WorldWideScience

Sample records for emerging nuclear plant

  1. Nuclear power plant emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The guide sets forth detailed requirements on how the licensee of a nuclear power plant shall plan, implement and maintain emergency response arrangements. The guide is also applied to nuclear material and nuclear waste transport in situations referred to in guide YVL 6.5. Requirements on physical protection are presented in a separate guide of Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK)

  2. Emergency control centers for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Guidance is provided for the development and implementation of emergency control centers for nuclear power plants, including nuclear plant control room, nuclear plant company headquarters, emergency control center, and nuclear plant alternate emergency control center. Requirements and recommendations are presented for the mission, communications, instrumentation and equipment associated with each type of control center. Decisional aids, manning requirements and resources are also given; the decision aids cover both the accident assessment and protective action areas. Both normal and alternate means of communications are considered. Off-site emergency control centers, although not covered in the strict sense by this standard, are considered in an appendix

  3. Millstone nuclear power plant emergency system assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad Khusyairi

    2011-01-01

    U.S.NRC determined an obligation to build a nuclear power plant emergency response organization for both on-site and off-site. Millstone Nuclear Power Plants have 3 nuclear reactors and 2 of 3 still in commercial operation. Reactor unit 1, BWR type has been permanently shut down in 1998, while the two others, units 2 and 3 obtain the extended operating license respectively until 2035 and 2045. As a nuclear installation has the high potential radiological impact, Millstone nuclear power plant emergency response organization must establish both on-site or off-site. Emergency response organization that is formed must involve several state agencies, both state agencies and municipality. They have specific duties and functions in a state of emergency, so that protective measures can be undertaken in accordance with the community that has been planned. Meanwhile, NRC conduct their own independent assessment of nuclear power plant emergencies. (author)

  4. Radiation emergency preparedness in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geetha, P.V.; Ramamirtham, B.; Khot, P.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of planning for radiation emergency response is to ensure adequate preparedness for protection of the plant personnel and members of the public from significant radiation exposures in the unlikely event of an accident. With a number of safety features in the reactor design and sound operating procedures, the probability of a major accident resulting in the releases of large quantities of radioactivity is extremely small. However, as an abundant cautious approach a comprehensive radiation emergency response preparedness is in place in all the nuclear power plants (NPPs). Radiation Emergency in NPPs is broadly categorized into three types; plant emergency, site emergency and off-site emergency. During off site emergency conditions, based on levels of radiation in the environment, Civil Authorities may impose several counter measures such as sheltering, administering prophylaxis (stable iodine for thyroid blocking) and evacuation of people from the affected area. Environmental Survey Laboratory (ESL) carries out environmental survey extensively in the affected sector identified by the meteorological survey laboratory. To handle emergency situations, Emergency Control Centre with all communication facility and Emergency Equipment Centre having radiation measuring instruments and protective equipment are functional at all NPPs. AERB stipulates certain periodicity for conducting the exercises on plant, site and off site emergency. These exercises are conducted and deficiencies corrected for strengthening the emergency preparedness system. In the case of off site emergency exercise, observers are invited from AERB and Crisis Management Group of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). The emergency exercises conducted by Nuclear Power Plant Sites have been very satisfactory. (author)

  5. Emergency power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Guide applies to nuclear power plants for which the total power supply comprises normal power supply (which is electric) and emergency power supply (which may be electric or a combination of electric and non-electric). In its present form the Guide provides general guidance for all types of emergency power systems (EPS) - electric and non-electric, and specific guidance (see Appendix A) on the design principles and the features of the emergency electric power system (EEPS). Future editions will include a second appendix giving specific guidance on non-electric power systems. Section 3 of this Safety Guide covers information on considerations that should be taken into account relative to the electric grid, the transmission lines, the on-site electrical supply system, and other alternative power sources, in order to provide high overall reliability of the power supply to the EPS. Since the nuclear power plant operator does not usually control off-site facilities, the discussion of methods of improving off-site reliability does not include requirements for facilities not under the operator's control. Sections 4 to 11 of this Guide provide information, recommendations and requirements that would apply to any emergency power system, be it electric or non-electric

  6. Emergency power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Nuclear Safety Standards programme for establishing Codes and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants (NPPs). The first edition of the present Safety Guide was developed in the early 1980s. The text has now been brought up-to-date, refined in several details and amended to include non-electrical diverse and independent power sources. This Guide applies to NPP for which the total power supply comprises a normal power supply and an emergency power supply (EPS), which may be electrical or a combination of electrical and non-electrical. The Guide provides general guidance for all types of EPS and specific guidance on the design safety requirements and the features of the electrical and non-electrical portions of the EPS. 9 figs, 2 tabs

  7. 76 FR 75771 - Emergency Planning Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Issuance of NUREG... Support of Nuclear Power Plants;'' NSIR/DPR-ISG-01, ``Interim Staff Guidance Emergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants;'' and NUREG/CR-7002, ``Criteria for Development of Evacuation Time Estimate Studies...

  8. Nuclear plant data systems - some emerging directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.D.; Humphress, G.B.; McCullough, L.D.; Tashjian, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    Significant changes have occurred in recent years in the nuclear power industry to accentuate the need for data systems to support information flow and decision making. Economic conditions resulting in rapid inflation and larger investments in new and existing plants and the need to plan further ahead are primary factors. Government policies concerning environmental control, as well as minimizing risk to the public through increased nuclear safety regulations on operating plants are additional factors. The impact of computer technology on plant data systems, evolution of corporate and plant infrastructures, future plant data, system designs and benefits, and decision making capabilities and data usage support are discussed. (U.K.)

  9. Preparedness of public authorities for emergencies at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The safety guide lays down the requirements for the establishment of suitable procedures to be followed in the event of an emergency situation at a nuclear power plant. Many of the procedures would also be applicable at other nuclear facilities such as fuel manufacturing plants, irradiated fuel processing plants and the like. The guide defines reponsibilities for emergency planning, organization and action, protective measures to be taken, information and instruction of the public, training and cooperation across boundaries

  10. Emergency procedures of nuclear power plants-Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atalla, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    During the TMI event the operators had some difficulties to accurately diagnose the accident, causing delay to recover the plant, and allowing the conditions to deteriorate. Further analysis concluded that the plant emergency procedures were incomplete, and did not cover the possibility of multiple and simultaneous failures. This paper covers a new approach for developing emergency procedures to create a new general strategy by providing valid instructions for all kinds of possible incidents in a nuclear power plant. (author) [pt

  11. Emergency core cooling systems in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This report contains the responses by the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety to three questions posed by the Atomic Energy Control Board concerning the need for Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) in CANDU nuclear power plants, the effectiveness requirement for such systems, and the extent to which experimental evidence should be available to demonstrate compliance with effectiveness standards

  12. Reliability of emergency ac power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Campbell, D.J.

    1983-07-01

    Reliability of emergency onsite ac power systems at nuclear power plants has been questioned within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because of the number of diesel generator failures reported by nuclear plant licensees and the reactor core damage that could result from diesel failure during an emergency. This report contains the results of a reliability analysis of the onsite ac power system, and it uses the results of a separate analysis of offsite power systems to calculate the expected frequency of station blackout. Included is a design and operating experience review. Eighteen plants representative of typical onsite ac power systems and ten generic designs were selected to be modeled by fault trees. Operating experience data were collected from the NRC files and from nuclear plant licensee responses to a questionnaire sent out for this project

  13. Meteorological considerations in emergency response capability at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairobent, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Meteorological considerations in emergency response at nuclear power plants are discussed through examination of current regulations and guidance documents, including discussion of the rationale for current regulatory requirements related to meteorological information for emergency response. Areas discussed include: major meteorological features important to emergency response; onsite meteorological measurements programs, including redundant and backup measurements; access to offsite sources of meteorological information; consideration of real-time and forecast conditions and atmospheric dispersion modeling

  14. Emergency Response Resources guide for nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience was this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly from those organizations within the Federal Government. This first revision of that guide broadens the focus of the original document. Also, new information defines the major Federal response facilities. This guide should assist State and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when their resources have been exhausted

  15. Emergency management in nuclear power plants: a regulatory view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Vikas; Chander, Vipin; Vijayan, P.; Nair, P.S.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear power plants in India adopts a high level of defence in depth concept in design and operates at highest degree of safety, however the possibility of nuclear accidents cannot be ruled out. The safety and regulatory review of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in India are carried out by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Section 33 of Atomic Energy (Radiation Protection) Rules-2004 provides the basic requirements of emergency preparedness aspects for a nuclear facility. Prior to the issuance of a license for the operation of NPPs, AERB ensures that the site specific emergency response manuals are in place and tested. The emergency response plan includes the emergency response organization, their responsibilities, the detailed scheme of emergency preparedness, response, facilities, equipments, coordination and support of various organizations and other technical aspects. These emergency preparedness plans are tested at periodic interval to check the overall effectiveness. The plant and site emergency exercise is handled by the plant authorities as per the site emergency plan. The events with off-site consequences are handled by the district authorities according to the off-site emergency plan. In off-site emergency exercises, observers from AERB and other associated organizations participate. Observations of the participants are discussed in the feedback session of the exercise for their disposition. This paper reviews the current level of emergency planning and preparedness, statistics of emergency exercises conducted and their salient findings. The paper highlights improvement in the emergency management programme over the years including development of advance technical support systems. The major challenges in off-site emergency management programme such as industrial growth and increase in population within the sterilized zone, frequent transfer of district officials and the floating population around the NPPs are outlined. The areas for improvement in

  16. Emergency public information procedures for nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    As a result of the accident at Three Mile Island on March 28, 1979, increased emphasis has been placed on the public information capabilities of utility companies, and particularly their crisis public information procedures. A special industry task force was assigned to develop a generic model for a utility crisis public information plan. This report has been prepared not as a literal emergency plan for a utility, but as a generic check-off list of items and procedures that a utility should consider as a part of its own plan. Because of considerable variations in service areas, utility organization, and other factors, specific approaches may vary from utility to utility. The approaches cited here are generic suggestions that would help lead to an industrywide ability to inform the public, quickly and accurately, about non-routine events that it would consider of importance

  17. The human contribution to nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reason, J.

    1987-01-01

    The safety of present and future nuclear power plants is considered, with particular reference to the human components of these plants. The approach by the United Kingdom Nuclear Installations Inspectorate is particularly criticised. In particular, objections are made to the use of event and fault tree analyses. The UK NII have also decided that comprehensive quantification of human reliability is not feasible. However, figures presented show that the human contribution to monitored power plant emergencies is high, by far the greatest proportion of root causes of emergencies were attributable to human performance. The origins of, and problems with, 'principle 124' are discussed. Automatic safety systems are also distrusted. Current probabilistic risk assessment and probabilistic safety analysis is seen as an unsatisfactory basis for the setting of safety targets. (UK)

  18. Planning of emergency medical treatment in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko

    1989-01-01

    Medical staffs and health physicists have shown deep concerning at the emergency plans of nuclear power plants after the TMI nuclear accident. The most important and basic countermeasure for accidents was preparing appropriate and concrete organization and plans for treatment. We have planed emergency medical treatment for radiation workers in a nuclear power plant institute. The emergency medical treatment at institute consisted of two stages, that is on-site emergency treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and analyzed all possible accidents in the institute and discussed on practical treatments for some possible accidents. The manuals of concrete procedure of emergency treatment for some accidents were prepared following discussion and facilities and equipment for medical treatment and decontamination were provided. All workers in the institute had periodical training and drilling of on-site emergency treatment and mastered technique of first aid. Decontamination and operation rooms were provided in the facillity medical service. The main functions at the facility medical service have been carried out by industrial nurses. Industrial nurses have been in close co-operation with radiation safety officers and medical doctors in regional hospital. (author)

  19. Emergency Preparedness and Response at Nuclear Power Plants in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, L. A.; Qamar, M. A.; Liaquat, M.R., E-mail: samasl@yahoo.com [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-10-15

    Emergency preparedness and response arrangements at Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in Pakistan have been reevaluated in the light of Fukushima Daiichi accident. Appropriate measures have been taken to strengthen and effectively implement the on-site and off-site emergency plans. Verification of these plans is conducted through regulatory review and by witnessing periodic emergency drills and exercises conducted by the NPPs in the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements. Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) have been revised at NPPs. A multi discipline reserve force has been formed for assistance during severe accidents. Nuclear Emergency Management System (NEMS) has been established at the national level in order to make necessary arrangements for responding to nuclear and radiological emergencies. Training programs for first responders and medical professionals have been launched. Emergencies coordination centres have been established at national and corporate levels. Public awareness program has been initiated to ensure that the surrounding population is provided with appropriate information on emergency planning and response. To share national and international operational experience, Pakistan has arranged various workshops and developed a strong link with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  20. Emergency response and nuclear risk governance. Nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlen, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The present study entitled ''Emergency Response and Nuclear Risk Governance: nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents'' deals with issues of the protection of the population and the environment against hazardous radiation (the hazards of nuclear energy) and the harmful effects of radioactivity during nuclear power plant accidents. The aim of this study is to contribute to both the identification and remediation of shortcomings and deficits in the management of severe nuclear accidents like those that occurred at Chernobyl in 1986 and at Fukushima in 2011 as well as to the improvement and harmonization of plans and measures taken on an international level in nuclear emergency management. This thesis is divided into a theoretical part and an empirical part. The theoretical part focuses on embedding the subject in a specifically global governance concept, which includes, as far as Nuclear Risk Governance is concerned, the global governance of nuclear risks. Due to their characteristic features the following governance concepts can be assigned to these risks: Nuclear Safety Governance is related to safety, Nuclear Security Governance to security and NonProliferation Governance to safeguards. The subject of investigation of the present study is as a special case of the Nuclear Safety Governance, the Nuclear Emergency governance, which refers to off-site emergency response. The global impact of nuclear accidents and the concepts of security, safety culture and residual risk are contemplated in this context. The findings (accident sequences, their consequences and implications) from the analyses of two reactor accidents prior to Fukushima (Three Mile Iceland in 1979, Chernobyl in 1986) are examined from a historical analytical perspective and the state of the Nuclear Emergency governance and international cooperation aimed at improving nuclear safety after Chernobyl is portrayed by discussing, among other topics, examples of &apos

  1. A study on emergency preparedness for nuclear power plant/ Establishment of emergency communication network system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y. K.; Jung, Y. D.; Kim, S. Y.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an emergency database search system for nuclear power plants during nuclear incidents / accidents. Image data reported from nuclear power plants to the regulatory body and other related data will be stored systematically in the computer. The data will be utilized during nuclear emergency to prevent the accident from spreading out and to minimize its effect. It will also be used in exchanging information on accident or incidents with the foreign countries. The operational documents in the Kori-4 nuclear power plant are used as the major source for the categorization and analysis in performing this research. It was not easy to access the detailed operational data due to its unique characteric for the security. Therefore, we strongly suggest to increase manpower for this project in Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) and archive involvement from Korea Electric Power Company to establish better database retrieval system

  2. A study on emergency preparedness for nuclear power plant/ Establishment of emergency communication network system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y K; Jung, Y D; Kim, S Y [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-12-15

    The objective of this study was to develop an emergency database search system for nuclear power plants during nuclear incidents / accidents. Image data reported from nuclear power plants to the regulatory body and other related data will be stored systematically in the computer. The data will be utilized during nuclear emergency to prevent the accident from spreading out and to minimize its effect. It will also be used in exchanging information on accident or incidents with the foreign countries. The operational documents in the Kori-4 nuclear power plant are used as the major source for the categorization and analysis in performing this research. It was not easy to access the detailed operational data due to its unique characteric for the security. Therefore, we strongly suggest to increase manpower for this project in Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) and archive involvement from Korea Electric Power Company to establish better database retrieval system.

  3. Safety assessment of emergency power systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This publication is intended to assist the safety assessor within a regulatory body, or one working as a consultant, in assessing the safety of a given design of the emergency power systems (EPS) for a nuclear power plant. The present publication refers closely to the NUSS Safety Guide 50-SG-D7 (Rev. 1), Emergency Power Systems at Nuclear Power Plants. It covers therefore exactly the same technical subject as that Safety Guide. In view of its objective, however, it attempts to help in the evaluation of possible technical solutions which are intended to fulfill the safety requirements. Section 2 clarifies the scope further by giving an outline of the assessment steps in the licensing process. After a general outline of the assessment process in relation to the licensing of a nuclear power plant, the publication is divided into two parts. First, all safety issues are presented in the form of questions that have to be answered in order for the assessor to be confident of a safe design. The second part presents the same topics in tabulated form, listing the required documentation which the assessor has to consult and those international and national technical standards pertinent to the topics. An extensive reference list provides information on standards. 1 tab

  4. Civil emergency preparedness at the Ignalina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    Workshop was held in the frame of Lithuania's cooperation with NATO on disasters management subject and was concentrated on the preparation of management of nuclear accident at Ignalina NPP. The following topics were covered: emergency preparedness inside Ignalina NPP, preparedness for nuclear accidents at national level, experience in Nordic countries and IAEA activities in harmonization of nuclear emergency preparedness in different countries

  5. Emergency preparedness for nuclear power plants in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    In the case of an operating reactor, if it is determined that there are such deficiencies that a favourable NRC finding is not warranted and if the deficiencies are not corrected within four months of that determination, the Commission will determine whether the reactor should be shut down or whether some other enforcement action is appropriate. In any case, where the Commission believes that the public health, safety, or interest so requires, the plant will be required to shut down immediately. Emergency planning considerations must be extended to emergency planning zones, and these shall consist of an area of about 10 miles in radius for exposure to the radioactive plume that might result from an accident in a nuclear power reactor and an area of about 50 miles in radius for food that might become contaminated. To evaluate the effectiveness of the licensee programme to implement their emergency plan, a 'management oversight and risk tree' (MORT) approach was developed and used by NRC appraisal teams at all operating facilities and those close to licensing. Since April 1981, over 250 emergency preparedness exercises have been observed and annual inspections conducted at US commercial nuclear power generating facilities. As a result of this experience, licensees have generally progressed from a basic ability to implement their plan to a systematic demonstration of their emergency preparedness capabilities. Almost five years have elapsed since the inception of the upgraded emergency preparedness regulatory programme, and the NRC is evaluating the resources committed to the programme to determine if modifications are appropriate. Our goal is to ensure continued adequate readiness capability to protect the public health and safety in the event of an accident

  6. Draft emergency action level guidelines for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-09-15

    This document is provided for interim use during the initial phases of the NRC effort to promptly improve emergency preparedness at operating nuclear power plants. Changes to the document can be expected as experience is gained in its use and public comments are received. Further, the Commission has initiated a rulemaking procedure, now scheduled for completion in January 1930 in the area of Emergency Planning and Preparedness. Additional requirements are to be expected when rulemaking is completed and some modifications to this document may be necessary. Four classes of Emergency Action Levels are established which replace the classes in Regulatory Guide 1.101, each with associated examples of initiating conditions. The classes are: - Notification of Unusual Event; - Alert; - Site Emergency; - General Emergency. The rationale for the notification and alert classes is to provide early and prompt notification of minor events which could lead to more serious consequences given operator error or equipment failure or which might be indicative of more serious conditions which are not yet fully realized. A gradation is provided to assure fuller response preparations for more serious indicators. The site emergency class reflects conditions where some significant releases are likely or are occurring but where a core melt situation is not indicated based on current information. In this situation full mobilization of emergency personnel in tie :near site environs is indicated as well as dispatch of monitoring teams and associated communications. The general emergency class involves actual or imminent substantial core degradation or malting with the potential for loss of containment. The immediate action for this class is sheltering (staying inside) rather thai evacuation until an assessment can be made that (1) an evacuation is indicated and (2) an evacuation, if indicated, can be completed prior to significant release and transport of radioactive material to the affected

  7. Draft emergency action level guidelines for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This document is provided for interim use during the initial phases of the NRC effort to promptly improve emergency preparedness at operating nuclear power plants. Changes to the document can be expected as experience is gained in its use and public comments are received. Further, the Commission has initiated a rulemaking procedure, now scheduled for completion in January 1930 in the area of Emergency Planning and Preparedness. Additional requirements are to be expected when rulemaking is completed and some modifications to this document may be necessary. Four classes of Emergency Action Levels are established which replace the classes in Regulatory Guide 1.101, each with associated examples of initiating conditions. The classes are: - Notification of Unusual Event; - Alert; - Site Emergency; - General Emergency. The rationale for the notification and alert classes is to provide early and prompt notification of minor events which could lead to more serious consequences given operator error or equipment failure or which might be indicative of more serious conditions which are not yet fully realized. A gradation is provided to assure fuller response preparations for more serious indicators. The site emergency class reflects conditions where some significant releases are likely or are occurring but where a core melt situation is not indicated based on current information. In this situation full mobilization of emergency personnel in tie :near site environs is indicated as well as dispatch of monitoring teams and associated communications. The general emergency class involves actual or imminent substantial core degradation or malting with the potential for loss of containment. The immediate action for this class is sheltering (staying inside) rather thai evacuation until an assessment can be made that (1) an evacuation is indicated and (2) an evacuation, if indicated, can be completed prior to significant release and transport of radioactive material to the affected

  8. Guidance for emergency planning in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, Tommy; Ekdahl, Maria

    2008-06-01

    Ringhals has been a model for this study, but the purpose has been to make the report applicable at all nuclear power plants in Sweden. The work has been done in close co-operation with the Swedish nuclear power plants and Rescue Services in the nuclear power municipalities Oesthammar, Oskarshamn, and Varberg. The internal fire brigade at the nuclear power plants has also been involved. A document will also be published as a further guidance at efforts of the type fires, which are mentioned in the enclosed document. After a fire in a switchgear room in 2005 the need of making the existing effort planning more effective at nuclear power plants was observed. The idea with the planning is to plan the effort in order to give the operational and emergency staff a good and actual support to come to a decision and to start the mission without delay. The risk information is showed by planning layouts, symbols and drawings as basis, give risk information and effort information. The effort information shows outer arrangements, manual action points, fire installations, passive fire safety etc. The risk information is shown by risk symbols. Their purpose is to give a fast overview of the existing risks. Reactor safety effects is the ruling influence if an effort has to be done in order to secure safety for a third person. In order to make an effort in an area personal risks for rescue staff, such as electricity risks, radiological risks, chemicals and gas bottles with compressed gases, has to be eliminated. For complicated missions detailed instructions are needed in order to handle specific risks. In a group discussion different people with pertinent knowledge has to value which problematic efforts need detailed instruction. Missions that have to be analyzed in a work group as above are: fire may affect the reactor safety, fire that may threaten the structural integrity, chemical discharge with big consequence on environment/third person and handling of gas system (compressed

  9. Internal emergency organization in the Beznau nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenger, H.

    1989-01-01

    The successful mastering of every emergency situation is based on the strict adherence to frequently reviewed emergency instruction and practice on simulators. This is the primary duty of all plant employees. In addition, executive bodies are necessary. The highest authority in the emergency organization is the emergency staff. Under the leadership of the plant manager, this staff consists of all department heads and several specialists. Outside normal working hours, it can be expected of the emergency staff that it is fully functional within, at most, one hour. Until the emergency staff can take over, the on-duty engineer leads emergency procedures. Several other different teams are responsible to the emergency staff. There are five emergency teams: off-duty plant employees; fire fighters; radiation defence; first-aid; plant guards. Then there is the technical support center (TSC). The responsibilities of the TSC are: giving technical advise to the emergency staff; working out different options for fighting the emergency; checking up on special methods; communication with the reactor manufacturer for additional support. 1 fig

  10. Comparison of nuclear plant emergency plans of PBNCC members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, W.Y.; Hopwood, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSWG) of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee initiated cooperation among Pacific Basin areas based primarily around emergency planning. The NSWG conducted a review of the emergency response plans of members. This paper briefly reviews and makes a comparison of the emergency response plans, with particular attention on the response organization, the planning zone, and the protective action guidelines for emergencies. Although all areas have adopted the same basic elements of emergency planning and are similar, there are also variances due to different governmental structures, population densities, and available resources. It is found that the most significant difference is in the size of the emergency planning zone. The paper concludes with a discussion on possible future cooperative activities of the working group. (author)

  11. National emergency medical assistance program for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnemann, R.E.; Berger, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation Management Consultant's Emergency Medical Assistance Program (EMAP) for nuclear facilities provides a twenty-four hour emergency medical and health physics response capability, training of site and off-site personnel, and three levels of care for radiation accident victims: first air and rescue at an accident site, hospital emergency assessment and treatment, and definitive evaluation and treatment at a specialized medical center. These aspects of emergency preparedness and fifteen years of experience in dealing with medical personnel and patients with real or suspected radiation injury will be reviewed

  12. Evaluating nuclear power plant crew performance during emergency response drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is responsible for the regulation of the health, safety and environmental consequences of nuclear activities in Canada. Recently, the Human Factors Specialists of the AECB have become involved in the assessment of emergency preparedness and emergency response at nuclear facilities. One key contribution to existing AECB methodology is the introduction of Behaviourally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS) to measure crew interaction skills during emergency response drills. This report presents results of an on-going pilot study to determine if the BARS provide a reliable and valid means of rating the key dimensions of communications, openness, task coordination and adaptability under simulated emergency circumstances. To date, the objectivity of the BARS is supported by good inter-rater reliability while the validity of the BARS is supported by the agreement between ratings of crew interaction and qualitative and quantitative observations of crew performance. (author)

  13. Security technology discussion for emergency command system of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhenjun

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power plant emergency command system can provide valuable data for emergency personnel, such as the unit data, weather data, environmental radiation data. In the course of emergency response, the emergency command system provides decision support to quickly and effectively control and mitigate the consequences of the nuclear accident, to avoid and reduce the dose received by staff and the public, to protect the environment and the public. There are high performance requirements on the security of the system and the data transmission. Based on the previous project and new demand after the Fukushima incident, the security technology design of emergency system in nuclear power plant was discussed. The results show that the introduction of information security technology can effectively ensure the security of emergency systems, and enhance the capacity of nuclear power plant to deal with nuclear accidents. (author)

  14. The optimization of nuclear power plants operation modes in emergency situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrebayev, A. M.; Trifonenkov, A. V.; Ramazanov, R. N.

    2018-01-01

    An emergency situations resulting in the necessity for temporary reactor trip may occur at the nuclear power plant while normal operating mode. The paper deals with some of the operation c aspects of nuclear power plant operation in emergency situations and during threatened period. The xenon poisoning causes limitations on the variety of statements of the problem of calculating characteristics of a set of optimal reactor power off controls. The article show a possibility and feasibility of new sets of optimization tasks for the operation of nuclear power plants under conditions of xenon poisoning in emergency circumstances.

  15. System model for evaluation of an emergency response plan for a nuclear power plant based on an assessment of nuclear emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcos Vinicius C.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are designed and built with systems dedicated to provide a high degree of protection to its workers, the population living in their neighborhoods and the environment. Among the requirements for ensuring safety there are the existence of the nuclear emergency plan. Due to the relationship between the actions contemplated in the emergency plan and the nuclear emergency exercise, it becomes possible to assess the quality of the nuclear emergency plan, by means of emergency exercise evaluation, The techniques used in this work aim at improving the evaluation method of a nuclear emergency exercise through the use of performance indicators in the evaluation of the structures, actions and procedures involved. The proposed model enables comparisons between different moments of an emergency plan directed to a nuclear power plant as well as comparisons between plans dedicated to different facilities. (author)

  16. System model for evaluation of an emergency response plan for a nuclear power plant based on an assessment of nuclear emergency exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcos Vinicius C.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear power plants are designed and built with systems dedicated to provide a high degree of protection to its workers, the population living in their neighborhoods and the environment. Among the requirements for ensuring safety there are the existence of the nuclear emergency plan. Due to the relationship between the actions contemplated in the emergency plan and the nuclear emergency exercise, it becomes possible to assess the quality of the nuclear emergency plan, by means of emergency exercise evaluation, The techniques used in this work aim at improving the evaluation method of a nuclear emergency exercise through the use of performance indicators in the evaluation of the structures, actions and procedures involved. The proposed model enables comparisons between different moments of an emergency plan directed to a nuclear power plant as well as comparisons between plans dedicated to different facilities. (author)

  17. Reliability of the emergency ac-power system at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Campbell, D.J.; Baranowsky, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    The reliability of the emergency ac-power systems typical of several nuclear power plants was estimated, the costs of several possible improvements was estimated. Fault trees were constructed based on a detailed design review of the emergency ac-power systems of 18 nuclear plants. The failure probabilities used in the fault trees were calculated from extensive historical data collected from Licensee Event Reports (LERs) and from operating experience information obtained from nuclear plant licensees. It was found that there are not one or two improvements that can be made at all plants to significantly increase the industry-average emergency ac-power-system reliability, but the improvements are varied and plant-specific. Estimates of the improvements in reliability and the associated cost are estimated using plant-specific designs and failure probabilities

  18. Reliability of the emergency AC power system at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Campbell, D.J.; Baranowsky, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability of the emergency ac power systems typical of most nuclear power plants was estimated, and the cost and increase in reliability for several improvements were estimated. Fault trees were constructed based on a detailed design review of the emergency ac power systems of 18 nuclear plants. The failure probabilities used in the fault trees were calculated from extensive historical data collected from Licensee Event Reports (LERs) and from operating experience information obtained from nuclear plant licensees. No one or two improvements can be made at all plants to significantly increase the industry-average emergency ac power system reliability; rather the most beneficial improvements are varied and plant specific. Improvements in reliability and the associated costs are estimated using plant specific designs and failure probabilities

  19. Introducing PCTRAN as an evaluation tool for nuclear power plant emergency responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Yi-Hsiang; Shih, Chunkuan; Chiang, Show-Chyuan; Weng, Tung-Li

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► PCTRAN is integrated with an atmospheric dispersion algorithm. ► The improved PCTRAN acts as an accident/incident simulator and a data exchange system. ► The software helps the responsible organizations decide the rescue and protective actions. ► The evaluation results show the nuclear power plant accident and its off-site dose consequences. ► The software can be used for nuclear power plant emergency responses. - Abstract: Protecting the public from radiation exposure is important if a nuclear power plant (NPP) accident occurs. Deciding appropriate protective actions in a timely and effective manner can be fulfilled by using an effective accident evaluation tool. In our earlier work, we have integrated PCTRAN (Personal Computer Transient Analyzer) with the off-site dose calculation model. In this study, we introduce PCTRAN as an evaluation tool for nuclear power plant emergency responses. If abnormal conditions in the plant are monitored or observed, the plant staffs can distinguish accident/incident initiation events. Thus, the responsible personnel can immediately operate PCTRAN and set up those accident/incident initiation events to simulate the nuclear power plant transient or accident in conjunction with off-site dose distributions. The evaluation results consequently help the responsible organizations decide the rescue and protective actions. In this study, we explain and demonstrate the capabilities of PCTRAN for nuclear emergency responses, through applying it to simulate the postulated nuclear power plant accident scenarios.

  20. National radiological emergency response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dela Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2011-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident occurred on March 11, 2011, when two natural disasters of unprecedented strengths, an earthquake with magnitude 9 followed one hour later by a powerful tsunami struck northeastern Japan and felled the external power supply and the emergency diesel generators of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, resulting in a loss of coolant accident. There were core meltdowns in three nuclear reactors with the release of radioactivity estimated to be 1/10 of what was released to the environment during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in April 1986. The Fukushima nuclear accident tested the capability of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) in responding to such radiological emergency as a nuclear power plant accident. The PNRI and NDRRMC activated the RADPLAN for possible radiological emergency. The emergency response was calibrated to the status of the nuclear reactors on site and the environmental monitoring undertaken around the site and off-site, including the marine environment. This orchestrated effort enabled the PNRI and the national agencies concerned to reassure the public that the nuclear accident does not have a significant impact on the Philippines, both on the health and safety of the people and on the safety of the environment. National actions taken during the accident will be presented. The role played by the International Atomic Energy Agency as the central UN agency for nuclear matters will be discussed. (author)

  1. The nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuertes Menendez, M. J.; Gasco Leonarte, L.; Granada Ferrero, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Planning of the response to emergencies in nuclear plants is regulated by the Basic Nuclear Emergency Plan (PLABEN). This basic Plan is the guidelines for drawing up, implementing and maintaining the effectiveness of the nuclear power plant exterior nuclear emergency plans. The five exterior emergency plans approved as per PLABEN (PENGUA, PENCA, PENBU, PENTA and PENVA) place special emphasis on the preventive issues of emergency planning, such as implementation of advance information programs to the population, as well as on training exercises and drills. (Author)

  2. Relation between source term and emergency planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhongqi; Yang Ling

    1992-01-01

    Some background information of the severe accidents and source terms related to the nuclear power plant emergency planning are presented. The new source term information in NUREG-0956 and NUREG-1150, and possible changes in emergency planning requirements in U.S.A. are briefly provided. It is suggested that a principle is used in selecting source terms for establishing the emergency planning policy and a method is used in determining the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) size in China. Based on the research results of (1) EPZ size of PWR nuclear power plants being built in China, and (2) impact of reactor size and selected source terms on the EPZ size, it is concluded that the suggested principle and the method are suitable and feasible for PWR nuclear power plants in China

  3. Nuclear emergency buildings of Asco and Vandellos II nuclear power plants; Centros alternativos de emergencias de las centrales nucleares de Asco y Vandellos II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massuet, J.; Sabater, J.; Mirallas Esteban, S.

    2016-08-01

    The Nuclear Emergency Buildings sited at Asco and Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) are designed to safety manage emergencies in extreme situations, beyond the design basis of the Nuclear Power Plants. Designed in accordance with the requirements of the Spanish Nuclear Regulator (Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear-CSN) these buildings are ready to operate over a period of 72 hours without external assistance and ensure habitability for crews of 120 and 70 people respectively. This article describes the architectural conception, features and major systems of the Nuclear Emergency Buildings sited at Asco and Vandellos II. (Author)

  4. Concept for the Emergency Protection in the Vicinity of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    In 1991, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK) issued a concept of the regulations for the cloud phase 1 of an nuclear power plant accident in Switzerland valid at that time in co-operation with the Federal Commission for AC Protection (KOMAC) and the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission (KSA). This concept replaced the version of 1977, which then formed the basis for emergency preparedness in Switzerland. Legal changes, such as the civil protection legislation and the ordinance on the distribution of iodine tablets to the population, as well as experience gained from the emergency exercises necessitated a revision of the existing concept. The present concept is issued by the Federal Commission for AC Protection (KOMAC) and deals with all phases of an accident sequence in a Swiss nuclear power plant focussing on the pre- and cloud phase. It also gives an overview of responsibilities and alert procedures for accidents at foreign nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations, as well as of accidents in connection with transportation of radioactive materials. The concept is designed to help the federal and cantonal authorities in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in charge of emergency protection in preparing their emergency procedure specifications, and in the realisation of the readiness for emergencies. Furthermore, it shall serve the cantons as a guideline for the preparation of emergency specifications for the communities. The concept is based on the assumption that the executive bodies and emergency forces provided for the general civil protection are employed in case of an accident at a nuclear power plant. (authors)

  5. Concept of voltage monitoring for a nuclear power plant emergency power supply system (PWR 1300 MWe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, R.B. de

    1988-01-01

    Voltage monitoring concept for a Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Power Supply Systems (PWR 1300 MWe) is described based on the phylosophy adopted for Angra 2 and 3 NPP's. Some suggested setpoints are only guidance values and can be modified during plant commissioning for a better performance of the whole protection system. (author) [pt

  6. Development and application of emergency operating procedures for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chengge

    1990-01-01

    The development and application of emergency operating procedures (EOPs) is an important measure to assure the operational safety for nuclear power plants. Event-oriented, symptom-, function- and state-oriented EOPs with their structures, interfaces, development procedures and practical application are described. The ideas and approach can be available for the preparation of EOPs for nuclear power plants which are going to be in service

  7. New fire and security rules change USA nuclear power plant emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrou, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    New safety and security rules for nuclear power plants have resulted from the Energy Reorganisation Act and also from a review following the Browns Ferry fire. The content of the emergency plan which covers personnel, plant, site, as well as a general emergency, is outlined. New fire protection rules, the plan for security, local and state government assistance are also discussed, with a brief reference to the impact of the new rules on continuity of operations. (author)

  8. Handbook for the planning, co-ordination and evaluation of emergency exercises in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtborn, I.; Bath, N.

    1999-01-01

    The efficiency of the on-site emergency organization in German nuclear power plants is tested regularly through emergency exercises. To achieve federal harmonization on a high level of quality a handbook for the planning, co-ordination and evaluation of such exercises has been developed in the frame of the regulatory investigation programme. In this handbook requirements are set out for emergency training. Key elements are a modular structure, rules to be observed and guidance for post-exercise evaluation. (orig.) [de

  9. The knowledge-based off-site emergency response system for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, L.W.; Loa, W.W.; Wang, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    A knowledge-based expert system for a nuclear power plant off-site emergency response system is described. The system incorporates the knowledge about the nuclear power plant behaviours, site environment and site geographic factors, etc. The system is developed using Chinshan nuclear power station of Taipower Company, Taiwan, ROC as a representative model. The objectives of developing this system are to provide an automated intelligent system with functions of accident simulation, prediction and with learning capabilities to supplement the actions of the emergency planners and accident managers in order to protect the plant personnel and the surrounding population, and prevent or mitigate property damages resulting from the plant accident. The system is capable of providing local and national authorities with rapid retrieval data from the site characteristics and accident progression. The system can also provide the framework for allocation of available resources and can handle the uncertainties in data and models

  10. Systematic preparation, execution and evaluation of emergency exercises at the Beznau nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenschert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Based on federal acts and a specific guideline of the nuclear authority ENSI, strict requirements are imposed on emergency exercises at Swiss NPPs. The Beznau NPP has conducted emergency exercises for more than 30 years. Systematic exercise planning assures that all emergency cases defined in the plant-specific emergency plan are considered in the exercise scenarios. Technically oriented scenarios cover all groups of initiating events and all safety levels of the defense in depth principle. The exercise results are an important input for optimization measures in the areas of emergency organization, documentation and infrastructure. Due to the goal-oriented enforcement of laws and guidelines by the nuclear authority ENSI, emergency exercises serve as a motor of further optimization of emergency preparedness. (orig.)

  11. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

  12. Experiences in the development of an emergency response facility (ERF) system for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seisdedos, A.; Sanchez-Fornie, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident gave rise to a series of new requirements with which Nuclear Power Plants must comply and amongst which the implementation of emergency response facilities, particularly the SPDS, has received special attention. This paper covers the experience and problems encountered in the developing of the engineering necessary for the detailed definition of the ERF in a Nuclear Power Plant in the commercial operation phase. Also, a real example is provided for the case of a plant in the last phase of construction and installation. This will serve to illustrate each of the topics covered. (author)

  13. Information for nuclear emergency response: a case study based on ANGRA nuclear power plant emergency simulation exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Paulo V.R. de

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Current nuclear emergency management procedures do not always satisfactorily address issues related to the information availability and to how people in emergency control centres use this information to respond to an nuclear accident. The lack of an adequate and prompt information may lead to a response that can be very different from what authorities recommend and thus create confusion, mistrust, and widespread uncertainty. This is a potentially serious problem for emergency planners. An adequate and prompt access to relevant information is a critical requirement that emergency teams face while they work towards reducing the undesired consequences of the emergency. There are three basic types of knowledge according to a conceptual framework developed to deal with emergency response: Previous Personal, Previous and, Current Contextual knowledge. Most decisions in emergency control centres require a dynamic combination of all types of knowledge, particularly the current contextual that comes from the emergency settings, including all information about the activities of other emergency teams. The aim of this paper is to describe the concepts and the structure of a system that aims at storing and disseminating the previous formal and contextual knowledge to help teams make the correct decisions during the evolution of an emergency. The elicitation of critical requirements are provided by a case study based on Cognitive Work Analysis and Naturalistic Decision Making methods, applied to a nuclear emergency response simulation. The framework and a prototype system were tested in a controlled experiment. The paper reports the results of this experiment. (author)

  14. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant's operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ''onsite'' response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world's collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously

  15. Study of arcview GIS application in the nuclear power plant emergency response decision support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peng; Chen Lin; Dong Binjiang

    2003-01-01

    It is very significant to apply the technique of GIS to the development of the Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response Decision Support System. On the basis of the software system ArcView. This paper investigate the framework, the function and the development methods of the system. (authors)

  16. Specification for self contained emergency luminiare and their qualification for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Shanmugam, T.K.

    1999-01-01

    Self contained emergency luminiare (SCEL) for application in a nuclear plant shall meet the illumination level requirement of ANSI/NFPA 101-1988 (Life Safety Code) Section 5.8. The testing shall be done as per IS 9583-1981 requirements. In the selection of self contained emergency luminiare the Sealed Maintenance Free (SMF) battery characteristic and Ampere-Hour ratings are to be carefully evaluated

  17. A Production-Rule Analysis System for Nuclear Plant monitoring and emergency response applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.; Tsoukalas, L.; McDonough, T.; Parker, M.

    1987-01-01

    A Production-Rule Analysis System for Nuclear Power Plant Monitoring is presented. The signals generated by the Zion-1 Plant are considered for emergency Response applications. The integrity of the Plant Radiation, the Reactor Coolant, the Fuel Clad, and the Containment Systems, is monitored. Representation of the system is in the form of a goal-tree generating a Knowledge-Base searched by an Inference Engine functioning in the forward-chaining mode. The Gaol-tree is built from Fault-Trees based on plant operational information. The system is implemented on a VAX-8500 and is programmed in OPS-5

  18. Emergency preparedness exercise ''Posavje 82'' in support of the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant, Krsko, Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.E.; Emmerson, B.W.

    1983-06-01

    In October 1982, the Yugoslavian Government requested the Agency's assistance in observing and evaluating an emergency preparedness exercise (code named ''POSAVJE 82'') on 5 and 6 November 1982, to test emergency plans and arrangements supportive of the KRSKO Nuclear Power Plant. The Krsko Nuclear Power Plant is a single unit pressurized water reactor of United States (Westinghouse) design rated at 664 MWe (Gross) and is located at Krsko, Socialist Republic of Slovenia, Yugoslavia. This assistance was provided by sending a Special Assistance Mission team of experts under the general provisions of the Agency's circular letter SC/651-3 of 7 April 1981 to Member States which offered such assistance upon request. This mission was a follow-up to a previous mission requested by the Yugoslavian Government which was conducted 24 June - 1 July 1981. At that time, the mission consisted of examining the then existing arrangements for emergency planning in support of the KRSKO Nuclear Power Plant at the National, Republic, local and nuclear power plant levels and discussing with Yugoslavian authorities criteria for emergency plan development and improvement. As a result of this 1981 mission, a ''Report to the Goverment of Yugoslavia'' (IAEA TA Report 1827 of 17 September 1981) was transmitted to the Yugoslavian Government. This report set forth a number of recommendations for improving and further developing the various emergency plans and arrangements for the KRSKO Nuclear Power Plant. A summary of the major recommendations contained in the report is given in Section 2.2. The entire report is listed as Reference 1 of Annex A

  19. Development of graphic display program of reactor operating parameters for emergency exercise at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Gotou, Kazuko

    2001-01-01

    A scenario of nuclear emergency exercise based on the result of accident progress analysis is expected to ensure effective training. Thereupon a new graphic display program for reactor operating parameters has been developed to present real-time of plant process values (parameters), released radioactivities from the plant, and dose rate data around the site calculated by using the accident analysis code MAAP4 and other codes. This system has a trend graph screen displaying reactor operating parameters, an environmental dose rate summary screen indicating dose rate distribution around the site on the map, and a plant parameters summary screen showing important plant parameters on a simplified plant system diagram. One screen can be switched to another any time. It also has a jump-function easily accessing any stage during the exercise scenario in accordance with progress of the exercise. As a result of the application of this system to a real nuclear emergency exercise, it has been verified that this system is quite useful for confirming the parameters when the nuclear emergency exercise starts and the licensee reports the plant conditions to related bodied. (author)

  20. Development of graphic display program of reactor operating parameters for emergency exercise at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yoshida, Yoshitaka [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Gotou, Kazuko [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    A scenario of nuclear emergency exercise based on the result of accident progress analysis is expected to ensure effective training. Thereupon a new graphic display program for reactor operating parameters has been developed to present real-time of plant process values (parameters), released radioactivities from the plant, and dose rate data around the site calculated by using the accident analysis code MAAP4 and other codes. This system has a trend graph screen displaying reactor operating parameters, an environmental dose rate summary screen indicating dose rate distribution around the site on the map, and a plant parameters summary screen showing important plant parameters on a simplified plant system diagram. One screen can be switched to another any time. It also has a jump-function easily accessing any stage during the exercise scenario in accordance with progress of the exercise. As a result of the application of this system to a real nuclear emergency exercise, it has been verified that this system is quite useful for confirming the parameters when the nuclear emergency exercise starts and the licensee reports the plant conditions to related bodied. (author)

  1. Nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This leaflet, which is in the form of a fold-up chart, has panels of text which summarize the emergencies that could arise and the countermeasures and emergency plans that have been prepared should nuclear accident occur or affect the United Kingdom. The levels of radiation doses at which various measures would be introduced are outlined. The detection and monitoring programmes that would operate is illustrated. The role of NRPB and the responsible government departments are set out together with an explanation of how the National Arrangements for Incidents involving Radioactivity would be coordinated. (UK)

  2. Medical emergency planning in case of severe nuclear power plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlenschlaeger, L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to discuss a three-step-plan on medical emergency planning in case of severe accidents at nuclear power plants on the basis of own experiences in the regional area as well as on the basis of recommendations of the Federal Minister of the Interior. The medical considerations take account of the severity and extension of an accident whereby the current definitions used in nuclear engineering for accident situations are taken as basis. A comparison between obligatory and actual state is made on the possibilities of medical emergency planning, taking all capacities of staff, facilities, and equipment available in the Federal Republic of Germany into account. To assure a useful and quick utilization of the existing infra-structure as well as nation-wide uniform training of physicians and medical assistants in the field of medical emergency in case of a nuclear catastrophe, a federal law for health protection is regarded urgently necessary. (orig.) [de

  3. The public opinion on emergency preparedness close to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultaaker, Oe.

    1984-07-01

    More than 1500 people have been interviewed on their attitudes towards and their knowledge of emergency actions on nuclear accidents at nuclear power plants. Of the people addressed, 768 lived in the inner zones close to the power plants. 775 were farmers near the four nuclear power sites in Sweden. The farmers lived both in inner zones and zones further away. A majority consider themselves not well-informed on health risks after a nuclear accident. More than a third would want more information on what to do in case of accident. Farmers outside the inner zones are more dissatisfied with the information status than other groups. Farmers from the inner zones consider the information given inadequate regarding risks to their health and also health risks for their live stock. The results of interviews are in some cases compared with the information given to the public. (Aa)

  4. Tactical and strategic decision-making aids for nuclear power plant emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the prospective role of computer-based decision aids for nuclear power plant emergency response. The role of these systems is subordinate to human activities, but in a complementary manner these systems process decision logic more accurately and foster a more thorough understanding of emergency situations than might other wise be possible. Within this context two decision support systems being developed are discussed. Both of these systems utilize technology derived from artificial intelligence, focussing on two different facets of emergency response. An automated emergency operating procedures (EOP) tracking expert system is described as a tactical aid for control room operator response. A reactor emergency action level monitor (REALM) expert system is proposed as a strategic decision aid for site emergency response. The discrimination between tactical and strategic decision-making is an intrinsic part of this examination

  5. Safety assessment of emergency electric power systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This paper is intended to assist the safety assessor within a regulatory body, or one working as a consultant, in assessing a given design of the Emergency Electrical Power System. Those non-electric power systems which may be used in a plant design to serve as emergency energy sources are addressed only in their general safety aspects. The paper thus relates closely to Safety Series 50-SG-D7 ''Emergency Power Systems at Nuclear Power Plants'' (1982), as far as it addresses emergency electric power systems. Several aspects are dealt with: the information the assessor may expect from the applicant to fulfill his task of safety review; the main questions the reviewer has to answer in order to determine the compliance with requirements of the NUSS documents; the national or international standards which give further guidance on a certain system or piece of equipment; comments and suggestions which may help to judge a variety of possible solutions

  6. A computerized assessment and response system for radiological emergency at Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, C.C.; Thuillier, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires that nuclear power plants provide for rapid assessment and response in the event of a radiological emergency. At the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Pacific Gas and Electric Company uses a system of linked central minicomputer, satellite desktop computers and microprocessors to provide decision makers with timely and pertinent information in emergency situations. The system provides for data acquisition and microprocessing at meteorological and radiological monitoring sites. Current estimates or projections of offsite dose commitment are made in real-time by a dispersion/dose calculation model. Computerized dissemination of data and calculational results to decision makers at the government and utility levels is also available. The basic system in use is a commercially available Emergency Assessment and Response System (EARS). This generic system has been modified in-house to meet requirements specific to emergency situations at the plant. Distinctive features of the modification program includes: a highly professional man-machine interaction; consideration of site-specific factors; simulation of environmental radiology for development of drill scenarios; and concise, pertinent reports as input to decision making

  7. Severe accident management at nuclear power plants - emergency preparedness and response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, S.K.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the current level of emergency planning and preparedness and also improvement in the emergency management programme over the years including lessons learned from Fukushima accident, hazard analysis and categorization of nuclear facilities into hazard category for establishing the emergency preparedness class, classification of emergencies based on the Emergency Action Levels (EAL), development of EAL’s for PHWR, Generic Criteria in terms of projected dose for initiating protective actions (precautionary urgent protective actions, urgent protective actions, early protective actions), operational intervention levels (OIL), Emergency planning zones and distances, protection strategy and reference levels, use of residual dose for establishing reference levels for optimization of protection strategy, criteria for termination of emergency, transition of emergency exposure situation to existing exposure situation or planned exposure situation, criteria for medical managements of exposed persons and guidance for controlling the dose of emergency workers. This paper also highlights the EALs for typical PHWR type reactors for all types of emergencies (plant, site and offsite), transition from emergency operating procedures (EOP) to accident management guidelines (AMG) to emergency response actions and proposed implementation of guidelines

  8. Study of time-critical diagnostic method for emergency operation of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Itoh, K.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1986-01-01

    In order to support the emergency operation of nuclear power plant, the method of time-critical diagnostic plant analyzer has been investigated. The conception of the emergency operation support center is proposed and two types of plant analyzer may be installed in this center. One analyzer is a real-time tracking simulation code using the observed signals and another is a fast trend-prediction code. A real-time tracking code, TOKRAC, has been developed for analyzing the PWR primary loop thermo-hydraulics at SBLOCA, and the applicability of this code was examined by the numerical experiments for the initial phase transient of both TMI-2 accident and 6% coldleg SBLOCA of a Westinghouse-type PWR plant. The results showed that fairly good tracking was carried out by TOKRAC. The CPU time of TOKRAC was about 12-14 percent of real-time

  9. Hypothetical accidents of light-water moderated nuclear power plants in the framework of emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    Hypothetical accidents in nuclear power plants are events which by definition can have a devastating impact on the surroundings of the plant. Apart from an adequate plant design, the protection of the population in case of an accident is covered by the emergency planning. Of major importance are the measures for the short-term emergency protection. The decision on whether these measures are applied has to be based on appropriate measurements within the plant. The aim and achieved result of this investigation is to specify accident types. They serve as operational decision making criteria to determine the necessary measurements for analysing the accident in the accident situation, and to provide indications for choosing the suitable strategy for the protection measures. (orig.) [de

  10. Comparison between Different Power Sources for Emergency Power Supply at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenasson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Currently the Swedish nuclear power plants are using diesel generator sets and to some extent gas turbines as their emergency AC power sources and batteries as their emergency DC power sources. In the laws governing Swedish nuclear activity, no specific power sources are prescribed. On the other hand, diversification of safety functions should be considered, as well as simplicity and reliability in the safety systems. So far the choices of emergency power sources have been similar between different power plants, and therefore this project investigated a number of alternative power sources and if they are suitable for use as emergency power on nuclear power plants. The goals of the project were to: - Define the parameters that are essential for rending a power source suitable for use at a nuclear power plant. - Present the characteristics of a number of power sources regarding the defined parameters. - Compile the suitability of the different power sources. - Make implementation suggestions for the less conventional of the investigated power sources. (unconventional in the investigated application) 10 different power sources in total have been investigated and to various degrees deemed suitable Out of the 10 power sources, diesel generators, batteries and to some extent gas turbines are seen as conventional technology at the nuclear power plants. In relation to them the other power sources have been assessed regarding diversification gains, foremost with regards to external events. The power sources with the largest diversification gains are: Internal steam turbine, Hydro power, Thermoelectric generators. The work should first and foremost put focus on the fact that under the right circumstances there are power sources that can complement conventional power sources and yield substantial diversification gains. This paper is a shortened version of the report 'Comparison between different power sources for emergency power supply at nuclear power plants'. The

  11. Development of computerized supporting system for emergency response in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Il

    1992-02-01

    In emergency situation of nuclear power plants, effective use of emergency operating procedures (EOPs) is a crucial part of the emergency response process. However, there are several problems in the emergency operating procedures because of the form of the written procedures. They are voluminous and complicate for effective references under high stress situation. Inevitably, it takes time that could be better spent employing measures to control and stabilize to select the correct procedures and apply the decision logic. In this study, a computerized supporting system has been developed to reduce the operator error possibility under emergency situations of nuclear power plant. Using on-line input parameters, the system can determine the status of the critical safety functions and can find appropriate procedures and necessary operator actions automatically. Moreover, the system can help the operator decision making in the core melt accident situation. By tracking the EOP in an on-line mode, most steps concerning checking or verifying plant state are processed automatically without operator participations. Therefore, the interactions between the system and the operator are simplified significantly and the possibility of human error is reduced

  12. Emergency preparedness post-9/11 enhancements at US nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In the wake of the terrorist attacks of 9-11, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) took several actions to improve the security profile and emergency response of its licensees. In early 2002 the commission issued orders to its nuclear power plant licensees which included changes to emergency plans, the performance of staffing adequacy reviews, changes to augmentation practices and the establishment of alternative facilities. Since that time NRC has implemented a force-on-force exercise program that includes emergency response. This program has helped licensees improve their response by testing procedures under simulated attack conditions. More recently, licensees have begun a program to enhance drills and exercises through the use of security event based scenarios. These drills will enhance previous practice and focus on two emerging issues: improving the interface between emergency response, security response and operations during security events and recovery from the loss of plant equipment due to terrorist acts. Additional areas of enhancement such as protective actions for plant personnel will also be discussed and the status of actions to date will be provided. (author)

  13. Use of a life simulator and SPDS for a nuclear plant emergency preparedness exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.; Anderson, J.; Goldman, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that in one of the first such efforts in the nuclear industry, Perry Nuclear Power Plant (PNPP) engineered its Control Room Simulator system to provide real-time live scenario data to the PNPP Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) during its 1989 Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Evaluated Emergency Preparedness Exercise. A Scenario Team developed realistic scenarios built upon exercise objectives coupled with Simulator capabilities. Free play by participants was an underlying objective of the Scenario Team. For the exercise, the Simulator SPDS was connected via telephone lines and modems to actual SPDS display units in two remote facilities: the Technical Support Center (TSC) and Emergency Operations Facility (EOF). Since the PNPP Simulator does not presently model radiological parameters, radiological data was input separately from plant scenario thermodynamic/mechanical/electrical data. During the exercise, plant operators at the Simulator manipulated plant controls to start/stop components or systems as needed for the exercise conditions. Players in the TSC and EOF were able to see and track plant conditions on a real-time basis

  14. Strainer device for an emergency cooling system in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trybom, J.

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to a strainer device for separating contaminants from water in an emergency cooling system for a nuclear power plant. The nuclear power plant has a wet-well for water in the emergency cooling system and the strainer device comprises at least one strainer device, which is arranged in the wet-well. According to the invention the strainer is suspended in a desired position in the wet-well by means of at least a group of at least three tie rods arranged at angles to each other, each tie rod being fixed at one end to the strainer and its other end to the container or an anchor ring joined thereto. (author) figs

  15. Nuclear power plant emergency preparedness: results from an evaluation of Michigan's potassium iodide distribution program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolinski, Laura R; Stanbury, Martha; Manente, Susan

    2012-10-01

    In 2009, the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) made potassium iodide (KI), a nonprescription radio-protective drug, available by mailing vouchers redeemable at local pharmacies for KI tablets, at no cost to residents living within 10 miles of Michigan's 3 nuclear power plants (NPPs). MDCH conducted an evaluation of this program to determine Michigan's KI coverage and to assess general emergency preparedness among residents living near the NPPs. KI coverage was estimated based on redeemed voucher counts and the 2010 Census. Telephone surveys were administered to a random sample (N = 153) of residents living near Michigan's NPPs to evaluate general emergency preparedness, reasons for voucher use or nonuse, and KI knowledge. Only 5.3% of eligible residences redeemed KI vouchers. Most surveyed residents (76.5%) were aware of living near an NPP, yet 42.5% reported doing "nothing" to plan for an emergency. Almost half of surveyed voucher users did not know when to take KI or which body part KI protects. Among voucher nonusers, 48.0% were either unaware of the program or did not remember receiving a voucher. Additional efforts are needed to ensure that all residents are aware of the availability of KI and that recipients of the drug understand when and why it should be taken. Minimal emergency planning among residents living near Michigan's NPPs emphasizes the need for increased emergency preparedness and awareness. Findings are particularly salient given the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant emergency in Japan.

  16. Improvements around nuclear power plants for effective implementation of emergency countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivasista, K.; Ravi, K.; Gupta, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    The 5 km sterilized zone (SZ) and 16 km emergency planning zone (EPZ) were set up for Indian nuclear power plants in 1960s. There is also a requirement that the growth of population in SZ shall be controlled. In the current scenario where population growth in SZ at some of the sites is much above the natural growth, the distinction between the two zones may disappear. It is clear that emergency preparedness plans shall be in place for these zones. In today's context if these numbers have to be revised, there is a need to give a fresh look to the basis and growth of population in these zones. In view of this, the issue of size and requirement of SZ and EPZ in Indian context are revisited. Technological advances and emerging improvements in some of the elements of emergency response were reviewed to determine their potential effects on decisions of emergency protective actions. Some such elements which affect implementation of emergency countermeasures effectively in SZ and EPZ around Indian nuclear power plants are discussed in this paper. (author)

  17. Dose-projection considerations for emergency conditions at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Poeton, R.W.; Powell, D.C.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to review the problems and issues associated with making environmental radiation-dose projections during emergencies at nuclear power plants. The review is divided into three areas: source-term development, characterization of atmospheric dispersion and selection of appropriate dispersion models, and development of dosimetry calculations for determining thyroid dose and whole-body dose for ground-level and elevated releases. A discussion of uncertainties associated with these areas is also provided

  18. Dose-projection considerations for emergency conditions at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Poeton, R.W.; Powell, D.C.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to review the problems and issues associated with making environmental radiation-dose projections during emergencies at nuclear power plants. The review is divided into three areas: source-term development, characterization of atmospheric dispersion and selection of appropriate dispersion models, and development of dosimetry calculations for determining thyroid dose and whole-body dose for ground-level and elevated releases. A discussion of uncertainties associated with these areas is also provided.

  19. Report to Congress on status of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This report responds to a request (Public Law 96-295, Section 109) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to report to Congress on the status of emergency response planning in support of nuclear power reactors. The report includes information on the status of this planning as well as on the Commission actions relating to emergency preparedness. These actions include a summary of the new regulatory requirements and the preliminary results of two comprehensive Evacuation Time Estimate studies; one requested by the NRC including 50 nuclear power plant sites and one conducted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for 12 high population density sites. FEMA provided the information in this report on the status of State and local planning, including projected schedules for joint State/county/licensee emergency preparedness exercises. Included as Appendicies are the NRC Emergency Planning Final Regulations, 10 CFR Part 50 (45 FR 55402), the FEMA Proposed Rule, 'Review and Approval of State and Local Radiological Emergency Plans and Preparedness', 44 CFR Part 350 (45 FR 42341) and the NRC/FEMA Memorandums of Understanding

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of warning systems for nuclear power plant emergencies: criteria and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant in 1979 was an emergency management disaster. Chief among the problems was ineffective public warning and communications. While it is difficult to assign blame for that condition to any given party or determine if it was due to unique situational factors, the failure led to fairly significant regulatory changes in the arena of public warning and notification. These changes are intended to avoid the problems that arose during the TMI accident. This chapter reviews these regulations and suggests an alternative set of criteria for evaluating warning systems. The criteria are used to assess the effectiveness of the warning system at the Ft. St. Vrain nuclear power plant in Colorado. The paper concludes with some discussion of the lessons learned from the TMI experience as they apply to warning systems for all nuclear generating stations

  1. Developing a taxonomy of coordination behaviours in nuclear power plant control rooms during emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunxing; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhizhong; Song, Fei; Ma, Liang

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to develop a taxonomy of coordination behaviours during emergencies in nuclear power plants (NPPs). We summarised basic coordination behaviours from literature in aviation, health care and nuclear field and identified coordination behaviours specific to the nuclear domain by interviewing and surveying control crew operators. The established taxonomy includes 7 workflow stages and 24 basic coordination behaviours. To evaluate the reliability and feasibility of the taxonomy, we analysed 12 videos of operators' training sessions by coding coordination behaviours with the taxonomy and the inter-rater reliability was acceptable. Further analysis of the frequency, the duration and the direction of the coordination behaviours revealed four coordination problems. This taxonomy provides a foundation of systematic observation of coordination behaviours among NPP crews, advances researchers' understanding of the coordination mechanism during emergencies in NPPs and facilitate the possibility to deepen the understanding of the relationships between coordination behaviours and team performance. Practitioner Summary: A taxonomy of coordination behaviours during emergencies in nuclear power plants was developed. Reliability and feasibility of the taxonomy was verified through the analysis of 12 training sessions. The taxonomy can serve as an observation system for analysis of coordination behaviours and help to identify coordination problems of control crews.

  2. Trial application of reliability technology to emergency diesel generators at the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.M.; Boccio, J.L.; Karimian, S.; Azarm, M.A.; Carbonaro, J.; DeMoss, G.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a trial application of reliability technology to the emergency diesel generator system at the Trojan Nuclear Power Plant is presented. An approach for formulating a reliability program plan for this system is being developed. The trial application has shown that a reliability program process, using risk- and reliability-based techniques, can be interwoven into current plant operational activities to help in controlling, analyzing, and predicting faults that can challenge safety systems. With the cooperation of the utility, Portland General Electric Co., this reliability program can eventually be implemented at Trojan to track its effectiveness

  3. Strengths of common resources for managing emergencies in the Spanish nuclear power plants (CAE y UME)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blas, J. de

    2014-01-01

    Following the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi power plants, the electrical sector of nuclear generation recognised the need to reinforce the capacities that the nuclear power plants already had and which they were developing in order to satisfy the requisites of the stress tests, with the additional support of equipment and human resources common to all of them. Thus the idea arose to create a Spanish emergency Support centre. Its scope included an intervention unit, pumping equipment and electrical generation, a centralised warehouse and transfer logistics. UNESA-UME Collaboration Protocol With the collaboration of the CSN as a mediator, the UME reached an agreement with the nuclear electrical sector (UNESA) in order to be able to increase knowledge about the Spanish nuclear power plants and establish a means of collaboration to be able to act with their own human and equipment resources at a site that might suffer an accident such as the one at the Japanese plants of Fukushima-Daiichi. (Author)

  4. Documents for designing the emergency system for the Temelin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machek, J.; Fiser, V.

    1993-12-01

    The organizational structure of the emergency system at the Temelin nuclear power plant is described and the responsibilities, principal assignments and number of personnel and their qualification are outlined; these include the Emergency Staff, emergency organization of the operator shift, Technical Support Center, External Emergency Support Center, and Operating Support Center. The emergency information system to secure personnel activities in emergency situations is also described. This consists of a critical safety function display system, a post-accident monitoring system, and a post-accident sampling system. The performance of the emergency support centers, their equipment with communications and computer hardware, and the number and qualification of personnel are also dealt with. The emergency classification is as follows: anomaly, incident, accident, major accident. The information and warning system is briefly described. A decision flow-chart for the assessment of emergency situations and their classification, including the complete algorithm for classifying accidents in the accident classification system, is given in the annex. (J.B.)

  5. Evaluation of nuclear data for emergency preparedness system of nuclear power plants. Comparison of radioactivity inventories by newest nuclear data and rather older nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Kimura, Itsuro

    2004-01-01

    The radioactivity inventories for emergency preparedness systems of nuclear power plants calculated by the combination of the generally-used in Japan (general-version), the INSS used by the present authors (INSS-version) and the newest nuclear data library and codes (newest-version) were compared, and the maintaining of conservativeness of the general-version and the INSS-version against the newest-version was examined. And the influences of the radioactivity inventories by the difference between the nuclear cross section and fission yield data, decay data and calculation codes were investigated. As a result, (1) the radioactivity inventories calculated by general-version and INSS-version were not confirmed the conservativeness to the newest-version. But the difference was less than 10%, and it would not give large influence to the calculation of the emergency preparedness system of nuclear plants. (2) The influence of the radioactivity inventories such as 135 Xe build-up were observed by the difference of neutron flux level in an operation of reactors that occurred by the variety of nuclear cross section and fission yield data. (3) Little influence by the variety of decay data was confirmed. (4) The ORIGEN2.1 code underestimated the amount of fission products generated by fission of minor actinides. From these result, the radioactivity inventories for the emergency preparedness system of nuclear power plants are recommended to use the calculation results by the combination of the library for ORIGEN2 based on JENDL3.3 and the ORIGEN2.2 code. (author)

  6. An Assessment for Emergency Preparedness Plan in Hanul Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sunghyun; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The purpose of emergency preparedness aims to protect the accident and mitigate the radiation damage of public by setting emergency preparedness plan. In order to perform successfully the emergency preparedness plan, it should be optimized through a quantitative analysis. There are so many variables to analyze it quantitatively. It is mission to classify a realistic and suitable variables among these variables. The realistic variables is converted to the decision node in decision tree which is helpful to decide what evacuation or sheltering is effective to mitigate public damage. Base on it, it's idealistic method to analyze offsite consequences for each end points in the decision tree. In this study, we selected the reference plant which already has the emergency preparedness plan. Among the plan, we implemented offsite consequence analysis for a specific plan by using MACCS 2 code. In this study, target group is people who gathered in place 1 have sheltered and evacuated along the pathway. the offsite consequences analysis result of the group are 1.17·10-9 (early fatality), 1.77·10-7 (late fatality). Various cases need to be quantified for make an optimized decision. In the future, we will perform the verification and modification of decision node. After The assessment of emergency preparedness plan for Hanul nuclear power plant unit 5, 6 might be contribute to establish the optimized decision making of emergency prepared plan.

  7. Trend analyses of the emergency diesel generator problem events in Japanese and U.S. nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Up to 2009, the author and a colleague conducted trend analyses of problem events related to main generators, emergency diesel generators, breakers, motors and transformers which are more likely to cause problems than other electric components in nuclear power plants. Among the electric components with high frequency of defect occurrence, i.e., emergency diesel generators, several years have passed since the last analyses. These are very important components needed to stop a nuclear reactor safely and to cool it down during external power supply loses. Then trend analyses were conducted for the second time. The trend analyses were performed on 80 problem events with emergency diesel generators which had occurred in U.S. nuclear power plants in the five years from 2005 through 2009 among events reported in the Licensee Event Reports (LERs: event reports submitted to NRC by U.S. nuclear power plants) which have been registered in the nuclear information database of the Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (INSS) , as well as 40 events registered in the Nuclear Information Archives (NUCIA), which occurred in Japanese nuclear power plants in the same time period. It was learned from the trend analyses of the problem events with emergency diesel generators that frequency of defect occurrence are high in both Japanese and US plants during plant operations and functional tests (that is, defects can be discovered effectively in advance), so that implementation of periodical functional tests under plant operation is an important task for the future. (author)

  8. Development of reliability program for emergency diesel generators in domestic nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Ho; Jung, Hyun Jong; Choi, Kwang Hee; Hong, Seoung Yeul

    2001-01-01

    Surveillance tests of Emergency Diesel Generators (EDGs) in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) have been conducted periodically to verify the reliability and integrity of the EDGs, however, it was found that these surveillance methods were so conservative and severe as to accelerate the degradation of the EDGs. Hence, new regulatory guideline, Reg. Guide 1.9 Rev. 3, was established by the U.S. NRC to resolve these problems. But it requires the additional implementation of reliability program of the EDGs to improve the actual reliability of them. In Korea, the EDGs of Yonggwang nuclear units 3 and 4 were the first plant applying new Reg. guide 1.9 rev.3 and implementing EDG reliability program. Furthermore it is expected that new guideline for the EDGs will be applied to other EDGs of Korean NPPs. In this paper, this reliability program is described, and it can be used as a reference for other EDGs in Korean NPPs

  9. A reliability program for emergency diesel generators at nuclear power plants: Maintenance, surveillance, and condition monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofgren, E.V.; Henderson, W.; Burghardt, D.; Kripps, L.; Rothleder, B.

    1988-12-01

    This report is a companion report on NUREG/CR-5078, Volume 1, ''A Reliability Program for Emergency Diesel Generators at Nuclear Power Plants: Program Structure.'' The purpose of this report is to provide technical findings and insights related to: failure evaluation, troubleshooting, maintenance, surveillance, and condition monitoring. Examples and recommendations are provided for each of these areas based on actual emergency diesel generator (EDG) operating experience and the opinions of diesel generator experts. This report expands the more general guidance provided in Volume 1. In addition, a discussion of EDG interactions with other plant systems (e.g., instrument, air, service water, dc power) is provided since experience has shown that these support systems and their operation can adversely affect EDG reliability. Portions of this report have been designed for use by onsite personnel for evaluating operational characteristics of EDGs. 5 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Process improvement of the emergency operating procedures for Embalse Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, A.D.; Pomerantz, M.; Moreno, C., E-mail: dmariotti@na-sa.com.ar, E-mail: mpomerantz@na-sa.com.ar, E-mail: cmoreno@na-sa.com.ar [Embalse Nuclear Power Plant, Nuclear Safety Dept., Embalse (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) package of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant (CNE) were made entirely by the plant staff since the beginning of its operation. With the emergence of Severe Accidents Guidelines (SAMG) and the latest events related to Fukushima, the EOP philosophy should include a new concept. It should consider that the EOP may be unsuccessful and an exit to the SAMG must be necessary. However, due to abnormal event mitigation using EOP is the way to prevent the beginning of a severe accident, EOP always had significant relevance in the plant documentation. For this reason, added to the overall requirement of an exit to the SAMG, it emerges a general review of the use efficiency of the EOP during an abnormal event. For this reason, a comprehensive process improvement has emerged using the operating experience, full-scope simulator training of the control room staff, advances in technology and the arrival of new generations. In this work, fundamental changes, new document format and ergonomic redesign for validation at full-scope simulator and use at main control room of new EOP for CNE are presented. (author)

  11. Brief introduction of nuclear power plant emergency system EmInfoSys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yuhua; Zhao Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear safety is the lifeline of nuclear energy and nuclear technology, nuclear accident emergency response is the last line of nuclear security defense, and is one of the important measures to ensure the healthy development of the nuclear energy safety. The establishment of complete function, sensitive reaction and efficient emergency management system for operation of nuclear and radiation accidents is an important task of nuclear security. From 2001 China Techenergy Co., Ltd. participated in the Qinshan, Tianwan, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Haiyang, Taishan, Fangchenggang, Sanmen, etc. nuclear emergency projects, and the nuclear emergency EmInfoSys (emergency management information system) platform was developed with independent intellectual property rights. A brief introduction about EmInfoSys system was performed in this paper. (authors)

  12. Criteria for preparation and evaluation of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a common reference and interim guidance source for: state and local governments and nuclear facility operators in the development of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other Federal agency personnel engaged in the review of state, local government, and licensee plans and preparedness

  13. Modifications of Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany based upon new version of Emergency Operating Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldorf, R.

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of 'living Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany Project' being performed by Nuclear Research Institute Rez during 1997 is planned to reflect on Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 basis on impact of Emergency Response Guidelines (as one particular event from the list of other modifications) on Plant Safety. Following highlights help to orient the reader in main general aspects, findings and issues of the work that currently continues on. Older results of Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany have revealed that human behaviour during accident progression scenarios represent one of the most important aspects in plant safety. Current effort of Nuclear Power Plants Dukovany (Czech Republic) and Bohunice (Slovak Republic) is focussed on development of qualitatively new symptom-based Emergency Operating Procedures called Emergency Response Guidelines Supplier - Westinghouse Energy Systems Europe, Brussels works in cooperation with teams of specialist from both Nuclear Power Plants. In the frame of 'living Probabilistic Safety Assessment-1 Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany Project' being performed by Nuclear Research Institute Rez during 1997 is planned to prove on Probabilistic Safety Assessment -1 basis an expected - positive impact of Emergency Response Guidelines on Plant Safety, Since this contract is currently still in progress, it is possible to release only preliminary conclusions and observations. Emergency Response Guidelines compare to original Emergency Operating Procedures substantially reduce uncertainty of general human behaviour during plant response to an accident process. It is possible to conclude that from the current scope Probabilistic Safety Assessment Dukovany point of view (until core damage), Emergency Response Guidelines represent adequately wide basis for mitigating any initiating event

  14. Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    In co-operation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on ''Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies'' in the period August 27-August 31, 2001. The Summer School was intended for scientists, engineers and technicians working for nuclear installations, engineering companies, industry and members of universities and research institutes, who wanted to broaden their nuclear background by getting acquainted with Man-Technology-Organisation-related subjects and issues. The Summer School should also serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the nuclear field. The following presentations were given: (1) Overview of the Nuclear Community and Current issues, (2) The Elements of Safety Culture; Evaluation of Events, (3) Quality Management (QM), (4) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PSA), (5) Human Behaviour from the Viewpoint of Industrial Psychology, (6) Technical tour of the Halden Project Experimental Facilities, (7) Human Factors in Control Room Design, (8) Computerised Operator Support Systems (COSSs) and (9) Artificial Intelligence; a new Approach. Most of the contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  15. Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In co-operation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on ''Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies'' in the period August 27-August 31, 2001. The Summer School was intended for scientists, engineers and technicians working for nuclear installations, engineering companies, industry and members of universities and research institutes, who wanted to broaden their nuclear background by getting acquainted with Man-Technology-Organisation-related subjects and issues. The Summer School should also serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the nuclear field. The following presentations were given: (1) Overview of the Nuclear Community and Current issues, (2) The Elements of Safety Culture; Evaluation of Events, (3) Quality Management (QM), (4) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PSA), (5) Human Behaviour from the Viewpoint of Industrial Psychology, (6) Technical tour of the Halden Project Experimental Facilities, (7) Human Factors in Control Room Design, (8) Computerised Operator Support Systems (COSSs) and (9) Artificial Intelligence; a new Approach. Most of the contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures

  16. Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    In co-operation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on ''Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies'' in the period August 27-August 31, 2001. The Summer School was intended for scientists, engineers and technicians working for nuclear installations, engineering companies, industry and members of universities and research institutes, who wanted to broaden their nuclear background by getting acquainted with Man-Technology-Organisation-related subjects and issues. The Summer School should also serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the nuclear field. The following presentations were given: (1) Overview of the Nuclear Community and Current issues, (2) The Elements of Safety Culture; Evaluation of Events, (3) Quality Management (QM), (4) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PSA), (5) Human Behaviour from the Viewpoint of Industrial Psychology, (6) Technical tour of the Halden Project Experimental Facilities, (7) Human Factors in Control Room Design, (8) Computerised Operator Support Systems (COSSs) and (9) Artificial Intelligence; a new Approach. Most of the contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  17. Human-Machine interface for off normal and emergency situations in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants (NPPs) have reported that a high percentage of all major failures in the plants are caused by human errors. Therefore, there has been much focus on elimination of human errors, enhancement of human performance, and general improvement of human machine interface (HMI). Both the utility management and the regulators are demanding improvement in this area. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Specialists' Meeting on 'Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in Nuclear Power Plants' was co-organized by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and the Korea Power Engineering Company, INC (KOPEC), and took place in Taejeon, Republic of Korea, 1999 October 26-28. Fifty eight participants, representing nine member countries reviewed recent developments and discussed directions for future efforts in the Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in NPPs. Twenty papers were presented, covering a wide spectrum of technical and scientific subjects including recent experience and benefits from Operational Experience with HMI, Development of HMI System, Licensing Issues for HMI and Future Development and Trends. (Author)

  18. Reevaluation of the emergency planning zone for nuclear power plants in Taiwan using MACCS2 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.; Yang, Y.-M.; Chen, I.-J.; Chen, H.-T.; Chuang, K.-S.

    2006-01-01

    According to government regulations, the emergency planning zone (EPZ) of a nuclear power plant (NPP) must be designated before operation and reevaluated every 5 years. Corresponding emergency response planning (ERP) has to be made in advance to guarantee that all necessary resources are available under accidental releases of radioisotope. In this study, the EPZ for each of the three operating NPPs, Chinshan, Kuosheng, and Maanshan, in Taiwan was reevaluated using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System 2 (MACCS2) developed by Sandia National Laboratory. Meteorological data around the nuclear power plant were collected during 2003. The source term data including inventory, sensible heat content, and timing duration, were based on previous PRA information of each plant. The effective dose equivalent and thyroid dose together with the related individual risk and societal risk were calculated. By comparing the results to the protective action guide and related safety criteria, 1.5, 1.5, and 4.5 km were estimated for Chinshan, Kuosheng, and Maanshan NPPs, respectively. We suggest that a radius of 5.0 km is a reasonably conservative value of EPZ for each of the three operating NPPs in Taiwan

  19. Human-Machine interface for off normal and emergency situations in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants (NPPs) have reported that a high percentage of all major failures in the plants are caused by human errors. Therefore, there has been much focus on elimination of human errors, enhancement of human performance, and general improvement of human machine interface (HMI). Both the utility management and the regulators are demanding improvement in this area. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Specialists' Meeting on 'Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in Nuclear Power Plants' was co-organized by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and the Korea Power Engineering Company, INC (KOPEC), and took place in Taejeon, Republic of Korea, 1999 October 26-28. Fifty eight participants, representing nine member countries reviewed recent developments and discussed directions for future efforts in the Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in NPPs. Twenty papers were presented, covering a wide spectrum of technical and scientific subjects including recent experience and benefits from Operational Experience with HMI, Development of HMI System, Licensing Issues for HMI and Future Development and Trends. (Author)

  20. Reliability of emergency alternating-current power systems at nuclear power plants: a discussion of NUREG/CR-2989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of emergency alternating-current power systems typical of most nuclear power plants was estimated by using fault-tree analysis of selected typical designs. The failure probabilities used in the fault trees were calculated from extensive historical data collected from Licensee Event Reports and from operating experience information obtained from nuclear plant licensees. Trends of diesel generator independent failure on demand are included. No one or two improvements can be made at all plants to increase significantly the industry-average emergency alternating-current power system reliability; the most beneficial improvements are varied and plant specific

  1. Diethylene-triamine-penta-acetate administration protocol for radiological emergency medicine in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation therapy of diethylene-triamine-penta-acetate (DTPA) should be initiated immediately to workers who have significant incorporation of plutonium, americium or curium in the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. A newly designed electric mesh nebulizer is a small battery-operated passive vibrating mesh device, in which vibrations in an ultrasonic horn are used to force drug solution through a mesh of micron-sized holes. This nebulizer enables DTPA administration at an early stage in the event of a radiation emergency from contamination from the above radioactive metals.

  2. Emergency preparedness for the accidental release of radionuclides from the Uljin Nuclear Power Plant in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soon-Ung; Lee, In-Hye; Joo, Seung Jin; Ju, Jae-Won

    2017-12-01

    Site specific radionuclide dispersion databases were archived for the emergency response to the hypothetical releases of 137 Cs from the Uljin nuclear power plant in Korea. These databases were obtained with the horizontal resolution of 1.5 km in the local domain centered the power plant site by simulations of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) with the Unified Model (UM)-Local Data Assimilation Prediction System (LDAPS). The Eulerian Dispersion Model-East Asia (EDM-EA) with the UM-Global Data Assimilation Prediction System (UM-GDAPS) meteorological models was used to get dispersion databases in the regional domain. The LPDM model was performed for a year with a 5-day interval yielding 72 synoptic time-scale cases in a year. For each case hourly mean near surface concentrations, hourly mean column integrated concentrations, hourly total depositions for 5 consecutive days were archived by the LPDM model in the local domain and by the EDM-EA model in the regional domain of Asia. Among 72 synoptic cases in a year the worst synoptic case that showed the highest mean surface concentration averaged for 5 days in the LPDM model domain was chosen to illustrate the emergency preparedness to the hypothetical accident at the site. The simulated results by the LPDM model with the 137 Cs emission rate of the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident for the first 5-day period were found to be able to provide prerequisite information for the emergency response to the early phase of the accident whereas those of the EDM-EA model could provide information required for the environmental impact assessment of the accident in the regional domain. The archived site-specific database of 72 synoptic cases in a year could have a great potential to be used as a prognostic information on the emergency preparedness for the early phase of accident. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. From reliability to maintenance of emergency generator sets in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyraud, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The particular conditions of operation of emergency generator sets in a nuclear energy plant induce to take up a strategy of supervision and of maintenance very different of the one recommended for production generator sets. Mechanical and thermal pulls are affected by the size of the set and the choice of rotation running in respect of the wanted power and the response time requirements for the security of nuclear reactor. Reliability studies are helpful to define the strategy of supervision tests. The importance of the number of starts with respect to the running time requires the introduction of the idea of equivalent hours for the definition of maintenance periods. The security of the equipment and the upholding of the reliability at a value close to the optimum impose rigorous choices and strict conditions of supervision and maintenance [fr

  4. Development of a standard communication protocol for an emergency situation management in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Cheol, E-mail: charleskim@kaeri.re.k [Integrated Risk Assessment Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150, Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea [Integrated Risk Assessment Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150, Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hanjeom; Kim, Yoon Joong [YGN Nuclear Power Division Training Center, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, 517 Kyemari, Hongnong-eup, Yeongkwang-gun, Chonnam 513-880 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Correct communication between main control room (MCR) operators is an important factor in the management of emergency situations in nuclear power plants (NPPs). For this reason, a standard communication protocol for the management of emergency situations in NPPs has been developed, with the basic direction of enhancing the safety of NPPs and the standardization of communication protocols. To validate the newly developed standard communication protocol, validation experiments with 10 licensed NPP MCR operator teams was performed. From the validation experiments, it was found that the use of the standard communication protocol required more time, but it can contribute to the enhancement of the safety of NPPs by an operators' better grasp of the safety-related parameters and a more efficient and clearer communication between NPP operators, while imposing little additional workloads on the NPP MCR operators. The standard communication protocol is expected to be used to train existing NPP MCR operators without much aversion, as well as new operators.

  5. Mental workload measurement for emergency operating procedures in digital nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qin; Wang, Yang; Song, Fei; Li, Zhizhong; Dong, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    Mental workload is a major consideration for the design of emergency operation procedures (EOPs) in nuclear power plants. Continuous and objective measures are desired. This paper compares seven mental workload measurement methods (pupil size, blink rate, blink duration, heart rate variability, parasympathetic/sympathetic ratio, total power and (Goals, Operations, Methods, and Section Rules)-(Keystroke Level Model) GOMS-KLM-based workload index) with regard to sensitivity, validity and intrusiveness. Eighteen participants performed two computerised EOPs of different complexity levels, and mental workload measures were collected during the experiment. The results show that the blink rate is sensitive to both the difference in the overall task complexity and changes in peak complexity within EOPs, that the error rate is sensitive to the level of arousal and correlate to the step error rate and that blink duration increases over the task period in both low and high complexity EOPs. Cardiac measures were able to distinguish tasks with different overall complexity. The intrusiveness of the physiological instruments is acceptable. Finally, the six physiological measures were integrated using group method of data handling to predict perceived overall mental workload. The study compared seven measures for evaluating the mental workload with emergency operation procedure in nuclear power plants. An experiment with simulated procedures was carried out, and the results show that eye response measures are useful for assessing temporal changes of workload whereas cardiac measures are useful for evaluating the overall workload.

  6. Design of test and emergency procedures to improve operator behaviour in French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffon-Fouco, M.; Gomolinski, M.

    1982-09-01

    The incident analyses performed in French nuclear power plants high-lighted that deficiencies in the design of procedures are frequent causes of human errors. The process for developing new guidelines for the writing of test and emergency procedures is presented: this process is based on operators interviews and observations at the plants or at simulators. The main principles for the writing of procedures are developed. For example: - the elaboration of a procedure for action and of a separate educational procedure, - the coordination of crew responses, - the choice of vocabulary, graphs, flow charts and so on as regards the format. Other complementary actions, such as the training of operators in the use of procedures, are described

  7. Design of test and emergency procedures to improve operator behavior in French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffon-Fouco, M.; Gomolinski, M.

    1983-01-01

    The incident analyses performed in French nuclear power plants high-lighted that deficiencies in the design of procedures are frequent causes of human errors. The process for developing new guidelines for the writing of test and emergency procedures is presented: this process is based on operators interviews and observations at the plants or at simulators. The main principles for the writing of procedures are developed. For example: the elaboration of a procedure for action and of separate educational procedure; the coordination of crew responses; and the choice of vocabulary, graphs, flow charts and so on as regards the format. Other complementary actions, such as the training of operators in the use of procedures, are described

  8. Effects of soft control in the nuclear power plants emergency operation condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Harbi, Mohamed Ali Salem; Kim, Ar Ryum; Jang, Inseok; Seong, Poong Hyun; Shirouzu, Shigenori; Katayama, Sotetsu; Kang, Hyun Gook

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effect of touch screen, known as ESCM, which is a soft control, on emergency operation of nuclear plants. ► Experiments clearly show the occurrence of more human errors in ESCM task groups. ► Physiological measures (ECG, EEG, nose temperature) were analyzed. ► Higher stress levels were consistently observed in ESCM task groups. - Abstract: In addition to the evolution from buttons and switches to the computer-based consoles, the operator may interact with the plant via soft controls. Soft controls are input interfaces connected with control and display systems that are mediated by software, rather than by direct physical connections. However use of soft control may cause unknown difficulties of operation and provide new opportunities of human errors. This study is to investigate the effect of the new interface to human errors in the emergency operation. Based on the emergency operation procedure, the human error modes were identified by using systematic human error reduction and prediction approach. Experiments with 21 graduate students in main control room mockup in the nuclear engineering departments of universities in UAE and Korea were conducted to observe the operators’ behavior resulted from the use of new input interface (Emergency safety feature-component control system Soft Control Module, ESCM). Physiological parameters such as electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram and skin temperature were measured to assess the stress level of the subjects. The experimental results showed more human errors during ESCM tasks than non-ESCM tasks. The analysis of the physiological measurements also demonstrated that subjects were in high stress level during the ESCM tasks in comparison with non-ESCM tasks. It is notable that this study was performed with graduate students without consideration of their expertise levels. Different behaviors of the novice and the expert groups were also discussed

  9. A knowledge based operator support system for emergency conditions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh Babu, C.; Subramanium, K.

    1992-01-01

    The control centres of the operating Indian nuclear power plants contain a large number of indicators and controls spread over many panels. In the event of onset of an emergency condition, there results a profusion of information, both numeric and symbolic. The operator may succumb to an information and cognitive overload that may be compounded by a lack of knowledge. The failure to apply knowledge and reasoning to solve an operational problem can lead to human error, which has been a major contributing factor in nuclear accidents. From the viewpoint of Artificial Intelligence, human error occurs if the operational problem requires computing resources that exceed human capabilities. The application of Artificial Intelligence, particularly expert systems, to nuclear power plant control room activities has considerable potential to reduce operator error and improve safety and reliability. The purpose of this paper is to discuss an investigative study of the feasibility of developing an operator support system incorporating Artificial Intelligence techniques. An information processing model of such a system, herein designated as Knowledge Based Operator Support System - KBOSS, employing expert systems technology, has been developed. The features of this system are described, and issues involved in its development are discussed. (author). 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  10. NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Probanz, B; Foster, K T; Simpson, M; Vogt, P; Aluzzi, F; Dillon, M; Homann, S

    2012-02-14

    This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff

  11. NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, G.; Nasstrom, J.S.; Probanz, B.; Foster, K.T.; Simpson, M.; Vogt, P.; Aluzzi, F.; Dillon, M.; Homann, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff members

  12. Emergency management in the countries without nuclear power plants: the Italian case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzero, S.; Giaimo, G.; Pizzi, R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Italy stopped the activity of its nuclear power plants (NPPs), built up starting from the '60s, alter the accident occurred at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986 and the suspension of the use of nuclear energy for pacific motives, sanctioned by a popular referendum in 1987. They are going to be decommissioned in the near future. In spite of this, Italian people are still exposed to a risk of nuclear or radiological accidents, due to the presence of 1) research centres making use of nuclear reactors (although without critical masses); 2) industrial plants and storage centres that manage radioactive and nuclear materials; 3) the chance of foreign ships with nuclear engines mooring in some Italian harbours. Actually, the worst scenario deals with the possibility of an accident occuring at a foreign NPP, especially if the NPP is located less than 200 Km from the national boundaries. Inside this distance, there are 13 NPPs (see picture 1, next page), 6 located in France, 4 in Switzerland, 2 in Germany and 1 in Slovenia. An accident occurring at one of those NPPs is the basic scenario of the 'National plan of the countermeasures against radiological emergencies', which was prepared in 1996 and is now under review. The plan reports in detail the actions that national and local authorities must take in order to contain the effects of a possible radioactive plume diffusion coming from foreign countries: 1) the procedures to activate the relevant authorities; 2) the command and control sequence for the emergency management (which put at the top the Department of Civil Protection - DCP - established in the Presidency of the Council of Ministers); 3) the procedures for the information exchange between authorities and the people likely to be involved in the accident. In addition to the planned procedures, the Italian authorities have many technical and scientific tools at their disposal to survey disasters. Since the 80s, Italy has been provided with a national automatic

  13. Emergency response and nuclear risk governance. Nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents; Notfallschutz und Risk Governance. Zur nuklearen Sicherheit bei Kernkraftwerksunfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlen, Johannes

    2014-07-01

    The present study entitled ''Emergency Response and Nuclear Risk Governance: nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents'' deals with issues of the protection of the population and the environment against hazardous radiation (the hazards of nuclear energy) and the harmful effects of radioactivity during nuclear power plant accidents. The aim of this study is to contribute to both the identification and remediation of shortcomings and deficits in the management of severe nuclear accidents like those that occurred at Chernobyl in 1986 and at Fukushima in 2011 as well as to the improvement and harmonization of plans and measures taken on an international level in nuclear emergency management. This thesis is divided into a theoretical part and an empirical part. The theoretical part focuses on embedding the subject in a specifically global governance concept, which includes, as far as Nuclear Risk Governance is concerned, the global governance of nuclear risks. Due to their characteristic features the following governance concepts can be assigned to these risks: Nuclear Safety Governance is related to safety, Nuclear Security Governance to security and NonProliferation Governance to safeguards. The subject of investigation of the present study is as a special case of the Nuclear Safety Governance, the Nuclear Emergency governance, which refers to off-site emergency response. The global impact of nuclear accidents and the concepts of security, safety culture and residual risk are contemplated in this context. The findings (accident sequences, their consequences and implications) from the analyses of two reactor accidents prior to Fukushima (Three Mile Iceland in 1979, Chernobyl in 1986) are examined from a historical analytical perspective and the state of the Nuclear Emergency governance and international cooperation aimed at improving nuclear safety after Chernobyl is portrayed by discussing, among other topics, examples of &apos

  14. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 4. Radiological emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, W.W.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report reviews the state of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California. Attention is given to the role of Federal agencies, particularly the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in planning for both on and off site emergency measures and to the role of State and local agencies for off site planning. The relationship between these various authorities is considered. Existing emergency plans for nuclear power plants operating or being constructed in California are summarized. The developing role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission is examined

  15. A database for human performance under simulated emergencies of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2005-01-01

    Reliable human performance is a prerequisite in securing the safety of complicated process systems such as nuclear power plants. However, the amount of available knowledge that can explain why operators deviate from an expected performance level is so small because of the infrequency of real accidents. Therefore, in this study, a database that contains a set of useful information extracted from simulated emergencies was developed in order to provide important clues for understanding the change of operators' performance under stressful conditions (i.e., real accidents). The database was developed under Microsoft Windows TM environment using Microsoft Access 97 TM and Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0 TM . In the database, operators' performance data obtained from the analysis of over 100 audio-visual records for simulated emergencies were stored using twenty kinds of distinctive data fields. A total of ten kinds of operators' performance data are available from the developed database. Although it is still difficult to predict operators' performance under stressful conditions based on the results of simulated emergencies, simulation studies remain the most feasible way to scrutinize performance. Accordingly, it is expected that the performance data of this study will provide a concrete foundation for understanding the change of operators' performance in emergency situations

  16. Emergency planning requirements and short-term countermeasures for commercial nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, F.; Hogan, R.; Mohseni, A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit, the United States Nuclear Regulatory's Commission (NRC's) emergency planning regulations are now considered and an important part of the regulatory framework for protecting the public health and safety. Many aspects of the countermeasures are presented: Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ), off-Site emergency planning and preparedness, responsibilities of nuclear power plants operators and states and local government. Finally, protective action recommendations are given as well as the federal response to an emergency. The authors noted that the use of potassium iodide is not considered as an effective countermeasure for the public protection in the US. (TEC). 1 fig

  17. Nuclear power plants in Germany. Recent developments in off-site nuclear emergency preparedness and response; Kernkraftwerke in Deutschland. Neue Entwicklungen im anlagenexternen Notfallschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gering, Florian [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim/Neuherberg (Germany). Abt. SW 2.2 Entscheidungshilfesysteme, Lageermittlung und Kommunikation

    2014-10-15

    The reactor accident in Fukushima, Japan, in 2011 triggered a thorough review of the off-site emergency preparedness and response for nuclear power plants in Germany. ''Off-site emergency preparedness and response'' includes all actions to protect the public outside the fence of a nuclear power plant. This review resulted in several changes in off-site emergency preparedness and response, which are briefly described in this article. Additionally, several recent activities are described which may influence emergency preparedness and response in the future.

  18. Guidance for emergency planning in nuclear power plants; Vaegledning foer insatsplanering i kaerntekniska anlaeggningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Tommy; Ekdahl, Maria (Ringhals AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Ringhals has been a model for this study, but the purpose has been to make the report applicable at all nuclear power plants in Sweden. The work has been done in close co-operation with the Swedish nuclear power plants and Rescue Services in the nuclear power municipalities Oesthammar, Oskarshamn, and Varberg. The internal fire brigade at the nuclear power plants has also been involved. A document will also be published as a further guidance at efforts of the type fires, which are mentioned in the enclosed document. After a fire in a switchgear room in 2005 the need of making the existing effort planning more effective at nuclear power plants was observed. The idea with the planning is to plan the effort in order to give the operational and emergency staff a good and actual support to come to a decision and to start the mission without delay. The risk information is showed by planning layouts, symbols and drawings as basis, give risk information and effort information. The effort information shows outer arrangements, manual action points, fire installations, passive fire safety etc. The risk information is shown by risk symbols. Their purpose is to give a fast overview of the existing risks. Reactor safety effects is the ruling influence if an effort has to be done in order to secure safety for a third person. In order to make an effort in an area personal risks for rescue staff, such as electricity risks, radiological risks, chemicals and gas bottles with compressed gases, has to be eliminated. For complicated missions detailed instructions are needed in order to handle specific risks. In a group discussion different people with pertinent knowledge has to value which problematic efforts need detailed instruction. Missions that have to be analyzed in a work group as above are: fire may affect the reactor safety, fire that may threaten the structural integrity, chemical discharge with big consequence on environment/third person and handling of gas system (compressed

  19. New aspects in the radiological emergency plan outside the Nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alva L, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Mexican government through the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards has imposed to the Federal Commission of Electricity to fulfill the requirement of having a functional Emergency Plan and under the limits that the regulator organisms in the world have proposed. The PERE (Plan of External Radiological Emergency) it has been created for the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde, Mexico

  20. Facilities and medical care for on-site nuclear power plant radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear power plant introduces risks of injury or accidents that could also result in the exposure of personnel to radiation or radioactive materials. It is important in such an event to have adequate first aid and medical facilities, supplies, equipment, transportation capabilities and trained personnel available to provide necessary care. This standard provides guidance for first aid during an emergency and for initial medical care of those overexposed to penetrating radiation or contaminated with radioactive material or radionuclides. Recommendations cover facilities, supplies, equipment and the extent of care on-site, where first aid and initial care may be provided, and off-site at a local hospital, where further medical and surgical care may be provided. Additional recommendations are also provided for the transportation of patients and the training of personnel. A brief discussion of specialized care is provided in an appendix

  1. Method and apparatus for emergency cooling of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Masanori; Chino, Koichi; Sato, Chikara; Inoue, Hisamichi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the cooling effect of spray water by eliminating the flow control effect for spray water due to increase in the steam pressure and flowing the entire spray water into the reactor core. Constitution: Upon emergency cooling of a reactor core by spraying coolants from above at the loss of coolant accident in a nuclear power plant, coolant is sprayed in a state where the temperature upon flowing into the reactor core is below the saturated temperature after heat exchange with vapors rising from the core. This enables to apply spray water always at a temperature and a flow rate in the range of whole volume falling irrespective of the water temperature in a pressure suppression pool. (Furukawa, Y.)

  2. Role of security during safety-related emergencies at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardwell, R.G.; Moul, D.A.; McBride, J.A.; Wilson, C.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report provides an analysis of the literature and on-site data gathering relating to the actions of security forces at licensed nuclear power plants during safety-related emergencies. Literature search findings and results of on-site data gathering are furnished and subjected to analysis. Taking into account the analysis provided, appropriate recommendations are presented. Recommendations are keyed as to how improvements can be made in the regulatory approach and licensee planning and procedures as they relate to the subject matter under examination. In addition, certain technological problems and issues are examined within the context of the study. Appendices provide the results of the literature search, an annotated bibliography, the Data Collection Guide used, and additional details regarding certain aspects of the study that are relevant for further explication of the body of the report

  3. A Method for Analyzing the Communications among Nuclear Power Plant Operators in Emergency Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Cheol; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2006-01-01

    Communications among MCR operators is an important factor for understanding how and how well MCR operators manage abnormal situations in NPPs. As mentioned by Ujita et al., the performance of MCR operators in emergency situations in NPPs is strongly affected by not only the cognitive process for each operator, but also by communications and collaboration among operators. Many researches have been conducted to find out the relation between the communication of human operators and the performance of them. But, it seems that few researches have been conducted on in what way the communication among MCR operators should be performed to enhance the performance of them. In this paper, we propose an analysis method for evaluating the quality of communications among MCR operators in nuclear power plants (NPPs)

  4. Nuclear power plant with improved arrangements for the removal of post fission and emergency heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, E.; Vinzens, K.

    1977-01-01

    This is concerned with additional equipment for emergency heat removal in a sodium cooled reactor, which operates on failure of the post fission heat removal system. The space for pressure relieving spaces and concrete masses as heat sinks within the reactor cell is no longer required. In this nuclear power plant, a heat exchanger chain transmits heat and power: There is a first sodium circuit between pressure vessel and the first heat exchanger, a second one between the first and second heat excahngers, and a third (Steam) circuit with turbine, condenser and return pump. A fourth circuit connects the secondary side of the condenser with a cooling tower. There is a threee component heat excahgner in the primary circuit after the first heat exchanger, which is built around the first heat exchanger, and is sealed into an unloading space. This space is situated next to the reactor cell and is above the operating level of the sodium in the pressure vessel. It is connected to the cell by an upper duct, normally closed by a bursting disc, and by a lower duct. In the three comopnent heat exchanger, a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic mixture transmits the heat from sodium pipes to water pipes. In normal operation it is used for steam superheating or feedwater preheating. The three component heat exchanger bridges the first and second heat exchangers as an emergency heat exchanger. If in such a case the post fission heat removal has failed, the sodium evaporating in the pressure vessel flows into the unloading space and condenses on the ribs of the emergency heat exchanger. The post fission heat is fed by the water secondary medium directly into the tertiary circuit. The sodium condensate flows back from the unloading space via the lower duct into the reactor cell and maintains the emergency level there. (RW) 891 RW [de

  5. Atmospheric release advisory capability pilot project at two nuclear power plants and associated state offices of emergency preparedness. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    A project to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) limited service with commercial nuclear power plants and their associated state offices of emergency preparedness is discussed. Preliminary planning, installation and testing of the ARAC site facilities at Indian Point Nucler Power Station, New York State; at New York State Office of Emergency Preparedness, Albany, New York; at Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, California; and at the State of California Office of Emergency Services, Sacramento, California, are summarized. ARAC participation in the Robert E. Ginna nuclear generating plant accident in New York on January 25, 1982, is discussed. The ARAC system is evaluated with emphasis on communications, the suite of models contained within the ARAC system, and the staff. The implications of this project in designing the next-generation ARAC system to service federal and state needs are assessed

  6. Reliability evaluation of emergency AC power systems based on operating experience at U.S. nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowsky, P. W. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1986-02-15

    The reliability of emergency AC power Systems has been under study at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and by its contractors for several years. This paper provides the results of work recently performed to evaluate past U.S. nuclear power plant emergency AC power System reliability performance using system level data. Operating experience involving multiple diesel generator failures, unavailabilities, and simultaneous occurrences of failures and out of service diesel generators were used to evaluate reliability performance at individual nuclear power plants covering a 9 year period from 1976 through 1984. The number and nature of failures and distributions of reliability evaluation results are provided. The results show that plant specific performance varied considerably during the period with a large number achieving high reliability performance and a smaller number accounting for lower levels of reliability performance. (author)

  7. Emergency Mitigating Equipments - Post Fukushima Actions at Canadian Nuclear Power Plants - Portable AC Power Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucetic, Jasmina; Kameswaran, R.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident in 2011, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission set up a Task Force to evaluate operational, technical and regulatory implications on Canadian NPPs. While accepting that the risk from beyond-design-basis accidents (BDBA) at Canadian NPPs is very low, the Task Force identified a number of areas where additional improvements or confirmatory assessments would further enhance safety. As a result, a set of 36 Fukushima Action Items (FAIs) were assigned to the licensees. This paper focuses on the FAI related to electrical power system enhancements to address a total loss of all AC Power leading to a possibility of loss of heat sinks (i.e. Station Blackout). This required the licensees to implement the following: - Additional back up power supplied by portable diesel generator(s) to allow key instrumentation and control equipment and key electrical loads to remain operable; - Provisions for a storage and timely transportation and connection of the portable generator(s) to the applicable units; - Provisions for testing of the portable generator; - Provisions for fuelling of portable generators; - Provisions such as panels, receptacles, and connectors to quickly deploy the portable generators to plant system, and separate feeder cables route to avoid a common mode failure; - Load shedding strategy to extend the existing station's battery life to ensure that the connection of portable generators can be completed before the batteries are depleted; - Provisions to supply water to steam generators and Irradiated Fuel Bay using portable pumps; The paper will also provide a brief description of Electrical power systems of the Canadian NPPs designed to satisfy the high safety and reliability requirements for nuclear systems, which are based on the following: - 2 group design philosophy (Group 1 and Group 2 Electrical Power Systems) - 2 separate groups of onsite emergency generators (Class III Standby generators and Emergency

  8. Plant incident progress scenario analysis for nuclear emergency exercise of Fukui Pref. 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatebe, Yasumasa; Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Minami, Noritoshi

    2010-01-01

    Severe accident scenario was analyzed to assist the nuclear emergency exercise of Fukui prefecture in 2009. The evaluation of the postulated disaster was evaluated based on analysis result, including the time of occurrence of specified events, response of the plant to the AM measures, etc. The evaluation results are as follows: (1) loss of core cooling took place about 7 hours after, abnormal leakage of fission products from containment vessel to the containment annulus started about 17 hours after and the disaster terminated about 46 hours after the initiation of the accident, (2) although multiple failures of the engineered safety system and failure of AM measures were postulated in the accident scenario, the integrity of the containment vessel could be maintained successfully for a long term, if the AM measures are taken to protect the containment vessel. (3) according to the evaluation of radiation dose rate during the emergency response assuming the operation of recirculation mode using containment spray A, the dose rate could be too high for the operators to work not only in the containment spray A area but also in the another containment spray heat exchanger and the residual heat removal system heat exchanger areas. (author)

  9. Emergency management for a nuclear power plant using fuzzy cognitive maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Laureano-Cruces, A.L.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A.; Espinosa-Martinez, E.-G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the application of fuzzy cognitive maps (FCM) to emergency operating procedures (EOPS), to represent the decision-making process during abnormal situations in a nuclear power plant (NPP). The decision-making process in a NPP is a complex process, due to the many elements involved in its operation, and the permanent attention demanded by its maintenance. At the present time, the decision making process in a NPP is analyzed and developed by reactor operators, based on a set of instructions as well as flow charts to mitigate the consequences of a broad range of transients, accidents and multiple equipment failures, whose main characteristic is to be linear representations of events within a scenario. One of the main objectives of this paper is to present a method based in FCM that could be applied in the development of EOPS, and show some simulations, specifically the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenario in a boiling water reactor (BWR) with the Mark II containment design was studied. The FCM-based method represents with high fidelity the expert reasoning (the human expert is very important) and the interpretation of the results aids instantly to the reactor operators in the surveillance of the reactor proper functionality due that they have the responsibility of the decision taking in emergency situations. The simulations results show that the FCM predict properly the phenomenon in the reactor vessel and primary containment

  10. Emergency ac power systems operating experience at U.S. nuclear power plants - 1976 through 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battle, R. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

    1986-02-15

    Success and failure data of test and emergency starts of emergency ac power sources (diesel generators) at U.S. nuclear power plants were collected and evaluated to estimate diesel generator reliability parameters. A regression analysis of the estimates of the probability of failure to start based on surveillance test data from 1976 through 1983 indicates that the probability of failure to start has been decreasing. However, the reliability of diesel generator performance during losses of off-site power for 1981 through 1983 was less than expected based on the test data estimates. The failures that occurred during losses of off-site power were reviewed to determine why the calculated failure to start was greater than expected, and possible explanations for this high value are presented. The subsystems involved In diesel generator subsystem failures were categorized to determine whether there were any dominant failure modes. The results indicate that further significant Improvement in diesel generator reliability will require improvement of many subsystems. (author)

  11. Goal-oriented functional tree structure for nuclear power plant emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, R.V.; Roush, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Guidelines for development and implementation of emergency response plans do not provide the planner/implementer with an adequate overview of the functions to be achieved or a measure of their relative importance. To provide a framework in which this importance can be recognized, understood and quantified, a logical goal oriented tree structure has been developed which integrates and gives a clear visual representation of the functions required to meet the emergency preparedness objective. The tree considers a spectrum of both high and low probability events which may require mitigation both onsite and offsite. The ultimate objective: to Minimize the Ill Effects of a Nuclear Power Plant Incident is satisfied by functions concerned with prevention and mitigation of human injury and property damage. A complete and detailed structure which specifies the subfunctions and success paths which satisfy these functions has been developed. Institutional activities such as planning, training, procedure development, monitoring and decision making do not enter the tree directly. Instead, the logic structure defines the extent to which these activities must be considered and the information systems and decision models required for successful implementation of the plan. The top structure of the tree is presented and a few branches are considered in detail. The impact of institutional activities, information systems, etc. is discussed. Tree quantification is considered

  12. Application of the methodology of safety probabilistic analysis to the modelling the emergency feedwater system of Juragua nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troncoso, M.; Oliva, G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the methodology developed in the framework of the national plan of safety probabilistic analysis (APS) to the emergency feed water system for the failures of small LOCAS and external electrical supply loss in the nuclear power plant is illustrated in this work. The facilities created by the ARCON code to model the systems and its documentation are also expounded

  13. Counter Action Procedure Generation in an Emergency Situation of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofuku, A.

    2018-02-01

    Lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident revealed various weak points in the design and operation of nuclear power plants at the time although there were many resilient activities made by the plant staff under difficult work environment. In order to reinforce the measures to make nuclear power plants more resilient, improvement of hardware and improvement of education and training of nuclear personnel are considered. In addition, considering the advancement of computer technology and artificial intelligence, it is a promising way to develop software tools to support the activities of plant staff.This paper focuses on the software tools to support the operations by human operators and introduces a concept of an intelligent operator support system that is called as co-operator. This paper also describes a counter operation generation technique the authors are studying as a core component of the co-operator.

  14. Some defaults of OILs under emergency conditions in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Pengfei; Zhong Chongjun; Gou Quanlu; Wu Deqiang

    2005-01-01

    Based on the formulae presented in IAEA-TECDOC-955 for operational intervention levels (OILs) under emergency conditions in nuclear power plant (NPP) and by InterRAS1.3 computer code, this paper calculates OIL1 and OIL2 for two kinds of postulated severe accidents (core melt-containment integrity failure or leakage accident and SG integrity severe failure accident) of PWR NPP respectively. OIL1 and OIL2 are used to recommend for public evacuation and taking iodine-blocking agent during the period of plume exposure resulted from the above postulated severe accidents. The effects on OIL1 and OIL2 calculation results of related times (e.g. expected plume exposure time, beginning time of the radioactivity released into the environment), weather conditions (wind speed, height of mixing layer, stability, and rainfall), distance from release source and release patterns (release at low elevation and high elevation) are also discussed. On the basis of the calculation and discussion, this paper presents the relevant recommended defaults of OIL1 and OIL2 for above-mentioned postulated severe accidents, and also points out that OIL1 and OIL2 not only depend on the specific type of accidents, but also on the factors such as whether radioactivity are reduced before being released into the environment, so the defaults shall be presented for different accident types and specific conditions under which radioactivity are how reduced. (authors)

  15. Emerging sensor and I and C technologies for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Wood, R. T.; Freer, E.; Antonescu, C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a survey of emerging technologies in the field of instrumentation and controls (I and C). The survey findings give an overview of the state-of-the-art in selected technology focus areas for industrial, research, or scientific applications that are relevant to nuclear power plant I and C systems, and discuss potential regulatory impact for safety-related applications. Four technology focus areas are selected for review: Sensors and Measurement Systems; Radiation Hardness of Microprocessors and other Integrated Circuits; Diagnostics and Prognostics Systems; and High-Integrity Software. It is concluded that, while there have been considerable advances in digital I and C hardware, advances in software engineering have not kept pace with hardware. The authors anticipate advances in hardware (e.g., more accurate sensors, sophisticated on-line diagnostics, advances in rad-hard electronics) to influence some regulatory revisions (e.g., surveillance requirements, margins, calibration intervals). However, the state-of-the-art in software engineering has not advanced enough to warrant significant changes in the current position in software review requirements. (authors)

  16. Computer based virtual reality approach towards its application in an accidental emergency at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jun; Yao Qingshan

    1999-01-01

    Virtual reality is a computer based system for creating and receiving virtual world. As an emerging branch of computer discipline, this approach is extensively expanding and widely used in variety of industries such as national defence, research, engineering, medicine and air navigation. The author intends to present the fundamentals of virtual reality, in attempt to study some interested aspects for use in nuclear power emergency planning

  17. More safety for emergency diesel engines for the Belgium nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laire, Ch.; Scauflaire, O.; D'ans, G.; Moland, G. de; Bresseleers, J.

    2002-01-01

    Each nuclear plant in Belgium is equipped with a series of ultimate power supply (UPS) units, also called emergency power units. These consist of generators driven by multi-cylinder (typically 18) diesel engines, which are marine derivatives. Unlike marine applications, the steady-state load does not produce pulsating torques. However, these diesel engines are designed to start upon short notice following a blackout and reach full power within a few seconds to guarantee the availability or all safety valves and ventilators. Such sharp and quasi-cold starts, periodically performed to guarantee the UPS availability, may spell utter failures of the crank shaft, as demonstrated by a fatigue failure observed on the fillets connecting the crank pin to the web faces. The fillet cracks initiate in bending mode and then progress in torsion mode to excessive transient torques arising in the power train during successive starts. Aware of the potential risk and conforming to the Belgian nuclear safety rules, the plant operator of Doel sponsored the development of a nondestructive technique enabling the inspection of each fillet for cracks without first removing each piston rod from its crank pin. As a result, Laborelec developed a specific eddy-current probe which avoids fully dismantling the engine, as is done during ten-yearly overhauls with dye-checks for cracks. Inspecting crank shaft fillet integrity with this least obtrusive technique requires 24 hours per engine. It can thus be performed more frequently to prevent total crank shaft failures in time and monitor the engine fatigue caused following the mandatory monthly start-up tests. This promising technique may also find marine applications. Measuring the transient torque arising between the engine and the generator showed that this reached very high values shortly after starting the engine and injecting fuel at full throttle to reach full power within seconds. The pulsating torque of the 18-cylinders engine occurring 9

  18. Resources available for nuclear power plant emergencies under the Price-Anderson Act and the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Through a series of TABLETOP exercises and other events that involved participation by State and Federal organizations, the need was identified for further explanation of financial and other related resources available to individuals and State and local governments in a major emergency at a nuclear power plant. A group with representatives from the Nuclear Regulatory commission, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the American Nuclear Insurers/Mutual Atomic Energy Liability Underwriters was established to work toward this end. This report is the result of that effort. This document is not meant to modify, undermine, or replace any other planning document (e.g., the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan or the Federal Response Plan). Its purpose is to clarify issues that have surfaced regarding resources available under the Price-Anderson and Stafford Acts

  19. Recommended criteria for the evaluation of on-site nuclear power plant emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafortune, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    A review of existing Canadian and International emergency exercise evaluation criteria and approaches has been conducted. Based on the results of the review, criteria are proposed for the evaluation of on-site emergency exercises for Canadian nuclear power stations. The proposed criteria are performance-based. They are comprehensive, yet remain adaptable to all stations and accident scenarios. They are primarily aimed at radiological emergency exercises, but are entirely applicable to fire or other conventional exercises. This report also addresses evaluation preparation and methodology. (author). 21 refs., 6 tabs

  20. Situation-assessment and decision-aid production-rule analysis system for nuclear plant monitoring and emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gvillo, D.; Ragheb, M.; Parker, M.; Swartz, S.

    1987-01-01

    A Production-Rule Analysis System is developed for Nuclear Plant Monitoring. The signals generated by the Zion-1 Plant are considered. A Situation-Assessment and Decision-Aid capability is provided for monitoring the integrity of the Plant Radiation, the Reactor Coolant, the Fuel Clad, and the Containment Systems. A total of 41 signals are currently fed as facts to an Inference Engine functioning in the backward-chaining mode and built along the same structure as the E-Mycin system. The Goal-Tree constituting the Knowledge Base was generated using a representation in the form of Fault Trees deduced from plant procedures information. The system is constructed in support of the Data Analysis and Emergency Preparedness tasks at the Illinois Radiological Emergency Assessment Center (REAC)

  1. Situation-Assessment And Decision-Aid Production-Rule Analysis System For Nuclear Plant Monitoring And Emergency Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvillo, D.; Ragheb, M.; Parker, M.; Swartz, S.

    1987-05-01

    A Production-Rule Analysis System is developed for Nuclear Plant Monitoring. The signals generated by the Zion-1 Plant are considered. A Situation-Assessment and Decision-Aid capability is provided for monitoring the integrity of the Plant Radiation, the Reactor Coolant, the Fuel Clad, and the Containment Systems. A total of 41 signals are currently fed as facts to an Inference Engine functioning in the backward-chaining mode and built along the same structure as the E-Mycin system. The Goal-Tree constituting the Knowledge Base was generated using a representation in the form of Fault Trees deduced from plant procedures information. The system is constructed in support of the Data Analysis and Emergency Preparedness tasks at the Illinois Radiological Emergency Assessment Center (REAC).

  2. Cross-connected onsite emergency A.C. power supplies for multi-unit nuclear power plant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martore, J.A.; Voss, J.D.; Duncil, B.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, utility management, both at the corporate and plant operations levels, have reinforced their commitment to assuring increased plant reliability and availability. One means of achieving this objective involves an effective preventive maintenance program with technical specifications which allow implementation of certain preventive maintenance without plant shutdown. To accomplish this, Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has proposed a design change for San Onofre nuclear generating station (SONGS) units 2 and 3 to permit on emergency diesel generator for one unit to perform as an available AC power source for both units. Technical specifications for SCE's SONGS units 2 and 3, as at most nuclear power plants, currently require plant shutdown should one of the two dedicated onsite emergency AC power sources (diesel generators) become inoperable for more than 72 hours. This duration hinders root cause failure analysis, tends to limit the flexibility of preventive maintenance and precludes plant operation in the event of component failure. Therefore, this proposed diesel generator cross-connect design change offers an innovative means for averting plant shutdown should a single diesel generator become inoperable for longer than 72 hours. (orig./GL)

  3. Dose assessment for emergency workers in early phase of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, Nahid; Ahangari, Rohollah; Kasesaz, Yaser; Noori-kalkhoran, O. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Reactor Research School

    2017-11-15

    In the case of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FNP) accident, the radioactive material was released from reactor units 1-3 and transported to short and long distances due to the atmospheric pathways-motions. Power sources for monitoring posts were lost due to earthquake and tsunami. Based on air dose rates and other data measured by monitoring cars, the amount of radioactive material released to the atmosphere from the power station was obtained. The atmospheric dispersion and the transport model used in the RASCAL code, estimate the radionuclide concentrations downwind, both in the air and on the ground due to deposition. The calculated concentrations are then used to estimate the projected doses for workers in vicinity of the accident area in the first minutes of accident time. For dose modeling, we assumed that each worker was 15 min in vicinity of FNP in accident situation, once without and once with protective clothes or respirator. According to Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) report six workers had received doses over 250 mSv (309 to 678 mSv) apparently due to inhaling Iodine-131 fume. In this paper the calculated dose results using RASCAL code shows that, if emergency workers who work in early phase of accident had not used protective equipment, for 15 min, inhalation doses from iodine in their thyroid gland up to 12 March afternoon would have been 520 mSv. A comparison between calculation results and TEPCO report shows that dose calculated virtually is nearly equal to TEPCO measurement results.

  4. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Planning for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper aims to stimulate discussions between nuclear engineers and the radiological protection professions in order to facilitate planning for nuclear emergencies. A brief review is given of the response to nuclear accidents. Studying accidents can lead to prevention, but some effort must be put into emergency response. Such issues as decontamination and decommissioning, socio-economic consequences, education and training for nuclear personnel and exercises and drills, are raised. (UK)

  6. The evolution and improvements of the external emergency plans of Angra dos Reis nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goes, Alexandre Gromann de; Araujo, Jefferson Borges, E-mail: gromann@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jeferson@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/CGRC), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Reatores e do Ciclo Combustivel

    2015-07-01

    The scenery that now has been configuring in the area of science and nuclear technology in the society, with their obstacles and their evolution tendencies, their philosophical discussions around fundamental concepts, and the necessity to evolve the capacity in emergency response is described in this paper. Some obstacles related to the acceptance of the nuclear energy are mentioned and some proposed strategies are also presented, as well as, specific politics for the analyzed case. One can conclude that it is imperative, that the opinion and public perception of the risk, associated with radioactive facilities should be considered and that the debate continues involving legislators, operators and the public in general. (author)

  7. The evolution and improvements of the external emergency plans of Angra dos Reis nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goes, Alexandre Gromann de; Araujo, Jefferson Borges

    2015-01-01

    The scenery that now has been configuring in the area of science and nuclear technology in the society, with their obstacles and their evolution tendencies, their philosophical discussions around fundamental concepts, and the necessity to evolve the capacity in emergency response is described in this paper. Some obstacles related to the acceptance of the nuclear energy are mentioned and some proposed strategies are also presented, as well as, specific politics for the analyzed case. One can conclude that it is imperative, that the opinion and public perception of the risk, associated with radioactive facilities should be considered and that the debate continues involving legislators, operators and the public in general. (author)

  8. Activities of research group on radiological aspects of emergency countermeasures in the nuclear accident of Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urabe, Itsumasa

    2012-01-01

    Radiation effects research group of 'Nuclear safety' investigation committee has been working after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster on evaluating the emission rate and the diffusion of radioactive materials, on collecting, analyzing and evaluating the information on radioactive materials in the environment, on measuring the radiation dose at the state of emergency, on managing the exposure of habitants and disaster-prevention staff, on collaborating with related associations, and on making proposals on information release and actions against the disaster. At the international symposium by the 'Nuclear safety' investigation committee on November, 2011, the following issues were presented: Application of the concept of ICRP, Release of radioactive materials into the air, Evaluation of spatial dose distribution, Diffusion of radioactive materials in the sea, Evaluation of the exposure of the habitants, and Radiation measurement at the state of emergency (J.P.N.)

  9. The development of emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR Candu type of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mursid Djokolelono.

    1976-01-01

    Emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR-Candu type of nuclear power plant are reviewed. In PWR and BWR the emergency cooling can be catagorized as active high pressure, active low pressure, and a passive one. The PWR uses components of the shutdown cooling system: whereas the BWR uses components of pressure suppression contaiment. HWR Candu also uses the shutdown cooling system similar to the PWR except some details coming out from moderator coolant separation and expensive cost of heavy water. (author)

  10. Accident management in the case of serious emergencies in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    On-site emergency planning comprises all action taken in a nuclear power station to identify beyond-design base accidents at an early stage and reliably, to keep it under control and overcome it with the minimum of damage. The individual papers set out the basic terminology, the thermohydraulic processes in the cooling circuits during severe incidents, action to maintain the integrity of the containment, the potential of expert systems, simulator training and new developments for simulating accident conditions. (DG) [de

  11. Test and maintenance of the emergency power supply in the nuclear power plant Biblis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotthoff, K.; Huren, H.

    1986-01-01

    Besides design and construction test and maintenance play an important role for the availability of the emergency power supply. As an example test and maintenance provided for the emergency power supply in a German 4-loop PWR will be described. In general one has to differentiate between test and maintenance performed during power operation of the plant and those carried out during the refuelling outage. For both periods of operation detailed information will be given including type, extent and frequency of test and maintenance work. The results of test and maintenance up to now will be discussed. (authors)

  12. Test and maintenance of the emergency power supply in the nuclear power plant Biblis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotthoff, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit - GRS mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, D-5000 Koeln 1, Cologne (Germany); Huren, H. [Rheinisch-Westfaelisches Elektrizitaetswerk AG, Betriebsverwaltung Biblis, Biblis (Germany)

    1986-02-15

    Besides design and construction test and maintenance play an important role for the availability of the emergency power supply. As an example test and maintenance provided for the emergency power supply in a German 4-loop PWR will be described. In general one has to differentiate between test and maintenance performed during power operation of the plant and those carried out during the refuelling outage. For both periods of operation detailed information will be given including type, extent and frequency of test and maintenance work. The results of test and maintenance up to now will be discussed. (authors)

  13. Verification of voltage/ frequency requirement for emergency diesel generator in nuclear power plant using dynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, J.S.; Roh, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: One major cause of the plant shutdown is the loss of electrical power. The study is to comprehend the coping action against station blackout including emergency diesel generator, sequential loading of safety system and to ensure that the emergency diesel generator should meet requirements, especially voltage and frequency criteria using modeling tool. This paper also considered the change of the sequencing time and load capacity only for finding electrical design margin. However, the revision of load list must be verified with safety analysis. From this study, it is discovered that new load calculation is a key factor in EDG localization and in-house capability increase. (author)

  14. Analysis of the emergency plan of Angra dos Reis Nuclear Power Plants: a critical view related to accessibility and mobility of people with special needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Luanda C.A.; Correa, Samanda C.A.; Santos, Geissa; Souza, Edmilson M.

    2014-01-01

    This work intends to make a critical analysis of the emergency plan of the Angra dos Reis Nuclear Power Plants related to appropriate transportation, accommodation and infrastructure for people with special needs

  15. Analysis of human performance observed under simulated emergencies of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea; Kim, Jae Whan; Ha, Jae Joo

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have continuously and commonly revealed that human performance is decisive factor affecting the safety of complicated process systems. Subsequently, extensive effort has been spent to suggest serviceable countermeasures for human performance related problems under emergencies. However, several obstacles including very limited number of available data have hindered researchers from elucidating effective ways to cope with human performance related problems. In this study, human performance data under simulated emergencies have been extracted using a full scope simulator located in the reference NPP. The main purpose of this study is to provide plant-specific and domain-specific human performance data that can be used to premeditate human performance related problems under emergencies. To accomplish this goal, over 100 records that were collected from retraining sessions for licensed MCR operators have been analyzed by the time-line and protocol analysis technique. As a result, many kinds of useful information that can play a remarkable role in scrutinizing human performance related problems have been secured. Although it is still careful to make some predictions about human performance under a real situation on the basis of that under a simulated situation. However, it is also true that the simulator is a basic tool in observing human behaviors under emergencies. Thus, it is strongly believed that human performance data obtained from this study will be a concrete foundation in scrutinizing the change of human performance under emergencies

  16. Statistical inquiry on the reliability of emergency diesel stations in German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This statistic inquiry is based on 692 occurrances in 40 diesel stations of 10 German nuclear power plants. Various parameters influencing the failure behaviour of diesel stations were investigated on only significant plant-specific influences and the impact of diesel station circuitry on failure behaviour were established. According to the results of this inquiry, running time, start-up number and increasing operational experience do not apparently influence the failure behaviour of diesel stations. The expected failure probability of diesel stations varies with the different nuclear power plants. Taking into account both start-up and operational failures, (with monthly inspections and running times of up to 2 h), this value is in the range of 1.6 x 10 -2 to 1.7 x 10 -3 per application. Considering failure data of all diesel stations, the failure probability (start-up and operational failures) is 8.1 x 10 -3 per application. On account of the two common-mode failures registered, a common-mode failure probability of 10 -3 was established. The inquiry also showed that non-availability of diesel stations is essentially determined by maintenance intervals. (orig.) [de

  17. Severe accident modeling and offsite dose consequence evaluations for nuclear power plant emergency planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.H.; Feng, T.S.; Huang, K.C. [National Tsing-Hua Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wang, J.R. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.H. [Industrial Tech. Res. Inst., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Shih, C., E-mail: ckshih@ess.nthu.edu.tw [National Tsing-Hua Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated the roles of Firewater Addition System and Passive Flooder in ABWR severe accidents, such as LOCA and SBO. The results are apparent that Firewater System is vital in the highly unlikely situation where all AC are lost. Also in this paper, we present EPZDose, an effective and faster-than-real time code for offsite dose consequences predictions and evaluations. Illustrations with the release from our severe accident scenario show friendly and informative user's interface for supporting decision makings in nuclear emergency situations. (author)

  18. Emerging nuclear suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sands, A.

    1990-01-01

    Efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons have usually taken two tracks: The traditional approach has concentrated on a potential proliferant's perceived need for nuclear technology and possibly weapons; a second approach has targeted the supply side of the proliferation equation. The issue being examined in this book---emerging nuclear suppliers---falls between these two approaches. The potential proliferants have emerged as possible unrestrained suppliers of nuclear materials and technology. They threaten the entire nonproliferation regime by their exporting, not their weapons development. Analyzing and understanding the issue of emerging suppliers requires a refined definition of suppliers in general. The simple dichotomy of traditional versus emerging suppliers is no longer an adequate framework for analysis. Suppliers differ significantly in their technical capabilities, experience, and regime involvement, and these distinctions result in different nuclear export policies

  19. Control room, emergency control system and local control panels in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The requirements on planning and construction of control boards including ergonomic-technical designing are specified in this rule. The specifications put the requirements on the design of place, process and environment of work, which are mentioned in the sections 90 and 91 of the labor-management relations act, into more concrete terms for the safety-relevant control panels as work places in a nuclear power station. The work places at control panels are not considered as video workstations in the sense of the 'Safety Rules for Video Workstations in the Office Sector' published by the General Association of the Industrial Trade Associations. The requirements are based on the operation and information technology realized at present in control panels of stationary nuclear power plants. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Knowledge-based framework for procedure synthesis and its application to the emergency response in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    In this dissertation a nuclear power plant operator is viewed as a knowledge based problem solver. It is shown that, in responding to an abnormal situation, an operator typically solves several problems, for example, plant status monitoring, diagnosis, sensor data validation, consequence prediction, and procedure synthesis. It is proposed that, in order to respond to unexpected situations and handle procedure failures the capability to synthesize and modify procedures dynamically or in runtime is required. A knowledge based framework for dynamically synthesizing procedures (DPS), a knowledge representation language to apply DPS framework for real problems (DPSRL), and a framework for emergency procedure synthesis (FEPS) for nuclear power plants based on DPS are developed. The DPS framework views the task of synthesis as a process of selecting predefined procedures to match the needs of the dynamically changing plant conditions. The DPSRL language provides knowledge organization and representation primitives required to support the DPS framework. Specifically, it provides mechanisms to build various plant libraries and procedures to access information from them. The capabilities and the use of DPS, DPSRL, and FEPS are demonstrated by developing an experimental expert system for a typical boiling water reactor and analyzing its performance for various selected abnormal incidents

  1. Building Up an On-Line Plant Information System for the Emergency Response Center of the Hungarian Nuclear Safety Directorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegh, Janos; Major, Csaba; Horvath, Csaba; Hozer, Zoltan; Adorjan, Ferenc; Lux, Ivan; Horvath, Kristof

    2002-01-01

    The main design features, services, and human-machine interface characteristics are described of the CERTA VITA on-line plant information system developed and installed by KFKI AEKI at the Nuclear Safety Directorate (NSD) of the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) in cooperation with experts from the NSD. The Center for Emergency Response, Training, and Analysis (CERTA) located at the headquarters of NSD, Budapest, Hungary, was established in 1997. The center supports the NSD installation, radiological monitoring, and advisory team in case of nuclear emergencies, with appropriate hardware and software for communication, diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction. The vital information transfer and analysis (VITA) system represents an important part of the CERTA, as it provides for the continuous remote inspection of the four VVER-440/V213 units of the Hungarian Paks nuclear power plant (NPP). The on-line information system maintains a continuous data link with the NPP through a managed leased line that connects CERTA to a gateway computer located at the Paks NPP. The present scope of the system is a result of a 4-yr development project: In addition to the basic safety parameter display functions, the VITA system now includes an on-line break parameter estimation module, an extensive training package based on simulated transients, and on-line data transfer capabilities to feed accident diagnosis/analysis codes

  2. Application of the failure modes and effects analysis technique to the emergency cooling system of an experimental nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao Junior, Osmar; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e

    2009-01-01

    This study consists on the application of the failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), a hazard identification and a risk assessment technique, to the emergency cooling system (ECS), of an experimental nuclear power plant. The choice of this technique was due to its detailed analysis of each component of the system, enabling the identification of all possible ways of failure and its related consequences (in order of importance), allowing the designer to improve the system, maximizing its security and reliability. Through the application of this methodology, it could be observed that the ECS is an intrinsically safe system, in spite of the modifications proposed. (author)

  3. Implementation of a radiological emergency monitoring system for Bruce Power nuclear power plant (Canada); Implementierung eines radiologischen Umgebungsueberwachungsmesssystems fuer das Kernkraftwerk Bruce Power (Kanada)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madaric, M. [Saphymo GmbH, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Bruce Power nuclear power plant (BP NPP) in Ontario, Canada, is the largest nuclear generating station in the world, operating 8 nuclear reactors producing 6300 MW. In correlation with Bruce Power's safety culture, ''Safety first'' and continuous improvements are essential and substantial parts of the Bruce Power philosophy and management system. After the Fukushima nuclear accident the existing radiological emergency monitoring was analyzed and improved.

  4. Developments in the preparation of operating procedures for emergency conditions of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    In recent years a substantial effort has been devoted by the nuclear community to extend Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) to cover all conceivable events and to develop procedure formats that transmit the essential guidance to operators in an optimum way. The information given in this report is based upon the most recent developments in formulating and applying EOPs. It should therefore provide guidance to those involved in preparing or reviewing EOPs on the scope, technical basis, organization and format of such procedures. It also outlines the actions required to validate the adequacy and applicability of these procedures so that the correct operator actions are achieved. Examples are given to illustrate the developments in some Member States

  5. Development of Emergency Operating Strategies for Beyond Design Basis External Event(BDBEE)s in Korean WH Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Lee, Seung-Chan; Sung, Je-Joong; Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Soon-Joon; Hwang, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Chul; Park, Kang-Min [FNC Tech. Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Westinghouse developed and connected emergency operating procedures into a set of FLEX Support Guidelines(FSGs). This paper explains that Korean WH(Westinghouse) type nuclear power plants develop emergency operating strategies for ELAP(extended loss of all AC power), which include guidelines to use permanent and portable equipment as necessary to prevent core damage until AC power is restored from a reliable alternate source of AC power. The Korean emergency operating response strategies were developed to cope with a ELAP such as Fukushima event. The strategies include guidelines to prevent fuel damage using the FLEX equipment. Operators should take actions to prepare FLEX equipment within license basis SBO coping time. The loss of all AC power has been analyzed to identify the behavior of major NSSS process variables using RELAP computer code. The accident analysis showed that the plant does not result in fuel damage in 72 hours after an ELAP if operators take actions to cool RCS with opening of SG ADV in 5 gpm seal leak case. In this scenario, because ELAP is in process and all power cannot be used, operator should operate the FLEX equipment in order to actuate active equipment using the EOP fo SBO response. This strategy will prevent entering SAMG because this actions result in core cooling and stay in core exit temperature less than 650 .deg. C. Korean emergency operating guidelines(EOGs) will be developed using this strategies for response to the BDBEE.

  6. On-site emergency preparedness and response PLAN for EDF Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOSSARD, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    Considering nuclear safety concepts applied to reactor design and preventive measures taken by EDF during operation, and although the probability of a nuclear accident, even minor, on a unit is very low, it still cannot be considered nil. Therefore, the operator must be prepared, if such an event should occur, by defining and implementing a 'crisis organisation' in cooperation with the Safety Authorities. The crisis organisation has been set up in order to master and control the accident, i.e. in order to prevent, in real time, the accident developing into a more serious situation and to limit the consequences regarding technical and radiological concerns. EDF crisis organisation is integrated into the current organisation at local level as well as at national level. In addition to the operation team in 'shifts', crisis organisation is based 'on-call' personnel available at home (local level) or within a restricted area (national level). This organisation includes Managers, Experts, Participants EDF (+FRAMATOME), each of the them working, in case of an emergency, in his field of skills

  7. RODOS-based simulation of potential accident scenarios for emergency response management in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, H.; Gering, F.; Arnold, K.; Gerich, B.; Heinrich, G.; Welte, U.

    2016-09-15

    In the wake of the Fukushima disaster in March 2011, the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) started to investigate the potential radiological consequences of a ''Fukushima-like'' accident in a German nuclear power plant and conducted appropriate simulations in 2012. Between the end of 2012 and the end of 2013, the first study was followed by a much more detailed and comprehensive investigation comprising more than 5000 case studies for three nuclear power plant (NPP) sites in Germany. Based on these results the German Commission on Radiological Protection (SSK) released a new recommendation in March 2014 including an expansion of the current emergency planning zones for nuclear power plants in Germany. The key results of this study with respect to the maximum dimensions of the affected areas where dose criteria may be exceeded are described below. The following results are based on the largest nuclear release scenario ''FKA'' (INES scale 7): - Threshold levels for deterministic effects and high doses (effective doses higher than 1000 mSv) can be reached or exceeded within a distance of about 3 km on average. - The emergency reference level for the intervention ''Evacuation'' can be reached or exceeded within a distance of up to 9 to 18 km (adults) and/or up to 14 to 24 km (infants) on average (the indicated interval describes the minimum and maximum levels of the median value at all three NPP sites). - The emergency reference level for the intervention ''Sheltering'' can be reached or exceeded within a distance of up to 62 to 80 km (adults) and/or up to 91 to 114 km (infants) on average. - The emergency reference level for the intervention ''Stable iodine prophylaxis'' can be exceeded within a distance of up to 24 to 34 km (adults) and/or up to 148 to 161 km (infants and pregnant women) on average.

  8. The emerging nuclear suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, a growing amount of attention has been paid to a small group of mostly developing countries that have come to be called the emerging nuclear suppliers. Argentina and Brazil, China and South Korea, India and Pakistan, Spain and Yugoslavia have frequently been mentioned in this category. Their actual and potential nuclear export dealings and policies have been the subject of academic writings and policy papers, of scholarly symposia and exchanges at meetings of the traditional nuclear suppliers. With foundation and other support, UCLA's Center for International and Strategic Affairs has begun a major project to develop a database on the transactions, policies, and export control institutions of the emerging suppliers. This chapter provides some guidelines for policy toward the emerging nuclear suppliers

  9. Identification and Evaluation of Human Factors Issues Associated with Emerging Nuclear Plant Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Brown, William S.

    2009-01-01

    This study has identified human performance research issues associated with the implementation of new technology in nuclear power plants (NPPs). To identify the research issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were prioritized into four categories based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts representing vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. The study also identifies the priority of each issue and the rationale for those in the top priority category. The top priority issues were then organized into research program areas of: New Concepts of Operation using Multi-agent Teams, Human-system Interface Design, Complexity Issues in Advanced Systems, Operating Experience of New and Modernized Plants, and HFE Methods and Tools. The results can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas to support the safe operation of new NPPs.

  10. A human error analysis methodology, AGAPE-ET, for emergency tasks in nuclear power plants and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Whan; Jung, Won Dea [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    This report presents a procedurised human reliability analysis (HRA) methodology, AGAPE-ET (A Guidance And Procedure for Human Error Analysis for Emergency Tasks), for both qualitative error analysis and quantification of human error probability (HEP) of emergency tasks in nuclear power plants. The AGAPE-ET is based on the simplified cognitive model. By each cognitive function, error causes or error-likely situations have been identified considering the characteristics of the performance of each cognitive function and influencing mechanism of PIFs on the cognitive function. Then, error analysis items have been determined from the identified error causes or error-likely situations to help the analysts cue or guide overall human error analysis. A human error analysis procedure based on the error analysis items is organised. The basic scheme for the quantification of HEP consists in the multiplication of the BHEP assigned by the error analysis item and the weight from the influencing factors decision tree (IFDT) constituted by cognitive function. The method can be characterised by the structured identification of the weak points of the task required to perform and the efficient analysis process that the analysts have only to carry out with the necessary cognitive functions. The report also presents the the application of AFAPE-ET to 31 nuclear emergency tasks and its results. 42 refs., 7 figs., 36 tabs. (Author)

  11. Criteria for preparation and evaluation of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants: Criteria for utility offsite planning and preparedness: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podolak, E.M. Jr.; Sanders, M.E.; Wingert, V.L.; Donovan, R.W.

    1988-09-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have added a supplement to NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1 that provides guidance for the development, review, and evaluation of utility offsite radiological emergency response planning and preparedness for those situations in which state and/or local governments decline to participate in emergency planning. While this guidance primarily applies to plants that do not have full-power operating licenses, it does have relevance to operating nuclear power plants

  12. OPERA-a human performance database under simulated emergencies of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea

    2007-01-01

    In complex systems such as the nuclear and chemical industry, the importance of human performance related problems is well recognized. Thus a lot of effort has been spent on this area, and one of the main streams for unraveling human performance related problems is the execution of HRA. Unfortunately a lack of prerequisite information has been pointed out as the most critical problem in conducting HRA. From this necessity, OPERA database that can provide operators' performance data obtained under simulated emergencies has been developed. In this study, typical operators' performance data that are available from OPERA database are briefly explained. After that, in order to ensure the appropriateness of OPERA database, operators' performance data from OPERA database are compared with those of other studies and real events. As a result, it is believed that operators' performance data of OPERA database are fairly comparable to those of other studies and real events. Therefore it is meaningful to expect that OPERA database can be used as a serviceable data source for scrutinizing human performance related problems including HRA

  13. Emergency cooling system for a nuclear reactor in a closed gas turbine plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutschi, H.U.

    1974-01-01

    In undisturbed operation of the closed gas turbine plant with compressor stages, reactor, and turbine, a compressor stage driven by a separate motor is following with reduced power. The power input this way is so small that the working medium is just blown through without pressure increase. The compressor stage is connected with the reactor by means of a reactor feedback pipe with an additional cooler and with the other compressor stages by means of a recuperator in the pipe between these and the turbine. In case of emergency cooling, e.g. after the rupture of a pipe with decreasing pressure of the working medium, the feedback pipe is closed short and the additional compressor stage is brought to higher power. It serves as a coolant blower and transfers the necessary amount of working medium to the reactor. The compressor stage is controlled at a constant torque, so that the heat removal from the reactor is adapted to the conditions of the accident. (DG) [de

  14. Identifying cognitive complexity factors affecting the complexity of procedural steps in emergency operating procedures of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinkyun; Jeong, Kwangsup; Jung, Wondea

    2005-01-01

    In complex systems such as a nuclear and chemical plant, it is well known that the provision of understandable procedures that allow operators to clarify what needs to be done and how to do it is one of the requisites to secure their safety. As a previous study in providing understandable procedures, the step complexity (SC) measure that can quantify the complexity of procedural steps in emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of a nuclear power plant (NPP) was suggested. However, the necessity of additional complexity factors that can consider a cognitive aspect in evaluating the complexity of procedural steps is raised. To this end, the comparisons between operators' performance data measured by the form of a step performance time with their behavior in carrying out the prescribed activities of procedural steps are conducted in this study. As a result, two kinds of complexity factors (the abstraction level of knowledge and the level of engineering decision) that could affect an operator's cognitive burden are identified. Although a well-designed experiment is indispensable for confirming the appropriateness of the additional complexity factors, it is strongly believed that the change of operators' performance data can be more authentically explained if the additional complexity factors are taken into consideration

  15. Identifying cognitive complexity factors affecting the complexity of procedural steps in emergency operating procedures of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jinkyun [Integrated Safety Assessment Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Duckjin-Dong, Yusong-Ku, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: kshpjk@kaeri.re.kr; Jeong, Kwangsup [Integrated Safety Assessment Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Duckjin-Dong, Yusong-Ku, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Wondea [Integrated Safety Assessment Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Duckjin-Dong, Yusong-Ku, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-08-01

    In complex systems such as a nuclear and chemical plant, it is well known that the provision of understandable procedures that allow operators to clarify what needs to be done and how to do it is one of the requisites to secure their safety. As a previous study in providing understandable procedures, the step complexity (SC) measure that can quantify the complexity of procedural steps in emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of a nuclear power plant (NPP) was suggested. However, the necessity of additional complexity factors that can consider a cognitive aspect in evaluating the complexity of procedural steps is raised. To this end, the comparisons between operators' performance data measured by the form of a step performance time with their behavior in carrying out the prescribed activities of procedural steps are conducted in this study. As a result, two kinds of complexity factors (the abstraction level of knowledge and the level of engineering decision) that could affect an operator's cognitive burden are identified. Although a well-designed experiment is indispensable for confirming the appropriateness of the additional complexity factors, it is strongly believed that the change of operators' performance data can be more authentically explained if the additional complexity factors are taken into consideration.

  16. Identifying cognitive complexity factors affecting the complexity of procedural steps in emergency operating procedures of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinkyun Park; Kwangsup Jeong; Wondea Jung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea). Integrated Safety Assessment Division

    2005-08-15

    In complex systems such as a nuclear and chemical plant, it is well known that the provision of understandable procedures that allow operators to clarify what needs to be done and how to do it is one of the requisites to secure their safety. As a previous study in providing understandable procedures, the step complexity (SC) measure that can quantify the complexity of procedural steps in emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of a nuclear power plant (NPP) was suggested. However, the necessity of additional complexity factors that can consider a cognitive aspect in evaluating the complexity of procedural steps is raised. To this end, the comparisons between operator' performance data measured by the form of a step performance time with their behavior in carrying out the prescribed activities of procedural steps are conducted in this study. As a result, two kinds of complexity factors (the abstraction level of knowledge and the level of engineering decision) that could affect an operator's cognitive burden are identified. Although a well-designed experiment is indispensable for confirming the appropriateness of the additional complexity factors, it is strongly believed that the change of operators' performance data can be more authentically explained if the additional complexity factors are taken into consideration. (author)

  17. Soil sampling and analytical strategies for mapping fallout in nuclear emergencies based on the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takahashi, Yoshio; Nguyen, Minh-Long

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident resulted in extensive radioactive contamination of the environment via deposited radionuclides such as radiocesium and 131 I. Evaluating the extent and level of environmental contamination is critical to protecting citizens in affected areas and to planning decontamination efforts. However, a standardized soil sampling protocol is needed in such emergencies to facilitate the collection of large, tractable samples for measuring gamma-emitting radionuclides. In this study, we developed an emergency soil sampling protocol based on preliminary sampling from the FDNPP accident-affected area. We also present the results of a preliminary experiment aimed to evaluate the influence of various procedures (e.g., mixing, number of samples) on measured radioactivity. Results show that sample mixing strongly affects measured radioactivity in soil samples. Furthermore, for homogenization, shaking the plastic sample container at least 150 times or disaggregating soil by hand-rolling in a disposable plastic bag is required. Finally, we determined that five soil samples within a 3 m × 3-m area are the minimum number required for reducing measurement uncertainty in the emergency soil sampling protocol proposed here. - Highlights: • Emergency soil sampling protocol was proposed for nuclear hazards. • Various sampling procedures were tested and evaluated in Fukushima area. • Soil sample mixing procedure was of key importance for measured radioactivity. • Minimum number of sampling was determined for reducing measurement uncertainty

  18. American National Standard: for facilities and medical care for on-site nuclear-power-plant radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This standard provides guidance for first aid during an emergency and for initial medical care of those persons on-site who are overexposed to penetrating radiation (irradiated). It also provides guidance for medical care of persons contaminated with radioactive material or radionuclides who may also be irradiated or injured as a result of an accident at a nuclear power plant. It provides recommendations for facilities, supplies, equipment, and the extent of care both on-site where first aid and initial care may be provided and off-site at a local hospital where further medical and surgical care may be provided. This initial care continues until either the patient is released or admitted, or referred to another, possibly distant, medical center for definitive care. Recommendations are also provided for the transportation of patients and the training of personnel. Recommendations for specialized care are considered to be beyond the scope of this standard on emergency medical care; however, since emergency and specialized care are related, a brief discussion of specialized care is provided in the Appendix

  19. Recommended criteria for the evaluation of on-site nuclear power plant emergency plans, volume II: criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A critical review of existing Canadian and international nuclear power plant (NPP) emergency plans, evaluation criteria, and approaches has been conducted to provide AECB staff with information which can be used to assess the adequacy of NPP on-site emergency response plans. The results of this work are published in two volumes. Volume I, Basis Document, provides the reasons why certain requirements are in place. It also gives comprehensive references to various standards.Volume II, Criteria, contains the criteria which relate to on-site actions and their integration with control room activities and the roles of off-site responsible organizations. The recommended criteria provide information on what is required, and not on how to accomplish the requirements. The licensees are given the latitude to decide on the methods and processes needed to meet the requirements. The documents do not address NPP off-site plans and response capability, or the control room emergency operating procedures and response capability. This report contains only Volume II: Criteria. 55 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  20. Proposal of modification of the Atucha I nuclear power plant's emergency power supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacio, Pedro; Dabove, Mario

    1989-01-01

    The emergency power supply system of Atucha I N.P.P. consists of three 50% diesel generators. During the transient from normal power supply to emergency power supply (approximately 15 seconds) an hydraulic generator takes care of the emergency system. By this way, the emergency busbars constitute themselves an interruption free system. The two emergency busbars work normally coupled. This proposal consists of the following modifications: 1) Add a new diesel generator in order to allow the operation with two diesel generators per busbar. 2) To work with the two emergency busbars not coupled as normal operation mode. 3) To eliminate the hydraulic generator from the emergency power supply system, in order to simplify the operation and to reduce the failure possibility. Without the hydraulic turbine generator, the emergency busbars loose the interruption free condition. For this reason, for the loads that are not able for this mode of operation and are connected to the emergency power supply system, two additional low-voltage interruption free busbars are necessary. Finally, this proposal is compared with the Atucha II N.P.P. emergency power supply system. (Author)

  1. American National Standard: for radiological emergency-preparedness exercises for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The development of emergency plans and procedures should provide for testing and evaluating the emergency response organization and decision making processes. To test and evaluate emergency plans and procedures, realistic scenarios should be used for drills or exercises. Emergency exercises are training activities that require a substantial effort to plan and coordinate effectively. The exercise trains personnel who would be expected to participate in the emergency response. Emergency exercises should be conducted as realistically as possible. Insofar as possible, the participants should not be notified in advance except where necessary to assure that the exercise will not cause injuries or property damage. A real emergency will naturally impart stress on emergency response personnel and their organizations. Exercises should be designed to duplicate this sense of stress insofar as practical. An important element of testing the emergency response is to ensure that provisions have been made for observation, evaluation, and critiquing each exercise. These evaluations and critiques should be used to improve and revise emergency plans and procedures where required

  2. Preparedness of the operating organization (licensee) for emergencies at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Guide outlines the principal elements in devising and implementing emergency plans so that actions to be taken in accordance with the plans ensure an orderly and timely decision-making process and the availability of essential personnel, equipment, supplies and services. Principal elements included in the Guide are: (1) An outline for the basis and content of emergency planning, and the activities to be covered; (2) The responsibilities and arrangements of the operating organization (licensee) in establishing and implementing the Operating Organization Emergency Plan; (3) The liaison between the operating organization (licensee), the regulatory body, and public authorities in relation to the Operating Organization Emergency Plan; (4) Detailed measures to protect persons on-site, and guidance with respect to protection of the public off-site; (5) Facilities and equipment to cope with the emergency situation; (6) Aspects relevant to maintaining the plan and the organization in operational readiness. Although this Guide does not consider emergencies related to the off-site transportation of radioactive materials or new or irradiated fuel, many of its recommendations may be useful in planning how to cope with such emergencies

  3. Communication in nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Masao

    1996-01-01

    In order to take protection measures smoothly at the time of emergency in nuclear power stations and others, it is necessary to prepare information communication facilities mutually among disaster prevention organizations including the state and information transmission network for residents in surrounding areas. The matters decided in ''the measures to be taken for the time being for the countermeasures to prevent disaster in nuclear power stations and others'' are shown. In order to avoid the congestion of communication, the exclusively used communication systems are adopted for disaster prevention organizations, in which facsimile is used to transmit graphic information. The data communication circuits for distributing SPEEDI are installed between Science and Technology Agency, Nuclear Power Safety Technology Center and respective prefectures. The routes, means and order of notices must be confirmed beforehand mutually among the related organizations. As to the general communication for disaster countermeasures, the communication systems in ministries and agencies are described. (K.I.)

  4. Necessities of the Development of a Database for the Communications Between Nuclear Power Plant Operators in Simulated Emergency Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Cheol; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2007-01-01

    Communications among main control room (MCR) operators is an important factor for understanding how and how well MCR operators manage abnormal or emergency situations in nuclear power plants (NPPs). As mentioned by many researchers, the performance of MCR operators in emergency situations in NPPs is strongly affected by not only the cognitive process of each operator, but also by communications and collaboration among operators. Despite of the importance of correct communications among NPP operators, the possibilities of human errors in communications have not received much attention. A representative example for the lack of interests in communication-related problems is the lack of considering communication-related human errors in human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. HRA methods are used, in general, to provide human error probabilities to probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of NPPs. In THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction), which was developed by Swain and Guttmann and currently is one of the most widely used HRA method, the human errors in communications are not directly considered. The human error probability (HEP) and error factor (EF) data that we could find as the most related ones to communication-related human errors are the estimated probabilities of errors in recalling oral instruction items which are not written down. But, it is obvious that the failure in recalling oral instruction items and misunderstanding oral instruction items are different error types

  5. Investigating the effect of communication characteristics on crew performance under the simulated emergency condition of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea; Yang, Joon-Eon

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the safety of large process control systems could be significantly affected by the communication characteristics of crews that have a responsibility for their operations. Accordingly, many researchers have spent huge amount of effort to grasp the relationship between the characteristics of crew communications and the associated crew performance. Unfortunately, in the case of nuclear power plants (NPPs), it seems that most of existing studies have tried to identify the relationship between the characteristics of crew communications and the associated crew performance using empirical observations without a firm technical underpinning. For these reasons, Park suggested a novel framework that is able to represent the characteristics of crew communications based on social network analysis (SNA) metrics. In order to confirm the appropriateness of the suggested framework, in this study, the characteristics of crew communications that are gathered from the simulated emergency condition of NPPs are additionally compared with the associated crew performance data. As a consequence, it is observed that there are significant relationships between communication characteristics and the associated crew performance. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that the characteristics of crew communications can be properly grasped using the suggested framework. - Highlights: ► Communication data of MCR operating crews are collected from a simulated emergency condition. ► Communication characteristics are represented by the associated SNA metrics. ► Identified communication characteristics are compared with the results of existing studies. ► SNA metrics are meaningful for explaining the characteristics of crew communications.

  6. Technical evaluation of the proposed changes in the technical specifications for emergency power sources for the Big Rock Point nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latorre, V.R.

    1979-12-01

    The technical evaluation is presented for the proposed changes to the Technical Specifications for emergency power sources for the Big Rock Point nuclear power plant. The criteria used to evaluate the acceptability of the changes include those delineated in IEEE Std-308-1974, and IEEE Std-450-1975 as endorsed by US NRC Regulatory Guide 1.129

  7. Nuclear medicine in emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansi, L.; Rambaldi, P.F.; Cuccurullo, V.; Varetto, T.

    2005-01-01

    The role of a procedure depends not only on its own capabilities but also on a cost/effective comparison with alternative technique giving similar information. Starting from the definition of emergency as a sudden unexpected occurrence demanding immediate action, the role of nuclear medicine (NM) is difficult to identify if it is not possible to respond 24h a day, 365 days a year, to clinical demands. To justify a 24 h NM service it is necessary to reaffirm the role in diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in the spiral CT era, to spread knowledge of the capabilities of nuclear cardiology in reliability diagnosis myocardial infraction (better defining admission and discharge to/from the emergency department), to increase the number of indications. Radionuclide technique could be used as first line, alternative, complementary procedures in a diagnostic tree taking into account not only the diagnosis but also the connections with prognosis and therapy in evaluating cerebral pathologies, acute inflammation/infection, transplants, bleeding, trauma, skeletal, hepatobiliary, renal and endocrine emergencies, acute scrotal pain

  8. A Human Performance Analysis on Emergency Tasks of a Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Wondea; Park, Jinkyun; Kim, Jae W.

    2007-01-01

    Considering risk-informed activities that require the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) quality to be as high as possible, an HRA should be performed by using a systematic method with realistic plant specific data to meet the requirements for risk-informed applications. In order to obtain more objective HRA results, data extracted from real experiences or simulators is essential. To support HRA activities and researches, we have developed a human performance database, OPERA (Operator Performance and Reliability Analysis). This paper introduces a study to analyze an operators' performance time, which is the most crucial input for estimating a human error probability of a post-initiating human failure event

  9. Review of environmental scenario planning for nuclear power plant emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, J.

    1996-11-01

    A prerequisite for the safe operation of the nuclear reactors is preparedness against accidents. To maintain this requirement activities in accidental situations are practised in various preparedness organisations together and separately in several annual site preparedness and larger rescue service exercises. This report accumulates planning practice of exercises and important aspects affecting on that. The principal target and partial aims of the exercise are set in good time. Exercises concern mostly the early phase of an accident. The radiological calculational methods of accident are based on the existing dose calculation models. The radiation safety points of view should be taken into account when off-site radiation situations are created so that alternative countermeasures could be weighed. Exercises include also activity on the field due to radiation monitoring patrols. When the real-time weather is employed the exercising of measurement patrols need to be reorganized. (orig.) (4 refs.)

  10. Structured information analysis for human reliability analysis of emergency tasks in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Dea; Kim, Jae Whan; Park, Jin Kyun; Ha, Jae Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    More than twenty HRA (Human Reliability Analysis) methodologies have been developed and used for the safety analysis in nuclear field during the past two decades. However, no methodology appears to have universally been accepted, as various limitations have been raised for more widely used ones. One of the most important limitations of conventional HRA is insufficient analysis of the task structure and problem space. To resolve this problem, we suggest SIA (Structured Information Analysis) for HRA. The proposed SIA consists of three parts. The first part is the scenario analysis that investigates the contextual information related to the given task on the basis of selected scenarios. The second is the goals-means analysis to define the relations between the cognitive goal and task steps. The third is the cognitive function analysis module that identifies the cognitive patterns and information flows involved in the task. Through the three-part analysis, systematic investigation is made possible from the macroscopic information on the tasks to the microscopic information on the specific cognitive processes. It is expected that analysts can attain a structured set of information that helps to predict the types and possibility of human error in the given task. 48 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  11. A reliability program for emergency diesel generators at nuclear power plants: Program structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofgren, E.V.; DeMoss, G.M.; Fragola, J.R.; Appignani, P.L.; Delarche, G.; Boccio, J.

    1988-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide technical guidelines for NRC staff use in the development of positions for evaluating emergency diesel generator (EDG) reliability programs. Such reviews will likely result following resolution of USI A-44 and GSI B-56. The diesel generator reliability program is a management system for achieving and maintaining a selected (or target) level of reliability. This can be achieved by: (1) understanding the factors that control the EDG reliability and (2) then applying reliability and maintenance techniques in the proper proportion to achieve selected performance goals. The concepts and guidelines discussed in this report are concepts and approaches that have been successful in applications where high levels of reliability must be maintained. Both an EDG reliability program process and a set of review items for NRC use are provided. The review items represent a checklist for reviewing EDG reliability programs. They do not, in themselves, constitute a reliability program. Rather, the review items are those distinctive features of a reliability program that must be present for the program to be effective

  12. Research of the improvement of the process, organization, etc. related to the emergency correspondence of JNES based on the cause analysis about emergency correspondence of JNES in case of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    At the time of the occurrence of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident, JNES implemented various emergency correspondences. On the other hand, various organizations published the report about the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. In them, the problems about the regulatory body's regulatory process, regulatory organization, etc. are also pointed out. JNES is a designated public institution. JNES is required to improve process, organization, etc. related to emergency correspondence continuously based on the lessons learned obtained from the emergency corresponding experience about the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident. Specifically, the following activities will be implemented in the 2014 and 2015 fiscal year. 1. Collect systematically and comprehensively the information about emergency correspondence of JNES in case of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident, and create the timeline of the event. 2. Specify problems and analyze human factors and organizational factors. 3. Specify the requirements for establishing a designated public institution's emergency correspondence based on the viewpoint of a human and an organization. 4. Publish the report which indicates collected information, the contents of analysis, proposals of improvement, etc. (author)

  13. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulova, T.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    The textbook focuses on the technology and the operating characteristics of nuclear power plants equiped with pressurized water or boiling water reactors, which are in operation all over the world at present. The following topics are dealt with in relation to the complete plant and to economics: distribution and consumption of electric and thermal energy, types and equipment of nuclear power plants, chemical processes and material balance, economical characteristics concerning heat and energy, regenerative preheating of feed water, degassing and condenser systems, water supply, evaporators, district heating systems, steam generating systems and turbines, coolant loops and pipes, plant siting, ventilation and decontamination systems, reactor operation and management, heat transfer including its calculation, design of reactor buildings, and nuclear power plants with gas or sodium cooled reactors. Numerous technical data of modern Soviet nuclear power plants are included. The book is of interest to graduate and post-graduate students in the field of nuclear engineering as well as to nuclear engineers

  14. Nuclear Power Plants | RadTown USA | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-12

    Nuclear power plants produce electricity from the heat created by splitting uranium atoms. In the event of a nuclear power plant emergency, follow instructions from emergency responders and public officials.

  15. Nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls nuclear power plant safety in Finland. In addition to controlling the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, STUK also controls refuelling and repair outages at the plants. According to section 9 of the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87), it shall be the licence-holder's obligation to ensure the safety of the use of nuclear energy. Requirements applicable to the licence-holder as regards the assurance of outage safety are presented in this guide. STUK's regulatory control activities pertaining to outages are also described

  16. Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patodi, Anuj; Parashar, Abhishek; Samadhiya, Akshay K.; Ray, Saheli; Dey, Mitun; Singh, K.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Recycle Board (NRB), Tarapur proposes to set up an 'Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant' at Tarapur. This will be located in the premises of BARC facilities. The project location is at coastal town of Tarapur, 130 Km north of Mumbai. Project area cover of INRP is around 80 hectares. The plant will be designed to process spent fuel received from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). This is the first large scale integrated plant of the country. INRP will process spent fuel obtained from indigenous nuclear power plants and perform left over nuclear waste disposal

  17. BORILAIN. Mobile device for automatic continuous supply of liquid injection system backup of a nuclear plant in emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacalle, J.; Traino, J.; Troeung, J.; Arnaldos, A.; Alcaraz, D. A.; Lopez, B.; Ponce, A. T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of the first automatic mobile device for the preparation of a neutron absorbing solution, and providing continuous, 30 days, of the injection system liquid reserve of a nuclear emergency. The work has been developed by GD Energy Services (GDES) for Electricite de France (EDF). (Author)

  18. Nuclear emergencies and protective actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, Klaus

    1995-01-01

    Although technical improvements have increased the safety of new and old nuclear power plants, many simultaneous component failures and/or human errors are improbable but possible. Both the plant (on-site) and the nearby area (off-site) have emergency plans. Rescue service authorities are responsible of the off-site. The main protective actions are sheltering, evacuation and iodine ingestion. The Loviisa off-site emergency plan assumes that a major part of this population takes care of their own protective actions; Rescue service authorities can then concentrate on the coordination activities and to those people who need help. To be able to carry out the protective actions timely and effectively the people should have information on radiation risk and emergency planning. In case of a potential accident the local population should follow the rescue service information and know how to shelter and how to evacuate themselves. Though there are many stockpiles of iodine pellets in the area the rescue service authorities recommend that each household should purchase iodine pellets for their own need. The utility and the rescue service authorities have distributed information brochures to all homes within 30 km from Loviisa NPP since 1990. This brochure gives information on radiation and protective actions in case of an accident. Because the brochures might not stay available and so also the local telephone book contains this information

  19. Reconstruction of the Radiation Emergency Medical System From the Acute to the Sub-acute Phases After the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojino, Mayo; Ishii, Masami

    2014-02-01

    The radiation emergency medical system in Japan ceased to function as a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, which has commonly become known as the "Fukushima Accident." In this paper, we review the reconstruction processes of the radiation emergency medical system in order of events and examine the ongoing challenges to overcoming deficiencies and reinforcing the system by reviewing relevant literature, including the official documents of the investigation committees of the National Diet of Japan, the Japanese government, and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, as well as technical papers written by the doctors involved in radiation emergency medical activities in Fukushima. Our review has revealed that the reconstruction was achieved in 6 stages from March 11 to July 1, 2011: (1) Re-establishment of an off-site center (March 13), (2) Re-establishment of a secondary radiation emergency hospital (March 14), (3) Reconstruction of the initial response system for radiation emergency care (April 2), (4) Reinforcement of the off-site center and stationing of disaster medical advisors at the off-site center (April 4), (5) Reinforcement of the medical care system and an increase in the number of hospitals for non-contaminated patients (From April 2 to June 23), and (6) Enhancement of the medical care system in the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant and the construction of a new medical care system, involving both industrial medicine and emergency medicine (July 1). Medical resources such as voluntary efforts, academic societies, a local community medical system and university hospitals involved in medical care activities on 6 stages originally had not planned. In the future, radiation emergency medical systems should be evaluated with these 6 stages as a basis, in order to reinforce and enrich both the existing and backup systems so that minimal harm will come to nuclear power plant workers or evacuees and that they will receive proper care. This

  20. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  1. Emergency management and the nuclear terrorism threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVito, D.A.; Suiter, L.

    1987-01-01

    Counterterrorism is not the province of the emergency manager. Generally law enforcement has that role. Instead, the emergency manager's role is crisis management; the responsibility is to be the focal point for the chief executive officer (mayor, governor, or national executive) regarding the protection of the population. Managers must be able to gather and synthesize sufficient information, rapidly and accurately, on which to base sound decisions. To do so, they must have a highly efficient, coordinated emergency management organization in place at the state and local levels of government, and there must be a workable plan for emergency operations that integrates all public safety forces into an effective response to all types of emergencies. A major goal of emergency management is to ensure that government is in control and that the public perceives that the system is working. All states have an emergency management organization at the state level, as do most counties and large cities. However, some states and local governments, particularly those that have nuclear power plants within their borders, are better staffed, equipped, and trained than others to deal with nuclear incidents. States with nuclear facilities have an emergency management organization, an emergency plan, and adequate communications, equipment, and trained personnel to handle a nuclear accident or incident at a plant. 21 references

  2. Report on the emergency evacuation review team on emergency response plans for the Perry and Davis-Besse nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a report by Ohio's Emergency Evacuation Review Team, at the request of Governor Richard Celeste. The Team concludes that the current emergency response plan for Ohio's reactors is inadequate to protect the public and recommends changes in the current emergency plant requirements. The report also includes a summary of the litigation that has occurred since Celeste withdrew his support for the plans, a list of experts consulted, and sources used to prepare the report. An important document, and a study which every state should undertake

  3. 'Present nuclear emergency responses in India: tracing requirements and guidelines suggested after Fukushima accident in regards to public and plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawale, Priyanka M.

    2014-01-01

    In this poster the primary initiative is to educate the public at large and instill confidence about the present Emergency Response Systems of DAE and the imminent agencies in India. Poster attempts to analyse present regulatory and safety systems, mechanisms like plant and site emergency response plans are in place to handle radiation emergencies and how public will not be affected in any manner. In India also we needed some supplementary provisions to cope up with major disasters in Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) apart from the existing one. Some of the NPPs are not under the UN safeguards, which can not import Uranium also need extra care and protection. Regulatory and safety functions of Atomic Energy in India are carried out by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (Atomic Energy Regulatory Board), the poster attempts to explain the present regulatory and safety mechanism under Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. We have the plant and site emergency response plans in place. The well planned functioning of these is demonstrated here. India is equipped with detail plans of emergency response system, to handle the radiation emergencies in public domain even at the locations where DAE facility is not available

  4. MOCAT project: support tool to the management of the emergencies in the nuclear power plant of Santa Maria of Garona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleja, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Santa Maria de Garona NPP, as part of its continuous improvement philosophy, has decided to undertake the modernization of its Technical Support Center (CAT with the aim of improving the emergency management, provided in the Internal Emergency Plan. To this end, Tecnatom, applying the know-how acquired and within its line of technological innovation, has designed the Technical Support Center modernization project, MOCAT, in collaboration with Garona NPP. This project is basically the application of new information and communications technologies to the management of the information available on the CAT, and the computerization of the procedures for the responsible from the different areas of the CAT, which it is going to contribute significantly to the improvement of the security, allowing a better understanding of the state of the plant in emergency as well as a faster and smoother decision making, and an improved training and education of those responsible for the CAT in emergency management. (Author) 8 refs.

  5. Pumps in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that pumps play an important role in nuclear plant operation. For instance, reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) should provide adequate cooling for reactor core in both normal operation and transient or accident conditions. Pumps such as Low Pressure Safety Injection (LPSI) pump in the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) play a crucial role during an accident, and their reliability is of paramount importance. Some key issues involved with pumps in nuclear plant system include the performance of RCP under two-phase flow conditions, piping vibration due to pump operating in two-phase flows, and reliability of LPSI pumps

  6. Hydrogen/oxygen injection stopping method for nuclear power plant and emergent hydrogen/oxygen injection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Ryoichi; Ota, Masamoto; Takagi, Jun-ichi; Hirose, Yuki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for suppressing increase of electroconductivity of reactor water during operation of a BWR type reactor, upon occurrence of reactor scram of the plant or upon stopping of hydrogen/oxygen injection due to emergent stoppage of an injection device so as not to deteriorate the integrity of a gas waste processing system upon occurrence of scram. Namely, when injection of hydrogen/oxygen is stopped during plant operation, the injection amount of hydrogen is reduced gradually. Subsequently, injection of hydrogen is stopped. With such procedures, the increase of electroconductivity of reactor water can be suppressed upon stoppage of hydrogen injection. When injection of hydrogen/oxygen is stopped upon shut down of the plant, the amount of hydrogen injection is changed depending on the change of the feedwater flow rate, and then the plant is shut down while keeping hydrogen concentration of feedwater to a predetermined value. With such procedures, increase of the reactor water electroconductivity can be suppressed upon stoppage of hydrogen injection. Upon emergent stoppage of the hydrogen/oxygen injection device, an emergent hydrogen/oxygen injection device is actuated to continue the injection of hydrogen/oxygen. With such procedures, elevation of reactor water electroconductivity can be suppressed. (I.S.)

  7. Nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkiewicz, M.; Navratil, J.

    The construction of a nuclear power plant is conditioned on territorial requirements and is accompanied by the disturbance of the environment, land occupation, population migration, the emission of radioactive wastes, thermal pollution, etc. On the other hand, a nuclear power plant makes possible the introduction of district heating and increases the economic and civilization activity of the population. Due to the construction of a nuclear power plant the set limits of negative impacts must not be exceeded. The locality should be selected such as to reduce the unfavourable effects of the plant and to fully use its benefits. The decision on the siting of the nuclear power plant is preceded by the processing of a number of surveys and a wide range of documentation to which the given criteria are strictly applied. (B.H.)

  8. Transient evaluation using EMTP at single open phase with the offsite power transformer for the emergency power supply systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    The emergency power supply systems of nuclear power plants, as the objects of this research, are critical in supplying stable electric power to such systems as the emergency core cooling system (ECCS), and in maintaining safety of the nuclear power reactor; this was apparent in the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) issued regulatory documents (BL 2012-011, IN 2012-032), and has commenced evaluations on newly discovered vulnerability in the design of power supply systems which cannot be detected with under-voltage protection relays, with certain kinds of configuration of coils and iron core structures, such as when the offsite power supply side is a Y-connection and the load side is a ⊿-connection etc., when the detection of single open phase fault with the circuit of a transformer which is without a ground fault connected to the offsite power supply system. This report uses simulation by the electro magnetic transients program (EMTP) and clearly describe the response at the time of the power supply single open phase without ground fault for various configuration of coils and various iron core structures of the three-phase transformer, and identify the important issues in the response of emergency power supply systems and the safety related components of representative domestic PWR plants when the single open phase fault occurred without ground fault. This report describes the results of the simulations of operations of the protection relays of the emergency power supply systems and the safety related components of representative a domestic PWR plant with EMTP. This report explains the method to detect open-phase when the transformer is no-load which United States Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed. As the detailed analyses data from EPRI related to the detection method concerned have not been disclosed officially yet, in this paper, the quantitative and detailed verification results

  9. Future of Nuclear Power: NRC emergency preparedness licensing activities agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, T.H.

    1995-01-01

    This talk summary addresses the issue of how future policies of the NRC will affect nuclear power in areas such as construction, emergency preparedness, and licensing. Specific topics covered include the following: Emergent EP licensing issues for operating nuclear Power Plants; 10CFR Part 52 and the process for licensing of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs); and potential revisions to emergency preparedness programs for future nuclear power plants

  10. Nuclear emergency preparedness in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The preparedness of utilities and government agencies at various levels for dealing with nuclear emergencies occurring at nuclear reactors in Canada is reviewed and assessed. The review is centered on power reactors, but selected research reactors are included also. Emergency planning in the U.S.A., Germany and France, and international recommendations on emergency planning are reviewed to provide background and a basis for comparison. The findings are that Canadians are generally well protected by existing nuclear emergency plans at the electric utility and provincial levels but there are improvements that can be made, mainly at the federal level and in federal-provincial coordination. Ten issues of importance are identified: commitment to nuclear emergency planning by the federal government; division of federal and provincial roles and responsibilities; auditing of nuclear emergency preparedness of all levels of government and of electric utilities; the availability of technical guidance appropriate to Canada; protective action levels for public health and safety; communication with the public; planning and response for the later phases of a nuclear emergency; off-site exercises and training; coordination of international assistance; and emergency planning for research reactors. (L.L.) 79 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Moreira, Y.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    The legal aspects of nuclear power plant construction in Brazil, derived from governamental political guidelines, are presented. Their evolution, as a consequence of tecnology development is related. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  12. Planning and preparedness for radiological emergencies at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, R.; Muzzarelli, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiological Emergency Preparedness (REP) Program was created after the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assists state and local governments in reviewing and evaluating state and local REP plans and preparedness for accidents at nuclear power plants, in partnership with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which evaluates safety and emergency preparedness at the power stations themselves. Argonne National Laboratory provides support and technical assistance to FEMA in evaluating nuclear power plant emergency response exercises, radiological emergency plans, and preparedness

  13. Barsebaeck power plant - safety and emergency measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A Swedish-Danish Committee on safety at the Swedish nuclear power plant Barsebaeck was established in 1979 in order to evaluate the nuclear safety at Barsebaeck with a view to the reactor accident at the Three-Mile-Island nuclear power plant March 28, 1979. According to the committees mandate the investigations of the Kemeny Commission, the Rogouin investigation, investigations of the American Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Swedish report ''Safe nuclear power'' have been taken into consideration by the Committee. Furthermore, it has formed the basis for the Committees work that the authority responsibility for the safety at Barsebaeck lies with the Swedish authorities, and that these authorities have evaluated the safety aspects before the permissions for operation of the Barsebaeck power plant were given and hereafter currently in connection with the inspection of the power plant. The report prepared by the Commission treats aspects as: a) Nuclear safety at the Barsebaeck power plant, b) reactor safety and emergency provisions, c) common elements in the emergency provision situation in Sweden and Denmark, d) ongoing investigations on course of events during accidents and release limiting safety systems. (BP)

  14. Development of a mobile game based on virtual reality tools to sensitize the population about the nuclear power plant's emergency plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Lucas H.H.; Mol, Antônio C. de A.; Santo, André C. do E.; Legey, Ana Paula [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Universitário Carioca (Unicarioca), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Angra dos Reis Nuclear Power Plant's emergency plan, it is the bunch of instructions that every citizen must adopt in case of an emergency situation. It is highly important, that all the people living in the power plant's surroundings truly understand every single step of the plan, because only in this way people will know how to react in case of a necessity. To hit this goals, the Brazil's Electronuclear, made educational booklets, in the shape of comic books, trying to guide the population about the plan. On the other hand, we have an increasingly connected world, making possible that digital games, be very well accepted by the population. So this project has as an objective, developing a digital tool, in form of a mobile game that shows in a playful and interactive way for the user, the emergency plan, complementing the educational process and social actions made by many institutions. With the information taken from the booklets, objects and buildings were modeled in Autodesk 3Ds Max, allied with the Unity 3D Game Engine, to make a city, inspired in Angra do Reis (RJ). The player has to follow all the security protocols giving by the Eletronuclear according with the rules provided by the National Nuclear Energy Commission. Is expected, with this game that will be available for the Eletronuclear that more people have the chance to know and believe in the efficiency of the emergency plan already established. (author)

  15. Development of a mobile game based on virtual reality tools to sensitize the population about the nuclear power plant's emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Lucas H.H.; Mol, Antônio C. de A.; Santo, André C. do E.; Legey, Ana Paula

    2017-01-01

    The Angra dos Reis Nuclear Power Plant's emergency plan, it is the bunch of instructions that every citizen must adopt in case of an emergency situation. It is highly important, that all the people living in the power plant's surroundings truly understand every single step of the plan, because only in this way people will know how to react in case of a necessity. To hit this goals, the Brazil's Electronuclear, made educational booklets, in the shape of comic books, trying to guide the population about the plan. On the other hand, we have an increasingly connected world, making possible that digital games, be very well accepted by the population. So this project has as an objective, developing a digital tool, in form of a mobile game that shows in a playful and interactive way for the user, the emergency plan, complementing the educational process and social actions made by many institutions. With the information taken from the booklets, objects and buildings were modeled in Autodesk 3Ds Max, allied with the Unity 3D Game Engine, to make a city, inspired in Angra do Reis (RJ). The player has to follow all the security protocols giving by the Eletronuclear according with the rules provided by the National Nuclear Energy Commission. Is expected, with this game that will be available for the Eletronuclear that more people have the chance to know and believe in the efficiency of the emergency plan already established. (author)

  16. Reevaluation of environmental monitoring program for radiological emergency at Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Lilia M.J. Belem; Ramos Junior, Anthenor C.; Gomes, Carlos A.; Carvalho, Zenildo L.; Gouveia, Vandir; Estrada, Julio; Ney, Cezar

    1996-01-01

    In order to respond to a major radiological emergency at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, located in Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, the Emergency Response Team of the Institute for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD/CNEN) established a program of environmental monitoring. The purpose of this program is to define a monitoring trend to assess the off-site radiological conditions and give support to decision making for implementing protective measures in case of a radiological accident, taking into account atmospheric diffusion, population conglomerates and their habits, water and land use, contemplating the entire Emergency Planning Zone of 15 km radius. This program has been reevaluated recently, aiming to optimize it and keep it up to date to assure adequacy of environmental surveillance data in support to a prompt response in case of an emergency situation in the nuclear power plant. It has been organized in the form of a handbook to facilitate handling by field teams. Future revisions will be necessary to incorporate additional pertinent information and keep the handbook up to date, since Angra dos Reis is a summer resort region, subject to constant changes. This paper discusses the structure of the environmental monitoring program and describes the content and preparation of this handbook. (author)

  17. Upgrade the intervention levels derived for water and foods, to be include in the PERE 607 procedure the external radiological emergency plan in the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llado Castillo, R.; Aguilar Pacheco, R.

    1998-01-01

    The work shows the results obtained in the upgrade the intervention levels derived for water and foods, to be include in the PERE 607 procedure the external radiological emergency plan in the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

  18. The proposals on cooperation to foreign centers of science on thermophysical properties of reactor materials in a broad band of pressure and temperatures realized at normal transient and emergency operation activity of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortov, V.E.

    1996-01-01

    The proposals on cooperation in the area of thermophysical properties of reactor materials in a broad band of pressure and temperature realized at normal transient and emergency operation activity of nuclear power plants are discussed. 1 fig

  19. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  20. Analysis of the preliminary trajectory of emergency venting of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde using RELAP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecenas F, M.; Jimenez S, R.; Ovando C, R.; Tijerina S, F.; Tapia M, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    For a commercial nuclear plant, the availability of a vent line to the atmosphere is an improvement to achieve the prevention and mitigation of the consequences of a severe accident. The importance of this system received greater attention after the Fukushima accident in 2011. Subsequently, in 2012 and 2013, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued documents stating that the venting must be able to dislodge 1% of the rated thermal power of the core without over pressurizing the primary container. To analyze the venting of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, the line and the primary container are modeled using the thermo-hydraulic code RELAP5, simulating a release of 1% of the nominal licensed power to the container in the form of saturated steam. The vent has no problem to evacuate the energy and manages to keep the container without exceeding its design limit, and the highest percentage of thermal power that can channel the vent to the outside is approximately 3%. A sensitivity analysis increasing the diameter of the line to 14 inches allows increasing in 10% the percentage of power that can be vented to the outside without problem for the containment. (Author)

  1. Summary of public comments and NRC staff analysis relating to rulemaking on emergency planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This NUREG provides a summary and discussions of public comments received during the expedited rulemaking to upgrade emergency preparedness around nuclear power reactor sites. The final rule was published in the Federal Register (45 FR 55402) on August 19, 1980. The information in NUREG-0684 was excerpted in the main from internal paper SECY-80-275 (June 3, 1980) which forwarded the final rule to the Commission for consideration. This document, along with NUREG-0628, NUREG/CP-0011, and the materials cited in the Final Rules, should be considered a compendium of the major issues raised in this proceeding and acted upon by the Commission

  2. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  3. Dose monitoring in nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan Hongjie; Yang Zhongping; Lei Xin

    2012-01-01

    In order to protect people from irradiation sickness and rebuild the radiation filed in nuclear emergency, personal and environmental dose need to be monitored. The application of TLD in dose monitoring is discussed in this paper. (authors)

  4. Determination of atmospheric dispersion factors in emergency situations in Almirante Alvaro Alberto nuclear power plant - unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, I.L.B.

    1987-08-01

    The necessity of Knowing the atmospheric dispersion factor, used to obtain the first estimation dose in the public case for accidents with releasing of radioactive material to atmosphere in Almirante Alvaro Alberto nuclear power plant - unit I, lead to the development of a fast and efficient method to determine the dilution factors, in a pre-determined distance from the source, to be used in the dose estimate. The ACID computer program for pocket calculation allow to obtain the meteorological information to evaluate the dose. In this work the mathemathical models used and the program developed are described. (Author) [pt

  5. Preparedness of Operation Teams' Non-technical Skills in a Main Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants to Manage Emergency Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Human reliability is one of the important determinants for the system safety. Nuclear Energy Agency reported that approximately half of events reported by foreign nuclear industry were related with inappropriate human actions. The human error problems can be viewed in two ways: the person approach and the system approach. Other terms to represent each approach are active failures and latent conditions. Active failures are unsafe acts committed by people who are in direct contact with systems whereas latent conditions are the inevitable 'resident pathogens' within the system. To identify what kinds of non-technical skills were needed to cope with emergency conditions, a method to evaluate preparedness of task management in emergency conditions based on monitoring patterns was presented. Five characteristics were suggested to evaluate emergency task management and communication: latent mistake resistibility, latent violation resistibility, thoroughness, communication, and assertiveness. Case study was done by analyzing emergency training of 9 different real operation teams in the reference plant. The result showed that the 9 teams had their own emergency task management skills which resulted in good and bad performances

  6. Preparedness of Operation Teams' Non-technical Skills in a Main Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants to Manage Emergency Situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Human reliability is one of the important determinants for the system safety. Nuclear Energy Agency reported that approximately half of events reported by foreign nuclear industry were related with inappropriate human actions. The human error problems can be viewed in two ways: the person approach and the system approach. Other terms to represent each approach are active failures and latent conditions. Active failures are unsafe acts committed by people who are in direct contact with systems whereas latent conditions are the inevitable 'resident pathogens' within the system. To identify what kinds of non-technical skills were needed to cope with emergency conditions, a method to evaluate preparedness of task management in emergency conditions based on monitoring patterns was presented. Five characteristics were suggested to evaluate emergency task management and communication: latent mistake resistibility, latent violation resistibility, thoroughness, communication, and assertiveness. Case study was done by analyzing emergency training of 9 different real operation teams in the reference plant. The result showed that the 9 teams had their own emergency task management skills which resulted in good and bad performances

  7. Nuclear power plants maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plants maintenance now appears as an important factor contributing to the competitivity of nuclea energy. The articles published in this issue describe the way maintenance has been organized in France and how it led to an actual industrial activity developing and providing products and services. An information note about Georges Besse uranium enrichment plant (Eurodif) recalls that maintenance has become a main data not only for power plants but for all nuclear industry installations. (The second part of this dossier will be published in the next issue: vol. 1 January-February 1989) [fr

  8. Environmental monitoring program for radiological emergencies at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Lilia M.J. Belem; Ramos Junior, Anthenor C.; Gomes, Carlos A.; Carvalho, Zenildo L.; Gouveia, Vandir; Estrada, Julio; Ney, Cezar [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1997-12-31

    In order to respond to a major radiological emergency at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, located in Angra do Reis, Rio de Janeiro, the Emergency Response Team of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD/CNEN) established a program of environmental monitoring. A monitoring trend to assess the off-site radiological conditions and give support to decision making for implementing protective measure in case of a radiological accident is presented. For the selection of the monitoring points, the program takes into account atmospheric diffusion, population conglomerates and their habits, water and land use; it includes the entire Emergency Planning Zone of 15 km radius. The program has been organized in the form of a handbook to facilitate handling by field teams 2 refs., 1 fig.; e-mail: lilia at ird.gov.br

  9. KWU Nuclear Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennewitz, F.; Hummel, R.; Oelmann, K.

    1986-01-01

    The KWU Nuclear Plant Analyzer is a real time engineering simulator based on the KWU computer programs used in plant transient analysis and licensing. The primary goal is to promote the understanding of the technical and physical processes of a nuclear power plant at an on-site training facility. Thus the KWU Nuclear Plant Analyzer is available with comparable low costs right at the time when technical questions or training needs arise. This has been achieved by (1) application of the transient code NLOOP; (2) unrestricted operator interaction including all simulator functions; (3) using the mainframe computer Control Data Cyber 176 in the KWU computing center; (4) four color graphic displays controlled by a dedicated graphic computer, no control room equipment; and (5) coupling of computers by telecommunication via telephone

  10. Nuclear Power Plants (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell III, Walter [Southern Nuclear Engineering, Inc.

    1973-01-01

    Projected energy requirements for the future suggest that we must employ atomic energy to generate electric power or face depletion of our fossil-fuel resources—coal, oil, and gas. In short, both conservation and economic considerations will require us to use nuclear energy to generate the electricity that supports our civilization. Until we reach the time when nuclear power plants are as common as fossil-fueled or hydroelectric plants, many people will wonder how the nuclear plants work, how much they cost, where they are located, and what kinds of reactors they use. The purpose of this booklet is to answer these questions. In doing so, it will consider only central station plants, which are those that provide electric power for established utility systems.

  11. Radiological criteria in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, D.; Diaz de la Cruz, F.

    1985-01-01

    It is pretended to enlighten the way to adopt the recommendations, from supranational organizations or the practices followed in other countries, to the peculiarities existing in Spain for the specific case of Nuclear Emergency Response Planning. The adaptation has been focalized in the criteria given by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council and has taken into account the radiological protection levels, which have been considered adequate for Spanish population in case of nuclear accidents. (author)

  12. Nuclear emergencies: a GP's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterston, E.

    1991-01-01

    This booklet is designed for GPs in the event of a nuclear emergency, with answers to questions which people will commonly ask, concerning, for example, sheltering/evacuation, iodine tablets, milk, water; vegetables, meat, baby food and cancer risk. Information is also provided on radiation units, the Department of Environment plans for responding to nuclear accidents overseas, the Department of Energy plans for responding to a civil nuclear accident in the UK and information resources. (UK)

  13. Nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    Action at the international level will assume greater importance as the number of nuclear power plants increases, especially in the more densely populated parts of the world. Predictions of growth made prior to October 1973 [9] indicated that, by 1980, 14% of the electricity would be supplied by nuclear plants and by the year 2000 this figure would be about 50%. This will make the topic of international co-operation and standards of even greater importance. The IAEA has long been active in providing assistance to Member States in the siting design and operation of nuclear reactors. These activities have been pursued through advisory missions, the publication of codes of practice, guide books, technical reports and in arranging meetings to promote information exchange. During the early development of nuclear power, there was no well-established body of experience which would allow formulation of internationally acceptable safety criteria, except in a few special cases. Hence, nuclear power plant safety and reliability matters often received an ad hoc approach which necessarily entailed a lack of consistency in the criteria used and in the levels of safety required. It is clear that the continuation of an ad hoc approach to safety will prove inadequate in the context of a world-wide nuclear power industry, and the international trade which this implies. As in several other fields, the establishment of internationally acceptable safety standards and appropriate guides for use by regulatory bodies, utilities, designers and constructors, is becoming a necessity. The IAEA is presently planning the development of a comprehensive set of basic requirements for nuclear power plant safety, and the associated reliability requirements, which would be internationally acceptable, and could serve as a standard frame of reference for nuclear plant safety and reliability analyses

  14. Nuclear emergency planning in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baarli, J.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear emergency planning in Norway is forming a part of the Search and Rescue Service of the country. Due to the fact that Norway do not have any nucleat power reactor, the nuclear emergency planning has not been given high priority. The problems however are a part of the activity of the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene, and the emergency preparedness is at the present time to a large extent based on the availability of professional health physicists and their knowledge, rather than established practices

  15. Monitoring and evaluation of foods and waters in the planed emergency area of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant by γ spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Qiong; Guo Jianying; Shao Xianzhang; Zhao Qiufen

    1999-07-01

    The detection results of foods and waters that are adopted in the planed emergency area of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in 1996 and measured by γ spectrometry are reported and compared with the level of background radioactivity before the operation of the NPP. With national standards concerned, the detection results have been reviewed. And it is shown that there has been negligible radioactive environmental pollution found around NPP in the passed several years. Possible sources of slight level pollution of 110m Ag that is almost only detected are discussed. Some suggestions on detection programme and studies of methodology henceforth are put forward

  16. Online Decision Support System (IRODOS) - an emergency preparedness tool for handling offsite nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinod Kumar, A.; Oza, R.B.; Chaudhury, P.; Suri, M.; Saindane, S.; Singh, K.D.; Bhargava, P.; Sharma, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    A real time online decision support system as a nuclear emergency response system for handling offsite nuclear emergency at the Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) has been developed by Health, Safety and Environment Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) under the frame work of 'Indian Real time Online Decision Support System 'IRODOS'. (author)

  17. Nuclear emergency preparedness: national organisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki, H.; Lferde, M.; Moutia, Z. [Faculte des Sciences, Dept. de Physique, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-07-01

    As in all other industries, the nuclear facilities can be the object of accidents whose consequences go beyond the limits of their site and consequently radioactive releases would be issued in the environment justifying the protection measures of population. Even if all the precautions were taken during the stages from the design to the operation, to reduce the risk of accident in nuclear installations, this risk can not be completely suppressed. For the radiological risk, as for the other major risks, the protection of the public always was taken in consideration by public power. The nuclear emergency plan gives the opportunity to have a quick appropriate reaction to a sudden event, which has (or might have) direct consequences for the population. The Moroccan public authorities had proceeded to reinforce at the national level, the control of nuclear safety and protection against radiation by the set up of a new nuclear safety authority. Evidently, the organization and the management of a nuclear and/or radiological emergency were at centre of this reform. Taking into account the subjective risk of radiological terrorism, the authorities should reinforce measurements guaranteeing radiological safety and security, and elaborate the appropriate emergency plans. The aim of this paper is to give a progress report on nuclear emergency plan aspects and to present a corresponding organization which could be applied by national authority. (authors)

  18. Nuclear emergency preparedness: national organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Messaoudi, M.; Essadki, H.; Lferde, M.; Moutia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    As in all other industries, the nuclear facilities can be the object of accidents whose consequences go beyond the limits of their site and consequently radioactive releases would be issued in the environment justifying the protection measures of population. Even if all the precautions were taken during the stages from the design to the operation, to reduce the risk of accident in nuclear installations, this risk can not be completely suppressed. For the radiological risk, as for the other major risks, the protection of the public always was taken in consideration by public power. The nuclear emergency plan gives the opportunity to have a quick appropriate reaction to a sudden event, which has (or might have) direct consequences for the population. The Moroccan public authorities had proceeded to reinforce at the national level, the control of nuclear safety and protection against radiation by the set up of a new nuclear safety authority. Evidently, the organization and the management of a nuclear and/or radiological emergency were at centre of this reform. Taking into account the subjective risk of radiological terrorism, the authorities should reinforce measurements guaranteeing radiological safety and security, and elaborate the appropriate emergency plans. The aim of this paper is to give a progress report on nuclear emergency plan aspects and to present a corresponding organization which could be applied by national authority. (authors)

  19. Nuclear threats and emergency preparedness in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, R.; Aaltonen, H.; Laaksonen, J.; Lahtinen, J.; Rantavaara, A.; Reponen, H.; Rytoemaa, T.; Suomela, M.; Toivonen, H.; Varjoranta, T.

    1995-10-01

    The political and economic upheavals which have taken place in Eastern Europe have had an impact on radiation and nuclear safety throughout Europe. Emergency preparedness systems for unexpected nuclear events have been developed further in all European countries, and prosperous western nations have invested in improving the safety of East European nuclear power plants. The economic crisis facing countries of the former Soviet Union has also promoted illicit trade in nuclear materials; this has made it necessary for various border guards and police authorities to intensify their collaboration and to tighten border controls. On 3-4 October 1995, Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) arranged a seminar on nuclear threats and emergency preparedness in Finland. In addition to STUK experts, a wide range of rescue and civil defence authorities, environmental health specialists and other persons engaged in emergency preparedness attended the seminar. The publication contains a compilation of reports presented at the seminar. The reports cover a broad spectrum of nuclear threats analyzed at STUK, the impacts of radioactive fallout on human beings and on the environment, and preparedness systems by which the harmful effects of radiation or nuclear accidents can, if necessary, be minimized. (33 figs., 5 tabs.)

  20. Nuclear plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negin, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear power industry's addressing of life extension is a natural trend in the maturation of this technology after 20 years of commercial operation. With increasing emphasis on how plants are operated, and less on how to build them, attention is turning on to maximizing the use of these substantial investments. The first studies of life extension were conducted in the period from 1978 and 1982. These were motivated by the initiation, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), of studies to support decommissioning rulemaking. The basic conclusions of those early studies that life extension is feasible and worth pursuing have not been changed by the much more extensive investigations that have since been conducted. From an engineering perspective, life extension for nuclear plants is fundamentally the same as for fossil plants

  1. Benchmarking Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main tasks an owner have is to keep its business competitive on the market while delivering its product. Being owner of nuclear power plant bear the same (or even more complex and stern) responsibility due to safety risks and costs. In the past, nuclear power plant managements could (partly) ignore profit or it was simply expected and to some degree assured through the various regulatory processes governing electricity rate design. It is obvious now that, with the deregulation, utility privatization and competitive electricity market, key measure of success used at nuclear power plants must include traditional metrics of successful business (return on investment, earnings and revenue generation) as well as those of plant performance, safety and reliability. In order to analyze business performance of (specific) nuclear power plant, benchmarking, as one of the well-established concept and usual method was used. Domain was conservatively designed, with well-adjusted framework, but results have still limited application due to many differences, gaps and uncertainties. (author).

  2. Nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaziz Yunus

    1986-01-01

    A number of issues have to be taken into account before the introduction of any nuclear power plant in any country. These issues include reactor safety (site and operational), waste disposal and, lastly, the decommissioning of the reactor inself. Because of the radioactive nature of the components, nuclear power plants require a different approach to decommission compared to other plants. Until recently, issues on reactor safety and waste disposal were the main topics discussed. As for reactor decommissioning, the debates have been academic until now. Although reactors have operated for 25 years, decommissioning of retired reactors has simply not been fully planned. But the Shippingport Atomic Power Plant in Pennysylvania, the first large scale power reactor to be retired, is now being decommissioned. The work has rekindled the debate in the light of reality. Outside the United States, decommissioning is also being confronted on a new plane. (author)

  3. Center for emergency response at the ENUSA fuel fabrication plant in Juzbado; El centro de gestion de las emergencias de la fabrica de combustible nuclear de ENUSA en Juzbado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvaro Perez, C.; Romano, A.

    2016-08-01

    Effective emergency preparedness and management is critical for a safe exploitation of nuclear installations like the Enusa fuel fabrication plant. In 2012, an important project was carried out at the plant which enlarged and remodeled the Emergency Room used until then to give response to the Internal Emergency Plan postulated scenarios. This project was motivated after carefully analyzing the results of audits, inspections and operation experience as well as after studying the conclusions of the Fukushima accident emergency management weaknesses. The new Center for Emergency Response, which hosts the plant control room, devoted to monitoring the plant safety systems on a constant basis, greatly improves both technical means available and operative procedures as well as human interactions during an emergency. This paper describes the most relevant technical features of this Center, the safety systems which support its operation and the emergency management process that takes place in it. (Author)

  4. Nuclear power plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of Nuclear Power Plant Analyzers in USA is described. There are two different types of Analyzers under development in USA, the forst in Idaho and Los Alamos national Lab, the second in brookhaven National lab. That one is described in detail. The computer hardware and the mathematical models of the reactor vessel thermalhydraulics are described. (author)

  5. Nuclear plant scram reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegle, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Utility Management and Human Resources Committee (NUMARC) is a confederation of all 55 utilities with nuclear plants either in operation or under construction. NUMARC was formed in April 1984 by senior nuclear executives with hundreds of man-years of plant experience to improve (plant) performance and resolve NRC concerns. NUMARC has adopted 10 commitments in the areas of management, training, staffing and performance. One of these commitments is to strive to reduce automatic trips to 3 per year per unit for calendar year 1985 for plants in commercial operation greater than 3 years (with greater than 25% capacity factor). This goal applies to any unplanned automatic protection system trips at any time when the reactor is critical. Each utility has committed to develop methods to thoroughly evaluate all unplanned automatic trips to identify the root causes and formulate plans to correct the root causes thus reducing future unplanned scrams. As part of this program, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) collects and evaluates information on automatic reactor trips. It publishes the results of these evaluations to aid the industry to identify root causes and corrective actions

  6. Nuclear plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazda, P.A.; Bhatt, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    During the next 10 years, nuclear plant license renewal is expected to become a significant issue. Recent Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studies have shown license renewal to be technically and economically feasible. Filing an application for license renewal with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) entails verifying that the systems, structures, and components essential for safety will continue to perform their safety functions throughout the license renewal period. This paper discusses the current proposed requirements for this verification and the current industry knowledge regarding age-related degradation of structures. Elements of a license renewal program incorporating NRC requirements and industry knowledge including a schedule are presented. Degradation mechanisms for structural components, their significance to nuclear plant structures, and industry-suggested age-related degradation management options are also reviewed

  7. European protection principles against external hazards by means of Emergency Power Supply and Control Safety System Building in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallinat, Dipl Ing [Max Aicher Engineering GmbH, Freilassing (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    One of the most important nuclear power plant safety requirements is a redundant and independent power system. This requires such a design of emergency power systems that failure of one will not adversely impact the other. External hazards of natural origin or linked to human activity could potentially affect plant safety. The general objective of the design provisions is to ensure that the safety functions of the systems and components required to return the plant to a safe shutdown state and to prevent and limit radioactive release are not adversely affected. As external hazards are site dependent, Technical Guidelines specify that 'it is not necessary to take all of the hazards in a standardized design; such external hazards as external flooding, drought, ice formation and toxic, corrosive or combustible gases may be dealt with only for a specific plant, on a plant specific basis'. In accordance with the Technical Guidelines, external hazards are taken into consideration at the design stage consistently with internal events or hazards. The basic design principle is to protect against external hazards in accordance with the Technical Guidelines using a 'load case' procedure.

  8. Extractability of radiocesium from processed green tea leaves with hot water. The first emergent tea leaves harvested after the TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, K.; Uchida, S.; Ishii, N.

    2012-01-01

    In some tea tree planting areas within 300 km from the TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), it was found that newly emerged tea plant leaves for green tea contained two radiocesium species (cesium-134 and cesium-137). In this study, using processed green tea leaves for drinking, extraction ratios of radiocesium under several brew conditions were observed. When 90 deg C water was used, 50-70% of radiocesium was extracted into the water, while 54-60% of radiocesium was extracted with 60 deg C water. A part of radiocesium would be removed from leaves if the leaves were washed with 20 and 60 deg C water before brewing, and the efficiencies were 11 and 32%, respectively. Newly emerged camellia leaves were used to simulate the radiocesium removal ratio from raw tea leaves by washing and boiling; radioactivity concentration was decreased to 60% of the original concentration with washing and 10 min boiling. From these results, it was found that almost half of the radiocesium would not be removed from raw or processed tea leaves. The values obtained in the present study could be used for internal radiation dose estimation from tea leaves. (author)

  9. Nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The four-member New York Power Pool Panel concluded that, for a number of reasons, no nuclear power plant in New York State is prone to the type of accident that occurred at Three Mile Island (TMI). The Panel further concluded that changes in operating practices, both regulatory and voluntary, and heightened sensitivity to reactor-core-cooling requirements will substantially reduce the chances for another such accident anywhere. Panel members found that New York State utilities have taken a responsible attitude with regard to requirements set forth by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a result of the TMI accident. In a cover letter that accompanied the report to Federal and New York state officials, New York Power Pool Executive Committee Chairman Francis E. Drake, Jr. expressed hope that the report will alleviate public fears of nuclear reactors and promote wider acceptance of nuclear energy as an economic and safe means of power production. 17 references

  10. Nuclear plants - military hostages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramberg, B.

    1986-01-01

    Recent events suggest that nuclear reactors could make tempting military or terrorist targets. Despite the care with which most reactors are built, studies document their vulnerability to willful destruction through disruption of coolant mechanisms both inside and outside the containment building. In addition to reactors, such nuclear support facilities as fuel fabrication, reprocessing, and waste storage installations may be attractive military targets. A nuclear bomb which exploded in the vicinity of a reactor could increase its lethal effects by one-third. The implications of this is vulnerability for Middle East stability as well as to other volatile regions. The author suggests several avenues for controlling the dangers: international law, military and civil defense, facility siting, increasing plant safety, and the international management of nuclear energy. 21 references

  11. Pulsed nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear power plant. This power plant consists of: 1.) a cavity; 2.) a detonatable nuclear device in a central region of the cavity; 3.) a working fluid inside of the cavity; 4.) a method to denote a nuclear device inside of the cavity; 5.) a mechanical projection from an interior wall of the cavity for recoiling to absorb a shock wave produced by the detonation of the nuclear device and thereby protecting the cavity from damage. A plurality of segments defines a shell within the cavity and a plurality of shock absorbers, each connecting a corresponding segment to a corresponding location on the wall of the cavity. Each of these shock absorbers regulate the recoil action of the segments; and 6.) means for permitting controlled extraction of a quantity of hot gases from the cavity produced by the vaporization of the working fluid upon detonation of the nuclear device. A method of generating power is also described. This method consists of: 1.) introducing a quantity of water in an underground cavity; 2.) heating the water in the cavity to form saturated steam; 3.) detonating a nuclear device at a central location inside the cavity; 4.) recoiling plate-like elements inside the cavity away from the central location in a mechanically regulated and controlled manner to absorb a shock wave produced by the nuclear device detonation and thereby protect the underground cavity against damage; 5.) extracting a quantity of superheated steam produced by the detonation of the nuclear device; and 6.) Converting the energy in the extracted superheated steam into electrical power

  12. Fire prevention in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayla, J.P.; Jacquet-Francillon, J.; Matarozzo, F.

    2014-01-01

    About 80 fire starts are reported in EDF nuclear power plants every year but only 3 or 4 turn into a real fire and none has, so far, has led to a major safety failure of a nuclear plant. A new regulation has been implemented in july 2014 that strengthens the concept of defense in depth, proposes an approach that is proportionate to the stakes and risks, this proportionality means that the requirements for a power reactor are not the same as for a nuclear laboratory, and imposes an obligation or result rather than of means. The second article deals with the fire that broke out in the waste silo number 130 at La Hague plant in january 1981. The investigation showed that the flammability of the silo content had been underestimated. The third article presents the consequences of the fire that broke out in a power transformer at the Cattenom plant in june 2013. The fire was rapidly brought under control thanks to the immediate triggering of the emergency plan. The article details also the feedback experience of this event. (A.C.)

  13. Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) is located in Zarechny, approximately 60 km east of Ekaterinberg along the Trans-Siberian Highway. Zarechny, a small city of approximately 30,000 residents, was built to support BNPP operations. It is a closed city to unescorted visitors. Residents must show identification for entry. BNPP is one of the first and oldest commercial nuclear power plants in Russia and began operations in 1964. As for most nuclear power plants in the Russian Federation, BNPP is operated by Rosenergoatom, which is subordinated to the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation (Minatom). BNPP is the site of three nuclear reactors, Units 1, 2, and 3. Units 1 and 2, which have been shut-down and defueled, were graphite moderated reactors. The units were shut-down in 1981 and 1989. Unit 3, a BN-600 reactor, is a 600 MW(electric) sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. Unit 3 went on-line in April 1980 and produces electric power which is fed into a distribution grid and thermal power which provides heat to Zarechny. The paper also discusses the SF NIKIET, the Sverdiovsk Branch of NIKIET, Moscow, which is the research and development branch of the parent NIKEIT and is primarily a design institute responsible for reactor design. Central to its operations is a 15 megawatt IVV research reactor. The paper discusses general security and fissile material control and accountability at these two facilities

  14. Effort on Nuclear Power Plants safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayoto.

    1979-01-01

    Prospects of nuclear power plant on designing, building and operation covering natural safety, technical safety, and emergency safety are discussed. Several problems and their solutions and nuclear energy operation in developing countries especially control and permission are also discussed. (author tr.)

  15. Dukovany nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Presentation covers recommended safety issues for the Dukovany NPP which have been solved with satisfactory conclusions. Safety issues concerned include: radiation safety; nuclear safety; security; emergency preparedness; health protection at work; fire protection; environmental protection; chemical safety; technical safety. Quality assurance programs at all stages on NPP life time is described. Report includes description of NPP staff training provision, training simulator, emergency operating procedures, emergency preparedness, Year 2000 problem, inspections and life time management. Description of Dukovany Plant Safety Analysis Projects including integrity of the equipment, modernisation, equipment innovation and safety upgrading program show that this approach corresponds to the actual practice applied in EU countries, and fulfilment of current IAEA requirements for safety enhancement of the WWER 440/213 units in the course of MORAWA Equipment Upgrading program

  16. Nuclear emergency preparedness and management the international nuclear emergency exercise Inex 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundigl, St.

    2003-01-01

    With the initiation of the first international nuclear emergency exercise INEX 1, performed as a table-top exercise in 1993, the international community tested, for the first time, approaches and policies in place to manage a nuclear or radiological emergency. INEX 1 with its related workshops led to a wealth of lessons learned and to an improvement in nuclear emergency management. The INEX 2 exercise series, initiated by the NEA and performed between 1996 and 1999, established an international nuclear emergency 'exercise culture' leading to a clear improvement of the international aspects of nuclear emergency preparedness and management. INEX 2 was a series of four command post exercises based on national nuclear emergency exercises in Switzerland, Finland, Hungary and Canada. Simulated accidents at nuclear power plants were used to test existing procedures in emergency response and management, and to analyse local, regional, national and international emergency plans under realistic conditions. In addition, the exercises allowed the participating countries to gain experience using new concepts and tools. The most significant result of INEX 2 and a major step forward in nuclear emergency management was the development of a new communication and information exchange strategy, which is currently implemented by various NEA member countries as well as by the international community in general. The objective of this new strategy is to assist the decision-maker by improving the selection of the data transmitted, by encouraging the transmission and reception of such data and information using modern communication methods, e.g. secure world wide web technologies, and by defining emergency monitoring and modelling needs. To test the validity and usefulness of the newly-developed strategy, the NEA proposed to organize an international nuclear emergency exercise, INEX 2000, similar in scope to the INEX 2 exercises. In addition, the NEA suggested to include, for the first

  17. Nuclear Plant Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, C.P.; Turner, M.R.; Spore, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Data Bank (NPDB) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to assist analysts in the rapid and accurate creation of input decks for reactor transient analysis. The NPDB will reduce the time and cost of the creation or modification of a typical input deck. This data bank will be an invaluable tool in the timely investigation of recent and ongoing nuclear reactor safety analysis. This paper discusses the status and plans for the NPDB development and describes its anticipated structure and capabilities

  18. Ardennes nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-12-01

    The SENA nuclear power plant continued to operate, as before, at authorized rated power, namely 905MWth during the first half year and 950MWth during the second half year. Net energy production:2028GWh; hours phased to the line: 7534H; availability factor: 84%; utilization factor: 84%; total shutdowns:19; number of scrams:10; cost per KWh: 4,35 French centimes. Overall, the plant is performing very satisfactory. Over the last three years net production has been 5900GWh, corresponding to in average utilization factor of 83%

  19. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.V.; Rineisky, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The invention is aimed at designing a nuclear power plant with a heat transfer system which permits an accelerated fuel regeneration maintaining relatively high initial steam values and efficiency of the steam power circuit. In case of a plant with three circuits the secondary cooling circuit includes a steam generator with preheater, evaporator, steam superheater and intermediate steam superheater. At the heat supply side the latter is connected with its inlet to the outlet of the evaporator and with its outlet to the low-temperature side of the secondary circuit

  20. Principles of off-site nuclear emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miska, H.

    2011-01-01

    Due to high safety standards at nuclear power plants, no experience exits with nuclear emergencies in Western Europe. Thus, emergency exercises are the only possibility to assure effective protective measures should the very unlikely severe accident occur. The main objectives of exercises are generally the check of response plans for suitability, the test of the equipment's applicability and training of personnel for the unusual task to manage a nuclear emergency. After an introduction into the different types of exercises, this contribution focuses on offsite nuclear emergency exercises, explaining frame conditions to ensure good practice and, finally, reports some experience from exercises. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisaka, Tatsuyoshi; Kamahara, Hisato; Yanagisawa, Ko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent corrosion stress cracks in structural materials in a BWR type nuclear power plant by decreasing the oxygen concentration in the reactor coolants. Constitution: A hydrogen injector is connected between the condensator and a condensate clean up system of a nuclear power plant. The injector is incorporated with hydrogenated compounds formed from metal hydrides, for example, of alloys such as lanthanum-nickel alloy, iron titanium alloy, vanadium, palladium, magnesium-copper alloy, magnesium-nickel alloy and the like. Even if the pressure of hydrogen obtained from a hydrogen bomb or by way of water electrolysis is changed, the hydrogen can always be injected into a reactor coolant at a pressure equal to the equilibrium dissociation pressure for metal hydride by introducing the hydrogen into the hydrogen injector. (Seki, T.)

  2. Third generation nuclear plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Bertrand

    2012-05-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, a new generation of Light Water Reactors has been designed and is being built. Third generation nuclear plants are equipped with dedicated systems to insure that if the worst accident were to occur, i.e. total core meltdown, no matter how low the probability of such occurrence, radioactive releases in the environment would be minimal. This article describes the EPR, representative of this "Generation III" and a few of its competitors on the world market.

  3. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Laurer, E.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a quick-acting valve on the main-steam pipe of a nuclear power plant. The engineering design of the valve is to be improved. To the main valve disc, a piston-operated auxiliary valve disc is to be assigned closing a section of the area of the main valve disc. This way it is avoided that the drive of the main valve disc has to carry out different movements. 15 sub-claims. (UWI) [de

  4. Off-site intervention plan of the public health authorities for emergencies at the Caorso nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, S.; Sogni, R.; Boeri, G.; Cencetti, S.; Melandri, G.; Paterlini, L.

    1986-01-01

    The Caorso nuclear power plant, which is near Piacenza and has an 875 MW boiling water reactor, has been generating electricity on a regular basis since 1978. The off-site intervention plan of the public health authorities, based on an analysis of hypothetical accidents, was approved in 1977 and subsequently revised. A study of the radiological consequences of these accidents for man and the environment indicates that the highest doses likely to be received by inhalation of 131 I would be no more than a few rem, whereas the levels of soil contamination, even at a distance of 40 km, could exceed 1 μCi/m 2 . The main problems caused by such accidents are therefore related to environmental contamination. Under the intervention plan, the provincial prefect is responsible for co-ordinating the work of all the civil, military and medical authorities. Teams from ENEL, the fire service and the local health services (USL) monitor the concentration of 131 I in the air and the exposure level, and take samples within a radius of 10 km around the site. The police and army control road traffic and are responsible, if necessary, for the evacuation of the population. A radiometry co-ordination centre (CCRI) is set up to process the readings made by the teams and provides the prefect with the technical information he requires to take decisions The local medical services (USL) run the centre where the population is assembled and monitor superficial contamination, apply initial decontamination measures, and provide medical assistance in general. The Piacenza USL also takes action by sending out its mobile radiometry laboratory, using its measurement equipment and providing logistic support to the CCRI. It is also to play a major role in informing the population in the event of an alarm. (author)

  5. Studying the emerging nuclear suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydell, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    None of these events---nor any of the many others that are cited in the case studies of this book---can be singled out as heralding a revolutionary transformation of the global nuclear marketplace. The cumulative effect of such developments, however, may well be the emergence of a market in the year 2000 that is far less concentrated than today's market for nuclear reactors and fuel cycle technology. If this gradual structural transformation is accompanied by the entry into the market of new buyers and sellers that do not accept the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), safeguards administered by the IAEA, or other international norms directed at preventing the spread of nuclear weapon capabilities, the result may indeed have revolutionary dimensions for the business, diplomacy, and research of nuclear energy. A similar outcome could arise even f these norms are widely accepted but are not matched by an increase in the resources available to national governments and key international agencies that implement these norms. This paper identifies some of the pitfalls that researchers often encounter in researching the emerging suppliers and will outline some basic ground rules to guide the collection and interpretation of empirical evidence on supplier behavior

  6. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  7. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented

  8. Medical assistance in the management of nuclear power plant accidents. Guide for: medical personnel of emergency preparedness services, doctors of emergency departments, doctors for out-patient or in-patient treatment. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumprecht, D.; Haehnel, S.

    1995-01-01

    The guide explains the medical tasks and activities in the context of the emergency preparedness programmes and provisions established by the Laender. The medical expert for radiation injuries is a particularly important function in the radiologial accident management services. The provisions for medical care have been determined on the basis of knowledge drawn among other sources from the German Nuclear Power Plant Risk Study, Phase B. In addition, the guide's provisions are based on international knowledge about the consequences of enhanced radiation exposure, and the medical tasks and the required organisational infrastructure have been determined accordingly. A further source of reference for planning the activities are the data accumulated during emergency preparedness training activities in the various Laender. (orig./MG). 3 figs., 5 tabs [de

  9. On nuclear power plant uprating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S. Allen; Bailey, James V.; Maginnis, Stephen T.

    2004-01-01

    Power uprating for commercial nuclear power plants has become increasingly attractive because of pragmatic reasons. It provides quick return on investment and competitive financial benefits, while involving low risks regarding plant safety and public objection. This paper briefly discussed nuclear plant uprating guidelines, scope for design basis analysis and engineering evaluation, and presented the Salem nuclear power plant uprating study for illustration purposes. A cost and benefit evaluation of the Salem power uprating was also included. (author)

  10. Nuclear Power Plant 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Again this year, our magazine presents the details of the conference on Spanish nuclear power plant operation held in February and that was devoted to 1996 operating results. The Protocol for Establishment of a New Electrical Sector Regulation that was signed last December will undoubtedly represent a new challenge for the nuclear industry. By clearing stating that current standards of quality and safety should be maintained or even increased if possible, the Protocol will force the Sector to improve its productivity, which is already high as demonstrated by the results of the last few years described during this conference and by recent sectorial economic studies. Generation of a nuclear kWh that can compete with other types of power plants is the new challenge for the Sector's professionals, who do not fear the new liberalization policies and approaching competition. Lower inflation and the resulting lower interest rates, apart from being representative indices of our economy's marked improvement, will be very helpful in facing this challenge. (Author)

  11. A prototype nuclear emergency response decision making expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Shih, C.; Hong, M.; Yu, W.; Su, M.; Wang, S.

    1990-01-01

    A prototype of emergency response expert system developed for nuclear power plants, has been fulfilled by Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. Key elements that have been implemented for emergency response include radioactive material dispersion assessment, dynamic transportation evacuation assessment, and meteorological parametric forecasting. A network system consists of five 80386 Personal Computers (PCs) has been installed to perform the system functions above. A further project is still continuing to achieve a more complicated and fanciful computer aid integral emergency response expert system

  12. Ar-41 measurements and nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunst, J.J.; Rodriguez, M.; Ugarte, R.; Vigile, R.S.; Boutet, L.I.; Jordan, O.D.; Hernandez, D.G.

    2010-01-01

    During the early phase of an emergency is necessary to confirm the release of radioactivity predictions made by the operator of the nuclear plant. In this context, it has begun measuring Ar-41 in the vicinity of a research reactor. Since the Ar-41 is produced in the reactor, it has been studied as a good way to validate the air dispersion model used in nuclear emergencies and to develop a method to improve the characterization of the release. For this latter purpose a pilot experiment was conducted to determine computational and experimental methods, the flux of 1.29 MeV of Ar-41 and compared to evaluate the accuracy of the assessments made. This paper describes meteorological forecasting systems used in the experiment, the estimate of the stability class and the concentration of nuclides using a calculation code developed by the ARN, as well as the methodology and equipment used for measurement in the field. (authors) [es

  13. Emerging trends in nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear energy is faltering in many places - especially in the USA: should it be written off. The author sees underlying trends that justify a more optimistic view of nuclear energy's future - the continuing tendency for the electricity intensity of economic activity to rise while the total energy intensity falls; a consistently favourable price trend for electricity compared with energy prices generally - a trend that may become more favourable if his judgment that nuclear plants will turn out to be very long-lived is borne out by events; the substitution of electricity-based processes in industry for older processes; and the development of ultra-safe reactors which will remove once and for all the fears of accidents such as the one that occurred at Three Mile Island. (author)

  14. The role of industrial-sanitary laboratory of medical aid station of Federal administration in prophylaxis of emergency situations at the plants of nuclear-energy complex and liquidation of their after-effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipin, E.B.

    1995-01-01

    On the example of several radiation accidents the author summarized the personal practical experience in organization of work in industrial-sanitary laboratories based at the nuclear energy plants of nuclear-energy complex, in respect of prophylaxis of emergency radiation situations and liquidation of their after-effects. It is pointed out that successful activity in rendering emergency medical aid in emergency situations, caused by radiation accidents, is possible only subject to close contact of science, practical medical care and sanitary service which should become a part of the uniform public health system. 4 refs

  15. Siting nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellin, J.; Joskow, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The first edition of this journal is devoted to the policies and problems of siting nuclear power plants and the question of how far commercial reactors should be placed from urban areas. The article is divided into four major siting issues: policies, risk evaluation, accident consequences, and economic and physical constraints. One concern is how to treat currently operating reactors and those under construction that were established under less-stringent criteria if siting is to be used as a way to limit the consequences of accidents. Mehanical cost-benefit analyses are not as appropriate as the systematic use of empirical observations in assessing the values involved. Stricter siting rules are justified because (1) opposition because of safety is growing: (2) remote siting will make the industry more stable; (3) the conflict is eliminated between regulatory policies and the probability basis for nuclear insurance; and (4) joint ownership of utilities and power-pooling are increasing. 227 references, 7 tables

  16. Technical subsidies for the operation of IRD/CNEN emergency vehicles in the case of a nuclear accident at the Angra Nuclear Power Plant with associated radioactive releases to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, J.L.B.

    1982-03-01

    Technical support is provided for the operation of an emergency vehicle of Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria/Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in the event of uncontrolled release of radioactivity from the Angra Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) to the atmosphere. It is based on internationally adopted emergency decision process philosophy, the concept of 'Protective Action Guide' (PAG), the exposure pathways relevant to nuclear accidents, the measuring systems to be used in obtaining the exposure rate in the effluent 'plume', the methods utilized to predict dose to the population, radioiodine suppression measures, the monitoring instrumentation available to the emergency group, some post-accident considerations and finally, the monitoring that may be carried out from an aircraft. Information is given about the NPP operator's responsabilities with respect to the prediction of the consequences of an accident, as well as methods for thyroid and whole body dose estimation based on exposure to the radioiodine and noble gases present in the effluent plume. The example of the Three Mile Island's incident is used to formulate some observations regarding collective dose to the public estimates derived from measurements made from a helicopter. (Author) [pt

  17. Nuclear power plant disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of a nuclear power plant disaster is small but not excluded: in its event, assistance to the affected population mainly depends on local practitioners. Already existing diseases have to be diagnosed and treated; moreover, these physicians are responsible for the early detection of those individuals exposed to radiation doses high enough to induce acute illness. Here we present the pathogenesis, clinical development and possible diagnostic and therapeutical problems related to acute radiation-induced diseases. The differentiation of persons according to therapy need and prognosis is done on the sole base of the clinical evidence and the peripheral blood count. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Laurer, E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention is concerned with a quick-closing valve on the main-steam pipe of a nuclear reactor plant. The quick-closing valve serves as isolating valve and as safety valve permitting depressurization in case of an accident. For normal operation a tube-shaped gate valve is provided as valve disc, enclosing an auxiliary valve disc to be used in case of accidents and which is opened at increased pressure to provide a smaller flow cross-section. The design features are described in detail. (RW) [de

  19. Plan for national nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The responsibility for Denmark's preparedness for nuclear emergencies lies with the Ministry of the Interior and the Civil Defense administration. The latter is particularly responsible for the presented plan which clarifies the organization and the measures to be taken in order to protect the public where, in the event of such an emergency, it could be in danger of radiation from radioactive materials. The main specifications of the plan, the activation of which covers the whole country, are that daily monitoring should be carried out so that warnings of nuclear accidents can be immediately conveyed to the relevant parties and that immediate action can be taken. These actions should result in the best possible protection against nuclear radiation so that acute and chronic damage to the health of members of the public can be restricted. The public, and relevant authorities should be informed of the situation and it should be attempted to regulate the reactions of individuals and of the society in general in such a way that damage to health, or social and economical conditions, can be restricted as much as possible. Denmark has not itself any atomic power plants, but some are located in neighbour countries and there are other sources such as nuclear research reactors, passing nuclear-driven ships etc. The detailed plan also covers possible sources of radiation, the nature of related damage to health, international cooperation, legal aspects, and a very detailed description of the overall administration and of the responsibilities of the organizations involved. (AB)

  20. The development of nuclear power and emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear power is a safe, clean energy, which has been evidenced by the history of nuclear power development. Nuclear power is associated with very low risk but not equal to zero. Accident emergency response and preparedness is a final barrier necessary to reduce potential risks that may arise from nuclear power plants, which must be enhanced. In the course of accident emergency response and preparedness, it is highly necessary to draw domestic and foreign experiences and lessons. Lastly, the paper presents the discussions of some issues which merit attention with respect to emergency response and preparedness in China. (authors)

  1. Nuclear Plant Integrated Outage Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstberger, C. R.; Coulehan, R. J.; Tench, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of an emerging concept for improving nuclear plant outage performance - integrated outage management. The paper begins with an explanation of what the concept encompasses, including a scope definition of the service and descriptions of the organization structure, various team functions, and vendor/customer relationships. The evolvement of traditional base scope services to the integrated outage concept is addressed and includes discussions on changing customer needs, shared risks, and a partnership approach to outages. Experiences with concept implementation from a single service in 1984 to the current volume of integrated outage management presented in this paper. We at Westinghouse believe that the operators of nuclear power plants will continue to be aggressively challenged in the next decade to improve the operating and financial performance of their units. More and more customers in the U. S. are looking towards integrated outage as the way to meet these challenges of the 1990s, an arrangement that is best implemented through a long-term partnering with a single-source supplier of high quality nuclear and turbine generator outage services. This availability, and other important parameters

  2. Garigliano nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    During the period under review, the Garigliano power station produced 1,028,77 million kWh with a utilization factor of 73,41% and an availability factor of 85,64%. The disparity between the utilization and availability factors was mainly due to a shutdown of about one and half months owing to lack of staff at the plant. The reasons for nonavailability (14.36%) break down as follows: nuclear reasons 11,49%; conventional reasons 2,81%; other reasons 0,06%. During the period under review, no fuel replacements took place. The plant functioned throughout with a single reactor reticulation pump and resulting maximum available capacity of 150 MWe gross. After the month of August, the plant was operated at levels slightly below the maximum available capacity in order to lengthen the fuel cycle. The total number of outages during the period under review was 11. Since the plant was brought into commercial operation, it has produced 9.226 million kWh

  3. Availability of the electrical supply system of emergency sources of 900-MW pressurized water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blin, A.

    A study made by CEA and EDF on the time-dependent probability of simultaneous loss of the electrical supply system from emergency sources is reported. Aspects covered include the availability of the electrical supply system in all possible conditions (2 available external sources, 1 available external source...) and the probability for repair after total loss of supply sources

  4. Reinforcement of planning and response to emergencies inside nuclear power plants; Refuerzo de la planificación y respuesta ante emergencias en el interior de las centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortés, M.A.; Garcés, J.M.; Bolaños, J.; Fernández, J.; Gutiérrez, C.; Pontejo, A.; Rosell, B.

    2015-07-01

    Fukushima Daichi nuclear accident (11th march of 2011) required a rapid and effective response of nuclear industry, in order to guarantee that current safety margins were enough to cope with events like this or even worse. In Europe, stress tests were carried out to comply with that objective, evaluating if every nuclear plant was able to succeed managing design basis accidents or even beyond. Stress-test results were satisfactory, although several areas for improvement where identified. Improvements in emergency response and management have been developed in several phases. First, increasing emergency response capacity by implementing modifications in existing equipment. Later, installing new equipment (generally portable) which would be used in even more degraded conditions. This must be held by the revision of emergency response personnel and their training. Finally, external support has been reinforced to help in longstanding emergencies, with the establishment of CAE (Regional Center), and collaboration protocols with the Army. These actions, supervised and approved by the Regulator Body (CSN) will lead to increase plants safety margins and their emergency response capacities in order to reduce probability and consequences of a nuclear accident to the minimum. [Spanish] El accidente nuclear ocurrido el 11 de marzo de 2011 en Fukushima Daichi requirió de una pronta y efectiva respuesta de la industria nuclear, que garantizase que los márgenes de seguridad eran los adecuados para hacer frente a sucesos de estas características o incluso peores. Con ese objetivo se planteó, a nivel europeo, la realización de unas pruebas de resistencia que valorasen si las centrales podían hacer frente con garantías a una serie de accidentes dentro y más allá de las bases de diseño. Los resultados fueron satisfactorios, si bien se identificaron varios aspectos de mejora. La mejora en la respuesta y gestión de emergencias de las centrales nucleares se ha planteado en

  5. Safety design of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yu; Zhang Lian; Du Shenghua; Zhao Jiayu

    1984-01-01

    Safety issues have been greatly emphasized through the design of the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant. Reasonable safety margine has been taken into account in the plant design parameters, the design incorporated various safeguard systems, such as engineering safety feature systems, safety protection systems and the features to resist natural catastrophes, e. g. earthquake, hurricanes, tide and so on. Preliminary safety analysis and environmental effect assessment have been done and anti-accident provisions and emergency policy were carefully considered. Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant safety related systems are designed in accordance with the common international standards established in the late 70's, as well as the existing engineering standard of China

  6. Diesel engine power generating set efficiency for nuclear power plant electrical energy supply in case of emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, I.; Aksamija, R.; Tumpa, M.

    1984-01-01

    Working ability of diesel engine set to starting and functioning reliability during operation is evaluated within study of efficiency. methods of calculation are applied: data compilation method and Markov method. The evaluation is that a diesel engine set has efficiency of 0.993285. It is a high efficiency which ensures a safe start, load take over and safe operation. This evaluation makes a basis for similar calculations which will be needed for national nuclear program. (author)

  7. New source terms and the implications for emergency planning requirements at nuclear power plants in the United State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.D.; Cheok, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper begins with a brief review of current approaches to source term driven changes to NRC emergency planning requirements and addresses significant differences between them. Approaches by IDCOR and EPRI, industry submittals to NRC and alternative risk-based evaluations have been considered. Important issues are discussed, such as the role of Protective Action Guides in determining the radius of the emergency planning zone (EPZ). The significance of current trends towards the prediction of longer warning times and longer durations of release in new source terms is assessed. These trends may help to relax the current notification time requirements. Finally, the implications of apparent support in the regulations for a threshold in warning time beyond which ad hoc protective measures are adequate is discussed

  8. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Genard Gilles; Portal Romain; Bouchat Virginie; Vanderperre Serge

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assump...

  9. Emergency Cooling of Nuclear Power Plant Reactors With Heat Removal By a Forced-Draft Cooling Tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murav’ev, V. P., E-mail: murval1@mail.ru

    2016-07-15

    The feasibility of heat removal during emergency cooling of a reactor by a forced-draft cooling tower with accumulation of the peak heat release in a volume of precooled water is evaluated. The advantages of a cooling tower over a spray cooling pond are demonstrated: it requires less space, consumes less material, employs shorter lines in the heat removal system, and provides considerably better protection of the environment from wetting by entrained moisture.

  10. Nuclear power plant operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The guide applies to the nuclear power plant operator licensing procedure referred to the section 128 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. The licensing procedure applies to shift supervisors and those operators of the shift teams of nuclear power plant units who manipulate the controls of nuclear power plants systems in the main control room. The qualification requirements presented in the guide also apply to nuclear safety engineers who work in the main control room and provide support to the shift supervisors, operation engineers who are the immediate superiors of shift supervisors, heads of the operational planning units and simulator instructors. The operator licensing procedure for other nuclear facilities are decided case by case. The requirements for the basic education, work experience and the initial, refresher and complementary training of nuclear power plant operating personnel are presented in the YVL guide 1.7. (2 refs.)

  11. Development of a quantitative evaluation method for non-technical skills preparedness of operation teams in nuclear power plants to deal with emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We selected important non-technical skills for emergency conditions in NPPs. ► We proposed an evaluation method for the selected non-technical skills. ► We conducted two sets of training, 9 experiments each, with real plant operators. ► Teams showed consistent non-technical skills preparedness with changing scenarios. ► Non-technical skills preparedness gives plausible explanations why teams fail tasks. -- Abstract: Many statistical results from safety reports tell that human related errors are the dominant influencing factor on the safe operation of power plants. Fortunately, training operators for the technical and non-technical skills can prevent many types of human errors. In this study, four important non-technical skills in safety critical industries – medical, aviation, and nuclear – were selected to describe behaviors of operation teams in emergency conditions of nuclear power plants (NPPs): communication, leadership, situation awareness, and decision-making skills. Also, preparedness of the non-technical skills was defined, and a quantification method of those skills called NoT-SkiP (Non-Technical Skills Preparedness) was developed to represent ‘how well operation teams are prepared to deal with emergency conditions’ in the non-technical skills aspect by analyzing monitoring-control patterns and a verbal protocol. Two case studies were conducted to validate the method. The first case was applied to Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) training. Independent variables were scenario, training repetition, and members. Relative values of the NoT-SkiP showed a consistent trend with changing scenarios. However, when training was repeated with the same scenario, NoT-SkiP values of some team were changed. It was supposed that leaders of some teams exerted their knowledge acquired from the previous training and gave up thoroughness of using procedures. When members especially who play a dominant role

  12. Development of a quantitative evaluation method for non-technical skills preparedness of operation teams in nuclear power plants to deal with emergency conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Poong Hyun, E-mail: phseong@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► We selected important non-technical skills for emergency conditions in NPPs. ► We proposed an evaluation method for the selected non-technical skills. ► We conducted two sets of training, 9 experiments each, with real plant operators. ► Teams showed consistent non-technical skills preparedness with changing scenarios. ► Non-technical skills preparedness gives plausible explanations why teams fail tasks. -- Abstract: Many statistical results from safety reports tell that human related errors are the dominant influencing factor on the safe operation of power plants. Fortunately, training operators for the technical and non-technical skills can prevent many types of human errors. In this study, four important non-technical skills in safety critical industries – medical, aviation, and nuclear – were selected to describe behaviors of operation teams in emergency conditions of nuclear power plants (NPPs): communication, leadership, situation awareness, and decision-making skills. Also, preparedness of the non-technical skills was defined, and a quantification method of those skills called NoT-SkiP (Non-Technical Skills Preparedness) was developed to represent ‘how well operation teams are prepared to deal with emergency conditions’ in the non-technical skills aspect by analyzing monitoring-control patterns and a verbal protocol. Two case studies were conducted to validate the method. The first case was applied to Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) training. Independent variables were scenario, training repetition, and members. Relative values of the NoT-SkiP showed a consistent trend with changing scenarios. However, when training was repeated with the same scenario, NoT-SkiP values of some team were changed. It was supposed that leaders of some teams exerted their knowledge acquired from the previous training and gave up thoroughness of using procedures. When members especially who play a dominant role

  13. Development and Testing of a Model for Simulation of Process Operators' During Emergencies in Nuclear Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes a program for the development and testing of a model of cognitive processes intended for simulation of operator responses to plant disturbances. It will be a part of a computer program complex called DYLAM for automatic identification of accident scenarios to be included...... to develop this data base is proposed. The human element is introduced in the model by a perturbation function derived from human error modes.A Program for testing the model in briefly mentioned....

  14. Images of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Katsuhisa; Misumi, Jyuji; Yamada, Akira; Sakurai, Yukihiro; Seki, Fumiyasu; Shinohara, Hirofumi; Misumi, Emiko; Kinjou, Akira; Kubo, Tomonori.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to check and see, using Hayashi's quantification method III, whether or not the respondents differed in their images of a nuclear power plant, depending on their demographic variables particularly occupations. In our simple tabulation, we compared subject groups of nuclear power plant employees with general citizens, nurses and students in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. The results were that while the nuclear power plant employees were high in their evaluations of facts about a nuclear power plant and in their positive images of a nuclear power plant, general citizens, nurses and students were overwhelmingly high in their negative images of a nuclear power plant. In our analysis on category score by means of the quantification method III, the first correlation axis was the dimension of 'safety'-'danger' and the second correlation axis was the dimension of 'subjectivity'-'objectivity', and that the first quadrant was the area of 'safety-subjectivity', the second quadrant was the area of 'danger-subjectivity', the third quadrant as the area of 'danger-objectivity', and the forth quadrant was the area of 'safety-objectivity'. In our analysis of sample score, 16 occupation groups was compared. As a result, it was found that the 16 occupation groups' images of a nuclear power plant were, in the order of favorableness, (1) section chiefs in charge, maintenance subsection chiefs, maintenance foremen, (2) field leaders from subcontractors, (3) maintenance section members, operation section members, (4) employees of those subcontractors, (5) general citizens, nurses and students. On the 'safety-danger' dimension, nuclear power plant workers on the one hand and general citizens, nurses and students on the other were clearly divided in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. Nuclear power plant workers were concentrated in the area of 'safety' and general citizens, nurses and students in the area of 'danger'. (J.P.N.)

  15. Wuergassen nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The decision of the Federal Court of Administration concerns an application for immediate decommissioning of a nuclear power plant (Wuergassen reactor): The repeal of the permit granted. The decision dismisses the appeal for non-admission lodged by the plaintiffs against the ruling of the Higher Court of Administration (OVG) of North-Rhine Westphalia of December 19th 1988 (File no. 21 AK 8/88). As to the matter in dispute, the Federal Court of Administration confirms the opinion of the Higher Court of Administration. As to the headnotes, reference can be made to that decision. Federal Court of Administration, decision of April 5th 1989 - 7 B 47.89. Lower instance: OVG NW, Az.: 21 AK 8/88. (orig./RST) [de

  16. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    In the first embodiment of the present invention, elements less activated by neutrons are used as reactor core structural materials placed under high neutron irradiation. In the second embodiment of the present invention, materials less activated by neutrons when corrosive materials intrude to a reactor core are used as structural materials constituting portions where corrosion products are generated. In the third embodiment, chemical species comprising elements less activated by neutrons are used as chemical species to be added to reactor water with an aim of controlling water quality. A nuclear power plant causing less radioactivity can be provided by using structural materials comprising a group of specific elements hardly forming radioactivity by activation of neutrons or by controlling isotope ratios. (N.H.)

  17. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear power plant is described which includes a steam generator supplied via an input inlet with feedwater heated by reactor coolant to generate steam, the steam being conducted to a steam engine having a high pressure stage to which the steam is supplied, and which exhausts the steam through a reheater to a low pressure stage. The reheater is a heat exchanger requiring a supply of hot fluid. To avoid the extra load that would be placed on the steam generator by using a portion of its steam output as such heating fluid, a portion of the water in the steam generator is removed and passed through the reheater, this water having received at least adequate heating in the steam generator to make the reheater effective, but not at the time of its removal being in a boiling condition

  18. Medical procedures in the event of nuclear power plant accidents. Guidelines for: Medical consultants for emergency response commander; physicians in emergency care centres; physicians in outpatient and inpatient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genkel, Simone

    2008-01-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on medical procedures in the event of nuclear power plant accidents. This contribution consists of the following sections: protective measures, tasks of radiation protection physicians, emergency care centres. It has been pointed out that differentiation of the hospitals is acquired which accept radiation accident patients. However, only a small number of hospitals will be able to professionally treat patients with suspected gastrointestinal or pronounced (muco)cutaneous type of hospitals with haemotological-oncological departments. Thus they should be able to treat patients who have been exposed to radiation doses between 1 and 6 Gy without any difficulties. Even larger is the number of hospitals which can accept patients who were exposed to a radiation dose of less than 1 Gy, but suffer from other complicating diseases (injuries, general diseases)

  19. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genard, Gilles; Portal, Romain; Bouchat, Virginie; Vanderperre, Serge

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  20. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genard Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  1. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyokawa, Teruyuki; Soman, Yoshindo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To constitute a heat exchanger as one unit by integrating primary and secondary coolant circuits with secondary coolant circuit and steam circuit into a single primary circuit and steam circuit. Constitution: A nuclear power plant comprises a nuclear reactor vessel, primary coolant pipeways and a leakage detection system, in which a dual-pipe type heat exchanger is connected to the primary circuit pipeway. The heat conduction tube of the heat exchanger has a dual pipe structure, in which the inside of the inner tube is connected to the primary circuit pipeway, the outside of the outer tube is connected to steam circuit pipeway and a fluid channel is disposed between the inner and outer tubes and the fluid channel is connected to the inside of an expansion tank for intermediate heat medium. The leak detection system is disposed to the intermediate heat medium expansion tank. Sodium as the intermediate heat medium is introduced from the intermediate portion (between the inner and outer tubes) by way of inermediate heat medium pipeways to the intermediate heat medium expansion tank and, further, to the intermediate portion for recycling. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. The development of a quantitative measure for the complexity of emergency tasks stipulated in emergency operating procedures of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2006-11-01

    Previous studies have continuously pointed out that human performance is a decisive factor affecting the safety of complicated process systems. Subsequently, as the result of extensive efforts, it has been revealed that the provision of procedures is one of the most effective countermeasures, especially if human operators have to carry out their tasks under a very stressful environment. That is, since good procedures are helpful to not only enhance the performance of human operators but also the reduction of the possibility of a human error through stipulating detailed tasks to be done by human operators. Ironically, it has been emphasized that the performance of human operators could be impaired due to complicated procedures, because procedures directly govern the physical as well as cognitive behavior of human operators by institutionalizing detailed actions. Therefore, it is a prerequisite to develop a systematic framework that properly evaluate the complexity of tasks described in procedures. For this reason, a measure called TACOM (Task Complexity) that can quantify the complexity of emergency tasks described in the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of NPPs has been developed. In this report, a technical background as well as practical steps to quantify the complexity of tasks were presented with a series of studies that were conducted to ensure the validity of the TACOM measure. As a result of validation studies, since it is shown that the TACOM measure seem to properly quantify the complexity of emergency tasks, it is desirable that the TACOM measure plays an important role in improving the performance of human operators

  3. The development of a quantitative measure for the complexity of emergency tasks stipulated in emergency operating procedures of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2006-11-15

    Previous studies have continuously pointed out that human performance is a decisive factor affecting the safety of complicated process systems. Subsequently, as the result of extensive efforts, it has been revealed that the provision of procedures is one of the most effective countermeasures, especially if human operators have to carry out their tasks under a very stressful environment. That is, since good procedures are helpful to not only enhance the performance of human operators but also the reduction of the possibility of a human error through stipulating detailed tasks to be done by human operators. Ironically, it has been emphasized that the performance of human operators could be impaired due to complicated procedures, because procedures directly govern the physical as well as cognitive behavior of human operators by institutionalizing detailed actions. Therefore, it is a prerequisite to develop a systematic framework that properly evaluate the complexity of tasks described in procedures. For this reason, a measure called TACOM (Task Complexity) that can quantify the complexity of emergency tasks described in the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of NPPs has been developed. In this report, a technical background as well as practical steps to quantify the complexity of tasks were presented with a series of studies that were conducted to ensure the validity of the TACOM measure. As a result of validation studies, since it is shown that the TACOM measure seem to properly quantify the complexity of emergency tasks, it is desirable that the TACOM measure plays an important role in improving the performance of human operators.

  4. Perspectives of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, Gy.

    2001-01-01

    In several countries the construction of nuclear power plants has been stopped, and in some counties several plants have been decommissioned or are planned to. Therefore, the question arises: have nuclear power plants any future? According to the author, the question should be reformulated: can mankind survive without nuclear power? To examine this challenge, the global power demand and its trends are analyzed. According to the results, traditional energy sources cannot be adequate to supply power. Therefore, a reconsideration of nuclear power should be imminent. The economic, environmental attractions are discussed as opposite to the lack of social support. (R.P.)

  5. Medical treatment of radiation damages and medical emergency planning in case of nuclear power plant incidents and accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlenschlaeger, L.

    1981-03-01

    Medical measures in case of radiation damages are discussed on the basis of five potential categories of radiation incidents and accidents, respectively, viz. contaminations, incorporations, external local and general radiation over-exposures, contaminated wounds, and combinations of radiation damages and conventional injuries. Considerations are made for diagnostic and therapeutic initial measures especially in case of minor and moderate radiation accidents. The medical emergency planning is reviewed by means of definations used in the practical handling of incidents or accidents. The parameters are: extent of the incident or accident, number of persons involved, severity of radiation damage. Based on guiding symptoms the criteria for the classification into minor, moderate or severe radiation accidents are discussed. Reference is made to the Medical Radiation Protection Centers existing in the Federal Republic of Germany and the possibility of getting advices in case of radiation incidents and accidents. (orig.) [de

  6. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1994-06-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of the Finnish NPPs describe nuclear and radiation safety related events and observations which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers significant. Safety improvements at the plants and general matters relating to the use of nuclear energy are also reported. A summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, and tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors are also given. One event during the last quarter of 1993 was rated on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) as level 1. During this event at Loviisa 2, the secondary circuit emergency feedwater system was erroneously isolated from automatic start-up readiness. The error went unnoticed for 4.5 hours. During 1993 one level 2 incident and three level 1 incidents occurred at the Finnish NPPs. (8 figs., 4 tabs.)

  7. Development of nuclear emergency exercise programme (NEEP) in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear emergency exercise programme (NEEP) is a PC-based application intended for design and planning emergency preparedness and response (EP and R) exercises for a potential nuclear emergency in Korea. The application programme allows EP and R staff to create and edit exercise scenarios based on information customised for a specific nuclear power plant's emergency plans. NEEP includes the following features: (1) step-by-step guide to developing new exercise scenario according to emergency alarm level and potential accident type, (2) database of specific plant's field exercise scenarios that can be easily modified by users, (3) generating master scenario events list and messages of exercise participants and (4) allowing the quantitative evaluation of exercise participants from the view of exercise objectives and evaluator guides. NEEP also features tools for queries, reports and visualisation that can be used to create documentation during the scenario planning and exercise evaluation processes. (authors)

  8. Owners of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  9. Emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Rahmah Hidayati; Pande Made Udiyani

    2009-01-01

    All nuclear facilities in Indonesia are owned and operated by the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). The programs and activities of emergency planning and preparedness in Indonesia are based on the existing nuclear facilities, i.e. research reactors, research reactor fuel fabrication plant, radioactive waste treatment installation and radioisotopes production installation. The assessment is conducted to learn of status of emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia and to support the preparation of future Nuclear Power Plant. The assessment is conducted by comparing the emergency preparedness and response system in Indonesia to the system in other countries such as Japan and Republic of Korea, since the countries have many Nuclear Power Plants and other nuclear facilities. As a result, emergency preparedness response plan for existing nuclear facility in Indonesia has been implemented in many activities such as environmental monitoring program, facility monitoring equipment, and the continuous exercise of emergency preparedness and response. However, the implementation need law enforcement for imposing the responsibility of the coordinators in National Emergency Preparedness Plan. It also needs some additional technical support systems which refer to the system in Japan or Republic of Korea. The systems must be completed with some real time monitors which will support the emergency preparedness and response organization. The system should be built in NPP site before the first NPP will be operated. The system should be connected to an Off Site Emergency Center under coordination of BAPETEN as the regulatory body which has responsibility to control of nuclear energy in Indonesia. (Author)

  10. Methodology of complexity analysis of Emergency Operating Procedures for Nuclear Power Plants; Metodologia de analisis de complejidad de Procedimientos de Operacion de Emergencia de Centrales Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martorell, P.; Martorell, S.; Marton, I.; Pelayo, F.; Mendizabal, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Emergency Operating Procedures (SOPs) set out the stages and contain actions to be executed by an operator to respond to an emergency situation. Methodologies are being developed to assess aspects such as complexity, completeness and vulnerability of these procedures. A methodology is presented in this paper to develop a network topology POE and analysis focused on the same complexity as a fundamental attribute.

  11. Study on computerized presentation of emergency procedures of a nuclear plant (step 2). The guidelines of the prototype of the computerized procedure presentation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Yuji; Hollnagel, E.; Iwaki, Toshio.

    1995-01-01

    New methods of information presentation and interface design are changing the working conditions in the modern Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control room. One area receiving considerable attention is that of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs), which plays an essential role in NPPs. Conventionally procedures are presented in a hard copy form. However developments in information technology have offered new opportunities for the computerization of such procedures. Consideration for the first stage of computerization should be focused upon the presentation of procedures. The specification of the computerized presentation of procedures is discussed with respect to the issues which were central to the project: navigation through procedures; formatting and presentation of procedures; and process monitoring. Issues that would be included in more advanced systems, such as help and explanation facilities features, and process linking, are also discussed. This paper deals with the specific design guidelines that were implemented for the computerization of procedure presentation. Issues of principal concern that were identified from this experience are highlighted, such as the relationship between procedure presentation and format; the registration of progress through a procedure; compensation for the limitations of computer displays versus printed documents; and the way in which the added capabilities of computerized presentation can be generally utilized in the operators' working environment. (author)

  12. Nuclear emergency exercises in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, F.B.

    1993-01-01

    The practice followed in planning, preparing and conducting offsite nuclear emergency exercises in the Province of Ontario, Canada, is described. In addition, some of the main issues that arise during this process are discussed, as well as Canadian experience in dealing with them. The planning process starts with basic decisions on the aim, scope and duration of the exercise. It proceeds through selection of the exercise objectives and participants, the development of scenarios and incident lists culminating in a master scenario and a master incident list, and finally, the production of control inputs. Preparations include the setting up of a planning organization, making arrangements for exercise control and evaluation, and the required logistics. Some aspects of international exercises are also covered, based upon experience with joint exercises with the U.S.A

  13. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiba, James M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  14. Development of the drug for acute treatment of emergent exposure to radiation by nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Described is a flow of authors' studies on the drug development in the title, aiming to save the life after the emergent exposure to peri-lethal dose. Medicals with radioprotective properties have been essentially those to be given before the exposure. Authors have studied the mechanism of bystander effect of non-exposed cells where they, localizing around the directly radiation-exposed cells, acquire the radioresistance; have found that nitrogen oxide (NO) is one of mediators for the effect; and have thought to apply the NO generating agents for the drug already clinically available, such as sodium nitroprusside (SNP), isosorbide nitrate (ISDN), nicolandil (NC), nitroglycerin (NG), and nipradilol (NP). ISDN, NC, NG and NP exhibited no in vitro-toxicity in colony formation of human fibroblast AG1522 cells up to 30 micro-M whereas SNP was toxic at the level >3 micro-M due to the formation of cyanide which could be detoxicated in vivo. Actually, the 5 agents were not toxic in vivo. When male jcl/ICR mice were irradiated with lethal dose of 7.5 Gy X-ray and the 5 agents were given to make their level 30 micro-M immediately, 1, 2 and 7 days after the exposure, 3/5 animals given SNP survived. With the half lethal dose of 6.5 Gy X-ray and 50 animals, SNP was further examined in details: survival was found to be 75-85% in mice given SNP in contrast to 30-40% in the control and the life-saving effect was suggested to be due to suppression of intestinal and marrow death with the improved feature of peripheral platelet and leukocyte. Thus SNP, a drug for angina pectoris, is found radioprotective even post exposure. (T.T.)

  15. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small folder presents a digest of some useful information concerning the nuclear power plants worldwide and the situation of nuclear industry at the end of 1997: power production of nuclear origin, distribution of reactor types, number of installed units, evolution and prediction of reactor orders, connections to the grid and decommissioning, worldwide development of nuclear power, evolution of power production of nuclear origin, the installed power per reactor type, market shares and exports of the main nuclear engineering companies, power plants constructions and orders situation, evolution of reactors performances during the last 10 years, know-how and development of nuclear safety, the remarkable facts of 1997, the future of nuclear power and the energy policy trends. (J.S.)

  16. Emerging nuclear suppliers in the Third World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, K.

    1990-01-01

    The emergence of new supplier states of nuclear technology within the Third World has raised concern, if those nuclear supplier states will promote an unrestricted and uncontrolled transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries and augment the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. The article analyses the nuclear export capacities, nuclear exports and the export policy of Argentina, Brazil and India. Argentina is considered as the most important emerging nuclear supplier state in the Third World. Nuclear exports have to be authorisized by the government in all three states and will be covered by IAEA-safeguards in the recipient country. The three states will exercise restraint in the transfer of sensitive nuclear technology. Nuclear exports of Argentina, Brazil and India so far will not augment the danger of nuclear weapons proliferation. (orig./HSCH) [de

  17. Owners of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.S.

    1991-07-01

    This report indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies. The report includes all plants operating, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review, but does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. Part 1 of the report lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants or licensees and percentage ownership. Part 2 lists applicants or licensees alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part 1 also indicates which plants have received operating licenses (OLS)

  18. Nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Hidehiro; Oya, Takashi

    1996-11-05

    The present invention provides a highly safe light water-cooled type nuclear power plant capable of reducing radiation dose by suppressing deposition of activated corrosion products by a simple constitution. Namely, equipments and pipelines for fluid such as pumps at least in one of fluid systems such as a condensate cleanup system are constituted by a material containing metal species such as Zn having an effect of suppressing deposition of radioactivity. Alternatively, the surface of these equipments and pipelines for fluids on which water passes is formed by a coating layer comprising a material containing a metal having a radiation deposition suppressing effect. As a result, radioactivity deposited on the equipments and pipelines for fluids is reduced. In addition, since the method described above may be applied only at least to a portion of the members constituting at least one of the systems for fluids, it is economical. Accordingly, radiation dose upon inspection of equipments and pipelines for fluids can be reduced simply and reliably. (I.S.)

  19. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Hidehiro; Oya, Takashi.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a highly safe light water-cooled type nuclear power plant capable of reducing radiation dose by suppressing deposition of activated corrosion products by a simple constitution. Namely, equipments and pipelines for fluid such as pumps at least in one of fluid systems such as a condensate cleanup system are constituted by a material containing metal species such as Zn having an effect of suppressing deposition of radioactivity. Alternatively, the surface of these equipments and pipelines for fluids on which water passes is formed by a coating layer comprising a material containing a metal having a radiation deposition suppressing effect. As a result, radioactivity deposited on the equipments and pipelines for fluids is reduced. In addition, since the method described above may be applied only at least to a portion of the members constituting at least one of the systems for fluids, it is economical. Accordingly, radiation dose upon inspection of equipments and pipelines for fluids can be reduced simply and reliably. (I.S.)

  20. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushijima, Susumu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to prevent the degradation in the quality of condensated water in a case where sea water leakage should occur in a steam condenser of a BWR type nuclear power plant. Constitution: Increase in the ion concentration in condensated water is detected by an ion concentration detector and the leaking factor of sea water is calculated in a leaking factor calculator. If the sea water leaking factor exceeds a predetermined value, a leak generation signal is sent from a judging device to a reactor power control device to reduce the reactor power. At ehe same tiem, the leak generation signal is also sent to a steam condenser selection and isolation device to interrupt the sea water pump of a specified steam condenser based on the signal from the ion concentration detector, as well as close the inlet and outlet valves while open vent and drain valves to thereby forcively discharge the sea water in the cooling water pipes. This can keep the condensate desalting device from ion breaking and prevent the degradation in the quality of the reactor water. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Underground nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo.

    1997-01-01

    In an underground-type nuclear power plant, groups of containing cavities comprising a plurality of containing cavities connected in series laterally by way of partition walls are disposed in parallel underground. Controlled communication tunnels for communicating the containing cavities belonging to a control region to each other, and non-controlled communication tunnels for communicating containing cavities belonging to a non-controlled area to each other are disposed underground. A controlled corridor tunnel and a non-controlled corridor tunnel extended so as to surround the containing cavity groups are disposed underground, and the containing cavities belonging to the controlled area are connected to the controlled corridor tunnel respectively, and the containing cavities belonging to the non-controlled area are connected to the non-controlled corridor tunnel respectively. The excavating amount of earth and sand upon construction can be reduced by disposing the containing cavity groups comprising a plurality of containing cavities connected in series laterally. The time and the cost for the construction can be reduced, and various excellent effects can be provided. (N.H.)

  2. Safety in Swiss nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederqvist, H.

    1992-01-01

    Safety-related facilities and equipment are continuously backfitted in Swiss nuclear power plants. In the Beznau-1 and -2 nuclear generating units, the measures taken under the heading of 'Backfitting of Emergency Systems' included provisions to enhance the protection against earthquakes, airplane crash, and fire; in addition, the emergency power system was upgraded. In Muehleberg, the stack exhaust air monitoring system was optimized. The containment pressure suppression system of the plant has been designed to withstand a hypothetical accident exceeding the design basis. The BKM-Crud computer simulation model simulates steps taken to reduce radiation exposure. The power of Swiss nuclear power stations will be raised by 4% to 15% within the 'Energy 2000' action program. (orig.) [de

  3. Public regulation of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtheret, M.; Cormis, de

    1980-01-01

    The construction and operation of nuclear plants are subject to a complex system of governmental administration. The authors list the various governmental authorisations and rules applicable to these plants. In the first part, they describe the national regulations which relate specifically to nuclear plants, and emphasize the provisions which are intended to ensure the safety of the installations and the protection of the public against ionizing radiation. However, while the safety of nuclear plants is a major concern of the authorities, other interests are also protected. This is accomplished by various laws or regulations which apply to nuclear plants as well as other industrial installations. The duties which these texts, and the administrative practice based thereon, impose on Electricite de France are covered in the second part [fr

  4. Nuclear power plant diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokop, K.; Volavy, J.

    1982-01-01

    Basic information is presented on diagnostic systems used at nuclear power plants with PWR reactors. They include systems used at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant in the USSR, at the Nord power plant in the GDR, the system developed at the Hungarian VEIKI institute, the system used at the V-1 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice in Czechoslovakia and systems of the Rockwell International company used in US nuclear power plants. These diagnostic systems are basically founded on monitoring vibrations and noise, loose parts, pressure pulsations, neutron noise, coolant leaks and acoustic emissions. The Rockwell International system represents a complex unit whose advantage is the on-line evaluation of signals which gives certain instructions for the given situation directly to the operator. The other described systems process signals using similar methods. Digitized signals only serve off-line computer analyses. (Z.M.)

  5. Nuclear power plant V-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear power plant Bohunice V -1 is briefly described. This NPP consists from two reactor units. Their main time characteristics are (Reactor Unit 1, Reactor Unit 2): beginning of construction - 24 April 1972; first controlled reactor power - 27 November 1978, 15 March 1980; connection to the grid - 17 December 1978, 26 March 1980; commercial operation - 1 April 1980, 7 January 1981. This leaflet contains: NPP V-1 construction; Major technological equipment (Primary circuit: Nuclear reactor [WWER 440 V230 type reactor];Steam generator; Reactor Coolant Pumps; Primary Circuit Auxiliary Systems. Secondary circuit: Turbine generators, Nuclear power plant electrical equipment; power plant control) and technical data

  6. Nuclear emergency preparedness in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworska, A. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    Radiation emergency preparedness systems must be able to deal with the threats posed to each country and the region as a whole. The threats from nuclear accidents differ in the various countries of the region. The most serious nuclear threats are those with cross-border implications and are generally assumed to be due to the presence of nuclear reactors of various kinds. Some countries in the region, Finland, Germany, Lithuania, the Russian Federation and Sweden, have nuclear power plants, and several countries in the region possess smaller research reactors. Other nuclear threats arise from nuclear powered naval vessels or submarines, and from nuclear powered satellites. Production, transportation, use, and disposal of radioactive materials constitute potential local nuclear hazards. Finally, terrorist use of radioactive material poses a nuclear threat to all countries. (au)

  7. Nuclear emergency preparedness in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation emergency preparedness systems must be able to deal with the threats posed to each country and the region as a whole. The threats from nuclear accidents differ in the various countries of the region. The most serious nuclear threats are those with cross-border implications and are generally assumed to be due to the presence of nuclear reactors of various kinds. Some countries in the region, Finland, Germany, Lithuania, the Russian Federation and Sweden, have nuclear power plants, and several countries in the region possess smaller research reactors. Other nuclear threats arise from nuclear powered naval vessels or submarines, and from nuclear powered satellites. Production, transportation, use, and disposal of radioactive materials constitute potential local nuclear hazards. Finally, terrorist use of radioactive material poses a nuclear threat to all countries. (au)

  8. Man and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    According to the Inst. fuer Unfallforschung/TUeV Rheinland, Koeln, the interpretation of empirical data gained from the operation of nuclear power plants at home and abroad during the period 1967-1975 has shown that about 38% of all reactor accidents were caused by human failures. These occured either during the design and construction, the commissioning, the reconditioning or the operation of the plants. This very fact stresses human responsibility for the safety of nuclear power plants, in spite of those plants being automated to a high degree and devices. (orig.) [de

  9. Monitoring support system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashikawa, Yuichi; Kubota, Rhuji; Tanaka, Keiji; Takano, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear power plants in Japan reach to 49 plants and supply 41.19 million kW in their installed capacities, which is equal to about 31% of total electric power generation and has occupied an important situation as a stable energy supplying source. As an aim to keeping safe operation and working rate of the power plants, various monitoring support systems using computer technology, optical information technology and robot technology each advanced rapidly in recent year have been developed to apply to the actual plants for a plant state monitoring system of operators in normal operation. Furthermore, introduction of the emergent support system supposed on accidental formation of abnormal state of the power plants is also investigated. In this paper, as a monitoring system in the recent nuclear power plants, design of control panel of recent central control room, introduction to its actual plant and monitoring support system in development were described in viewpoints of improvement of human interface, upgrade of sensor and signal processing techniques, and promotion of information service technique. And, trend of research and development of portable miniature detector and emergent monitoring support system are also introduced in a viewpoint of labor saving and upgrade of the operating field. (G.K.)

  10. Radiochemistry in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, W.

    2007-01-01

    Radiochemistry is employed in nuclear power plants not as an end in itself but, among other things, as a main prerequisite of optimum radiation protection. Radiochemical monitoring of various loops provides important information about sources of radioactivity, activity distribution in the plant and its changes. In the light of these analytical findings, plant crews are able to take measures having a positive effect on radiation levels in the plant. The example of a BWR plant is used to show, among other things, how radiochemical analyses helped to reduce radiation levels in a plant and, as a consequence, to decrease clearly radiation exposure of the personnel despite higher workloads. (orig.)

  11. Nuclear emergency protection. Today and tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, Jens Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The state of affairs of the nuclear emergency protection at accidents in connection with the use of nuclear power, at incidents with dangerous radiation sources as well as in case of criminal use of radioactive substances is presented. Moreover, the organization and the responsibilities as well as the preparation and realization of emergency training are considered and commented.

  12. Fusion of Nuclear and Emerging Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrul Khaer Alang Rashid

    2005-04-01

    The presentation discussed the following subjects: emerging technology; nuclear technology; fusion emerging and nuclear technology; progressive nature of knowledge; optically stimulated luminescence - application of luminescence technology to sediments; Biosystemics technology -convergence nanotechnology, ecological science, biotechnology, cognitive science and IT - prospective impact on materials science, the management of public system for bio-health, eco and food system integrity and disease mitigation

  13. Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fran

    1979-01-01

    Presents a nuclear power plant simulation game which is designed to involve a class of 30 junior or senior high school students. Scientific, ecological, and social issues covered in the game are also presented. (HM)

  14. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-08-01

    During the first quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. Nuclear electricity accounted for 32.5% of the total Finnish electricity production during this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 99.0%. An international nuclear event scale has been introduced for the classification of nuclear power plant events according to their nuclear and radiation safety significance. The scale first undergoes about a year long trial period in several countries. on the scale, events are divided into levels from 1 to 7 of which events at Level 7 are the most serious. Furthermore, Level 0 (Below Scale) is used for events with no safety significance. All events which occurred at the Finnish nuclear power plants this quarter are classified as Level 0. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were considerably below authorised limits. At the Loviisa plant, a back-up emergency feedwater system independent of the plant's other systems has been introduced which offers a new, alternative means of removing residual heat from the reactor. Owing to this system, the risk of a severe accident has been further reduced. At the TVO plants, systems have been introduced by which accident sequences which lead to containment failure could be eliminated and the consequences of a potential severe accident could be mitigated. In this report, also the release of short-lived radioactive materials along the transfer route of an irradiated sample is described which occured at the FiR 1 research reactor. The amounts of radioactive materials individuals received in their bodies in connection with this event were very low

  15. Robotics for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraiwa, Takanori; Watanabe, Atsuo; Miyasawa, Tatsuo

    1984-01-01

    Demand for robots in nuclear power plants is increasing of late in order to reduce workers' exposure to radiations. Especially, owing to the progress of microelectronics and robotics, earnest desire is growing for the advent of intellecturized robots that perform indeterminate and complicated security work. Herein represented are the robots recently developed for nuclear power plants and the review of the present status of robotics. (author)

  16. Robotics for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraiwa, Takanori; Watanabe, Atsuo; Miyasawa, Tatsuo

    1984-10-01

    Demand for robots in nuclear power plants is increasing of late in order to reduce workers' exposure to radiations. Especially, owing to the progress of microelectronics and robotics, earnest desire is growing for the advent of intellecturized robots that perform indeterminate and complicated security work. Herein represented are the robots recently developed for nuclear power plants and the review of the present status of robotics.

  17. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollradt, J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of the main questions of decommissioning of nuclear power plants will be given in the sight of German utilities (VDEW-Working group 'Stillegung'). The main topics are: 1) Definitions of decommissioning, entombment, removal and combinations of such alternatives; 2) Radioactive inventory (build up and decay); 3) Experience up to now; 4) Possibilities to dismantle are given by possibility to repair nuclear power plants; 5) Estimated costs, waste, occupational radiation dose; 6) German concept of decommissioning. (orig./HK) [de

  18. Medical rescue for nuclear or radiologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaohua; Nie Suifeng

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear or radiologic emergencies are defined as incidents that are caused by radioactive substance or by other sources of radiation and can pose a serious hazard to public health. In case of nuclear or radiologic emergencies, radioactive rays will damage the human body and bring about psychological and mental stress, resulting in a series of social psychological effects. The key to medical rescue for nuclear or radiologic emergencies is to take effective measures which can minimize the body harm resulting from nuclear or radiologic emergencies and maintain social stability. This article reviews the personnel protection, on-the-spot salvage, treatments of various harm, and prevention of public psychological effect following nuclear or radiologic emergencies. (authors)

  19. Nuclear emergency planning and response in the Netherlands after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, L.J.W.M.; Kerkhoven, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    After Chernobyl an extensive project on nuclear emergency planning and response was started in the Netherlands. The objective of this project was to develop a (governmental) structure to cope with accidents with radioactive materials, that can threaten the Dutch community and neighbouring countries. The project has resulted in a new organizational structure for nuclear emergency response, that differs on major points from the existing plans and procedures. In this paper an outline of the new structure is given. Emphasis is placed on accidents with nuclear power plants

  20. Pre-fire planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbert, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Regardless of the fire prevention measures which are taken, plant experience indicates that fires will occur in a nuclear power plant. When a fire occurs, the plant staff must handle the fire emergency. Pre-fire planning is a method of developing detailed fire attack plans and salvage operations to protect equipment from damage due to fire and fire fighting operations. This paper describes the purpose and use of a pre-fire plan to achieve these goals in nuclear power plants

  1. Emergency measures following hypothetical actions against nuclear facilities in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogani, A.; Tabet, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: After the Chernobyl accident a national emergency plan of protective measures for radiological emergencies has been set up in Italy to cope with nuclear risks which require actions at national level. Since most of the Italian nuclear installations are, at present, not operational, the most relevant nuclear risk sources identified in the national emergency plan stem from accidents in nuclear power plants near the Italian borders or aboard nuclearpropelled ships, or events related to the fall of nuclear-powered satellites and transportation of radioactive materials. The plan identifies a reference scenario for nation-wide emergency interventions and the proper structures to be involved in the radiological emergency. However, risks related to nuclear terrorism are not taken into account in the plan, whereas nuclear plants as well as nuclear materials and sources (in use in medical, scientific and industrial applications) are known to represent potential targets for hostile acts, potentially giving rise to harmful radioactive releases into the atmosphere. Along with four nuclear power plants, now undergoing a decommissioning procedure, several other nuclear facilities, such as provisional radioactive waste deposits or research centers, are present in Italy. Unfortunately not all of the radioactive waste inventory is conditioned in such a way to make a spread of radioactive contamination, as a consequence of a hostile action, unlikely; moreover, spent fuel elements are still kept, in some cases, inside the plant spent fuel storage pool. In this paper the hypothetical radiological impact of deliberate actions against some reference nuclear installations will be evaluated, together with its amplications for an appropriate profiling of the emergency countermeasures which could be required. Especially the case of a terrorism act against a spent fuel storage pool is worked out in some detail, as this event appears to be one of those with the most severe

  2. Organizing nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, H.W.; Rekittke, K.

    1987-01-01

    With the preliminary culmination in the convoy plants of the high standard of engineered safeguards in German nuclear power plants developed over the past twenty years, the interest of operators has now increasingly turned to problems which had not been in the focus of attention before. One of these problems is the organization of nuclear power plant operation. In order to enlarge the basis of knowledge, which is documented also in the rules published by the Kerntechnischer Ausschuss (Nuclear Technology Committee), the German Federal Minister of the Interior has commissioned a study of the organizational structures of nuclear power plants. The findings of that study are covered in the article. Two representative nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany were selected for the study, one of them a single-unit plant run by an independent operating company in the form of a private company under German law (GmbH), the other a dual-unit plant operated as a dependent unit of a utility. The two enterprises have different structures of organization. (orig.) [de

  3. The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) and its participation in the External Radiological Emergency Plans at Laguna Verde Power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, G.

    1998-01-01

    In this article it is described the form in which the ININ participates in the External Radiological Emergency Plan at Laguna Verde Power plant. It is set the objective, mission and organization of this plan. The responsibilities and activities that plan has assigned are mentioned also the organization to fulfil them and the obtained results during 9 years of participation. (Author)

  4. Partner of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribi, M.; Lauer, F.; Pauli, W.; Ruzek, W.

    1992-01-01

    Sulzer, the Swiss technology group, is a supplier of components and systems for nuclear power plants. Important parts of Swiss nuclear power stations, such as containments, reactor pressure vessels, primary pipings, are made in Winterthur. Sulzer Thermtec AG and some divisions of Sulzer Innotec focus their activities on servicing and backfitting nuclear power plants. The European market enjoys priority. New types of valves or systems are developed as economic solutions meeting more stringent criteria imposed by public authorities or arising from operating conditions. (orig.) [de

  5. Operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook gives a systematic introduction into the operational and maintenance activities in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Subjects: (1) Setup and operational behaviour of power reactors, (2) setup of nuclear power plants, (3) radiation protection and nuclear safety, (4) nuclear fuel, (5) constructional layout of nuclear power plants, (6) management, and (7) maintenance. 158 figs., 56 tabs

  6. Methodology for the identification of the factors that can influence the performance of operators of nuclear power plants control room under emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Bernardo Spitz; Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti

    2009-01-01

    In order to minimize the human errors of the operators in a nuclear power plan control room, during emergency situations, it has to be considered the factors which affect the human performance. Work situations adequately projected, compatible with the necessities, capacities and human limitations, taking into consideration the factors which affect the operator performance . This paper aims to develop a methodology for identification of the factors affecting the operator performance under emergency situation, using the aspects defined by the human reliability analysis focusing the judgment done by specialists

  7. Loviisa nuclear power plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkholm, K.; Nurmilaukas, P.; Tiihonen, O.; Haenninen, M.; Puska, E.

    1992-12-01

    The APROS Simulation Environment has been developed since 1986 by Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). It provides tools, solution algorithms and process components for use in different simulation systems for design, analysis and training purposes. One of its main nuclear applications is the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant Analyzer (LPA). The Loviisa Plant Analyzer includes all the important plant components both in the primary and in the secondary circuits. In addition, all the main control systems, the protection system and the high voltage electrical systems are included. (orig.)

  8. German risk study 'nuclear power plants, phase B'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, F.W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the German risk study 'Nuclear power plants, phase B' indicate that an accident in a nuclear power plant which cannot be managed by the safety systems according to design, is extremely improbable: Its probability is at about 3 to 100,000 per year and plant. Even if the safety systems fail, emergency measures can be effected in a nuclear power plant to prevent an accident. These in-plant emergency measures diminish the probability of a core meltdown to about 4 to 1,000,000 per year and plant. Hence, the accident risk is greatly reduced. The information given by the author are to smooth the emotional edge in the discussion about the safety of nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  9. A study on expert system applications for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Young Hwan; Kim, Yeong Jin; Park, Nam Seog; Dong, In Sook; Choi, In Seon

    1987-12-01

    The application of artificial intelligence techniques to nuclear power plants such as expert systems is rapidly emerging. expert systems can contribute significantly to the availability and the improved operation and safety of nuclear power plants. The objective of the project is to develop an expert system in a selected application area in the nuclear power plants. This project will last for 3 years. The first year's tasks are: - Information collection and literature survey on expert systems. - Analysis of several applicable areas for applying AI technologies to the nuclear power plants. - Conceptual design of a few selected domains. - Selection of hardware and software tools for the development of the expert system

  10. Building of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takashi.

    1997-01-01

    A first nuclear plant and a second nuclear power plant are disposed in adjacent with each other in a building for a nuclear reactor. A reactor container is disposed in each of the plants, and each reactor container is surrounded by a second containing facility. A repairing chamber capable of communicating with the secondary containing facilities for both of the secondary containing facilities is disposed being in contact with the second containing facility of each plant for repairing control rod driving mechanisms or reactor incorporated-type recycling pumps. Namely, the repairing chamber is in adjacent with the reactor containers of both plants, and situated between both of the plants as a repairing chamber to be used in common for both plants. Air tight inlet/exit doors are formed to the inlets/exits of both plants of the repairing chamber. Space for the repairing chamber can be reduced to about one half compared with a case where the repairing chamber is formed independently on each plant. (I.N.)

  11. TVA's nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews TVA's nuclear power plant design and construction experience in terms of schedule and capital costs. The completed plant in commercial operation at Browns Ferry and six additional plants currently under construction represent the nation's largest single commitment to nuclear power and an ultimate investment of $12 billion by 1986. The presentation is made in three separate phases. Phase one will recapitulate the status of the nuclear power industry in 1966 and set forth the assumptions used for estimating capital costs and projecting project schedules for the first TVA units. Phase two describes what happened to the program in the hectic early 1979's in terms of expansion of scope (particularly for safety features), the dramatic increase in regulatory requirements, vendor problems, stretchout of project schedules, and unprecedented inflation. Phase three addresses the assumptions used today in estimating schedules and plant costs for the next ten-year period

  12. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-03-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost the whole third quarter of 1991. Longer interruptions in electricity generation were caused by the annual maintenances of the Loviisa plant units. The load factor average was 81.7 %. In a test conducted during the annual maintenance outage of Loviisa 1 it was detected that the check valve of the discharge line of one pressurized emergency make-up tank did not open sufficiently at the tank's hydrostatic pressure. In connection with a 1988 modification, a too tightly dimensioned bearing had been mounted on the valve's axle rod and the valve had not been duly tested after the operation. The event is classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Other events in this quarter which are classified according to the International Nuclear Event Scale are Level Zero (Below Scale). Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site were below authorised limits in this quarter. Only small amounts of radioactive materials originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  13. Nuclear security - New challenge to the safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ganjie

    2008-01-01

    The safety of nuclear power plants involves two aspects: one is to prevent nuclear accidents resulted from systems and equipments failure or human errors; the other is to refrain nuclear accidents from external intended attack. From this point of view, nuclear security is an organic part of the nuclear safety of power plants since they have basically the same goals and concrete measures with each other. In order to prevent malicious attacks; the concept of physical protection of nuclear facilities has been put forward. In many years, a series of codes and regulations as well as technical standard systems on physical protection had been developed at international level. The United Nations passed No. 1540 resolution as well as 'Convention on the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear terrorism', and revised 'Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials', which has enhanced a higher level capacity of preparedness by international community to deal with security issues of nuclear facilities. In China, in order to improve the capability of nuclear power plants on preventing and suppressing the external attacks, the Chinese government consecutively developed the related codes and standards as well as technical documents based on the existing laws and regulations, including 'Guide for the Nuclear Security of Nuclear Power Plants' and 'Guide for the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials', so as to upgrade the legislative requirements for nuclear security in power plants. The government also made greater efforts to support the scientific research and staff training on physical protection, and satisfying the physical protection standards for newly-built nuclear facilities such as large scale nuclear power plants to meet requirement at international level. At the same time old facilities were renovated and the Chinese government established a nuclear emergency preparedness coordination mechanism, developed corresponding emergency preparedness plans, intensified the

  14. Nuclear plant simulation using the Nuclear Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.; Laats, E.T.; Wagner, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), a state-of-the-art computerized safety analysis and engineering tool, was employed to simulate nuclear plant response to an abnormal transient during a training exercise at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in Washington, DC. Information relative to plant status was taken from a computer animated color graphics display depicting the course of the transient and was transmitted to the NRC Operations Center in a manner identical to that employed during an actual event. Recommendations from the Operations Center were implemented during on-line, interactive execution of the RELAP5 reactor systems code through the NPA allowing a degree of flexibility in training exercises not realized previously. When the debriefing was conducted, the RELAP5 calculations were replayed by way of the color graphics display, adding a new dimension to the debriefing and greatly enhancing the critique of the exercise

  15. The seismic assessment of wheeled vehicle type equipment (e.g. emergency power supply vehicle) against severe accident for nuclear power plant in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takuya; Mitsuzawa, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Yoshikazu; Hasebe, Motohiko; Imamura, Ryutaro; Tomitani, Yuji; Ueyama, Ippei; Kawamoto, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    After the events at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, the equipment to mitigate the effects of severe accidents has been installed in the domestic nuclear power plants. From the viewpoint of convenience for installation, etc., a number of industry standard-based wheeled vehicle type equipment has been placed. On the other hand, the new regulations require the equipment for severe accidents to withstand the Design Basis Earthquake. Therefore, the seismic qualification is essential item for wheeled vehicle type equipment according to the regulatory requirement. At that time, compared to the traditional safety-related equipment, there was not enough knowledge of seismic evaluation for vehicle type equipment. This paper reports the overview of wheeled vehicle type equipment and the seismic qualification by test. (author)

  16. Nuclear plant analyzer development and analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1984-10-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is being developed as the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) state of the art safety analysis and engineering tool to address key nuclear plant safety issues. This paper describes four applications of the NPA in assisting reactor safety analyses. Two analyses evaluated reactor operating procedures, during off-normal operation, for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR), respectively. The third analysis was performed in support of a reactor safety experiment conducted in the Semiscale facility. The final application demonstrated the usefulness of atmospheric dispersion computer codes for site emergency planning purposes. An overview of the NPA and how it supported these analyses are the topics of this paper

  17. Latin America: emerging nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The need for nuclear power in Latin American countries is surveyed. It is concluded that Latin America offers the greatest external market for all exporters of nuclear reactors and associated services in the near future. Mexico, Venezuela, Ecuador, and Bolivia are the only countries with fossil-fuel reserves adequate to meet their requirements in the next 20 to 30 years. Nuclear power is a necessity to maintain or improve the standard of living in the countries of Brazil, Argentina, Chile, and Peru

  18. ALARA at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of the ALARA principle at nuclear power plants presents a continuing challenge for health physicists at utility corporate and plant levels, for plant designers, and for regulatory agencies. The relatively large collective doses at some plants are being addressed through a variety of dose reduction techniques. Initiatives by the ICRP, NCRP, NRC, INPO, EPRI, and BNL ALARA Center have all contributed to a heightened interest and emphasis on dose reduction. The NCRP has formed Scientific Committee 46-9 which is developing a report on ALARA at Nuclear Power Plants. It is planned that this report will include material on historical aspects, management, valuation of dose reduction ($/person-Sv), quantitative and qualitative aspects of optimization, design, operational considerations, and training. The status of this work is summarized in this report

  19. Exercises for radiological and nuclear emergency response. Planing - performance - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, A.; Faleschini, J.; Goelling, K.; Stapel, R.; Strobl, C.

    2010-01-01

    The report of the study group emergency response seminar covers the following topics: (A) purpose of exercises and exercise culture: fundamentals and appliances for planning, performance and evaluation; (B) exercises in nuclear facilities; (C) exercises of national authorities and aid organizations on nuclear scenarios; exercises of national authorities and aid organizations on other radiological scenarios; (D) exercises in industrial plants, universities, medical facilities and medical services, and research institutes; (E) transnational exercises, international exercises; (F): exercises on public information.

  20. World nuclear power plant capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report provides the background information for statistics and analysis developed by NUKEM in its monthly Market Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The assessments in this Special Report are based on the continuous review of individual nuclear power plant projects. This Special Report begins with tables summarizing a variety of nuclear power generating capacity statistics for 1990. It continues with a brief review of the year's major events regarding each country's nuclear power program. The standard NUKEM Market Report tables on nuclear plant capacity are given on pages 24 and 25. Owing to space limitations, the first year shown is 1988. Please refer to previous Special Reports for data covering earlier years. Detailed tables for each country list all existing plants as well as those expected by NUKEM to be in commercial operation by the end of 2005. An Appendix containing a list of abbreviations can be found starting on page 56. Only nuclear power plants intended for civilian use are included in this Special Report. Reactor lifetimes are assumed to be 35 years for all light water reactors and 30 years for all other reactor types, unless other data or definite decommissioning dates have been published by the operators. (orig./UA) [de

  1. Medium-size nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelweith, L.; Lavergne, J.C.; Martinot, G.; Weiss, A.

    1977-01-01

    CEA (TECHNICATOME) has developed a range of pressurized water reactors of the type ''CAS compact'' which are adapted to civil ship propulsion, or to electric power production, combined possibly with heat production, up to outputs equivalent to 125 MWe. Nuclear plants equipped with these reactors are suitable to medium-size electric networks. Among the possible realizations, two types of plants are mentioned as examples: 1) Floating electron-nuclear plants; and 2) Combined electric power and desalting plants. The report describes the design characteristics of the different parts of a 125 MWe unit floating electro-nuclear plant: nuclear steam system CAS 3 G, power generating plant, floating platform for the whole plant. The report gives attention to the different possibilities according to site conditions (the plant can be kept floating, in a natural or artificial basin, it can be put aground, ...) and to safety and environment factors. Such unit can be used in places where there is a growing demand in electric power and fresh water. The report describes how the reactor, the power generating plant and multiflash distillation units of an electric power-desalting plant can be combined: choice of the ratio water output/electric power output, thermal cycle combination, choice of the gain ratio, according to economic considerations, and to desired goal of water output. The report analyses also some technical options, such as: choice of the extraction point of steam used as heat supply of the desalting station (bleeding a condensation turbine, or recovering steam at the exhaust of a backpressure turbine), design making the system safe. Lastly, economic considerations are dealt with: combining the production of fresh water and electric power provides usually a much better energy balance and a lower cost for both products. Examples are given of some types of installations which combine medium-size reactors with fresh water stations yielding from 10000 to 120000 m 3 per day

  2. Owners of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.S.

    1979-12-01

    The following list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of December 1, 1979. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and envionmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. It does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. In many cases, ownership may be in the process of changing as a result of antitrust license conditions and hearings, altered financial conditions, changed power needs, and other reasons. However, this list reflects only those ownership percentages of which the NRC has been formally notified

  3. Effective nuclear and radiation emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes how to develop a balanced emergency plan, which realistically reflect the interfaces with various emergency organizations. The use of resources should be optimized with focusing on the most likely accidents. The pitfalls of writing an emergency plan without ''big picture'' in mind should be avoided. It is absolutely essential to have a clear definition of responsibilities and to have proper understanding of the tasks in between all counterparts in the emergency preparedness. Special attention should be paid to off-site part of the nuclear emergency preparedness, because the people involved in it usually receive less training than the on-site personnel and they are not specialized for nuclear emergencies but deal with all sorts of emergencies. (author)

  4. Latina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    In the period under review, the Latina power plant produced 1009,07 million kWh with a utilization factor of 72% and an availability factor of 80,51%. The disparity between the utilization and availability factors was mainly due to the shutdown of the plant owing to trade union strife. The reasons for non-availability (19,49%) were almost all related to the functioning of the conventional part and the general servicing of the plant (18 September-28 October). During the shutdown for maintenance, an inspection of the steel members and parts of the core stabilizing structure was made in order to check for the familiar oxidation phenomena caused by CO 2 ; the results of the inspection were all satisfactory. Operation of the plant during 1974 was marked by numerous power cutbacks as a result of outages of the steam-raising units (leaks from the manifolds) and main turbines (inspection and repairs to the LP rotors). Since it was first brought into commercial operation, the plant has produced 13,4 thousand million kWh

  5. Maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashgari, Farbod.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is about maintenance of nuclear power plants. In part one, the outage management of nuclear power plants has described. Meaning of the outage and objectives of outage management is given in introduction. The necessity of a long-term outage strategy is shown in chapter one. The main parts of an outage are as follows: Planning; Preparation; Execution, Each of them and also post-outage review have been explained in the followed chapters. Part two deals with technical details of main primary components of nuclear power plant type WWER. After an introduction about WWER reactors, in each chapter first the general and detailed description of main primary components has given and then their maintenance schedules and procedures. Chapter about reactor and steam generator is related to both types of WWER-440 and WWER-1000, but chapter about reactor coolant pump has specified to WWER-1000 to be more in details.(author)

  6. Licensed bases management for advanced nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, J.; Rumble, E.; Rodwell, E.

    2001-01-01

    Prospective Advanced Nuclear Plant (ANP) owners must have high confidence that the integrity of the licensed bases (LB) of a plant will be effectively maintained over its life cycle. Currently, licensing engineers use text retrieval systems, database managers, and checklists to access, update, and maintain vast and disparate licensing information libraries. This paper describes the demonstration of a ''twin-engine'' approach that integrates a program from the emerging class of concept searching tools with a modern Product Data Management System (PDMS) to enhance the management of LB information for an example ANP design. (author)

  7. Taxonomy of the nuclear plant operator's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.; Fullerton, A.M.; Frey, P.R.; Dougherty, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    A program is presently under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define the functional design requirements of operational aids for nuclear power plant operators. A first and important step in defining these requirements is to develop an understanding of the operator's role or function. This paper describes a taxonomy of operator functions that applies during all operational modes and conditions of the plant. Other topics such as the influence of automation, role acceptance, and the operator's role during emergencies are also discussed. This systematic approach has revealed several areas which have potential for improving the operator's ability to perform his role

  8. Licensed bases management for advanced nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, J [Duke Engineering and Services, Marlborough, MA (United States); Rumble, E; Rodwell, E [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Prospective Advanced Nuclear Plant (ANP) owners must have high confidence that the integrity of the licensed bases (LB) of a plant will be effectively maintained over its life cycle. Currently, licensing engineers use text retrieval systems, database managers, and checklists to access, update, and maintain vast and disparate licensing information libraries. This paper describes the demonstration of a ''twin-engine'' approach that integrates a program from the emerging class of concept searching tools with a modern Product Data Management System (PDMS) to enhance the management of LB information for an example ANP design. (author)

  9. Licensed bases management for advanced nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, J. [Duke Engineering and Services, Marlborough, MA (United States); Rumble, E.; Rodwell, E. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Prospective Advanced Nuclear Plant (ANP) owners must have high confidence that the integrity of the licensed bases (LB) of a plant will be effectively maintained over its life cycle. Currently, licensing engineers use text retrieval systems, database managers, and checklists to access, update, and maintain vast and disparate licensing information libraries. This paper describes the demonstration of a ''twin-engine'' approach that integrates a program from the emerging class of concept searching tools with a modern Product Data Management System (PDMS) to enhance the management of LB information for an example ANP design. (author)

  10. Emerging nuclear security issues for transit countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabulov, I.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Tragic events of September eleventh have made nuclear terrorism dangers more evident. In the light of increased terrorism preventing the spread of nuclear and nuclear related items as well as radioactive materials that can be used for production so-called 'dirty bomb'is an urgent global claim. Nuclear Security issues cover multiple aspects of the security and first of all the threat from nuclear terrorism, detection and protection of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources, legal shipment of such type materials as well as nuclear related dual use items. In the face of emerging threats the prevention of proliferation by the development of effective national system of nuclear export controls is hugely important for transit countries like Azerbaijan with underdeveloped export controls and strategic locations along trade and smuggling routes between nuclear suppliers States and countries attempting to develop nuclear weapons or any nuclear explosive devices. Thus, in the face of increasing international threat from nuclear terrorism the role and place of Azerbaijan Republic in the struggle against terrorism increases. In this context it is very important to establish effective national capabilities for detection and prevention of illicit trafficking of radioactive and nuclear materials as well as nuclear related dual use items across Azerbaijan's borders. One of the ways for enhancing and strengthening existing activities in this field is carrying out joint actions between scientists and enforcement officials in order to improve knowledge of the front-line customs and border guard inspectors concerning multiple aspects of Nuclear Security

  11. Developments in emergency planning within Scottish nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Scottish Nuclear has recently completed a major program of improvements to its nuclear emergency facilities. The improvements include the construction of a purpose built Off-Site Emergency Centre for each of its two power stations and the development of a computer based information management system to facilitate the rapid distribution of information on an emergency to local, regional and national agencies. A computer code has also been developed to allow the rapid assessment of the effects of any accidental release on the local population. The improvements to the emergency facilities have been coupled with changes in local and national arrangements for dealing with a civil nuclear emergency. The use of airborne surveying techniques for rapidly determining levels of deposited activity following an accident is also being examined and preliminary airborne surveys have been carried out. (author)

  12. Emergency preparedness and response: compensating victims of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Julia

    2004-01-01

    The 1986 tragedy at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine motivated the entire international nuclear community to ensure that countries would, in the future, be well prepared to manage the physical, psychological and financial consequences of a serious nuclear accident. Since that event, numerous nuclear emergency preparedness and post-emergency management programmes have been established at national and international levels to ensure that appropriate mechanisms will respond to the threat, and the aftermath, of a nuclear accident. The INEX 2000 Workshop on the Indemnification of Nuclear Damage, jointly organised by the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency and the French Government, was the first ever international programme to address the manner in which victims of a nuclear accident with trans-boundary consequences would be compensated for damage suffered before, during and after the accident. The Workshop results revealed striking differences in the compensation principles and practices implemented in the 30 participating countries, in the co-ordination measures between different public authorities within an affected state, and in the co-operative procedures between the accident state and its neighbours. All participants agreed on the need for improvement in these areas, particularly for maintaining public confidence in governments' ability to properly manage nuclear emergencies

  13. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Ranken, W.A.; Koenig, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  14. Nuclear power plant V-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear power plant Bohunice V -2 is briefly described. This NPP consists from two reactor units. Their main time characteristics are (Reactor Unit 1, Reactor Unit 2): beginning of construction - December 1976; first controlled reactor power - 7 August 1984, 2 August 1985; connection to the grid - 20 August 1984, 9 August 1985; commercial operation - 14 February 1985, 18 December 1985. This leaflet contains: NPP V-2 construction; Major technological equipment [WWER 440 V230 type reactor; Nuclear Power plant operation safety (Safety barriers; Safety systems [Active safety systems, Passive safety systems]); Centralized heat supply system; Scheme of Bohunice V-2 NPP and technical data

  15. Development of CSA N1600-14: general requirements for nuclear emergency management programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellar, C. [Canadian Standards Association Group, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Coles, J. [Ontario Power Generation, Darlington, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    CSA Group has published a new standard on General requirements for nuclear emergency management programs (CSA N1600-14). The standard establishes criteria for the emergency management programs of on- and off-site organizations to address nuclear emergencies at Canadian nuclear power plants (NPPs). It provides the requirements to develop, implement, evaluate, maintain, and continuously improve a nuclear emergency management program for prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery from a nuclear emergency at a NPP. This paper discusses the development of the standard, and provides the key drivers, structure, scope, and outline of the standard, while highlighting key features, impacts, and benefits. (author)

  16. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, R.

    1979-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel consists of two parts. A cylindrical lower part with a hemispherical steel roof is placed at some distance within an equally shaped pressure vessel of concrete. Both vessels are standing on a common bottom plate. The interspace is kept at subpressure. It serves to contain ring galleries, elevator shafts, and power plant components. (GL) [de

  17. Nuclear plant undergrounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.C.; Bastidas, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Under Section 25524.3 of the Public Resources Code, the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (CERCDC) was directed to study ''the necessity for '' and the effectiveness and economic feasibility of undergrounding and berm containment of nuclear reactors. The author discusses the basis for the study, the Sargent and Lundy (S and L) involvement in the study, and the final conclusions reached by S and L

  18. Challenges for new nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    In the past 20 years, numerous new nuclear plant designs have been introduced in the hope of generating a mixture of features and benefits that generated enough enthusiasm amongst the utility industry decision makers to move forward with a new nuclear generation. Not only has there not been enough enthusiasm, there has been little interest in building new plants with advanced features, especially in the U.S. Compounding this predicament are the changing paradigms to which a new plant would be measured. The near hiatus on new plant orders is the clear cause of the significant consolidation in the nuclear industry. Regardless whether the disappearance of old-line nuclear companies is over or not, some paradigms for new generation designs are unmovable, while others are still under discussion as to their role in future plant designs. This paper will address those design goals that Westinghouse deems already having earned the rank of exemplar, and those still open to debate. Because it is my hope that this paper will lead to a fruitful discussion period, I will provide a list of what I feel are the champion design requirements, and those I consider the contenders. (author)

  19. Robotics for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Ryoichi; Kimura, Motohiko; Abe, Akira

    1993-01-01

    A continuing need exists for automatic or remote-controlled machines or robots which can perform inspection and maintenance tasks in nuclear power plants. Toshiba has developed several types of monofunctional and multi- functional robots for such purposes over the past 20 years, some of which have already been used in actual plants. This paper describes new multifunctional robots for inspection and maintenance. An inspection robot has been applied in an actual plant for two years for performance testing. Maintenance robots for grinding tasks have also been developed, which can be easily teleoperated by the operator using automatic control. These new robots are expected to be applied to actual inspection and maintenance work in nuclear power plants. (author)

  20. Submarine nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enohara, Masami; Araragi, Fujio.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a ballast tank, and nuclear power facilities within the containment shell of a pressure resistance structure and a maintenance operator's entrance and a transmission cable cut-off device at the outer part of the containment shell, whereby after the construction, the shell is towed, and installed by self-submerging, and it can be refloated for repairs by its own strength. Constitution: Within a containment shell having a ballast tank and a pressure resisting structure, there are provided nuclear power facilities including a nuclear power generating chamber, a maintenance operator's living room and the like. Furthermore, a maintenance operator's entrance and exit device and a transmission cable cut-off device are provided within the shell, whereby when it is towed to a predetermined a area after the construction, it submerges by its own strength and when any repair inspection is necessary, it can float up by its own strength, and can be towed to a repair dock or the like. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. The emerging nuclear suppliers and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The number of states capable of exporting nuclear material, technology, equipment, and services is large and growing. Once confined primarily to states party to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the list of actual and potential nuclear suppliers now includes many countries that do not subscribe to the NPT or to other international nuclear export control agreements. Although international control accords---such as the Nuclear Exporters' (Zangger) Committee and the London Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) guidelines---do not prohibit the export of sensitive nuclear materials and equipment, they do reduce the risks of proliferation by imposing international safeguards as a condition for export. The purpose of this book---the culmination of one phase of an ongoing international research project on the emerging nuclear suppliers and nonproliferation---is to remedy, at least in part, this data deficiency

  2. Emerging nuclear energy systems and nuclear weapon proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gsponer, A.; Sahin, S.; Jasani, B.

    1983-01-01

    Generally when considering problems of proliferation of nuclear weapons, discussions are focused on horizontal proliferation. However, the emerging nuclear energy systems currently have an impact mainly on vertical proliferation. The paper indicates that technologies connected with emerging nuclear energy systems, such as fusion reactors and accelerators, enhance the knowledge of thermonuclear weapon physics and will enable production of military useful nuclear materials (including some rare elements). At present such technologies are enhancing the arsenal of the nuclear weapon states. But one should not forget the future implications for horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons as some of the techniques will in the near future be within the technological and economic capabilities of non-nuclear weapon states. Some of these systems are not under any international control. (orig.) [de

  3. Worldwide nuclear-plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surrey, J.; Thomas, S.

    1980-01-01

    The authors compare the performance of different reactor systems to identify the determinants of plant performance, to examine the evidence of technological maturation, and to discover the principal causes of outage or unavailability. In the light of the findings, they discuss the implications for the UK regarding reactor choice and technology development. They make no judgements about the relative merits of nuclear and fossil-fuel plants, or about safety. (author)

  4. Improving operator quality at Genkai Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwano, Takeshi.

    1989-01-01

    Improvement in operator quality, or improvement in an operator's skill and professional knowledge, is of prime importance because of its great influence on safe and steady plant operation. This paper describes the education and training of reactor operators at the Genkai pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant with respect to the following topics: organization of Genkai power plant; education and training program management; training at the Nuclear Training Center; training and education on-site including emergency procedures training, normal operating procedures training, informational study of emergency conditions in existing plants, and all-around training of operators; qualifying tests for supervisors; and operator motivation

  5. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friske, A.; Thiele, D.

    1988-01-01

    The IAEA classification of decommissioning stages is outlined. The international development hitherto observed in decommissioning of nuclear reactors and nuclear power stations is presented. The dismantling, cutting and decontamination methods used in the decommissioning process are mentioned. The radioactive wastes from decommissioning are characterized, the state of the art of their treatment and disposal is given. The radiation burdens and the decommissioning cost in a decommissioning process are estimated. Finally, some evaluation of the trends in the decommissioning process of nuclear power plants is given. 54 refs. (author)

  6. Transient evaluation using EMTP at one phase opening of the offsite power transformer of the emergency power supply systems for nuclear power plants. This report is a follow-up the last year's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    The emergency power supply systems of nuclear power plants, as the objects of this research, are critical to supplying stable electric power to such systems as the emergency core cooling system (ECCS), and to maintaining the safety of the nuclear power reactor; this was apparent from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The USNRC issued regulatory documents (BL 2012-01, IN 2012-03), and has commenced to review those problems which cannot be detected by degraded-voltage protection relays such as new design vulnerability of the power supply systems that are certain kinds of winding structures and iron core structures when the one-phase open fault occurs without a ground fault of the transformer connected to the offsite power supply system, including when the offsite power supply side is a wye connection and the load side is a delta connection etc. The report of the INSS JOURNAL 2013 used simulation by the electro-magnetic transients program (EMTP) and obtained findings that clearly specified the response at the time of the power supply side one-phase open without ground fault of various winding structures and various iron core structures of the three-phase transformer and identified the important issues for the response of emergency power supply systems and the safety related components of representative domestic PWR plants when the one-phase open fault occurred without ground fault. In a continuation of the previous report, this paper summarizes the previous results, and then presents the principles by which normal voltages are maintained by both the primary and the secondary sides when the one-phase open failure without ground fault occurs on the primary side of the transformer, and the results of the analysis of operations of the protection relays of the emergency power systems and the safety related components of representative a domestic PWR plant by the simulation using EMTP. (author)

  7. CEGB nuclear power stations basic emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    The introduction states that this is a typical emergency plan for a nuclear power station employing about 500 people, having two reactors and a total electrical output of 500 Megawatts in an intensively farmed rural area. The document has the following headings: definitions ('site incident', etc); functions of the site emergency organization; conditions for taking emergency action; persons empowered to declare or cancel a site incident or an emergency; emergency actions by staff; control centres; communication; collaboration with other bodies; warnings; transport; house rules; public information centre. (U.K.)

  8. Off-site nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miska, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Urgent protective measures for the possibly affected population are the main items to be addressed here, that means actions to be planned and taken in the pre-release and release phase of a nuclear accident. Since we will focus an off-site nuclear emergency management, the utility or licensee only plays a subordinate role, but nevertheless may be the potential cause of all actions. At the other end, there is the possible affected population, the environment, and also economic values. Emergency preparedness and response aims at minimizing adverse effects from the power plant to the values to protect. In the early phase of an accident under consideration here, prompt and sharp actions are necessary to ensure efficacy. On the other hand, the available information on the situation is most limited in this phase such that pre-determined actions based on simple criteria are indispensable. The responsibility for early response actions normally rest with a regional authority which may have some county administrations at subordinate level. The leader of the regional staff has to decide upon protective measures to be implemented at county or municipal level; thus, coherence of the response is ensured at least at a regional level. The decision will be governed at the one side by the existing or predicted radiological situation, on the other side an practical limitations like availability of teams and means. The radiological situation has to be assessed by an advisory team that compiles all information from the utility, the weather conditions, and monitoring results. While the staff leader is experienced through response to major non-nuclear events, the advisors mainly come from the environmental side, having no experience in taking swift decisions in an emergency, but are used to control and prevent. This might be the source of conflicts as observed in several exercises. The radiation protection advisors collect information from the utility, especially about time

  9. Nuclear power plant diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollo, E.; Siklossy, P.

    1982-01-01

    The cooling circuit vibration diagnostic system of the Block 1 of the Paks nuclear power station is described. The automatic online vibration monitoring system consisting presently of 42 acceleration sensors and 9 pressure fluctuation sensors, which could be extended, performs both global and local inspection of the primary cooling circuit and its components. The offline data processing system evaluates the data for failure mode analysis. The software under development will be appropriate for partial preliminary identification of failure reasons during their initial phases. The installation experiences and the preliminary results during the hot operational testing of Block 1 are presented. (Sz.J.)

  10. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This 2003 version of Elecnuc contents information, data and charts on the nuclear power plants in the world and general information on the national perspectives concerning the electric power industry. The following topics are presented: 2002 highlights; characteristics of main reactor types and on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; the worldwide status of nuclear power plants on 2002/12/3; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the Grid by reactor type groups; nuclear power plants under construction; capacity of the nuclear power plants on the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear plants by country at the end 2002; performance indicator of french PWR units; trends of the generation indicator worldwide from 1960 to 2002; 2002 cumulative Load Factor by owners; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by countries; status of license renewal applications in Usa; nuclear power plants under construction; Shutdown nuclear power plants; exported nuclear power plants by type; exported nuclear power plants by countries; nuclear power plants under construction or order; steam generator replacements; recycling of Plutonium in LWR; projects of MOX fuel use in reactors; electricity needs of Germany, Belgium, Spain, Finland, United Kingdom; electricity indicators of the five countries. (A.L.B.)

  11. Danish emergency plan for Barsebaeck Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A revised edition of the Danish emergency plan for the Swedish Power Plant Barsebaeck (about 20 km from the Danish Territory) is prepared at the request of Environmental Council in cooperation with police management and civil defense organisations. The plan is valid from October 1981. The emergency plan defines the emergency organization and the provisions to be taken quickly to protect the population if it is exposed to ionizing radiation from release of radioactive effluents as a result of an accident in the Barsebaeck power plant. The emergency plan is based upon Regulation no. 278, June 27, 1963 and Regulation no. 502, October 1, 1974. (EG)

  12. Nuclear plant aging research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program in its Division of Engineering Technology. Principal contractors for this program include Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The program goals are: to identify and characterize time-dependent degradation (aging) of nuclear plant safety-related electrical and mechanical components which could lead to loss of safety function; to identify and recommend methods for detecting and trending aging effects prior to loss of safety function so that timely maintenance can be implemented; and to recommend maintenance practices for mitigating the effects of aging. Research activities include prioritization of system and component aging in nuclear plants, characterization of aging degradation of specific components including identification of functional indicators useful for trending degradation, and testing of practical methods and devices for measuring the functional indicators. Aging assessments have been completed on electric motors, snubbers, motor-operated valves, and check valves. Testing of trending methods and devices for motor-operated valves and check valves is in progress

  13. Underwater nuclear power plant structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severs, S.; Toll, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A structure for an underwater nuclear power generating plant comprising a triangular platform formed of tubular leg and truss members upon which are attached one or more large spherical pressure vessels and one or more small cylindrical auxiliary pressure vessels. (author)

  14. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Kyne

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives.

  15. Emerging Environmental Justice Issues in Nuclear Power and Radioactive Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyne, Dean; Bolin, Bob

    2016-07-12

    Nuclear hazards, linked to both U.S. weapons programs and civilian nuclear power, pose substantial environment justice issues. Nuclear power plant (NPP) reactors produce low-level ionizing radiation, high level nuclear waste, and are subject to catastrophic contamination events. Justice concerns include plant locations and the large potentially exposed populations, as well as issues in siting, nuclear safety, and barriers to public participation. Other justice issues relate to extensive contamination in the U.S. nuclear weapons complex, and the mining and processing industries that have supported it. To approach the topic, first we discuss distributional justice issues of NPP sites in the U.S. and related procedural injustices in siting, operation, and emergency preparedness. Then we discuss justice concerns involving the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and the ways that uranium mining, processing, and weapons development have affected those living downwind, including a substantial American Indian population. Next we examine the problem of high-level nuclear waste and the risk implications of the lack of secure long-term storage. The handling and deposition of toxic nuclear wastes pose new transgenerational justice issues of unprecedented duration, in comparison to any other industry. Finally, we discuss the persistent risks of nuclear technologies and renewable energy alternatives.

  16. Nuclear threats and emergency preparedness in Finland; Ydinuhkat ja varautuminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, R; Aaltonen, H; Laaksonen, J; Lahtinen, J; Rantavaara, A; Reponen, H; Rytoemaa, T; Suomela, M; Toivonen, H; Varjoranta, T

    1995-10-01

    The political and economic upheavals which have taken place in Eastern Europe have had an impact on radiation and nuclear safety throughout Europe. Emergency preparedness systems for unexpected nuclear events have been developed further in all European countries, and prosperous western nations have invested in improving the safety of East European nuclear power plants. The economic crisis facing countries of the former Soviet Union has also promoted illicit trade in nuclear materials; this has made it necessary for various border guards and police authorities to intensify their collaboration and to tighten border controls. On 3-4 October 1995, Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) arranged a seminar on nuclear threats and emergency preparedness in Finland. In addition to STUK experts, a wide range of rescue and civil defence authorities, environmental health specialists and other persons engaged in emergency preparedness attended the seminar. The publication contains a compilation of reports presented at the seminar. The reports cover a broad spectrum of nuclear threats analyzed at STUK, the impacts of radioactive fallout on human beings and on the environment, and preparedness systems by which the harmful effects of radiation or nuclear accidents can, if necessary, be minimized. (33 figs., 5 tabs.).

  17. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the reducing speed of nuclear reactor water level after the water level has reached a turbine trip level to trip the turbine thereby preventing cooling systems or the likes from undesired operation upon separation caused by the reduction of the reactor water level to a low water level before the water level control is switched to the manual control. Constitution: Two feedwater pumps arranged in parallel are operated in usual operation to feedwater to a BWR type reactor. If a trouble should occur in a feedwater controller to increase the feedwater rate and the reactor water level, one of the feedwater pumps is tripped by a signal from a feedwater pump trip device. Then, when the trip level is reached again the remaining pump is tripped. In this way, the sudden decrease in the feedwater rate and the reactor water level can be prevented. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. Emergency planning and preparedness for a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahe, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Based on current regulations, FEMA approves each site-specific plan of state and local governments for each power reactor site after 1) formal review offsite preparedness, 2) holding a public meeting at which the preparedness status has been reviewed, and 3) a satisfactory joint exercise has been conducted with both utility and local participation. Annually, each state, within any position of the 10-mile emergency planning zone, must conduct a joint exercise with the utility to demonstrate its preparedness for a nuclear accident. While it is unlikely that these extreme measures will be needed as a result of an accident at a nuclear power station, the fact that these plans have been well thought out and implemented have already proven their benefit to society. The preparedness for a nuclear accident can be of great advantage in other types of emergencies. For example, on December 11, 1982, a non-nuclear chemical storage tank exploded at a Union Carbide plant in Louisiana shortly after midnight. More than 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes. They were evacuated under the emergency response plan formulated for use in the event of a nuclear accident at the nearby Waterford Nuclear plants. Clearly, this illustrates how a plan conceived for one purpose is appropriate to handle other types of accidents that occur in a modern industrial society

  19. Interface robotics in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Mungia, E.

    1998-01-01

    The area between the reactor building and the external wall of a nuclear power station could be affected in case of a severe accident with repercussion in the outside. The article describes a series of robotics machines which could be used for building recognition, transmission improvement, civil works and for the making of a radiologic cartography in this area. (Author)

  20. India: an emerging nuclear giant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, Boris

    2015-01-01

    After having recalled that India has always been interested in nuclear energy, this article outlines that this country is suffering from an increasing air pollution with noticeable impacts on health (thousands of deaths per year due to pollution), and, even though its CO 2 emissions have very much increased during the past decades, its governments want to rely on nuclear energy to face climatic challenges. The article also outlines that the country is facing increasing energy needs when about 300 millions of inhabitants do not have access to electricity. New sources of energy production must then be developed, preferably de-carbonated sources (hydraulic, wind, nuclear, solar, so on). Therefore, progress must be made to reduce the share of fossil energy. The author proposes a brief presentation of the Indian nuclear programme, with its 20 existing reactors and 6 reactors under construction. A strategy has been defined to exploit as many PWRs as possible, to introduce fourth generation reactors, and to use a thorium fuelled reactor. The framework of the French-Indian partnership is briefly presented, and the involvements of AREVA for the construction of six EPRs, and of the CEA for the development of fourth generation reactors are evoked

  1. Composition and fundamental requirements of nuclear emergency response monitoring equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Yongfang; Huang Weiqi; Wang Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is concrete foundation for accomplishing radiation monitoring in nuclear or radiation accidents. Based on technical report: Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency published by IAEA in 1999, this paper presents the main task and composition of nuclear emergency monitoring briefly, and then the basic equipment and trends of nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is put forward in detail, which is useful to construction and reinforcement of our nuclear emergency monitoring. (authors)

  2. NRC nuclear-plant-analyzer concept and status at INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, F.; Wagner, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The Office of Research of the US NRC has proposed development of a software-hardware system called the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA). This paper describes how we of the INEL envision the nuclear-plant analyzer. The paper also describes a pilot RELAP5 plant-analyzer project completed during the past year and current work. A great deal of analysis is underway to determine nuclear-steam-system response. System transient analysis being so complex, there is the need to present analytical results in a way that interconnections among phenomena and all the nuances of the transient are apparent. There is the need for the analyst to dynamically control system calculations to simulate plant operation in order to perform what if studies as well as the need to perform system analysis within hours of a plant emergency to diagnose the state of the stricken plant and formulate recovery actions. The NRC-proposed nuclear-plant analyzer can meet these needs

  3. The handling of nuclear emergencies in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, Daniel; Jordan, Osvaldo; Kunst, Juan; Bruno, Hector

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In 1998, the Executive signed the decree 1390, which defined the scope and the procedures corresponding to the Nuclear Activity Law. In this decree, the new functions of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) are described, being the most important related to preparation and response for a nuclear emergency the following ones: 1) ARN must provide protection from harmful effects of ionizing radiations under normal conditions and emergency situations; 2) ARN must advise the Executive in case of radiological and nuclear emergencies; 3) ARN shall establish the criteria for the emergency plans of the facilities and train the members of neighbor public to the facilities in case of nuclear emergencies; 4) The emergency plans developed by local, provincial and national authorities must be approved by the ARN; 5) ARN shall lead the actions within the area covered by the emergency plans of the facilities. Security Forces and the Representatives of Civil Institutions shall report the designated ARN officer. The ARN recognized immediately the responsibility imposed by this law and, at the same time, the opportunity of improving the handling of emergencies through a centralized direction of the operations. Under this frame, ARN created the Radiological Emergencies Intervention System (SIER) with the goal of taking charge of the preparation and the handling of emergency situations. From the beginning, the purpose of the SIER was to improve the preparation and response to nuclear emergencies in a regular form, bearing in mind the cultural and socioeconomic situation of the country, as well as the local peculiarities. The first steep to achieve such a target was to gain the confidence of other organizations included in the response on the ARN technical and operational aptitude to lead the actions inside the emergency area and, later, to establish the pertinent arrangements. The strategy chosen by ARN to respond to nuclear emergencies consists in establishing an expert

  4. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masahide

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a constitution capable of previously and reliably preventing radioactivity from releasing into the atmosphere upon occurrence of main steam pipe rupture accidents in a main steam tunnel chamber. Constitution: The outer circumference at the penetration portion of a nuclear reactor container is tightly closed and the main steam tunnel chamber has a tightly closed vessel structure, which is cooled by a local cooler during normal operation. The main steam tunnel chamber is in communication with a pressure control chamber by way of a release line and a releaf valve is disposed at the midway of the release line. Upon occurrence of rupture accident to the main steam pipes in the main steam tunnel chamber, while steams are issued from the ruptured portion, they are discharged through the release line to the suppression chamber and condensated. As a result, excess pressure in the main steam tunnel can be prevented and when the rupture accident is detected, the main steam isolation valve is closed rapidly to interrupt the steam feeding, whereby the steam released from the ruptured pipeways is stopped to avoid the radioactivity release to the atmosphere. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Fire protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    This lecture describes briefly the chronological order of events which may arise for a very serious emergency situation in a nuclear power plant for which preparations should be made even though the situation has an extremely low probability of happening. The planning and preparedness required are expected to cope with a whole spectrum of emergency situations, from minor accidents to serious plant failures which also lead to releases of significant quantities of radioactive material beyond the site boundary. Fire protection aspects will be briefly covered, and some guidance will be provided on exercises to ensure the plans are feasible and the appropriate personnel and facilities are in a satisfactory state of preparedness. (orig./RW)

  6. Research on evacuation planning as nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2007-10-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has introduced new concepts of precautionary action zone (PAZ) and urgent protective action planning zone (UPZ) in 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency' (GS-R-2 (2002)), in order to reduce substantially the risk of severe deterministic health effects. Open literature based research was made to reveal problems on evacuation planning and the preparedness for nuclear emergency arising from introduction of PAZ into Japan that has applied the emergency planning zone (EPZ) concept currently. In regard to application of PAZ, it should be noted that the requirements for preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency are not only dimensional but also timely. The principal issue is implementation of evacuation of precautionary decided area within several hours. The logic of evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency and the methods of advance public education and information in the U.S. is effective for even prompt evacuation to the outside of the EPZ. As concerns evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency in Japan, several important issues to be considered were found, that is, selection of public reception centers which are outside area of the EPZ, an unique reception center assigned to each emergency response planning area, public education and information of practical details about the evacuation plan in advance, and necessity of the evacuation time estimates. To establish a practical evacuation planning guide for nuclear emergencies, further researches on application of traffic simulation technology to evacuation time estimates and on knowledge of actual evacuation experience in natural disasters and chemical plant accidents are required. (author)

  7. Passive Nuclear Plants Program (UPDATE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimeno, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The light water passive plants program (PCNP), today Advanced Nuclear Power Plants Program (PCNA), was constituted in order to reach the goals of the Spanish Electrical Sector in the field of advanced nuclear power plants, optimize the efforts of all Spanish initiatives, and increase joint presence in international projects. The last update of this program, featured in revision 5th of the Program Report, reflects the consolidation of the Spanish sector's presence in International programs of the advanced power plants on the basis of the practically concluded American ALWR program. Since the beginning of the program , the PCNP relies on financing from the Electrical sector, Ocide, SEPI-Endesa, Westinghouse, General Electric, as well as from the industrial cooperators, Initec, UTE (Initec- Empresarios Agrupados), Ciemat, Enusa, Ensa and Tecnatom. The program is made up of the following projects, already concluded: - EPRI's Advanced Light Water Plants Certification Project - Westinghouse's AP600 Project - General Electric's SBWR Project (presently paralyzed) and ABWR project Currently, the following project are under development, at different degrees of advance: - EPP project (European Passive Plant) - EBWR project (European Advanced Boiling Water Reactor)

  8. Nuclear emergency planning in Spain. The PLABEN review project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo Lentijo, J. C.; Vila Pena, M.

    2002-01-01

    The international rules and recommendations for nuclear emergency planning and the Spanish experience gained in the management of event with radiological risk have noticed that is necessary to review the planning radiological bases for emergencies in nuclear power plants and to define the planning radiological bases for radiological emergencies that could happen in radioactive facilities or in activities out of the regulatory framework. The paper focuses on CSN actions concerning the Plaben review project related to define the new radiological principles taking into account the current international recommendations for interventions, make a proposal about the organisation and operation of the provincial radiological action group and the national support level for radiological emergency response. (Author) 7 refs

  9. Relative costs to nuclear plants: international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1992-03-01

    This work approaches the relative costs to nuclear plants in the Brazil. It also presents the calculation methods and its hypothesis to determinate the costs, and the nacional experience in costs of investment, operating and maintenance of the nuclear plants

  10. Cooling water recipients for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, F.-E.; Saetre, H.J.

    1971-10-01

    The hydrographical and hydrological conditions at 17 prospective nuclear power plant sites in the Oslofjord district are evaluated with respect to their suitability as recipients for thermal discharges from nuclear power plants. No comparative evaluations are made. (JIW)

  11. Nuclear plants gain integrated information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavicencio-Ramirez, A.; Rodriquez-Alvarez, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    With the objective of simplifying the complex mesh of computing devices employed within nuclear power plants, modern technology and integration techniques are being used to form centralized (but backed up) databases and distributed processing and display networks. Benefits are immediate as a result of the integration and the use of standards. The use of a unique data acquisition and database subsystem optimizes the high costs of engineering, as this task is done only once for the life span of the system. This also contributes towards a uniform user interface and allows for graceful expansion and maintenance. This article features an integrated information system, Sistema Integral de Informacion de Proceso (SIIP). The development of this system enabled the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant to fully use the already existing universe of signals and its related engineering during all plant conditions, namely, start up, normal operation, transient analysis, and emergency operation. Integrated systems offer many advantages over segregated systems, and this experience should benefit similar development efforts in other electric power utilities, not only for nuclear but also for other types of generating plants

  12. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inami, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Minoru.

    1995-01-01

    In a condensate cleanup system and a reactor water cleanup system of a BWR-type reactor, in which primary coolants flow, there is disposed a filtering and desalting device using hollow thread membrane filter and ion exchange resin for a condensate cleanup system, and using a high temperature filter made of a metal, a metal oxide or ceramics as a filtering material and a precoat filter made of a powdery ion exchange resin as a filtering material for a reactor water cleanup system. This can completely remove cruds generated in the condensate system. Since the reactor water cleanup system comprises the powdery resin precoat-type filtering and desalting device and the high temperature filter using ceramics, ionic impurities such as radioactive materials can be removed. Accordingly, cruds are not carried into the inside of the reactor, and since the radioactive concentration in the reactor water is reduced, radiation exposure upon periodical inspection can be minimized almost to zero, to attain a clean plant. (T.M.)

  13. Use of human factors in the integration of a safety parameter display system (SPDS) and emergency response facility (ERF) capabilities for the James A. Fitzpatrick nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, H.C. Jr.; Gutierrez, R.

    1987-01-01

    In 1987, New York Power Authority's Emergency and Process Information Computer (EPIC) System will be operational. The EPIC system was designed to perform two distinct functions: to serve as an advanced replacement for the existing plant process computer and to assist in providing the JAFNPP operations staff with information during plant emergency conditions. Besides meeting the operational and regulatory goals of NYPA, EPIC was designed to meet NYPA human factors criteria. Using human factors literature, industry standards and guidelines, a Human Factors Criteria document was prepared for the EPIC project. This document served as the bases for all hardware, display, and documentation design applicable to EPIC. The major tasks of the EPIC human factors plan include integration of past and present applicable human factors information, establishment of a user definition using data gathered from control room observations (startup and shutdown of JAFNPP), survey of computer programs used by the operators, and obtaining input from licensed operators. These major tasks played a role in the design of the design of the control room configuration, the design and development of computer generated displays, and the format in which the displayed and hard copy information would be presented to the user. This paper presents an overview of the human factors work performed and the documents researched or developed in the design of EPIC displays, software, and hardware. The location and operation of this new computer based information system, like the displays was based on the systematic application of operations and human factors principles

  14. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarola, K.; Jamison, S.; Manazir, R.M.; Rescorl, R.L.; Harmon, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel in the control room. A separate data processing system, which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board. The discrete indicator and alarm system and the data processing system receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accidental conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof. (author)

  15. Docommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essmann, J.

    1981-01-01

    The German utilities operating nuclear power plants have long concerned themselves with aspects of decommissioning and for this purpose an engineering company was given a contract to study the entire spectrum of decommissioning. The results of this study have been available in autumn 1980 and it is possible to discuss all the aspects of decommissioning on a new basis. Following these results no change in the design concept of LWR nuclear power plants in operation or under construction is necessary because the techniques, necessary for decommissioning, are fully available today. The technical feasibility of decommissioning for power plants of Biblis A and KRB type has been shown in detail. The calculations of the quantity of waste produced during removal of a nuclear power plant could be confirmed and it could be determined with high procedure. The radiation dose to the decommissioning personnel is in the range of the radiation protection regulations and is in the same range as the radiation dose to the personnel within a yearly inservice inspection. (AF)

  16. SECURE nuclear district heating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson; Hannus, M.

    1978-01-01

    The role foreseen for the SECURE (Safe Environmentally Clean Urban REactor) nuclear district heating plant is to provide the baseload heating needs of primarily the larger and medium size urban centers that are outside the range of waste heat supply from conventional nuclear power stations. The rationale of the SECURE concept is that the simplicity in design and the inherent safety advantages due to the use of low temperatures and pressures should make such reactors economically feasible in much smaller unit sizes than nuclear power reactors and should make their urban location possible. It is felt that the present design should be safe enough to make urban underground location possible without restriction according to any criteria based on actual risk evaluation. From the environmental point of view, this is a municipal heat supply plant with negligible pollution. Waste heat is negligible, gaseous radioactivity release is negligible, and there is no liquid radwaste release. Economic comparisons show that the SECURE plant is competitive with current fossil-fueled alternatives. Expected future increase in energy raw material prices will lead to additional energy cost advantages to the SECURE plant

  17. Atucha I nuclear power plant transients analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, J.; Schivo, M.

    1987-01-01

    A program for the transients simulation thermohydraulic calculation without loss of coolant (KWU-ENACE development) to evaluate Atucha I nuclear power plant behaviour is used. The program includes systems simulation and nuclear power plants control bonds with real parameters. The calculation results show a good agreement with the output 'protocol' of various transients of the nuclear power plant, keeping the error, in general, lesser than ± 10% from the variation of the nuclear power plant's state variables. (Author)

  18. Safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeberlein, K.

    1987-01-01

    In nuclear power plants large amounts of radioactive fission products ensue from the fission of uranium. In order to protect the environment, the radioactive material is confined in multiple 'activity barriers' (crystal matrix of the fuel, fuel cladding, coolant boundary, safety containment, reactor building). These barriers are protected by applying a defense-in-depth concept (high quality requirements, protection systems which recognize and terminate operational incidents, safety systems to cope with accidents). In spite of a favorable safety record of German nuclear power plants it is obvious - and became most evident by the Chernobyl accident - that absolute safety is not achievable. At Chernobyl, however, design disadvantages of that reactor type (like positive reactivity feedback of coolant voiding, missing safety containment) played an important role in accident initiation and progression. Such features of the Russian 'graphite-moderated pressure tube boiling water reactor' are different from those of light water reactors operating in western countries. The essential steps of the waste management of the nuclear fuel cycle ('Entsorgung') are the interim storage, the shipment, and the reprocessing of the spent fuel and the final repository of radioactive waste. Reprocessing means the separation of fossil material (uranium, plutonium) from radioactive waste. Legal requirements for radiological protection of the environment, which are identical for nuclear power plants and reprocessing plant, are complied with by means of comprehensive filter systems. Safety problems of a reprocessing plant are eased considerably by the fact that system pressures, process temperatures and energy densities are low. In order to confine the radioactive waste from the biosphere for a very long period of time, it is to be discarded after appropriate treatment into the deep geological underground of salt domes. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Fighting fires in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantom, L.F.; Weldon, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    Since the Browns Ferry incident, the specter of fires at nuclear plants has been the focus of attention by NRC, the utilities, and the public. There are sophisticated hardware and software available - in the form of fire-protection systems and equipment and training and fire-protection programs. Potential fire losses at nuclear faclities can be staggering. Thus, it behooves all those involved to maximize fire-protection security while simultaneously minimizing the chance of human error, which cancels out the effectiveness of the most up-to-date protective systems and devices

  20. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In order to review the advances made over the past seven years in the area of emergency planning and preparedness supporting nuclear facilities and consider developments which are on the horizon, the IAEA at the invitation of the Government of Italy, organized this International Symposium in co-operation with the Italian Commission for Nuclear and Alternative Energy Sources, Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Health Protection (ENEA-DISP). There were over 250 designated participants and some 70 observers from 37 Member States and four international organizations in attendance at the Symposium. The Symposium presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: emergency planning (20 papers), accident assessment (30 papers), protective measures and recovery operations (10 papers) and emergency preparedness (16 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  1. Anticipated and abnormal transients in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of an international conference on Anticipated and Abnormal Transients in Nuclear Power Plants. Included are the following papers: Comparative evaluation of recent water hammer events in light water reactors, Rick reduction through enhanced human performance, Assessment of the performance of an emergency boration system for anticipated transients without trip faults, Emergency procedure planning to mitigate event progression

  2. QA programs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, A.C.

    1976-01-01

    As an overview of quality assurance programs in nuclear power plants, the energy picture as it appears today is reviewed. Nuclear power plants and their operations are described and an attempt is made to place in proper perspective the alleged ''threats'' inherent in nuclear power. Finally, the quality assurance programs being used in the nuclear industry are described

  3. 4. Nuclear power plant component failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power plant component failures are dealt with in relation to reliability in nuclear power engineering. The topics treated include classification of failures, analysis of their causes and impacts, nuclear power plant failure data acquisition and processing, interdependent failures, and human factor reliability in nuclear power engineering. (P.A.). 8 figs., 7 tabs., 23 refs

  4. Configuration management of plant modifications for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritsch, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of nuclear power plant operation, regulatory pressure, and the large numbers of people required to operate and support the stations, the control of plant modifications at these plants needs to be expanded and improved. The aerospace and defense industries, as well as the owners or operators of large energy projects have established configuration management programs (CMPs) to control plant design changes. These programs are composed of well-defined functions for identifying, evaluating, recording, tracking, issuing, and documenting the established baseline conditions, as well as required changes to these baseline conditions. The purpose of this paper is to describe a recommended CMP for plant modifications consisting of a computerized data base installed on the utility's computer to provide a central storage of plant design and operations data necessary to control the following activities as they are affected by plant design changes: training; record management; operations; maintenance; health physics; planning/scheduling; procurement/inventory control; outage management (including modifications); and emergency response

  5. Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, J. M.; Sanchez, J. T.

    2002-01-01

    With this article about the Maintenance in nuclear power plants we will try to give to see the importance of this kind of installations but the problems found by the clients and contractors to face it, and some possible solutions to improve it. It is necessary to understand this problem like something inner to the installation and must be considerate like a benefit for the same. Of course, there must be adequate Sevices Companies in direct relation with the installation that take the responsibility of assuming and understanding the correct fulfillment of the fixed milestones to get the optimal working of the whole plant systems. (Author)

  6. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1997 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1997; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; forecasts; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  7. The systematics of emerging nuclear energy concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.; Ligou, J.

    1980-01-01

    The basic systematics pertaining to emerging nuclear energy concepts are examined from a historical and categorical perspective. For this purpose a complementary formulation of the interdependence of the vital fission-fusion-acceleration processes is established and then developed to accommodate explicitly recent developments for advanced synergetic nuclear energy proposals. The papers presented at the conference which form these proceeding are shown to integrate well and thus ecluidate the generalized systematics of this formulation. (orig.) [de

  8. Nuclear power plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorive, P.; Berthe, J.; Lafaille, J.P.; Eussen, G.

    1998-01-01

    Several definitions can be given to the design life of a nuclear power plant just as they can be attributed to the design life of an industrial installation: the book-keeping life which is the duration of the provision for depreciation of the plant, the licensed life which corresponds to the duration for which the plant license has been granted and beyond which a new license should be granted by the safety authorities, the design life which corresponds to the duration specified for ageing and fatigue calculations in the design of some selected components during the plant design phase, the technical life which is the duration of effective technical operation and finally the economic life corresponding to the duration of profitable operation of the plant compared with other means of electricity production. Plant life management refers to the measures taken to cope with the combination of licensed, design, technical and economical life. They can include repairs and replacements of components which have arrived to the end of their life due to known degradation processes such as fatigue, embrittlement, corrosion, wear, erosion, thermal ageing. In all cases however, it is of great importance to plan the intervention so as to minimise the economic impact. Predictive maintenance is used together with in-service inspection programs to fulfil this goal. The paper will go over the methodologies adopted in Belgium in all aspects of electrical, mechanical and civil equipment for managing plant life. (author)

  9. Thoughts on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouze, Michel

    1996-01-01

    In this article published before the Chernobyl accident (and the greenhouse effect issue), the author comments the evolution of the perception people have on nuclear energy: it was supposed to be the beginning of a golden age, and is finally perceived as a source of thermal and radioactive pollution and a major industrial risk. He outlines and criticizes the various and more or less violent reactions and debates about the fact that choosing nuclear energy means choosing a certain type of society. He considers that this point of view refuses reality. He states that the emerging new and renewable energies cannot be the solution. He comments the emergence of an energy crisis after the first oil crisis, and the associated questions about a possible reduction of consumption, the replacement of oil, the potential of renewable energies. He criticizes the excessive fear about nuclear materials and energy, discusses the actual risks associated with electronuclear production, and discusses the energy issue in the international context to outline the importance of nuclear energy. He finally addresses issues related to the definition and implementation of an energy policy, with EDF as a major actor

  10. Expert robots in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.; DeVries, K.R.; Martin, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Expert robots enhance a safety and operations in nuclear plants. E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Savannah River Laboratory, is developing expert mobile robots for deployment in nuclear applications at the Savannah River Plant. Knowledge-based expert systems are being evaluated to simplify operator control, to assist in navigation and manipulation functions, and to analyze sensory information. Development work using two research vehicles is underway to demonstrate semiautonomous, intelligence, expert robot system operation in process areas. A description of the mechanical equipment, control systems, and operating modes is presented, including the integration of onboard sensors. A control hierarchy that uses modest computational methods is being used to allow mobile robots to autonomously navigate and perform tasks in known environments without the need for large computer systems

  11. Expert robots in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.; DeVries, K.R.; Martin, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Expert robots will enhance safety and operations in nuclear plants. E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Savannah River Laboratory, is developing expert mobile robots for deployment in nuclear applications at the Savannah River Plant. Knowledge-based expert systems are being evaluated to simplify operator control, to assist in navigation and manipulation functions, and to analyze sensory information. Development work using two research vehicles is underway to demonstrate semiautonomous, intelligent, expert robot system operation in process areas. A description of the mechanical equipment, control systems, and operating modes is presented, including the integration of onboard sensors. A control hierarchy that uses modest computational methods is being used to allow mobile robots to autonomously navigate and perform tasks in known environments without the need for large computer systems

  12. Emergency system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a circuit called 'of emergency help' intended to remove, in a safe and quick manner, the residual thermal power on the safety vessel of a fast neutron reactor cooled by a liquid metal flow, in the event of a failure occurring inside the main reactor vessel or on it. This system includes a network of spray nozzle tubes, distributed around and near the external surface of the safety vessel, to project on to the surface of the vessel a mist of a liquid having high latent vaporisation heat. The steam produced on contact with the safety vessel is collected in the space provided between the safety vessel and the external protection vessel by at least one collector pipe for dischaging this steam outside the vessel. Under a preferred design mode of the invention the liquid is water the use of which turns out to be particularly advantageous in practice owing to its favourable physical properties and its low cost [fr

  13. Police procedures in civil nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.H.

    1989-01-01

    The responsibilities of the police in the event of a nuclear emergency are summarized. Preparation and planning is needed with site operators and other organisations who would also be involved in the event of an accident. Several points in particular are discussed; shelter and evacuation, the issue of potassium iodate tablets, protection of police officers, the police involvement in the operation support centres, public education and further discussion on the integration and development of the organisation of emergency procedures. (U.K.)

  14. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This 2005 edition of the Elecnuc booklet summarizes in tables all numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the PRIS database managed by the IAEA. The following aspects are reviewed: 2004 highlights; main characteristics of reactor types; map of the French nuclear power plants on 2005/01/01; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 2004; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by reactor-type group; nuclear power plants under construction on 2004; evolution of nuclear power plant capacities connected to the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2004; performance indicator of PWR units in France; trend of the generation indicator worldwide; 2004 load factor by owners; units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2004; status of licence renewal applications in USA; nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2004; shutdown reactors; exported nuclear capacity in net MWe; exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid; exported nuclear power plants under construction or order; exported and national nuclear capacity under construction or order; recycling of plutonium in LWR; Mox licence plant projects; Appendix - historical development; acronyms, glossary

  15. Nuclear power plants and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agudo, E.G.; Penteado Filho, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    The question of nuclear power plants is analysed in details. The fundamental principles of reactors are described as well as the problems of safety involved with the reactor operation and the quantity and type of radioactive released to the environment. It shows that the amount of radioactive is very long. The reactor accidents has occurred, as three mile island, are also analysed. (M.I.A.)

  16. Operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, P.

    1988-04-01

    The textbook for training nuclear power plant personnel is centred on the most important aspects of operating modes of WWER-440 reactors. Attention is devoted to the steady state operation of the unit, shutdown, overhaul with refuelling, physical and power start-up. Also given are the regulations of shift operation and the duties of individual categories of personnel during the shift and during the change of shifts. (Z.M.). 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Nuclear power plants - Quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This International Standard defines principles for the establishment and implementation of quality assurance programmes during all phases of design, procurement, fabrication, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants. These principles apply to activities affecting the quality of items, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling and modifying and eventually decommissioning. The manner in which the principles described in this document will be implemented in different organizations involved in a specific nuclear power project will depend on regulatory and contractual requirements, the form of management applied to a nuclear power project, and the nature and scope of the work to be performed by different organizations

  18. Exploiting nuclear plants in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Lionel

    2011-02-01

    This document outlines that the French fleet of 58 reactors is only 25 year old in average, and that nuclear safety is strongly regulated, and notably relies on improved indicators and on a decennial re-assessment. It outlines that nuclear energy is a response to energy challenges and that it is therefore relevant to operate the nuclear fleet beyond the initially foreseen lifetime (40 years). Due to maintenance and renewal activities, plants are supposed to be safer and more efficient. To guarantee an always safer and more efficient operation in time, five actions are highlighted: decennial controls, installation and equipment modifications, control and anticipation of installation and equipment wear, competencies and ability renewal, better knowledge of techniques and technologies

  19. Community attitudes toward nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelle, E.

    1982-01-01

    Among the many effects of the accident at Three Mile Island are impacts upon other communities that currently host nuclear-power reactors. Because studies on communities' reactions not immediately available, this chapter reviews existing studies and speculates about possible effects. The patterns and variations in impacts on and responses of nuclear host communities have been the subject of studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge, Tennessee) since 1972. This essay presents results from four post-licensing studies of host communities - Plymouth, Massachusetts, and Waterford, Connecticut (PL-1), and Brunswick, North Carolina, and Appling-Toombs counties, Georgia (PL-2) - along with case study and attitude survey information from two additional communities in which reactors are under construction: Hartsville, Tennessee, and Cherokee County, South Carolina. Differences and similarities between the sites have been assessed in terms of differences in input and social structure; factors affecting the generally favorable attitudes toward local nuclear plants are discussed

  20. Nuclear plant analyzer desktop workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    In 1983 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) commissioned the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA). The NPA was envisioned as a graphical aid to assist reactor safety analysts in comprehending the results of thermal-hydraulic code calculations. The development was to proceed in three distinct phases culminating in a desktop reactor safety workstation. The desktop NPA is now complete. The desktop NPA is a microcomputer based reactor transient simulation, visualization and analysis tool developed at INEL to assist an analyst in evaluating the transient behavior of nuclear power plants by means of graphic displays. The NPA desktop workstation integrates advanced reactor simulation codes with online computer graphics allowing reactor plant transient simulation and graphical presentation of results. The graphics software, written exclusively in ANSI standard C and FORTRAN 77 and implemented over the UNIX/X-windows operating environment, is modular and is designed to interface to the NRC's suite of advanced thermal-hydraulic codes to the extent allowed by that code. Currently, full, interactive, desktop NPA capabilities are realized only with RELAP5

  1. Occupational dose control in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorsson, C.; Lochard, J.; Benedittini, M.; Baum, J.; Khan, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Reduction in occupational exposure at nuclear power plants is desirable not only in the interest of the health and safety of plant personnel, but also because it enhances the safety and reliability of the plants. This report summarises the current trends of doses to workers at nuclear power plants and the achievements and developments regarding methods for their reduction

  2. Nuclear plant life cycle costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Life cycle costs of nuclear power plants in the United States are discussed. The author argues that these costs have been mishandled or neglected. Decommissioning costs have escalated, e.g. from $328 per unit in 1991 to $370 in 1993 for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, though they still only amount to less than 0.1 cent per kWh. Waste management has been complicated in the U.S. by the decision to abandon civilian reprocessing; by the year 2000, roughly 30 U.S. nuclear power units will have filled their storage pools; dry storage has been delayed, and will be an expense not originally envisaged. Some examples of costs of major component replacement are provided. No single component has caused as much operational disruption and financial penalties as the steam generator. Operation and maintenance costs have increased steadily, and now amount to more than 70% of production costs. A strategic plan by the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (of U.S. utilities) will ensure that the ability to correctly operate and maintain a nuclear power plant is built into the original design. 6 figs

  3. Autonomous Control of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basher, H.

    2003-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is a complex system that requires highly sophisticated controllers to ensure that desired performance and safety can be achieved and maintained during its operations. Higher-demanding operational requirements such as reliability, lower environmental impacts, and improved performance under adverse conditions in nuclear power plants, coupled with the complexity and uncertainty of the models, necessitate the use of an increased level of autonomy in the control methods. In the opinion of many researchers, the tasks involved during nuclear reactor design and operation (e.g., design optimization, transient diagnosis, and core reload optimization) involve important human cognition and decisions that may be more easily achieved with intelligent methods such as expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Many experts in the field of control systems share the idea that a higher degree of autonomy in control of complex systems such as nuclear plants is more easily achievable through the integration of conventional control systems and the intelligent components. Researchers have investigated the feasibility of the integration of fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and expert systems with the conventional control methods to achieve higher degrees of autonomy in different aspects of reactor operations such as reactor startup, shutdown in emergency situations, fault detection and diagnosis, nuclear reactor alarm processing and diagnosis, and reactor load-following operations, to name a few. With the advancement of new technologies and computing power, it is feasible to automate most of the nuclear reactor control and operation, which will result in increased safety and economical benefits. This study surveys current status, practices, and recent advances made towards developing autonomous control systems for nuclear reactors

  4. Autonomous Control of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basher, H.

    2003-10-20

    A nuclear reactor is a complex system that requires highly sophisticated controllers to ensure that desired performance and safety can be achieved and maintained during its operations. Higher-demanding operational requirements such as reliability, lower environmental impacts, and improved performance under adverse conditions in nuclear power plants, coupled with the complexity and uncertainty of the models, necessitate the use of an increased level of autonomy in the control methods. In the opinion of many researchers, the tasks involved during nuclear reactor design and operation (e.g., design optimization, transient diagnosis, and core reload optimization) involve important human cognition and decisions that may be more easily achieved with intelligent methods such as expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Many experts in the field of control systems share the idea that a higher degree of autonomy in control of complex systems such as nuclear plants is more easily achievable through the integration of conventional control systems and the intelligent components. Researchers have investigated the feasibility of the integration of fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and expert systems with the conventional control methods to achieve higher degrees of autonomy in different aspects of reactor operations such as reactor startup, shutdown in emergency situations, fault detection and diagnosis, nuclear reactor alarm processing and diagnosis, and reactor load-following operations, to name a few. With the advancement of new technologies and computing power, it is feasible to automate most of the nuclear reactor control and operation, which will result in increased safety and economical benefits. This study surveys current status, practices, and recent advances made towards developing autonomous control systems for nuclear reactors.

  5. Ventilation-air conditioner system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Sugisaki, Toshihiko.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a ventilation-air conditioner system which enables, upon occurrence of accidents in a nuclear power plant, continuous operation for other adjacent nuclear power plants with no effect of accidents. Air supply system and exhaust system are operated during usual operaiton. If loss of coolants accidents should occur in an adjacent nuclear power plants, operation is switched from ventilation operaiton to the operation of re-cycling system based on an AND logic of three signals, that is, a pressure HIGH signal for the reactor container, a water level LOW signal for the reactor and a radioactivity signal of the ventilation-air conditioner sytem on the side of air supply in the nuclear power plant. Thus, nuclear reactor buildings of the nuclear power plant are from the external atmosphere. Therefore, the radioactivity HIGH signal for switching to the emergency air conditioner system of the nuclear power plant is not actuated due to the loss of coolant accidents in the adjacent nuclear power plant. In addition, since the atmospheric temperature in the nuclear reactor building can be maintained by a cooling device disposed to the recycling system, reactor shutdown can be prevented. (I.S.)

  6. The innovative simulator for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, A [The Inst. of Applied Energy, Tokyo (Japan); Ohashi, H; Akiyama, M [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Nuclear power simulators are becoming more and more important tools for ensuring the safety and the reliability during the whole cycle of plants from design to operation. Recently, there has been remarkable progress in computer science such as increase of computing speed, refinement of mathematical models and emergence of various AI technologies. By fully exploiting this progress to nuclear plant simulators, it becomes possible to achieve much faster, more extensive and more realistic simulation than ever. The Institute of Applied Energy (IAE) has organized a feasibility study on the advanced simulator since 1990, to develop the concept of nuclear power plant simulators in future. In this study, several academic organizations make fundamental researches on parallelization of transient analyses, large-scale parallel computing, thermal-hydraulic analysis using cellular automata, code development methodology by module-integration and task scheduling methods for parallel compilers. The concept and impact of the innovative simulator, as a multipurpose simulator complex, are summarized from the viewpoints of wide range scenarios including severe accidents, 3D multi-media interface, much faster than real-time simulation, and innovative algorithms for analyses of thermal-hydraulics, structure, neutronkinetics and their coupled phenomena. (orig.) (2 refs., 2 figs.).

  7. The innovative simulator for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, A.; Ohashi, H.; Akiyama, M.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear power simulators are becoming more and more important tools for ensuring the safety and the reliability during the whole cycle of plants from design to operation. Recently, there has been remarkable progress in computer science such as increase of computing speed, refinement of mathematical models and emergence of various AI technologies. By fully exploiting this progress to nuclear plant simulators, it becomes possible to achieve much faster, more extensive and more realistic simulation than ever. The Institute of Applied Energy (IAE) has organized a feasibility study on the advanced simulator since 1990, to develop the concept of nuclear power plant simulators in future. In this study, several academic organizations make fundamental researches on parallelization of transient analyses, large-scale parallel computing, thermal-hydraulic analysis using cellular automata, code development methodology by module-integration and task scheduling methods for parallel compilers. The concept and impact of the innovative simulator, as a multipurpose simulator complex, are summarized from the viewpoints of wide range scenarios including severe accidents, 3D multi-media interface, much faster than real-time simulation, and innovative algorithms for analyses of thermal-hydraulics, structure, neutronkinetics and their coupled phenomena. (orig.) (2 refs., 2 figs.)

  8. Preliminary regulatory assessment of nuclear power plants vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.; Petelin, S.

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary attempts to develop models for nuclear regulatory vulnerability assessment of nuclear power plants are presented. Development of the philosophy and computer tools could be new and important insight for management of nuclear operators and nuclear regulatory bodies who face difficult questions about how to assess the vulnerability of nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities to external and internal threats. In the situation where different and hidden threat sources are dispersed throughout the world, the assessment of security and safe operation of nuclear power plants is very important. Capability to evaluate plant vulnerability to different kinds of threats, like human and natural occurrences and terrorist attacks and preparation of emergency response plans and estimation of costs are of vital importance for assurance of national security. On the basis of such vital insights, nuclear operators and nuclear regulatory bodies could plan and optimise changes in oversight procedures, organisations, equipment, hardware and software to reduce risks taking into account security and safety of nuclear power plants operation, budget, manpower, and other limitations. Initial qualitative estimations of adapted assessments for nuclear applications are shortly presented. (author)

  9. Safety philosophy for nuclear power plants in egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mervat, S.A.; Hammad, F.H.

    1988-01-01

    This work establishes the basic principles of a safety philosophy for nuclear power plants in egypt. A number of deterministic requirements stemming the multiple barriers and the defense-in-depth concept are emphasised. other requirements in the areas of siting, operational safety, safety analysis, special issues, and experience feedback are also identified. The role of international cooperation in nuclear safety technology-transfer and nuclear emergencies is highlighted. In addition probabilistic ally based guidelines are set for acceptable risk and dose limits

  10. Uncertainties under emergency conditions and possible application of fuzzy theory for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Various uncertainties involved in emergency conditions are discussed, and it is pointed out that uncertainties, in many factors, are fuzzy. As a result, it is proposed to use fuzzy theory as an attempt for analysing cause and effects under emergency conditions such as Hiroshima, Nagasaki and other nuclear accidents and, for fuzzy failure analysis and diagnostics of nuclear power plant

  11. Managing a Nuclear Emergency Originating from Abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    1998-01-01

    The basic aspects of managing a nuclear emergency, which occurred in a foreign country, are considered. The most important sources of information are defined by the bilateral or multilateral conventions. The decision aiding techniques and intervention levels can substantially improve the decision making. The experiences from the INEX-2 exercises are presented after the Swiss and Finnish exercise. (author)

  12. The Norwegian nuclear emergency preparedness system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naadland, E.; Stranden, E.

    1995-01-01

    A new national organisation for nuclear emergency preparedness was established in Norway in 1993, based on experiences from the Chernobyl accident. This organisation is based on authorities and research institutions which in a normal situation have responsibilities and knowledge in fields that are also of major importance in a nuclear accident situation. The national emergency preparedness organisation consists of the Ministerial Co-ordination Committee, the Advisory Committee for Nuclear Accidents and their secretariat at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, and an Information Group. The organisations participating in the Advisory Committee operate measuring networks, stations and laboratories. In an early phase of an accident, a minor group from the Advisory Committee forms a Crisis Committee for Nuclear Accidents. This committee has been delegated the authority to make decisions in this phase. The organisation represented by its secretariat at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority is responsible for coordinating the emergency planning, the measuring capacities and the professional needs ordinarily. The secretariat is on call 24 hours a day as point of contact according to bilateral and international agreements on early notification. In this paper the features of the emergency preparedness organisation are presented. (Author)

  13. Nuclear radiation sensors and monitoring following a nuclear or radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Management of Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies arising from Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND), Nuclear Reactors/Power plants and Nuclear War require measurement of ionizing radiations and radioactivity on an enhanced scale relative to the levels encountered in peaceful uses of ionizing radiations and radioactivity. It is heartening that since Hiroshima, Nagasaki nuclear disaster, the world has been quiet but since early 2000 there has been a fear of certain devices to be used by terrorists, which could lead to panic, and disaster due to dispersal of radioactivity by RDD, IND. Nuclear attack would lead to blast, thermal, initial nuclear radiation, nuclear fall out leading to gamma and neutron dose, dose rates in range from few R, R/h to kR, kR/h, and determinations of k Bq or higher order. Such situations have been visualized at national levels and National Disaster Management Authority NDMA has been established and Disaster Management Act 2005 has come into existence. NDMA has prepared guidelines for Nuclear and radiological emergency management highlighting preparedness, mitigation, response, capacity building, etc. Critical point in all these issues is detection of emergency, quick intimation to the concerned for action in shortest possible time. Upper most requirement by those involved in pursuing action, is radiation sensor based radiation monitors for personnel, area, and to assess contamination due to radioactivity.This presentation briefly describes the Indian scenario in the development of the radiation sensors and the sensor-based radiation monitors. (author)

  14. Nuclear radiation sensors and monitoring following a nuclear or radiological emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, P K [Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (India)

    2009-01-15

    Management of Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies arising from Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND), Nuclear Reactors/Power plants and Nuclear War require measurement of ionizing radiations and radioactivity on an enhanced scale relative to the levels encountered in peaceful uses of ionizing radiations and radioactivity. It is heartening that since Hiroshima, Nagasaki nuclear disaster, the world has been quiet but since early 2000 there has been a fear of certain devices to be used by terrorists, which could lead to panic, and disaster due to dispersal of radioactivity by RDD, IND. Nuclear attack would lead to blast, thermal, initial nuclear radiation, nuclear fall out leading to gamma and neutron dose, dose rates in range from few R, R/h to kR, kR/h, and determinations of k Bq or higher order. Such situations have been visualized at national levels and National Disaster Management Authority NDMA has been established and Disaster Management Act 2005 has come into existence. NDMA has prepared guidelines for Nuclear and radiological emergency management highlighting preparedness, mitigation, response, capacity building, etc. Critical point in all these issues is detection of emergency, quick intimation to the concerned for action in shortest possible time. Upper most requirement by those involved in pursuing action, is radiation sensor based radiation monitors for personnel, area, and to assess contamination due to radioactivity.This presentation briefly describes the Indian scenario in the development of the radiation sensors and the sensor-based radiation monitors. (author)

  15. An expert system for improving nuclear emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salame-Alfie, A.; Goldbogen, G.C.; Ryan, R.M.; Wallace, W.A.; Yeater, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The accidents at TMI-2 and Chernobyl have produced initiatives aimed at improving nuclear plant emergency response capabilities. Among them are the development of emergency response facilities with capabilities for the acquisition, processing, and diagnosis of data which are needed to help coordinate plant operations, engineering support and management under emergency conditions. An effort in this direction prompted the development of an expert system. EP (EMERGENCY PLANNER) is a prototype expert system that is intended to help coordinate the overall management during emergency conditions. The EP system was built using the GEN-X expert system shell. GEN-X has a variety of knowledge representation mechanisms including AND/OR trees, Decision trees, and IF/THEN tables, and runs on an IBM PC-XT or AT computer or compatible. Among the main features, EP is portable, modular, user friendly, can interact with external programs and interrogate data bases. The knowledge base is made of New York State (NYS) Procedures for Emergency Classification, NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Plan (REPP) and knowledge from experts of the NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Group and the Office of Radiological Health and Chemistry of the New York Power Authority (NYPA)

  16. Hungarian system for nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsi, Laszlo; Szabo, Laszlo; Ronaky, Jozsef

    2000-01-01

    The Hungarian Government had established in 1989 on the basis of national and international experience the National System for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (NSNEP). Its guidance is ad-ministered by the Governmental Commission for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (GCNEP). The work of the Governmental Commission is designated to be assisted by the Secretariat, the Operational Staff and by the Technical Scientific Council. The leading and guiding duties of the relevant ministries and national agencies are performed by the Sectional Organisations for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness (SONEP), together with those of the Metropolitan Agencies and of the county agencies by the Metropolitan Local Committee (MLCNEP) and by County Local Committees. The chairman of the Governmental Commission is the Minister of the Interior whose authority covers the guidance of the NSNEP's activities. The Secretariat of the Governmental Commission (SGC) co-ordinates the activities of the bodies of the Governmental Commission, the sectional organisations, the local committees for nuclear emergency preparedness and those of the other bodies responsible for implementing action. The Emergency Information Centre (EIC) of GCNEP as the central body of the National Radiation Monitoring, Warning and Surveillance System provides the information needed for preparing decisions at Governmental Commission level. The technical-scientific establishment of the governmental decisions in preparation for nuclear emergency situations and the elimination of their consequences are tasks of the Technical-Scientific Council. The Centre for Emergency Response, Training and Analysis (CERTA) of the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) may be treated as a body of the Governmental Commission as well. The National Radiation Monitoring, Warning and Surveillance System (NRMWSS) is integral part of the NSNEP. The NRMWSS consists of the elements operated by the ministries and the operation of nation-wide measuring network in

  17. Nuclear emergency management: what is new?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; Mundigl, S.

    2003-01-01

    Through the use of internationally organised, multinational drills, a wealth of experience and knowledge have been gained at both the national and international levels. The lessons learnt primarily concerned the early, urgent-communication phases of nuclear emergencies, and are currently in the process of being consolidated and incorporated into national structures and approaches. The focus of current works is shifting towards later accident phases, particularly to the mid-term phase, when control has been regained of the emergency situation but the accident consequences have yet to be addressed. In addition to these ''classic'' nuclear emergency response interests, since the 11 september 2001 national authorities have been concerned with accident response capabilities in case of terrorist acts that might involve radiation. (A.L.B.)

  18. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2002 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 65 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 28 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  19. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2007/2008 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from electric power companies and other nuclear organizations around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 18 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; effect of the Niigata-ken chuetsu-oki earthquake; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  20. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2003 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 81 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 33 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  1. Maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migaud, D.; Hutin, J.P.; Jouette, I.; Eymond, P.; Devie, P.; Cudelou, C.; Magnier, S.; Frydman, M.

    2016-01-01

    This document gathers different articles concerning the maintenance of the French nuclear power plants. The first article analyses the impact of the recent law on the energetic transition that sets the share of nuclear power at 50% of the electricity produced by 2025. A consequence may be the decommissioning of 17 to 20 reactors by 2025 and the huge maintenance program called 'Grand Carenage' whose aim is to extend operating life over 40 years will have to be re-considered in order to avoid useless expenses. The second article shows that in 2015 the French nuclear reactor fleet got very good results in terms of availability and safety. There were 49 scheduled outages and among them some ended ahead of time. The third article describes the specificities of the maintenance of a nuclear power plant, for instance the redundancy of some systems implies that maintenance has to deal with systems that have never functioned but must be ready to operate at any moment. Another specificity is the complexity of a nuclear power plant that implies an essential phase of preparation for maintenance operations. Because of safety requirements any maintenance operation has to be controlled, checked and may provide feedback. The fourth article presents the 'Grand Carenage' maintenance program that involves the following operations: the replacement of steam generators, the re-tubing of condensers, the replacement of the filtering drums used for cooling water, the testing of the reactor building, the hydraulic test of the primary circuit and the inspection of the reactor vessel. The fifth article focuses on the organization of the work-site for maintenance operations and the example of the Belleville-sur-Loire is described in the sixth article. Important maintenance operations like 'Grand Carenage' requires a strong collaboration with a network of specialized enterprises and as no reactor (except Flamanville EPR) is being built in France, maintenance

  2. Nuclear Plant Analyzer: Installation manual. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, D.M.; Wagner, K.L.; Grush, W.H.; Jones, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains the installation instructions for the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) System. The NPA System consists of the Computer Visual System (CVS) program, the NPA libraries, the associated utility programs. The NPA was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide a highly flexible graphical user interface for displaying the results of these analysis codes. The NPA also provides the user with a convenient means of interactively controlling the host program through user-defined pop-up menus. The NPA was designed to serve primarily as an analysis tool. After a brief introduction to the Computer Visual System and the NPA, an analyst can quickly create a simple picture or set of pictures to aide in the study of a particular phenomenon. These pictures can range from simple collections of square boxes and straight lines to complex representations of emergency response information displays

  3. Use of computers at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen'kin, V.I.; Ozhigano, Yu.V.

    1974-01-01

    Applications of information and control computors in reacter central systems in Great Britain, Federal Republic of Germany, France, Canada, and the USA is surveyed. For the purpose of increasing the reliability of the computers effective means were designed for emergency operation and automatic computerized controls, and highly reliable micromodel modifications were developed. Numerical data units were handled along with development of methods and diagrams for converting analog values to numerical values, in accordance with modern requirements. Some data are presented on computer reliability in operating nuclear power plants both proposed and under construction. It is concluded that in foreign nuclear power stations the informational and calculational computers are finding increasingly wide distribution. Rapid action, the possibility of controlling large parameters, and operation of the computer in conjunction with increasing reliability are speeding up the process of introducing computers in atomic energy and broadenig their functions. (V.P.)

  4. Simulators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancarani, A.; Zanobetti, D.

    1983-01-01

    The different types of simulator for nuclear power plants depend on the kind of programme and the degree of representation to be achieved, which in turn determines the functions to duplicate. Different degrees correspond to different simulators and hence to different choices in the functions. Training of nuclear power plant operators takes advantage of the contribution of simulators of various degrees of complexity and fidelity. Reduced scope simulators are best for understanding basic phenomena; replica simulators are best used for formal qualification and requalification of personnel, while modular mini simulators of single parts of a plant are best for replay and assessment of malfunctions. Another category consists of simulators for the development of assistance during operation, with the inclusion of disturbance and alarm analysis. The only existing standard on simulators is, at present, the one adopted in the United States. This is too stringent and is never complied with by present simulators. A description of possible advantages of a European standard is therefore offered: it rests on methods of measurement of basic simulator characteristics such as fidelity in values and time. (author)

  5. Study on Korean Radiological Emergency System-Care System- and National Nuclear Emergency Preparedness System Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad Khusyairi; Yudi Pramono

    2008-01-01

    Care system; Radiological Emergency Supporting System. Environmental radiology level is the main aspect that should be concerned deal with the utilization of nuclear energy. The usage of informational technology in nuclear area gives significant contribution to anticipate and to protect human and environment. Since 1960, South Korea has developed environment monitoring system as the effort to protect the human and environment in the radiological emergency condition. Indonesia has possessed several nuclear installations and planned to build and operate nuclear power plants (PLTN) in the future. Therefore, Indonesia has to prepare the integrated system, technically enables to overcome the radiological emergency. Learning from the practice in South Korea, the system on the radiological emergency should be prepared and applied in Indonesia. However, the government regulation draft on National Radiological Emergency System, under construction, only touches the management aspect, not the technical matters. Consequently, when the regulation is implemented, it will need an additional regulation on technical aspect including the consideration on the system (TSS), the organization of operator and the preparation of human resources development of involved institution. For that purpose, BAPETEN should have a typical independence system in regulatory frame work. (author)

  6. Advanced plant design recommendations from Cook Nuclear Plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, W.L.

    1993-01-01

    A project in the American Electric Power Service Corporation to review operating and maintenance experience at Cook Nuclear Plant to identify recommendations for advanced nuclear plant design is described. Recommendations so gathered in the areas of plant fluid systems, instrument and control, testing and surveillance provisions, plant layout of equipment, provisions to enhance effective maintenance, ventilation systems, radiological protection, and construction, are presented accordingly. An example for a design review checklist for effective plant operations and maintenance is suggested

  7. New Nuclear Emergency Prognosis system in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Ha; Jeong, Seung-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Kwan-Hee

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews the status of assessment and prognosis system for nuclear emergency response in Korea, especially atmospheric dispersion model. The Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) performs the regulation and radiological emergency preparedness of the nuclear facilities and radiation utilizations. Also, KINS has set up the "Radiological Emergency Technical Advisory Plan" and the associated procedures such as an emergency response manual in consideration of the IAEA Safety Standards GS-R-2, GS-G-2.0, and GS-G-2.1. The Radiological Emergency Technical Advisory Center (RETAC) organized in an emergency situation provides the technical advice on radiological emergency response. The "Atomic Computerized Technical Advisory System for nuclear emergency" (AtomCARE) has been developed to implement assessment and prognosis by RETAC. KINS developed Accident Dose Assessment and Monitoring (ADAMO) system in 2015 to reflect the lessons learned from Fukushima accident. It incorporates (1) the dose assessment on the entire Korean peninsula, Asia region, and global region, (2) multi-units accident assessment (3) applying new methodology of dose rate assessment and the source term estimation with inverse modeling, (4) dose assessment and monitoring with the environmental measurements result. The ADAMO is the renovated version of current FADAS of AtomCARE. The ADAMO increases the accuracy of the radioactive material dispersion with applying the LDAPS(Local Data Assimilation Prediction System, Spatial resolution: 1.5 km) and RDAPS(Regional Data Assimilation Prediction System, Spatial resolution: 12km) of weather prediction data, and performing the data assimilation of automatic weather system (AWS) data from Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) and data from the weather observation tower at NPP site. The prediction model of the radiological material dispersion is based on the set of the Lagrangian Particle model and Lagrangian Puff model. The dose estimation methodology

  8. Nuclear power plant V-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In this leaflet the short history of commissioning of Bohunice V-2 NPP is reviewed (beginning of construction December 1976; First controlled reactor power, Reactor Unit 1 (RU1): 7 August 1984, Reactor Unit 2 (RU2): 2 August 1985; Connection to the grid: RU1 20 August 1984, RU2 9 August 1985; Commercial operation: RU1 14 February 1985, RU2 18 December 1985. The scheme of the nuclear reactor WWER 440/V213 is depicted. The major technological equipment are described. Principles of nuclear power plant operation safety (safety barriers, active and passive safety systems, centralized heat supply system, as well as technical data of the Bohunice V-2 NPP are presented

  9. Nuclear power plant V-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In this leaflet the short history of commissioning of Bohunice V-1 NPP is reviewed (beginning of construction 24 April 1972; First controlled reactor power, Reactor Unit 1 (RU1): 27 November 1978, Reactor Unit 2 (RU2): 15 March 1980; Connection to the grid: RU1 17 December 1978, RU2 26 March 1980; Commercial operation: RU1 1 April 1980, RU2 7 January 1981. The scheme of the nuclear reactor WWER 440/V230 is depicted. The major technological equipment (primary circuit, nuclear reactor, steam generators, reactor coolant pumps, primary circuit auxiliary systems, secondary circuit, turbine generators, NPP electrical equipment, and power plant control) are described. Technical data of the Bohunice V-1 NPP are presented

  10. [Risk communication in construction of new nuclear power plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gui-Zhen; Lü, Yong-Long

    2013-03-01

    Accompanied by construction of new nuclear power plants in the coming decades in China, risk management has become increasingly politicized and contentious. Nuclear risk communication is a critical component in helping individuals prepare for, respond to, and recover from nuclear power emergencies. It was discussed that awareness of trust and public attitudes are important determinants in nuclear power risk communication and management. However, there is limited knowledge about how to best communicate with at-risk populations around nuclear power plant in China. To bridge this gap, this study presented the attitudinal data from a field survey in under-building Haiyang nuclear power plant, Shandong Province to measure public support for and opposition to the local construction of nuclear power plant. The paper discussed the structure of the communication process from a descriptive point of view, recognizing the importance of trust and understanding the information openness. The results showed that decision-making on nuclear power was dominated by a closed "iron nuclear triangle" of national governmental agencies, state-owned nuclear enterprises and scientific experts. Public participation and public access to information on nuclear constructions and assessments have been marginal and media was a key information source. As information on nuclear power and related risks is very restricted in China, Chinese citizens (51%) tend to choose the government as the most trustworthy source. More respondents took the negative attitudes toward nuclear power plant construction around home. It drew on studies about risk communication to develop some guidelines for successful risk communication. The conclusions have vast implications for how we approach risk management in the future. The findings should be of interest to state and local emergency managers, community-based organizations, public health researchers, and policy makers.

  11. Slovak Electric, plc, Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In this popular scientific brochure a brief description of construction scheme of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant is presented. Electricity generation in a nuclear power plant is described. Instrumentation and control system as well as nuclear safety principles applied on the NPP are presented

  12. Nuclear power plants in populated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmann, F.

    1973-01-01

    The article first deals with the permanently increasing demand for electical power. Considering the ever growing energy demand which can no longer be covered by conventional power plants, it has become necessary to set up nuclear power plants of larger range. The author presents in a survey the basic function of nuclear power plants as well as the resulting risks and safety measures. The author concludes that according to present knowledge there is no more need to erect nuclear power plants outside densely populated urban areas but there is now the possibility of erecting nuclear power plants in densely populated areas. (orig./LH) [de

  13. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  14. Design of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    The criteria of design and safety, applied internationally to systems and components of PWR type reactors, are described. The main criteria of the design analysed are: thermohydraulic optimization; optimized arrangement of buildings and components; low costs of energy generation; high level of standardization; application of specific safety criteria for nuclear power plants. The safety criteria aim to: assure the safe reactor shutdown; remove the residual heat and; avoid the release of radioactive elements for environment. Some exemples of safety criteria are given for Angra-2 and Angra-3 reactors. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Off-shore nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, T.

    1980-01-01

    In order to avoid losses of energy and seawater pollution an off-shore nuclear power plant is coupled with a power plant which utilizes the temperature difference between seawater and hot reactor cooling water. According to the invention the power plant has a working media loop which is separated from the nuclear power plant. The apparative equipment and the operational characteristics of the power plant are the subject of the patent. (UWI) [de

  16. Network of siren, public address and display system to preparedness and response for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, G.H.; Padmanabhan, N.; Raman, N.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Abani, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    For an effective emergency response and implementation of counter measures, communication during a nuclear emergency is a very important aspect. The declaration of a nuclear emergency must be immediately conveyed to all those working in the plant and around the nuclear site. Besides this, the nature of emergency also needs to be conveyed unambiguously along with corresponding counter measures, such as stay in, evacuation or all clear signal for the relevant plants. This requirement has necessitated the need for a networked signaling system. Based on this requirement, a microcontroller based signaling and a telephone/wireless based communication and display system has been designed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. It is proposed to be used as a part of emergency preparedness and response programme at the nuclear facility sites. As per the design made for Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay site, each plant or area in the site is identified by a unique identification code. The main Site Emergency Control Centre/Emergency Response Centre at Mod. Labs. selectively calls the various plants and declares the nature of emergency to be followed In that plant/area through different siren signals along with display and announcement of instructions. This paper describes the details of the system that is designed for Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay site and proposed for other nuclear power plant sites. (author)

  17. Nuclear power. Volume 1. Nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DESIGN is intended to be used as a working reference book for management, engineers and designers, and as a graduate-level text for engineering students. The book is designed to combine theory with practical nuclear power engineering and design experience, and to give the reader an up-to-date view of the status of nuclear power and a basic understanding of how nuclear power plants function. Volume 1 contains the following chapters; (1) nuclear reactor theory; (2) nuclear reactor design; (3) types of nuclear power plants; (4) licensing requirements; (5) shielding and personnel exposure; (6) containment and structural design; (7) main steam and turbine cycles; (8) plant electrical system; (9) plant instrumentation and control systems; (10) radioactive waste disposal (waste management) and (11) conclusion

  18. Radiological aerial monitoring in a nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyeongki; Kim, Juyoul; Jung, Gunhyo

    2008-01-01

    Since North Korea announced the underground nuclear test on last October 9th, 2006, many countries around the world have worried about the atmospheric dispersion and pollution of radioactive materials crossing the border by the clandestine nuclear test. After that time, verifying the existence of nuclear test by detecting radioactive materials such as xenon, I-131, and Cs-134 at the early stage of radiological emergency, locating the position of test site by backward trajectory analysis, and chasing the moving path of airborne radionuclide have been heavily issued. And collection of airborne radioactivity and gamma radiation monitoring technology using an aircraft have been recently examined by an authority concerned in South Korea. Although various techniques of radiological aerial monitoring have been developed and operated around the world, the relevant technical development or research is still required. In order to decide potential measuring location and time within the framework of radiological monitoring system, we use HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of U.S. Department of Commerce. The model is validated and assessed against North Korea's nuclear test. Calculation results of radionuclide trajectory show a good agreement with measured values. Backward trajectory analysis is useful to track the radiological source term, possible time and place of nuclear accidents and/or activities. Nationwide early warning system using aircraft and atmospheric dispersion model can help a nearly real-time forecasting and warning in preparation for radiological emergencies. (author)

  19. Nuclear power plant operation 2016. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2017-05-15

    A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2016, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from nuclear power plants in Germany. Reports about nuclear power plants in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain will be published in a further issue.

  20. Environmental survey around EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulquier, L.

    1992-01-01

    Description of various types of environmental test carried out under the responsibility of the Operator of nuclear power plants in France, with taking Fessenheim nuclear power plant as an example: permanent monitoring of radioactivity, periodic radioecological assessments, main results of measurements taken, showing that there are no detectable effects of the plant on the environment, policy of openness by publication of these results

  1. Nuclear plant analyzer development and analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is being developed as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) state of the art safety analysis and engineering tool to address key nuclear plant safety issues. The NPA integrates the NRC's computerized reactor behavior simulation codes such as RELAP5 and TRAC-BWR, both of which are well-developed computer graphics programs, and large repositories of reactor design and experimental data. Utilizing the complex reactor behavior codes as well as the experiment data repositories enables simulation applications of the NPA that are generally not possible with more simplistic, less mechanistic reactor behavior codes. These latter codes are used in training simulators or with other NPA-type software packages and are limited to displaying calculated data only. This paper describes four applications of the NPA in assisting reactor safety analyses. Two analyses evaluated reactor operating procedures, during off-normal operation, for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR), respectively. The third analysis was performed in support of a reactor safety experiment conducted in the Semiscale facility. The final application demonstrated the usefulness of atmospheric dispersion computer codes for site emergency planning purposes. An overview of the NPA and how it supported these analyses are the topics of this paper

  2. Explanation of procedure on site medical emergency response for nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yulong; Jiang Zhong

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Procedure on Site Medical Emergency Response for Nuclear Accident has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. This standard is formulated according to the Emergency Response Law of the People's Republic of China, Law of the People 's Republic of China on Prevention and Control of Occupational Diseases, Regulations on Emergency Measures for Nuclear Accidents at Nuclear Power Plants, and Health Emergency Plans for Nuclear and Radiological Accidents of Ministry of Health, supporting the use of On-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents and Off-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents. Nuclear accident on-site medical response procedure is a part of the on-site emergency plan. The standard specifies the basic content and requirements of the nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response procedures of nuclear facilities operating units to guide and regulate the work of nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response of nuclear facilities operating units. The criteria-related contents were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  3. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear installations are designed, constructed and operated in such a way that the probability for an incident or accident is very low and the probability for a severe accident with catastrophic consequences is extremely small. These accidents represent the residual risk of the nuclear installation, and this residual risk can be decreased on one hand by a better design, construction and operation and on the other hand by planning and taking emergency measures inside the facility and in the environment of the facility. By way of introduction and definition it may be indicated to define some terms pertaining to the subject in order to make for more uniform understanding. (orig./DG)

  4. Nuclear emergency management procedures in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Emma

    The Chernobyl accident brought to the fore the need for decision-making in nuclear emergency management to be transparent and consistent across Europe. A range of systems to support decision-making in future emergencies have since been developed, but, by and large, with little consultation with potential decision makers and limited understanding of the emergency management procedures across Europe and how they differ. In nuclear emergency management, coordination, communication and information sharing are of paramount importance. There are many key players with their own technical expertise, and several key activities occur in parallel, across different locations. Business process modelling can facilitate understanding through the representation of processes, aid transparency and structure the analysis, comparison and improvement of processes. This work has been conducted as part of a European Fifth Framework Programme project EVATECH, whose aim was to improve decision support methods, models and processes taking into account stakeholder expectations and concerns. It has involved the application of process modelling to document and compare the emergency management processes in four European countries. It has also involved a multidisciplinary approach taking a socio-technical perspective. The use of process modelling did indeed facilitate understanding and provided a common platform, which was not previously available, to consider emergency management processes. This thesis illustrates the structured analysis approach that process modelling enables. Firstly, through an individual analysis for the United Kingdom (UK) model that illustrated the potential benefits for a country. These are for training purposes, to build reflexive shared mental models, to aid coordination and for process improvement. Secondly, through a comparison of the processes in Belgium, Germany, Slovak Republic and the UK. In this comparison of the four processes we observed that the four process

  5. Analysis of emergency response to fukushima nuclear accident in Japan and suggestions for China's nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wei; Ding Qihua; Wu Haosong

    2014-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station of the Tokyo Electric Power Company ('TEPCO') was hit and damaged by a magnitude 9 earthquake and accompanying tsunami. The accident is determined to be of the highest rating on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The Government of Japan and TEPCO have taken emergency response actions on-site and off-site at the accident. It became clear through the investigation that the accident had been initiated on the occasion of a natural disaster of an earthquake and tsunami, but there have been various complex problems behind this very serious and large scale accident. For an example, the then-available accident preventive measures and disaster preparedness of TEPCO were insufficient against tsunami and severe accidents; inadequate TEPCO emergency responses to the accident at the site were also identified. The accident rang the alarm for the nuclear safety of nuclear power plants. It also taught us a great of lessons in nuclear emergency management. (authors)

  6. Simulation of potential accident scenarios for the emergency protection in the neighborhood of nuclear power plants using RODOS; Simulation potentieller Unfallszenarien fuer den Notfallschutz in der Umgebung von Kernkraftwerken mit RODOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, H.; Gering, F.; Arnold, K.; Gerich, B.; Heinrich, G.; Welte, U.

    2014-12-15

    Triggered by the Fukushima disaster, the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) in Germany started in March 2011 to investigate the potential radiological consequences of a ''Fukushima-like'' accident in a German nu-clear power plant and conducted appropriate simulations in 2012. Between end 2012 and end 2013, the first study was followed by a much more detailed and comprehensive investigation comprising more than 5.000 case studies for three nuclear power plant (NPP) sites in Germany. Based on these results the German Commission on Radio-logical Protection (SSK) has released a new recommendation in March 2014 for the extension of current emer-gency planning zones for nuclear power plants in Germany. Key results of this study are maximum distances, in which dose criteria for protective actions for the population are exceeded; all results are given for the largest source term scenario ''FKA'' (INES scale 7): - Threshold values for deterministic effects and high doses (effective doses higher than 1.000 mSv) can be ex-ceeded within a distance of about 3 km on average. - The dose criterion for ''evacuation'' can be exceeded within a distance of about 9 - 18 km (adults) resp. 14 -24 km (infants) on average (the given interval considers minimum and maximum values for the median value for all three NPP sites). - The dose criterion for ''sheltering'' can be exceeded within a distance of about 62 - 80 km (adults) resp. 91 - 114 km (infants) on average. - The dose criteria for ''iodine thyroid blocking'' can be exceeded within a distance of about 24 - 34 km (adults) resp. 148 - 161 km (infants) on average.

  7. National emergency plan for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The national emergency plan for nuclear accidents is a plan of action designed to provide a response to accidents involving the release or potential release of radioactive substances into the environment, which could give rise to radiation exposure to the public. The plan outlines the measures which are in place to assess and mitigate the effects of nuclear accidents which might pose a radiological hazard in ireland. It shows how accident management will operate, how technical information and monitoring data will be collected, how public information will be provided and what measures may be taken for the protection of the public in the short and long term. The plan can be integrated with the Department of Defence arrangements for wartime emergencies

  8. Lessons Learned after Nuclear Power Plants and Hydropower Plants Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, A., E-mail: gce@gce.ru [GCE Group, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15

    Full text: The World is becoming more open and free for communication. However, the experience (positive or negative) is still badly cross over sectorial borders. I would like to illustrate the point with the examples, even with several unexpected ones. I would like to start with a few words regarding the Sayano – Shushenskaya Hydro Power Plant accident and the factors that caused it. Sayano – Shushenskaya Hydro Power Plant is a unique Hydro Power Plant with efficiency factor of 96 %. Nevertheless, the efficiency factor, in particular, caused a series of restrictions: hydro-electric units vibration amplitude must not exceed 4 micron!!! (Slide 1: Vibration amplitude dependence on output capacity) As it is clearly seen, there is a so called “prohibited area”, which the hydro-electric unit must pass over. Operations in the area are prohibited in accordance with the regulatory documents. However, due to the changes that occurred in Russian power supply industry, the hydro-electric unit passed through the prohibited area more than 12 times, if we take into account only the day of the accident. The bolts keeping the turbine cover, keeping water apart from the machinery hall, were too much released. The mentioned above reasons led to the hydro-electric unit disruption and the machinery hall flooding. Water inflow was possible to stop by putting down the regulating valves. However, the regulating valves control console was in the flooded machinery hall. There was standby emergency control console, but it was in the machinery hall, as well. The machinery hall was flooded, consequently, main and standby systems were destroyed. Moreover, the machinery hall, where all the units were disposed, was a huge hall without dividing walls, etc. (Photo) Take a look at the next slide. (Photo – Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant machinery hall). Take note of Fukushima–1 Nuclear Power Plant: standby power supply source was situated in the same place and destroyed by water. All the

  9. Commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning is presented as a step in the commercialization of nuclear energy. Opportunities for technology application advances are identified. Utility planning needs are presented

  10. Nuclear Power Plants and Uranium Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGHEI MĂRGULESCU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent UN Climate Talks in Paris have put forward the goal of limiting the global temperature rise to two degrees Celsius by the end of the century. This is providing a strong political base for expanding the nuclear power capacity because of the critical role that nuclear power plants play in the production of electricity without emissions of greenhouse gases. In all, more than a dozen countries get over 25% of their energy from nuclear power, with 437 nuclear reactors operating around the world. On top of that, there are another 71 reactors under construction, 165 planned, and 315 proposed. Global uranium demand is expected to rise 40% by 2025 and 81% by 2035. Mined supply of uranium will struggle to keep pace amid rising demand and falling secondary supplies. A cumulative supply deficit is expected to emerge by 2021 while 2016 marks a huge inflection point for the industry, beeing the first year that demand will actually exceed supplies, creating a 60,000-tonne shortfall by 2018. Over the next 10 years, we're going to see uranium prices more than double while the bull run will begin in earnest in 2016.

  11. Countermeasures for dairy products in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkko, K.; Ammann, M.; Kostiainen, E.; Salo, A.; Liskola, K.; Haemaelaeinen, R.P.; Mustajoki, J.

    2001-01-01

    This work was performed in order to plan countermeasures that, after an accidental release of radioactivity, could reduce the dose to the public due to the consumption of contaminated milk and milk products. The attention was focused on whether there are justified and optimised actions below the international recommended concentration levels in foodstuffs. The analysis was conducted as a case study, i.e., it was assumed that a hypothetical accident had happened in a nuclear power plant leading to a release of radionuclides which severely contaminated a wide area of Ostrobothnia, one of Finland's most important milk production areas. The dose averted by actions, the' monetary costs and the feasibility of actions were assessed. It was also studied what information is needed by decision-makers and in which form this information should be presented. Finally, it was examined how planning of countermeasures could be enhanced by applying decision analysis in establishing actions strategies and valuing attributes considered in decision making. Preparative meetings and a concluding workshop was arranged and all authorities involved in food-related emergency management were invited to jointly analyse different options. According to the query made the participants considered the decision workshop and decision analysis very practicable in exercises. The exercise as a whole was also evaluated useful or very useful. The presented techniques in a real situation were considered applicable but not as useful as in exercises. Thus it can be deduced that the concluding workshop and decision analysis interviews augment well conventional emergency exercises. Realistic dose assessments proved out to be very difficult. The software used was able to calculate the maximum radionuclide concentrations in foodstuffs processed from local raw materials. Radionuclide concentration in food or feedstuffs may, however, change quickly. Also, the production and processing of foodstuffs is a complex

  12. Measures for reinforcing safety at the Ohma Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroyasu; Iwata, Kichisa; Koga, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. ('J-POWER') has been moving ahead with the Ohma Nuclear Power Project at Ohma-machi, Shimokita-gun in Aomori Prefecture and commenced the construction of an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) in May 2008. In light of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Incident, J-POWER has undertaken an investigation of various measures for reinforcing safety at the Ohma nuclear power plant. These measures include a range of anti-tsunami measures, measures to ensure emergency power sources and ultimate heat removal functions, and responses for severe accidents. While consistently and properly reflecting the necessary measures, J-POWER will continue to ensure the creation of a safe power plant. J-POWER intends to appropriately reflect at all times new standards of technology established by the Nuclear Regulation Authority and makes concerted efforts to build a safe nuclear power plant in which the local community can have confidence. (author)

  13. Particular features of fire protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, W.

    1985-01-01

    The particular features of fire protection in nuclear power plants that are connected with the need to ensure nuclear and radiation safety even during an emergency are outlined followed by the recommendation to lay them down in special fire protection standards. These, in conjunction with comprehensive fire hazard analyses, could serve to work out complex concepts for the fire protection of individual nuclear power plants. Such concepts would be very useful for review and assessment of the fire protection design during the licensing process and for later inspections. (author)

  14. TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiba, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Norio

    1990-01-01

    TOSHIBA aims to secure safety, increase reliability and improve efficiency through the engineering for nuclear power plant using Computer Aided Engineering (CAE). TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant consists of numbers of sub-systems which had been integrated centering around the Nuclear Power Plant Engineering Data Base (PDBMS) and covers all stage of engineering for nuclear power plant from project management, design, manufacturing, construction to operating plant service and preventive maintenance as it were 'Plant Life-Cycle CAE System'. In recent years, TOSHIBA has been devoting to extend the system for integrated intelligent CAE system with state-of-the-art computer technologies such as computer graphics and artificial intelligence. This paper shows the outline of CAE system for nuclear power plant in TOSHIBA. (author)

  15. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-06-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  16. Safety culture in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weihe, G. von; Pamme, H.

    2003-01-01

    Experience shows that German nuclear power plants have always been operated reliably and safely. Over the years, the safety level in these plants has been raised considerably so that they can stand any comparison with other countries. This is confirmed by the two reports published by the Federal Ministry for the Environment on the nuclear safety convention. Behind this, there must obviously stand countless appropriate 'good practices' and a safety management system in nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  17. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-03-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  18. HVDC transmission from nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yukio; Takenaka, Kiyoshi; Taniguchi, Haruto; Ueda, Kiyotaka

    1980-01-01

    HVDC transmission directly from a nuclear power plant is expected as one of the bulk power transmission systems from distant power generating area. Successively from the analysis of HVDC transmission from BWR-type nuclear power plant, this report discusses dynamic response characteristics of HVDC transmission (double poles, two circuits) from PWR type nuclear power plant due to dc-line faults (DC-1LG, 2LG) and ac-line faults (3LG) near inverter station. (author)

  19. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  20. Summary of nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Saburo

    1973-01-01

    Various conditions for the construction of nuclear power plants in Japan without natural resources were investigated. Expansion of the sites of plants, change of reactor vessels, standardization of nuclear power plants, possiblity of the reduction of construction period, approaching of nuclear power plants to consuming cities, and group construction were studied. Evaluation points were safety and economy. Previous sites of nuclear power plants were mostly on plane ground or cut and enlarge sites. Proposals for underground or offshore plants have been made. The underground plants were made at several places in Europe, and the ocean plant is now approved in U.S.A. as a plant on a man-made island. Vessels for containing nuclear reactors are the last barriers to the leakage of radioactive substance. At the initial period, the vessels were made of steel, which were surrounded by shielding material. Those were dry well type containers. Then, vessel type changed to pressure-suppression type wet containers. Now, it tends to concrete (PC or RC) type containers. There is the policy on the standardization of nuclear power plants by U.S.A.E.C. in recent remarkable activity. The merit and effect of the standardization were studied, and are presented in this paper. Cost of the construction of nuclear power plants is expensive, and interest of money is large. Then, the reduction of construction period is an important problem. The situations of plants approaching to consuming cities in various countries were studied. Idea of group construction is described. (Kato, T.)