn by hand, a tedious and time-consuming process. We have developed and successfully applied a support vector machine (SVM) for segmentation of MIMS images that allows fast, semi-automatic boundary detection of regions of interests. Using the SVM, high-quality ROIs (as compared to an expert's manual delineation) were obtained for 2 types of images derived from unrelated data sets. This automation simplifies, accelerates and improves the post-processing analysis of MIMS images. This approach has been integrated into “Open MIMS,” an ImageJ-plugin for comprehensive analysis of MIMS images that is available online at http://www.nrims.hms.harvard.edu/NRIMS_ImageJ.php. PMID:22347386

  13. Detection of Biosignatures by Geomatrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (GALDI) Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jill R. Scott; Beizhan Yan; Daphne L. Stoner; J. Michelle Kotler; Nancy W. Hinman

    2007-04-01

    Identification of mineral-associated biosignatures is of significance for retrieving biochemical information from geological records here on Earth and detecting signs of life on other planets, such as Mars. The importance of the geomatrix for identifying amino acids (e.g., histidine, threonine, and cysteine) and small proteins (e.g., gramicidin S) was investigated by laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometry. The investigated geomatrices include analogues of Fe-bearing minerals such as hematite and Na-bearing evaporites (e.g., halite). Samples were prepared by two methods: 1) application of analyte to the geomatrix surface and 2) production of homogenous analyte:geomatrix mixtures. Comparison of the two sample preparation methods revealed that the mixing method produces a better signal/noise ratio than surface application for the analyses of amino acids. The composition of the geomatrix has a profound influence on the detection of biomolecules. Peaks corresponding to the cation-attached biomolecular ions were observed for the Na-bearing evaporite analogue. No detectable peaks for the biomolecular ion species were observed when the biomolecules were associated with Fe-bearing minerals. Instead, only minor peaks were observed that may correspond to ions from fragments of the biomolecules. Depending on the underlying mineral composition, geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization shows promise for directly identifying biosignatures associated with minerals.

  14. Quantification of steroid conjugates using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskell, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Fast atom bombardment/mass spectrometry or liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry provides the capability for direct analysis of steroid conjugates (sulfates, glucuronides) without prior hydrolysis or derivatization. During the analysis of biologic extracts, limitations on the sensitivity of detection arise from the presence of co-extracted material which may suppress or obscure the analyte signal. A procedure is described for the quantitative determination of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in serum which achieved selective isolation of the analyte using immunoadsorption extraction and highly specific detection using tandem mass spectrometry. A stable isotope-labeled analog [( 2H2]dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate) was used as internal standard. Fast atom bombardment of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate yielded abundant [M-H]- ions that fragmented following collisional activation to give HSO4-; m/z 97. During fast atom bombardment/tandem mass spectrometry of serum extracts, a scan of precursor ions fragmenting to give m/z 97 detected dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and the [2H2]-labeled analog with a selectivity markedly superior to that observed using conventional mass spectrometry detection. Satisfactory agreement was observed between quantitative data obtained in this way and data obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the heptafluorobutyrates of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and [2H2]dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate obtained by direct derivatization. 21 refs

  15. Using natural beta emission for detecting concealed tobacco in parcels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Jeremy; Hussein, Esam M.A.

    2007-01-01

    It is suspected that postal systems are used for the illegal shipment of tobacco products to circumvent taxation and excise payments. This paper demonstrates that beta-particle emission from the potassium-40 contained in tobacco can be used to passively detect its presence in paperboard postal parcels. The same concept can be utilized for the detection of marijuana, whose leaves are also rich in 40 K. The combination of high beta activity and a low weight is a good indicator of the presence of these two contraband materials

  16. Using natural beta emission for detecting concealed tobacco in parcels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Jeremy [Laboratory for Threat Material Detection, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada); Hussein, Esam M.A. [Laboratory for Threat Material Detection, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 5A3 (Canada)], E-mail: hussein@unb.ca

    2007-10-15

    It is suspected that postal systems are used for the illegal shipment of tobacco products to circumvent taxation and excise payments. This paper demonstrates that beta-particle emission from the potassium-40 contained in tobacco can be used to passively detect its presence in paperboard postal parcels. The same concept can be utilized for the detection of marijuana, whose leaves are also rich in {sup 40}K. The combination of high beta activity and a low weight is a good indicator of the presence of these two contraband materials.

  17. Trace element determination using static high-sensitivity inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (SHIP-OES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, Carsten; Scheffer, Andy; Nowak, Sascha; Vielhaber, Torsten; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2007-02-05

    A low-flow air-cooled inductively coupled plasma (ICP) design for optical emission spectrometry (OES) with axial plasma viewing is described and an evaluation of its analytical capabilities in trace element determinations is presented. Main advantage is a total argon consumption of 0.6 L min(-1) in contrast to 15 L min(-1) using conventional ICP sources. The torch was evaluated in trace element determinations and studied in direct comparison with a conventional torch under the same conditions with the same OES system, ultrasonic nebulization (USN) and single-element optimization. A variety of parameters (x-y-position of the torch, rf power, external air cooling, gas flow rates and USN operation parameters) was optimized to achieve limits of detection (LOD) which are competitive to those of a conventional plasma source. Ionic to atomic line intensity ratios for magnesium were studied at different radio frequency (rf) power conditions and different sample carrier gas flows to characterize the robustness of the excitation source. A linear dynamic range of three to five orders of magnitude was determined under compromise conditions in multi-element mode. The accuracy of the system was investigated by the determination of Co, Cr, Mn, Zn in two certified reference materials (CRM): CRM 075c (Copper with added impurities), and CRM 281 (Trace elements in rye grass). With standard addition values of 2.44+/-0.04 and 3.19+/-0.21 microg g(-1) for Co and Mn in the CRM 075c and 2.32+/-0.09, 81.8+/-0.4, 32.2+/-3.9 for Cr, Mn and Zn, respectively, were determined in the samples and found to be in good agreement with the reported values; recovery rates in the 98-108% range were obtained. No influence on the analysis by the matrix load in the sample was observed.

  18. Cobalt as chemical modifier to improve chromium sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sidnei G. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Donati, George L., E-mail: georgedonati@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Santos, Luana N. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Jones, Bradley T. [Department of Chemistry, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Nóbrega, Joaquim A. [Group of Applied Instrumental Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, P.O. Box 676, São Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2013-05-30

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Charge transfer reactions increase the population of Cr{sup +}. •Chromium ions and electrons recombine to form excited-state Cr atoms. •A 10-fold improvement in LOD is observed for Cr emission measurements. •The two-step ionization/excitation mechanism improves sensitivity and accuracy. •High concentrations of Co also minimize matrix effects. -- Abstract: Cobalt is used as chemical modifier to improve sensitivity and minimize matrix effects in Cr determinations by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). The atomizer is a tungsten filament extracted from microscope light bulbs. A solid-state power supply and a handheld CCD-based spectrometer are also used in the instrumental setup. In the presence of 1000 mg L{sup −1} Co, WCAES limit of detection for Cr (λ = 425.4 nm) is calculated as 0.070 mg L{sup −1}; a 10-fold improvement compared to determinations without Co modifier. The mechanism involved in such signal enhancement is similar to the one observed in ICP OES and ICP-MS determinations of As and Se in the presence of C. Cobalt increases the population of Cr{sup +} by charge transfer reactions. In a second step, Cr{sup +}/e{sup −} recombination takes place, which results in a larger population of excited-state Cr atoms. This alternative excitation route is energetically more efficient than heat transfer from atomizer and gas phase to analyte atoms. A linear dynamic range of 0.25–10 mg L{sup −1} and repeatability of 3.8% (RSD, n = 10) for a 2.0 mg L{sup −1} Cr solution are obtained with this strategy. The modifier high concentration also contributes to improving accuracy due to a matrix-matching effect. The method was applied to a certified reference material of Dogfish Muscle (DORM-2) and no statistically significant difference was observed between determined and certified Cr values at a 95% confidence level. Spike experiments with bottled water samples resulted in recoveries between 93% and

  19. Preconcentration of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium with oxine supported on microcrystalline naphthalene and their determinations by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen Kumar, P.; Sanjay Kumar; Vijay Kumar; Nandakishore, S.S.; Bangroo, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid method for the determination of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after solid-liquid extraction with microcrystalline naphthalene is developed. Analytes were quantitatively adsorbed as their oxinate complexes on naphthalene and determined by ICP-AES after stripping with 2 M HCl. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, reagent amounts, naphthalene amount and stripping conditions on the determination of these elements was investigated in detail. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the detection limits of this method for U (VI), Th (IV), Zr (IV), Ti (IV), Mo (VI) and V (V) were 20.0 ng mL -1 and the relative standard deviations obtained for three replicate determinations at a concentration of 1.0 µg mL -1 were 1.5-3.0%. The proposed method has been applied in the analysis of SY-2, SY-3 and pre-analysed samples for U, Th, Zr, Ti, Mo and V the analytical results are in good agreement with recommended values. (author)

  20. Detection of high molecular weight proteins by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainini, Veronica; Bovo, Giorgio; Chinello, Clizia; Gianazza, Erica; Grasso, Marco; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Magni, Fulvio

    2013-06-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a unique technology to explore the spatial distribution of biomolecules directly on tissues. It allows the in situ investigation of a large number of small proteins and peptides. Detection of high molecular weight proteins through MALDI IMS still represents an important challenge, as it would allow the direct investigation of the distribution of more proteins involved in biological processes, such as cytokines, enzymes, neuropeptide precursors and receptors. In this work we compare the traditional method performed with sinapinic acid with a comparable protocol using ferulic acid as the matrix. Data show a remarkable increase of signal acquisition in the mass range of 20k to 150k Th. Moreover, we report molecular images of biomolecules above 70k Th, demonstrating the possibility of expanding the application of this technology both in clinical investigations and basic science.

  1. Inductively coupled plasma as atomization, excitation and ionization sources in analytical atomic spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Studies on inductively coupled plasma (ICP) for atomic emission and mass spectrometry accomplished in our laboratory since 1978 are reviewed. In emission spectrometry, the characteristics of the plasma are studied concerning the spatial profiles of spectral line intensity, axial profiles of gas and excitation temperatures, spectral line widths and matrix effect. The studies are particularly emphasized on the instrumentation such as developments of plasma generator, emission spectrometers, water-cooled torches and sample introduction methods. A slew-scan type spectrometer developed in these works represents a predecessor of the current commercial spectrometers. An ICP mass spectrometer was first developed in Japan in this laboratory in 1984. Non-spectroscopic interference of this method was found to have the correlation with the atomic weight of the matrix element. Plasma gases other than argon such as nitrogen and oxygen were used for the ICP to evaluate their performance in mass spectrometry as for the sensitivity and interferences. (author). 63 refs

  2. Determination of silver in fresh water by atomic absorption spectrometry following flotation preconcentration by iron(III) collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cundeva, K.; Stafilov, T. [Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, St. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje (Yugoslavia)

    1997-08-01

    Colloid precipitate flotation of silver from fresh water is applied for preconcentration and separation. Optimal conditions using hydrated iron(III) oxide and iron(III) tetramethylenedithiocarbamate as collectors were investigated. Various factors affecting the silver recovery, including collector mass, nature of the supporting electrolyte, pH of the working medium, electrokinetic potential of the collector particle surfaces, type of surfactant, induction time etc., were checked. Within the optimal pH range (5.5-6.5) silver was separated quantitatively (94.9- 100.0%) with 30 mg Fe(III) as collector. The content of silver was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and compared to that from inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The detection limit of silver by the method described is 0.01 {mu}g/L. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for simultaneous determination of cadmium, cobalt, lead and nickel in water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos Silva, E.; Correia, L.O.; Dos Santos, L.O.; Dos Santos Vieira, E.V.; Lemos, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new method for the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of Cd(II), Co(II), Pb(II) and Ni (II) from water samples prior to their simultaneous determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The procedure is based on the injection of a ternary solvent system composed of appropriate quantities of extraction solvent (trichloroethylene), dispersive solvent (ethanol), and the chelating reagent 2-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-p-cresol into the sample solution. The solution turns turbid immediately after injection, and the analytes are extracted into the droplets of the organic phase which was dried and dissolved in a mixture of Triton X-114, nitric acid, and ethanol. The metal ions in this mixture were quantified by ICP-OES. The detection limits under optimized conditions are 0.2, 0.3, 0.2 and 0.7 μg L -1 for Cd(II), Co(II), Pb(II) and Ni(II), respectively. The enrichment factors were also calculated for Cd (13), Co (11), Pb (11) and Ni (8). The procedure was applied to the determination of cadmium, cobalt, lead and nickel in certified reference material (waterway sediment) and water samples. (author)

  4. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry — Critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bings, N.H.; Orlandini von Niessen, J.O.; Schaper, J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally

  5. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry — Critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bings, N.H., E-mail: bings@uni-mainz.de; Orlandini von Niessen, J.O.; Schaper, J.N.

    2014-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally

  6. Trends in preconcentration procedures for metal determination using atomic spectrometry techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoi Pereira, M. de; Arruda, M.A.Z.

    2003-01-01

    Methods for metal preconcentration are often described in the literature. However, purposes are often different, depending on whether the methods are applied in environmental, clinical or technological fields. The respective method needs to be efficient, give high sensitivity, and ideally also is selective which is useful when used in combination with atomic spectroscopy. This review presents the actual tendencies in metal preconcentration using techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Procedures based on related to electrochemical, coprecipitation/precipitation, liquid-liquid and solid-liquid extraction and atom trapping mechanisms are presented. (author)

  7. Nature of unresolved complex mixture in size-distributed emissions from residential wood combustion as measured by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Michael D.; Smith, N. Dean; Dong, Yuanji

    2004-08-01

    Unresolved complex mixture (UCM) is an analytical artifact of gas chromatographs of combustion source-related fine aerosol extracts. In this study the UCM is examined in size-resolved fine aerosol emissions from residential wood combustion. The aerosols are sorted by size in an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and subsequently analyzed by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). A semiquantitative system for predicting the branched alkane, cycloalkane, alkylbenzene, C3-, C4-, C5-alkylbenzene, methylnaphthalene, C3-, C4-, C5-alkylnaphthalene, methylphenanthrene C2-, C3-alkylphenanthrene, and dibenzothiophene concentrations in the UCM is introduced. Analysis by TD/GS/MS detects UCM on each ELPI stage for all six combustion tests. The UCM baseline among the different fuel types is variable. In particular, the UCM of Pseudotsuga sp. is enriched in later-eluting compounds of lower volatility. A high level of reproducibility is achieved in determining UCM areas. UCM fractions (UCM ion area/total extracted ion chromatograph area) by individual ELPI stage return a mean relative standard deviation of 19.1% over the entire combustion test set, indicating a highly consistent UCM fraction across the ELPI size boundaries. Among the molecular ions investigated, branched alkane (m/z 57) and dibenzothiophene (m/z 212 and 226) constituents are most abundant in UCM emissions from RWC, collectively accounting for 64-95% of the targeted chemical species. The total UCM emissions span 446-756 mg/kg of dry biomass burned and correspond to an upper limit of 7.1% of the PM2.5 mass. The UCM emissions are primarily accumulation mode (0.1 μm ≤ aerodynamic diameter (da) ≤ 1 μm), with a geometric mean diameter (dg) range of 120.3-518.4 nm. UCM in PM2.5 is chemically asymmetric (shifted to finer da), typically clustering at da ≤ 1 μm. Measurable shifts in dg and changes in distribution widths (σg) on an intratest basis suggest that the particle density

  8. Early biotic stress detection in tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) by BVOC emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasal-Slavik, Tina; Eschweiler, Julia; Kleist, Einhard; Mumm, Roland; Goldbach, Heiner E.; Schouten, Sander; Wildt, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    We investigated impacts of early and mild biotic stress on Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) emissions from tomato in order to test their potential for early (biotic) stress detection. Tomato plants were exposed to two common fungal pathogens, Botrytis cinerea and Oidium neolycopesici and

  9. Use of magnesium as a test element for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermet, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    To optimize atomization and ionization processes in an inductively coupled plasma used as a source in atomic emission spectrometry, the Mg II 280.270-nm/Mg I 285-213-nm line intensity ratio is used. A theoretic ratio is calculated assuming a local thermodynamic equilibrium.A review of previously published experimental values of the ratio is given as a function of the parameters influencing the energy transfer between the plasma and injected species. In particular, the effects of the power, the carrier gas flow-rate, the i.d. of the torch injector, the use of a sheathing gas and the presence of hydrogen are described. Values of the ratio close to the theoretical values are obtained with a high power (>1.4 kW), a lower carrier gas flow-rate ( -1 ) and a large i.d. of the injector (>2 mm). This optimization can also be applied to the minimization of interference effects due to the presence of sodium. (author). 64 refs.; 9 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Flow injection on-line dilution for multi-element determination in human urine with detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jianhua; Hansen, Elo Harald; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2001-01-01

    A simple flow injection on-line dilution procedure with detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for the determination of copper, zinc, arsenic, lead, selenium, nickel and molybdenum in human urine. Matrix effects were minimized by employing a dilution factor...

  11. Probing protein surface with a solvent mimetic carbene coupled to detection by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Gabriela E; Mundo, Mariana R; Craig, Patricio O; Delfino, José M

    2012-01-01

    Much knowledge into protein folding, ligand binding, and complex formation can be derived from the examination of the nature and size of the accessible surface area (SASA) of the polypeptide chain, a key parameter in protein science not directly measurable in an experimental fashion. To this end, an ideal chemical approach should aim at exerting solvent mimicry and achieving minimal selectivity to probe the protein surface regardless of its chemical nature. The choice of the photoreagent diazirine to fulfill these goals arises from its size comparable to water and from being a convenient source of the extremely reactive methylene carbene (:CH(2)). The ensuing methylation depends primarily on the solvent accessibility of the polypeptide chain, turning it into a valuable signal to address experimentally the measurement of SASA in proteins. The superb sensitivity and high resolution of modern mass spectrometry techniques allows us to derive a quantitative signal proportional to the extent of modification (EM) of the sample. Thus, diazirine labeling coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection can shed light on conformational features of the native as well as non-native states, not easily addressable by other methods. Enzymatic fragmentation of the polypeptide chain at the level of small peptides allows us to locate the covalent tag along the amino acid sequence, therefore enabling the construction of a map of solvent accessibility. Moreover, by subsequent MS/MS analysis of peptides, we demonstrate here the feasibility of attaining amino acid resolution in defining the target sites. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  12. Redox-Triggered Bonding-Induced Emission of Thiol-Functionalized Gold Nanoclusters for Luminescence Turn-On Detection of Molecular Oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Hang; Feng, Hui; Zhao, Mengting; Zhao, Meizhi; Chen, Jianrong; Qian, Zhaosheng

    2017-11-22

    Most optical sensors for molecular oxygen were developed based on the quenching effect of the luminescence of oxygen-sensitive probes; however, the signal turn-off mode of these probes is undesirable to quantify and visualize molecular oxygen. Herein, we report a novel luminescence turn-on detection strategy for molecular oxygen via the specific oxygen-triggered bonding-induced emission of thiol-functionalized gold nanoclusters. Thiol-functionalized gold nanoclusters were prepared by a facile one-step synthesis, and as-prepared gold nanoclusters possess significant aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property. It is the first time to discover the oxygen-triggered bonding-induced emission (BIE) behavior of gold nanoclusters, which results in disulfide-linked covalent bonding assemblies with intensely red luminescence. This specific redox-triggered BIE is capable of quantitatively detecting dissolved oxygen in aqueous solution in a light-up manner, and trace amount of dissolved oxygen at ppb level is achieved based on this detection method. A facile and convenient test strip for oxygen detection was also developed to monitor molecular oxygen in a gas matrix. Covalent bonding-induced emission is proven to be a more efficient way to attain high brightness of AIEgens than a physical aggregation-induced emission process, and provides a more convenient and desirable detection method for molecular oxygen than the previous sensors.

  13. Influence of Culture Media on Detection of Carbapenem Hydrolysis by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Ana Carolina; Carvalhaes, Cecília Godoy; Cordeiro-Moura, Jhonatha Rodrigo; Rockstroh, Anna Carolina; Machado, Antonia Maria Oliveira; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the influence of distinct bacterial growth media on detection of carbapenemase hydrolysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. False-negative results were observed for OXA-25-, OXA-26-, and OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates grown on MacConkey agar medium. The other culture media showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for detecting carbapenemase. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Normal-Gamma-Bernoulli Peak Detection for Analysis of Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongho; Jang, Hyejeong; Koo, Imhoi; Lee, Joohyoung; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Compared to other analytical platforms, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) has much increased separation power for analysis of complex samples and thus is increasingly used in metabolomics for biomarker discovery. However, accurate peak detection remains a bottleneck for wide applications of GC×GC-MS. Therefore, the normal-exponential-Bernoulli (NEB) model is generalized by gamma distribution and a new peak detection algorithm using the normal-gamma-Bernoulli (NGB) model is developed. Unlike the NEB model, the NGB model has no closed-form analytical solution, hampering its practical use in peak detection. To circumvent this difficulty, three numerical approaches, which are fast Fourier transform (FFT), the first-order and the second-order delta methods (D1 and D2), are introduced. The applications to simulated data and two real GC×GC-MS data sets show that the NGB-D1 method performs the best in terms of both computational expense and peak detection performance.

  15. Determination of hafnium at the 10−4% level (relative to zirconium content) using neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik, Marek; Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina; Hubicki, Zbigniew; Jakóbik-Kolon, Agata; Danko, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We worked out ICP-MS method of Hf determination in Zr and Zr compounds. •We used NAA method as reference one. •We obtained pure zirconium matrix by ion exchange (Diphonix ® resin). •These permit to determine ≥1 × 10 −4 % Hf in Zr sample by ICP MS with good precision and accuracy. -- Abstract: Hafnium at the very low level of 1–8 ppm (in relation to zirconium) was determined in zirconium sulfate solutions (originating from investigations of the separation of ca. 44 ppm Hf from zirconium by means of the ion exchange method) by using three independent methods: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results of NAA and ICP MS determinations were consistent with each other across the entire investigated range (the RSD of both methods did not exceed 38%). The results of ICP-AES determination were more diverse, particularly at less than 5 ppm Hf (RSD was significantly higher: 29–253%). The ion exchange method exploiting Diphonix ® resin proved sufficient efficiency in Zr–Hf separation when the initial concentration ratio of the elements ([Zr] 0 /[Hf] 0 ) ranged from 1200 to ca. 143,000

  16. Multielement detection limits and sample nebulization efficiencies of an improved ultrasonic nebulizer and a conventional pneumatic nebulizer in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.W.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Fassel, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Two important aspects of the analytical performance of a newly developed ultrasonic nebulizer and a specially designed pneumatic nebulizer have been compared for use in inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The ultrasonic nebulizer, when combined with a conventional aerosol desolvation apparatus, provided an order of magnitude or more improvement in simultaneous multielement detection limits as compared to those obtained when the pneumatic nebulizer was used either with or without desolvation. Application of a novel method for direct measurement of the overall efficiency of nebulization to the two systems showed that an approximately tenfold greater rate of sample delivery to the plasma torch was primarily responsible for the superior detection limits afforded by the ultrasonic nebulizer. A unique feature of the ultrasonic nebulizer described is the protection against chemical attack which is achieved by completely enclosing the transducer in an acoustically coupled borosilicate glass cylinder. Direct sample introduction, convenient sample change, and rapid cleanout are other important characteristics of the system which make it an attractive alternate to pneumatic nebulizer systems

  17. Study on Leak Detection of the Pipeline System by Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, D. J.; Kim, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    Leak detection testing for the pipeline system was performed by the acoustic emission method. It was found that the detected signal spectrum was influenced by the frequency response of sensors and pressure changes. AE parameters and frequency spectrum distributions were used to analyze the leak signals. The slope rise time of AE parameters were the important factors for distinguishing leak signals. The amplitude of leak signal was more affected by the changes of leak, rate and pressure than those of leak type

  18. Detection of CI line emission towards the oxygen-rich AGB star omi Ceti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, M.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; De Beck, E.; Montez, R.; Ramstedt, S.

    2018-05-01

    We present the detection of neutral atomic carbon CI(3P1-3P0) line emission towards omi Cet. This is the first time that CI is detected in the envelope around an oxygen-rich M-type asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star. We also confirm the previously tentative CI detection around V Hya, a carbon-rich AGB star. As one of the main photodissociation products of parent species in the circumstellar envelope (CSE) around evolved stars, CI can be used to trace sources of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in CSEs. The observed flux density towards omi Cet can be reproduced by a shell with a peak atomic fractional abundance of 2.4 × 10-5 predicted based on a simple chemical model where CO is dissociated by the interstellar radiation field. However, the CI emission is shifted by 4 km s-1 from the stellar velocity. Based on this velocity shift, we suggest that the detected CI emission towards omi Cet potentially arises from a compact region near its hot binary companion. The velocity shift could, therefore, be the result of the orbital velocity of the binary companion around omi Cet. In this case, the CI column density is estimated to be 1.1 × 1019 cm-2. This would imply that strong UV radiation from the companion and/or accretion of matter between two stars is most likely the origin of the CI enhancement. However, this hypothesis can be confirmed by high-angular resolution observations.

  19. Velocity-space sensitivity of neutron spectrometry measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Eriksson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron emission spectrometry (NES) measures the energies of neutrons produced in fusion reactions. Here we present velocity-space weight functions for NES and neutron yield measurements. Weight functions show the sensitivity as well as the accessible regions in velocity space for a given range...

  20. Speciation of chromium by dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction followed by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry detection (DLLME–LIBS)

    OpenAIRE

    Gaubeur, Ivanise; Aguirre Pastor, Miguel Ángel; Kovachev, Nikolay; Hidalgo Núñez, Montserrat; Canals Hernández, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an analytical methodology based on a combination of dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction with laser-induced breakdown spectrometry was evaluated for simultaneous pre-concentration, speciation and detection of Cr. The microextraction procedure was based on the injection of appropriated quantities of 1-undecanol and ethanol into a sample solution containing the complexes formed between Cr(VI) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC). The main experimental factors affecting the compl...

  1. Radio-frequency glow discharge spectrometry: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winchester, Michael R.; Payling, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a critical review of analytical radio frequency glow discharge spectrometry (rf-GDS). The historical foundations of rf-GDS are described, and current knowledge of the fundamental physics of analytical rf glow discharges is discussed. Additionally, instrumentation, methodologies, and applications of rf glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (rf-GDOES) and mass spectrometry (rf-GDMS) are reviewed. Although other rf-GDS techniques have appeared [e.g. rf glow discharge atomic absorption spectrophotometry (rf-GDAAS)], the emphasis is placed upon rf-GDOES and rf-GDMS, because they have received by far the most interest from analytical chemical metrologists. This review also provides explanations of some developments that are needed for further progress in the field of analytical rf-GDS

  2. Analysis of human plasma lipids by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual detection and with the support of high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry for structural elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salivo, Simona; Beccaria, Marco; Sullini, Giuseppe; Tranchida, Peter Q; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of the present research is the analysis of the unsaponifiable lipid fraction of human plasma by using data derived from comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual quadrupole mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection. This approach enabled us to attain both mass spectral information and analyte percentage data. Furthermore, gas chromatography coupled with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to increase the reliability of identification of several unsaponifiable lipid constituents. The synergism between both the high-resolution gas chromatography and mass spectrometry processes enabled us to attain a more in-depth knowledge of the unsaponifiable fraction of human plasma. Additionally, information was attained on the fatty acid and triacylglycerol composition of the plasma samples, subjected to investigation by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual quadrupole mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection and high-performance liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry, respectively. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Online Determination of Sm, Eu and Yb in Environmental Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dilip Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A procedure was developed for the determination of Sm, Eu and Yb in water samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES after preconcentration on synthesized 5-(4-pyridyl azo-8-quinolinol supported by Borassus flabellifer inflorescence (BFI. The sorbed element was subsequently eluted with 0.4 M HNO3 and the acid eluates were analyzed by ICP-OES. Under the optimal conditions, Sm, Eu and Yb in aqueous samples were concentrated 100-fold. Recoveries were obtained by the proposed method in the range of 98.6 -99.8%. This method was also applied for the analysis of spiked and natural water samples. The results provide strong evidence to support the hypothesis of an adsorption mechanism.

  4. Gamma-emissions of some meteorites and terrestrial rocks. Evaluation of lunar soil radioactivity; Emissions gamma de quelques meteorites et roches terrestres. Evaluation de la radioactivite du sol lunaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordemann, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    The gamma-emissions of some terrestrial rocks and of the following meteorites: Bogou, Eagle-Station, Granes, and Dosso were studied by quantitative low background gamma spectrometry. These measurements and their interpretation lead to the evaluation of the possible gamma-emissions of several models of lunar soils. (author) [French] Les emissions gamma des meteorites Bogou, Eagle-Station, Granes et Dosso et de quelques roches terrestres ont ete etudiees par spectrometrie gamma quantitative a faible mouvement propre. Ces mesures et leur interpretation permettent d'evaluer les principales contributions des emissions gamma du sol lunaire pour des modeles de compositions possibles variees. (auteur)

  5. Gamma-emissions of some meteorites and terrestrial rocks. Evaluation of lunar soil radioactivity; Emissions gamma de quelques meteorites et roches terrestres. Evaluation de la radioactivite du sol lunaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordemann, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    The gamma-emissions of some terrestrial rocks and of the following meteorites: Bogou, Eagle-Station, Granes, and Dosso were studied by quantitative low background gamma spectrometry. These measurements and their interpretation lead to the evaluation of the possible gamma-emissions of several models of lunar soils. (author) [French] Les emissions gamma des meteorites Bogou, Eagle-Station, Granes et Dosso et de quelques roches terrestres ont ete etudiees par spectrometrie gamma quantitative a faible mouvement propre. Ces mesures et leur interpretation permettent d'evaluer les principales contributions des emissions gamma du sol lunaire pour des modeles de compositions possibles variees. (auteur)

  6. Improved detection limit for {sup 59}Ni using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Per; Erlandsson, Bengt; Hellborg, Ragnar; Kiisk, Madis; Larsson, Ragnar; Skog, Goeran; Stenstroem, Kristina [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics

    2002-11-01

    59 Ni is produced by neutron activation in the stainless steel close to the core of a nuclear reactor. To be able to classify the different parts of the reactor with respect to their content of long-lived radionuclides before final storage it is important to measure the 59 Ni level. Accelerator mass spectrometry is an ultra-sensitive method for counting atoms, suitable for 59 Ni measurements. Improvements in the reduction of the background and in the chemical reduction of cobalt, the interfering isobar, have been made. This chemical purification is essential when using small tandem accelerators, <3 MV, combined with the detection of characteristic projectile X-rays. These improvements have lowered the detection limit for 59 Ni by a factor of twenty compared with the first value reported for the Lund AMS facility. Material from the Swedish nuclear industry has been analysed and examples of the results are presented.

  7. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) of actinides: Pushing the limits of accuracy and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stefan; Boulyga, Sergei; Cunningham, Alan; Klose, Dilani; Koepf, Andreas; Poths, Jane [Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Stephan [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC-EU, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    New method developments in multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) for actinide isotope ratio analysis to improve accuracy and limits of detection will be presented. With respect to limits of detection, results on improving work function using various carbon additives will be reviewed and presented as well as developments in cavity ion source (as compared to standard flat ribbon filament ion source) for femto- and attogram levels of uranium, plutonium, and americium. With respect to accuracy, results on isotope ratio measurements of isotopes of uranium (relative accuracy of 0.3% to 0.01%) are presented with an example being U-234-Th-230 age-dating (NBL CRM 112-A). In this context, the importance of traceability (to the S.I. units) and the use of (certified) reference materials are emphasized. The focus of this presentation is on applications to nuclear safeguards / forensics.

  8. A Computational Drug Metabolite Detection Using the Stable Isotopic Mass-Shift Filtering with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry in Pioglitazone and Flurbiprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Miyamoto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The identification of metabolites in drug discovery is important. At present, radioisotopes and mass spectrometry are both widely used. However, rapid and comprehensive identification is still laborious and difficult. In this study, we developed new analytical software and employed a stable isotope as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. A deuterium-labeled compound and non-labeled compound were both metabolized in human liver microsomes and analyzed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS. We computationally aligned two different MS data sets and filtered ions having a specific mass-shift equal to masses of labeled isotopes between those data using our own software. For pioglitazone and flurbiprofen, eight and four metabolites, respectively, were identified with calculations of mass and formulas and chemical structural fragmentation analysis. With high resolution MS, the approach became more accurate. The approach detected two unexpected metabolites in pioglitazone, i.e., the hydroxypropanamide form and the aldehyde hydrolysis form, which other approaches such as metabolite-biotransformation list matching and mass defect filtering could not detect. We demonstrated that the approach using computational alignment and stable isotopic mass-shift filtering has the ability to identify drug metabolites and is useful in drug discovery.

  9. Detection of biological particles in ambient air using Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McJimpsey, E L; Steele, P T; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M; Tobias, H J; Lebrilla, C

    2006-01-01

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is an instrument used for the real time detection and identification of biological aerosols. Particles are drawn from the atmosphere directly into vacuum and tracked as they scatter light from several continuous wave lasers. After tracking, the fluorescence of individual particles is excited by a pulsed 266nm or 355nm laser. Molecules from those particles with appropriate fluorescence properties are subsequently desorbed and ionized using a pulsed 266nm laser. Resulting ions are analyzed in a dual polarity mass spectrometer. During two field deployments at the San Francisco International Airport, millions of ambient particles were analyzed and a small but significant fraction were found to have fluorescent properties similar to Bacillus spores and vegetative cells. Further separation of non-biological background particles from potential biological particles was accomplished using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This has been shown to enable some level of species differentiation in specific cases, but the creation and observation of higher mass ions is needed to enable a higher level of specificity across more species. A soft ionization technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is being investigated for this purpose. MALDI is particularly well suited for mass analysis of biomolecules since it allows for the generation of molecular ions from large mass compounds that would fragment under normal irradiation. Some of the initial results from a modified BAMS system utilizing this technique are described

  10. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Kristian E; Moritz, Robert L

    2012-10-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas-phase ions by their behavior in strong and weak electric fields. FAIMS is easily interfaced with electrospray ionization and has been implemented as an additional separation mode between liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in proteomic studies. FAIMS separation is orthogonal to both LC and MS and is used as a means of on-line fractionation to improve the detection of peptides in complex samples. FAIMS improves dynamic range and concomitantly the detection limits of ions by filtering out chemical noise. FAIMS can also be used to remove interfering ion species and to select peptide charge states optimal for identification by tandem MS. Here, the authors review recent developments in LC-FAIMS-MS and its application to MS-based proteomics.

  11. Multiplexed microRNA detection using lanthanide-labeled DNA probes and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun

    2014-01-01

    coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Three miRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana were analyzed simultaneously with high specificity, and the sensitivity of the method was comparable to radioactive detection (low femtomol range). The perspective of the developed method is highly multiplexed......In the past decade, microRNAs (miRNAs) have drawn increasing attention due to their role in regulation of gene expression. Especially, their potential as biomarkers in disease diagnostics has motivated miRNA research, including the development of simple, accurate, and sensitive detection methods....... The narrow size range of miRNAs (20-24 nucleotides) combined with the chemical properties of conventional reporter tags has hampered the development of multiplexed miRNA assays. In this study, we have used lanthanide-labeled DNA probes for the detection of miRNAs on membranes using laser ablation inductively...

  12. Possible detection of an emission feature near 584 A in the direction of G191-B2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James; Bowyer, Stuart; Jelinsky, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    A possible spectral emission feature is reported in the direction of the nearby hot white dwarf G191-B2B at 581.5 + or - 6 A with a significance of 3.8 sigma. This emission has been identified as He I 584.3 A. The emission cannot be due to local geocoronal emission or interplanetary backscatter of solar He I 584 A emission because the feature is not detected in a nearby sky exposure. Possible sources for this emission are examined, including the photosphere of G191-B2B, the comparison star G191-B2A, and a possible nebulosity near or around G191-B2B. The parameters required to explain the emission are derived for each case. All of these explanations require unexpected physical conditions; hence we believe this result must receive confirming verification despite the statistical likelihood of the detection.

  13. Possible detection of an emission feature near 584 A in the direction of G191-B2B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J.; Bowyer, S.; Jelinsky, P.

    1990-01-01

    A possible spectral emission feature is reported in the direction of the nearby hot white dwarf G191-B2B at 581.5 + or - 6 A with a significance of 3.8 sigma. This emission has been identified as He I 584.3 A. The emission cannot be due to local geocoronal emission or interplanetary backscatter of solar He I 584 A emission because the feature is not detected in a nearby sky exposure. Possible sources for this emission are examined, including the photosphere of G191-B2B, the comparison star G191-B2A, and a possible nebulosity near or around G191-B2B. The parameters required to explain the emission are derived for each case. All of these explanations require unexpected physical conditions; hence we believe this result must receive confirming verification despite the statistical likelihood of the detection. 15 refs

  14. Theoretical evaluation of the detectability of random lesions in bayesian emission reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi

    2003-01-01

    Detecting cancerous lesion is an important task in positron emission tomography (PET). Bayesian methods based on the maximum a posteriori principle (also called penalized maximum likelihood methods) have been developed to deal with the low signal to noise ratio in the emission data. Similar to the filter cut-off frequency in the filtered backprojection method, the prior parameters in Bayesian reconstruction control the resolution and noise trade-off and hence affect detectability of lesions in reconstructed images. Bayesian reconstructions are difficult to analyze because the resolution and noise properties are nonlinear and object-dependent. Most research has been based on Monte Carlo simulations, which are very time consuming. Building on the recent progress on the theoretical analysis of image properties of statistical reconstructions and the development of numerical observers, here we develop a theoretical approach for fast computation of lesion detectability in Bayesian reconstruction. The results can be used to choose the optimum hyperparameter for the maximum lesion detectability. New in this work is the use of theoretical expressions that explicitly model the statistical variation of the lesion and background without assuming that the object variation is (locally) stationary. The theoretical results are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. The comparisons show good agreement between the theoretical predications and the Monte Carlo results

  15. Use of gradient dilution to flag and overcome matrix interferences in axial-viewing inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Yan; Schwartz, Andrew J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the undisputed power of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), its users still face serious challenges in obtaining accurate analytical results. Matrix interference is perhaps the most important challenge. Dilution of a matrix-containing sample is a common practice to reduce matrix interference. However, determining the optimal dilution factor requires tedious and time-consuming offline sample preparation, since emission lines and the effect of matrix interferences are affected differently by the dilution. The current study exploits this difference by employing a high-performance liquid chromatography gradient pump prior to the nebulizer to perform on-line mixing of a sample solution and diluent. Linear gradient dilution is performed on both the calibration standard and the matrix-containing sample. By ratioing the signals from two emission lines (from the same or different elements) as a function of dilution factor, the analyst can not only identify the presence of a matrix interference, but also determine the optimal dilution factor needed to overcome the interference. A ratio that does not change with dilution signals the absence of a matrix interference, whereas a changing ratio indicates the presence of an interference. The point on the dilution profile where the ratio stabilizes indicates the optimal dilution factor to correct the interference. The current study was performed on axial-viewing ICP-AES with o-xylene as the solvent

  16. Determination of rare-earth elements content in granitic rocks by argon plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merodio, J.C.; Martinez, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed that enables the rare-earth elements in granitic rocks to be measured sequentially, using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source spectrometer with medium spectral resolution (0,02nm). The rocks were dissolved in an open system with a mixture of nitric-hydrofluoric-perchloric acids. Any residues remaining at this stage were removed by filtration and digested using a mini-fusion method with lithium tetraborate. Prior to the excitation in the spectrometer the rare-earth group was separated from other constituents using cation-exchange chromatography. A detailed study of spectral interferences and the evaluation of the detection limits have been performed. Five geochemical reference sample (granitic rocks) were analyzed and the obtained results agree favourably with recommended values and with reported determinations, using high spectral resolution ICP spectrometry. (Author) [es

  17. X-ray spectrometry induced by electron and proton bombardment: Two complementary techniques for the micro-characterization of mineral materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remond, G.; Gilles, C.; Isabelle, D.; Choi, C.G.; Rouer, O.; Cesbron, F.; Yang, C.

    1994-01-01

    Spatially resolved quantitative analysis by means of the Electron Probe Micro Analyser (EPMA) is now well established as a routine analytical method for point chemical analysis of a variety of mineral materials. Modern computer controlled EPMA are most often equipped with wavelength dispersive spectro- meters (WDS). Quantitative analyses are generally carried out according to a standard based approach, i. e, the x-ray intensities measured at the surface of the unknowns are normalized to those measured at the surface of reference specimens. By the use of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) a standardless quantitative based method is preferred when the incident beam current is not accurately known as for the case of EDS analysis coupled to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The accuracy of point analysis by means of electron beam induced x-ray spectrometry is discussed emphasizing the x-ray photon interactions respectively.The continuous x-ray emission is the physical limit of detection. The excitation conditions must be optimised in order to obtain the higher peak to continuous emission intensity ratios for each element within the matrix. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) complements this electron induced x-ray emission for the localization of elements present at trace levels. The experimental procedure used for quantitative analysis by means of PIXE is illustrated emphasizing the use of a limited number of reference materials for deriving quantitative data from the raw PIXE spectra. The complementarity of EMPA/SEM and PIXE techniques is illustrated for the case of rare-earth elements (REE) bearing natural and synthetic doped zircon crystals (Si Zr O sub 4). For such compounds x-ray spectra are very complex because of the existence of severe peak overlaps between the L x-ray emission spectra of the REE. It is shown that cathodoluminescence (EPLA:SEM) and ionoluminescence (PIXE) may be an original alternative approach to x-ray spectrometry for studying REE

  18. Exhaled breath analysis for lung cancer detection using ion mobility spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Handa

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for lung cancer detection including computed tomography (CT and bronchoscopy are expensive and invasive. Thus, there is still a need for an optimal lung cancer detection technique.The exhaled breath of 50 patients with lung cancer histologically proven by bronchoscopic biopsy samples (32 adenocarcinomas, 10 squamous cell carcinomas, 8 small cell carcinomas, were analyzed using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS and compared with 39 healthy volunteers. As a secondary assessment, we compared adenocarcinoma patients with and without epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation.A decision tree algorithm could separate patients with lung cancer including adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. One hundred-fifteen separated volatile organic compound (VOC peaks were analyzed. Peak-2 noted as n-Dodecane using the IMS database was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 70.0% and a specificity of 89.7%. Incorporating a decision tree algorithm starting with n-Dodecane, a sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 100% was achieved. Comparing VOC peaks between adenocarcinoma and healthy subjects, n-Dodecane was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 81.3% and a specificity of 89.7%. Fourteen patients positive for EGFR mutation displayed a significantly higher n-Dodecane than for the 14 patients negative for EGFR (p<0.01, with a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 78.6%.In this prospective study, VOC peak patterns using a decision tree algorithm were useful in the detection of lung cancer. Moreover, n-Dodecane analysis from adenocarcinoma patients might be useful to discriminate the EGFR mutation.

  19. Emission of VOC's from modified rendering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, Z.A.; Raja, I.A.; Saddique, M.; Langenhove, H.V.

    2005-01-01

    Rendering technique for processing of dead animal and slaughterhouse wastes into valuable products. It involves cooking of raw material and later Sterilization was added to reduce the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). Studies have been carried out on rendering emission, with the normal cooking process. Our study shows, that the sterilization step in rendering process increases the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC's). Gas samples, containing VOC's, were analyzed by the GC/MS (Gas Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometry). The most important groups of compounds- alcohols and cyclic hydrocarbons were identified. In the group of alcohol; 1-butanol, l-pentanol and l-hexanol compounds were found while in the group of cyclic hydrocarbon; methyl cyclopentane and cyclohexane compounds were detected. Other groups like aldehyde, sulphur containing compounds, ketone and furan were also found. Some compounds, like l-pentanol, 2-methyl propanal, dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, which belong to these groups, cause malodor. It is important to know these compounds to treat odorous gasses. (author)

  20. Protein biomarker discovery and fast monitoring for the identification and detection of Anisakids by parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Mónica; Gallardo, José M; Pascual, Santiago; González, Ángel F; Medina, Isabel

    2016-06-16

    Anisakids are fish-borne parasites that are responsible for a large number of human infections and allergic reactions around the world. World health organizations and food safety authorities aim to control and prevent this emerging health problem. In the present work, a new method for the fast monitoring of these parasites is described. The strategy is divided in three steps: (i) purification of thermostable proteins from fish-borne parasites (Anisakids), (ii) in-solution HIFU trypsin digestion and (iii) monitoring of several peptide markers by parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) mass spectrometry. This methodology allows the fast detection of Anisakids in Biomarker Discovery and the Fast Monitoring for the identification and detection of Anisakids in fishery products. The strategy is based on the purification of thermostable proteins, the use of accelerated in-solution trypsin digestions under an ultrasonic field provided by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) and the monitoring of several peptide biomarkers by Parallel Reaction Monitoring (PRM) Mass Spectrometry in a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The workflow allows the unequivocal detection of Anisakids, in <2h. The present strategy constitutes the fastest method for Anisakids detection, whose application in the food quality control area, could provide to the authorities an effective and rapid method to guarantee the safety to the consumers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Detection of Biofouling on Water Purification Membranes by Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakka Ravindran, Swathy; Kumar, Ramesh; Srimany, Amitava; Philip, Ligy; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2018-01-02

    By direct analysis of water purification membranes using ambient ionization mass spectrometry, an attempt has been made to understand the molecular signatures of bacterial fouling. Membrane based purification methods are used extensively in water treatment, and a major challenge for them is biofouling. The buildup of microbes and their extracellular polymeric matrix clog the purification membranes and reduce their efficiency. To understand the early stages of bacterial fouling on water purification membranes, we have used desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS), where ion formation occurs in ambient conditions and the ionization event is surface sensitive. Biosurfactants at the air-water interface generated by microorganisms as a result of quorum sensing, influence the water-membrane interface and are important for the bacterial attachment. We show that these biosurfactants produced by bacteria can be indicator molecular species signifying initiation of biofilms on membrane surfaces, demonstrated by specific DESI MS signatures. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the best studied models for biofilm formation, this process is mediated by rhamnolipids forewarning bacterial fouling. Species dependent variation of such molecules can be used for the precise identification of the microorganisms, as revealed by studies on P. aeroginosa (ATCC 25619). The production of biosurfactants is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level by the quorum-sensing (QS) response. Thus, secretion of these extracellular molecules across the membrane surface allows rapid screening of the biofilm community. We show that, the ambient ionization mass spectrometry can detect certain toxic heavy metals present in water, using surfactant-metal complexes as analytes. We believe that such studies conducted on membranes in various input water streams will help design suitable membrane processes specific to the input streams.

  2. High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kiuchi, Kenta [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2017-10-10

    We investigate current and future prospects for coincident detection of high-energy neutrinos and gravitational waves (GWs). Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are believed to originate from mergers of compact star binaries involving neutron stars. We estimate high-energy neutrino fluences from prompt emission, extended emission (EE), X-ray flares, and plateau emission, and we show that neutrino signals associated with the EE are the most promising. Assuming that the cosmic-ray loading factor is ∼10 and the Lorentz factor distribution is lognormal, we calculate the probability of neutrino detection from EE by current and future neutrino detectors, and we find that the quasi-simultaneous detection of high-energy neutrinos, gamma-rays, and GWs is possible with future instruments or even with current instruments for nearby SGRBs having EE. We also discuss stacking analyses that will also be useful with future experiments such as IceCube-Gen2.

  3. Detection of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in urine by gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklerov, J H; Kalasinsky, K S; Ehorn, C A

    1999-10-01

    A confirmatory method for the detection and quantitation of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is presented. The method employs gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) using an internal ionization ion trap detector for sensitive MS-MS-in-time measurements of LSD extracted from urine. Following a single-step solid-phase extraction of 5 mL of urine, underivatized LSD can be measured with limits of quantitation and detection of 80 and 20 pg/mL, respectively. Temperature-programmed on-column injections of urine extracts were linear over the concentration range 20-2000 pg/mL (r2 = 0.999). Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were LSD-positive samples in this laboratory. Comparisons with alternate GC-MS methods and extraction procedures are discussed.

  4. Trace detection of organic compounds in complex sample matrixes by single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry: real-time detection of security-relevant compounds and online analysis of the coffee-roasting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Elisabeth; Kürten, Andreas; Hölzer, Jasper; Mitschke, Stefan; Mühlberger, Fabian; Sklorz, Martin; Wieser, Jochen; Ulrich, Andreas; Pütz, Michael; Schulte-Ladbeck, Rasmus; Schultze, Rainer; Curtius, Joachim; Borrmann, Stephan; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2009-06-01

    An in-house-built ion trap mass spectrometer combined with a soft ionization source has been set up and tested. As ionization source, an electron beam pumped vacuum UV (VUV) excimer lamp (EBEL) was used for single-photon ionization. It was shown that soft ionization allows the reduction of fragmentation of the target analytes and the suppression of most matrix components. Therefore, the combination of photon ionization with the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) capability of an ion trap yields a powerful tool for molecular ion peak detection and identification of organic trace compounds in complex matrixes. This setup was successfully tested for two different applications. The first one is the detection of security-relevant substances like explosives, narcotics, and chemical warfare agents. One test substance from each of these groups was chosen and detected successfully with single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (SPI-ITMS) MS/MS measurements. Additionally, first tests were performed, demonstrating that this method is not influenced by matrix compounds. The second field of application is the detection of process gases. Here, exhaust gas from coffee roasting was analyzed in real time, and some of its compounds were identified using MS/MS studies.

  5. Emerging mass spectrometry techniques for the direct analysis of microbial colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the emerging areas in microbiology is detecting specialized metabolites produced by microbial colonies and communities with mass spectrometry. In this review/perspective, we illustrate the emerging mass spectrometry methodologies that enable the interrogation of specialized metabolites directly from microbial colonies. Mass spectrometry techniques such as imaging mass spectrometry and real-time mass spectrometry allow two and three dimensional visualization of the distri...

  6. Efficiency transfer using the GEANT4 code of CERN for HPGe gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagren, S.; Tekaya, M.Ben; Reguigui, N.; Gharbi, F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we apply the GEANT4 code of CERN to calculate the peak efficiency in High Pure Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry using three different procedures. The first is a direct calculation. The second corresponds to the usual case of efficiency transfer between two different configurations at constant emission energy assuming a reference point detection configuration and the third, a new procedure, consists on the transfer of the peak efficiency between two detection configurations emitting the gamma ray in different energies assuming a “virtual” reference point detection configuration. No pre-optimization of the detector geometrical characteristics was performed before the transfer to test the ability of the efficiency transfer to reduce the effect of the ignorance on their real magnitude on the quality of the transferred efficiency. The obtained and measured efficiencies were found in good agreement for the two investigated methods of efficiency transfer. The obtained agreement proves that Monte Carlo method and especially the GEANT4 code constitute an efficient tool to obtain accurate detection efficiency values. The second investigated efficiency transfer procedure is useful to calibrate the HPGe gamma detector for any emission energy value for a voluminous source using one point source detection efficiency emitting in a different energy as a reference efficiency. The calculations preformed in this work were applied to the measurement exercise of the EUROMET428 project. A measurement exercise where an evaluation of the full energy peak efficiencies in the energy range 60–2000 keV for a typical coaxial p-type HpGe detector and several types of source configuration: point sources located at various distances from the detector and a cylindrical box containing three matrices was performed. - Highlights: • The GEANT4 code of CERN has been used to transfer the peak efficiency from point to points and voluminous detection configurations in HPGe gamma

  7. ETHYL CYANIDE ON TITAN: SPECTROSCOPIC DETECTION AND MAPPING USING ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Palmer, M. Y.; Nixon, C. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Mumma, M. J.; Serigano, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen’s Road, Bristol, BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Kisiel, Z. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikøw 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Kuan, Y.-J.; Chuang, Y.-L. [National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Wang, K.-S., E-mail: martin.cordiner@nasa.gov [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-10

    We report the first spectroscopic detection of ethyl cyanide (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN) in Titan’s atmosphere, obtained using spectrally and spatially resolved observations of multiple emission lines with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The presence of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN in Titan’s ionosphere was previously inferred from Cassini ion mass spectrometry measurements of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CNH{sup +}. Here we report the detection of 27 rotational lines from C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN (in 19 separate emission features detected at >3σ confidence) in the frequency range 222–241 GHz. Simultaneous detections of multiple emission lines from HC{sub 3}N, CH{sub 3}CN, and CH{sub 3}CCH were also obtained. In contrast to HC{sub 3}N, CH{sub 3}CN, and CH{sub 3}CCH, which peak in Titan’s northern (spring) hemisphere, the emission from C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN is found to be concentrated in the southern (autumn) hemisphere, suggesting a distinctly different chemistry for this species, consistent with a relatively short chemical lifetime for C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN. Radiative transfer models show that C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN is most concentrated at altitudes ≳200 km, suggesting production predominantly in the stratosphere and above. Vertical column densities are found to be in the range (1–5) × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}.

  8. Gas chromatography/multiphoton ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry of polychlorinated biphenyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Taiki; Uchimura, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2011-01-01

    A sample mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was measured by gas chromatography/multiphoton ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/MPI/TOF-MS) using four types of laser sources. When a fourth harmonic emission (266 nm) of a picosecond Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) was utilized, highly chlorinated PCBs larger than hepta-CBs were not observed. A fifth harmonic emission (213 nm) of the picosecond Nd:YAG laser allowed the measurement of PCBs from di-CBs to octa-CBs, and the limit of detection (LOD) was several pg for each component of PCBs. The LOD for the total amount of PCBs, which was calculated using the protocol provided by the Ministry of the Environment, Japan, was 1000 pg. The signal intensity of the congeners with chlorine atoms at the ortho positions (non-coplanar PCBs) was enhanced by using the fifth harmonic emission. When the fourth harmonic emission remaining after fifth harmonic generation was simultaneously used, the LOD for total PCBs was improved to 667 pg. The PCB sample was also measured using a third harmonic emission (267 nm) of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (800 nm), providing an LOD of 677 pg. Thus, the two-color beam (266/213 nm) of a picosecond Nd:YAG laser had a comparable, or even slightly superior, performance to the more expensive femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser.

  9. Detection and evaluation of uranium in different minerals by gamma spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergani, F.M.; Khedr, M.A.; Harith, M.A.; El Mongy, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis, detection and evaluation of source nuclear materials (e.g. uranium) in different minerals by sensitive techniques are a vital objective for uranium exploration, nuclear materials extraction, processing and verification. In this work, uranium in different geological formations was determined using gamma spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The investigated samples were collected from different regions distributed all over Egypt. The samples were then prepared for non-destructive analysis. A hyper pure germanium detector was used to measure the emitted gamma rays of uranium and its daughters in the samples. The concentrations of uranium in ppm (μg/g) in the investigated samples are given and discussed in this work. The highest uranium concentration (4354.9 ppm) was found in uranophane samples of Gattar rocks. In Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, plasma was formed by irradiating the rock surface with focused Q-switched Nd:Yag laser pulses of 7 ns pulse duration at the fundamental wavelength (1064 nm). Atoms and ions originating from the rock surface are excited and ionized in the laser produced hot plasma (∝10 000 K). The plasma emission spectral line is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma and allows identification of the uranium in the uranophane mineral. The strong atomic line at 424.2 nm is used for the qualitative identification of uranium. It can be mentioned that the elevated levels of uranium in some of the investigated uranophane samples are of great economic feasibility to be extracted. (orig.)

  10. Simultaneous Detection of Androgen and Estrogen Abuse in Breeding Animals by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/Combustion/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) Evaluated against Alternative Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Geert; Mangelinckx, Sven; Courtheyn, Dirk; De Kimpe, Norbert; Matthijs, Bert; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2015-09-02

    The administration of synthetic homologues of naturally occurring steroids can be demonstrated by measuring (13)C/(12)C isotopic ratios of their urinary metabolites. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) was used in this study to appraise in a global approach isotopic deviations of two 17β-testosterone metabolites (17α-testosterone and etiocholanolone) and one 17β-estradiol metabolite (17α-estradiol) together with those of 5-androstene-3β,17α-diol as endogenous reference compound (ERC). Intermediate precisions of 0.35‰, 1.05‰, 0.35‰, and 0.21‰, respectively, were observed (n = 8). To assess the performance of the analytical method, a bull and a heifer were treated with 17β-testosterone propionate and 17β-estradiol-3-benzoate. The sensitivity of the method permitted the demonstration of 17β-estradiol treatment up to 24 days. For 17β-testosterone treatment, the detection windows were 3 days and 24 days for the bull and the heifer, respectively. The capability of GC-MS/C/IRMS to demonstrate natural steroid abuse for urinary steroids was eventually compared to those of mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) when measuring intact steroid esters in blood and hair.

  11. Automated valve fault detection based on acoustic emission parameters and support vector machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah M. Ali

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocating compressors are one of the most used types of compressors with wide applications in industry. The most common failure in reciprocating compressors is always related to the valves. Therefore, a reliable condition monitoring method is required to avoid the unplanned shutdown in this category of machines. Acoustic emission (AE technique is one of the effective recent methods in the field of valve condition monitoring. However, a major challenge is related to the analysis of AE signal which perhaps only depends on the experience and knowledge of technicians. This paper proposes automated fault detection method using support vector machine (SVM and AE parameters in an attempt to reduce human intervention in the process. Experiments were conducted on a single stage reciprocating air compressor by combining healthy and faulty valve conditions to acquire the AE signals. Valve functioning was identified through AE waveform analysis. SVM faults detection model was subsequently devised and validated based on training and testing samples respectively. The results demonstrated automatic valve fault detection model with accuracy exceeding 98%. It is believed that valve faults can be detected efficiently without human intervention by employing the proposed model for a single stage reciprocating compressor. Keywords: Condition monitoring, Faults detection, Signal analysis, Acoustic emission, Support vector machine

  12. A method for studies on interactions between a gold-based drug and plasma proteins based on capillary electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tam T T N; Østergaard, Jesper; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    An analytical method based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection was developed for studies on the interaction of gold-containing drugs and plasma proteins using auranofin as example. A detection limit of 18 ng/mL of auranofin corresp...

  13. Strongly lensed neutral hydrogen emission: detection predictions with current and future radio interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, R. P.; Obreschkow, D.; Heywood, I.

    2015-09-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides some of the deepest views of the Universe, enabling studies of high-redshift galaxies only possible with next-generation facilities without the lensing phenomenon. To date, 21-cm radio emission from neutral hydrogen has only been detected directly out to z ˜ 0.2, limited by the sensitivity and instantaneous bandwidth of current radio telescopes. We discuss how current and future radio interferometers such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will detect lensed H I emission in individual galaxies at high redshift. Our calculations rely on a semi-analytic galaxy simulation with realistic H I discs (by size, density profile and rotation), in a cosmological context, combined with general relativistic ray tracing. Wide-field, blind H I surveys with the SKA are predicted to be efficient at discovering lensed H I systems, increasingly so at z ≳ 2. This will be enabled by the combination of the magnification boosts, the steepness of the H I luminosity function at the high-mass end, and the fact that the H I spectral line is relatively isolated in frequency. These surveys will simultaneously provide a new technique for foreground lens selection and yield the highest redshift H I emission detections. More near term (and existing) cm-wave facilities will push the high-redshift H I envelope through targeted surveys of known lenses.

  14. Determination of Phenolic Content in Different Barley Varieties and Corresponding Malts by Liquid Chromatography-diode Array Detection-Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O. Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple and reliable method for the simultaneous determination of nine phenolic compounds in barley and malted barley was established, using liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. The phenolic compounds can be easily detected with both systems, despite significant differences in sensitivity. Concentrations approximately 180-fold lower could be achieved by mass spectrometry analysis compared to diode array detection, especially for the flavan-3-ols (+-catechin and (−-epicatechin, which have poor absorptivity in the UV region. Malt samples were characterized by higher phenolic content comparing to corresponding barley varieties, revealing a significant increase of the levels of (+-catechin and (−-epicatechin during the malting process. Moreover, the industrial malting is responsible for modification on the phenolic profile from barley to malt, namely on the synthesis or release of sinapinic acid and epicatechin. Accordingly, the selection of the malting parameters, as well as the barley variety plays an important role when considering the quality and antioxidant stability of beer.

  15. Determination of uranium in seawater by fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Toshi; Kawakubo, Senkichi; Minegishi, Hisako.

    1984-01-01

    A Fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of uranium in seawater has been developed. Anion exchange separation of uranium from seawater followed by preparation of NaF-carbonate cake and by spectrometry for ultraviolet ray excited fluorescence of uranium on the fluoride host provide the trace determinaton of uranium at the subnano gram level. Anion exchange behavior, excitation-emission behavior of the uranium on the host and effects of foreign ions to the fluorescence have been presented. Appling the method to 1 ml of seawater 3 ppb of uranium has been determined. (author)

  16. Acquiring Structural Information on Virus Particles with Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, David Z.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Jarrold, Martin F.

    2016-06-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is a single-molecule technique particularly well-suited to measuring the mass and charge distributions of heterogeneous, MDa-sized ions. In this work, CDMS has been used to analyze the assembly products of two coat protein variants of bacteriophage P22. The assembly products show broad mass distributions extending from 5 to 15 MDa for A285Y and 5 to 25 MDa for A285T coat protein variants. Because the charge of large ions generated by electrospray ionization depends on their size, the charge can be used to distinguish hollow shells from more compact structures. A285T was found to form T = 4 and T = 7 procapsids, and A285Y makes a small number of T = 3 and T = 4 procapsids. Owing to the decreased stability of the A285Y and A285T particles, chemical cross-linking was required to stabilize them for electrospray CDMS. Graphical Abstract[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  18. Clinical value of whole body fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the detection of metastatic bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongyi; Pan, Lingling; Cheng, Jingyi; Hu, Silong; Xu, Junyan; Ye, Dingwei; Zhang, Yingjian

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the value of whole-body fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for the detection of metastatic bladder cancer. From December 2006 to August 2010, 60 bladder cancer patients (median age 60.5 years old, range 32-96) underwent whole body positron emission tomography/computed tomography positron emission tomography/computed tomography. The diagnostic accuracy was assessed by performing both organ-based and patient-based analyses. Identified lesions were further studied by biopsy or clinically followed for at least 6 months. One hundred and thirty-four suspicious lesions were identified. Among them, 4 primary cancers (2 pancreatic cancers, 1 colonic and 1 nasopharyngeal cancer) were incidentally detected, and the patients could be treated on time. For the remaining 130 lesions, positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected 118 true positive lesions (sensitivity = 95.9%). On the patient-based analysis, the overall sensitivity and specificity resulted to be 87.1% and 89.7%, respectively. There was no difference of sensitivity and specificity in patients with or without adjuvant treatment in terms of detection of metastatic sites by positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Compared with conventional imaging modality, positron emission tomography/computed tomography correctly changed the management in 15 patients (25.0%). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography has excellent sensitivity and specificity in the detection of metastatic bladder cancer and it provides additional diagnostic information compared to standard imaging techniques. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. Clinical value of whole body fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the detection of metastatic bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhongyi; Pan Lingling; Cheng Jingyi; Hu Silong; Xu Junyan; Zhang Yingjian; Ye Dingwei

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the value of whole-body fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for the detection of metastatic bladder cancer. From December 2006 to August 2010, 60 bladder cancer patients (median age 60.5 years old, range 32-96) underwent whole body positron emission tomography/computed tomography positron emission tomography/computed tomography. The diagnostic accuracy was assessed by performing both organ-based and patient-based analyses. Identified lesions were further studied by biopsy or clinically followed for at least 6 months. One hundred and thirty-four suspicious lesions were identified. Among them, 4 primary cancers (2 pancreatic cancers, 1 colonic and 1 nasopharyngeal cancer) were incidentally detected, and the patients could be treated on time. For the remaining 130 lesions, positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected 118 true positive lesions (sensitivity=95.9%). On the patient-based analysis, the overall sensitivity and specificity resulted to be 87.1% and 89.7%, respectively. There was no difference of sensitivity and specificity in patients with or without adjuvant treatment in terms of detection of metastatic sites by positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Compared with conventional imaging modality, positron emission tomography/computed tomography correctly changed the management in 15 patients (25.0%). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography has excellent sensitivity and specificity in the detection of metastatic bladder cancer and it provides additional diagnostic information compared to standard imaging techniques. (author)

  20. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection and quantification of natural contaminants of wine by gas chromatography-differential ion mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Malick; Gharbi, Nasser; Lenouvel, Audrey; Behr, Marc; Guignard, Cédric; Orlewski, Pierre; Evers, Danièle

    2013-02-06

    Rapid and direct, in situ headspace screening for odoriferous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in fresh grapes and in wines is a very promising method for quality control because the economic value of a wine is closely related to its aroma. Long used for the detection of VOCs in complex mixtures, miniature differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) seems therefore adequate for in situ trace detection of many kinds of VOCs of concern appearing in the headspace of selected foodstuffs. This work aims at a rapid detection, identification, and quantification of some natural and volatile contaminants of wine such as geosmin, 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB), 1-octen-3-ol, 1-octen-3-one, and pyrazines (2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, IPMP, and 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine, IBMP). In the present study, these compounds were spiked at a known concentration in wine and analyzed with a hyphenated trap-GC-DMS device. The detection of all target compounds at concentrations below the human olfactory threshold was demonstrated.

  2. Detection of Polarized Infrared Emission by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the MWC 1080 Nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Han; Telesco, Charles M.; Pantin, Eric; Barnes, Peter; Hoang, Thiem; Li, Aigen; Wright, Christopher M.; Li, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments, as revealed by their pronounced emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 μ m commonly ascribed to the C–H and C–C vibrational modes. Although these features have long been predicted to be polarized, previous searches for PAH polarization led to null or, at best, tentative detections. Here we report the definite detection of polarized PAH emission at 11.3 μ m in the nebula associated with the Herbig Be star MWC 1080. We measure a polarization degree of 1.9% ± 0.2%, which is unexpectedly high compared to models. This poses a challenge in the current understanding of the alignment of PAHs, which is required to polarize the PAH emission but thought to be substantially suppressed. PAH alignment with a magnetic field via a resonance paramagnetic relaxation process may account for such a high level of polarization.

  3. Detection of Polarized Infrared Emission by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the MWC 1080 Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Han; Telesco, Charles M.; Pantin, Eric; Barnes, Peter [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hoang, Thiem [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Li, Aigen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Wright, Christopher M. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW Canberra, P.O. Box 7916, Canberra BC 2610 (Australia); Li, Dan, E-mail: hanzh0420@ufl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2017-07-20

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments, as revealed by their pronounced emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 μ m commonly ascribed to the C–H and C–C vibrational modes. Although these features have long been predicted to be polarized, previous searches for PAH polarization led to null or, at best, tentative detections. Here we report the definite detection of polarized PAH emission at 11.3 μ m in the nebula associated with the Herbig Be star MWC 1080. We measure a polarization degree of 1.9% ± 0.2%, which is unexpectedly high compared to models. This poses a challenge in the current understanding of the alignment of PAHs, which is required to polarize the PAH emission but thought to be substantially suppressed. PAH alignment with a magnetic field via a resonance paramagnetic relaxation process may account for such a high level of polarization.

  4. Ultratrace analysis of uranium and plutonium by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogman, N.A.; Wacker, J.F.; Olsen, K.B.; Petersen, S.L.; Farmer, O.T.; Kelley, J.M.; Eiden, G.C.; Maiti, T.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Uranium and plutonium have traditionally been analyzed using alpha energy spectrometry. Both isotopic compositions and elemental abundances can be characterized on samples containing microgram to milligram quantities of uranium and nanogram to microgram quantities of plutonium. In the past ten years or so, considerable interest has developed in measuring nanograms quantities of uranium and sub-picogram quantities of plutonium in environmental samples. Such measurements require high sensitivity and as a consequence, sensitive mass spectrometric-based methods have been developed. Thus, the analysis of uranium and plutonium have gone from counting decays to counting atoms, with considerable increases in both sensitivity and precision for isotopic measurements. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), we have developed highly sensitive methods to analyze uranium and plutonium in environmental samples. The development of an ultratrace analysis capability for measuring uranium and plutonium has arisen from a need to detect and characterize environmental samples for signatures associated with nuclear industry processes. Our most sensitive well-developed methodologies employ thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), however, recent advances in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have shown considerable promise for use in detecting uranium and plutonium at ultratrace levels. The work at PNNL has included the development of both chemical separation and purification techniques, as well as the development of mass spectrometric instrumentation and techniques. At the heart of our methodology for TIMS analysis is a procedure that utilizes 100-microliter-volumes of analyte for chemical processing to purify, separate, and load actinide elements into resin beads for subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. The resin bead technique has been combined with a thorough knowledge of the physicochemistry of thermal ion emission to achieve

  5. Quantitative Thin-Layer Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Caffeine Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Deibel, Michael A. [Earlham College; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  6. High Sensitivity and High Detection Specificity of Gold-Nanoparticle-Grafted Nanostructured Silicon Mass Spectrometry for Glucose Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Chia-Wen; Yang, Zhi-Jie

    2015-10-14

    Desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS) is a high-performance matrix-free mass spectrometry (MS) analysis method that involves using silicon nanostructures as a matrix for MS desorption/ionization. In this study, gold nanoparticles grafted onto a nanostructured silicon (AuNPs-nSi) surface were demonstrated as a DIOS-MS analysis approach with high sensitivity and high detection specificity for glucose detection. A glucose sample deposited on the AuNPs-nSi surface was directly catalyzed to negatively charged gluconic acid molecules on a single AuNPs-nSi chip for MS analysis. The AuNPs-nSi surface was fabricated using two electroless deposition steps and one electroless etching step. The effects of the electroless fabrication parameters on the glucose detection efficiency were evaluated. Practical application of AuNPs-nSi MS glucose analysis in urine samples was also demonstrated in this study.

  7. Inkjet-printed gold nanoparticle surfaces for the detection of low molecular weight biomolecules by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsico, Alyssa L M; Creran, Brian; Duncan, Bradley; Elci, S Gokhan; Jiang, Ying; Onasch, Timothy B; Wormhoudt, Joda; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2015-11-01

    Effective detection of low molecular weight compounds in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is often hindered by matrix interferences in the low m/z region of the mass spectrum. Here, we show that monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can serve as alternate matrices for the very sensitive detection of low molecular weight compounds such as amino acids. Amino acids can be detected at low fmol levels with minimal interferences by properly choosing the AuNP deposition method, density, size, and monolayer surface chemistry. By inkjet-printing AuNPs at various densities, we find that AuNP clusters are essential for obtaining the greatest sensitivity. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. High Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Kristian E.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas-phase ions by their behavior in strong and weak electric fields. FAIMS is easily interfaced with electrospray ionization and has been implemented as an additional separation mode between liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in proteomic studies. FAIMS separation is orthogonal to both LC and MS and is used as a means of on-line fractionation to improve detection of peptides in complex samples. FAIMS improves dynamic range and concomitantly the detection limits of ions by filtering out chemical noise. FAIMS can also be used to remove interfering ion species and to select peptide charge states optimal for identification by tandem MS. Here, we review recent developments in LC-FAIMS-MS and its application to MS-based proteomics. PMID:23194268

  9. Simultaneous Pre-Concentration of Cadmium and Lead in Environmental Water Samples with Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction and Determination by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salahinejad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME method for determination of Pb+2 and Cd+2 ions in the environmental water samples was combined with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES. Ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC, chloroform and ethanol were used as chelating agent, extraction solvent and disperser solvent, respectively. Some effective parameters on the microextraction and the complex formation were selected and optimized. These parameters included extraction and disperser solvent type as well as their volume, extraction time, salt effect, pH, sample volume and amount of the chelating agent.   Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor of 75 and 105 for Cd+2 and Pb+2 ions respectively was obtained from only 5.00mL of water sample. The detection limit (S/N=3 was 12 and 0.8ngmL−1 for Pb and Cd respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSDs for five replicate measurements of 0.50 mgL−1 of lead and cadmium was 6.5 and 4.4 % respectively. Mineral, tap, river, sea, dam and spiked water samples were analyzed for Cd and Pb amount.

  10. Acoustic emission technique for characterisation of deformation, fatigue, fracture and phase transformation and for leak detection with high sensitivity- our experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, T.; Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission technique has been used for studying tensile deformation, fracture behaviour, detection and assessment of fatigue crack growth and α-martensite phase transformation in austenitic alloys. A methodology for amplification of weak acoustic emission signals has been established. Acoustic emission technique with advanced spectral analysis has enabled detection with high sensitivity of minute leaks in noisy environments. (author)

  11. Forensic analysis of tempered sheet glass by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jisonna, L.J. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); DeYoung, P.A., E-mail: deyoung@hope.ed [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Ferens, J.; Hall, C.; Lunderberg, J.M.; Mears, P. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Padilla, D. [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1233 (United States); Peaslee, G.F. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Hope College, Holland, MI 49422-9000 (United States); Sampson, R. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} PIXE was found to give the same results for trace elements in glass as ICP. {yields} PIXE can non-destructively determine trace element concentrations in auto glass. {yields} Measured Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn, and Sr in auto glass with PIXE. -- Abstract: The elemental concentrations of five trace elements in tempered sheet glass fragments were determined using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectrometry. The trace element concentrations for calcium, iron, manganese, strontium, and titanium are compared to those obtained by inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) following complete digestion by hydrofluoric acid. For these five elements, the absolute concentrations obtained by both methods are shown to agree well over a wide range of concentrations. The limits of detection for trace elements are typically lower for the ICP-AES method. However, we show that the concentrations of these five elements can be accurately measured by the PIXE method. Since PIXE is an entirely non-destructive method, there exists a niche for this technique to be used as a complement to the more sensitive ICP-AES technique in the forensic analysis of sheet glass.

  12. High sensitivity detection of selenium by laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry using electrothermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, U.; Hese, A.; Schoknecht, G.; Gries, W.

    1995-01-01

    The high sensitivity detection of the trace element selenium is reported. The analytical method applied is Laser Excited Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry using Electrothermal Atomization within a graphite furnace atomizer. For the production of tunable laser radiation in the VUV spectral region a laser system was developed which consists of two dye lasers pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. The laser radiations are subsequently frequency doubled and sum frequency mixed by nonlinear optical KDP or BBO crystals, respectively. The system works with a repetition rate of 20 Hz and provides output energies of up to 100 μJ in the VUV at a pulse duration of 5 ns. The analytical investigations were focused on the detection of selenium in aqueous solutions and samples of human whole blood. From measurements on aqueous standards detection limits of 1.5 ng/l for selenium were obtained, with corresponding absolute detected masses of only 15 fg. The linear dynamic range spanned six orders of magnitude and good precision was achieved. In case of human whole blood samples the recovery was found to be within the range of 96% to 104%. The determination of the selenium content yielded medians of [119.5 ± 17.3] μg/l for 200 frozen blood samples taken in 1988 and [109.1 ± 15.6] μg/l for 103 fresh blood samples. (author)

  13. Detection of Adriamycin-DNA adducts by accelerator mass spectrometry at clinically relevant Adriamycin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, Kate E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Ognibene, Ted J; Henderson, Paul T; Phillips, Don R

    2008-09-01

    Limited sensitivity of existing assays has prevented investigation of whether Adriamycin-DNA adducts are involved in the anti-tumour potential of Adriamycin. Previous detection has achieved a sensitivity of a few Adriamycin-DNA adducts/10(4) bp DNA, but has required the use of supra-clinical drug concentrations. This work sought to measure Adriamycin-DNA adducts at sub-micromolar doses using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique with origins in geochemistry for radiocarbon dating. We have used conditions previously validated (by less sensitive decay counting) to extract [(14)C]Adriamycin-DNA adducts from cells and adapted the methodology to AMS detection. Here we show the first direct evidence of Adriamycin-DNA adducts at clinically-relevant Adriamycin concentrations. [(14)C]Adriamycin treatment (25 nM) resulted in 4.4 +/- 1.0 adducts/10(7) bp ( approximately 1300 adducts/cell) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, representing the best sensitivity and precision reported to date for the covalent binding of Adriamycin to DNA. The exceedingly sensitive nature of AMS has enabled over three orders of magnitude increased sensitivity of Adriamycin-DNA adduct detection and revealed adduct formation within an hour of drug treatment. This method has been shown to be highly reproducible for the measurement of Adriamycin-DNA adducts in tumour cells in culture and can now be applied to the detection of these adducts in human tissues.

  14. Multiresidue method for detection of pesticides in beef meat using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS) after QuEChERS extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Fabiano Aurélio da Silva; Pereira, Elba Nathália Corrêa; Gobbi, Jennifer Mattedi; Soto-Blanco, Benito; Melo, Marília Martins

    2018-01-01

    Beef meat is an important food that can be contaminated by pesticides. This study aimed to optimize a multiresidue method for identification and quantification of pesticides in beef meat by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS). The extraction and clean-up procedures were adapted from the QuECHERS method. From the 188 analytes tested, the method was validated as qualitative method for 19 compounds and as quantitative method for 152 compounds. The results were satisfactory, yielding coefficients of variation of less than 20% and recoveries ranging from 70% to 120% and expanded uncertainty of less than 50%. The quantification limit was typically 10 µg kg -1 (but 25 µg kg -1 for 12 of the compounds) and the detection limit was 5.0 µg kg -1 . Thirty-two real samples of commercialized beef meat were analyzed without any residual pesticide being found. Thus, the results showed that the multiresidue method for detecting 171 pesticides, using adapted QuECHERS for extraction and LC-MS for detection, is suitable for analyzing beef meat.

  15. Quantitative determination of impurities in nuclear grade aluminum by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jat, J.R.; Nayak, A.K.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Ravindra, H.R.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with quantitative determination of impurity elements in nuclear grade aluminum, used as fin tubes in research reactors, by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS). The results have been compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) method. Experimental conditions used in both the methods are given in the paper. (author)

  16. [Study on Ammonia Emission Rules in a Dairy Feedlot Based on Laser Spectroscopy Detection Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-jun; You, Kun; Wang, Li-ming; Gao, Yan-wei; Xu, Jin-feng; Gao, Zhi-ling; Ma, Wen-qi

    2016-03-01

    It needs on-line monitoring of ammonia concentration on dairy feedlot to disclose ammonia emissions characteristics accurately for reducing ammonia emissions and improving the ecological environment. The on-line monitoring system for ammonia concentration has been designed based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology combining with long open-path technology, then the study has been carried out with inverse dispersion technique and the system. The ammonia concentration in-situ has been detected and ammonia emission rules have been analyzed on a dairy feedlot in Baoding in autumn and winter of 2013. The monitoring indicated that the peak of ammonia concentration was 6.11 x 10(-6) in autumn, and that was 6.56 x 10(-6) in winter. The concentration results show that the variation of ammonia concentration had an obvious diurnal periodicity, and the general characteristic of diurnal variation was that the concentration was low in the daytime and was high at night. The ammonia emissions characteristic was obtained with inverse dispersion model that the peak of ammonia emissions velocity appeared at noon. The emission velocity was from 1.48 kg/head/hr to 130.6 kg/head/hr in autumn, and it was from 0.004 5 kg/head/hr to 43.32 kg/head/hr in winter which was lower than that in autumn. The results demonstrated ammonia emissions had certain seasonal differences in dairy feedlot scale. In conclusion, the ammonia concentration was detected with optical technology, and the ammonia emissions results were acquired by inverse dispersion model analysis with large range, high sensitivity, quick response without gas sampling. Thus, it's an effective method for ammonia emissions monitoring in dairy feedlot that provides technical support for scientific breeding.

  17. Food Forensics: Using Mass Spectrometry To Detect Foodborne Protein Contaminants, as Exemplified by Shiga Toxin Variants and Prion Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Christopher J

    2018-06-13

    Food forensicists need a variety of tools to detect the many possible food contaminants. As a result of its analytical flexibility, mass spectrometry is one of those tools. Use of the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method expands its use to quantitation as well as detection of infectious proteins (prions) and protein toxins, such as Shiga toxins. The sample processing steps inactivate prions and Shiga toxins; the proteins are digested with proteases to yield peptides suitable for MRM-based analysis. Prions are detected by their distinct physicochemical properties and differential covalent modification. Shiga toxin analysis is based on detecting peptides derived from the five identical binding B subunits comprising the toxin. 15 N-labeled internal standards are prepared from cloned proteins. These examples illustrate the power of MRM, in that the same instrument can be used to safely detect and quantitate protein toxins, prions, and small molecules that might contaminate our food.

  18. DETECTION OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES IN 9975 PACKAGES USING ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, D.

    2013-03-04

    This report documents the initial feasibility tests performed using a commercial acoustic emission instrument for the purpose of detecting beetles in Department of Energy 9975 shipping packages. The device selected for this testing was a commercial handheld instrument and probe developed for the detection of termites, weevils, beetles and other insect infestations in wooden structures, trees, plants and soil. The results of two rounds of testing are presented. The first tests were performed by the vendor using only the hand-held instrument’s indications and real-time operator analysis of the audio signal content. The second tests included hands-free positioning of the instrument probe and post-collection analysis of the recorded audio signal content including audio background comparisons. The test results indicate that the system is promising for detecting the presence of drugstore beetles, however, additional work would be needed to improve the ease of detection and to automate the signal processing to eliminate the need for human interpretation. Mechanisms for hands-free positioning of the probe and audio background discrimination are also necessary for reliable detection and to reduce potential operator dose in radiation environments.

  19. Plutonium determination in urine by techniques of mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez M, H.; Yllera de Ll, A.

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an analytic method for quantification and plutonium reappraisal in plane tables of alpha spectrometry be means of the mass spectrometry technique of high resolution with plasma source inductively coupled and desolvator Aridus (Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms) and mass spectrometry with accelerator (AMS). The obtained results were, the recovery percentage of Pu in the plane table was of ∼ 90% and activity minimum detectable obtained with Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS was of ∼ 3 and ∼ 0.4 f g of 239 Pu, respectively. Conclusion, the results demonstrate the aptitude of the Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS techniques in the Pu reappraisal in plane tables with bigger speed and precision, improving the values notably of the activity minimum detectable that can be obtained with the alpha spectrometry (∼ 50 f g of 239 Pu). (author)

  20. Determination of daily intake of elements from Philippine total diet samples using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, G.C. de; Shiraishi, K.; Kawamura, H.; Igaraishi, Y.; Palattao, M.V.; Azanon, E.M.

    1990-10-01

    Total diet samples were analyzed for major elements (Na, K, Ca, Mg, P) and some minor trace elements (Fe, Zn, Mn, Al, Sr, Cu, Ba, Yt) using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Samples analyzed were classified into sex and age groups. Results for some elements (Na, K, Mg, Zn, Cu, Mn) were compared with values from Bataan dietary survey calculated using the Philippine composition table. Exceot for Na, analytical results were similar to calculated values. Analytical results for Ca and Fe were also compared with the values from Food and Nutrition Research Institute. In general, values obtained in the study were lower than the FNRI values. Comparison of the analytical and calculated results with the Japanese and ICRP data showed that Philippine values were lower than foreign values. (Auth.). 22 refs., 9 tabs

  1. FIRST DETECTION OF NEAR-INFRARED LINE EMISSION FROM ORGANICS IN YOUNG CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandell, Avi M.; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bast, Jeanette; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Blake, Geoffrey A. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, MS 150-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Salyk, Colette, E-mail: Avi.Mandell@nasa.gov [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We present an analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of several bright T Tauri stars using the CRIRES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope and NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck Telescope, revealing the first detections of emission from HCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in circumstellar disks at near-infrared wavelengths. Using advanced data reduction techniques, we achieve a dynamic range with respect to the disk continuum of {approx}500 at 3 {mu}m, revealing multiple emission features of H{sub 2}O, OH, HCN, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. We also present stringent upper limits for two other molecules thought to be abundant in the inner disk, CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}. Line profiles for the different detected molecules are broad but centrally peaked in most cases, even for disks with previously determined inclinations of greater than 20 Degree-Sign , suggesting that the emission has both a Keplerian and non-Keplerian component as observed previously for CO emission. We apply two different modeling strategies to constrain the molecular abundances and temperatures: we use a simplified single-temperature local thermal equilibrium (LTE) slab model with a Gaussian line profile to make line identifications and determine a best-fit temperature and initial abundance ratios, and we compare these values with constraints derived from a detailed disk radiative transfer model assuming LTE excitation but utilizing a realistic temperature and density structure. Abundance ratios from both sets of models are consistent with each other and consistent with expected values from theoretical chemical models, and analysis of the line shapes suggests that the molecular emission originates from within a narrow region in the inner disk (R < 1 AU).

  2. Combination of atomic force microscopy and mass spectrometry for the detection of target protein in the serum samples of children with autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysheva, A. L.; Pleshakova, T. O.; Kopylov, A. T.; Shumov, I. D.; Iourov, I. Y.; Vorsanova, S. G.; Yurov, Y. B.; Ziborov, V. S.; Archakov, A. I.; Ivanov, Y. D.

    2017-10-01

    Possibility of detection of target proteins associated with development of autistic disorders in children with use of combined atomic force microscopy and mass spectrometry (AFM/MS) method is demonstrated. The proposed method is based on the combination of affine enrichment of proteins from biological samples and visualization of these proteins by AFM and MS analysis with quantitative detection of target proteins.

  3. Development of a mass spectrometry immunoassay for unambiguous detection of egg allergen traces in wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilolli, Rosa; Chaudhari, Ravindra; Palmisano, Francesco; Monaci, Linda

    2017-02-01

    A mass spectrometry immunoassay (MSIA) specifically designed for the detection of egg allergens in wines is described. MSIA is based on an immunoaffinity enrichment procedure combined with targeted MS/MS detection of selected egg peptide markers. Polyclonal antibodies raised against native ovalbumin, chosen as the target protein tracing for egg powder, were immobilized onto low backpressure monolithic MSIA customized disposable tips. Ovalbumin-free wine samples were fortified with standard protein at different concentrations in the low microgram-per-milliliter range. A simple protocol was devised consisting of a 1:4 dilution of the wine sample with a basic solution for pH adjustment, followed by a semi-automated purification/enrichment step on MSIA customized disposable tips fitted on a multichannel electronic pipette. Among the main figures of merit, LOD and LOQ values as low as 0.01 and 0.03 μg/mL, respectively, and within-day precision of 18% should be noticed. Noteworthy, the developed assay outperformed current MS-based methods for the detection of allergenic protein in wine matrices, thanks to the immunoaffinity enrichment. In addition, compared to other immunoassays, the present approach boasts the unquestionable advantage of providing an unambiguous identification of the target protein by simultaneous detection of three unique peptide markers each giving three specific MS/MS transitions.

  4. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, Amélie, E-mail: amelie.leclercq@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nonell, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.nonell@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Todolí Torró, José Luis, E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es [Universidad de Alicante, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatología, Ap. de Correos, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Bresson, Carole, E-mail: carole.bresson@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vio, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vio@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vercouter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.vercouter@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chartier, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.chartier@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-23

    Graphical abstract: This tutorial review is dedicated to the analysis of organic/hydro-organic matrices by ICP techniques. A state-of-the-art focusing on sample introduction, relevant operating parameters optimization and analytical strategies for elemental quantification is provided. - Highlights: • Practical considerations to perform analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Description, benefits and drawbacks of recent introduction devices. • Optimization to improve plasma tolerance towards organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Analytical strategies for elemental quantification in organic/hydro-organic matrices. - Abstract: Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review

  5. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: This tutorial review is dedicated to the analysis of organic/hydro-organic matrices by ICP techniques. A state-of-the-art focusing on sample introduction, relevant operating parameters optimization and analytical strategies for elemental quantification is provided. - Highlights: • Practical considerations to perform analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Description, benefits and drawbacks of recent introduction devices. • Optimization to improve plasma tolerance towards organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Analytical strategies for elemental quantification in organic/hydro-organic matrices. - Abstract: Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review

  6. Detection of gamma-ray emission from the Vela pulsar wind nebula with AGILE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzoni, A; Trois, A; Tavani, M; Pilia, M; Giuliani, A; Pucella, G; Esposito, P; Sabatini, S; Piano, G; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Bulgarelli, A; Burgay, M; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A W; Cocco, V; Contessi, T; Costa, E; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Hotan, A; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Marisaldi, M; Mastropietro, M; Mereghetti, S; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Palfreyman, J; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pittori, C; Possenti, A; Prest, M; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Santolamazza, P; Scalise, E; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Trifoglio, M; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Verrecchia, F; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Giommi, P; Colafrancesco, S; Antonelli, A; Salotti, L; D'Amico, N; Bignami, G F

    2010-02-05

    Pulsars are known to power winds of relativistic particles that can produce bright nebulae by interacting with the surrounding medium. These pulsar wind nebulae are observed by their radio, optical, and x-ray emissions, and in some cases also at TeV (teraelectron volt) energies, but the lack of information in the gamma-ray band precludes drawing a comprehensive multiwavelength picture of their phenomenology and emission mechanisms. Using data from the AGILE satellite, we detected the Vela pulsar wind nebula in the energy range from 100 MeV to 3 GeV. This result constrains the particle population responsible for the GeV emission and establishes a class of gamma-ray emitters that could account for a fraction of the unidentified galactic gamma-ray sources.

  7. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in Multidrug Resistant Clinical Isolate Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many Proteobacteria communicate via production followed by response of quorum sensing molecules, namely, N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. These molecules consist of a lactone moiety with N-acyl side chain with various chain lengths and degrees of saturation at C-3 position. AHL-dependent QS is often associated with regulation of diverse bacterial phenotypes including the expression of virulence factors. With the use of biosensor and high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, the AHL production of clinical isolate A. baumannii 4KT was studied. Production of short chain AHL, namely, N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL and N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL, was detected.

  8. The Role of Emissivity in the Detection of Arctic Night Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Romano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection of clouds over polar areas from satellite radiometric measurements in the visible and IR atmospheric window region is rather difficult because of the high albedo of snow, possible ice covered surfaces, very low humidity, and the usual presence of atmospheric temperature inversion. Cold and highly reflective polar surfaces provide little thermal and visible contrast between clouds and the background surface. Moreover, due to the presence of temperature inversion, clouds are not always identifiable as being colder than the background. In addition, low humidity often causes polar clouds to be optically thin. Finally, polar clouds are usually composed of a mixture of ice and water, which leads to an unclear spectral signature. Single and bi-spectral threshold methods are sometimes inappropriate due to a large variability of surface emissivity and cloud conditions. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the crucial role played by surface emissivity in the detection of polar winter clouds and the potential improvement offered by infrared hyperspectral observations, such as from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI. In this paper a new approach for cloud detection is proposed and validated exploiting active measurements from satellite sensors, i.e., the CloudSat cloud profiling radar (CPR and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO. For a homogenous IASI field of view (FOVs, the proposed cloud detection scheme tallies with the combined CPR and CALIOP product in classifying 98.11% of the FOVs as cloudy and also classifies 97.54% of the FOVs as clear. The Hansen Kuipers discriminant reaches 0.95.

  9. Evaluation of non-enteric sources of non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emissions from dairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Myeong Y.; Beene, Matt; Ashkan, Shawn; Krauter, Charles; Hasson, Alam S.

    2010-02-01

    Dairies are believed to be a major source of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in Central California, but few studies have characterized VOC emissions from these facilities. In this work, samples were collected from six sources of VOCs (Silage, Total Mixed Rations, Lagoons, Flushing Lanes, Open Lots and Bedding) at six dairies in Central California during 2006-2007 using emission isolation flux chambers and polished stainless steel canisters. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. Forty-eight VOCs were identified and quantified in the samples, including alcohols, carbonyls, alkanes and aromatics. Silage and Total Mixed Rations are the dominant sources of VOCs tested, with ethanol as the major VOC present. Emissions from the remaining sources are two to three orders of magnitude smaller, with carbonyls and aromatics as the main components. The data suggest that animal feed rather than animal waste are the main source of non-enteric VOC emissions from dairies.

  10. State-of-the art of selective detection and identification of I-, Br-, Cl-, and F-containing compounds in gas chromatography and liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, Cato; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2004-09-24

    This review article presents an overview of halogen-specific detection in gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC). Attention is primarily focused on the use of plasma emission spectroscopy and plasma mass spectrometry as detectors, but other halogen-selective detection principles are also mentioned. Different instrumental configurations are discussed both with respect to technical set-up and performance, the principal reasons for halogen-selective detection are highlighted, and recent applications are reviewed from areas such as environmental chemistry, petroleum characterization, and drug analysis.

  11. In-situ determination of cross-over point for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2008-01-01

    A novel method is described for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The method is based on measurement of the vertically resolved atomic emission of analyte within the plasma and therefore requires the addition of no reagents to the sample solution or to the plasma. Plasma-related matrix effects enhance analyte emission intensity low in the plasma but depress the same emission signal at higher positions. Such bipolar behavior is true for all emission lines and matrices that induce plasma-related interferences. The transition where the enhancement is balanced by the depression (the so-called cross-over point) results in a spatial region with no apparent matrix effects. Although it would be desirable always to perform determinations at this cross-over point, its location varies between analytes and from matrix to matrix, so it would have to be found separately for every analyte and for every sample. Here, a novel approach is developed for the in-situ determination of the location of this cross-over point. It was found that the location of the cross-over point is practically invariant for a particular analyte emission line when the concentration of the matrix was varied. As a result, it is possible to determine in-situ the location of the cross-over point for all analyte emission lines in a sample by means of a simple one-step sample dilution. When the original sample is diluted by a factor of 2 and the diluted sample is analyzed again, the extent of the matrix effect is identical (zero) between the original sample and the diluted sample at one and only one location - the cross-over point. This novel method was verified with several single-element matrices (0.05 M Na, Ca, Ba and La) and some mixed-element matrices (mixtures of Na-Ca, Ca-Ba, and a plant-sample digest). The inaccuracy in emission intensity due to the matrix effect could be as large as - 30% for conventional measurements in the

  12. 134Cs emission probabilities determination by gamma spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, M. C. M.; Poledna, R.; Delgado, J. U.; Silva, R. L.; Araujo, M. T. F.; da Silva, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    The National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN) of Rio de Janeiro performed primary and secondary standardization of different radionuclides reaching satisfactory uncertainties. A solution of 134Cs radionuclide was purchased from commercial supplier to emission probabilities determination of some of its energies. 134Cs is a beta gamma emitter with 754 days of half-life. This radionuclide is used as standard in environmental, water and food control. It is also important to germanium detector calibration. The gamma emission probabilities (Pγ) were determined mainly for some energies of the 134Cs by efficiency curve method and the Pγ absolute uncertainties obtained were below 1% (k=1).

  13. Extraction inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Determination of traces of phosphorus in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.; Wegscheider, W.; Mueller, K.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the separation and preconcentration of traces of phosphorus from tungsten was developed. Solid phase extraction of the phosphovanadomolybdate complex performed on a micro-column was applied. Phosphorus was determined by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) excitation. A limit of detection of 0,4 μg/g P with respect to the solid phase is obtained. By directly coupling the extraction/elution step to the ICP instrument a detection limit of 0,06 μg/g P in W was achieved. Besides, the complexity of spectral evaluation in ICP-OES determinations of traces in spectralline-rich matrices is discussed. (Authors)

  14. Effects of air exchange, temperature and slurry management on odorant emissions from pig production units and slurry tanks studied by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feilberg, A.; Adamsen, A.P.S.; Liu, D.; Hansen, M.J.; Bildsoe, P. [Aarhus Univ., Tjele (Denmark). Dept. of Biosystems Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The factors affecting the variability of odorant emissions from intensive pig production facilities were examined using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to monitor emissions of odorants. Quantitative and time-resolved results for protonated ions representing hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S), volatile organic sulphur compounds, organic amines, volatile carboxylic acids, carbonyls, phenols and indoles can be obtained. This study presented the results from PTRMS measurements of odorant emissions from finisher pig houses and finisher manure storage tanks. The measurements were performed at an experimental full-scale pig section with mechanical ventilation and at an experimental manure storage facility with controlled air exchange. Field measurements were taken during variable air exchange rates and temperatures, during finisher growth, and during emptying of the slurry pit. The results revealed a pronounced diurnal variation in emissions of odorants from the pig section with peaks in daytime coinciding with the highest ventilation rates and highest room temperatures. The highest emission rates were observed for H{sub 2}S and carboxylic acids. Based on odour threshold values, methanethiol and 4-methylphenol were estimated to contribute considerably to the odour nuisance. Discharging of the slurry pit led to reduced H{sub 2}S emissions, but peaks of H{sub 2}S were observed during manure handling.

  15. Detection of anabolic and androgenic steroids and/or their esters in horse hair using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Karen Y; Choi, Timmy L S; Kwok, Wai Him; Wong, Jenny K Y; Wan, Terence S M

    2017-04-14

    Anabolic and androgenic steroids (AASs) are a class of prohibited substances banned in horseracing at all times. The common approach for controlling the misuse of AASs in equine sports is by detecting the presence of AASs and/or their metabolites in urine and blood samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). This approach, however, often falls short as the duration of effect for many AASs are longer than their detection time in both urine and blood. As a result, there is a high risk that such AASs could escape detection in their official race-day samples although they may have been used during the long period of training. Hair analysis, on the other hand, can afford significantly longer detection windows. In addition, the identification of synthetic ester derivatives of AASs in hair, particularly for the endogenous ones, can provide unequivocal proof of their exogenous origin. This paper describes the development of a sensitive method (at sub to low parts-per-billion or ppb levels) for detecting 48 AASs and/or their esters in horse hair using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). Decontaminated horse hair was pulverised and subjected to in-situ liquid-liquid extraction in a mixture of hexane - ethyl acetate (7:3, v/v) and phosphate buffer (0.1M, pH 9.5), followed by additional clean-up using mixed-mode solid-phase extraction. The final extract was analysed using UHPLC-HRMS in the positive electrospray ionisation (ESI) mode with both full scan and parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). This method was validated for qualitative identification purposes. Validation data, including method specificity, method sensitivity, extraction recovery, method precision and matrix effect are presented. Method applicability was demonstrated by the successful detection and confirmation of testosterone propionate in a referee hair sample. To our knowledge, this was

  16. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Albert T.

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10 -21 ), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents

  17. SISGR: Room Temperature Single-Molecule Detection and Imaging by Stimulated Emission Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2017-03-13

    Single-molecule spectroscopy has made considerable impact on many disciplines including chemistry, physics, and biology. To date, most single-molecule spectroscopy work is accomplished by detecting fluorescence. On the other hand, many naturally occurring chromophores, such as retinal, hemoglobin and cytochromes, do not have detectable fluorescence. There is an emerging need for single-molecule spectroscopy techniques that do not require fluorescence. In the last proposal period, we have successfully demonstrated stimulated emission microscopy, single molecule absorption, and stimulated Raman microscopy based on a high-frequency modulation transfer technique. These first-of-a- kind new spectroscopy/microscopy methods tremendously improved our ability to observe molecules that fluorescence weakly, even to the limit of single molecule detection for absorption measurement. All of these methods employ two laser beams: one (pump beam) excites a single molecule to a real or virtual excited state, and the other (probe beam) monitors the absorption/emission property of the single. We extract the intensity change of the probe beam with high sensitivity by implementing a high-frequency phase-sensitive detection scheme, which offers orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity over direct absorption/emission measurement. However, single molecule detection based on fluorescence or absorption is fundamentally limited due to their broad spectral response. It is important to explore other avenues in single molecule detection and imaging which provides higher molecular specificity for studying a wide variety of heterogeneous chemical and biological systems. This proposal aimed to achieve single-molecule detection sensitivity with near resonance stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. SRS microscopy was developed in our lab as a powerful technique for imaging heterogeneous samples based on their intrinsic vibrational contrasts, which provides much higher molecular

  18. Capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry detects low concentration host cell impurities in monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guijie; Sun, Liangliang; Heidbrink-Thompson, Jennifer; Kuntumalla, Srilatha; Lin, Hung-yu; Larkin, Christopher J.; McGivney, James B.; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2016-01-01

    We have evaluated capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-ESI-MS/MS) for detection of trace amounts of host cell protein impurities in recombinant therapeutics. Compared to previously published procedures, we have optimized the buffer pH used in the formation of a pH junction to increase injection volume. We also prepared a five-point calibration curve by spiking twelve standard proteins into a solution of a human monoclonal antibody. A custom CZE-MS/MS system was used to analyze the tryptic digest of this mixture without depletion of the antibody. CZE generated a ~70 min separation window (~90 min total analysis duration) and ~300 peak capacity. We also analyzed the sample using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-MS/MS. CZE-MS/MS generated ~five times higher base peak intensity and more peptide identifications for low-level spiked proteins. Both methods detected all proteins spiked at the ~100 ppm level with respect to the antibody. PMID:26530276

  19. Direct detection of illicit drugs from biological fluids by desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with nanoporous silicon microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, T M; Kirkbride, P; Della Vedova, C B; Kershaw, S G; Kobus, H; Voelcker, N H

    2015-12-07

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) is a high throughput analytical technique capable of detecting low molecular weight analytes, including illicit drugs, and with potential applications in forensic toxicology as well as athlete and workplace testing, particularly for biological fluids (oral fluids, urine and blood). However, successful detection of illicit drugs using SALDI-MS often requires extraction steps to reduce the inherent complexity of biological fluids. Here, we demonstrate an all-in-one extraction and analytical system consisting of hydrophobically functionalized porous silicon microparticles (pSi-MPs) for affinity SALDI-MS of prescription and illicit drugs. This novel approach allows for the analysis of drugs from multiple biological fluids without sample preparation protocols. The effect of pSi-MP size, pore diameter, pore depth and functionalization on analytical performance is investigated. pSi-MPs were optimized for the rapid and high sensitivity detection of methadone, cocaine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). This optimized system allowed extraction and detection of methadone from spiked saliva and clinical urine samples. Furthermore, by detecting oxycodone in additional clinical saliva and plasma samples, we were able to demonstrate the versatility of the pSi-MP SALDI-MS technique.

  20. Detection of nitro-organic and peroxide explosives in latent fingermarks by DART- and SALDI-TOF-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Frederick; Seviour, John; Lim, Angelina Yimei; Elumbaring-Salazar, Cheryl Grace; Loke, Jason; Ma, Jan

    2012-09-10

    The ability of two mass spectrometric methods, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (SALDI-TOF-MS) and direct analysis in real time (DART-MS), to detect the presence of seven common explosives (six nitro-organic- and one peroxide-type) in spiked latent fingermarks has been examined. It was found that each explosive could be detected with nanogram sensitivity for marks resulting from direct finger contact with a glass probe by DART-MS or onto stainless steel target plates using SALDI-TOF-MS for marks pre-dusted with one type of commercial black magnetic powder. These explosives also could be detected in latent marks lifted from six common surfaces (paper, plastic bag, metal drinks can, wood laminate, adhesive tape and white ceramic tile) whereas no explosive could be detected in equivalent pre-dusted marks on the surface of a commercial lifting tape by the DART-MS method due to high background interference from the tape material. The presence of TNT and Tetryl could be detected in pre-dusted latent fingermarks on a commercial lifting tape for up to 29 days sealed and stored under ambient conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. OBT measurement of vegetation by mass spectrometry and radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamari, T.; Kakiuchi, H.; Momoshima, N.; Sugihara, S.; Baglan, N.; Uda, T.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out OBT (organically bound tritium) measurement by two different methods those are radiometry and mass spectrometry and compared the applicability of these methods for environmental tritium analysis. The dried grass sample was used for the experiments. To eliminate the exchangeable OBT, the sample was washed with tritium free water before analysis. Three times washing reduced the tritium activity in the labile sites below the detectable level. In radiometry the sample was combusted to convert the OBT as well as other hydrogen isotopes to. water and tritium activity in the water was measured by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). In mass spectrometry, the sample was kept in a glass container and 3 He produced by tritium decay was measured by mass spectrometry. The results were in good agreement suggesting applicability of these methods for environmental tritium analysis. The mass spectrometry is more suitable for environmental tritium research because of a lower detection limit than that of the LSC. (authors)

  2. An Investigation on the Extraction and Quantitation of a Hexavalent Chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Copolymer (ABS) and Printed Circuit Board (PCB) by Ion Chromatography Coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Sang Ho; Kim, Yu Na [Mokpo National University, Muan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    A hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is one of the hazardous substances regulated by the RoHS. The determination of Cr (VI) in various polymers and printed circuit board (PCB) has been very important. In this study, the three different analytical methods were investigated for the determination of a hexavalent chromium in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene copolymer (ABS) and PCB. The results by three analytical methods were obtained and compared. An analytical method by UV-Visible spectrometer has been generally used for the determination of Cr (VI) in a sample, but a hexavalent chromium should complex with diphenylcarbazide for the detection in the method. The complexation did make an adverse effect on the quantitative analysis of Cr (VI) in ABS. The analytical method using diphenylcarbazide was also not applicable to printed circuit board (PCB) because PCB contained lots of irons. The irons interfered with the analysis of hexavalent chromium because those also could complex with diphenylcarbazide. In this study, hexavalent chromiums in PCB have been separated by ion chromatography (IC), then directly and selectively detected by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The quantity of Cr (VI) in PCB was 0.1 mg/kg

  3. Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurement of the Cd content in animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Huong Quynh; Demeter, I.; Hollos-Nagy, K.; Szoekefalvi-Nagy, Z.

    1989-12-01

    Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurements were performed on thin samples prepared from different rabbit tissues, using 3 MeV proton beam for inducing x-rays from the animal tissues. This method is very sensitive and very small amounts of trace elements can be detected. Cadmium, one of the most toxic elements which can be concentrated in animal and human tissues due to environmental pollution, was detected with a limit of 0.7 ppm. The trace element concentrations obtained by PIXE were compared to those measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. PIXE method is proposed for routine analysis at the Veterinary and Food Investigating Service, Budapest, Hungary. (D.Gy.) 6 refs.; 3 figs

  4. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900, Sichuan Province (China); Li, Shuo, E-mail: lishuo@cqut.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Li, Weiyi, E-mail: weiyili@mail.xhu.edu.cn [School of Science, Xihua University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610065 (China); Wang, Xiaolin, E-mail: xlwang@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, 621900, Sichuan Province (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel AIE fluorescent sensor for the detection of uranyl has been developed. • TPE-T is capable of visually distinguish UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} among many metals owing to the AIE phenomenon. • TPE-T showed a wide effective pH range, high selectivity and good anti-interference qualities. • TPE-T showed good accuracy in the determination of uranyl in river water. - Abstract: A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems.

  5. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry - NICE-AAS - A technique for detection of elements down to zeptogram amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axner, Ove; Ehlers, Patrick; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang

    2014-10-01

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) is a powerful technique for detection of molecular compounds in gas phase that is based on a combination of two important concepts: frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) for reduction of noise, and cavity enhancement, for prolongation of the interaction length between the light and the sample. Due to its unique properties, it has demonstrated unparalleled detection sensitivity when it comes to detection of molecular constituents in the gas phase. However, despite these, it has so far not been used for detection of atoms, i.e. for elemental analysis. The present work presents an assessment of the expected performance of Doppler-broadened (Db) NICE-OHMS for analytical atomic spectrometry, then referred to as noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry (NICE-AAS). After a description of the basic principles of Db-NICE-OHMS, the modulation and detection conditions for optimum performance are identified. Based on a previous demonstrated detection sensitivity of Db-NICE-OHMS of 5 × 10- 12 cm- 1 Hz- 1/2 (corresponding to a single-pass absorbance of 7 × 10- 11 over 10 s), the expected limits of detection (LODs) of Hg and Na by NICE-AAS are estimated. Hg is assumed to be detected in gas phase directly while Na is considered to be atomized in a graphite furnace (GF) prior to detection. It is shown that in the absence of spectral interferences, contaminated sample compartments, and optical saturation, it should be feasible to detect Hg down to 10 zg/cm3 (10 fg/m3 or 10- 5 ng/m3), which corresponds to 25 atoms/cm3, and Na down to 0.5 zg (zg = zeptogram = 10- 21 g), representing 50 zg/mL (parts-per-sextillion, pps, 1:1021) in liquid solution (assuming a sample of 10 μL) or solely 15 atoms injected into the GF, respectively. These LODs are several orders of magnitude lower (better) than any previous laser-based absorption technique previously demonstrated under atmospheric

  6. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus by functional gold nanoparticle-based affinity surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hong-Zheng; Wang, Sin-Ge; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2015-02-17

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the common pathogenic bacteria responsible for bacterial infectious diseases and food poisoning. This study presents an analytical method based on the affinity nanoprobe-based mass spectrometry that enables detection of S. aureus in aqueous samples. A peptide aptamer DVFLGDVFLGDEC (DD) that can recognize S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was used as the reducing agent and protective group to generate DD-immobilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs@DD) from one-pot reactions. The thiol group from cysteine in the peptide aptamer, i.e., DD, can interact with gold ions to generate DD-immobilized AuNPs in an alkaline solution. The generated AuNPs@DD has an absorption maximum at ∼518 nm. The average particle size is 7.6 ± 1.2 nm. Furthermore, the generated AuNPs@DD can selectively bind with S. aureus and MRSA. The conjugates of the target bacteria with AuNPs were directly analyzed by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS). The gold ions generated from the AuNPs@DD anchored on the target bacteria were monitored. Gold ions (m/z 197 and 394) were only generated from the conjugates of the target bacterium-AuNP@DD in the SALDI process. Thus, the gold ions could be used as the indicators for the presence of the target bacteria. The detection limit of S. aureus using this method is in the order of a few tens of cells. The low detection limit is due to the ease of generation of gold cluster ion derived from AuNPs under irradiation with a 355 nm laser beam. Apple juice mixed with S. aureus was used as the sample to demonstrate the suitability of the method for real-world application. Because of its low detection limit, this approach can potentially be used to screen the presence of S. aureus in complex samples.

  7. Urban gamma spectrometry. Report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aage, H.K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Kuukankorpi, S.; Moring, M.; Smolander, P.; Toivonen, H. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-06-15

    Urban gamma spectrometry has been given only minor attention with the focus being on rural gamma spectrometry. However, in recent years the Nordic emergency management authorities have turned focus towards border control and lost or stolen sources. Gamma spectra measured in urban areas are characterized by a wide variety of spectrum shapes and very fast changes in environmental background. In 2004 a Danish CGS (Carborne Gamma Spectrometry) survey took place in Copenhagen. It was found that gamma spectrometry in urban areas is far more complicated to interpret than had previously been thought and a new method 'Fitting with Spectral Components', FSC, based on NASVD, was tested with some success. In Finland, a database 'LINSSI' has been developed for spectral data management. In CGS search mode a 'peak hypothesis test' is applied to the measured spectra. This system was tested during the Helsinki 2005 Athletics World Championship and it provides fast and reliable automated alarms for intermediate and high level signals. In Sweden mobile detector systems are used for border controls and problems are encountered when making measurement in harbour, container areas. The methods for handling data and for interpretation of urban gamma spectrometry measurements were compared and tested on the same data sets from Copenhagen and Helsinki. Software tools were developed for converting data between the Finnish LINSSI database and the binary file formats used in Denmark and Sweden. The Processing methods used at DTU and STUK have different goals. The ASSS and FSC methods are designed to optimize the overall detection capability of the system, while sacrificing speed, usability and to a certain level robustness. These methods cannot always be used for real time analysis. The Peak Significance method is designed to give robust alarms in real time, while sacrificing some of the detection capability. Thus these methods are not interchangeable, but rather

  8. Urban gamma spectrometry. Report 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aage, H.K.; Kuukankorpi, S.; Moring, M.; Smolander, P.; Toivonen, H.

    2009-06-01

    Urban gamma spectrometry has been given only minor attention with the focus being on rural gamma spectrometry. However, in recent years the Nordic emergency management authorities have turned focus towards border control and lost or stolen sources. Gamma spectra measured in urban areas are characterized by a wide variety of spectrum shapes and very fast changes in environmental background. In 2004 a Danish CGS (Carborne Gamma Spectrometry) survey took place in Copenhagen. It was found that gamma spectrometry in urban areas is far more complicated to interpret than had previously been thought and a new method 'Fitting with Spectral Components', FSC, based on NASVD, was tested with some success. In Finland, a database 'LINSSI' has been developed for spectral data management. In CGS search mode a 'peak hypothesis test' is applied to the measured spectra. This system was tested during the Helsinki 2005 Athletics World Championship and it provides fast and reliable automated alarms for intermediate and high level signals. In Sweden mobile detector systems are used for border controls and problems are encountered when making measurement in harbour, container areas. The methods for handling data and for interpretation of urban gamma spectrometry measurements were compared and tested on the same data sets from Copenhagen and Helsinki. Software tools were developed for converting data between the Finnish LINSSI database and the binary file formats used in Denmark and Sweden. The Processing methods used at DTU and STUK have different goals. The ASSS and FSC methods are designed to optimize the overall detection capability of the system, while sacrificing speed, usability and to a certain level robustness. These methods cannot always be used for real time analysis. The Peak Significance method is designed to give robust alarms in real time, while sacrificing some of the detection capability. Thus these methods are not interchangeable, but rather complementary. An ideal system

  9. Speciation of organotin compounds in waters and marine sediments using purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campillo, Natalia; Aguinaga, Nerea; Vin-tilde as, Pilar; Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of six organotin compounds, including methyl-, butyl- and phenyltins, in waters and marine sediments is developed. The analytes were leached from the solid samples into an acetic acid:methanol mixture by using an ultrasonic probe. The organotins were derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt 4 ) in the aqueous phase, stripped by a flow of helium, pre-concentrated in a trap and thermally desorbed. This was followed by capillary gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry as the detection system (GC-AED). Each chromatographic run took 22 min, including the purge time. Calibration curves were obtained by plotting peak area versus concentration and the correlation coefficients for linear calibration were at least 0.9991. Detection limits ranged from 11 to 50 ng Sn l -1 for tributyltin and tetramethyltin, respectively. The seawater samples analyzed contained variable concentrations of mono-, di- and tributyl- and monophenyltin, ranging from 0.05 to 0.48 μg Sn l -1 , depending on the compound. Some of the sediments analyzed contained concentrations of dibutyl- and tributyltin of between 6.0 and 13.0 ng Sn g -1 . Analysis of the certified reference material PACS-2, as well as of spiked water and sediment samples showed the accuracy of the method. The proposed method is selective and reproducible, and is considered suitable for monitoring organotin compounds in water and sediment samples

  10. Speciation of organotin compounds in waters and marine sediments using purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campillo, Natalia [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Aguinaga, Nerea [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Vin-tilde as, Pilar [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain)]. E-mail: hcordoba@um.es

    2004-11-08

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of six organotin compounds, including methyl-, butyl- and phenyltins, in waters and marine sediments is developed. The analytes were leached from the solid samples into an acetic acid:methanol mixture by using an ultrasonic probe. The organotins were derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt{sub 4}) in the aqueous phase, stripped by a flow of helium, pre-concentrated in a trap and thermally desorbed. This was followed by capillary gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry as the detection system (GC-AED). Each chromatographic run took 22 min, including the purge time. Calibration curves were obtained by plotting peak area versus concentration and the correlation coefficients for linear calibration were at least 0.9991. Detection limits ranged from 11 to 50 ng Sn l{sup -1} for tributyltin and tetramethyltin, respectively. The seawater samples analyzed contained variable concentrations of mono-, di- and tributyl- and monophenyltin, ranging from 0.05 to 0.48 {mu}g Sn l{sup -1}, depending on the compound. Some of the sediments analyzed contained concentrations of dibutyl- and tributyltin of between 6.0 and 13.0 ng Sn g{sup -1}. Analysis of the certified reference material PACS-2, as well as of spiked water and sediment samples showed the accuracy of the method. The proposed method is selective and reproducible, and is considered suitable for monitoring organotin compounds in water and sediment samples.

  11. A New Acoustic Emission Sensor Based Gear Fault Detection Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junda Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce wind energy costs, prognostics and health management (PHM of wind turbine is needed to ensure the reliability and availability of wind turbines. A gearbox is an important component of a wind turbine. Therefore, developing effective gearbox fault detection tools is important to the PHM of wind turbine. In this paper, a new acoustic emission (AE sensor based gear fault detection approach is presented. This approach combines a heterodyne based frequency reduction technique with time synchronous average (TSA and spectrum kurtosis (SK to process AE sensor signals and extract features as condition indictors for gear fault detection. Heterodyne technique commonly used in communication is first employed to preprocess the AE signals before sampling. By heterodyning, the AE signal frequency is down shifted from several hundred kHz to below 50 kHz. This reduced AE signal sampling rate is comparable to that of vibration signals. The presented approach is validated using seeded gear tooth crack fault tests on a notational split torque gearbox. The approach presented in this paper is physics based and the validation results have showed that it could effectively detect the gear faults.

  12. Photoacoustic detection of NH3 in power plant emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassmussen, O.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a photoacoustic spectrometer initially designed for detection of NH 3 in power plant emission with a detection limit below 1 ppm. The radiation source is a high tunable CO 2 waveguide laser emitting its own frequency standard in one of 90 laserlines. The detection is performed at reduced pressure where the vibration-rotation transitions give an unambiguous fingerprint for each trace gas. Immunity against interference is ensured by recording this characteristic spectral fingerprint over the tuning range of the laser, and problems associated with the high concentration of CO 2 or other interfering molecules are further eliminated by utilizing the effect of kinetic cooling in the photoacoustic phase. The use of a CO 2 laser as radiation source combined with the highly sensitive photoacoustic detection provides a great possibility of measuring a wide range of air pollutants in the range down to ppt concentrations. Experimental measurements have been carried out on gases like sulfur dioxide, ethylene, sulfur hexafluoride, vinylchloride, ozone, etc., and many others have been theoretically examined to give a high response in the CO 2 laser frequency range. A computerized NH 3 spectrometer has been constructed and tested under realistic conditions at a Danish power plant operating a test facility for selective non-catalytic reduction of NO x . Results of this test will be presented

  13. Method optimization and quality assurance in speciation analysis using high performance liquid chromatography with detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1998-01-01

    Achievement of optimum selectivity, sensitivity and robustness in speciation analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection requires that each instrumental component is selected and optimized with a view to the ideal....... The optimized anion and cation exchange HPLC-ICP-MS systems were used for arsenic speciation in contaminated ground water and in an in-house shrimp reference sample. For the purpose of verification, HPLC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization was additionally used for arsenic...... a mass balance of the analytes in each fraction of the extraction procedure, by recovery of spikes and by employing and comparing independent techniques. The urgent need for reference materials certified for elemental species is stressed....

  14. Trace analysis of tiamulin in honey by liquid chromatography-diode array-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozal, M J; Bernal, J L; Martín, M T; Jiménez, J J; Bernal, J; Higes, M

    2006-05-26

    A liquid chromatography with diode array or electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry detection (LC-DAD-ESI-MS) method for the determination of tiamulin residues in honey is presented. The procedure employs a solid-phase extraction (SPE) on polymeric cartridges for the isolation of tiamulin from honey samples diluted in aqueous solution of tartaric acid. Chromatographic separation of the tiamulin is performed, in isocratic mode, on a C18 column using methanol and ammonium carbonate 0.1% in water, in proportion (30:70, v/v). Average analyte recoveries were from 88 to 106% in replica sets of fortified honey samples. The LC-ESI-MS method detection limits differ from 0.5 microg kg(-1) for clear honeys to 1.2 microg kg(-1) for dark honeys. The developed method has been applied to the analysis of tiamulin residues in multifloral honey samples collected from veterinary treated beehives.

  15. Integrating qualitative and quantitative characterization of traditional Chinese medicine injection by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuan-yuan; Xiao, Xue; Luo, Juan-min; Fu, Chan; Wang, Qiao-wei; Wang, Yi-ming; Liang, Qiong-lin; Luo, Guo-an

    2014-06-01

    The present study aims to describe and exemplify an integrated strategy of the combination of qualitative and quantitative characterization of a multicomponent mixture for the quality control of traditional Chinese medicine injections with the example of Danhong injection (DHI). The standardized chemical profile of DHI has been established based on liquid chromatography with diode array detection. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray multistage tandem ion-trap mass spectrometry have been developed to identify the major constituents in DHI. The structures of 26 compounds including nucleotides, phenolic acids, and flavonoid glycosides were identified or tentatively characterized. Meanwhile, the simultaneous determination of seven marker constituents, including uridine, adenosine, danshensu, protocatechuic aldehyde, p-coumaric acid, rosmarinic acid, and salvianolic acid B, in DHI was performed by multiwavelength detection based on high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The integrated qualitative and quantitative characterization strategy provided an effective and reliable pattern for the comprehensive and systematic characterization of the complex traditional Chinese medicine system. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A Novel Detection Method for Underwater Moving Targets by Measuring Their ELF Emissions with Inductive Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we propose a novel detection method for underwater moving targets by detecting their extremely low frequency (ELF emissions with inductive sensors. The ELF field source of the targets is modeled by a horizontal electric dipole at distances more than several times of the targets’ length. The formulas for the fields produced in air are derived with a three-layer model (air, seawater and seafloor and are evaluated with a complementary numerical integration technique. A proof of concept measurement is presented. The ELF emissions from a surface ship were detected by inductive electronic and magnetic sensors as the ship was leaving a harbor. ELF signals are of substantial strength and have typical characteristic of harmonic line spectrum, and the fundamental frequency has a direct relationship with the ship’s speed. Due to the high sensitivity and low noise level of our sensors, it is capable of resolving weak ELF signals at long distance. In our experiment, a detection distance of 1300 m from the surface ship above the sea surface was realized, which shows that this method would be an appealing complement to the usual acoustic detection and magnetic anomaly detection capability.

  17. High efficiency nebulization for helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorabchi, Kaveh; McCormick, Ryan; Levine, Jonathan A.; Liu Huiying; Nam, S.-H.; Montaser, Akbar

    2006-01-01

    A pneumatically-driven, high efficiency nebulizer is explored for helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The aerosol characteristics and analyte transport efficiencies of the high efficiency nebulizer for nebulization with helium are measured and compared to the results obtained with argon. Analytical performance indices of the helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are evaluated in terms of detection limits and precision. The helium inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection limits obtained with the high efficiency nebulizer at 200 μL/min are higher than those achieved with the ultrasonic nebulizer consuming 2 mL/min solution, however, precision is generally better with high efficiency nebulizer (1-4% vs. 3-8% with ultrasonic nebulizer). Detection limits with the high efficiency nebulizer at 200 μL/min solution uptake rate approach those using ultrasonic nebulizer upon efficient desolvation with a heated spray chamber followed by a Peltier-cooled multipass condenser

  18. Determination of boron content and isotopic composition in gypsum by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry using phase transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun-Qi; Peng, Zhang-Kuang; Yang, Jian; Xiao, Ying-Kai; Zhang, Yan-Ling

    2017-12-01

    As a stable isotope, boron plays an important role in hydrogeology, environmental geochemistry, ore deposit geochemistry and marine paleoclimatology. However, there is no report of boron isotopic composition in gypsum. This is mainly confined to complete dissolution of Gypsum by water or acid. In this study, gypsum was converted to calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) with ammonium bicarbonate(NH 4 HCO 3 ) by two steps at 50°C. In every step, the mass ratio of NH 4 HCO 3 /CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O was twice, and conversion rate reached more than 98%. Converted CaCO 3 was totally dissolved with hydrochloric acid (the dissolution rate was over 99%). In order to overcome the difficulties of the matrix interference and the detection limit of Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES), we use Amberlite IRA 743 resin to purify and enrichment the boron at first, then eluting boron from the resin with 10mL 0.1mol/L hydrochloric acid at 75°C. The boron isotopic composition of natural gypsum samples was determined using positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry (P-TIMS). The boron isotopic composition of gypsum may be an excellent indicator for the formation environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gas chromatography/plasma spectrometry - an important analytical tool for elemental speciation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuilloud, Jorgelina C.A.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.; Vonderheide, Anne P.; Caruso, Joseph A.

    2004-01-01

    In this review, a full discussion and update of the state-of-the-art of gas chromatography (GC) coupled to all known plasma spectrometers is presented. A brief introductive discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of GC-plasma interfaces, as well as types of plasmas and mass spectrometers, is given. The plasma-based techniques covered include inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Also, different variants of plasma sources, such as low power plasmas and glow discharge (GD) sources, are described and compared with respect to their capabilities in elemental speciation. Recent advances and alternative mass analyzers (collision/reaction cell; time-of-flight; double-focusing sector field) are also mentioned. Different aspects of the GC-plasma coupling are discussed with particular attention to the applications of these hyphenated techniques to the analysis of elemental species. Additionally, classical and modern sample preparation methods, including extraction and/or preconcentration and derivatization reactions, are presented and evaluated

  20. Physical and chemical characterization of residential oil boiler emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Michael D; Beck, Lee; Barfield, Pamela; Lavrich, Richard J; Dong, Yuanji; Vander Wal, Randy L

    2008-04-01

    The toxicity of emissions from the combustion of home heating oil coupled with the regional proximity and seasonal use of residential oil boilers (ROB) is an important public health concern. Yet scant physical and chemical information about the emissions from this source is available for climate and air quality modeling and for improving our understanding of aerosol-related human health effects. The gas- and particle-phase emissions from an active ROB firing distillate fuel oil (commonly known as diesel fuel) were evaluated to address this deficiency. Ion chromatography of impactor samples showed that the ultrafine ROB aerosol emissions were approximately 45% (w/w) sulfate. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected various n-alkanes at trace levels, sometimes in accumulation mode particles, and out of phase with the size distributions of aerosol mass and sulfate. The carbonaceous matter in the ROB aerosol was primarily light-adsorbing elemental carbon. Gas chromatography-atomic emission spectroscopy measured a previously unrecognized organosulfur compound group in the ROB aerosol emissions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of ROB soot indicated the presence of a highly ordered primary particle nanostructure embedded in larger aggregates. Organic gas emissions were measured using EPA Methods TO-15 and TO-11A. The ROB emitted volatile oxygenates (8 mg/(kg of oil burned)) and olefins (5 mg/(kg of oil burned)) mostly unrelated to the base fuel composition. In the final analysis, the ROB tested was a source of numerous hazardous air pollutants as defined in the Clean Air Act Amendments. Approximations conducted using emissions data from the ROB tests show relatively low contributions to a regional-level anthropogenic emissions inventory for volitile organic compounds, PM2.5, and SO2 mass.

  1. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S.; Pozebon, Dirce; Mello, Paola A.; Flores, Erico M.M.

    2007-01-01

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO 3 ) 2 was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 μg g -1 of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES)

  2. On the prospects to detect superheavy elements (SHE) in the earth's crust using the high energy synchrotron radiation and the mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnier, C.

    2001-01-01

    There are many indications for the existence of superheavy elements (SHE) in the Earth's crust. The appropriate detection methods are X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using the high energy synchrotron radiation and the mass spectrometry. The characteristic X-rays of each element up to Z >120 (corresponding binding energy of the K-electrons E b >230 keV) can be precisely excited with synchrotron XRF. Up to now, the XRF with high energy photons has never been applied to the quest for SHE. New methods of mass spectrometry eg using resonance ionization (RIMS) are promising to detect unambiguously atomic masses about 300 in solid matrices. It is proposed to restart the quest for SHE in the nature. Finding a SHE in the Earth's crust would be very important, because of what it will tell us about the origin of the elements eg about the nucleosynthesis during a super nova explosion, the structure of the atomic nuclei and the site of SHE in the periodic table of elements. (orig.) [de

  3. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascuch, Samantha J; Moree, Wilna J; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Turner, Gregory G; Cheng, Tina L; Blehert, David S; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Frick, Winifred F; Meehan, Michael J; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gerwick, Lena

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  4. The detection of iron protoporphyrin (heme b) in phytoplankton and marine particulate material by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry – comparison with diode array detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, Martha, E-mail: m.gledhill@geomar.de

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • Mass spectrometry was applied to the analysis of heme b in biological material. • Optimal conditions involved selective reactant monitoring of the heme b product ion. • The isotopic signature for this iron tetrapyrrole further improved selectivity. • Mass spectrometry and spectrophotometry were compared for heme b analysis. • Combining techniques made a powerful tool for analysis of heme in marine microbes. - Abstract: A mass spectrometric (MS) method for the identification of iron protoporphyrin (IX) (FePTP, heme b) in marine particulate material and phytoplankton is described. Electrospray ionisation of FePTP produced the molecular Fe(III)PTP{sup +} ion (m/z = 616) or the pseudomolecular [Fe(II)PTP + H]{sup +} ion (m/z = 617), depending on the oxidation state of the central iron ion. Collision induced dissociation (CID) in the ion trap mass spectrometer resulted in a single detected product ion (m/z = 557) indicative of loss of ethanoic acid from a carboxylic acid side chain. Widening the isolation width to 616 ± 3 resulted in production of a mass spectrum demonstrating the distinctive isotopic ratio of the iron containing fragment, further increasing the specificity of the analysis. Selective reactant monitoring (SRM) of the fragment ion (m/z = 557) was applied to the detection of FePTP after chromatography of ammoniacal OGP extracts of marine samples. The detection limit for FePTP analysed by SRM after chromatography was 1.2 ± 0.5 fmol. For phytoplankton samples, reasonably good agreement was achieved between results obtained with SRM and those obtained by monitoring absorbance at λ = 400 nm using a diode array detector (DAD). Use of SRM for analysis of particulate material obtained from the high latitude North Atlantic allowed for the analysis of FePTP in the presence of a co-eluting compound that interfered with detection by DAD. Simultaneous collection of mass spectra from m/z = 300 to 1500 resulted in identification of the

  5. Hands-on Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Naomi L.; March, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for the detection, identification, and quantification of organic compounds. As mass spectrometers have become more user-friendly and affordable, many students--often with little experience in mass spectrometry--find themselves needing to incorporate mass spectrometry into…

  6. Analysis of background components in Ge-spectrometry and their influence on detection limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusser, G [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    In low radioactivity measurements the system own background of the spectrometer is, besides the counting efficiency, the limiting factor for the achievable sensitivity. Since the latter is mostly fixed, background reduction is the only way to gain sensitivity, although it is inversely proportional only to the square root of the background rate but directly proportional to the counting efficiency. A thorough understanding of the background sources and their quantitative contribution helps to choose the most adequate suppression method in order to reach a certain required level of detection limit. For Ge-spectrometry the background can be reduced by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared to the unshielded case applying state-of-the-art techniques. This reduction factor holds for the continuous background spectrum as well as for the line background as demonstrated for a Ge detector of the Heidelberg-Moscow double beta decay experiment. (orig./DG)

  7. Filterless preconcentration, flow injection analysis and detection by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    The influence of interferences in the analysis of elements by inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS) may be significantly diminished by utilising a protocol of flow-injection analysis (FIA). The method is based on filterless preconcentration of metallic elements at the walls...... of a knotted reactor that was made of nylon tubings. In the load mode, the preconcentration was accomplished by precipitation of metallic species in alkaline-buffered carriers onto the inner walls of the hydrofilic tube. After a preconcen-tration period of 40-120 seconds using sample volumes of 4-10 m...... of 10-30 were obtained in the analysis of aluminium, of chromium and of iron, which resulted in detection limits (3) down to 20 g/L at a sampling frequency of 50 per hour. The preconcentration protocol improves the selectivity thus allowing direct determination of the elements in saline media. Anionic...

  8. Mass spectrometry with particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator use is renewing the ultrasensitive mass spectrometry in extending the detection limits. These new devices allow the measurement of rare isotope ratio, as 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl or 41 Ca, from the earth natural reservoirs [fr

  9. Detection of elusive radio and optical emission from cosmic-ray showers in the 1960s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegan, David J.

    2012-01-01

    During the 1960s, a small but vibrant community of cosmic ray physicists, pioneered novel optical methods of detecting extensive air showers (EAS) in the Earth's atmosphere with the prime objective of searching for point sources of energetic cosmic γ-rays. Throughout that decade, progress was extremely slow. Attempts to use the emission of optical Cherenkov radiation from showers as a basis for TeV gamma-ray astronomy proved difficult and problematical, given the rather primitive light-collecting systems in use at the time, coupled with a practical inability to reject the overwhelming background arising from hadronic showers. Simultaneously, a number of groups experimented with passive detection of radio emission from EAS as a possible cheap, simple, stand-alone method to detect and characterise showers of energy greater than 10 16 eV. By the end of the decade, it was shown that the radio emission was quite highly beamed and hence the effective collection area for detection of high energy showers was quite limited, diminishing the effectiveness of the radio signature as a stand-alone shower detection channel. By the early 1970s much of the early optimism for both the optical and radio techniques was beginning to dissipate, greatly reducing research activity. However, following a long hiatus both avenues were in time revived, the optical in the early 1980s and the radio in the early 2000s. With the advent of digital logic hardware, powerful low-cost computing, the ability to perform Monte Carlo simulations and above all, greatly improved funding, rapid progress became possible. In time this work proved to be fundamental to both High Energy γ-ray Astronomy and Neutrino Astrophysics. Here, that first decade of experimental investigation in both fields is reviewed.

  10. Detection of elusive radio and optical emission from cosmic-ray showers in the 1960s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegan, David J., E-mail: david.fegan@ucd.ie [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2012-01-11

    During the 1960s, a small but vibrant community of cosmic ray physicists, pioneered novel optical methods of detecting extensive air showers (EAS) in the Earth's atmosphere with the prime objective of searching for point sources of energetic cosmic {gamma}-rays. Throughout that decade, progress was extremely slow. Attempts to use the emission of optical Cherenkov radiation from showers as a basis for TeV gamma-ray astronomy proved difficult and problematical, given the rather primitive light-collecting systems in use at the time, coupled with a practical inability to reject the overwhelming background arising from hadronic showers. Simultaneously, a number of groups experimented with passive detection of radio emission from EAS as a possible cheap, simple, stand-alone method to detect and characterise showers of energy greater than 10{sup 16} eV. By the end of the decade, it was shown that the radio emission was quite highly beamed and hence the effective collection area for detection of high energy showers was quite limited, diminishing the effectiveness of the radio signature as a stand-alone shower detection channel. By the early 1970s much of the early optimism for both the optical and radio techniques was beginning to dissipate, greatly reducing research activity. However, following a long hiatus both avenues were in time revived, the optical in the early 1980s and the radio in the early 2000s. With the advent of digital logic hardware, powerful low-cost computing, the ability to perform Monte Carlo simulations and above all, greatly improved funding, rapid progress became possible. In time this work proved to be fundamental to both High Energy {gamma}-ray Astronomy and Neutrino Astrophysics. Here, that first decade of experimental investigation in both fields is reviewed.

  11. Ethanol analysis by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame-ionization and mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin

    2011-09-01

    Ethanol is the most frequently identified compound in forensic toxicology. Although confirmation involving mass spectrometry is desirable, relatively few methods have been published to date. A novel technique utilizing a Dean's Switch to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame-ionization (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation is presented. Using 100 μL of sample, the limits of detection and quantitation were 0.005 and 0.010 g/dL, respectively. The zero-order linear range (r(2) > 0.990) was determined to span the concentrations of 0.010 to 1.000 g/dL. The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 3.1%. Quantitative accuracy was within ±8%, ±6%, ±3%, and ±1.5% at concentrations of 0.010, 0.025, 0.080, and 0.300 g/dL, respectively. In addition, 1,1-difluoroethane was validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validated FID-MS method provides a procedure for the quantitation of ethyl alcohol in blood by FID with simultaneous confirmation by MS and can also be utilized as an identification method for inhalants such as 1,1-difluoroethane.

  12. Enhanced Peptide Detection Toward Single-Neuron Proteomics by Reversed-Phase Fractionation Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sam B.; Lombard-Banek, Camille; Muñoz-LLancao, Pablo; Manzini, M. Chiara; Nemes, Peter

    2018-05-01

    The ability to detect peptides and proteins in single cells is vital for understanding cell heterogeneity in the nervous system. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) provides high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) with trace-level sensitivity, but compressed separation during CE challenges protein identification by tandem HRMS with limited MS/MS duty cycle. Here, we supplemented ultrasensitive CE-nanoESI-HRMS with reversed-phase (RP) fractionation to enhance identifications from protein digest amounts that approximate to a few mammalian neurons. An 1 to 20 μg neuronal protein digest was fractionated on a RP column (ZipTip), and 1 ng to 500 pg of peptides were analyzed by a custom-built CE-HRMS system. Compared with the control (no fractionation), RP fractionation improved CE separation (theoretical plates 274,000 versus 412,000 maximum, resp.), which enhanced detection sensitivity (2.5-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio), minimized co-isolation spectral interferences during MS/MS, and increased the temporal rate of peptide identification by up to 57%. From 1 ng of protein digest (organization. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: a tutorial review. Part I. Theoretical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-07-23

    Due to their outstanding analytical performances, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are widely used for multi-elemental measurements and also for isotopic characterization in the case of ICP-MS. While most studies are carried out in aqueous matrices, applications involving organic/hydro-organic matrices become increasingly widespread. This kind of matrices is introduced in ICP based instruments when classical "matrix removal" approaches such as acid digestion or extraction procedures cannot be implemented. Due to the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices and their associated effects on instrumentation and analytical performances, their introduction into ICP sources is particularly challenging and has become a full topic. In this framework, numerous theoretical and phenomenological studies of these effects have been performed in the past, mainly by ICP-OES, while recent literature is more focused on applications and associated instrumental developments. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP-OES and ICP-MS. The present Part I, provides theoretical considerations in connection with the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices, in order to better understand the induced phenomena. This focal point is divided in four chapters highlighting: (i) the impact of organic/hydro-organic matrices from aerosol generation to atomization/excitation/ionization processes; (ii) the production of carbon molecular constituents and their spatial distribution in the plasma with respect to analytes repartition; (iii) the subsequent modifications of plasma fundamental properties; and (iv) the resulting spectroscopic and non spectroscopic interferences. This first part of this tutorial review is addressed either to beginners or to more experienced scientists who are interested in the

  14. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy for accurate and well resolved analysis of coatings and thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Wilke, Marcus

    2011-12-01

    In the last years, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) gained more and more acceptance in the analysis of functional coatings. GDOES thereby represents an interesting alternative to common depth profiling techniques like AES and SIMS, based on its unique combination of high erosion rates and erosion depths, sensitivity, analysis of nonconductive layers and easy quantification even for light elements such as C, N, O and H. Starting with the fundamentals of GDOES, a short overview on new developments in instrument design for accurate and well resolved thin film analyses is presented. The article focuses on the analytical capabilities of glow discharge optical emission spectrometry in the analysis of metallic coatings and thin films. Results illustrating the high depth resolution, confirmation of stoichiometry, the detection of light elements in coatings as well as contamination on the surface or interfaces will be demonstrated by measurements of: a multilayer system Cr/Ti on silicon, interface contamination on silicon during deposition of aluminum, Al2O3-nanoparticle containing conversion coatings on zinc for corrosion resistance, Ti3SiC2 MAX-phase coatings by pulsed laser deposition and hydrogen detection in a V/Fe multilayer system. The selected examples illustrate that GDOES can be successfully adopted as an analytical tool in the development of new materials and coatings. A discussion of the results as well as of the limitations of GDOES is presented. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Time-resolved analysis of primary volatile emissions and secondary aerosol formation potential from a small-scale pellet boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Hendryk; Pieber, Simone M.; Tiitta, Petri; Sippula, Olli; Kortelainen, Miika; Lamberg, Heikki; Grigonyte, Julija; Streibel, Thorsten; Prévôt, André S. H.; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    Small-scale pellet boilers and stoves became popular as a wood combustion appliance for domestic heating in Europe, North America and Asia due to economic and environmental aspects. Therefore, an increasing contribution of pellet boilers to air pollution is expected despite their general high combustion efficiency. As emissions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and permanent gases of pellet boilers are well investigated, the scope of this study was to investigate the volatile organic emissions and the formation potential of secondary aerosols for this type of appliance. Fresh and aged emissions were analysed by a soot-particle aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SP-AMS) and the molecular composition of the volatile precursors with single-photon ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SPI-TOFMS) at different pellet boiler operation conditions. Organic emissions in the gas phase were dominated by unsaturated hydrocarbons while wood-specific VOCs, e.g. phenolic species or substituted furans, were only detected during the starting phase. Furthermore, organic emissions in the gas phase were found to correlate with fuel grade and combustion technology in terms of secondary air supply. Secondary organic aerosols of optimised pellet boiler conditions (OPT, state-of-the-art combustion appliance) and reduced secondary air supply (RSA, used as a proxy for pellet boilers of older type) were studied by simulating atmospheric ageing in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor. Different increases in OA mass (55% for OPT, 102% for RSA), associated with higher average carbon oxidation state and O:C, could be observed in a PAM chamber experiment. Finally, it was found that derived SOA yields and emission factors were distinctly lower than reported for log wood stoves.

  16. Composition of Renaissance paint layers: simultaneous particle induced X-ray emission and backscattering spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viguerie, L; Beck, L; Salomon, J; Pichon, L; Walter, Ph

    2009-10-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) is now routinely used in the field of cultural heritage. Various setups have been developed to investigate the elemental composition of wood/canvas paintings or of cross-section samples. However, it is not possible to obtain information concerning the quantity of organic binder. Backscattering spectrometry (BS) can be a useful complementary method to overcome this limitation. In the case of paint layers, PIXE brings the elemental composition (major elements to traces) and the BS spectrum can give access to the proportion of pigment and binder. With the use of 3 MeV protons for PIXE and BS simultaneously, it was possible to perform quantitative analysis including C and O for which the non-Rutherford cross sections are intense. Furthermore, with the use of the same conditions for PIXE and BS, the experiment time and the potential damage by the ion beam were reduced. The results obtained with the external beam of the Accélérateur Grand Louvre pour l'Analyse Elementaire (AGLAE) facility on various test painting samples and on cross sections from Italian Renaissance masterpieces are shown. Simultaneous combination of PIXE and BS leads to a complete characterization of the paint layers: elemental composition and proportion of the organic binder have been determined and thus provide useful information about ancient oil painting recipes.

  17. NON-DETECTION OF L-BAND LINE EMISSION FROM THE EXOPLANET HD189733b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandell, Avi M.; Deming, L. Drake; Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Knutson, Heather A.; Salyk, Colette

    2011-01-01

    We attempt to confirm bright non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) emission from the exoplanet HD 189733b at 3.25 μm, as recently reported by Swain et al. based on observations at low spectral resolving power (λ/δλ ∼ 30). Non-LTE emission lines from gas in an exoplanet atmosphere will not be significantly broadened by collisions, so the measured emission intensity per resolution element must be substantially brighter when observed at high spectral resolving power. We observed the planet before, during, and after a secondary eclipse event at a resolving power λ/δλ = 27, 000 using the NIRSPEC spectrometer on the Keck II telescope. Our spectra cover a spectral window near the peak found by Swain et al., and we compare emission cases that could account for the magnitude and wavelength dependence of the Swain et al. result with our final spectral residuals. To model the expected line emission, we use a general non-equilibrium formulation to synthesize emission features from all plausible molecules that emit in this spectral region. In every case, we detect no line emission to a high degree of confidence. After considering possible explanations for the Swain et al. results and the disparity with our own data, we conclude that an astrophysical source for the putative non-LTE emission is unlikely. We note that the wavelength dependence of the signal seen by Swain et al. closely matches the 2ν 2 band of water vapor at 300 K, and we suggest that an imperfect correction for telluric water is the source of the feature claimed by Swain et al.

  18. Is Optical Gas Imaging Effective for Detecting Fugitive Methane Emissions? - A Technological and Policy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, A. P.; Wang, J.; Brandt, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Mitigating fugitive methane emissions from the oil and gas industry has become an important concern for both businesses and regulators. While recent studies have improved our understanding of emissions from all sectors of the natural gas supply chain, cost-effectively identifying leaks over expansive natural gas infrastructure remains a significant challenge. Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recommended the use of optical gas imaging (OGI) technologies to be used in industry-wide leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs. However, there has been little to no systematic study of the effectiveness of infrared-camera-based OGI technology for leak detection applications. Here, we develop a physics-based model that simulates a passive infrared camera imaging a methane leak against varying background and ambient conditions. We verify the simulation tool through a series of large-volume controlled release field experiments wherein known quantities of methane were released and imaged from a range of distances. After simulator verification, we analyze the effects of environmental conditions like temperature, wind, and imaging background on the amount of methane detected from a statistically representative survey program. We also examine the effects of LDAR design parameters like imaging distance, leak size distribution, and gas composition. We show that imaging distance strongly affects leak detection - EPA's expectation of a 60% reduction in fugitive emissions based on a semi-annual LDAR survey will be realized only if leaks are imaged at a distance less than 10 m from the source under ideal environmental conditions. Local wind speed is also shown to be important. We show that minimum detection limits are 3 to 4 times higher for wet-gas compositions that contain a significant fraction of ethane and propane, resulting a significantly large leakage rate. We also explore the importance of `super-emitters' on the performance of an OGI-based leak

  19. Spectrochemical determination of tantalum in plutonium metal using direct current plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeff, S.K.; Morris, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Tantalum is determined by direct current plasma spectrometry after separation of plutonium from solution as PuF 3 . After centrifugation of the PuF 3 precipitate, a low level of plutonium remains in solution in sufficient quantity to cause spectral interferences. It is necessary to determine the plutonium by dc plasma spectrometry and apply a correction to determine low tantalum concentrations with good accuracy and precision. Tantalum can be determined down to 0.4 ppM in solution with a relative standard deviation of 10 percent. Better precision can be achieved at higher concentrations. The procedure is simple and convenient for glovebox work. 5 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  20. Detection of creatinine in exhaled breath of humans with chronic kidney disease by extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qian; Li, Penghui; Cai, Yunfeng; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Haidong; Luo, Jiao; Ding, Jianhua; Chen, Huanwen

    2016-02-09

    Exhaled breath contains chemicals that have a diagnostic value in human pathologies. Here in vivo breath analysis of creatinine has been demonstrated by constructing a novel platform based on extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) without sample pretreatment. Under optimized experimental conditions, the limit of creatinine detection in breath was 30.57 ng L(-1), and the linear range of detection was from 0.3 μg L(-1) to 100 μg L(-1). The concentration range of creatinine in the exhaled breath of 50 volunteers with chronic kidney disease was from 42 pptv to 924 pptv, and the range of the relative standard deviations was from 9.3% to 19.2%. The method provides high sensitivity, high specificity and high speed for semi-quantitative analysis of creatinine in exhaled human breath.

  1. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI). Copyright © 2012 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and environment. SIMS as applied to the detection of stable and radioactive isotopes in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassard-Bouchaud, C.; Escaig, F.; Hallegot, P.

    1984-01-01

    Several marine species of economical interest, Crustacea (crabs and prawns) and Molluscs (common mussels and oysters) were collected from coastal waters of France: English Channel, Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea and of Japan. Microanalyses which were performed at the tissue and cell levels, using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, revealed many contaminants; stable isotopes as well as radioactive actinids such as uranium were detected. Uptake, storage and excretion target organs were identified [fr

  3. Analysis of posttranslational modifications of proteins by tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Trelle, Morten B; Thingholm, Tine E

    2006-01-01

    -temporal distribution in cells and tissues. Most PTMs can be detected by protein and peptide analysis by mass spectrometry (MS), either as a mass increment or a mass deficit relative to the nascent unmodified protein. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides a series of analytical features that are highly useful...

  4. Efficiency transfer using the GEANT4 code of CERN for HPGe gamma spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagren, S; Tekaya, M Ben; Reguigui, N; Gharbi, F

    2016-01-01

    In this work we apply the GEANT4 code of CERN to calculate the peak efficiency in High Pure Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry using three different procedures. The first is a direct calculation. The second corresponds to the usual case of efficiency transfer between two different configurations at constant emission energy assuming a reference point detection configuration and the third, a new procedure, consists on the transfer of the peak efficiency between two detection configurations emitting the gamma ray in different energies assuming a "virtual" reference point detection configuration. No pre-optimization of the detector geometrical characteristics was performed before the transfer to test the ability of the efficiency transfer to reduce the effect of the ignorance on their real magnitude on the quality of the transferred efficiency. The obtained and measured efficiencies were found in good agreement for the two investigated methods of efficiency transfer. The obtained agreement proves that Monte Carlo method and especially the GEANT4 code constitute an efficient tool to obtain accurate detection efficiency values. The second investigated efficiency transfer procedure is useful to calibrate the HPGe gamma detector for any emission energy value for a voluminous source using one point source detection efficiency emitting in a different energy as a reference efficiency. The calculations preformed in this work were applied to the measurement exercise of the EUROMET428 project. A measurement exercise where an evaluation of the full energy peak efficiencies in the energy range 60-2000 keV for a typical coaxial p-type HpGe detector and several types of source configuration: point sources located at various distances from the detector and a cylindrical box containing three matrices was performed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bayesian Integration and Characterization of Composition C-4 Plastic Explosives Based on Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Christine M.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Alexander, M. L.; Newburn, Matthew K.; Bader, Sydney P.; Ewing, Robert G.; Fahey, Albert J.; Atkinson, David A.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2016-02-25

    Key elements regarding the use of non-radioactive ionization sources will be presented as related to explosives detection by mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. Various non-radioactive ionization sources will be discussed along with associated ionization mechanisms pertaining to specific sample types.

  6. Extended Structures of Planetary Nebulae Detected in H2 Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xuan; Zhang, Yong; Kwok, Sun; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chau, Wayne; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Guerrero, Martín A.

    2018-06-01

    We present narrowband near-infrared images of a sample of 11 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) obtained in the H2 2.122 μm and Brγ 2.166 μm emission lines and the K c 2.218 μm continuum. These images were collected with the Wide-field Infrared Camera on the 3.6 m Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope (CFHT); their unprecedented depth and wide field of view allow us to find extended nebular structures in H2 emission in several PNe, some of these being the first detection. The nebular morphologies in H2 emission are studied in analogy with the optical images, and indication of stellar wind interactions is discussed. In particular, the complete structure of the highly asymmetric halo in NGC 6772 is witnessed in H2, which strongly suggests interaction with the interstellar medium. Our sample confirms the general correlation between H2 emission and the bipolarity of PNe. The knotty or filamentary fine structures of the H2 gas are resolved in the inner regions of several ring-like PNe, also confirming the previous argument that H2 emission mostly comes from knots or clumps embedded within fully ionized material at the equatorial regions. Moreover, the H2 image of the butterfly-shaped Sh 1-89, after removal of field stars, clearly reveals a tilted ring structure at the waist. These high-quality CFHT images justify follow-up detailed morphokinematic studies that are desired in order to deduce the true physical structures of a few PNe in the sample. Based on observations obtained with WIRCam, a joint project of CFHT, Taiwan, Korea, Canada, and France, at the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l’Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  7. Sampling and analyte enrichment strategies for ambient mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianjiang; Ma, Wen; Li, Hongmei; Ai, Wanpeng; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2018-01-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry provides great convenience for fast screening, and has showed promising potential in analytical chemistry. However, its relatively low sensitivity seriously restricts its practical utility in trace compound analysis. In this review, we summarize the sampling and analyte enrichment strategies coupled with nine modes of representative ambient mass spectrometry (desorption electrospray ionization, paper vhspray ionization, wooden-tip spray ionization, probe electrospray ionization, coated blade spray ionization, direct analysis in real time, desorption corona beam ionization, dielectric barrier discharge ionization, and atmospheric-pressure solids analysis probe) that have dramatically increased the detection sensitivity. We believe that these advances will promote routine use of ambient mass spectrometry. Graphical abstract Scheme of sampling stretagies for ambient mass spectrometry.

  8. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-06

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  9. Establishing the link between health effects and tire pyrolysis emissions through X RF spectrometry of particulate matter in the 2.5 range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Flora L.; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Bautista VII, Angel T.; Bucal, Camille Grace DL.

    2011-01-01

    In July 2009, several tire pyrolysis facility started operations in Angat, Bulacan. Very soon after the facility in Pulong Yantok started operations, nearby residents noted oily effluents contaminating the surrounding area including a nearby creek and adjacent rice fields; sacks of dark ash stacked close just outside the facility; dark layers of soot on the ground, foliage and rooftops. Residents complained that they could no longer save rainwater for drinking because their rain gutters were contaminated by soot. The residents also complained of foul odor emanating from the facility. many of them has to stay indoors and close their windows to keep away tire pyrolysis emissions. In January, 2010, people became alarmed on realizing that they were exhibiting a communal reaction to airborne substances which they suspected were coming from the tire pyrolysis facility. Symptoms experienced were: tightening of the chest, asthma, excessive phlegm formation, coughing, allergic rhinitis, eye and skin irritation, headaches, stomach ache and even fever. At the time the exact nature of the facility was not yet clear to stake holders. Assistance was sought from the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) for the conduct of air particulate monitoring, in order to generate preliminary information on the nature of airborne pollutants. PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 monitoring was undertaken with the Gent sampler and subsequent elemental analysis by X RF spectrometry, in an attempt to identify possible signature elements. PM2.5 and PM10 levels were much below the WHO guideline values. Elements present above one percent in PM2.5 were: Black C, Na, S, Si, K, Ca, Al and Mg. Those present below one percent in PM2.5 were: Fe, Zn, Pb, P, and Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Cu were below detection limits. A drop in concentration was noted for elements present in tires (Zn, S, Pb, Al, Si, Mg and Black C) when the facility stopped operations after the implementation of the Cease and Desist Order (CDO). Zn

  10. DETECTION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION DURING THE X-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY IN GRB 100728A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present the simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of the bright GRB 100728A and its afterglow. The early X-ray emission is dominated by a vigorous flaring activity continuing until 1 ks after the burst. In the same time interval, high-energy emission is significantly detected by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope. Marginal evidence of GeV emission is observed up to later times. We discuss the broadband properties of this burst within both the internal and external shock scenarios, with a particular emphasis on the relation between X-ray flares, the GeV emission, and a continued long-duration central engine activity as their power source.

  11. Depositions of heavy metals and radionuclides in the region of the plant for non-ferrous metals (Plovdiv) studied by the methods of mass- and gamma- spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrikov, M.; Hristov, Hr.; Antonov, A.

    2001-01-01

    Soil samples and vegetation from the region of KCM-S.A. (Plant for non-ferrous metals) -Plovdiv have been studied by means of a conventional γ-spectroscopy and a mass-spectrometry analysis. The concentrations of several decades of elements, including heavy metals and radionuclides have been determined at low detection limits. Conclusions about the influence of atmospheric emissions connected with the production of non-ferrous metal on the present environmental state of the region have been drown from the obtained results. (author)

  12. Environmental atmospheric impact assessment by the emission of particles in an industrial area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Dario R.; Ledesma, Ariel G.; Vazquez, Cristina; Smichowski, Patricia N.; Romero, Carlos A.; Dawidowski, Laura E.; Ortiz, Maria; Marrero, Julieta G.

    1999-01-01

    The content of metals present in suspended particulate matter was evaluated using analytical related nuclear techniques, in order to discriminate the contribution of different emission sources to the atmospheric concentration in the area of Campana, located in the Province of Buenos Aires. The levels of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ag, Cd y Pb were quantified by Wave Dispersion X-Ray Florescence spectrometry (WDXRF), Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometry (TRXRF) and Inducted Coupled Plasma Absorption Emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). (author)

  13. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascuch, Samantha J.; Moree, Wilna J.; Cheng-Chih Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Turner, Gregory G.; Cheng, Tina L.; Blehert, David S.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Frick, Winifred F.; Meehan, Michael J.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gerwick, Lena

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  14. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Mascuch

    Full Text Available White-nose syndrome (WNS caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  15. DETECTION OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE STARBURST GALAXIES M82 AND NGC 253 WITH THE LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ON FERMI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of high-energy γ-ray emission from two starburst galaxies using data obtained with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Steady point-like emission above 200 MeV has been detected at significance levels of 6.8σ and 4.8σ, respectively, from sources positionally coincident with locations of the starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The total fluxes of the sources are consistent with γ-ray emission originating from the interaction of cosmic rays with local interstellar gas and radiation fields and constitute evidence for a link between massive star formation and γ-ray emission in star-forming galaxies.

  16. Radiation dosimetry and spectrometry with superheated emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Errico, Francesco

    2001-01-01

    Detectors based on emulsions of overexpanded halocarbon droplets in tissue equivalent aqueous gels or soft polymers, known as 'superheated drop detectors' or 'bubble (damage) detectors', have been used in radiation detection, dosimetry and spectrometry for over two decades. Recent technological advances have led to the introduction of several instruments for individual and area monitoring: passive integrating meters based on the optical or volumetric registration of the bubbles, and active counters detecting bubble nucleations acoustically. These advances in the instrumentation have been matched by the progress made in the production of stable and well-specified emulsions of superheated droplets. A variety of halocarbons are employed in the formulation of the detectors, and this permits a wide range of applications. In particular, halocarbons with a moderate degree of superheat, i.e. a relatively small difference between their operating temperature and boiling point, can be used in neutron dosimetry and spectrometry since they are only nucleated by energetic heavy ions such as those produced by fast neutrons. More recently, halocarbons with an elevated degree of superheat have been utilised to produce emulsions that nucleate with much smaller energy deposition and detect low linear energy transfer radiations, such as photons and electrons. This paper reviews the detector physics of superheated emulsions and their applications in radiation measurements, particularly in neutron dosimetry and spectrometry

  17. Analysis of non-regulated vehicular emissions by extractive FTIR spectrometry: tests on a hybrid car in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, F.; Grutter, M.; Jazcilevich, A.; González-Oropeza, R.

    2006-07-01

    A methodology to acquire valuable information on the chemical composition and evolution of vehicular emissions is presented. The analysis of the gases is performed by passing a constant flow of a sample gas from the tail-pipe into a 10 L multi-pass cell. The absorption spectra within the cell are obtained using an FTIR spectrometer at 0.5 cm-1 resolution along a 13.1 m optical path. Additionally, the total flow from the exhaust is continuously measured from a differential pressure sensor on a Pitot tube installed at the exit of the exhaust. This configuration aims to obtain a good speciation capability by coadding spectra during 30 s and reporting the emission (in g/km) of key and non-regulated pollutants, such as CO2, CO, NO, SO2, NH3, HCHO, NMHC, during predetermined driving routines. The advantages and disadvantages of increasing the acquisition frequency, as well as the effect of other parameters such as spectral resolution, cell volume and flow rate, are discussed. With the aim of testing and evaluating the proposed technique, experiments were performed on a dynamometer running FTP-75 and typical driving cycles of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) on a Toyota Prius hybrid vehicle. This car is an example of recent automotive technology to reach the market dedicated to reduce emissions and therefore pressing the need of low detection techniques. This study shows the potential of the proposed technique to measure and report in real time the emissions of a large variety of pollutants, even from a super ultra-low emission vehicle (SULEV). The emissions of HC's, NOx, CO and CO2 obtained here are similar to experiments performed in other locations with the same vehicle model. Some differences suggest that an inefficient combustion process and type of gasoline used in the MCMA may be partly responsible for lower CO2 and higher CO and NO emission factors. Also, a fast reduction of NO emission to very low values is observed after cold ignition, giving rise to

  18. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Incipient in Journal Bearings - Part I : Detectability and measurement for bearing damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dong Jin; Kwon, Oh Yang; Chung, Min Hwa; Kim, Kyung Woong

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to the machinery using rolling element bearings, systems with journal bearings generally operate in large scale and under severe loading condition such as steam generator turbines and internal combustion engines. Failure of the bearings in these machinery can result in the system breakdown. To avoid the time consuming repair and considerable economic loss, the detection of incipient failure in journal bearings becomes very important. In this experimental approach, acoustic emission monitoring is applied to the detection of incipient failure caused by several types of abnormal operating condition most probable in the journal bearing systems. It has been known that the intervention of foreign materials, insufficient lubrication and misassembly etc. are principal factors to cause bearing failure and distress. The experiment was conducted under such designed conditions as hard particles in the lubrication layer, insufficient lubrication, and metallic contact in the simulated journal bearing system. The results showed that acoustic emission could be an effective tool to detect the incipient failure in journal bearings

  19. On-Chip Spyhole Nanoelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sensitive Biomarker Detection in Small Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaoqin; Qiao, Liang; Stauffer, Géraldine; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H.

    2018-03-01

    A polyimide microfluidic chip with a microhole emitter (Ø 10-12 μm) created on top of a microchannel by scanning laser ablation has been designed for nanoelectrospray ionization (spyhole-nanoESI) to couple microfluidics with mass spectrometry. The spyhole-nanoESI showed higher sensitivity compared to standard ESI and microESI from the end of the microchannel. The limits of detection (LOD) for peptide with the spyhole-nanoESI MS reached 50 pM, which was 600 times lower than that with standard ESI. The present microchip emitter allows the analysis of small volumes of samples. As an example, a small cell lung cancer biomarker, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), was detected by monitoring the transition of its unique peptide with the spyhole-nanoESI MS/MS. NSE at 0.2 nM could be well identified with a signal to noise ratio (S/N) of 50, and thereby its LOD was estimated to be 12 pM. The potential application of the spyhole-nanoESI MS/MS in cancer diagnosis was further demonstrated with the successful detection of 2 nM NSE from 1 μL of human serum. Before the detection, the serum sample spiked with NSE was first depleted with immune spin column, then desalted by centrifugal filter device, and finally digested by trypsin, without any other complicated preparation steps. The concentration matched the real condition of clinical samples. In addition, the microchips can be disposable to avoid any cross contamination. The present technique provides a highly efficient way to couple microfluidics with MS, which brings additional values to various microfluidics and MS-based analysis.

  20. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan Joe Saetveit

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 (micro)g L -1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 (micro)L injection in a physiological saline matrix

  1. Mass spectrometry for characterizing plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eBauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a selective and powerful technique to obtain identification and structural information on compounds present in complex mixtures. Since it requires only small sample amount it is an excellent tool for researchers interested in detecting changes in composition of complex carbohydrates of plants. This mini-review gives an overview of common mass spectrometry techniques applied to the analysis of plant cell wall carbohydrates. It presents examples in which mass spectrometry has been used to elucidate the structure of oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses and pectins and illustrates how information on sequence, linkages, branching and modifications are obtained from characteristic fragmentation patterns.

  2. Laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Fundamentals .Applications; Desorption laser et spectrometrie de masse par temps de vol. Aspects fondamentaux. Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaurand, P

    1994-11-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a very powerful technique for the analysis of heavy molecular ions (100 000 u and more). The ejection in the gas phase and the ionization of these molecules is now possible through the MALDI technique (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization). This technique consists in mixing the heavy molecules to be analysed with a organic matrix which absorbs at the wavelength of the laser. The necessary irradiance are of the order of 10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2}. In these conditions we have shown that the mass resolutions are optimum and that the relative mass accuracies are of the order of 10{sup -4}. We have also demonstrated that the emission angle of the molecular ions in MALDI depends on the incident angle of the laser light. During the desorption process, the molecular ions are emitted in the opposite direction of the incident laser light. This effect is particularly important for the design of the accelerating stage of the time-of-flight spectrometers. Problems relative to the detection of these heavy molecular ions have been studied in details between 0.5 10{sup 4} m/s and 10{sup 5} m/s. The velocity threshold of the electronic emission is lower than the value of 0.5 10{sup 4} m/s. The relation between the electronic emission and the projectile velocity is complex. Finally, examples on mass identification of C{sub 60} molecules and derivated C{sub 60} are presented. Desorption methods are compared. (author). 32 refs., 34 figs.

  3. Detection of methamphetamine in the presence of nicotine using in situ chemical derivatization and ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Mariela L; Harrington, Peter B

    2004-02-15

    The detection of methamphetamine in the presence of nicotine has been successfully accomplished using in situ chemical derivatization with propyl chloroformate as the derivatization reagent and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The rapid detection of methamphetamine is important for forensic scientists in order to establish a chain of evidence and link criminals to the crime scene. Nicotine is pervasive in clandestine drug laboratories from cigarette smoke residue. It has been demonstrated that nicotine obscures the methamphetamine peaks in ion mobility spectrometers due to their similar charge affinities and ion mobilities, which makes their detection a challenging task. As a consequence, false positive or negative responses may arise. In situ chemical derivatization poses as a sensitive, accurate, and reproducible alternative to remove the nicotine background when detecting nanogram amounts of methamphetamine. The derivatization agent was coated onto the sample disk, and the derivatization product corresponding to propyl methamphetamine carbamate was detected. In the present study, in situ chemical derivatization was demonstrated to be a feasible method to detect methamphetamine hydrochloride as the carbamate derivative, which was baseline-resolved from the nicotine peak. Alternating least squares (ALS) was used to model the datasets. A mixture containing both compounds revealed reduced mobilities of 1.61 cm(2)/V.s and 1.54 cm(2)/V.s for methamphetamine and nicotine, respectively. The reduced mobility of propyl methamphetamine carbamate was found at 1.35 cm(2)/V.s.

  4. Evaluation of a new optic-enabled portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry instrument for measuring toxic metals/metalloids in consumer goods and cultural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Diana; Praamsma, Meredith L.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is a rapid, non-destructive multi-elemental analytical technique used for determining elemental contents ranging from percent down to the μg/g level. Although detection limits are much higher for XRF compared to other laboratory-based methods, such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), ICP-optical emission spectrometry (OES) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), its portability and ease of use make it a valuable tool, especially for field-based studies. A growing necessity to monitor human exposure to toxic metals and metalloids in consumer goods, cultural products, foods and other sample types while performing the analysis in situ has led to several important developments in portable XRF technology. In this study, a new portable XRF analyzer based on the use of doubly curved crystal optics (HD Mobile®) was evaluated for detecting toxic elements in foods, medicines, cosmetics and spices used in many Asian communities. Two models of the HD Mobile® (a pre-production and a final production unit) were investigated. Performance parameters including accuracy, precision and detection limits were characterized in a laboratory setting using certified reference materials (CRMs) and standard solutions. Bias estimates for key elements of public health significance such as As, Cd, Hg and Pb ranged from - 10% to 11% for the pre-production, and - 14% to 16% for the final production model. Five archived public health samples including herbal medicine products, ethnic spices and cosmetic products were analyzed using both XRF instruments. There was good agreement between the pre-production and final production models for the four key elements, such that the data were judged to be fit-for-purpose for the majority of samples analyzed. Detection of the four key elements of interest using the HD Mobile® was confirmed using archived samples for which ICP-OES data were available based on digested sample materials. The HD

  5. Detection of Potato Storage Disease via Gas Analysis: A Pilot Study Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Rutolo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry. In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection. A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation.

  6. Damage Detection in Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers using Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A.; Kaewunruen, S.; Janeliukstis, R.; Papaelias, M.

    2017-10-01

    Prestressed concrete sleepers (or railroad ties) are safety-critical elements in railway tracks that distribute the wheel loads from the rails to the track support system. Over a period of time, the concrete sleepers age and deteriorate in addition to experiencing various types of static and dynamic loading conditions, which are attributable to train operations. In many cases, structural cracks can develop within the sleepers due to high intensity impact loads or due to poor track maintenance. Often, cracks of sleepers develop and present at the midspan due to excessive negative bending. These cracks can cause broken sleepers and sometimes called ‘center bound’ problem in railway lines. This paper is the world first to present an application of non-destructive acoustic emission technology for damage detection in railway concrete sleepers. It presents experimental investigations in order to detect center-bound cracks in railway prestressed concrete sleepers. Experimental laboratory testing involves three-point bending tests of four concrete sleepers. Three-point bending tests correspond to a real failure mode, when the loads are not transferred uniformly to the ballast support. It is observed that AE sensing provides an accurate means for detecting the location and magnitude of cracks in sleepers. Sensor location criticality is also highlighted in the paper to demonstrate the reliability-based damage detection of the sleepers.

  7. Plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry by group I and group II matrix-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Chan, W.-T.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of Na, K, Ca and Ba matrices on the plasma excitation conditions in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were studied. Normalized relative intensity was used to indicate the extent of the plasma-related matrix effects. The group I matrices have no effects on the plasma excitation conditions. In contrast, the group II matrices depress the normalized relative intensities of some spectral lines. Specifically, the Group II matrices have no effects on the normalized relative intensity of atomic lines of low upper energy level (soft lines), but reduce the normalized relative intensity of some ionic lines and atomic lines of high energy level (hard lines). The Group II matrices seem to shift the Saha balance of the analytes only; no shift in the Boltzmann balance was observed experimentally. Moreover, for some ionic lines with sum of ionization and excitation potentials close to the ionization potential of argon (15.75 eV), the matrix effect is smaller than other ionic lines of the same element. The reduced matrix effects may be attributed qualitatively to charge transfer excitation mechanism of these ionic lines. Charge transfer reaction renders ionic emission lines from the quasi-resonant levels similar in characteristics of atomic lines. The contribution of charge transfer relative to excitation by other non-specific excitation mechanisms (via Saha balance and Boltzmann balance) determines the degree of atomic behavior of a quasi-resonant level. A significant conclusion of this study is that plasma-related matrix effect depends strongly on the excitation mechanism of a spectral line. Since, in general, more than one excitation mechanism may contribute to the overall excitation of an emission line, the observed matrix effects reflect the sum of the effects due to individual excitation mechanisms. Excitation mechanisms, in addition to the often-used total excitation energy, should be considered in matrix effect studies

  8. Ion trace detection algorithm to extract pure ion chromatograms to improve untargeted peak detection quality for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, San-Yuan; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Tseng, Yufeng J

    2015-03-03

    Able to detect known and unknown metabolites, untargeted metabolomics has shown great potential in identifying novel biomarkers. However, elucidating all possible liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) ion signals in a complex biological sample remains challenging since many ions are not the products of metabolites. Methods of reducing ions not related to metabolites or simply directly detecting metabolite related (pure) ions are important. In this work, we describe PITracer, a novel algorithm that accurately detects the pure ions of a LC/TOF-MS profile to extract pure ion chromatograms and detect chromatographic peaks. PITracer estimates the relative mass difference tolerance of ions and calibrates the mass over charge (m/z) values for peak detection algorithms with an additional option to further mass correction with respect to a user-specified metabolite. PITracer was evaluated using two data sets containing 373 human metabolite standards, including 5 saturated standards considered to be split peaks resultant from huge m/z fluctuation, and 12 urine samples spiked with 50 forensic drugs of varying concentrations. Analysis of these data sets show that PITracer correctly outperformed existing state-of-art algorithm and extracted the pure ion chromatograms of the 5 saturated standards without generating split peaks and detected the forensic drugs with high recall, precision, and F-score and small mass error.

  9. Hot gas cleaning in power stations by using electron beam technology. Influence on PAH emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, M.S.; de la Cruz, M.T.; Mastral, A.M.; Murillo, R.; Marinov, S.; Stefanova, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Electron Beam Technology (EBT), proven treatment for SO 2 and NO x removal, is applied to different power stations as a hot gas cleaning system. In this paper, an assessment of this technique installed in a Bulgarian power station on organic emissions is analyzed. The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) content, not only emitted in the gas phase but also trapped in the solid phase, has been carried out before and after the irradiation. The main aim has been to know whether the EBT affects organic emissions, like PAH, as it happens with inorganic pollutants, like SO 2 and NO x , studying EBT effects from an organic environmental point of view. The PAH quantification was performed by using a very sensitive analytical technique, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS-MS). Results showed that PAH are influenced by the EBT showing a reduction of the most volatile PAH in the gas phase. With regard to the solid by-products obtained after the irradiation, fertilizers, similar PAH concentration to the fly ashes produced when no irradiation is applied were found. These fertilizers were considered like unpolluted soils being adequate for agriculture applications with PAH concentrations below the target value set up by the Dutch government. (author)

  10. Positron emission measurement with coincidence counting technic using large plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinasse, P.; Minchella, P.

    1990-01-01

    For measuring positron emission of a large organ such as the brain for example, a device has been built with two cylindric plastic scintillators allowing the detection in coincidence of the 511 keV gamma rays without any spectrometry. The main results are for the sensitivity at the center of the field with 22 Na source in water: 240 ips/MBq; background = 12 ips, and for the countloss due to the deadtime >5% with 42 MBq. Sensitivity is almost uniform on the main axis between the probes. It falls to about 50% on the edges of a central diameter of 20 cm. The performances could certainly be improved by using modern rapid photomultipliers [fr

  11. Determination of cadmium(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), lead(II), zinc(II), and copper(II) in water samples using dual-cloud point extraction and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingling; Zhong, Shuxian; Fang, Keming; Qian, Zhaosheng; Chen, Jianrong

    2012-11-15

    A dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) procedure has been developed for simultaneous pre-concentration and separation of heavy metal ions (Cd2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ion) in water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The procedure is based on forming complexes of metal ion with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) into the as-formed Triton X-114 surfactant rich phase. Instead of direct injection or analysis, the surfactant rich phase containing the complexes was treated by nitric acid, and the detected ions were back extracted again into aqueous phase at the second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by ICP-OES. Under the optimum conditions (pH=7.0, Triton X-114=0.05% (w/v), 8-HQ=2.0×10(-4) mol L(-1), HNO3=0.8 mol L(-1)), the detection limits for Cd2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ions were 0.01, 0.04, 0.01, 0.34, 0.05, and 0.04 μg L(-1), respectively. Relative standard deviation (RSD) values for 10 replicates at 100 μg L(-1) were lower than 6.0%. The proposed method could be successfully applied to the determination of Cd2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ion in water samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. {sup 134}Cs emission probabilities determination by gamma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, M.C.M. de, E-mail: candida@cnen.gov.br [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DINOR/CNEN), Riode Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Poledna, R.; Delgado, J.U.; Silva, R.L.; Araujo, M.T.; Silva, C.J. da [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The National Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Metrology (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN) of Rio de Janeiro performed primary and secondary standardization of different radionuclides reaching satisfactory uncertainties. A solution of {sup 134}Cs radionuclide was purchased from commercial supplier to emission probabilities determination of some of its energies. {sup 134}Cs is a beta gamma emitter with 754 days of half-life. This radionuclide is used as standard in environmental, water and food control. It is also important to germanium detector calibration.The gamma emission probabilities (Pγ) were determined mainly for some energies of the {sup 134}Cs by efficiency curve method and the Pγ absolute uncertainties obtained were below 1% (k=1). (author)

  13. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pozebon, Dirce [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: dircepoz@iq.ufrgs.br; Mello, Paola A.; Flores, Erico M.M. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, UFSM, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-10-17

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 {mu}g g{sup -1} of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES)

  14. Detection of Radiation-Exposure Biomarkers by Differential Mobility Prefiltered Mass Spectrometry (DMS-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Stephen L; Krylov, Evgeny V; Schneider, Bradley B; Covey, Thomas R; Brenner, David J; Tyburski, John B; Patterson, Andrew D; Krausz, Kris W; Fornace, Albert J; Nazarov, Erkinjon G

    2010-04-15

    Technology to enable rapid screening for radiation exposure has been identified as an important need, and, as a part of a NIH / NIAD effort in this direction, metabolomic biomarkers for radiation exposure have been identified in a recent series of papers. To reduce the time necessary to detect and measure these biomarkers, differential mobility spectrometry - mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) systems have been developed and tested. Differential mobility ion filters preselect specific ions and also suppress chemical noise created in typical atmospheric-pressure ionization sources (ESI, MALDI, and others). Differential-mobility-based ion selection is based on the field dependence of ion mobility, which, in turn, depends on ion characteristics that include conformation, charge distribution, molecular polarizability, and other properties, and on the transport gas composition which can be modified to enhance resolution. DMS-MS is able to resolve small-molecule biomarkers from nearly-isobaric interferences, and suppresses chemical noise generated in the ion source and in the mass spectrometer, improving selectivity and quantitative accuracy. Our planar DMS design is rapid, operating in a few milliseconds, and analyzes ions before fragmentation. Depending on MS inlet conditions, DMS-selected ions can be dissociated in the MS inlet expansion, before mass analysis, providing a capability similar to MS/MS with simpler instrumentation. This report presents selected DMS-MS experimental results, including resolution of complex test mixtures of isobaric compounds, separation of charge states, separation of isobaric biomarkers (citrate and isocitrate), and separation of nearly-isobaric biomarker anions in direct analysis of a bio-fluid sample from the radiation-treated group of a mouse-model study. These uses of DMS combined with moderate resolution MS instrumentation indicate the feasibility of field-deployable instrumentation for biomarker evaluation.

  15. Matrix effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Staci, E-mail: staci.brown@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Ford, Alan, E-mail: alan.ford@alakaidefense.com [Alakai Defense Systems, 197 Replacement Ave, Suite 102, Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473 (United States); Akpovo, Charlemagne C., E-mail: charlemagne.akpovo@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Martinez, Jorge, E-mail: jmartinez@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Johnson, Lewis, E-mail: lewis@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can be used for the detection of isotopes of elements via isotopic shifts in diatomic species in a technique known as laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). While LAMIS works quite well for isotopic analysis of pure compounds under optimal conditions, it is desirable for it to be applicable for a variety of compounds and matrices. However, the LIBS plasma emission associated with LAMIS depends on several parameters, including the applied electric field of the laser pulse, the physical properties of the material being investigated, and the presence of additional elements other than the element of interest. In this paper, we address some of the pitfalls arising from these dependencies when using LAMIS for the determination of the relative isotopic abundance of boron-containing materials with varying chemical matrices. - Highlights: • LAMIS usually determines isotopic composition of boron compounds within 3 percent. • LaBO{sub 3} and some boron-containing mixtures yield inaccurate LAMIS results. • Higher laser energy reduces variability but does not remedy poor LAMIS outcomes.

  16. MPAI (mass probes aided ionization) method for total analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Aki; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Hifumi, Hiroki; Honma, Yuya; Tanji, Noriyuki; Iwasawa, Naoko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Suzuki, Koji

    2007-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized various mass probes, which enable us to effectively ionize various molecules to be detected with mass spectrometry. We call the ionization method using mass probes the "MPAI (mass probes aided ionization)" method. We aim at the sensitive detection of various biological molecules, and also the detection of bio-molecules by a single mass spectrometry serially without changing the mechanical settings. Here, we review mass probes for small molecules with various functional groups and mass probes for proteins. Further, we introduce newly developed mass probes for proteins for highly sensitive detection.

  17. Nondestructive Online Detection of Welding Defects in Track Crane Boom Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive detection of structural component of track crane is a difficult and costly problem. In the present study, acoustic emission (AE was used to detect two kinds of typical welding defects, that is, welding porosity and incomplete penetration, in the truck crane boom. Firstly, a subsidiary test specimen with special preset welding defect was designed and added on the boom surface with the aid of steel plates to get the synchronous deformation of the main boom. Then, the AE feature information of the welding defect could be got without influencing normal operation of equipment. As a result, the rudimentary location analysis can be attained using the linear location method and the two kinds of welding defects can be distinguished clearly using AE characteristic parameters such as amplitude and centroid frequency. Also, through the comparison of two loading processes, we concluded that the signal produced during the first loading process was mainly caused by plastic deformation damage and during the second loading process the stress release and structure friction between sections in welding area are the main acoustic emission sources. Thus, the AE is an available tool for nondestructive online detection of latent welding defects of structural component of track crane.

  18. Sample preparation for arsenic speciation analysis in baby food by generation of substituted arsines with atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Charles S; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Dessuy, Morgana B; Svoboda, Milan; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiři

    2017-12-01

    A slurry sampling procedure for arsenic speciation analysis in baby food by arsane generation, cryogenic trapping and detection with atomic absorption spectrometry is presented. Several procedures were tested for slurry preparation, including different reagents (HNO 3 , HCl and tetramethylammonium hydroxide - TMAH) and their concentrations, water bath heating and ultrasound-assisted agitation. The best results for inorganic arsenic (iAs) and dimethylarsinate (DMA) were reached when using 3molL -1 HCl under heating and ultrasound-assisted agitation. The developed method was applied for the analysis of five porridge powder and six baby meal samples. The trueness of the method was checked with a certified reference material (CRM) of total arsenic (tAs), iAs and DMA in rice (ERM-BC211). Arsenic recoveries (mass balance) for all samples and CRM were performed by the determination of the tAs by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after microwave-assisted digestion and its comparison against the sum of the results from the speciation analysis. The relative limits of detection were 0.44, 0.24 and 0.16µgkg -1 for iAs, methylarsonate and DMA, respectively. The concentrations of the most toxic arsenic species (iAs) in the analyzed baby food samples ranged between 4.2 and 99µgkg -1 which were below the limits of 300, 200 and 100µgkg -1 set by the Brazilian, Chinese and European legislation, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drugs of Abuse in Hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, Bryn; Cuypers, Eva; Porta, Tiffany; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Heeren, Ron M A

    2017-01-01

    Hair testing is a powerful tool routinely used for the detection of drugs of abuse. The analysis of hair is highly advantageous as it can provide prolonged drug detectability versus that in biological fluids and chronological information about drug intake based on the average growth of hair. However, current methodology requires large amounts of hair samples and involves complex time-consuming sample preparation followed by gas or liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry imaging is increasingly being used for the analysis of single hair samples, as it provides more accurate and visual chronological information in single hair samples.Here, two methods for the preparation of single hair samples for mass spectrometry imaging are presented.The first uses an in-house built cutting apparatus to prepare longitudinal sections, the second is a method for embedding and cryo-sectioning hair samples in order to prepare cross-sections all along the hair sample.

  20. Regulation of Floral Terpenoid Emission and Biosynthesis in Sweet Basil (Ocimum basilicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yifan; Ye, Jiayan; Li, Shuai; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-12-01

    Past studies have focused on the composition of essential oil of Ocimum basilicum leaves, but data on composition and regulation of its aerial emissions, especially floral volatile emissions are scarce. We studied the chemical profile, within-flower spatial distribution (sepals, petals, pistils with stamina and pedicels), diurnal emission kinetics and effects of exogenous methyl jasmonate (MeJA) application on the emission of floral volatiles by dynamic headspace collection and identification using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We observed more abundant floral emissions from flowers compared with leaves. Sepals were the main emitters of floral volatiles among the flower parts studied. The emissions of lipoxygenase compounds (LOX) and monoterpenoids, but not sesquiterpene emissions, displayed a diurnal variation driven by light. Response to exogenous MeJA treatment of flowers consisted of a rapid stress response and a longer-term acclimation response. The initial response was associated with enhanced emissions of fatty acid derivatives, monoterpenoids, and sesquiterpenoids without variation of the composition of individual compounds. The longer-term response was associated with enhanced monoterpenoid and sesquiterpenoid emissions with profound changes in the emission spectrum. According to correlated patterns of terpenoid emission changes upon stress, highlighted by a hierarchical cluster analysis, candidate terpenoid synthases responsible for observed diversity and complexity of released terpenoid blends were postulated. We conclude that flower volatile emissions differ quantitatively and qualitatively from leaf emissions, and overall contribute importantly to O. basilicum flavor, especially under stress conditions.

  1. First detection of nonflare microwave emissions from the coronae of single late-type dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, D. E.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of a search for nonflare microwave radiation from the coronae of nearby late-type dwarf stars comparable to the sun: single stars without evidence for either a large wind or circumstellar envelope. The observing program consisted of flux measurements of six stars over a 24-h period with the VLA in the C configuration at a wavelength of 6 cm with 50 MHz bandwidth. Positive detections at 6 cm were made for Chi 1 Ori (0.6 mJy) and the flare star UV Cet (1.55 mJy), and upper limits were obtained for the stars Pi 1 UMa, Xi Boo A, 70 Oph A and Epsilon Eri. It is suggested that Chi 1 Ori, and possibly UV Cet, represent the first detected members of a new class of radio sources which are driven by gyroresonance emission, i.e. cyclotron emission from nonrelativistic Maxwellian electrons.

  2. Intrinsic spatial resolution limitations due to differences between positron emission position and annihilation detection localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Pedro; Malano, Francisco; Valente, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Since its successful implementation for clinical diagnostic, positron emission tomography (PET) represents the most promising medical imaging technique. The recent major growth of PET imaging is mainly due to its ability to trace the biologic pathways of different compounds in the patient's body, assuming the patient can be labeled with some PET isotope. Regardless of the type of isotope, the PET imaging method is based on the detection of two 511-keV gamma photons being emitted in opposite directions, with almost 180 deg between them, as a consequence of electron-positron annihilation. Therefore, this imaging method is intrinsically limited by random uncertainties in spatial resolutions, related with differences between the actual position of positron emission and the location of the detected annihilation. This study presents an approach with the Monte Carlo method to analyze the influence of this effect on different isotopes of potential implementation in PET. (author)

  3. Determination of 5-fluorouracil in plasma with HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, A. B. P.; van Lenthe, H.; Maring, J. G.; van Gennip, A. H.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we describe a fast and specific method to measure 5FU with HPLC tandem-mass spectrometry. Reversed-phase HPLC was combined with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and detection was performed by multiple-reaction monitoring. Stable-isotope-labeled 5FU (1,3-15N2-5FU) was

  4. Improved detection of multiple environmental antibiotics through an optimized sample extraction strategy in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xinzhu; Bayen, Stéphane; Kelly, Barry C; Li, Xu; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    A solid-phase extraction/liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/multi-stage mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was optimized in this study for sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple antibiotics in urban surface waters and soils. Among the seven classes of tested antibiotics, extraction efficiencies of macrolides, lincosamide, chloramphenicol, and polyether antibiotics were significantly improved under optimized sample extraction pH. Instead of only using acidic extraction in many existing studies, the results indicated that antibiotics with low pK a values (antibiotics with high pK a values (>7) were extracted more efficiently under neutral conditions. The effects of pH were more obvious on polar compounds than those on non-polar compounds. Optimization of extraction pH resulted in significantly improved sample recovery and better detection limits. Compared with reported values in the literature, the average reduction of minimal detection limits obtained in this study was 87.6% in surface waters (0.06-2.28 ng/L) and 67.1% in soils (0.01-18.16 ng/g dry wt). This method was subsequently applied to detect antibiotics in environmental samples in a heavily populated urban city, and macrolides, sulfonamides, and lincomycin were frequently detected. Antibiotics with highest detected concentrations were sulfamethazine (82.5 ng/L) in surface waters and erythromycin (6.6 ng/g dry wt) in soils. The optimized sample extraction strategy can be used to improve the detection of a variety of antibiotics in environmental surface waters and soils.

  5. Acoustic Emission Technology and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Y. S.; Lim, S. H.; Eom, H. S.; Kim, J. H.; Jung, H. K.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic emission is the elastic wave that is generated by the rapid release of energy from the localized sources within a material. After the observation of acoustic emission phenomenon in 1950, the research and further investigation had been performed. Acoustic emission examination becomes a rapidly matured nondestructive testing method with demonstrated capabilities for characterizing material behavior and for detecting the defect. It is of interest as a possible passive monitoring technique for detecting, locating and characterizing the defects in component and structure. Acoustic emission technology has recently strengthened the on-line monitoring application for the detection of incipient failures and the assurance of structural integrity. The field of acoustic emission testing is still growing vigorously and presents many challenges. Especially, acoustic emission has been successfully applied in the leak detection of primary pressure boundary of nuclear power plants. In this state-of-art report, the principle, measurement and field applications of acoustic emission technique is reviewed and summarized. Acoustic emission technology will contribute to the assurance of nuclear safety as the on-line monitoring technique of structural integrity of NSSS components and structures

  6. Simultaneous determination of macronutrients, micronutrients and trace elements in mineral fertilizers by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Souza, Sidnei; da Costa, Silvânio Silvério Lopes; Santos, Dayane Melo; dos Santos Pinto, Jéssica; Garcia, Carlos Alexandre Borges; Alves, José do Patrocínio Hora; Araujo, Rennan Geovanny Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    An analytical method for simultaneous determination of macronutrients (Ca, Mg, Na and P), micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) and trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Pb and V) in mineral fertilizers was optimized. Two-level full factorial design was applied to evaluate the optimal proportions of reagents used in the sample digestion on hot plate. A Doehlert design for two variables was used to evaluate the operating conditions of the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer in order to accomplish the simultaneous determination of the analyte concentrations. The limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 2.0 mg kg- 1 for Mn to 77.3 mg kg- 1 for P. The accuracy and precision of the proposed method were evaluated by analysis of standard reference materials (SRMs) of Western phosphate rock (NIST 694), Florida phosphate rock (NIST 120C) and Trace elements in multi-nutrient fertilizer (NIST 695), considered to be adequate for simultaneous determination. Twenty-one samples of mineral fertilizers collected in Sergipe State, Brazil, were analyzed. For all samples, the As, Ca, Cd and Pb concentrations were below the LOQ values of the analytical method. For As, Cd and Pb the obtained LOQ values were below the maximum limit allowed by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento - MAPA). The optimized method presented good accuracy and was effectively applied to quantitative simultaneous determination of the analytes in mineral fertilizers by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES).

  7. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  8. Emission-Line Galaxies from the PEARS Hubble Ultra Deep Field: A 2-D Detection Method and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J. P.; Straughn, Amber N.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Cohen, Seth H.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, james; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hathi, Nimish P.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism PEARS (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) survey provides a large dataset of low-resolution spectra from thousands of galaxies in the GOODS North and South fields. One important subset of objects in these data are emission-line galaxies (ELGs), and we have investigated several different methods aimed at systematically selecting these galaxies. Here we present a new methodology and results of a search for these ELGs in the PEARS observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) using a 2D detection method that utilizes the observation that many emission lines originate from clumpy knots within galaxies. This 2D line-finding method proves to be useful in detecting emission lines from compact knots within galaxies that might not otherwise be detected using more traditional 1D line-finding techniques. We find in total 96 emission lines in the HUDF, originating from 81 distinct "knots" within 63 individual galaxies. We find in general that [0 1111 emitters are the most common, comprising 44% of the sample, and on average have high equivalent widths (70% of [0 1111 emitters having rest-frame EW> 100A). There are 12 galaxies with multiple emitting knots; several show evidence of variations in H-alpha flux in the knots, suggesting that the differing star formation properties across a single galaxy can in general be probed at redshifts approximately greater than 0.2 - 0.4. The most prevalent morphologies are large face-on spirals and clumpy interacting systems, many being unique detections owing to the 2D method described here, thus highlighting the strength of this technique.

  9. Methodology for determination of activity of radionuclides by gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de Farias; Oliveira, Victor Rogerio S. de; Oliveira, Mercia L.; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Due to the growth in the number of procedures that make use of the positron emission tomography (PET), there is a need for standard solutions for the calibration of the systems used for the measurement of the PET radiopharmaceutical (activimeter) in radiopharmacies and in nuclear medicine services. Among the existing alternatives for the standardization of radioactive sources, the method known as gamma spectrometry is widely used for short-lived radionuclides. The purpose of this study was to implement the methodology for standardization of the 18 F solutions by gamma spectrometry at the Regional Center for Nuclear Sciences of the Northeast (CRCN-NE/CNEN-NE), Brazil. (author)

  10. Development of a high energy resolution magnetic bolometer for the determination of photon emission intensities by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M.

    2007-12-01

    In this research thesis, a first chapter describes the metrological difficulties for the determination of radionuclide photon emission intensities. Then, it discusses the understanding and the required tools for the computing of a magnetic bolometer signal with respect to the different operation parameters and to the sensor geometry. The author describes the implementation of the experimental device and its validation with a first sensor. The new sensor is then optimised for the measurement of photon emission intensities with a good efficiency and a theoretical energy resolution less than 100 eV up to 200 keV. The sensor's detection efficiency and operation have been characterized with a 133 Ba source. The author finally presents the obtained results

  11. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part I. Theoretical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, Amélie, E-mail: amelie.leclercq@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nonell, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.nonell@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Todolí Torró, José Luis, E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es [Universidad de Alicante, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatología, Ap. de Correos, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Bresson, Carole, E-mail: carole.bresson@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vio, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vio@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vercouter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.vercouter@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chartier, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.chartier@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-23

    Highlights: • Tutorial review addressed to beginners or more experienced analysts. • Theoretical background of effects caused by organic matrices on ICP techniques. • Spatial distribution of carbon species and analytes in plasma. • Carbon spectroscopic and non-spectroscopic interferences in ICP. - Abstract: Due to their outstanding analytical performances, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are widely used for multi-elemental measurements and also for isotopic characterization in the case of ICP-MS. While most studies are carried out in aqueous matrices, applications involving organic/hydro-organic matrices become increasingly widespread. This kind of matrices is introduced in ICP based instruments when classical “matrix removal” approaches such as acid digestion or extraction procedures cannot be implemented. Due to the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices and their associated effects on instrumentation and analytical performances, their introduction into ICP sources is particularly challenging and has become a full topic. In this framework, numerous theoretical and phenomenological studies of these effects have been performed in the past, mainly by ICP-OES, while recent literature is more focused on applications and associated instrumental developments. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP-OES and ICP-MS. The present Part I, provides theoretical considerations in connection with the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices, in order to better understand the induced phenomena. This focal point is divided in four chapters highlighting: (i) the impact of organic/hydro-organic matrices from aerosol generation to atomization/excitation/ionization processes; (ii) the production of carbon molecular constituents and their spatial distribution in the

  12. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part I. Theoretical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tutorial review addressed to beginners or more experienced analysts. • Theoretical background of effects caused by organic matrices on ICP techniques. • Spatial distribution of carbon species and analytes in plasma. • Carbon spectroscopic and non-spectroscopic interferences in ICP. - Abstract: Due to their outstanding analytical performances, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are widely used for multi-elemental measurements and also for isotopic characterization in the case of ICP-MS. While most studies are carried out in aqueous matrices, applications involving organic/hydro-organic matrices become increasingly widespread. This kind of matrices is introduced in ICP based instruments when classical “matrix removal” approaches such as acid digestion or extraction procedures cannot be implemented. Due to the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices and their associated effects on instrumentation and analytical performances, their introduction into ICP sources is particularly challenging and has become a full topic. In this framework, numerous theoretical and phenomenological studies of these effects have been performed in the past, mainly by ICP-OES, while recent literature is more focused on applications and associated instrumental developments. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP-OES and ICP-MS. The present Part I, provides theoretical considerations in connection with the physico-chemical properties of organic/hydro-organic matrices, in order to better understand the induced phenomena. This focal point is divided in four chapters highlighting: (i) the impact of organic/hydro-organic matrices from aerosol generation to atomization/excitation/ionization processes; (ii) the production of carbon molecular constituents and their spatial distribution in the

  13. Novel algorithm for simultaneous component detection and pseudo-molecular ion characterization in liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Xiaoan; Wo, Siukwan [School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Ho, Hingman; Han, Quanbin [School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, 7 Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Fan, Xiaohui [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zuo, Zhong, E-mail: joanzuo@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel stepwise component detection algorithm (SCDA) for LC–MS datasets. • New isotopic distribution and adduct-ion models for mass spectra. • Automatic component classification based on adduct-ion and isotopic distributions. - Abstract: Resolving components and determining their pseudo-molecular ions (PMIs) are crucial steps in identifying complex herbal mixtures by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. To tackle such labor-intensive steps, we present here a novel algorithm for simultaneous detection of components and their PMIs. Our method consists of three steps: (1) obtaining a simplified dataset containing only mono-isotopic masses by removal of background noise and isotopic cluster ions based on the isotopic distribution model derived from all the reported natural compounds in dictionary of natural products; (2) stepwise resolving and removing all features of the highest abundant component from current simplified dataset and calculating PMI of each component according to an adduct-ion model, in which all non-fragment ions in a mass spectrum are considered as PMI plus one or several neutral species; (3) visual classification of detected components by principal component analysis (PCA) to exclude possible non-natural compounds (such as pharmaceutical excipients). This algorithm has been successfully applied to a standard mixture and three herbal extract/preparations. It indicated that our algorithm could detect components’ features as a whole and report their PMI with an accuracy of more than 98%. Furthermore, components originated from excipients/contaminants could be easily separated from those natural components in the bi-plots of PCA.

  14. Novel algorithm for simultaneous component detection and pseudo-molecular ion characterization in liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Xiaoan; Wo, Siukwan; Ho, Hingman; Han, Quanbin; Fan, Xiaohui; Zuo, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel stepwise component detection algorithm (SCDA) for LC–MS datasets. • New isotopic distribution and adduct-ion models for mass spectra. • Automatic component classification based on adduct-ion and isotopic distributions. - Abstract: Resolving components and determining their pseudo-molecular ions (PMIs) are crucial steps in identifying complex herbal mixtures by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. To tackle such labor-intensive steps, we present here a novel algorithm for simultaneous detection of components and their PMIs. Our method consists of three steps: (1) obtaining a simplified dataset containing only mono-isotopic masses by removal of background noise and isotopic cluster ions based on the isotopic distribution model derived from all the reported natural compounds in dictionary of natural products; (2) stepwise resolving and removing all features of the highest abundant component from current simplified dataset and calculating PMI of each component according to an adduct-ion model, in which all non-fragment ions in a mass spectrum are considered as PMI plus one or several neutral species; (3) visual classification of detected components by principal component analysis (PCA) to exclude possible non-natural compounds (such as pharmaceutical excipients). This algorithm has been successfully applied to a standard mixture and three herbal extract/preparations. It indicated that our algorithm could detect components’ features as a whole and report their PMI with an accuracy of more than 98%. Furthermore, components originated from excipients/contaminants could be easily separated from those natural components in the bi-plots of PCA

  15. [Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Histopathologic Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Fumiyoshi; Seto, Mitsutoshi

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) enables visualization of the distribution of a range of biomolecules by integrating biochemical information from mass spectrometry with positional information from microscopy. IMS identifies a target molecule. In addition, IMS enables global analysis of biomolecules containing unknown molecules by detecting the ratio of the molecular weight to electric charge without any target, which makes it possible to identify novel molecules. IMS generates data on the distribution of lipids and small molecules in tissues, which is difficult to visualize with either conventional counter-staining or immunohistochemistry. In this review, we firstly introduce the principle of imaging mass spectrometry and recent advances in the sample preparation method. Secondly, we present findings regarding biological samples, especially pathological ones. Finally, we discuss the limitations and problems of the IMS technique and clinical application, such as in drug development.

  16. Food safety evaluation: Detection and confirmation of chloramphenicol in milk by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolich, Rebecca S.; Werneck-Barroso, Eduardo; Marques, Marlice A. Sipoli

    2006-01-01

    A simple and rapid procedure for extraction of chloramphenicol (CAP) in milk and analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry in tandem was developed. The method consisted of one step of liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate and acidified water (10 mmol L -1 formic acid) and HPLC-MS/MS detection. CAP-D5 was used as internal standard. The method was validated according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The calibration curves were linear, with typical r 2 values higher than 0.98. Absolute recovery of CAP from milk proved to be more than 95%, however CAP-D5 absolute recovery was 75%. The method was accurate and reproducible, being successfully applied to the monitoring of CAP in milk samples obtained from the Brazilian market. Decision limit (CCα) was 0.05 ng mL -1 and detection capability (CCβ) was 0.09 ng mL -1

  17. Initial Gamma Spectrometry Examination of the AGR-3/4 Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Stempien, John D.

    2016-11-01

    The initial results from gamma spectrometry examination of the different components from the combined third and fourth US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development TRISO-coated particle fuel irradiation tests (AGR-3/4) have been analyzed. This experiment was designed to provide information about in-pile fission product migration. In each of the 12 capsules, a single stack of four compacts with designed-to-fail particles surrounded by two graphitic diffusion rings (inner and outer) and a graphite sink were irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Advanced Test Reactor. Gamma spectrometry has been used to evaluate the gamma-emitting fission product inventory of compacts from the irradiation and evaluate the burnup of these compacts based on the activity of the radioactive cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) in the compacts. Burnup from gamma spectrometry compares well with predicted burnup from simulations. Additionally, inner and outer rings were also examined by gamma spectrometry both to evaluate the fission product inventory and the distribution of gamma-emitting fission products within the rings using gamma emission computed tomography. The cesium inventory of the scanned rings compares acceptably well with the expected inventory from fission product transport modeling. The inventory of the graphite fission product sinks is also being evaluated by gamma spectrometry.

  18. Comparison of electrothermal atomization diode laser Zeeman- and wavelength-modulated atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blecker, Carlo R.; Hermann, Gerd M.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry by using a near-infrared diode laser with and without Zeeman and wavelength modulation were carried out with graphite furnace electrothermal atomization. Analytical curves and limits of detection were compared. The magnetic field was modulated with 50 Hz, and the wavelength of the diode laser with 10 kHz. Coherent forward scattering was measured with crossed and slightly uncrossed polarizers. The results show that the detection limits of atomic absorption spectrometry are roughly the same as those of coherent forward scattering spectrometry with crossed polarizers. According to the theory with bright flicker noise limited laser sources the detection limits and linear ranges obtained with coherent forward scattering spectrometry with slightly uncrossed polarizers are significantly better than those obtained with crossed polarizers and with atomic absorption spectrometry. This is due to the fact that employing approaches of polarization spectroscopy reduce laser intensity fluctuations to their signal carried fractions

  19. Laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Fundamentals .Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaurand, P.

    1994-11-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a very powerful technique for the analysis of heavy molecular ions (100 000 u and more). The ejection in the gas phase and the ionization of these molecules is now possible through the MALDI technique (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization). This technique consists in mixing the heavy molecules to be analysed with a organic matrix which absorbs at the wavelength of the laser. The necessary irradiance are of the order of 10 6 W/cm 2 . In these conditions we have shown that the mass resolutions are optimum and that the relative mass accuracies are of the order of 10 -4 . We have also demonstrated that the emission angle of the molecular ions in MALDI depends on the incident angle of the laser light. During the desorption process, the molecular ions are emitted in the opposite direction of the incident laser light. This effect is particularly important for the design of the accelerating stage of the time-of-flight spectrometers. Problems relative to the detection of these heavy molecular ions have been studied in details between 0.5 10 4 m/s and 10 5 m/s. The velocity threshold of the electronic emission is lower than the value of 0.5 10 4 m/s. The relation between the electronic emission and the projectile velocity is complex. Finally, examples on mass identification of C 60 molecules and derivated C 60 are presented. Desorption methods are compared. (author). 32 refs., 34 figs

  20. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Güdel, Manuel [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Rupen, Michael, E-mail: jrv@astro.caltech.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  1. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen; Güdel, Manuel; Rupen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  2. Critical comparison of performances of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and neutron activation analysis for the determination of elements in human lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimonti, A.; Coni, E.; Caroli, S.; Sabbioni, E.; Nicolaou, G.E.; Pietra, R.

    1989-01-01

    A study was carried out to assess the performance of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques for determining reference values for Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mg, Mn, V and Zn in human lungs of urban non-smoking subjects. Experimental data were subjected to the usual basic statistical tests to evaluate the respective merits of the two basically different analytical techniques. Both approaches, if used under carefully optimised experimental conditions, can yield reliable results affected only minimally by systematic and random errors. On the other hand, on a more routine basis, particular attention should be paid to elements such as Al, Cd and V which may pose some problems with both techniques. (author)

  3. Detection of variable VHE γ-ray emission from the extra-galactic γ-ray binary LMC P3

    Science.gov (United States)

    HESS Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Armand, C.; Arrieta, M.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Malyshev, D.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Prokhorov, D. A.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Żywucka, N.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Recently, the high-energy (HE, 0.1-100 GeV) γ-ray emission from the object LMC P3 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has been discovered to be modulated with a 10.3-day period, making it the first extra-galactic γ-ray binary. Aim. This work aims at the detection of very-high-energy (VHE, >100 GeV) γ-ray emission and the search for modulation of the VHE signal with the orbital period of the binary system. Methods: LMC P3 has been observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.); the acceptance-corrected exposure time is 100 h. The data set has been folded with the known orbital period of the system in order to test for variability of the emission. Results: VHE γ-ray emission is detected with a statistical significance of 6.4 σ. The data clearly show variability which is phase-locked to the orbital period of the system. Periodicity cannot be deduced from the H.E.S.S. data set alone. The orbit-averaged luminosity in the 1-10 TeV energy range is (1.4 ± 0.2) × 1035 erg s-1. A luminosity of (5 ± 1) × 1035 erg s-1 is reached during 20% of the orbit. HE and VHE γ-ray emissions are anti-correlated. LMC P3 is the most luminous γ-ray binary known so far.

  4. Detection and identification of drugs and toxicants in human body fluids by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry under data-dependent acquisition control and automated database search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberacher, Herbert; Schubert, Birthe; Libiseller, Kathrin; Schweissgut, Anna

    2013-04-03

    Systematic toxicological analysis (STA) is aimed at detecting and identifying all substances of toxicological relevance (i.e. drugs, drugs of abuse, poisons and/or their metabolites) in biological material. Particularly, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) represents a competent and commonly applied screening and confirmation tool. Herein, we present an untargeted liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) assay aimed to complement existing GC/MS screening for the detection and identification of drugs in blood, plasma and urine samples. Solid-phase extraction was accomplished on mixed-mode cartridges. LC was based on gradient elution in a miniaturized C18 column. High resolution electrospray ionization-MS/MS in positive ion mode with data-dependent acquisition control was used to generate tandem mass spectral information that enabled compound identification via automated library search in the "Wiley Registry of Tandem Mass Spectral Data, MSforID". Fitness of the developed LC/MS/MS method for application in STA in terms of selectivity, detection capability and reliability of identification (sensitivity/specificity) was demonstrated with blank samples, certified reference materials, proficiency test samples, and authentic casework samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Peak detection method evaluation for ion mobility spectrometry by using machine learning approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Anne-Christin; Kopczynski, Dominik; D'Addario, Marianna; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Rahmann, Sven; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-04-16

    Ion mobility spectrometry with pre-separation by multi-capillary columns (MCC/IMS) has become an established inexpensive, non-invasive bioanalytics technology for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with various metabolomics applications in medical research. To pave the way for this technology towards daily usage in medical practice, different steps still have to be taken. With respect to modern biomarker research, one of the most important tasks is the automatic classification of patient-specific data sets into different groups, healthy or not, for instance. Although sophisticated machine learning methods exist, an inevitable preprocessing step is reliable and robust peak detection without manual intervention. In this work we evaluate four state-of-the-art approaches for automated IMS-based peak detection: local maxima search, watershed transformation with IPHEx, region-merging with VisualNow, and peak model estimation (PME).We manually generated Metabolites 2013, 3 278 a gold standard with the aid of a domain expert (manual) and compare the performance of the four peak calling methods with respect to two distinct criteria. We first utilize established machine learning methods and systematically study their classification performance based on the four peak detectors' results. Second, we investigate the classification variance and robustness regarding perturbation and overfitting. Our main finding is that the power of the classification accuracy is almost equally good for all methods, the manually created gold standard as well as the four automatic peak finding methods. In addition, we note that all tools, manual and automatic, are similarly robust against perturbations. However, the classification performance is more robust against overfitting when using the PME as peak calling preprocessor. In summary, we conclude that all methods, though small differences exist, are largely reliable and enable a wide spectrum of real-world biomedical applications.

  6. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, A.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Di Gaetano, J.O.; D'Atellis, C.E.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  7. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, L.; Stellaard, F.; Irth, H.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Pel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix

  8. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, L.; Stellaard, F.; Irth, H.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Pel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix

  9. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, Lawrence; Stellaard, Frans; Irth, Hubertus; Vreuls, Rene J. J.; Pel, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix

  10. Characterization of nitrated sugar alcohols by atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrinskaya, Alla; Kelley, Jude A; Kunz, Roderick R

    2017-02-28

    The nitrated sugar alcohols mannitol hexanitrate (MHN), sorbitol hexanitrate (SHN) and xylitol pentanitrate (XPN) are in the same class of compounds as the powerful military-grade explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and the homemade explosive erythritol tetranitrate (ETN) but, unlike for PETN and ETN, ways to detect MHN, SHN and XPN by mass spectrometry (MS) have not been fully investigated. Atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) was used to detect ions characteristic of nitrated sugar alcohols. APCI time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APCI-TOF MS) and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID MS/MS) were used for confirmation of each ion assignment. In addition, the use of the chemical ionization reagent dichloromethane was investigated to improve sensitivity and selectivity for detection of MHN, SHN and XPN. All the nitrated sugar alcohols studied followed similar fragmentation pathways in the APCI source. MHN, SHN and XPN were detectable as fragment ions formed by the loss of NO 2 , HNO 2 , NO 3 , and CH 2 NO 2 groups, and in the presence of dichloromethane chlorinated adduct ions were observed. It was determined that in MS/MS mode, chlorinated adducts of MHN and SHN had the lowest limits of detection (LODs), while for XPN the lowest LOD was for the [XPN-NO 2 ] - fragment ion. Partially nitrated analogs of each of the three compounds were also present in the starting materials, and ions attributable to these compounds versus those formed from in-source fragmentation of MHN, SHN, and XPN were distinguished and assigned using liquid chromatography APCI-MS and ESI-MS. The APCI-MS technique provides a selective and sensitive method for the detection of nitrated sugar alcohols. The methods disclosed here will benefit the area of explosives trace detection for counterterrorism and forensics. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Sequential cloud point extraction for the speciation of mercury in seafood by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yingjie [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hu Bin [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)], E-mail: binhu@whu.edu.cn

    2007-10-15

    A novel nonchromatographic speciation technique for the speciation of mercury by sequential cloud point extraction (CPE) combined with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was developed. The method based on Hg{sup 2+} was complexed with I{sup -} to form HgI{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and the HgI{sub 4}{sup 2-} reacted with the methyl green (MG) cation to form hydrophobic ion-associated complex, and the ion-associated complex was then extracted into the surfactant-rich phase of the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114), which are subsequently separated from methylmercury (MeHg{sup +}) in the initial solution by centrifugation. The surfactant-rich phase containing Hg(II) was diluted with 0.5 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} for ICP-OES determination. The supernatant is also subjected to the similar CPE procedure for the preconcentration of MeHg{sup +} by the addition of a chelating agent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), in order to form water-insolvable complex with MeHg{sup +}. The MeHg{sup +} in the micelles was directly analyzed after disposal as describe above. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction efficiency was 93.5% for Hg(II) and 51.5% for MeHg{sup +} with the enrichment factor of 18.7 for Hg(II) and 10.3 for MeHg{sup +}, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) were 56.3 ng L{sup -1} for Hg(II) and 94.6 ng L{sup -1} for MeHg{sup +} (as Hg) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.6% for Hg(II) and 4.5% for MeHg{sup +} (C = 10 {mu}g L{sup -1}, n = 7), respectively. The developed technique was applied to the speciation of mercury in real seafood samples and the recoveries for spiked samples were found to be in the range of 93.2-108.7%. For validation, a certified reference material of DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) was analyzed and the determined values are in good agreement with the certified values.

  12. Sequential cloud point extraction for the speciation of mercury in seafood by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yingjie; Hu Bin

    2007-01-01

    A novel nonchromatographic speciation technique for the speciation of mercury by sequential cloud point extraction (CPE) combined with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was developed. The method based on Hg 2+ was complexed with I - to form HgI 4 2- , and the HgI 4 2- reacted with the methyl green (MG) cation to form hydrophobic ion-associated complex, and the ion-associated complex was then extracted into the surfactant-rich phase of the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114), which are subsequently separated from methylmercury (MeHg + ) in the initial solution by centrifugation. The surfactant-rich phase containing Hg(II) was diluted with 0.5 mol L -1 HNO 3 for ICP-OES determination. The supernatant is also subjected to the similar CPE procedure for the preconcentration of MeHg + by the addition of a chelating agent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), in order to form water-insolvable complex with MeHg + . The MeHg + in the micelles was directly analyzed after disposal as describe above. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction efficiency was 93.5% for Hg(II) and 51.5% for MeHg + with the enrichment factor of 18.7 for Hg(II) and 10.3 for MeHg + , respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) were 56.3 ng L -1 for Hg(II) and 94.6 ng L -1 for MeHg + (as Hg) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.6% for Hg(II) and 4.5% for MeHg + (C = 10 μg L -1 , n = 7), respectively. The developed technique was applied to the speciation of mercury in real seafood samples and the recoveries for spiked samples were found to be in the range of 93.2-108.7%. For validation, a certified reference material of DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) was analyzed and the determined values are in good agreement with the certified values

  13. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains six papers which together provide an overall review of the inspection technique known as acoustic emission or stress wave emission. The titles are: a welder's introduction to acoustic emission technology; use of acoustic emission for detection of defects as they arise during fabrication; examples of laboratory application and assessment of acoustic emission in the United Kingdom; (Part I: acoustic emission behaviour of low alloy steels; Part II: fatigue crack assessment from proof testing and continuous monitoring); inspection of selected areas of engineering structures by acoustic emission; Japanese experience in laboratory and practical applications of acoustic emission to welded structures; and ASME acoustic emission code status. (U.K.)

  14. Imaging mass spectrometry in drug development and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-06-01

    During the last decades, imaging mass spectrometry has gained significant relevance in biomedical research. Recent advances in imaging mass spectrometry have paved the way for in situ studies on drug development, metabolism and toxicology. In contrast to whole-body autoradiography that images the localization of radiolabeled compounds, imaging mass spectrometry provides the possibility to simultaneously determine the discrete tissue distribution of the parent compound and its metabolites. In addition, imaging mass spectrometry features high molecular specificity and allows comprehensive, multiplexed detection and localization of hundreds of proteins, peptides and lipids directly in tissues. Toxicologists traditionally screen for adverse findings by histopathological examination. However, studies of the molecular and cellular processes underpinning toxicological and pathologic findings induced by candidate drugs or toxins are important to reach a mechanistic understanding and an effective risk assessment strategy. One of IMS strengths is the ability to directly overlay the molecular information from the mass spectrometric analysis with the tissue section and allow correlative comparisons of molecular and histologic information. Imaging mass spectrometry could therefore be a powerful tool for omics profiling of pharmacological/toxicological effects of drug candidates and toxicants in discrete tissue regions. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of imaging mass spectrometry, with particular focus on MALDI imaging mass spectrometry, and its use in drug development and toxicology in general.

  15. Fast quantitative detection of cocaine in beverages using nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Peng, Xuejiao; Yang, Shuiping; Gu, Haiwei; Chen, Huanwen; Huan, Yanfu; Zhang, Tingting; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2010-02-01

    Without any sample pretreatment, effervescent beverage fluids were manually sprayed into the primary ion plume created by using a nanoelectrospray ionization source for direct ionization, and the analyte ions of interest were guided into an ion trap mass spectrometer for tandem mass analysis. Functional ingredients (e.g., vitamins, taurine, and caffeine, etc.) and spiked impurity (e.g., cocaine) in various beverages, such as Red Bull energy drink, Coco-cola, and Pepsi samples were rapidly identified within 1.5 s. The limit of detection was found to be 7-15 fg (S/N = 3) for cocaine in different samples using the characteristic fragment (m/z 150) observed in the MS(3) experiments. Typical relative standard deviation and recovery of this method were 6.9%-8.6% and 104%-108% for direct analysis of three actual samples, showing that nanoextractive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is a useful technique for fast screening cocaine presence in beverages. 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Selective detection of isomers with photoionization mass spectrometry for studies of hydrocarbon flame chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool, Terrill A.; Nakajima, Koichi; Mostefaoui, Toufik A.; Qi, Fei; McIlroy, Andrew; Westmoreland, Phillip R.; Law, Matthew E.; Poisson, Lionel; Peterka, Darcy S.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2003-01-01

    We report the first use of synchrotron radiation, continuously tunable from 8 to 15 eV, for flame-sampling photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS). Synchrotron radiation offers important advantages over the use of pulsed vacuum ultraviolet lasers for PIMS; these include superior signal-to-noise, soft ionization, and access to photon energies outside the limited tuning ranges of current VUV laser sources. Near-threshold photoionization efficiency measurements were used to determine the absolute concentrations of the allene and propyne isomers of C 3 H 4 in low-pressure laminar ethylene-oxygen and benzene-oxygen flames. Similar measurements of the isomeric composition of C 2 H 4 O species in a fuel-rich ethylene-oxygen flame revealed the presence of substantial concentrations of ethenol (vinyl alcohol) and acetaldehyde. Ethenol has not been previously detected in hydrocarbon flames. Absolute photoionization cross sections were measured for ethylene, allene, propyne, and acetaldehyde, using propene as a calibration standard. PIE curves are presented for several additional reaction intermediates prominent in hydrocarbon flames

  17. Measurement of non-enteric emission fluxes of volatile fatty acids from a California dairy by solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis, Phillip; Sorenson, Mark; Beene, Matt; Krauter, Charles; Shamp, Brian; Hasson, Alam S.

    Dairies are a major source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in California's San Joaquin Valley; a region that experiences high ozone levels during summer. Short-chain carboxylic acids, or volatile fatty acids (VFAs), are believed to make up a large fraction of VOC emissions from these facilities, although there are few studies to substantiate this. In this work, a method using a flux chamber coupled to solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) fibers followed by analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed to quantify emissions of six VFAs (acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, pentanoic acid, hexanoic acid and 3-methyl butanoic acid) from non-enteric sources. The technique was then used to quantify VFA fluxes from a small dairy located on the campus of California State University Fr