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Sample records for emerging highly lethal

  1. Double jeopardy: Predictors of elevated lethality risk among intimate partner violence victims seen in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignone, Laura; Gomez, Anu Manchikanti

    2017-10-01

    Many intimate partner homicide victims visit emergency departments (EDs) prior to their deaths, yet their lethality risk is not well understood. eHealth interventions for intimate partner violence (IPV) improve provider information, tailor care to victim need and link victims to services. We analyzed ED patients' lethality risk using one such intervention, Domestic Violence Report and Referral (DVRR). DVRR records were assessed for 263 female patients aged 16 and older seen for IPV at an urban, high-traffic, Northern California ED in 2014-15. Multiple linear regression was used to test the association of children's presence at home, pregnancy, age, and abuser-victim relationship with victim's lethality risk using the Danger Assessment (DA) score from the Lethality Risk Assessment for Intimate Partner Femicide. Differences in means were assessed using t- and F-tests. The mean DA score indicated high lethality risk, with a third of respondents (33.1%) reporting very high DA scores. Multiple linear regression models indicated that increasing victim age (β=0.20/year; 95% CI: 0.11-0.29), children's presence at home (β=2.61, 95% CI: 0.63-4.58), and perpetrator reported as dating partner (β=4.50, 95% CI: 1.62-7.38) or ex-partner (β=4.38, 95% CI: 1.10-7.66) were significantly associated with the DA score (p<0.05). Use of DA scores as ED risk assessment tools in response to IPV victimization could help hospital staff and IPV advocates direct resources toward highest-need patients, improving health outcomes without additional burden on hospitals. These results also foreground eHealth interventions' utility in linking providers and IPV advocates and reducing the risk of intimate partner homicide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cognitive Inhibition in Elderly High-Lethality Suicide Attempters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Devantoy, Stéphane; Szanto, Katalin; Butters, Meryl A.; Kalkus, Jan; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background People who attempt suicide often display cognitive impairments, particularly poor cognitive control. Could poor cognitive control contribute to high suicide rates in old age? A component of cognitive control, cognitive inhibition – active suppression of task-irrelevant processing – is very sensitive to aging and has been linked to attempted suicide. We investigated cognitive inhibition in older high-lethality suicide attempters, closely resembling suicide victims, as well as low-lethality attempters, and control groups with and without depression and suicidal ideation. Methods 102 participants aged 60+ (17 psychiatrically healthy control subjects, 38 depressed control subjects, 16 suicide ideators, 14 low-lethality suicide attempters, and 17 high-lethality suicide attempters) underwent comprehensive clinical and cognitive assessments. They completed the Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System Color-Word Interference Test, a validated modification of the Stroop test. Results High-lethality suicide attempters demonstrated a distinct pattern of cognitive inhibition deficits. Compared to psychiatrically healthy control subjects and suicide ideators, high-lethality attempters took longer to complete inhibition trials, even after accounting for potential confounding factors (age, education, MMSE score, information processing speed, and accuracy). Compared to non-suicidal depressed and healthy control subjects, low-lethality suicide attempters committed more uncorrected errors; however, this difference was not specific to the inhibition condition. Conclusions Older suicide attempters are a cognitively heterogeneous group. Poor cognitive control in high-lethality attempters may undermine their ability to solve real-life problems, precipitating a catastrophic accumulation of stressors. Meanwhile, low-lethality attempters' poor performance may reflect a careless approach to the task or faulty monitoring. PMID:24816626

  3. Lethal Means Counseling for Parents of Youth Seeking Emergency Care for Suicidality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol W. Runyan, MPH, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A youth’s emergency department (ED visit for suicidal behaviors or ideation provides an opportunity to counsel families about securing medications and firearms (i.e., lethal means counseling. Methods: In this quality improvement project drawing on the Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM model, we trained 16 psychiatric emergency clinicians to provide lethal means counseling with parents of patients under age 18 receiving care for suicidality and discharged home from a large children’s hospital. Through chart reviews and follow-up interviews of parents who received the counseling, we examined what parents recalled, their reactions to the counseling session, and actions taken after discharge. Results: Between March and July 2014, staff counseled 209 of the 236 (89% parents of eligible patients. We conducted follow-up interviews with 114 parents, or 55% of those receiving the intervention; 48% of those eligible. Parents had favorable impressions of the counseling and good recall of the main messages. Among the parents contacted at follow up, 76% reported all medications in the home were locked as compared to fewer than 10% at the time of the visit. All who had indicated there were guns in the home at the time of the visit reported at follow up that all were currently locked, compared to 67% reporting this at the time of the visit. Conclusion: Though a small project in just one hospital, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of adding a counseling protocol to the discharge process within a pediatric psychiatric emergency service. Our positive findings suggest that further study, including a randomized control trial in more facilities, is warranted.

  4. Impulsivity, aggression and brain structure in high and low lethality suicide attempters with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloff, Paul; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2014-06-30

    Impulsivity and aggressiveness are trait dispositions associated with the vulnerability to suicidal behavior across diagnoses. They are associated with structural and functional abnormalities in brain networks involved in regulation of mood, impulse and behavior. They are also core characteristics of borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder defined, in part, by recurrent suicidal behavior. We assessed the relationships between personality traits, brain structure and lethality of suicide attempts in 51 BPD attempters using multiple regression analyses on structural MRI data. BPD was diagnosed by the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients-revised, impulsivity by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), aggression by the Brown-Goodwin Lifetime History of Aggression (LHA), and high lethality by a score of 4 or more on the Lethality Rating Scale (LRS). Sixteen High Lethality attempters were compared to 35 Low Lethality attempters, with no significant differences noted in gender, co-morbidity, childhood abuse, BIS or LHA scores. Degree of medical lethality (LRS) was negatively related to gray matter volumes across multiple fronto-temporal-limbic regions. Effects of impulsivity and aggression on gray matter volumes discriminated High from Low Lethality attempters and differed markedly within lethality groups. Lethality of suicide attempts in BPD may be related to the mediation of these personality traits by specific neural networks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Broad spectrum antiviral activity of favipiravir (T-705: protection from highly lethal inhalational Rift Valley Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Caroline

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of antiviral drugs that have broad-spectrum activity against a number of viral infections would be of significant benefit. Due to the evolution of resistance to currently licensed antiviral drugs, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is in progress, including Favipiravir (T-705, which is currently in human clinical trials. T-705 displays broad-spectrum in vitro activity against a number of viruses, including Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV. RVF is an important neglected tropical disease that causes human, agricultural, and economic losses in endemic regions. RVF has the capacity to emerge in new locations and also presents a potential bioterrorism threat. In the current study, the in vivo efficacy of T-705 was evaluated in Wistar-Furth rats infected with the virulent ZH501 strain of RVFV by the aerosol route. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wistar-Furth rats are highly susceptible to a rapidly lethal disease after parenteral or inhalational exposure to the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. In the current study, two experiments were performed: a dose-determination study and a delayed-treatment study. In both experiments, all untreated control rats succumbed to disease. Out of 72 total rats infected with RVFV and treated with T-705, only 6 succumbed to disease. The remaining 66 rats (92% survived lethal infection with no significant weight loss or fever. The 6 treated rats that succumbed survived significantly longer before succumbing to encephalitic disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Currently, there are no licensed antiviral drugs for treating RVF. Here, T-705 showed remarkable efficacy in a highly lethal rat model of Rift Valley Fever, even when given up to 48 hours post-infection. This is the first study to show protection of rats infected with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Our data suggest that T-705 has potential to be a broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  6. Mice lacking functional STAT1 are highly susceptible to lethal infection with Lassa virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Walker, David H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Walker, Aida G; Smith, Jeanon N; Miller, Milagros; de la Torre, Juan C; Smith, Jennifer K; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Fair, Joseph N; Wauquier, Nadia; Grant, Donald S; Bockarie, Bayon; Bente, Dennis; Paessler, Slobodan

    2013-10-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a potentially lethal human disease that is caused by the arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Annually, around 300,000 infections with up to 10,000 deaths occur in regions of Lassa fever endemicity in West Africa. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking a functional STAT1 pathway are highly susceptible to infection with LASV and develop lethal disease with pathology similar to that reported in humans.

  7. Lethal neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by multi-drug resistant, highly virulent Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Junaid; Dufendach, Kevin R; Wellons, John C; Kuba, Maria G; Nickols, Hilary H; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G; Wynn, James L

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis is a rare but devastating condition. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria represent a substantial global health risk. This study reports on an aggressive case of lethal neonatal meningitis due to a MDR Escherichia coli (serotype O75:H5:K1). Serotyping, MDR pattern and phylogenetic typing revealed that this strain is an emergent and highly virulent neonatal meningitis E. coli isolate. The isolate was resistant to both ampicillin and gentamicin; antibiotics currently used for empiric neonatal sepsis treatment. The strain was also positive for multiple virulence genes including K1 capsule, fimbrial adhesion fimH, siderophore receptors iroN, fyuA and iutA, secreted autotransporter toxin sat, membrane associated proteases ompA and ompT, type II polysaccharide synthesis genes (kpsMTII) and pathogenicity-associated island (PAI)-associated malX gene. The presence of highly-virulent MDR organisms isolated in neonates underscores the need to implement rapid drug resistance diagnostic methods and should prompt consideration of alternate empiric therapy in neonates with Gram negative meningitis.

  8. A novel coronavirus capable of lethal human infections: an emerging picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Summary In September 2012, a novel coronavirus was isolated from a patient in Saudi Arabia who had died of an acute respiratory illness and renal failure. The clinical presentation was reminiscent of the outbreak caused by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) exactly ten years ago that resulted in over 8000 cases. Sequence analysis of the new virus revealed that it was indeed a member of the same genus as SARS-CoV. By mid-February 2013, 12 laboratory-confirmed cases had been reported with 6 fatalities. The first 9 cases were in individuals resident in the Middle East, while the most recent 3 cases were in family members resident in the UK. The index case in the UK family cluster had travel history to Pakistan and Saudi Arabia. Although the current evidence suggests that this virus is not highly transmissible among humans, there is a real danger that it may spread to other parts of the world. Here, a brief review of the events is provided to summarize the rapidly emerging picture of this new virus. PMID:23445530

  9. [Surgical complications in drug body-packers: an uncommon but potentially lethal emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Llano, Laura; Rey Valcárcel, Cristina; Mohamed Al-Lal, Yusef; Sánchez Rodríguez, Teresa; García Marín, Andrés; Pérez Díaz, María Dolores; Turégano Fuentes, Fernando

    2012-11-01

    Drug trafficking by means of introducing packets of illegal substances in body cavities carries a risk of suffering from a gastrointestinal obstruction and/or severe poisoning in the person who transports them. Spain is considered as the port of entry to Europe for drugs, and some Spanish hospitals have experience in managing these types of patients. Two hospitals in Madrid, including the Gregorio Marañón University General Hospital (HGUGM), received these potential patients from the Madrid Barajas airport. To analyse the results of the conservative treatment and the need for surgery in "body-packers". A retrospective, observational study of patients diagnosed as a body-packer between January 2000 and December 2008. Those with gastrointestinal symptoms, signs of poisoning, or positive for drugs of abuse, were admitted to the Custodial Unit of our hospital. The conservative treatment consisted of digestive rest and imaging studies until expulsion from the body. Asymptomatic patients were discharged from the Emergency Department. A total of 549 patients, with a median age of 31 years, and of whom 81% were males, were hospitalised during this period. Less than half (40%) showed positive for drugs in the urine, with cocaine in 80% of the cases. Of the 549 patients with initial conservative treatment, 27 (4.9%) had serious complications (16, bowel obstruction, and 11 with signs of poisoning). Of these, 23 required surgery (the 16 obstructions and 7 of the poisonings); 2 were successfully treated in ICU, and 2 died before surgery (0.4%) of the cases. The most frequent surgical treatment was enterotomy and/or gastrostomy to extract the packets. Thirteen (56%) of those operated on had associated morbidity (11 abdominal infections and 2 nosocomial infections). Conservative treatment is safe in 95% of the patients. A small percentage required surgical treatment, basically for gastrointestinal obstruction or severe poisoning. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier

  10. The toxic mechanism of high lethality of herbicide butachlor in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huarong; Yin, Licheng; Zhang, Shicui; Feng, Wenrong

    2010-09-01

    The toxic mechanism of herbicide butachlor to induce extremely high lethality in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys Olivaceus, was analyzed by histopathological examination, antioxidant enzymes activities and ATP content assay. Histopathological examination of gill, liver and kidney of exposed fishes showed that gill was a target organ of butachlor. The butachlor seriously impaired the respiration of gills by a series of lesions such as edema, lifting and detachment of lamellar epithelium, breakdown of pillar cells, and blood congestion. The dysfunction of gill respiration caused suffocation to the exposed flounder with extremely high acute lethality. Antioxidant enzyme activity assay of the in vitro cultured flounder gill (FG) cells exposed to butachlor indicated that butachlor markedly inhibited the antioxidant enzyme activities of Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Furthermore, along with the decline of antioxidant enzyme activities, ATP content in the exposed FG cells decreased, too. This infers that the oxidative stress induced by butachlor can inhibit the production of cellular ATP. Similar decrease of ATP content was also observed in the exposed flounder gill tissues. Taken together, as in FG cells, butachlor possibly induced a short supply of ATP in pillar cells by inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme activities and then affecting the contractibility of the pillar cells, which in turn resulted in the blood congestion and suffocation of exposed flounder.

  11. Building high-resolution synthetic lethal networks: a 'Google map' of the cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, James M; Templeton, Shaina D; Baharani, Akanksha; Freywald, Andrew; Vizeacoumar, Franco J

    2014-12-01

    The most commonly used therapies for cancer involve delivering high doses of radiation or toxic chemicals to the patient that also cause substantial damage to normal tissue. To overcome this, researchers have recently resorted to a basic biological concept called 'synthetic lethality' (SL) that takes advantage of interactions between gene pairs. The identification of SL interactions is of considerable therapeutic interest because if a particular gene is SL with a tumor-causing mutation, then the targeting that gene carries therapeutic advantages. Mapping these interactions in the context of human cancer cells could hold the key to effective, targeted cancer treatments. In this review, we cover the recent advances that aim to identify these SL interactions using unbiased genetic screens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel highly reproducible and lethal nonhuman primate model for orthopox virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Kramski

    Full Text Available The intentional re-introduction of Variola virus (VARV, the agent of smallpox, into the human population is of great concern due its bio-terroristic potential. Moreover, zoonotic infections with Cowpox (CPXV and Monkeypox virus (MPXV cause severe diseases in humans. Smallpox vaccines presently available can have severe adverse effects that are no longer acceptable. The efficacy and safety of new vaccines and antiviral drugs for use in humans can only be demonstrated in animal models. The existing nonhuman primate models, using VARV and MPXV, need very high viral doses that have to be applied intravenously or intratracheally to induce a lethal infection in macaques. To overcome these drawbacks, the infectivity and pathogenicity of a particular CPXV was evaluated in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus.A CPXV named calpox virus was isolated from a lethal orthopox virus (OPV outbreak in New World monkeys. We demonstrated that marmosets infected with calpox virus, not only via the intravenous but also the intranasal route, reproducibly develop symptoms resembling smallpox in humans. Infected animals died within 1-3 days after onset of symptoms, even when very low infectious viral doses of 5x10(2 pfu were applied intranasally. Infectious virus was demonstrated in blood, saliva and all organs analyzed.We present the first characterization of a new OPV infection model inducing a disease in common marmosets comparable to smallpox in humans. Intranasal virus inoculation mimicking the natural route of smallpox infection led to reproducible infection. In vivo titration resulted in an MID(50 (minimal monkey infectious dose 50% of 8.3x10(2 pfu of calpox virus which is approximately 10,000-fold lower than MPXV and VARV doses applied in the macaque models. Therefore, the calpox virus/marmoset model is a suitable nonhuman primate model for the validation of vaccines and antiviral drugs. Furthermore, this model can help study mechanisms of OPV pathogenesis.

  13. Maize lethal necrosis (MLN), an emerging threat to maize-based food security in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    In sub-Saharan Africa, maize is a staple food and key determinant of food security for smallholder farming communities. Pest and disease outbreaks are key constraints to maize productivity. In September 2011, a serious disease outbreak, later diagnosed as maize lethal necrosis (MLN), was reported on...

  14. Treatment of Irradiated Mice with High-Dose Ascorbic Acid Reduced Lethality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomohito; Kinoshita, Manabu; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Masataka; Nishida, Takafumi; Takeuchi, Masaru; Saitoh, Daizoh; Seki, Shuhji; Mukai, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is an effective antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Therefore, it is expected that ascorbic acid should act as a radioprotectant. We investigated the effects of post-radiation treatment with ascorbic acid on mouse survival. Mice received whole body irradiation (WBI) followed by intraperitoneal administration of ascorbic acid. Administration of 3 g/kg of ascorbic acid immediately after exposure significantly increased mouse survival after WBI at 7 to 8 Gy. However, administration of less than 3 g/kg of ascorbic acid was ineffective, and 4 or more g/kg was harmful to the mice. Post-exposure treatment with 3 g/kg of ascorbic acid reduced radiation-induced apoptosis in bone marrow cells and restored hematopoietic function. Treatment with ascorbic acid (3 g/kg) up to 24 h (1, 6, 12, or 24 h) after WBI at 7.5 Gy effectively improved mouse survival; however, treatments beyond 36 h were ineffective. Two treatments with ascorbic acid (1.5 g/kg × 2, immediately and 24 h after radiation, 3 g/kg in total) also improved mouse survival after WBI at 7.5 Gy, accompanied with suppression of radiation-induced free radical metabolites. In conclusion, administration of high-dose ascorbic acid might reduce radiation lethality in mice even after exposure. PMID:25651298

  15. Modeling synthetic lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Meur, Nolwenn; Gentleman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic lethality defines a genetic interaction where the combination of mutations in two or more genes leads to cell death. The implications of synthetic lethal screens have been discussed in the context of drug development as synthetic lethal pairs could be used to selectively kill cancer cells, but leave normal cells relatively unharmed. A challenge is to assess genome-wide experimental data and integrate the results to better understand the underlying biological processes. We propose statistical and computational tools that can be used to find relationships between synthetic lethality and cellular organizational units. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we identified multi-protein complexes and pairs of multi-protein complexes that share an unusually high number of synthetic genetic interactions. As previously predicted, we found that synthetic lethality can arise from subunits of an essential multi-protein complex or between pairs of multi-protein complexes. Finally, using multi-protein complexes allowed us to take into account the pleiotropic nature of the gene products. Modeling synthetic lethality using current estimates of the yeast interactome is an efficient approach to disentangle some of the complex molecular interactions that drive a cell. Our model in conjunction with applied statistical methods and computational methods provides new tools to better characterize synthetic genetic interactions.

  16. Highly variable penetrance of abnormal phenotypes in embryonic lethal knockout mice [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

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    Robert Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying genes that are essential for mouse embryonic development and survival through term is a powerful and unbiased way to discover possible genetic determinants of human developmental disorders. Characterising the changes in mouse embryos that result from ablation of lethal genes is a necessary first step towards uncovering their role in normal embryonic development and establishing any correlates amongst human congenital abnormalities. Methods: Here we present results gathered to date in the Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD programme, cataloguing the morphological defects identified from comprehensive imaging of 220 homozygous mutant embryos from 42 lethal and subviable lines, analysed at E14.5. Results: Virtually all embryos show multiple abnormal phenotypes and amongst the 42 lines these affect most organ systems. Within each mutant line, the phenotypes of individual embryos form distinct but overlapping sets. Subcutaneous edema, malformations of the heart or great vessels, abnormalities in forebrain morphology and the musculature of the eyes are all prevalent phenotypes, as is loss or abnormal size of the hypoglossal nerve. Conclusions: Overall, the most striking finding is that no matter how profound the malformation, each phenotype shows highly variable penetrance within a mutant line. These findings have challenging implications for efforts to identify human disease correlates.

  17. Highly variable penetrance of abnormal phenotypes in embryonic lethal knockout mice [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wilson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying genes that are essential for mouse embryonic development and survival through term is a powerful and unbiased way to discover possible genetic determinants of human developmental disorders. Characterising the changes in mouse embryos that result from ablation of lethal genes is a necessary first step towards uncovering their role in normal embryonic development and establishing any correlates amongst human congenital abnormalities. Methods: Here we present results gathered to date in the Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD programme, cataloguing the morphological defects identified from comprehensive imaging of 220 homozygous mutant and 114 wild type embryos from 42 lethal and subviable lines, analysed at E14.5. Results: Virtually all mutant embryos show multiple abnormal phenotypes and amongst the 42 lines these affect most organ systems. Within each mutant line, the phenotypes of individual embryos form distinct but overlapping sets. Subcutaneous edema, malformations of the heart or great vessels, abnormalities in forebrain morphology and the musculature of the eyes are all prevalent phenotypes, as is loss or abnormal size of the hypoglossal nerve. Conclusions: Overall, the most striking finding is that no matter how profound the malformation, each phenotype shows highly variable penetrance within a mutant line. These findings have challenging implications for efforts to identify human disease correlates.

  18. Emergency contraception knowledge amongst female high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emergency contraception (EC) is of public health importance for preventing unintended pregnancies and unsafe abortions. Challenged by the high incidence of unplanned pregnancies and unsafe abortions observed among female high school learners who were attending the clinics in Tswaing Sub-district of North West ...

  19. Galleria mellonella infection model demonstrates high lethality of ST69 and ST127 uropathogenic E. coli.

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    Majed F Alghoribi

    Full Text Available Galleria mellonella larvae are an alternative in vivo model for investigating bacterial pathogenicity. Here, we examined the pathogenicity of 71 isolates from five leading uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC lineages using G. mellonella larvae. Larvae were challenged with a range of inoculum doses to determine the 50% lethal dose (LD50 and for analysis of survival outcome using Kaplan-Meier plots. Virulence was correlated with carriage of a panel of 29 virulence factors (VF. Larvae inoculated with ST69 and ST127 isolates (10(4 colony-forming units/larvae showed significantly higher mortality rates than those infected with ST73, ST95 and ST131 isolates, killing 50% of the larvae within 24 hours. Interestingly, ST131 isolates were the least virulent. We observed that ST127 isolates are significantly associated with a higher VF-score than isolates of all other STs tested (P≤0.0001, including ST69 (P<0.02, but one ST127 isolate (strain EC18 was avirulent. Comparative genomic analyses with virulent ST127 strains revealed an IS1 mediated deletion in the O-antigen cluster in strain EC18, which is likely to explain the lack of virulence in the larvae infection model. Virulence in the larvae was not correlated with serotype or phylogenetic group. This study illustrates that G. mellonella are an excellent tool for investigation of the virulence of UPEC strains. The findings also support our suggestion that the incidence of ST127 strains should be monitored, as these isolates have not yet been widely reported, but they clearly have a pathogenic potential greater than that of more widely recognised clones, including ST73, ST95 or ST131.

  20. Feasibility of High-Power Diode Laser Array Surrogate to Support Development of Predictive Laser Lethality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, W H; Rubenchik, A M; Springer, H K

    2011-01-13

    Predictive modeling and simulation of high power laser-target interactions is sufficiently undeveloped that full-scale, field testing is required to assess lethality of military directed-energy (DE) systems. The cost and complexity of such testing programs severely limit the ability to vary and optimize parameters of the interaction. Thus development of advanced simulation tools, validated by experiments under well-controlled and diagnosed laboratory conditions that are able to provide detailed physics insight into the laser-target interaction and reduce requirements for full-scale testing will accelerate development of DE weapon systems. The ultimate goal is a comprehensive end-to-end simulation capability, from targeting and firing the laser system through laser-target interaction and dispersal of target debris; a 'Stockpile Science' - like capability for DE weapon systems. To support development of advanced modeling and simulation tools requires laboratory experiments to generate laser-target interaction data. Until now, to make relevant measurements required construction and operation of very high power and complex lasers, which are themselves costly and often unique devices, operating in dedicated facilities that don't permit experiments on targets containing energetic materials. High power diode laser arrays, pioneered by LLNL, provide a way to circumvent this limitation, as such arrays capable of delivering irradiances characteristic of De weapon requires are self-contained, compact, light weight and thus easily transportable to facilities, such as the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where testing with energetic materials can be performed. The purpose of this study was to establish the feasibility of using such arrays to support future development of advanced laser lethality and vulnerability simulation codes through providing data for materials characterization and laser

  1. Trends in emerging and high risk activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert C. White; Richard Schreyer; Kent Downing

    1980-01-01

    Newly emerging and high risk activities have increased markedly in the last generation, yet little is known about trends in participation. Factors such as technological innovation and creative experimentation with traditional activities appear to play a major role in the development of new activities. Christy's criteria for mass demand in recreation are used to...

  2. High-Sensitivity Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Homoserine Lactones Protect Mice from Lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downham, Christina; Broadbent, Ian; Charlton, Keith; Porter, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    A number of bacteria, including pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, utilize homoserine lactones (HSLs) as quorum sensing (QS) signaling compounds and engage in cell-to-cell communication to coordinate their behavior. Blocking this bacterial communication may be an attractive strategy for infection control as QS takes a central role in P. aeruginosa biology. In this study, immunomodulation of HSL molecules by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was used as a novel approach to prevent P. aeruginosa infections and as tools to detect HSLs in bodily fluids as a possible first clue to an undiagnosed Gram-negative infection. Using sheep immunization and recombinant antibody technology, a panel of sheep-mouse chimeric MAbs were generated which recognized HSL compounds with high sensitivity (nanomolar range) and cross-reactivity. These MAbs retained their nanomolar sensitivity in complex matrices and were able to recognize HSLs in P. aeruginosa cultures grown in the presence of urine. In a nematode slow-killing assay, HSL MAbs significantly increased the survival of worms fed on the antibiotic-resistant strain PA058. The therapeutic benefit of these MAbs was further studied using a mouse model of Pseudomonas infection in which groups of mice treated with HSL-2 and HSL-4 MAbs survived, 7 days after pathogen challenge, in significantly greater numbers (83 and 67%, respectively) compared with the control groups. This body of work has provided early proof-of-concept data to demonstrate the potential of HSL-specific, monoclonal antibodies as theranostic clinical leads suitable for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections. PMID:24185854

  3. Highly Enhanced Risk Management Emergency Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalmeir, Michael; Gataullin, Yunir; Indrajit, Agung

    HERMES (Highly Enhanced Risk Management Emergency Satellite) is potential European satellite mission for global flood management, being implemented by Technical University Munich and European Space Agency. With its main instrument - a reliable and precise Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna...... - and its orbit characteristics (covering the whole earth surface in 3 days, low altitude), HERMES will provide stand-alone-data for: flood disaster monitoring, flood forecasting and flood prevention. Data obtained by HERMES can be used for commercial soil type maps (e.g. for optimized land use). As only...... highly effective and orbit proven hardware is used, HERMES is designed to be reliable, precise and of low cost. The project can be extended for use on other space bodies (planets) for rapid observation of the planetary surface....

  4. Lethal triad in severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherren, P B; Hussey, J; Martin, R; Kundishora, T; Parker, M; Emerson, B

    2014-12-01

    Hypothermia, acidaemia and coagulopathy in trauma is associated with significant mortality. This study aimed to identify the incidence of the lethal triad in major burns, and describe demographics and outcomes. Patients admitted during a 71 month period with a total body surface area burn (TBSA)≥30% were identified. A structured review of a prospective database was conducted. The lethal triad was defined as a combination of coagulopathy (International normalised ratio>1.2), hypothermia (temperature≤35.5°C) and acidaemia (pH≤7.25). Fifteen of 117 patients fulfilled the criteria for the lethal triad on admission. Lethal triad patients had a higher median (IQR) abbreviated burn severity index (ABSI) (12 (9-13) vs. 8.5 (6-10), p=0.001), mean (SD) TBSA burn (59.2% (18.7) vs. 47.9% (18.1), p=0.027), mean (SD) age (46 (22.6) vs. 33 (28.3) years, p=0.033), and had a higher incidence of inhalational injury (p0.05). The lethal triad was associated with increased mortality (66.7% vs. 13.7%, plethal triad was not shown to be a predictor of mortality (p>0.05). Burn patients with the lethal triad have a high mortality rate which reflects the severity of the injury sustained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. High male: Female ratio of germ-line mutations: An alternative explanation for postulated gestational lethality in males in X-linked dominant disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1996-06-01

    In this paper I suggest that a vastly higher rate of de novo mutations in males than in females would explain some, if not most, X-linked dominant disorders associated with a low incidence of affected males. It is the inclusion of the impact of a high ratio of male:female de novo germ-line mutations that makes this model new and unique. Specifically, it is concluded that, if an X-linked disorder results in a dominant phenotype with a significant reproductive disadvantage (genetic lethality), affected females will, in virtually all cases, arise from de novo germ-line mutations inherited from their fathers rather than from their mothers. Under this hypothesis, the absence of affected males is explained by the simple fact that sons do not inherit their X chromosome (normal or abnormal) from their fathers. Because females who are heterozygous for a dominant disorder will be clinically affected and will, in most cases, either be infertile or lack reproductive opportunities, the mutant gene will not be transmitted by them to the next generation (i.e., it will be a genetic lethal). This, not gestational lethality in males, may explain the absence of affected males in most, if not all, of the 13 known X-linked dominant diseases characterized by high ratios of affected female to male individuals. Evidence suggesting that this mechanism could explain the findings in the Rett syndrome is reviewed in detail. 34 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Development of IgY antibodies against anti-snake toxins endowed with highly lethal neutralizing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, David Gitirana; Fernandez, Jorge Hernandez; de Almeida, Cláudia Maria Costa; da Silva, Cláudia Letícia; Magnoli, Fábio Carlos; da Silva, Osmair Élder; da Silva, Wilmar Dias

    2017-08-30

    Snakebite envenoming is a major neglected disease related to poverty in developing countries. Treatment involves the administration of a specific antivenom serum and auxiliary therapies, if necessary. The improvement of antibodies is of great importance for the technological advancement of antivenom therapy and to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with this medical burden. In the present study, adult hens were immunized nine times with 20μg of B. arietans or C. d. terrificus venoms at three-week intervals between immunizations. Developing antibodies presented increasing avidity and affinity to antigenic toxin epitopes along immunization, attaining a plateau after the seventh immunization. Pooled egg yolk-purified IgY antivenom antibodies, subjected to in vitro-in vivo lethality assay using Swiss adult mice, exhibited potent venom lethal neutralizing activity. Taken together, chickens under the described immunization schedule were considered alternative candidates for antivenom production. Lower maintenance costs, a simple antibody manufacturing process and immunization suffering restrictions are additional advantages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling synthetic lethality

    OpenAIRE

    Le Meur, Nolwenn; Gentleman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Background Synthetic lethality defines a genetic interaction where the combination of mutations in two or more genes leads to cell death. The implications of synthetic lethal screens have been discussed in the context of drug development as synthetic lethal pairs could be used to selectively kill cancer cells, but leave normal cells relatively unharmed. A challenge is to assess genome-wide experimental data and integrate the results to better understand the underlying biological processes. We...

  8. Lethality Prediction for Escherichia Coli O157:H7 and Uropathogenic E. coli in Ground Chicken Treated with High Pressure Processing and Trans-Cinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Shiowshuh; Huang, Chi-Yun; Ramos, Rommel; Chien, Shih-Yung; Scullen, O Joseph; Sommers, Christopher

    2018-02-07

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli, intestinal (O157:H7) as well as extraintestinal types (for example, Uropathogenic E. coli [UPEC]) are commonly found in many foods including raw chicken meat. The resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to UPEC in chicken meat under the stresses of high hydrostatic Pressure (HHP, also known as HPP-high pressure processing) and trans-cinnamaldehyde (an essential oil) was investigated and compared. UPEC was found slightly less resistant than O157:H7 in our test parameter ranges. With the addition of trans-cinnamaldehyde as an antimicrobial to meat, HPP lethality enhanced both O157:H7 and UPEC inactivation. To facilitate the predictive model development, a central composite design (CCD) was used to assess the 3-parameter effects, that is, pressure (300 to 400 MPa), trans-cinnamaldehyde dose (0.2 to 0.5%, w/w), and pressure-holding time (15 to 25 min), on the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and UPEC in ground chicken. Linear models were developed to estimate the lethality of E. coli O157:H7 (R 2 = 0.86) and UPEC (R 2 = 0.85), as well as dimensionless nonlinear models. All models were validated with data obtained from separated CCD combinations. Because linear models of O157:H7 and UPEC had similar R 2 and the significant lethality difference of CCD points was only 9 in 20; all data were combined to generate models to include both O157:H7 and UPEC. The results provide useful information/tool to predict how pathogenic E. coli may survive HPP in the presence of trans-cinnamaldehyde and to achieve a great than 5 log CFU/g reduction in chicken meat. The models may be used for process optimization, product development and to assist the microbial risk assessment. The study provided an effective means to reduce the high hydrostatic pressure level with incorporation of antimicrobial compound to achieve a 5-log reduction of pathogenic E. coli without damaging the raw meat quality. The developed models may be used to predict the high pressure processing

  9. Resveratrol Antagonizes Antimicrobial Lethality and Stimulates Recovery of Bacterial Mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanli Liu

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical are thought to contribute to the rapid bactericidal activity of diverse antimicrobial agents. The possibility has been raised that consumption of antioxidants in food may interfere with the lethal action of antimicrobials. Whether nutritional supplements containing antioxidant activity are also likely to interfere with antimicrobial lethality is unknown. To examine this possibility, resveratrol, a popular antioxidant dietary supplement, was added to cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus that were then treated with antimicrobial and assayed for bacterial survival and the recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Resveratrol, at concentrations likely to be present during human consumption, caused a 2- to 3-fold reduction in killing during a 2-hr treatment with moxifloxacin or kanamycin. At higher, but still subinhibitory concentrations, resveratrol reduced antimicrobial lethality by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Resveratrol also reduced the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS characteristic of treatment with quinolone (oxolinic acid. These data support the general idea that the lethal activity of some antimicrobials involves ROS. Surprisingly, subinhibitory concentrations of resveratrol promoted (2- to 6-fold the recovery of rifampicin-resistant mutants arising from the action of ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, or daptomycin. This result is consistent with resveratrol reducing ROS to sublethal levels that are still mutagenic, while the absence of resveratrol allows ROS levels to high enough to kill mutagenized cells. Suppression of antimicrobial lethality and promotion of mutant recovery by resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant may contribute to the emergence of resistance to several antimicrobials, especially if new derivatives and/or formulations of resveratrol markedly increase bioavailability.

  10. The application of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide to a sample of Swiss patients attending a psychiatric emergency department for a non-lethal suicidal event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertschi, Marc; Costanza, Alessandra; Richard-Lepouriel, Hélène; Pompili, Maurizio; Sarasin, François; Weber, Kerstin; Canuto, Alessandra

    2017-03-01

    Visits to emergency departments (EDs) for suicidal ideation or a suicide attempt have increased in the past decades. Yet comprehensive models of suicide are scarce, potentially enhancing misunderstandings from health professionals. This study aimed to investigate the applicability of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) in a population visiting EDs for suicide-related issues. Three major hypotheses formulated by the IPTS were tested in a sample of 167 individuals visiting EDs for suicidal ideation or a suicide attempt. As predicted by the IPTS, greater levels of perceived burdensomeness (PB) were associated with presence of current suicidal ideation. However, contrary to the theory assumptions, thwarted belongingness (TB) was not predictive of current suicidal ideation (Hypothesis 1). Similarly, the interaction between PB, TB and hopelessness did not account for the transition from passive to active suicidal ideation (Hypothesis 2). The interaction between active suicidal ideation and fearlessness of death did not either predict the transition from active suicidal ideation to suicidal intent (Hypothesis 3). The cross-sectional design limited the interpretation of causal hypotheses. Patients visiting EDs during nights and weekends were underrepresented. A general measure of hopelessness was considered, not a measure of hopelessness specifically related to PB and TB. Although the three hypotheses were only partially verified, health professionals might consider the IPTS as useful for the management of patient with suicide-related issues. Clinical intervention based on perceived burdensomeness could notably be proposed shortly after ED admission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple pterygium syndrome is consist of wide range of fetal malformations which have a genetic linkage. A defect in embryonic acetylcholine receptor which can be inherited as autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked fashion is the cause of this syndrome. We present a sporadic case of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome.

  12. Infectious and lethal doses of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus for house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and rock pigeons (Columbia livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin D; Stallknecht, David E; Berghaus, Roy D; Swayne, David E

    2009-07-01

    Terrestrial wild birds commonly associated with poultry farms have the potential to contribute to the spread of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus within or between poultry facilities or between domesticated and wild bird populations. This potential, however, varies between species and is dependent on several virus and host factors, including habitat utilization, susceptibility, and viral shedding patterns. To provide data on susceptibility and shedding patterns of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and rock pigeons (Columba livia), 20 birds from each species were inoculated with decreasing concentrations of A/whooper swan/Mongolia/244/05 (H5N1) HPAI virus, and the birds were evaluated for morbidity, mortality, viral shedding, and seroconversion over a 14-day trial. The house sparrows were highly susceptible to the H5N1 HPAI virus as evidenced by low infectious and lethal viral doses. In addition, house sparrows excreted virus via the oropharynx and cloaca for several days prior to the onset of clinical signs. Based on these results, house sparrows could play a role in the dissemination of H5N1 HPAI virus in poultry. In contrast, pigeons were resistant to the HPAI virus, requiring a high concentration of virus to produce infection or death. When infection did occur, the duration of viral shedding was brief, and viral titers were low. The data suggests that pigeons would contribute little to the transmission and spread of H5N1 HPAI virus in poultry.

  13. The Rapid Emergence of High Level Gentamicin Resistance in Enterococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Forward

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of enterococci isolated from blood and urine cultures that were highly resistant to gentamicin and streptomycin were determined. No blood or urine isolates highly resistant to gentamicin were seen in 1983, whereas by 1986–87 25% of blood and 17% of urine isolates were highly resistant. The rapid emergence of gentamicin resistance has serious implications for patients with life threatening enterococcal disease.

  14. The Rapid Emergence of High Level Gentamicin Resistance in Enterococci

    OpenAIRE

    Forward, Kevin R; Kennedy, James K; Degagne, Patricia A; Bartlett, Kathy R; Harding, Godfrey KM

    1990-01-01

    The proportion of enterococci isolated from blood and urine cultures that were highly resistant to gentamicin and streptomycin were determined. No blood or urine isolates highly resistant to gentamicin were seen in 1983, whereas by 1986–87 25% of blood and 17% of urine isolates were highly resistant. The rapid emergence of gentamicin resistance has serious implications for patients with life threatening enterococcal disease.

  15. Dual-color high-resolution fiber-FISH analysis on lethal white syndrome carriers in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauciullo, A; Fleck, K; Lühken, G; Di Berardino, D; Erhardt, G

    2013-01-01

    Molecular defects occurring in the endothelin receptor type-B (EDNRB) gene are known to be associated with pigmentary anomalies and intestinal aganglionosis in humans, rodents and horses. We carried out a cytogenetic investigation in 2 ewes heterozygous for the deletion of the EDNRB gene and in 2 more females as control. The RBA-banding showed that all 4 ewes were karyologically normal. EDNRB gene-specific probes were produced by PCR and cloning. The application of the R-banding and propidium iodide-staining fluorescent in situ hybridization allowed mapping the gene to OAR 10q22 and confirmed the heterozygous status of the ewes investigated for the EDNRB gene deletion. For the fine estimation of the gene length in sheep and for the correct sizing of the chromosomal gap, a dual-color FISH was applied to high-resolution DNA fibers in combination with digital imaging microscopy. The comparison of the DNA fiber barcodes indicated a chromosomal deletion larger than the EDNRB gene itself. The length of the gene, not known for sheep until now, was estimated to be ∼21 kb, whereas the microchromosomal deletion was ∼100 kb. EDNRB is located in a chromosomal region previously shown to be a fragile site. The applied method allowed locating the potential breakpoints, thus permitting further interesting prospective investigations also in the field of the fragile sites in sheep. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Advanced Stage Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Ovary is both Rare and Highly Lethal: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaino, Richard J.; Brady, Mark F.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michael, Helen; Greer, Benjamin; Bookman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Primary mucinous adenocarcinomas of the ovary are uncommon and their biologic behavior uncertain. Retrospective studies suggest that many mucinous carcinomas diagnosed as primary to the ovary were actually metastatic from another site. A prospective randomized trial provided an opportunity to estimate the frequency of mucinous tumors, diagnostic reproducibility, and clinical outcomes. Methods A phase III trial enrolled 4000 women with stage III or IV ovarian carcinoma, treated by surgical staging and debulking, with randomization to one of five chemotherapeutic arms. Slides and pathology reports classified as primary mucinous carcinoma were reviewed independently by three pathologists. Cases were re-classified as primary or metastatic to the ovary according to two methods. Overall survival (OS) of reclassified groups was compared with each other and with that of patients with serous carcinomas. Results Forty-four cases were classified as mucinous adenocarcinoma at review. Using either method, only about one third were interpreted by the three reviewers as primary mucinous carcinomas. Reproducibility of interpretations among the reviewers was high with unanimity of opinion in 30 of the 44 (68%) cases. The median survival (MS) did not differ significantly between the groups interpreted as primary or metastatic, but the OS was significantly less than that for women with serous carcinoma (14 vs 42 months, povary is very rare and is associated with poor OS. Many mucinous adenocarcinomas that are diagnosed as primary ovarian neoplasms appear to be metastatic to the ovary. PMID:20862744

  17. Crash Lethality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    UAS) could inflict life threatening injuries to 3rd party individuals and develop a model that would calculate the total Lethal Crash Area ( LCA ...given some standard UAS calculations. A literature search was done to evaluate previous models at determining LCA from aircraft accidents. Two cases were...assess 3rd party risk. Ten UAS cases were evaluated and suggest that the factor most correlated to the size of the LCA is the weight of the air

  18. High morbidity after laparoscopic emergency colectomy for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qazi, S.M.; Skovdal, J.; Bisgaard, T.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Only limited data are available on subtotal laparoscopic colectomy (STC) in patients with in inflammatory bowel disease. We present the first Danish experiences with intended laparoscopic STC for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The primary outcome was 30-day morbidity. MATERIAL...... complications were recorded in 47% and 20% of the patients undergoing emergency and elective STC, respectively (p = 0.15). The overall morbidity was 72%. One emergency patient died. Five of eight emergency patients and one of three elective patients underwent conversion and experienced a major complication (p...... = 0.55). The overall conversion rate was 32% (p = 0.15). CONCLUSION: We found high morbidity and conversion rates in patients undergoing SLC for IBD. A prospective national Danish survey on early postoperative outcome is suggested....

  19. Sports-Related Emergency Preparedness in Oregon High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel T; Norcross, Marc F; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Hoffman, Mark A; Chang, Eunwook; Koester, Michael C

    Best practice recommendations for sports-related emergency preparation include implementation of venue-specific emergency action plans (EAPs), access to early defibrillation, and first responders-specifically coaches-trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator (AED) use. The objective was to determine whether high schools had implemented these 3 recommendations and whether schools with a certified athletic trainer (AT) were more likely to have done so. Schools with an AT were more likely to have implemented the recommendations. Cross-sectional study. Level 4. All Oregon School Activities Association member school athletic directors were invited to complete a survey on sports-related emergency preparedness and AT availability at their school. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze the associations between emergency preparedness and AT availability. In total, 108 respondents (37% response rate) completed the survey. Exactly half reported having an AT available. Only 11% (95% CI, 6%-19%) of the schools had implemented all 3 recommendations, 29% (95% CI, 21%-39%) had implemented 2, 32% (95% CI, 24%-42%) had implemented 1, and 27% (95% CI, 19%-36%) had not implemented any of the recommendations. AT availability was associated with implementation of the recommendations (χ2 = 10.3, P = 0.02), and the proportion of schools with ATs increased with the number of recommendations implemented (χ2 = 9.3, P Schools with an AT were more likely to implement venue-specific EAPs (52% vs 24%, P schools were inadequately prepared for sports-related emergencies. Schools with an AT were more likely to implement some, but not all, of the recommendations. Policy changes may be needed to improve implementation. Most Oregon high schools need to do more to prepare for sports-related emergencies. The results provide evidence for sports medicine professionals and administrators to inform policy changes that ensure the safety of athletes.

  20. Unraveling the physiological complexities of antibiotic lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Daniel J; Collins, James J; Walker, Graham C

    2015-01-01

    We face an impending crisis in our ability to treat infectious disease brought about by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and a decline in the development of new antibiotics. Urgent action is needed. This review focuses on a less well-understood aspect of antibiotic action: the complex metabolic events that occur subsequent to the interaction of antibiotics with their molecular targets and play roles in antibiotic lethality. Independent lines of evidence from studies of the action of bactericidal antibiotics on diverse bacteria collectively suggest that the initial interactions of drugs with their targets cannot fully account for the antibiotic lethality and that these interactions elicit the production of reactive oxidants including reactive oxygen species that contribute to bacterial cell death. Recent challenges to this concept are considered in the context of the broader literature of this emerging area of research. Possible ways that this new knowledge might be exploited to improve antibiotic therapy are also considered.

  1. Participation of gap junction communication in potentially lethal damage repair and DNA damage in human fibroblasts exposed to low- or high-LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; Suzuki, Masao; Plante, Ianik; Liu, Cuihua; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Murakami, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has not fully explained how different types of ionizing radiation (IR) modulate the responses of cell populations or tissues. In our previous work, we showed that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) mediates the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, in which almost every cells is traversed by an IR track. In the present study, we conducted an in-depth study of the role of GJIC in modulating the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) and micronuclei formation in cells exposed to low- or high-LET IR. Confluent human fibroblasts were exposed in the presence or absence of a gap junction inhibitor to 200 kV X rays (LET ∼ 1.7 keV/µm), carbon ions (LET ∼ 76 keV/µm), silicon ions (LET ∼ 113 keV/µm) or iron ions (LET ∼ 400 keV/µm) that resulted in isosurvival levels. The fibroblasts were incubated for various times at 37 °C. As expected, high-LET IR were more effective than were low-LET X rays at killing cells and damaging DNA shortly after irradiation. However, when cells were held in a confluent state for several hours, PLDR associated with a reduction in DNA damage, occurred only in cells exposed to X rays. Interestingly, inhibition of GJIC eliminated the enhancement of toxic effects, which resulted in an increase of cell survival and reduction in the level of micronucleus formation in cells exposed to high, but not in those exposed to low-LET IR. The experiment shows that gap-junction communication plays an important role in the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high-LET IR while GJIC has only a minimal effect on PLDR and DNA damage following low-LET irradiation. Together, our results show that PLDR and induction of DNA damage clearly depend on gap-junction communication and radiation quality. PMID:23867854

  2. Osteopathic emergency medicine programs infrequently publish in high-impact emergency medicine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Sean M; Lin, Christina; Carlson, Jestin N

    2014-11-01

    Both the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) require core faculty to engage in scholarly work, including publication in peer-reviewed journals. With the ACGME/AOA merger, we sought to evaluate the frequency of publication in high-impact peer-reviewed EM journals from authors affiliated with osteopathic emergency medicine (EM) programs. We performed a retrospective literature review using the Journal Citation Report database and identified the top five journals in the category of 'Emergency Medicine' by their 2011 Impact Factor. We examined all publications from each journal for 2011. For each article we recorded article type, authors' names, position of authorship (first, senior or other), the author's degree and affiliated institution. We present the data in raw numbers and percentages. The 2011 EM journals with the highest impact factor were the following: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Resuscitation, Journal of Trauma, Injury, and Academic Emergency Medicine. Of the 9,298 authors published in these journals in 2011; 1,309 (15%) claimed affiliation with U.S.-based EM programs, of which 16 (1%) listed their affiliations with eight different osteopathic EM programs. The 16 authors claimed affiliation with 8 of 46 osteopathic EM programs (17%), while 1,301 authors claimed affiliation with 104 of 148 (70%) U.S.-based allopathic programs. Authors from osteopathic EM programs are under-represented in the top EM journals. With the pending ACGME/AOA merger, there is a significant opportunity for improvement in the rate of publication of osteopathic EM programs in top tier EM journals.

  3. Internationalization of high-technology ventures from emerging economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    This paper aims to contribute towards filling in the gap in the international entrepreneurhsip literature by exploring how and why new high-technology ventures internationalize from an emerging economy, namely Moldova. To address the above research questions, a multiple-case study strategy...... was adopted for the purpose of theory building, relying on purposeful sampling the logic and power of which lie in selecting information-rich cases for study in depth. Six international new ventures were identified through the Moldovan Association of Private ICT Companies. Data were collected using two...

  4. Histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of glyphosate on African catfish Clarias gariepinus were investigated. C. gariepinus juveniles were assessed in a static renewal bioassay for 96 hours (acute toxicity) and 28 days (chronic toxicity) using varying concentrations (0.0 mg/l 20.0 mg/l, 30.0 mg/l, ...

  5. Suicide Lethality: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBastiani, Summer; De Santis, Joseph P

    2018-02-01

    Suicide is a significant health problem internationally. Those who complete suicide may have different behaviors and risk factors than those who attempt a non-fatal suicide. The purpose of this article is to analyze the concept of suicide lethality and propose a clear definition of the concept through the identification of antecedents, attributes, and consequences. A literature search for articles published in the English language between 1970 and 2016 was conducted using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Pubmed, Psychlit, Ovid, PsycINFO, and Proquest. The bibliographies of all included studies were also reviewed to identify additional relevant citations. A concept analysis was conducted on the literature findings using six stages of Walker and Avant's method. The concept analysis differentiated between suicide, lethality, suicidal behavior, and suicide lethality. Presence of a suicide plan or a written suicide note was not found to be associated with the majority of completed suicides included in the definition of suicide lethality. There are a few scales that measure the lethality of a suicide attempt, but none that attempt to measure the concept of suicide lethality as described in this analysis. Clarifying the concept of suicide lethality encourages awareness of the possibility of different suicidal behaviors associated with different suicide outcomes and will inform the development of future nursing interventions. A clearer definition of the concept of suicide lethality will guide clinical practice, research, and policy development aimed at suicide prevention.

  6. MIDLINE LETHAL GRANULOMA COMPLICATING PREGNANCY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    MIDLINE LETHAL GRANULOMA COMPLICATING PREGNANCY: CASE REPORT. B.D.O. SAHEEB and M.A. OJO. ABSTRACT. A case of midline lethal granuloma in a 28-year- old female Nigerian patient is reported. Oral, ocular and nasal lesions were present and these preceded a spontaneous abortion of a three.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Amish lethal microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Amish lethal microcephaly Amish lethal microcephaly Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Amish lethal microcephaly is a disorder in which infants ...

  8. Dengue Virus Infection with Highly Neutralizing Levels of Cross-Reactive Antibodies Causes Acute Lethal Small Intestinal Pathology without a High Level of Viremia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Wang, Jiaqi; Rivino, Laura; Lok, Shee-Mei; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2015-06-01

    Severe dengue virus (DENV)-associated diseases can occur in patients who have preexisting DENV antibodies (Abs) through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection. It is well established that during ADE, DENV-antibody immune complexes (ICs) infect Fcγ receptor-bearing cells and increase the systemic viral burden that can be measured in the blood. For protection against infection with DENV serotypes 1 to 4, strongly neutralizing Abs must be elicited to overcome the effect of ADE. Clinical observations in infants who have maternal DENV Abs or recent phase II/III clinical trials with a leading tetravalent dengue vaccine suggested a lack of correlation between Ab neutralization and in vivo disease prevention. In addressing this gap in knowledge, we found that inoculation of ICs formed with serotype cross-reactive Abs that are more than 98% neutralized in vitro promotes high mortality in AG129 mice even though peak viremia was lower than that in direct virus infection. This suggests that the serum viremia level is not always correlated with disease severity. We further demonstrated that infection with the ICs resulted in increased vascular permeability, specifically in the small intestine, accompanied with increased tissue viral load and cytokine production, which can be suppressed by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) Abs. Flow cytometric analysis identified increased infection in CD11b(int) CD11c(int/hi) CD103(-) antigen-presenting cells by IC inoculation, suggesting that these infected cells may be responsible for the increase in TNF-α production and vascular permeability in the small intestine that lead to mortality in mice. Our findings may have important implications for the development of dengue therapeutics. We examined the relationship between the neutralizing level of Abs at the time of infection and subsequent disease progression in a mouse model in order to understand why patients who are shown to have a neutralizing quantity of Abs

  9. Clinical Effects and Lethal and Forensic Aspects of Propofol*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Propofol is a potent intravenous anesthetic agent that rapidly induces sedation and unconsciousness. The potential for propofol dependency, recreational use and abuse has only recently been recognized and several cases of accidental overdose and suicide have emerged. In addition, the first documented case of murder using propofol was reported a few months ago and a high profile case of suspected homicide with propofol is currently under investigation. A number of analytical methods have been employed to detect and quantify propofol concentrations in biological specimens. The reported propofol related deaths and post-mortem blood and tissue levels are reviewed. Importantly, limitations of propofol detection are discussed and future considerations are presented. Because propofol has the potential for diversion with lethal consequences, the forensic scientist must have a basic understanding of its clinical indications and uses, pharmacologic properties, and detection methods. In addition, medical institutions should develop systems to prevent and detect diversion of this potential drug of abuse. PMID:20950316

  10. [Prognostic value of the lethal triad among patients with multiple trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Balverde, María; Ramírez Lizardo, Ernesto J; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto G; Totsuka Sutto, Sylvia E; García Benavides, Leonel

    2013-11-01

    Patients who have suffered multiple traumatic injuries, have a serious risk for death. Hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy are three complications in these patients, whose presence is known as lethal triad and indicates bad prognosis. To determine if the lethal triad in multiple trauma patients is associated with higher mortality and Injury Score Severity (ISS). One hundred multiple trauma patients aged 26 to 56 years (90 males), admitted to an emergency room, were studied. Body temperature, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, platelet count and blood gases were determined on admission. Twenty six patients had the lethal triad and 15% died in the emergency room within the first 6 hours. No death was recorded among the 74 patients without the lethal triad. The mean ISS among patients with and without the lethal triad was 31.7 and 25.6, respectively (p lethal triad among patients with multiple trauma is associated with a higher mortality and ISS.

  11. Candida auris: emergence and epidemiology of a highly pathogenic yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Slomp Santos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida auris is a multidrug-resistant emerging yeast, which was responsible for healthcare-associated infection outbreaks, and was cataloged as a new species in 2009, after being isolated from a patient’s ear canal secretion in Japan. Since the notification of this first occurrence, numerous cases have been reported throughout the world, including Brazil. C. auris affects mainly inpatients, patients in intensive care units, exposed to broad-spectrum antifungal medications and who make use of vascular catheters. Currently, this yeast is one of the main responsible for invasive infections in hospitals and has been cause of concern by authorities and organs due to its rapid dissemination and difficult treatment caused by its low susceptibility to antifungal agents traditionally used in clinical practice. As a contributor to the severity of infections associated with C. auris, the transmission mechanism is still unknown, which implies in a lack of control of the microorganism and high mortality rates. Thus, this literature review presents relevant information in order to alert the importance of C. auris as an etiological agent of systemic infections, as well as its epidemiology and the real challenges of the treatment. Keywords: Candida auris; candidiasis; candidemia; multidrug-resistance; biofilm; epidemiology; diagnosis

  12. High-fidelity hybrid simulation of allergic emergencies demonstrates improved preparedness for office emergencies in pediatric allergy clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Joshua L; Jones, Stacie M; Porter, Nicholas; White, Marjorie L; Gephardt, Grace; Hill, Travis; Cantrell, Mary; Nick, Todd G; Melguizo, Maria; Smith, Chris; Boateng, Beatrice A; Perry, Tamara T; Scurlock, Amy M; Thompson, Tonya M

    2013-01-01

    Simulation models that used high-fidelity mannequins have shown promise in medical education, particularly for cases in which the event is uncommon. Allergy physicians encounter emergencies in their offices, and these can be the source of much trepidation. To determine if case-based simulations with high-fidelity mannequins are effective in teaching and retention of emergency management team skills. Allergy clinics were invited to Arkansas Children's Hospital Pediatric Understanding and Learning through Simulation Education center for a 1-day workshop to evaluate skills concerning the management of allergic emergencies. A Clinical Emergency Preparedness Team Performance Evaluation was developed to evaluate the competence of teams in several areas: leadership and/or role clarity, closed-loop communication, team support, situational awareness, and scenario-specific skills. Four cases, which focus on common allergic emergencies, were simulated by using high-fidelity mannequins and standardized patients. Teams were evaluated by multiple reviewers by using video recording and standardized scoring. Ten to 12 months after initial training, an unannounced in situ case was performed to determine retention of the skills training. Clinics showed significant improvements for role clarity, teamwork, situational awareness, and scenario-specific skills during the 1-day workshop (all P Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of Lethality in Suicide Attempts: Gender Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Carol C; Harris, Keith M; Ho, Roger C

    2017-01-01

    This study explores gender differences in lethality of suicide attempts. Three years of medical records related to suicide attempters ( N = 666) were subjected to analysis. Of the sample, 69.2% were female, 30.8% male; 63.8% Chinese, 15.8% Indian, and 15.0 % Malay. Ages ranged from 10 to 85 years old ( M = 29.7, SD = 16.1). More males than females made attempts with high perceived lethality (χ2 = 12.10, p attempts and more than 80% of high perceived lethality attempts. Suicide intent and opportunity for rescue were significant predictors for both measures of lethality. Gender differences were examined. Findings were discussed in regard to implications in suicide assessments and interventions.

  14. [The "lethal white foal" syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blendinger, C; Müller, G; Bostedt, H

    1994-06-01

    The lethal white foal syndrome (congenital intestinal aganglionosis) was diagnosed by history, clinical signs and pathological findings in a female foal, born in March 1992, that was an offspring of two overo-spotted paint horses. The syndrome is a congenital innervation defect of the gastrointestinal tract. A literature review of this condition, relatively unknown in Germany, is given.

  15. High stakes and high emotions: providing safe care in Canadian emergency departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Samina Ali,1,2 Denise Thomson,3 Timothy A D Graham,4 Sean E Rickard,3 Antonia S Stang5 1Women and Children’s Health Research Institute, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Cochrane Child Health Field, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, 5Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada Background: The high-paced, unpredictable environment of the emergency department (ED contributes to errors in patient safety. The ED setting becomes even more challenging when dealing with critically ill patients, particularly with children, where variations in size, weight, and form present practical difficulties in many aspects of care. In this commentary, we will explore the impact of the health care providers’ emotional reactions while caring for critically ill patients, and how this can be interpreted and addressed as a patient safety issue. Discussion: ED health care providers encounter high-stakes, high-stress clinical scenarios, such as pediatric cardiac arrest or resuscitation. This health care providers’ stress, and at times, distress, and its potential contribution to medical error, is underrepresented in the current medical literature. Most patient safety research is limited to error reporting systems, especially medication-related ones, an approach that ignores the effects of health care provider stress as a source of error, and limits our ability to learn from the event. Ways to mitigate this stress and avoid this type of patient safety concern might include simulation training for rare, high-acuity events, use of pre-determined clinical order sets, and post-event debriefing. Conclusion: While there are physiologic and anatomic differences that contribute to patient safety, we believe that they are insufficient to explain the need to address critical life-threatening event-related patient safety issues for both adults and, especially, children

  16. High Altitude Platforms for Disaster Recovery: Capabilities, Strategies, and Techniques for Emergency Telecommunications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaton JuanD

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Natural disasters and terrorist acts have significant potential to disrupt emergency communication systems. These emergency communication networks include first-responder, cellular, landline, and emergency answering services such as 911, 112, or 999. Without these essential emergency communications capabilities, search, rescue, and recovery operations during a catastrophic event will be severely debilitated. High altitude platforms could be fitted with telecommunications equipment and used to support these critical communications missions once the catastrophic event occurs. With the ability to be continuously on station, HAPs provide excellent options for providing emergency coverage over high-risk areas before catastrophic incidents occur. HAPs could also provide enhanced 911 capabilities using either GPS or reference stations. This paper proposes potential emergency communications architecture and presents a method for estimating emergency communications systems traffic patterns for a catastrophic event.

  17. High Altitude Platforms for Disaster Recovery: Capabilities, Strategies, and Techniques for Emergency Telecommunications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. Deaton

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural disasters and terrorist acts have significant potential to disrupt emergency communication systems. These emergency communication networks include first-responder, cellular, landline, and emergency answering services such as 911, 112, or 999. Without these essential emergency communications capabilities, search, rescue, and recovery operations during a catastrophic event will be severely debilitated. High altitude platforms could be fitted with telecommunications equipment and used to support these critical communications missions once the catastrophic event occurs. With the ability to be continuously on station, HAPs provide excellent options for providing emergency coverage over high-risk areas before catastrophic incidents occur. HAPs could also provide enhanced 911 capabilities using either GPS or reference stations. This paper proposes potential emergency communications architecture and presents a method for estimating emergency communications systems traffic patterns for a catastrophic event.

  18. The Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service: High Frequency of Nontransported Calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwin E. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. There are no published studies on the Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service and no assessment of the calls that end in nontransported individuals. We describe reasons for the nontransport of potential clients. Methods. We used the Emergency Medical Dispatch (Medical Priority Dispatch System instrument, augmented with five local call types, to collect information on types of calls. The calls were categorised under 7 headings. Correlations between call types and response time were calculated. Results. Most calls were from the category medical (54%. Nineteen (19% percent of calls were in the non-transported category. Calls from call type Cancelled accounted for most of these and this was related to response time, while Refused service was inversely related (. Conclusions. The Barbados Ambulance Service is mostly used by people with a known illness and for trauma cases. One-fifth of calls fall into a category where the ambulance is not used often due to cancellation which is related to response time. Other factors such as the use of alternative transport are also important. Further study to identify factors that contribute to the non-transported category of calls is necessary if improvements in service quality are to be made.

  19. The emergence of Nipah virus, a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Michael K; Rota, Paul A

    2008-12-01

    Nipah virus first emerged in Malaysia and Singapore between 1998 and 1999, causing severe febrile encephalitis in humans with a mortality rate of close to 40%. In addition, a significant portion of those recovering from acute infection had relapse encephalitis and long-term neurological defects. Since its initial outbreak, there have been numerous outbreaks in Bangladesh and India, in which the mortality rate rose to approximately 70%. These subsequent outbreaks were distinct from the initial outbreak, both in their epidemiology and in their clinical presentations. Recent developments in diagnostics may expedite disease diagnosis and outbreak containment, while progress in understanding the molecular biology of Nipah virus could lead to novel therapeutics and vaccines for this deadly pathogen.

  20. Course of Untreated High Blood Pressure in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Feaster

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: No clear understanding exists about the course of a patient’s blood pressure (BP during an emergency department (ED visit. Prior investigations have demonstrated that BP can be reduced by removing patients from treatment areas or by placing patients supine and observing them for several hours. However, modern EDs are chaotic and noisy places where patients and their families wait for long periods in an unfamiliar environment. We sought to determine the stability of repeated BP measurements in the ED environment. Methods: A prospective study was performed at an urban ED. Research assistants trained and certified in BP measurement obtained sequential manual BPs and heart rates on a convenience sample of 76 patients, beginning with the patient arrival in the ED. Patients were observed through their stay for up to 2 hours, and BP was measured at 10-minute intervals. Data analysis with SAS PROC MIXED (SAS Institute, Cary, North Carolina for regression models with correlated data determined the shape of the curve as BP changed over time. Patients were grouped on the basis of their presenting BP as normal (less than 140/90, elevated (140–160/90–100, or severely elevated (greater than 160/100 for the regression analysis. Results: A statistically significant downward trend in systolic and diastolic BP was observed only for those patients presenting with severely elevated BPs (ie, greater than 160/100. Conclusion: We demonstrate a statistically significant decline in systolic and diastolic BP over time spent in the ED only for patients with severely elevated presenting BPs. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:421–425.

  1. Degree of suicide intent and the lethality of means employed: a study of Chinese attempters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Xu, Huilan

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if there is a relationship between the degree of suicide intent and the lethality of means employed by those who try to kill themselves. The study sample consists of 74 suicide attempters admitted to emergency rooms in a northeastern area of China. Structured interviews were performed with the patients and their companions to the hospital if necessary. It was found that the reason for the suicide attempt claimed by the highest percentage of attempters (35 of 74) was love/marriage issues, and there were significant gender differences in suicide reasons. It also was found that the choice of suicide means is generally independent of gender, and the lethality of means is positively correlated with the degree of suicide intent. One of the implications of the findings is a better understanding of the higher suicide rates for Chinese women than Chinese men. A hypothesis for future study on Chinese suicide may be that the high fatality rate of Chinese women who have swallowed poisonous pesticide is a function of the strong intent of death of the victim coupled with the well-known lethality of the pesticides.

  2. Sustainable Inclusion of Smallholders in the Emerging High Quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BRIAN

    security and the general livelihood conditions of any population. Agriculture, being one of the most weather-dependent of all human activities is highly vulnerable to climate change. African countries are particularly vulnerable to climate change because of their dependence on rain fed agriculture, high levels of poverty, low.

  3. Metal azides under pressure: An emerging class of high energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metal azides are well-known for their explosive properties such as detonation or deflagration. As chemically pure sources of nitrogen, alkali metal azides under high pressure have the ability to form polymeric nitrogen, an ultimate green high energy density material with energy density three times greater than that of known ...

  4. Design and Simulation of a High Performance Emergency Data Delivery Protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swartz, Kevin; Wang, Di

    2007-01-01

    . An emergency is defined as any event with high priority that needs to be handled immediately. It is assumed that this emergency event is important enough that energy efficiency is not a factor in our protocol. The desired effect is for fast as possible delivery to the base station for rapid event handling....

  5. Sustainable Inclusion of Smallholders in the Emerging High Quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BRIAN

    2010). The vulnerability of the developing countries like Nigeria is worsened by ... unpredictable yields, thereby making farmers more vulnerable, particularly in Africa ..... or build resilience .488 .400 .009 -.041 .212 -.296 .337. High cost of improved varieties .175 .124 .862 .082 .086 .053 -.045. Non-availability of farm labour.

  6. Peer leadership as an emerging high-impact practice: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher education, peer leadership, high-impact practice, first-year student ... and religious values; academic and social self-concept; intellectual ... ability to work under pressure; interpersonal skills; and an awareness and .... self-reported gains, thereby representing perceived measures of change ..... E-Source for College.

  7. Tasers – Less than Lethal!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abiram; Theivacumar, Nada S; Souka, Hesham M

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of potentially lethal injury associated with the use of Taser. A 42-year-old man was stopped by police for potential detention. He held a large carving knife over his epigasrium threatening to stab himself.With a view to achieving immobilisation, a Taser gun was used. On activation of the Taser, the subject suffered a 7-cm wide and 10-cm deep stab injury to the upper abdomen. In this case, activation of the Taser resulted in the contraction of skeletal muscles, flexors more intensely than extensors, resulting in the stab injury. PMID:19416583

  8. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  9. Hepatitis E: An emerging infection in high income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, J E; Ghisetti, V; Irving, W; Dalton, H R; Izopet, J; Hoepelman, A I M; Salmon, D

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 is the most recently characterized hepatotropic virus and is increasingly being recognized as the cause of unexplained liver disease in many western countries. Although asymptomatic in most cases, HEV GT3 may be responsible for a wide range of illnesses, from mild to fulminant acute hepatitis, and also chronic hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. Extrahepatic manifestations have been occasionally described. Anti-HEV antibody detection by immunoassays is hampered by moderate test accuracy particularly in immunocompromised hosts while a WHO international standard for molecular detection of HEV RNA by RT-PCR has recently been introduced. This review describes the basic virology, epidemiology, clinical virology and treatment of HEV GT3 infections in high income countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimates of high absolute densities and emergence rates of demersal zooplankton from the Agatti Atoll, laccadives

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.

    Direct sampling of the sandy substratus of the Agatti Lagoon with a corer showed the presence of vary high densities of epibenthic forms. On average, densities were about 25 times higher than previously estimated with emergence traps. About 80...

  11. Lethality prediction for Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Uropathogenic E. coli in ground chicken treated with high pressure processing and trans-cinnamaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli, intestinal (O157:H7) as well as extraintestinal types (Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC)) are commonly found in many foods including chicken meat. In this study we compared the resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to UPEC in chicken meat under the stresses of high hydrostatic pressu...

  12. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  13. Emerging metrology for high-throughput nanomaterial genotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bryant C; Wright, Christa W; Ibuki, Yuko; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Karlsson, Hanna L; Hendriks, Giel; Sims, Christopher M; Singh, Neenu; Doak, Shareen H

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of the engineered nanomaterial (ENM) manufacturing industry has accelerated the incorporation of ENMs into a wide variety of consumer products across the globe. Unintentionally or not, some of these ENMs may be introduced into the environment or come into contact with humans or other organisms resulting in unexpected biological effects. It is thus prudent to have rapid and robust analytical metrology in place that can be used to critically assess and/or predict the cytotoxicity, as well as the potential genotoxicity of these ENMs. Many of the traditional genotoxicity test methods [e.g. unscheduled DNA synthesis assay, bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test, etc.,] for determining the DNA damaging potential of chemical and biological compounds are not suitable for the evaluation of ENMs, due to a variety of methodological issues ranging from potential assay interferences to problems centered on low sample throughput. Recently, a number of sensitive, high-throughput genotoxicity assays/platforms (CometChip assay, flow cytometry/micronucleus assay, flow cytometry/γ-H2AX assay, automated 'Fluorimetric Detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding' (FADU) assay, ToxTracker reporter assay) have been developed, based on substantial modifications and enhancements of traditional genotoxicity assays. These new assays have been used for the rapid measurement of DNA damage (strand breaks), chromosomal damage (micronuclei) and for detecting upregulated DNA damage signalling pathways resulting from ENM exposures. In this critical review, we describe and discuss the fundamental measurement principles and measurement endpoints of these new assays, as well as the modes of operation, analytical metrics and potential interferences, as applicable to ENM exposures. An unbiased discussion of the major technical advantages and limitations of each assay for evaluating and predicting the genotoxic potential of ENMs is also provided. Published by Oxford University Press on

  14. The Rorschach Suicide Constellation: assessing various degrees of lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J C; Piers, C; Hilsenroth, M J; Holdwick, D J; Padawer, J R

    2001-04-01

    In this article we examine the relation between the Rorschach Comprehensive System's Suicide Constellation (S-CON; Exner, 1993; Exner & Wiley, 1977) and lethality of suicide attempts during the course of patients' hospitalization at the Austen Riggs Center (Stockbridge, MA). Patient records were rated as nonsuicidal (n = 37), parasuicidal (n = 37), or near-lethal (n = 30) based on the presence and lethality of self-destructive acts. Diagnostic efficiency statistics utilizing a cutoff score of 7 or more positive indicators successfully predicted which patients would engage in near-lethal suicidal activity relative to parasuicidal patients (overall correct classification rate [OCC] = .79), nonsuicidal inpatients (OCC = .79), and college students (OCC = .89). Although these predictions were influenced by relatively high base rates in the hospital population (14.5%), base rate estimates were calculated for other hypothetical populations revealing different prediction estimates that should be considered when judging the relative efficacy of the S-CON. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an S-CON score of 7 or more was the sole predictor of near-lethal suicide attempts among 9 psychiatric and demographic variables.

  15. Experimental and numerical study of heterogeneous pressure-temperature-induced lethal and sublethal injury of Lactococcus lactis in a medium scale high-pressure autoclave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimann, K V; Kitsubun, P; Delgado, A; Gänzle, M G; Chapleau, N; Le Bail, A; Hartmann, C

    2006-07-05

    The present contribution is dedicated to experimental and theoretical assessment of microbiological process heterogeneities of the high-pressure (HP) inactivation of Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris MG 1363. The inactivation kinetics are determined in dependence of pressure, process time, temperature and absence or presence of co-solutes in the buffer system namely 4 M sodium chloride and 1.5 M sucrose. The kinetic analysis is carried out in a 0.1-L autoclave in order to minimise thermal and convective effects. Upon these data, a deterministic inactivation model is formulated with the logistic equation. Its independent variables represent the counts of viable cells (viable but injured) and of the stress-resistant cells (viable and not injured). This model is then coupled to a thermo-fluiddynamical simulation method, high-pressure computer fluid dynamics technique (HP-CFD), which yields spatiotemporal temperature and flow fields occurring during the HP application inside any considered autoclave. Besides the thermo-fluiddynamic quantities, the coupled model predicts also the spatiotemporal distribution of both viable (VC) and stress-resistant cell counts (SRC). In order to assess the process non-uniformity of the microbial inactivation in a 3.3-L autoclave experimentally, microbial samples are placed at two distinct locations and are exposed to various process conditions. It can be shown with both, experimental and theoretical models that thermal heterogeneities induce process non-uniformities of more than one decimal power in the counts of the viable cells at the end of the treatment. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Lethal effects of high-intensity violet 405-nm light on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, and on dormant and germinating spores of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, L E; McKenzie, K; Maclean, M; Macgregor, S J; Anderson, J G

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of high-intensity violet light on selected yeast and mould fungi. Cell suspensions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, and dormant and germinating spores (conidia) of the mould Aspergillus niger were exposed to high-intensity narrow band violet light with peak output at 405 nm generated from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. All three fungal species were inactivated by the 405-nm light without a requirement for addition of exogenous photosensitiser chemicals. Of the fungal species tested, S. cerevisiae was most sensitive and dormant conidia of A. niger were most resistant to 405-nm light exposure. Five-log10 colony forming units per millilitre (CFU ml(-1)) reductions of the tested species required exposure doses of 288 J cm(-2) for S. cerevisiae, 576 J cm(-2) for C. albicans, and a much higher value of 2.3 kJ cm(-2) for dormant conidia of A. niger. During germination, A. niger conidia became more sensitive to 405-nm light exposure and sensitivity increased as germination progressed over an 8 h test period. Light exposure under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, together with results obtained using ascorbic acid as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species, revealed that 405-nm light inactivation in fungi involved an oxygen-dependent mechanism, as previously described in bacteria. The inactivation results achieved with yeast cells and fungal spores together with operational advantages associated with the use of a visible (nonultraviolet (UV)) light source highlight the potential of 405-nm light for fungal decontamination applications. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  18. Systemic insecticide treatment of the canine reservoir of Trypanosoma cruzi induces high levels of lethality in Triatoma infestans, a principal vector of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza, Ariel; Talaga, Adrianna; Herbas, Gladys; Canaviri, Ruben Jair; Cahuasiri, Thalia; Luck, Laura; Guibarra, Alvaro; Goncalves, Raquel; Pereira, Juan Antonio; Gomez, Sonia A; Picado, Albert; Messenger, Louisa Alexandra; Bern, Caryn; Courtenay, Orin

    2017-07-19

    Despite large-scale reductions in Chagas disease prevalence across Central and South America, Trypanosoma cruzi infection remains a considerable public health problem in the Gran Chaco region where vector-borne transmission persists. In these communities, peridomestic animals are major blood-meal sources for triatomines, and household presence of infected dogs increases T. cruzi transmission risk for humans. To address the pressing need for field-friendly, complementary methods to reduce triatomine infestation and interrupt T. cruzi transmission, this study evaluated the systemic activity of three commercial, oral, single dose insecticides Fluralaner (Bravecto®), Afoxolaner (NexGard®) and Spinosad (Comfortis®) in canine feed-through assays against Triatoma infestans, the principal domestic vector species in the Southern Cone of South America. Twelve healthy, outbred dogs were recruited from the Zoonosis Surveillance and Control Program in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, and randomized to three treatment groups, each containing one control and three treated dogs. Following oral drug administration, colony-reared second and third stage T. infestans instars were offered to feed on dogs for 30 min at 2, 7, 21, 34 and 51 days post-treatment. Eighty-five per cent (768/907) of T. infestans successfully blood-fed during bioassays, with significantly higher proportions of bugs becoming fully-engorged when exposed to Bravecto® treated dogs (P Fluralaner or Afoxolaner was safe and well tolerated, producing complete triatomine mortality on treated dogs over 7.3 weeks. While both drugs were highly efficacious, more bugs exposed to Fluralaner took complete blood-meals, and experienced rapid knock-down. Coupled with its longer residual activity, Fluralaner represents an ideal insecticide for development into a complementary, operationally-feasible, community-level method of reducing triatomine infestation and potentially controlling T. cruzi transmission, in the Gran Chaco region.

  19. Cyclopeptide toxins of lethal amanitas: Compositions, distribution and phylogenetic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shanshan; Zhou, Qian; He, Zhengmi; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Ping; Cai, Qing; Yang, Zhuliang; Chen, Jia; Chen, Zuohong

    2016-09-15

    Lethal amanitas (Amanita sect. Phalloideae) are responsible for 90% of all fatal mushroom poisonings. Since 2000, more than ten new lethal Amanita species have been discovered and some of them had caused severe mushroom poisonings in China. However, the contents and distribution of cyclopeptides in these lethal mushrooms remain poorly known. In this study, the diversity of major cyclopeptide toxins in seven Amanita species from Eastern Asia and three species from Europe and North America were systematically analyzed, and a new approach to inferring phylogenetic relationships using cyclopeptide profile was evaluated for the first time. The results showed that there were diversities of the cyclopeptides among lethal Amanita species, and cyclopeptides from Amanita rimosa and Amanita fuligineoides were reported for the first time. The amounts of amatoxins in East Asian Amanita species were significantly higher than those in European and North American species. The analysis of distribution of amatoxins and phallotoxins in various Amanita species demonstrated that the content of phallotoxins was higher than that of amatoxins in Amanita phalloides and Amanita virosa. In contrast, the content of phallotoxins was significantly lower than that of amatoxins in all East Asian lethal Amanita species tested. However, the distribution of amatoxins and phallotoxins in different tissues showed the same tendency. Eight cyclopeptides and three unknown compounds were identified using cyclopeptide standards and high-resolution MS. Based on the cyclopeptide profiles, phylogenetic relationships of lethal amanitas were inferred through a dendrogram generated by UPGMA method. The results showed high similarity to the phylogeny established previously based on the multi-locus DNA sequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High school automated external defibrillator programs as markers of emergency preparedness for sudden cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toresdahl, Brett G; Harmon, Kimberly G; Drezner, Jonathan A

    2013-01-01

    School-based automated external defibrillator (AED) programs have demonstrated a high survival rate for individuals suffering sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in US high schools. To examine the relationship between high schools having an AED on campus and other measures of emergency preparedness for SCA. Cross-sectional study. United States high schools, December 2006 to September 2009. Principals, athletic directors, school nurses, and certified athletic trainers represented 3371 high schools. Comprehensive surveys on emergency planning for SCA submitted by high school representatives to the National Registry for AED Use in Sports from December 2006 to September 2009. Schools with and without AEDs were compared to assess other elements of emergency preparedness for SCA. A total of 2784 schools (82.6%) reported having 1 or more AEDs on campus, with an average of 2.8 AEDs per school; 587 schools (17.4%) had no AEDs. Schools with an enrollment of more than 500 students were more likely to have an AED (relative risk [RR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.16, P schools were more likely to have an AED than were rural (RR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04, 1.11, P schools (RR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.04, 1.23, P Schools with 1 or more AEDs were more likely to ensure access to early defibrillation (RR = 3.45, 95% CI = 2.97, 3.99, P emergency action plan for SCA (RR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.67, 2.00, P emergency action plan at least annually (RR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.58, 2.50, P emergency medical services to develop the emergency action plan (RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.32, P emergency responders (RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.08, P High schools with AED programs were more likely to establish a comprehensive emergency response plan for SCA. Implementing school-based AED programs is a key step associated with emergency planning for young athletes with SCA.

  1. High School Automated External Defibrillator Programs as Markers of Emergency Preparedness for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toresdahl, Brett G.; Harmon, Kimberly G.; Drezner, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: School-based automated external defibrillator (AED) programs have demonstrated a high survival rate for individuals suffering sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in US high schools. Objective: To examine the relationship between high schools having an AED on campus and other measures of emergency preparedness for SCA. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: United States high schools, December 2006 to September 2009. Patients or Other Participants: Principals, athletic directors, school nurses, and certified athletic trainers represented 3371 high schools. Main Outcome Measure(s): Comprehensive surveys on emergency planning for SCA submitted by high school representatives to the National Registry for AED Use in Sports from December 2006 to September 2009. Schools with and without AEDs were compared to assess other elements of emergency preparedness for SCA. Results: A total of 2784 schools (82.6%) reported having 1 or more AEDs on campus, with an average of 2.8 AEDs per school; 587 schools (17.4%) had no AEDs. Schools with an enrollment of more than 500 students were more likely to have an AED (relative risk [RR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.16, P defibrillation (RR = 3.45, 95% CI = 2.97, 3.99, P < .01), establish an emergency action plan for SCA (RR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.67, 2.00, P < .01), review the emergency action plan at least annually (RR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.58, 2.50, P < .01), consult emergency medical services to develop the emergency action plan (RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.32, P < .01), and establish a communication system to activate emergency responders (RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.08, P < .01). Conclusions: High schools with AED programs were more likely to establish a comprehensive emergency response plan for SCA. Implementing school-based AED programs is a key step associated with emergency planning for young athletes with SCA. PMID:23672389

  2. Inferring synthetic lethal interactions from mutual exclusivity of genetic events in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srihari, Sriganesh; Singla, Jitin; Wong, Limsoon; Ragan, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) refers to the genetic interaction between two or more genes where only their co-alteration (e.g. by mutations, amplifications or deletions) results in cell death. In recent years, SL has emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy against cancer: by targeting the SL partners of altered genes in cancer cells, these cells can be selectively killed while sparing the normal cells. Consequently, a number of studies have attempted prediction of SL interactions in human, a majority by extrapolating SL interactions inferred through large-scale screens in model organisms. However, these predicted SL interactions either do not hold in human cells or do not include genes that are (frequently) altered in human cancers, and are therefore not attractive in the context of cancer therapy. Here, we develop a computational approach to infer SL interactions directly from frequently altered genes in human cancers. It is based on the observation that pairs of genes that are altered in a (significantly) mutually exclusive manner in cancers are likely to constitute lethal combinations. Using genomic copy-number and gene-expression data from four cancers, breast, prostate, ovarian and uterine (total 3980 samples) from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we identify 718 genes that are frequently amplified or upregulated, and are likely to be synthetic lethal with six key DNA-damage response (DDR) genes in these cancers. By comparing with published data on gene essentiality (~16000 genes) from ten DDR-deficient cancer cell lines, we show that our identified genes are enriched among the top quartile of essential genes in these cell lines, implying that our inferred genes are highly likely to be (synthetic) lethal upon knockdown in these cell lines. Among the inferred targets are tousled-like kinase 2 (TLK2) and the deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin-specific-processing protease 7 (USP7) whose overexpression correlates with poor survival in cancers. Mutual exclusivity between

  3. Automated External Defibrillators and Emergency Planning for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Vermont High Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Wasilko, Scott M.; Lisle, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sudden cardiac death (SCD) events are tragic. Secondary prevention of SCD depends on availability of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). High school athletes represent a high-risk group for SCD, and current efforts aim to place AEDs in all high schools. Hypothesis: The prevalence of AEDs and emergency planning for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in Vermont high schools is similar to other states. Understanding specific needs and limitations in rural states may prevent SCD in rur...

  4. Acute-lethal toxicity (LC50) effect of Moringa oleifera (Lam.) Fresh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SH

    aquaculture. This study assessed the acute-lethal toxicity (LC50) effect of Moringa oleifera fresh root-bark extract on fresh water fish, Oreochromis niloticus juveniles for 96-h under renewal toxicity exposure. Median. Lethal Concentration (LC50) for O. niloticus juvenile was 97.61 mgl-1 and high mortality was obtained at 200.

  5. ANALYSIS OF EMERGENCY AMBULANCE RECALLS AMONG PATIENTS WITH HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Plavunov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years the incidence of cardiovascular diseases had increased in Russian Federation. In a period of 2010-2014 y. the number of patients diagnosed hypertension increased by 16,8% (139,5 thousand patients. High prevalence of hypertension leads to different cardiac complications that could be responsible for death. Hypertension is a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease and stroke, increases the risk in 3-4 times, and therefore one of the most important causes of morality. The major cause that required emergency hospitalization in adult population was estimated to be cardiovascular diseases (23,9%, including ischemic heart disease (10,7%, cerebrovascular diseases (6%, and diseases attributable to high blood pressure (3,3%. We studied 1 605 374 (9,6% emergency ambulance calls to patients with high blood pressure during the period of 6 month (2015 y. . In 16,1% cases emergency service calls were related to hypertensive crisis and 1,45% of patients needed emergency evacuation. We determined that in 7,2% cases patients with high blood pressure called for emergency service again during 24 hours period. Among this group of patients the percent of hypertensive crisis and evacuation was higher — 19,4% and 4,1% respectively. Also we identified that in 59,5% cases the diagnosis was hypertensive disease. We determined that majority of frequent ambulance callers were elderly persons. 

  6. Design of a High Power Robotic Manipulator for Emergency Response to the Nuclear Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jongwon; Bae, Yeong-Geol; Kim, Myoung Ho; Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    An accident in a nuclear facility causes a great social cost. To prevent an unexpected nuclear accident from spreading to the catastrophic disaster, emergency response action in early stage is required. However, high radiation environment has been proved as a challenging obstacle for human workers to access to the accident site and take an action in previous accident cases. Therefore, emergency response robotic technology to be used in a nuclear accident site instead of human workers are actively conducted in domestically and internationally. Robots in an accident situation are required to carry out a variety of tasks depend on the types and patterns of accidents. An emergency response usually includes removing of debris, make an access road to a certain place and handling valves. These tasks normally involve high payload handling. A small sized high power robotic manipulator can be an appropriate candidate to deal with a wide spectrum of tasks in an emergency situation. In this paper, we discuss about the design of a high power robotic manipulator, which is capable of handling high payloads for an initial response action to the nuclear facility accident. In this paper, we presented a small sized high power robotic manipulator design. Actuator types of manipulator was selected and mechanical structure was discussed. In the future, the servo valve and hydraulic pump systems will be determined. Furthermore, control algorithms and test bed experiments will be also conducted.

  7. High-dose acetaminophen inhibits the lethal effect of doxorubicin in HepG2 cells: the role of P-glycoprotein and mitogen-activated protein kinase p44/42 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manov, Irena; Bashenko, Yulia; Eliaz-Wolkowicz, Anat; Mizrahi, Meital; Liran, Oded; Iancu, Theodore C

    2007-09-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug for human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A major limitation to its effectiveness is the development of multidrug resistance of cancer cells. In clinical trials, patients with advanced HCC were treated with high-dose acetaminophen (HAAP) in an effort to improve the antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics. In this study, we investigated the effect of concomitant treatment of DOX and HAAP on hepatoma-derived HepG2 cells. Viability, cell cycle distribution, and ultrastructure were examined. Unexpectedly, HAAP, when added to DOX-exposed cells, increased cell viability, released cell cycle arrest, and decreased apoptosis. To elucidate the mechanisms by which HAAP reduces the DOX lethal effect to HepG2 cells, we investigated the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and p44/42-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. The P-gp function was enhanced by DOX and HAAP, and it was further stimulated during combined treatment, leading to decreased DOX retention. Verapamil (VRP), when added to DOX + HAAP exposure, increased DOX accumulation and restored DOX-induced toxicity. The increased phospho-p44/42-MAPK level in DOX-exposed cells was inhibited by HAAP. In addition, suppression of p44/42 activation by the p44/42-MAPK inhibitor 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone (PD98059) blocked DOX-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that the antagonistic effect of concomitant DOX + HAAP treatment occurs as a result of interactive stimulation of P-gp, generating decreased intracellular drug concentrations. Furthermore, inhibition of the p44/42-MAPK phosphorylation by HAAP could abolish the DOX-induced cell death pathway. Thus, combined treatment by DOX + HAAP, intended to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy, could have an opposite effect facilitating cancer cell survival.

  8. The use of high-flow nasal cannula in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slain, Katherine N; Shein, Steven L; Rotta, Alexandre T

    To summarize the current literature describing high-flow nasal cannula use in children, the components and mechanisms of action of a high-flow nasal cannula system, the appropriate clinical applications, and its role in the pediatric emergency department. A computer-based search of PubMed/MEDLINE and Google Scholar for literature on high-flow nasal cannula use in children was performed. High-flow nasal cannula, a non-invasive respiratory support modality, provides heated and fully humidified gas mixtures to patients via a nasal cannula interface. High-flow nasal cannula likely supports respiration though reduced inspiratory resistance, washout of the nasopharyngeal dead space, reduced metabolic work related to gas conditioning, improved airway conductance and mucociliary clearance, and provision of low levels of positive airway pressure. Most data describing high-flow nasal cannula use in children focuses on those with bronchiolitis, although high-flow nasal cannula has been used in children with other respiratory diseases. Introduction of high-flow nasal cannula into clinical practice, including in the emergency department, has been associated with decreased rates of endotracheal intubation. Limited prospective interventional data suggest that high-flow nasal cannula may be similarly efficacious as continuous positive airway pressure and more efficacious than standard oxygen therapy for some patients. Patient characteristics, such as improved tachycardia and tachypnea, have been associated with a lack of progression to endotracheal intubation. Reported adverse effects are rare. High-flow nasal cannula should be considered for pediatric emergency department patients with respiratory distress not requiring immediate endotracheal intubation; prospective, pediatric emergency department-specific trials are needed to better determine responsive patient populations, ideal high-flow nasal cannula settings, and comparative efficacy vs. other respiratory support modalities

  9. National representation in the emergency medicine literature: a bibliometric analysis of highly cited journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Jiang, Yuan; Zhang, Mao

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, significant growth has been seen in the field of emergency medicine. However, the national productivity to the field of emergency medicine remains unknown. This study aimed to reveal the national contributions in the field of emergency medicine. Articles published in 13 highly cited journals in emergency medicine in 2006 to 2010 were retrieved from PubMed and Science Citation Index. The number of total articles, the per-capita numbers, impact factors (IFs), and citations were tabulated to assess the contribution of different countries. A total number of 9775 articles were published in the 13 journals from 2006 to 2010 worldwide. West Europe, North America, and East Asia were the most productive regions. High-income countries published 87.9% of the total articles. United States published the most number of articles in 2006 to 2010 (4523/9775, or 46.3%), followed by United Kingdom, Australia, China, and Canada. Besides, United States also had the highest total IFs (8729.73) and total citations (22,117). When normalized to population size, Australia had the highest number of articles per million persons (26.00). Germany had the highest mean IF (2.27) and mean citations (6.87). United States is the most productive country in the field of emergency medicine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementation of a High-Performance Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol at a Collegiate Emergency Medical Services Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefos, Kathryn A.; Nable, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant public health issue. Although OHCA occurs relatively infrequently in the collegiate environment, educational institutions with on-campus emergency medical services (EMS) agencies are uniquely positioned to provide high-quality resuscitation care in an expedient fashion. Georgetown University's…

  11. [From the discovery of antibiotics to emerging highly drug-resistant bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotics has enabled serious infections to be treated. However, bacteria resistant to several families of antibiotics and the emergence of new highly drug-resistant bacteria constitute a public health issue in France and across the world. Actions to prevent their transmission are being put in place. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Bloomsbury report on mouse embryo phenotyping: recommendations from the IMPC workshop on embryonic lethal screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David; Baldock, Richard; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Copp, Andrew J.; Dickinson, Mary; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Henkelman, Mark; Justice, Monica; Mohun, Timothy; Murray, Stephen A.; Pauws, Erwin; Raess, Michael; Rossant, Janet; Weaver, Tom; West, David

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genes that are important for embryo development is a crucial first step towards understanding their many functions in driving the ordered growth, differentiation and organogenesis of embryos. It can also shed light on the origins of developmental disease and congenital abnormalities. Current international efforts to examine gene function in the mouse provide a unique opportunity to pinpoint genes that are involved in embryogenesis, owing to the emergence of embryonic lethal knockout mutants. Through internationally coordinated efforts, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) has generated a public resource of mouse knockout strains and, in April 2012, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC), supported by the EU InfraCoMP programme, convened a workshop to discuss developing a phenotyping pipeline for the investigation of embryonic lethal knockout lines. This workshop brought together over 100 scientists, from 13 countries, who are working in the academic and commercial research sectors, including experts and opinion leaders in the fields of embryology, animal imaging, data capture, quality control and annotation, high-throughput mouse production, phenotyping, and reporter gene analysis. This article summarises the outcome of the workshop, including (1) the vital scientific importance of phenotyping embryonic lethal mouse strains for basic and translational research; (2) a common framework to harmonise international efforts within this context; (3) the types of phenotyping that are likely to be most appropriate for systematic use, with a focus on 3D embryo imaging; (4) the importance of centralising data in a standardised form to facilitate data mining; and (5) the development of online tools to allow open access to and dissemination of the phenotyping data. PMID:23519032

  13. The role of GATA2 in lethal prostate cancer aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Carceles-Cordon, Marc; Hoshida, Yujin; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Galsky, Matthew D.; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is a classic example of the intractability and consequent lethality that characterizes metastatic carcinomas. Novel treatments have improved the survival of men with prostate cancer; however, advanced prostate cancer invariably becomes resistant to these therapies and ultimately progresses to a lethal metastatic stage. Consequently, detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that control prostate cancer cell survival and progression towards this lethal stage of disease will benefit the development of new therapeutics. The transcription factor endothelial transcription factor GATA-2 (GATA2) has been reported to have a key role in driving prostate cancer aggressiveness. In addition to being a pioneer transcription factor that increases androgen receptor (AR) binding and activity, GATA2 regulates a core subset of clinically relevant genes in an AR-independent manner. Functionally, GATA2 overexpression in prostate cancer increases cellular motility and invasiveness, proliferation, tumorigenicity, and resistance to standard therapies. Thus, GATA2 has a multifaceted function in prostate cancer aggressiveness and is a highly attractive target in the development of novel treatments against lethal prostate cancer. PMID:27872477

  14. Influence Analysis of Shell Material and Charge on Shrapnel Lethal Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the shrapnel lethal power with different shell material and charge, LS-DYNA was used to numerically simulate four kinds of shrapnel lethal power. The shell material was 58SiMn, 50SiMnVB or 40Cr, whereas the charge was RL-F. And the shell material was 58SiMn, whereas the charge was TNT. The shell rupture process and lethal power test were analyzed. The results show that, the lethal power of RL-F charge increase by 25%, 45%, 14% compared with the TNT charge, whereas the shell material was 58SiMn, 50SiMnVB, 40Cr. And then the guarantee range and lethal power can be improved by using the high explosive and changing shell material, whereas the projectile shape coefficient is invariable.

  15. Experiences in therapy for lethal midline granuloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosaka, K.; Ishikawa, T. (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-03-01

    Four cases of the lethal midline granuloma or malignant granuloma of the nose were treated by irradiation and chemotherapy, which are generally prescribed for malignant lymphomas. Clinical, histological and laboratory examination indicated that they were the lethal midline granuloma and clearly differentiated from Wegener's granulomatosis or malignant lymphoma. All of the cases exhibited primary remission. The four cases were observed up to 38, 22, 14, and 10 months since the beginning of the therapy, showing no local or general recurrence.

  16. How to obtain high returns with lower volatility in emerging markets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipun Agarwal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerging markets equity indexes are usually seen as high return with a high degree of volatility associated with them. However, this should not be the case, if you choose high-quality firms that have increasing returns and lower volatility. The intent of this paper is to introduce the risk weighted alpha (RWA indexation method that helps identify stocks that have stable increasing returns with lower volatility. In order to review this method in the context of emerging markets scenario, this paper takes the example of the Sensex index listed on the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE that comprises India’s top 30 stocks by market capitalisation. Results show that some stocks like Hindustan Lever do show increasing returns and lower volatility. The RWA Sensex index outperforms the BSE Sensex index, while still maintaining a beta that is the same as that in the BSE Sensex index.

  17. REAL-TIME high-resolution urban surface water flood mapping to support flood emergency management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, M.; Yu, D.; Wilby, R.

    2016-12-01

    Strong evidence has shown that urban flood risks will substantially increase because of urbanisation, economic growth, and more frequent weather extremes. To effectively manage these risks require not only traditional grey engineering solutions, but also a green management solution. Surface water flood risk maps based on return period are useful for planning purposes, but are limited for application in flood emergencies, because of the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of rainfall and complex urban topography. Therefore, a REAL-TIME urban surface water mapping system is highly beneficial to increasing urban resilience to surface water flooding. This study integrated numerical weather forecast and high-resolution urban surface water modelling into a real-time multi-level surface water mapping system for Leicester City in the UK. For rainfall forecast, the 1km composite rain radar from the Met Office was used, and we used the advanced rainfall-runoff model - FloodMap to predict urban surface water at both city-level (10m-20m) and street-level (2m-5m). The system is capable of projecting 3-hour urban surface water flood, driven by rainfall derived from UK Met Office radar. Moreover, this system includes real-time accessibility mapping to assist the decision-making of emergency responders. This will allow accessibility (e.g. time to travel) from individual emergency service stations (e.g. Fire & Rescue; Ambulance) to vulnerable places to be evaluated. The mapping results will support contingency planning by emergency responders ahead of potential flood events.

  18. Improving the self-confidence level of medical undergraduates during emergencies using high fidelity simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniandy, R K; Nyein, K K; Felly, M

    2015-10-01

    Medical practice involves routinely making critical decisions regarding patient care and management. Many factors influence the decision-making process, and self-confidence has been found to be an important factor in effective decision-making. With the proper transfer of knowledge during their undergraduate studies, selfconfidence levels can be improved. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of High Fidelity Simulation as a component of medical education to improve the confidence levels of medical undergraduates during emergencies. Study participants included a total of 60 final year medical undergraduates during their rotation in Medical Senior Posting. They participated in a simulation exercise using a high fidelity simulator, and their confidence level measured using a self-administered questionnaire. The results found that the confidence levels of 'Assessment of an Emergency Patient', 'Diagnosing Arrhythmias', 'Emergency Airway Management', 'Performing Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation', 'Using the Defibrillator' and 'Using Emergency Drugs' showed a statistically significant increase in confidence levels after the simulation exercise. The mean confidence levels also rose from 2.85 to 3.83 (pundergraduates.

  19. High wall shear stress and high-risk plaque: an emerging concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshtehardi, Parham; Brown, Adam J; Bhargava, Ankit; Costopoulos, Charis; Hung, Olivia Y; Corban, Michel T; Hosseini, Hossein; Gogas, Bill D; Giddens, Don P; Samady, Habib

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant effort to identify high-risk plaques in vivo prior to acute events. While number of imaging modalities have been developed to identify morphologic characteristics of high-risk plaques, prospective natural-history observational studies suggest that vulnerability is not solely dependent on plaque morphology and likely involves additional contributing mechanisms. High wall shear stress (WSS) has recently been proposed as one possible causative factor, promoting the development of high-risk plaques. High WSS has been shown to induce specific changes in endothelial cell behavior, exacerbating inflammation and stimulating progression of the atherosclerotic lipid core. In line with experimental and autopsy studies, several human studies have shown associations between high WSS and known morphological features of high-risk plaques. However, despite increasing evidence, there is still no longitudinal data linking high WSS to clinical events. As the interplay between atherosclerotic plaque, artery, and WSS is highly dynamic, large natural history studies of atherosclerosis that include WSS measurements are now warranted. This review will summarize the available clinical evidence on high WSS as a possible etiological mechanism underlying high-risk plaque development.

  20. What Are Reasons for the Large Gender Differences in the Lethality of Suicidal Acts? An Epidemiological Analysis in Four European Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Mergl

    objects and poisoning by substances other than drugs. Median age at time of suicidal behaviour (35-44 years did not differ between males and females. The overall gender difference in lethality of suicidal behaviour was explained by males choosing more lethal suicide methods (odds ratio (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.65 to 2.50; p < 0.000001 and additionally, but to a lesser degree, by a higher lethality of suicidal acts for males even within the same method (OR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.32 to 2.02; p = 0.000005. Results of a regression analysis revealed neither age nor country differences were significant predictors for gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. The proportion of serious suicide attempts among all non-fatal suicidal acts with known intentionality (NFSAi was significantly higher in men (57.1%; 1,207 of 2,115 NFSAi than in women (48.6%; 1,508 of 3,100 NFSAi (χ2 = 35.74; p < 0.000001.Due to restrictive data security regulations to ensure anonymity in Ireland, specific ages could not be provided because of the relatively low absolute numbers of suicide in the Irish intervention and control region. Therefore, analyses of the interaction between gender and age could only be conducted for three of the four countries. Attempted suicides were assessed for patients presenting to emergency departments or treated in hospitals. An unknown rate of attempted suicides remained undetected. This may have caused an overestimation of the lethality of certain methods. Moreover, the detection of attempted suicides and the registration of completed suicides might have differed across the four countries. Some suicides might be hidden and misclassified as undetermined deaths.Men more often used highly lethal methods in suicidal behaviour, but there was also a higher method-specific lethality which together explained the large gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. Gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts were fairly consistent across all four European

  1. Crystal Structure of Protein Reveals Target for Drugs Against Lethal MERS Virus | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    A research team of scientists from the National Cancer Institute and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research recently identified the structure of a key protein of the virus that causes the highly lethal Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.

  2. Emergency planning for sudden cardiac events in North Carolina high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Anna; Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Davis, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the state of emergency planning for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in North Carolina high schools, primarily focusing on the existence and characteristics of written plans and the presence of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). All athletic directors listed in the 2007-2008 North Carolina High School Athletic Association Directory were surveyed via an online survey to determine their level of planning and preparation for SCA. Completed surveys were received from 36.7% (138/376) of the schools. Emergency action plans (EAPs) existed in 55.8% (n = 77) of high schools and were significantly less likely to be present in Divisions 1 and 2 (p schools, and the presence of an AED was related to the presence of an EAP (p Schools in Division 1 were less likely to possess an AED (p schools in the larger divisions. Of schools without AEDs, 39.5% (n = 15) reported children or adults attending or working at the school who were at risk for heart disease. Lack of funding was the most commonly reported barrier to obtaining an AED. A low response rate and self-reported data may have biased results in favor of those who adopted plans or purchased an AED. The majority of responding schools possessed both an EAP and an AED and reported that they met several current recommended guidelines for emergency preparedness for SCA. These results for North Carolina high schools are similar to reports from other states. Significant room for improvement exists, however, as the number of schools without an EAP or AED is still relatively large and some important components of emergency planning are lacking in the EAPs.

  3. [Lethal intravenous infusion of a wound antiseptic containing polyhexanide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Frank; Wehner, Heinz-Dieter; Schulz, Martin Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is considered to be highly histocompatible and is one of the most frequently used wound antiseptics. Only one case of intoxication has been reported so far. The present case of a lethal intoxication is the first fatal incident described where causality is substantiated by a temporal coincidence between application and ascertainable organ damage. The laboratory-chemical and histological investigations verified the toxicity of this substance after intravenous application with the main findings being severe hepatic and pancreatic damage.

  4. Identification of lethal cluster of genes in the yeast transcription network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, K.; Jeong, H.; Kahng, B.

    2006-05-01

    Identification of essential or lethal genes would be one of the ultimate goals in drug designs. Here we introduce an in silico method to select the cluster with a high population of lethal genes, called lethal cluster, through microarray assay. We construct a gene transcription network based on the microarray expression level. Links are added one by one in the descending order of the Pearson correlation coefficients between two genes. As the link density p increases, two meaningful link densities pm and ps are observed. At pm, which is smaller than the percolation threshold, the number of disconnected clusters is maximum, and the lethal genes are highly concentrated in a certain cluster that needs to be identified. Thus the deletion of all genes in that cluster could efficiently lead to a lethal inviable mutant. This lethal cluster can be identified by an in silico method. As p increases further beyond the percolation threshold, the power law behavior in the degree distribution of a giant cluster appears at ps. We measure the degree of each gene at ps. With the information pertaining to the degrees of each gene at ps, we return to the point pm and calculate the mean degree of genes of each cluster. We find that the lethal cluster has the largest mean degree.

  5. Dose-response tests and semi-field evaluation of lethal and sub-lethal effects of slow release pyriproxyfen granules (Sumilarv®0.5G) for the control of the malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae sensu lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbare, Oscar; Lindsay, Steven W; Fillinger, Ulrike

    2013-03-14

    Recently research has shown that larviciding can be an effective tool for integrated malaria vector control. Nevertheless, the uptake of this intervention has been hampered by the need to re-apply larvicides frequently. There is a need to explore persistent, environmentally friendly larvicides for malaria vector control to reduce intervention efforts and costs by reducing the frequency of application. In this study, the efficacy of a 0.5% pyriproxyfen granule (Surmilarv®0.5G, Sumitomo Chemicals) was assessed for the control of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Anopheles arabiensis, the major malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa. Dose-response and standardized field tests were implemented following standard procedures of the World Health Organization's Pesticide Evaluation Scheme to determine: (i) the susceptibility of vectors to this formulation; (ii) the residual activity and appropriate retreatment schedule for field application; and, (iii) sub-lethal impacts on the number and viability of eggs laid by adults after exposure to Sumilarv®0.5G during larval development. Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis were highly susceptible to Sumilarv®0.5G. Estimated emergence inhibition (EI) values were very low and similar for both species. The minimum dosage that completely inhibited adult emergence was between 0.01-0.03 parts per million (ppm) active ingredient (ai). Compared to the untreated control, an application of 0.018 ppm ai prevented 85% (95% confidence interval (CI) 82%-88%) of adult emergence over six weeks under standardized field conditions. A fivefold increase in dosage of 0.09 ppm ai prevented 97% (95% CI 94%-98%) emergence. Significant sub-lethal effects were observed in the standardized field tests. Female An. gambiae s.s. that were exposed to 0.018 ppm ai as larvae laid 47% less eggs, and females exposed to 0.09 ppm ai laid 74% less eggs than females that were unexposed to the treatment. Furthermore, 77% of eggs laid by females exposed to 0

  6. What Are Reasons for the Large Gender Differences in the Lethality of Suicidal Acts? An Epidemiological Analysis in Four European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Katherina; Székely, András; Tóth, Mónika Ditta; Coyne, James; Quintão, Sónia; Arensman, Ella; Coffey, Claire; Maxwell, Margaret; Värnik, Airi; van Audenhove, Chantal; McDaid, David; Sarchiapone, Marco; Schmidtke, Armin; Genz, Axel; Gusmão, Ricardo; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    methods hanging, jumping, moving objects, sharp objects and poisoning by substances other than drugs. Median age at time of suicidal behaviour (35–44 years) did not differ between males and females. The overall gender difference in lethality of suicidal behaviour was explained by males choosing more lethal suicide methods (odds ratio (OR) = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.65 to 2.50; p suicidal acts for males even within the same method (OR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.32 to 2.02; p = 0.000005). Results of a regression analysis revealed neither age nor country differences were significant predictors for gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. The proportion of serious suicide attempts among all non-fatal suicidal acts with known intentionality (NFSAi) was significantly higher in men (57.1%; 1,207 of 2,115 NFSAi) than in women (48.6%; 1,508 of 3,100 NFSAi) (χ2 = 35.74; p suicide in the Irish intervention and control region. Therefore, analyses of the interaction between gender and age could only be conducted for three of the four countries. Attempted suicides were assessed for patients presenting to emergency departments or treated in hospitals. An unknown rate of attempted suicides remained undetected. This may have caused an overestimation of the lethality of certain methods. Moreover, the detection of attempted suicides and the registration of completed suicides might have differed across the four countries. Some suicides might be hidden and misclassified as undetermined deaths. Conclusions Men more often used highly lethal methods in suicidal behaviour, but there was also a higher method-specific lethality which together explained the large gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. Gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts were fairly consistent across all four European countries examined. Males and females did not differ in age at time of suicidal behaviour. Suicide attempts by males were rated as being more serious independent of the method used, with

  7. Johnsongrass mosaic virus contributes to maize lethal necrosis in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize lethal necrosis (MLN), a severe virus disease of maize, has emerged in East Africa in recent years with devastating effects on production and food security where maize is a staple subsistence crop. In extensive surveys of MLN-symptomatic plants in East Africa, sequences of Johnsongrass mosaic ...

  8. Use of High-Flow Nasal Cannula for Acute Dyspnea and Hypoxemia in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Tscheikuna, Jamsak; Praphruetkit, Nattakarn; Kijpinyochai, Sunthorn

    2015-10-01

    Acute dyspnea and hypoxemia are 2 of the most common problems in the emergency room. Oxygen therapy is an essential supportive treatment to correct these issues. In this study, we investigated the physiologic effects of high-flow nasal oxygen cannula (HFNC) compared with conventional oxygen therapy (COT) in subjects with acute dyspnea and hypoxemia in the emergency room. A prospective randomized comparative study was conducted in the emergency department of a university hospital. Forty subjects were randomized to receive HFNC or COT for 1 h. The primary outcome was level of dyspnea, and secondary outcomes included change in breathing frequency, subject comfort, adverse events, and rate of hospitalization. Common causes of acute dyspnea and hypoxemia were congestive heart failure, asthma exacerbation, COPD exacerbation, and pneumonia. HFNC significantly improved dyspnea (2.0 ± 1.8 vs 3.8 ± 2.3, P = .01) and subject comfort (1.6 ± 1.7 vs 3.7 ± 2.4, P = .01) compared with COT. No statistically significant difference in breathing frequency was found between the 2 groups at the end of the study. HFNC was well tolerated, and no serious adverse events were found. The rate of hospitalization in the HFNC group was lower than in the COT group, but there was no statistically significant difference (50% vs 65%, P = .34). HFNC improved dyspnea and comfort in subjects presenting with acute dyspnea and hypoxemia in the emergency department. HFNC may benefit patients requiring oxygen therapy in the emergency room. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  9. Development and Evaluation of Senior High School Courses on Emerging Technology: A Case Study of a Course on Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Tung

    2012-01-01

    In Taiwan, the National Science Council has implemented the High Scope Program (HSP) since 2006. The purpose of this study was to analyze the development and effectiveness of senior high school HSP courses on emerging technology. This study used a course on virtual reality as an example, to investigate the influence of emerging technology courses…

  10. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. II. Active and passive immunization as protection against a lethal bacterial dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1990-01-01

    Immunization against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and thymus-bearing LEW rats. Active immunization was performed with formalin-killed whole cell vaccine or sublethal infection prior to the lethal infection. After vaccination with killed bacteria the euthymic...... animals produced antibodies against S.typhimurium, but neither the euthymic nor the athymic animals survived the infection. After non-lethal infection euthymic and thymus-grafted nude rats were not affected by the second and otherwise lethal bacterial dose, and had high antibody titres. All the athymic...... nude rats died after the second and lethal bacterial challenge. Passive immunization with plasma from immunized euthymic animals did not protect any of the animals against the lethal bacterial dose. However, all animals survived when treated with large doses of spleen cells from immunized euthymic rats...

  11. High-fidelity multiactor emergency preparedness training for patient care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lancer A; Maddux, P Tim; Schnellmann, Jennifer; Hayes, Lauren; Tolley, Jessica; Wahlquist, Amy E

    2012-01-01

    Providing comprehensive emergency preparedness training (EPT) for patient care providers is important to the future success of emergency preparedness operations in the United States. Disasters are rare, complex events involving many patients and environmental factors that are difficult to reproduce in a training environment. Few EPT programs possess both competency-driven goals and metrics to measure life-saving performance during a multiactor simulated disaster. The development of an EPT curriculum for patient care providers-provided first to medical students, then to a group of experienced disaster medical providers-that recreates a simulated clinical disaster using a combination of up to 15 live actors and six high-fidelity human simulators is described. Specifically, the authors detail the Center for Health Professional Training and Emergency Response's (CHPTER's) 1-day clinical EPT course including its organization, core competency development, medical student self-evaluation, and course assessment. Two 1-day courses hosted by CHPTER were conducted in a university simulation center. Students who completed the course improved their overall knowledge and comfort level with EPT skills. The authors believe this is the first published description of a curriculum method that combines high-fidelity, multiactor scenarios to measure the life-saving performance of patient care providers utilizing a clinical disaster scenario with > 10 patients at once. A larger scale study, or preferably a multicenter trial, is needed to further study the impact of this curriculum and its potential to protect provider and patient lives.

  12. Lethality Index 2008-2014: Less shootings, same lethality, more opacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Silva Forné

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the use of lethal force by Mexican federal security forces during shootings with presumed members of organized crime from 2008-2014. The authors use official data and press reports on deaths and wounded in shootings to construct indicators such as the number of dead civilians over the number of dead officials from the federal security forces and the number of dead civilians over the number of wounded civilians. In a context where certain factors that contribute to an excessive use of force become more common, the results of the study show a growing use of lethal force. This raises questions over the possible excessive use of lethal force as a normal or systematic practice. The study also shows a growing context of opacity in the infor­mation available to evaluate the use of lethal force and the general lack of a legal framework to regulate the use of lethal force in Mexico.

  13. Lethal intimate partner violence: an interactional perspective on women's perceptions of lethal incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatnar, Solveig Karin Bø; Bjørkly, Stål

    2013-01-01

    Intimate partner homicide (IPH) is the only lethal violence in which women are the principal victims. This research reports on an investigation of possible differences between dynamics of lethal and nonlethal intimate partner violence (IPV). A representative sample of 157 help-seeking female victims of IPV in Norway was interviewed. Results from multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that women who perceived they had been subjected to lethal IPV were different from those who had not perceived the IPV as lethal concerning interactional dimensions of IPV and in their help-seeking responses. There was no difference related to sociodemographic factors. Because some IPV help-seeking women may be at a heightened risk for lethal violence, it is imperative that their efforts to seek assistance are responded to with care and structured risk assessment.

  14. Applications of Emerging Parallel Optical Link Technology to High Energy Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chramowicz, J.; Kwan, S.; Prosser, A.; Winchell, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Modern particle detectors depend upon optical fiber links to deliver event data to upstream trigger and data processing systems. Future detector systems can benefit from the development of dense arrangements of high speed optical links emerging from the telecommunications and storage area network market segments. These links support data transfers in each direction at rates up to 120 Gbps in packages that minimize or even eliminate edge connector requirements. Emerging products include a class of devices known as optical engines which permit assembly of the optical transceivers in close proximity to the electrical interfaces of ASICs and FPGAs which handle the data in parallel electrical format. Such assemblies will reduce required printed circuit board area and minimize electromagnetic interference and susceptibility. We will present test results of some of these parallel components and report on the development of pluggable FPGA Mezzanine Cards equipped with optical engines to provide to collaborators on the Versatile Link Common Project for the HI-LHC at CERN.

  15. High-risk facilities. Emergency management in nuclear, chemical and hazardous waste facilities; Hochrisikoanlagen. Notfallschutz bei Kernkraft-, Chemie- und Sondermuellanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloepfer, Michael (ed.) [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The book on emergency management in high-risk facilities covers the following topics: Change in the nuclear policy, risk management of high-risk facilities as a constitutional problem - emergency management in nuclear facilities, operational mechanisms of risk control in nuclear facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for nuclear facilities, operational mechanism of the risk control in chemical plants, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for chemical facilities, operational mechanisms of the risk control in hazardous waste facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for hazardous waste facilities, civil law consequences in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, criminal prosecution in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, safety margins as site risk for emission protection facilities, national emergency management - strategic emergency management structures, warning and self-protection of the public in case of CBRN hazards including aspects of the psych-social emergency management.

  16. Mortality of emergency abdominal surgery in high-, middle- and low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Surgical mortality data are collected routinely in high-income countries, yet virtually no low- or middle-income countries have outcome surveillance in place. The aim was prospectively to collect worldwide mortality data following emergency abdominal surgery, comparing findings across countries with a low, middle or high Human Development Index (HDI). This was a prospective, multicentre, cohort study. Self-selected hospitals performing emergency surgery submitted prespecified data for consecutive patients from at least one 2-week interval during July to December 2014. Postoperative mortality was analysed by hierarchical multivariable logistic regression. Data were obtained for 10 745 patients from 357 centres in 58 countries; 6538 were from high-, 2889 from middle- and 1318 from low-HDI settings. The overall mortality rate was 1·6 per cent at 24 h (high 1·1 per cent, middle 1·9 per cent, low 3·4 per cent; P high 4·5 per cent, middle 6·0 per cent, low 8·6 per cent; P surgery (high 74·2 per cent, middle 68·8 per cent, low 60·5 per cent). After adjustment, 30-day mortality remained higher in middle-income (odds ratio (OR) 2·78, 95 per cent c.i. 1·84 to 4·20) and low-income (OR 2·97, 1·84 to 4·81) countries. Surgical safety checklist use was less frequent in low- and middle-income countries, but when used was associated with reduced mortality at 30 days. Mortality is three times higher in low- compared with high-HDI countries even when adjusted for prognostic factors. Patient safety factors may have an important role. NCT02179112 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The bureaucratization of war: moral challenges exemplified by the covert lethal drone

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Richard; Barrie, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This article interrogates the bureaucratization of war, incarnate in the covert lethal drone. Bureaucracies are criticized typically for their complexity, inefficiency, and inflexibility. This article is concerned with their moral indifference. It explores killing, which is so highly administered, so morally remote, and of such scale, that we acknowledge a covert lethal program. This is a bureaucratized program of assassination in contravention of critical human rights. In this article, this ...

  18. High speed rail trends, technologies and operational patterns: a comparison of established and emerging networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto PALACIN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is set within the framework of the RailNewcastle Summer School program 2014 run by Newcastle University (UK. It presents a short history of high speed rail describing its main design and operational characteristics. The focus of the paper is on assessing the two key distinct models emerging from this trend: the Japanese or Shinkansen model and the French or TGV model. The study then applies these two models to an emerging high speed network such as the planned corridors in California (U.S. to assess the extent of applicability and suitability of applying established high speed models to the Californian network. The results suggest that a suitable possibility would be to apply the French model for the operational aspects given the similarities in terms of geography, population distribution and distance. Implementing the lessons learned from the Japanese model in terms of construction and infrastructure design would be more suitable given the striking similarities in geological characteristics linked to the latent earthquake threat.

  19. Evaluation of emerging parallel optical link technology for high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chramowicz, J.; Kwan, S.; Prosser, A.; Winchell, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Modern particle detectors utilize optical fiber links to deliver event data to upstream trigger and data processing systems. Future detector systems can benefit from the development of dense arrangements of high speed optical links emerging from industry advancements in transceiver technology. Supporting data transfers of up to 120 Gbps in each direction, optical engines permit assembly of the optical transceivers in close proximity to ASICs and FPGAs. Test results of some of these parallel components will be presented including the development of pluggable FPGA Mezzanine Cards equipped with optical engines to provide to collaborators on the Versatile Link Common Project for the HI-LHC at CERN.

  20. [Conditions and motivations for the work of nurses and physicians in high complexity emergency services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Antonio da Cruz Gouveia; de Araújo Júnior, José Luiz do Amaral Corrêa; Furtado, Betise Mery Alencar Souza Macau; Duarte, Petra Oliveira; da Silva, Ana Lúcia Andrade; Miranda, Gabriella Morais Duarte

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the motivations and conditions offered to the work of nurses and doctors in three high complexity emergency services of the city of Recife, Pernambuco. It is a descriptive transversal type study. It was interviewed 42 nurses and 84 doctors, of a total population of 97 nurses and 469 doctors. It was used a questionnaire prepared for this survey and the Scale of Values Related to Work. On the motivation assessment it was found that Professional Realization was the major motivational factor, and Prestige the less important factor.

  1. Virus-specific memory CD8 T cells provide substantial protection from lethal severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fett, Craig; Zhao, Jincun; Meyerholz, David K; Perlman, Stanley

    2014-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) caused an acute human respiratory illness with high morbidity and mortality in 2002-2003. Several studies have demonstrated the role of neutralizing antibodies induced by the spike (S) glycoprotein in protecting susceptible hosts from lethal infection. However, the anti-SARS-CoV antibody response is short-lived in patients who have recovered from SARS, making it critical to develop additional vaccine strategies. SARS-CoV-specific memory CD8 T cells persisted for up to 6 years after SARS-CoV infection, a time at which memory B cells and antivirus antibodies were undetectable in individuals who had recovered from SARS. In this study, we assessed the ability of virus-specific memory CD8 T cells to mediate protection against infection in the absence of SARS-CoV-specific memory CD4 T or B cells. We demonstrate that memory CD8 T cells specific for a single immunodominant epitope (S436 or S525) substantially protected 8- to 10-month-old mice from lethal SARS-CoV infection. Intravenous immunization with peptide-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) followed by intranasal boosting with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) encoding S436 or S525 resulted in accumulation of virus-specific memory CD8 T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), lungs, and spleen. Upon challenge with a lethal dose of SARS-CoV, virus-specific memory CD8 T cells efficiently produced multiple effector cytokines (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin 2 [IL-2]) and cytolytic molecules (granzyme B) and reduced lung viral loads. Overall, our results show that SARS-CoV-specific memory CD8 T cells protect susceptible hosts from lethal SARS-CoV infection, but they also suggest that SARS-CoV-specific CD4 T cell and antibody responses are necessary for complete protection. Virus-specific CD8 T cells are required for pathogen clearance following primary SARS-CoV infection. However, the role of SARS-CoV-specific memory CD

  2. A new lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingston, H.M. (Saint Mary' s Hospital, Manchester (UK). Regional Genetics Centre); Freeman, J.S. (Tameside General Hospital, Ashton-under-Lyne (UK). Dept. of Paediatrics); Hall, C.M. (Hospital for Sick Children, London (UK). Dept. of Paediatric Radiology)

    1991-02-01

    A neonate is described with a lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia associated with prenatal fractures and craniofacial abnormalities including microcephaly, exophthalmos, hypoplastic nose and mid-face, small jaw and nodular hyperplasia of the gums. Parental consanguinity suggests that an autosomal recessive mutation is the likely aetiology. (orig.).

  3. Guidebook for non-lethal experimentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulissen, J.J.M.; Rahimi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In the 2009-2011 timeframe, NATO conducts a capability based assessment of Non-Lethal Weapon (NLW) systems. The work, performed by the RTO study team SAS-078, involves the development of NLW requirement descriptions, which are put against a set of NLW systems. Gaps are likely to occur, indicating

  4. A lethal short rib syndrome without polydactyly.

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, R M

    1988-01-01

    A female infant is described with a lethal short rib syndrome, similar to a form of short rib-polydactyly syndrome but without polydactyly. It is felt that this infant has the same condition as that described by Beemer et al.

  5. Lethal ingestion of stored Amanita phalloides mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelmann, A; Mang, G; Schnorf-Huber, S

    2001-10-20

    We report the first case of a lethal Amanita phalloides intoxication from stored mushrooms. After picking the mushrooms were kept in a freezer for 7-8 months. This case is in accordance with the well-known stability of the amatoxins and demonstrates the possibility of A. phalloides poisoning at any time of year.

  6. Midline lethal granuloma complicating pregnancy: case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of midline lethal granuloma in a 28-year- old female Nigerian patient is reported. Oral, ocular and nasal lesions were present and these preceded a spontaneous abortion of a three month old pregnancy. The clinical course of the disease and its similarity to other granulomatous diseases, which are generally ...

  7. Prediction of Outcome After Emergency High-Risk Intra-abdominal Surgery Using the Surgical Apgar Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cihoric, Mirjana; Toft Tengberg, Line; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With current literature quoting mortality rates up to 45%, emergency high-risk abdominal surgery has, compared with elective surgery, a significantly greater risk of death and major complications. The Surgical Apgar Score (SAS) is predictive of outcome in elective surgery, but has never...... been validated exclusively in an emergency setting. METHODS: A consecutive prospective single-center cohort study of 355 adults undergoing emergency high-risk abdominal surgery between June 2013 and May 2014 is presented. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcome measures were...... emergency high-risk abdominal surgery. Despite its predictive value, the SAS cannot in its current version be recommended as a standalone prognostic tool in an emergency setting....

  8. Lethal and Sub-lethal Effects of Four Insecticides on the Aphidophagous Coccinellid Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depalo, Laura; Lanzoni, Alberto; Masetti, Antonio; Pasqualini, Edison; Burgio, Giovanni

    2017-12-05

    Conventional insecticide assays, which measure the effects of insecticide exposure on short-term mortality, overlook important traits, including persistence of toxicity or sub-lethal effects. Therefore, such approaches are especially inadequate for prediction of the overall impact of insecticides on beneficial arthropods. In this study, the side effects of four modern insecticides (chlorantraniliprole, emamectin benzoate, spinosad, and spirotetramat) on Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) were evaluated under laboratory conditions by exposition on treated potted plants. In addition to investigation of acute toxicity and persistence of harmful activity in both larvae and adults of A. bipunctata, demographic parameters were evaluated, to provide a comprehensive picture of the nontarget effects of these products. Field doses of the four insecticides caused detrimental effects to A. bipunctata; but in different ways. Overall, spinosad showed the best toxicological profile among the products tested. Emamectin benzoate could be considered a low-risk insecticide, but had high persistence. Chlorantraniliprole exhibited lethal effects on early instar larvae and adults, along with a long-lasting activity, instead spirotetramat showed a low impact on larval and adult mortality and can be considered a short-lived insecticide. However, demographic analysis demonstrated that chlorantraniliprole and spirotetramat caused sub-lethal effects. Our findings highlight that sole assessment of mortality can lead to underestimation of the full impact of pesticides on nontarget insects. Demographic analysis was demonstrated to be a sensitive method for detection of the sub-lethal effects of insecticides on A. bipunctata, and this approach should be considered for evaluation of insecticide selectivity. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Detection and mapping of a lethal locus in a eucalyptus hybrid population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barbosa Rosado

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to verify the existence of a lethal locus in a eucalyptus hybrid population, and to quantify the segregation distortion in the linkage group 3 of the Eucalyptus genome. A E. grandis x E. urophylla hybrid population, which segregates for rust resistance, was genotyped with 19 microsatellite markers belonging to linkage group 3 of the Eucalyptus genome. To quantify the segregation distortion, maximum likelihood (ML models, specific to outbreeding populations, were used. These models consider the observed marker genotypes and the lethal locus viability as parameters. The ML solutions were obtained using the expectation‑maximization algorithm. A lethal locus in the linkage group 3 was verified and mapped, with high confidence, between the microssatellites EMBRA 189 e EMBRA 122. This lethal locus causes an intense gametic selection from the male side. Its map position is 25 cM from the locus which controls the rust resistance in this population.

  10. High school dropouts in emerging adulthood: substance use, mental health problems, and crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Brandy R; Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Vaughn, Michael G

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the distribution of substance use, mental health, and criminal behavior among dropouts derived from a nationally representative sample of 18-25 year old (N = 19,312) emerging adults in the United States. Using public-use data from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this study employed multiple logistic regression with adjustments for complex survey sampling and compared high school dropouts with graduates with respect to substance use, mental health, and criminal behavior. After controlling for the effects of age, gender, race/ethnicity, family income, receipt of government assistance, employment status, and metropolitan population density, dropouts were more likely to meet criteria for nicotine dependence and report daily cigarette use, and more likely to report having attempted suicide in the previous year, been arrested for larceny, assault, drug possession or drug sales relative to their high school graduate counterparts. The findings of this study provide important insights and an initial epidemiologic portrait of mental health, substance use, and criminal behaviors of dropouts during emerging adulthood.

  11. The Potential Contributions of Lethal and Edema Toxins to the Pathogenesis of Anthrax Associated Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Q. Eichacker

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of Bacillus anthracis in the US and Europe over the past 10 years have emphasized the health threat this lethal bacteria poses even for developed parts of the world. In contrast to cutaneous anthrax, inhalational disease in the US during the 2001 outbreaks and the newly identified injectional drug use form of disease in the UK and Germany have been associated with relatively high mortality rates. One notable aspect of these cases has been the difficulty in supporting patients once shock has developed. Anthrax bacilli produce several different components which likely contribute to this shock. Growing evidence indicates that both major anthrax toxins may produce substantial cardiovascular dysfunction. Lethal toxin (LT can alter peripheral vascular function; it also has direct myocardial depressant effects. Edema toxin (ET may have even more pronounced peripheral vascular effects than LT, including the ability to interfere with the actions of conventional vasopressors. Additionally, ET also appears capable of interfering with renal sodium and water retention. Importantly, the two toxins exert their actions via quite different mechanisms and therefore have the potential to worsen shock and outcome in an additive fashion. Finally, both toxins have the ability to inhibit host defense and microbial clearance, possibly contributing to the very high bacterial loads noted in patients dying with anthrax. This last point is clinically relevant since emerging data has begun to implicate other bacterial components such as anthrax cell wall in the shock and organ injury observed with infection. Taken together, accumulating evidence regarding the potential contribution of LT and ET to anthrax-associated shock supports efforts to develop adjunctive therapies that target both toxins in patients with progressive shock.

  12. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of copper to the african catfish ( clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lethal and sub-lethal effects of copper on Clarias gariepinus were studied using a 96-hour static bioassay. Copper (as copper chloride, CuCl2 . H2O) was used to prepare the stock solution from which five standard concentrations 0.0, 1.8, 3.2, 5.6, and 10.0 mg/L were prepared (coded A – E). 15 juvenile C. gariepinus fish ...

  13. Left ventricular function during lethal and sublethal endotoxemia in swine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, R.D.; Nightingale, L.M.; Kish, P.; Weber, P.B.; Loegering, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    Previous studies suggested that after a median lethal dose (LD50) of endotoxin, cardiac contractility was depressed in nonsurviving dogs. The canine cardiovascular system is unlike humans in that dogs have a hepatic vein sphincter that is susceptible to adrenergic stimulation capable of raising hepatic and splanchnic venous pressures. The authors retested the hypothesis that lethality after endotoxin administration is associated with cardiac contractile depression in pigs, because of the hepatic circulation in this species is similar to that of humans. They compared cardiac mechanical function of pigs administered a high dose (250 g/kg) or a low dose (100 g/kg) endotoxin by use of the slope of the end-systolic pressure-diameter relationship (ESPDR) as well as other measurements of cardiac performance. In all the pigs administered a high dose, ESPDR demonstrated a marked, time-dependent depression whereas we observed no significant ESPDR changes after low endotoxin doses. The other cardiodynamic variables were uninterpretable, due to the significant changes in heart rate, end-diastolic diameter (preload), and aortic diastolic pressure (afterload). Plasma myocardia depressant factor activity accumulated in all endotoxin-administered animals, tending to be greater in the high-dose group. In this group, both subendocardial blood flow and global function were depressed, whereas pigs administered the low dose endotoxin demonstrated slight, but nonsignificant, increases in flow and function. These observations indicate that myocardial contractile depression is associated with a lethal outcome to high doses of endotoxin. Myocardial perfusion was measured using radiolabeled microspheres infused into the left atria.

  14. Epidemiologic comparison of injured high school basketball athletes reporting to emergency departments and the athletic training setting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fletcher, Erica N; McKenzie, Lara B; Comstock, R Dawn

    2014-01-01

    .... To compare patterns of athletes with basketball-related injuries presenting to US emergency departments from 2005 through 2010 and the high school athletic training setting from the 2005-2011 seasons...

  15. Hendra and Nipah infection: emerging paramyxoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljofan, Mohamad

    2013-11-06

    Since their first emergence in mid 1990s henipaviruses continued to re emerge in Australia and South East Asia almost every year. In total there has been more than 12 Nipah and 48 Hendra virus outbreaks reported in South East Asia and Australia, respectively. These outbreaks are associated with significant economic and health damages that most high risks countries (particularly in South East Asia) cannot bear the burden of such economical threats. Up until recently, there were no actual therapeutics available to treat or prevent these lethal infections. However, an international collaborative research has resulted in the identification of a potential equine Hendra vaccine capable of providing antibody protection against Hendra virus infections. Consequently, with the current findings and after nearly 2 decades since their first detection, are we there yet? This review recaps the chronicle of the henipavirus emergence and briefly evaluates potential anti-henipavirus vaccines and antivirals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Emergency response planning and sudden cardiac arrests in high schools after automated external defibrillator legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew M; Kannankeril, Prince J; Meredith, Mark

    2013-12-01

    To compare medical emergency response plan (MERP) and automated external defibrillator (AED) prevalence and define the incidence and outcomes of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in high schools before and after AED legislation. In 2011, Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association member schools were surveyed regarding AED placement, MERPs, and on-campus SCAs within the last 5 years. Results were compared with a similar study conducted in 2006, prior to legislation requiring AEDs in schools. Of the schools solicited, 214 (54%, total enrollment 182 289 students) completed the survey. Compared with 2006, schools in the 2011 survey had a significantly higher prevalence of MERPs (84% vs 71%, P medical emergency communication systems (80% vs 62%, P training (20% vs 17%, P = .58) or full compliance with American Heart Association guidelines (11% vs 7%, P = .16). Twenty-two SCA victims were identified, yielding a 5-year incidence of 1 in 10 schools. After state legislation, schools demonstrated a significant increase in MERPs and on-campus defibrillators but rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and overall compliance with guidelines remained low. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Emergence of the Dirac Electron System in a Single-Component Molecular Conductor under High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Reizo; Cui, HengBo; Tsumuraya, Takao; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Suzumura, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-08

    Single-component molecular conductors can provide a variety of electronic states. We demonstrate here that the Dirac electron system emerges in a single-component molecular conductor under high pressure. First-principles density functional theory calculations revealed that Dirac cones are formed in the single-component molecular conductor [Pd(dddt)2] (dddt = 5,6-dihydro-1,4-dithiin-2,3-dithiolate), which shows temperature-independent resistivity (zero-gap behavior) at 12.6 GPa. The Dirac cone formation in [Pd(dddt)2] can be understood by a tight-binding model. The Dirac points originate from the HOMO and LUMO bands, each of which is associated with different molecular layers. Overlap of these two bands provides a closed intersection at the Fermi level (Fermi line) if there is no HOMO-LUMO coupling. Two-step HOMO-LUMO couplings remove the degeneracy on the Fermi line, resulting in gap formation. The Dirac cones emerge at the points where the Fermi line intersects with a line on which the HOMO-LUMO coupling is zero.

  18. Are Simulation Stethoscopes a Useful Adjunct for Emergency Residents' Training on High-Fidelity Mannequins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Warrington

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medicine residents use simulation training for many reasons, such as gaining experience with critically ill patients and becoming familiar with disease processes. Residents frequently criticize simulation training using current high-fidelity mannequins due to the poor quality of physical exam findings present, such as auscultatory findings, as it may lead them down an alternate diagnostic or therapeutic pathway. Recently wireless remote programmed stethoscopes (simulation stethoscopes have been developed that allow wireless transmission of any sound to a stethoscope receiver, which improves the fidelity of a physical examination and the simulation case. Methods: Following institutional review committee approval, 14 PGY1-3 emergency medicine residents were assessed during 2 simulation-based cases using pre-defined scoring anchors on multiple actions, such as communication skills and treatment decisions (Appendix 1. Each case involved a patient presenting with dyspnea requiring management based off physical examination findings. One case was a patient with exacerbation of heart failure, while the other was a patient with a tension pneumothorax. Each resident was randomized into a case associated with the simulation stethoscope. Following the cases residents were asked to fill out an evaluation questionnaire. Results: Residents perceived the most realistic physical exam findings on those associated with the case using the simulation stethoscope (13/14, 93%. Residents also preferred the simulation stethoscope as an adjunct to the case (13/14, 93%, and they rated the simulation stethoscope case to have significantly more realistic auscultatory findings (4.4/5 vs. 3.0/5 difference of means 1.4, P = 0.0007. Average scores of residents were significantly better in the simulation stethoscope-associated case (2.5/3 vs. 2.3/3 difference of means 0.2, P = 0.04. There was no considerable difference in the total time taken per case

  19. Reconstructing the Lethal Part of the 1790 Eruption at Kilauea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, D.; Weaver, S. J.; Houghton, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    The most lethal known eruption from a volcano in the United States took place in November 1790 at Kilauea, killing perhaps 400-800 people (estimates range widely) who were crossing the summit on their way to a distant battle site. The eruption culminated ca. 300 years of sporadic explosive activity after the formation of Kilauea Caldera in about 1500. No contemporary account exists of the 1790 activity, but an eruption plume was observed from Kawaihae, 100 km NW of Kilauea, that probably was 10 km or higher. We are attempting to piece together the lethal event from a study of the 1790 and enclosing deposits and by using published accounts, written several decades later, based on interviews with survivors or others with knowledge of the tragedy. Determining what deposits actually formed in November 1790 is crucial. The best tie to that date is a deposit of phreatomagmatic lithic lapilli and ash that occurs SE of the caldera and must have been advected by high-level (>~10 km) westerly winds rather than low-level NE trade winds. It is the only contender for deposits from the high column observed in 1790. Small lapilli from the high column fell onto, and sank deeply into, a 3-5-cm-thick accretionary lapilli layer that was wet and likely no more than a few hours old. The wet ash occurs south of the caldera, where the lithic lapilli fell into it, and is also found west of the caldera in the saddle between Kilauea and Mauna Loa, where the victims were probably walking along a main foot trail still visible today. A lithic pyroclastic surge swept across the saddle, locally scouring away the wet accretionary lapilli layer but generally leaving a deposit think we have identified the lethal surge of the eruption, and it is sobering to realize that it overwhelmed the place where this abstract is being written 221 years later.

  20. Older adults and high-risk medication administration in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitchell Kim,1 Steven H Mitchell,1 Medley Gatewood,1 Katherine A Bennett,2 Paul R Sutton,3 Carol A Crawford,4 Itay Bentov,5 Mamatha Damodarasamy,2 Stephen J Kaplan,6 May J Reed2 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington, 2Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 3Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 4School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington, 6Section of General, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Background: Older adults are susceptible to adverse effects from opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, and benzodiazepines (BZDs. We investigated factors associated with the administration of elevated doses of these medications of interest to older adults (≥65 years old in the emergency department (ED.Patients and methods: ED records were queried for the administration of medications of interest to older adults at two academic medical center EDs over a 6-month period. Frequency of recommended versus elevated (“High doses” were defined as doses that ranged between 1.5 and 3 times higher than the recommended starting doses; “very high doses” were defined as higher than high doses starting doses of medications, as determined by geriatric pharmacy/medicine guidelines and expert consensus, was compared by age groups (65–69, 70–74, 75–79, 80–84, and ≥85 years, gender, and hospital.Results: There were 17896 visits representing 11374 unique patients >65 years of age (55.3% men, 44.7% women. A total of 3394 doses of medications of interest including 1678 high doses and 684 very high doses were administered to 1364 different patients. Administration of elevated doses of medications was more common than that of recommended doses. Focusing on opioids and

  1. Sub-lethal effects of pesticide residues in brood comb on worker honey bee (Apis mellifera development and longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Y Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous surveys reveal high levels of pesticide residue contamination in honey bee comb. We conducted studies to examine possible direct and indirect effects of pesticide exposure from contaminated brood comb on developing worker bees and adult worker lifespan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Worker bees were reared in brood comb containing high levels of known pesticide residues (treatment or in relatively uncontaminated brood comb (control. Delayed development was observed in bees reared in treatment combs containing high levels of pesticides particularly in the early stages (day 4 and 8 of worker bee development. Adult longevity was reduced by 4 days in bees exposed to pesticide residues in contaminated brood comb during development. Pesticide residue migration from comb containing high pesticide residues caused contamination of control comb after multiple brood cycles and provided insight on how quickly residues move through wax. Higher brood mortality and delayed adult emergence occurred after multiple brood cycles in contaminated control combs. In contrast, survivability increased in bees reared in treatment comb after multiple brood cycles when pesticide residues had been reduced in treatment combs due to residue migration into uncontaminated control combs, supporting comb replacement efforts. Chemical analysis after the experiment confirmed the migration of pesticide residues from treatment combs into previously uncontaminated control comb. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first to demonstrate sub-lethal effects on worker honey bees from pesticide residue exposure from contaminated brood comb. Sub-lethal effects, including delayed larval development and adult emergence or shortened adult longevity, can have indirect effects on the colony such as premature shifts in hive roles and foraging activity. In addition, longer development time for bees may provide a reproductive advantage for parasitic Varroa destructor

  2. Synthetic lethality to overcome cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, L; Quatrale, A E; Mantuano, P; Silvestris, N; Brunetti, A E; Calvert, H; Paradiso, A; Azzariti, A

    2012-01-01

    A large body of evidence point out that the onset of synthetic lethality may provide a useful tool for amplifying the efficacy of drugs in anticancer regimens, to uncover interdependence between genes and to identify predictive factors that would be extremely useful to guide in the selection of more effective targeted drugs and drug combinations for each patient. Here, we provide an overview on the exploitation of synthetic lethality to overcome drug resistance to conventional chemotherapy in several types of solid tumors. We report recent findings on cellular markers and gene mutations which are specifically essential for the viability of cancer cells and for resistance to chemotherapeutics. In addition, new molecularly targeted strategies to overcome drug resistance are suggested.

  3. Lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Yim, Chung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    We have detailed our experiences on 6 cases of neonatal lethal short-limbed dwarfism and reviewed the articles. They include, achondrogenesis, thanatophoric dysplasia, asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfect a congenita, and hypophosphatasia lethals. Five babies were born alive but died soon after birth and one was a stillbirth. The main cause of failure to thrive was respiratory insufficiency. Each case was having quite characteristic radiologic findings, even if the general appearances were similar to the achondroplasts clinically. Precise diagnosis is very important for genetic counselling of the parents and alarm to them the possibility of bone dysplasias to the next offsprings. For this purpose, the radiologists play major role for the correct diagnosis. We stress that when the baby is born with short-limbed dwarfism, whole body radiogram should be taken including lateral view and postmortem radiogram is also very precious.

  4. High Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography: An Emerging Tool for Small Animal Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Paulus

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Dedicated high-resolution small animal imaging systems have recently emerged as important new tools for cancer research. These new imaging systems permit researchers to noninvasively screen animals for mutations or pathologies and to monitor disease progression and response to therapy. One imaging modality, X-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT shows promise as a cost-effective means for detecting and characterizing soft-tissue structures, skeletal abnormalities, and tumors in live animals. MicroCT systems provide highresolution images (typically 50 microns or less, rapid data acquisition (typically 5 to 30 minutes, excellent sensitivity to skeletal tissue and good sensitivity to soft tissue, particularly when contrast-enhancing media are employed. The development of microCT technology for small animal imaging is reviewed, and key considerations for designing small animal microCT imaging protocols are summarized. Recent studies on mouse prostate, lung and bone tumor models are overviewed.

  5. High-speed detection of emergent market clustering via an unsupervised parallel genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Hendricks

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We implement a master-slave parallel genetic algorithm with a bespoke log-likelihood fitness function to identify emergent clusters within price evolutions. We use graphics processing units (GPUs to implement a parallel genetic algorithm and visualise the results using disjoint minimal spanning trees. We demonstrate that our GPU parallel genetic algorithm, implemented on a commercially available general purpose GPU, is able to recover stock clusters in sub-second speed, based on a subset of stocks in the South African market. This approach represents a pragmatic choice for low-cost, scalable parallel computing and is significantly faster than a prototype serial implementation in an optimised C-based fourth-generation programming language, although the results are not directly comparable because of compiler differences. Combined with fast online intraday correlation matrix estimation from high frequency data for cluster identification, the proposed implementation offers cost-effective, near-real-time risk assessment for financial practitioners.

  6. Emerging concepts in high-impact publishing: insights from the First Brazilian Colloquium on High Impact Research and Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Matarese

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Reports of scientific research are published by selective journals only when they meet stringent criteria, first and foremost of which are the quality and importance of the research. Even when the research is excellent, other elements come into play to determine if the manuscript will be accepted for publication. Many of these factors are under direct control of the researcher-author, but not all authors are aware of the elements of high-impact scientific writing. At the First Brazilian Colloquium on High Impact Research and Publishing, editors of leading biomedical journals provided insight on the aspects of scientific reporting that favor acceptance (or immediate rejection. This commentary summarizes the editors' advice and uses the debate that followed as the basis for analyzing emerging concepts in high-impact publishing. Lessons learned from this meeting are relevant to researcher-authors in other non-anglophone countries as well as to their educators and administrators who wish to improve the impact of the research that they support and finance.

  7. Short rib polydactyly syndrome: lethal skeletal dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Huertas, Erasmo; 1 Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal. Lima, Perú. 2 Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú.; Íngar, Jaime; 1 Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal. Lima, Perú. 2 Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Particular San Martín de Porres. Lima, Perú.; Gutiérrez, Guiselle; 1 Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal. Lima, Perú. 2 Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú.; Quiñones, Eva María; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Particular San Martín de Porres. Lima, Perú.

    2011-01-01

    Short rib-polydactyly syndrome is a descriptive category for a group of lethal skeletal dysplasias characterized by hypoplastic thorax, short ribs, short limbs, polydactyly, and visceral abnormalities. The 4 established variants are SRPS I (Saldino-Noonan type), SRPS II (Majewski type; 263520), SRPS III (Verma-Naumoff type; 263510), and SRPS IV (Beemer-Langer type; 269860). All variants are thought to be inherited in autosomal recessive pattern. Because of the frequent phenotype overlap there...

  8. Lethal injection for execution: chemical asphyxiation?

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmers, Teresa A.; Jonathan Sheldon; Lubarsky, David A; Francisco López-Muñoz; Linda Waterman; Richard Weisman; Koniaris, Leonidas G.

    2007-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Lethal injection is a common form of execution in a number of countries, most prominently the US and China. The protocols currently used in the US contain three drugs: an ultrashort-acting barbiturate, thiopental (which acts as an anesthetic, but does not have any analgesic effect); a neuromuscular blocker, pancuronium bromide (which causes muscle paralysis); and an electrolyte, potassium chloride (which stops the heart from beating). Each of these drugs on its ow...

  9. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    OpenAIRE

    Nohemi Sala; Juan Luis Arsuaga; Ana Pantoja-Pérez; Adrián Pablos; Ignacio Martínez; Quam, Rolf M.; Asier Gómez-Olivencia; José María Bermúdez de Castro; Eudald Carbonell

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force ...

  10. Lethal midline granuloma syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (HUCFF-UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Ana Luiza Vianna Sobral de Magalhaes [Resident of Medical Practice, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marchon Junior, Joao Luiz [Unit of Computed Tomography, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The rare lethal midline granuloma syndrome is difficult to diagnose because of the wide array of related diseases and lack of knowledge by the majority of physicians. In the present report, the authors describe the case of a patient with this disease, caused by squamous cell carcinoma, drawing attention to differential diagnoses and to clinical and radiological findings that may be useful to define the diagnosis. (author)

  11. Alcohol use trajectories after high school graduation among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Kathleen M; Stupiansky, Nathan W; Weaver, Michael T; Slaven, James E; Stump, Timothy E

    2014-08-01

    To explore alcohol involvement trajectories and associated factors during the year post-high school (HS) graduation among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Youth (N = 181) self-reported alcohol use at baseline and every 3 months for 1 year post-HS graduation. Data were also collected on parent-youth conflict, diabetes self-efficacy, major life events, living and educational situations, diabetes management, marijuana use, cigarette smoking, and glycemic control. Trajectories of alcohol use were modeled using latent class growth analysis. Associations between trajectory class and specific salient variables were examined using analysis of variance, chi square, or generalized linear mixed model, as appropriate. Identified alcohol involvement trajectory classes were labeled as (1) consistent involvement group (n = 25, 13.8%) with stable, high use relative to other groups over the 12 months; (2) growing involvement group (n = 55, 30.4%) with increasing use throughout the 12 months; and (3) minimal involvement group (n = 101, 55.8%) with essentially no involvement until the ninth month. Those with minimal involvement had the best diabetes management and better diabetes self-efficacy than those with consistent involvement. In comparison with those minimally involved, those with growing involvement were more likely to live independently of parents; those consistently involved had more major life events; and both the growing and consistent involvement groups were more likely to have tried marijuana and cigarettes. This sample of emerging adults with type 1 diabetes has three unique patterns of alcohol use during the first year after HS. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Maximal tachycardia and high cardiac strain during night shifts of emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutheil, Frédéric; Marhar, Fouad; Boudet, Gil; Perrier, Christophe; Naughton, Geraldine; Chamoux, Alain; Huguet, Pascal; Mermillod, Martial; Saâdaoui, Foued; Moustafa, Farès; Schmidt, Jeannot

    2017-08-01

    To compare tachycardia and cardiac strain between 24-hour shifts (24hS) and 14-hour night shifts (14hS) in emergency physicians (EPs), and to investigate key factors influencing tachycardia and cardiac strain. We monitored heart rate (HR) with Holter-ECG in a shift-randomized trial comparing a 24hS, a 14hS, and a control day, within a potential for 19 EPs. We also measured 24-h HR the third day (D3) after both shifts. We measured perceived stress by visual analog scale and the number of life-and-death emergencies. The 17 EPs completing the whole protocol reached maximal HR (180.9 ± 6.9 bpm) during both shifts. Minutes of tachycardia >100 bpm were higher in 24hS (208.3 ± 63.8) than in any other days (14hS: 142.3 ± 36.9; D3/14hS: 64.8 ± 31.4; D3/24hS: 57.6 ± 19.1; control day: 39.2 ± 11.6 min, p < .05). Shifts induced a cardiac strain twice higher than in days not involving patients contact. Each life-and-death emergency enhanced 26 min of tachycardia ≥100 bpm (p < .001), 7 min ≥ 110 bpm (p < .001), 2 min ≥ 120 bpm (p < .001) and 19 min of cardiac strain ≥30% (p = .014). Stress was associated with greater duration of tachycardia ≥100, 110 and 120 bpm, and of cardiac strain ≥30% (p < .001). We demonstrated several incidences of maximal HR during shifts combined with a high cardiac strain. Duration of tachycardia were the highest in 24hS and lasted several hours. Such values are comparable to those of workers exposed to high physical demanding tasks or heat. Therefore, we suggest that EPs limit their exposure to 24hS. We, furthermore, demonstrated benefits of HR monitoring for identifying stressful events. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01874704.

  13. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  14. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohemi Sala

    Full Text Available Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  15. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin. PMID:26018668

  16. Predicting Psychosocial Maladjustment in Emerging Adulthood From High School Experiences of Peer Victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Carie M; McDougall, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare recollections of sexual, physical, verbal, social, and cyber peer victimization experienced in high school in terms of depressed affect, self-esteem, and loneliness experienced in university. In all, 247 university students (70 males and 177 females; M = 20.62, SD = 2.54) completed online measures assessing retrospective accounts of their experiences of different forms of peer victimization during high school (i.e., sexual, physical, verbal, social, and cyber) and their current psychosocial adjustment (i.e., self-esteem, depressed affect, and loneliness). Three separate hierarchical multiple regressions were conducted to determine whether different indices of negative psychosocial adjustment are more strongly predicted by experiencing sexual or nonsexual forms of peer victimization. Although many university students recalled experiencing sexual peer victimization in high school at least once at an even higher percentage than verbal and social forms of peer victimization, the results of the present study suggest that social peer victimization in high school predicts higher levels of depressed affect and loneliness in university students than sexual peer victimization experienced in high school. Surprisingly, the young adults reporting higher levels of cyber peer victimization in high school were less lonely in university. Although the hypothesized relationships between each form of peer victimization and specific indices of psychosocial functioning were not consistently supported, these findings suggest that the form of peer victimization matters and may be differentially associated with well-being in emerging adulthood. It is important that future research explores how individual characteristics may further predict varied experiences of peer victimization and the long-term impact of those experiences.

  17. Emergency contraceptive pill in high school students at Popayán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Eugenia Bastidas-Sánchez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Emergency Contraceptive Pill (ECP is a hormonal method used by women to prevent an unintended pregnancy after unprotected intercourse. Objective: To determine the practice of the ECP in high school students at the Escuela Normal Superior de Popayan in the second semester of 2011. Methodology: It was performed as a descriptive quantitative cross-sectional study for 98 high school students by applying a survey conducted by the research group had the framework previous studies on the use of ECP in school population at regional and international levels. The instrument included 24 items; the information collected was processed in SPSS. The sample size was calculated based on a population of 723 students (EpiInfo; the type of sampling that was included multistage stratified random sampling (applied by degrees and simple random (applied within each grade. Results: 14,3% of students used the ECP; 31,2% had initiated sexual intercourse and of these, 50%, had used ECP, that as a contraceptive was second in frequency after the condom (79,8 and 39,9% respectively. Conclusions: The ECP has a high prevalence of use in the students, which makes it the second contraceptive method more used.

  18. Emergency positioning system accuracy with infrared LEDs in high-security facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Sierra N.; Nelson, Charles; Walker, Owens

    2017-05-01

    Instantaneous personnel location presents a challenge in Department of Defense applications where high levels of security restrict real-time tracking of crew members. During emergency situations, command and control requires immediate accountability of all personnel. Current radio frequency (RF) based indoor positioning systems can be unsuitable due to RF leakage and electromagnetic interference with sensitively calibrated machinery on variable platforms like ships, submarines and high-security facilities. Infrared light provide a possible solution to this problem. This paper proposes and evaluates an indoor line-of-sight positioning system that is comprised of IR and high-sensitivity CMOS camera receivers. In this system the movement of the LEDs is captured by the camera, uploaded and analyzed; the highest point of power is located and plotted to create a blueprint of crewmember location. Results provided evaluate accuracy as a function of both wavelength and environmental conditions. Research will further evaluate the accuracy of the LED transmitter and CMOS camera receiver system. Transmissions in both the 780 and 850nm IR are analyzed.

  19. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of UVB on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas, Debbie S; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T

    2006-11-01

    Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290-320nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild-type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects.

  20. Emergence of NDM-1-positive capsulated Escherichia coli with high resistance to serum killing in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Takano, Tomomi; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Hishinuma, Akira

    2011-06-01

    The New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) gene, bla (NDM-1), is an emerging plasmid-borne drug resistance gene, which encodes for exceptionally broad-spectrum β-lactamase, being able to hydrolyze a wide variety of β-lactams, including carbapenems, and was first reported in Klebsiella pneumoniae from a Swedish patient of Indian origin in 2009. It is widely distributed among Enterobacteriacae and has geographically exhibited extremely rapid and global spread. In this study, we characterized the bla (NDM-1)-positive ST38 Escherichia coli strain NDM-1 Dok01 (which was isolated from the blood of a 54-year-old Japanese inpatient, who had previously visited India), focusing on bacterial surface structures related to virulence. The E. coli culture contained colony variants, which developed a transparent smooth colony and a rough colony on blood agar plates. The smooth colony-forming cells (substrain M1) possessed a surface capsule and were resistant to serum killing, whereas rough colony-forming mutants (substrain B2) lacked a capsule (and a 5.3-kb plasmid) and were highly susceptible to serum killing. Reflecting the surface structural difference, substrain M1 was more flagellated and motile, whereas substrain B2 was less flagellated and apparently possessed straight pili 5 nm wide, which played a role in adherence to human intestinal cells and bacterial autoaggregation. Data suggest that the bla (NDM-1)-positive ST38 E. coli has emerged in Japan and that it is a capsulated bacterial pathogen with virulence potential in the blood stream.

  1. Active and passive immunization protects against lethal, extreme drug resistant-Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanpingshen Luo

    Full Text Available Extreme-drug-resistant (XDR Acinetobacter baumannii is a rapidly emerging pathogen causing infections with unacceptably high mortality rates due to inadequate available treatment. New methods to prevent and treat such infections are a critical unmet medical need. To conduct a rational vaccine discovery program, OmpA was identified as the primary target of humoral immune response after intravenous infection by A. baumannii in mice. OmpA was >99% conserved at the amino acid level across clinical isolates harvested between 1951 and 2009 from cerebrospinal fluid, blood, lung, and wound infections, including carbapenem-resistant isolates, and was ≥89% conserved among other sequenced strains, but had minimal homology to the human proteome. Vaccination of diabetic mice with recombinant OmpA (rOmpA with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant markedly improved survival and reduced tissue bacterial burden in mice infected intravenously. Vaccination induced high titers of anti-OmpA antibodies, the levels of which correlated with survival in mice. Passive transfer with immune sera recapitulated protection. Immune sera did not enhance complement-mediated killing but did enhance opsonophagocytic killing of A. baumannii. These results define active and passive immunization strategies to prevent and treat highly lethal, XDR A. baumannii infections.

  2. Centrifugal positive displacement pumps for emergency transfer of high-viscosity petrochemical cargoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, J.B.; Hackman, D.J.; Tierney, J.M.

    1978-05-01

    Centrifugal positive displacement pumps for emergency transfer of high-viscosity petrochemical cargoes from tankers which ground or sink may require heating of the cargo to lower its viscosity before it can be pumped. Since the energy needed for heating can be much greater than that required for pumping, and because the flow rate is highly dependent on the oil temperature, the amount of heat added must be optimized. To accurately compare the pumping and heating energy inputs, both must be converted into fuel input. The actual heat input is simply divided by a 75Vertical Bar3< boiler efficiency. Assume that the pumping power comes from a diesel engine consuming 0.4 lb of fuel/bhp at 18,000 Btu/lb and that power is transmitted by an 80Vertical Bar3< efficient hydraulic transmission for an over-all conversion factor of 150 Btu/hp min. Once these conversions are made, the pumping and heating energies can be added directly to find total energy in Btu/min.

  3. The emergence of high-performance multi-crystalline silicon in photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, C. W.; Lan, A.; Yang, C. F.; Hsu, H. P.; Yang, M.; Yu, A.; Hsu, B.; Hsu, W. C.; Yang, A.

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of the high-performance multi-crystalline silicon (HP mc-Si) in 2011 has made a significant impact to photovoltaic industry. In addition to the much better ingot uniformity and production yield, HP mc-Si also has better material quality for solar cells. As a result, the average efficiency of solar cells made from HP mc-Si in production increased from 16.6% in 2011 to 18.5% or beyond in 2016. More importantly, the efficiency distribution became much narrower; the difference from various producers became smaller as well. Unlike the conventional way of having large grains and electrically-inactive twin boundaries, the crystal growth of HP mc-Si by directional solidification is initiated from uniform small grains having a high fraction of random grain boundaries. The grains developed from such grain structures significantly relax thermal stress and suppress the massive generation and propagation of dislocation clusters. The gettering efficacy of HP mc-Si is also superior to the conventional one. Nowadays, most of commercial mc-Si is grown by this approach, which could be implemented by either seeded with silicon particles or controlled nucleation, e.g., using nucleation agent coating. The future improvement of this technology will also be discussed in this review.

  4. Prognosis of emergency room stabilization of decompensated congestive heart failure with high dose lasix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboob Pouraghaei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Congestive heart failure (CHF has become one of the most important health care problems in western countries. This article focuses on the outpatient diagnosis and management of heart failure. We want to compare the outcome of patients who were treated with high dose diuretics in the emergency department (ED without admission with patients who were admitted to hospital for standard treatment. Methods: This was a randomized prospective clinical trial study. The patients who came to the ED from March 20, 2008 up to August 20, 2008 were divided into two groups randomly. The length of ED stay in the experimental group was documented. Also, readmission and mortality in 6 months and satisfaction in both groups were taken into consideration. All data were analyzed using SPSS 15.0. Results: In experimental group, the rate of recurrent admission, expiration, discharge, clinic visit, and clinic admission was 8%, 4%, 29%, 18%, and 0% respectively. On the other hand, in control group it was 16%, 40%, 18%, 22%, and 2% respectively. Additionally, there was a significant difference between these groups (P = 0.00. Conclusion: This study is the first regional prospective trial to comprehensively examine the therapeutic management in patients with CHF. This study, comparing the high dose diuretic efficacy in the decreasing of hospital stay and readmission; and decreasing mortality rate with routine therapy, showed that there was a significant difference between these two strategies in the mortality rate, readmission, and length of hospital stay (P = 0.00.

  5. Identifying adolescents at highly elevated risk for suicidal behavior in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cheryl A; Berona, Johnny; Czyz, Ewa; Horwitz, Adam G; Gipson, Polly Y

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility and concurrent validity of adolescent suicide risk screening in medical emergency departments (EDs) has been documented. The objectives of this short-term prospective study of adolescents who screened positive for suicide risk in the ED were: 1) to examine adolescents' rate of suicidal behavior during the 2 months following their ED visits and compare it with reported rates for psychiatric samples; and 2) to identify possible predictors of acute risk for suicidal behavior in this at-risk sample. Participants were 81 adolescents, ages 14-19 years, seeking services for psychiatric and nonpsychiatric chief complaints, who screened positive for suicide risk because of recent suicidal ideation, a suicide attempt, and/or depression plus alcohol or substance misuse. A comprehensive assessment of suicidal behavior, using the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, was conducted at baseline and 2 month follow-up. Six adolescents (7.4%) reported a suicide attempt and 15 (18.5%) engaged in some type of suicidal behavior (actual, aborted, or interrupted suicide attempt; preparatory behavior) during the 2 months following their ED visit. These rates suggest that this screen identified a high-risk sample. Furthermore, adolescents who screened positive for suicidal ideation and/or attempt plus depression and alcohol/substance misuse were most likely to engage in future suicidal behavior (38.9%). In this study, use of a higher screen threshold (multiple suicide risk factors) showed promise for identifying highly elevated acute risk for suicidal behavior.

  6. Cost of specific emergency general surgery diseases and factors associated with high-cost patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogola, Gerald O; Shafi, Shahid

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown that overall cost of hospitalization for emergency general surgery (EGS) diseases is more than $28 billion annually and rising. The purposes of this study were to estimate the costs associated with specific EGS diseases and to identify factors associated with high-cost hospitalizations. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma definition was used to identify hospitalizations of adult EGS patients in the 2010 National Inpatient Sample data. Cost of each hospitalization was obtained using cost-to-charge ratio in National Inpatient Sample. Regression analysis was used to estimate the cost for each EGS disease adjusted for patient and hospital characteristics. Hospitalizations with cost exceeding 75th percentile for each EGS disease were compared with lower-cost hospitalizations to identify factors associated with high cost. Thirty-one EGS diseases resulted in 2,602,074 hospitalizations nationwide in 2010 at an average adjusted cost of $10,110 (95% confidence interval, $10,086-$10,134) per hospitalization. Of these, only nine diseases constituted 80% of the total volume and 74% of the total cost. Empyema chest, colorectal cancer, and small intestine cancer were the most expensive EGS diseases with adjusted mean cost per hospitalization exceeding $20,000, while breast infection, abdominal pain, and soft tissue infection were the least expensive, with mean adjusted costs of less than $7,000 per hospitalization. The most important factors associated with high-cost hospitalizations were the number and type of procedures performed (76.2% of variance), but a region in Western United States (11.3%), Medicare and Medicaid payors (2.6%), and hospital ownership by public or not-for-profit entities (5.6%) were also associated with high-cost hospitalizations. A small number of diseases constitute a vast majority of EGS hospitalizations and their cost. Attempts at reducing the cost of EGS hospitalization will require controlling the cost of

  7. The Consequences of Commercialization Choices for New Entrants in High-Tech Industries: A Venture Emergence Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giones, Ferran; Gurses, Kerem

    for these different markets. We test our hypotheses on longitudinal dataset of 453 new firms started in 2004 in different high-tech industries in the US. We find that that technology and human capital resources favor the adoption of alternative commercialization strategies; nevertheless, we do not observe significant...... differences in the venture emergence or survival likelihood. Our findings offer a closer view of the venture emergence process of new firms, clarifying the causes and consequences of the technology commercialization choices....

  8. Short time synthesis of high quality carbon nanotubes with high rates by CVD of methane on continuously emerged iron nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Behnam, E-mail: bahrami@email.sc.edu [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi, Abasali [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, Yadollah, E-mail: mortazav@ut.ac.ir [Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaieli, Mohamad [Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We report the variation of yield and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane on iron oxide-MgO at 900-1000 deg. C for 1-60 min. The catalyst was prepared by impregnation of MgO powder with iron nitrate, dried, and calcined at 300 deg. C. As calcined and unreduced catalyst in quartz reactor was brought to the synthesis temperature in helium flow in a few minutes, and then the flow was switched to methane. The iron oxide was reduced to iron nanoparticles in methane, while the CNTs were growing. TEM micrographs, in accordance with Raman RBM peaks, indicate the formation of mostly single wall carbon nanotubes of about 1.0 nm size. High quality CNTs with I{sub G}/I{sub D} Raman peak ratio of 14.5 are formed in the first minute of CNTs synthesis with the highest rate. Both the rate and quality of CNTs degrades with increasing CNTs synthesis time. Also CNTs quality sharply declines with temperature in the range of 900-1000 deg. C, while the CNTs yield passes through a maximum at 950 deg. C. About the same CNTs lengths are formed for the whole range of the synthesis times. A model of continuous emergence of iron nanoparticle seeds for CNTs synthesis may explain the data. The data can also provide information for continuous production of CNTs in a fluidized bed reactor.

  9. Degree of Suicide Intent and the Lethality of Means Employed: A Study of Chinese Attempters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jie; Xu, Huilan

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if there is a relationship between the degree of suicide intent and the lethality of means employed by those who try to kill themselves. The study sample consists of 74 suicide attempters admitted to emergency rooms in a northeastern area of China. Structured interviews were performed with the patients and their companions to the hospital if necessary. It was found that the reason for the suicide attempt claimed by the highest percentage of attempters (35 ...

  10. Physician-staffed emergency helicopter reduces transportation time from alarm call to highly specialized centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjaeldstad, A.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since 2007, the number of Danish emergency departments has decreased from 44 to 21. Longer distances to specialized treatment have increased the demand for advanced prehospital treatment. A Danish 24/7 Helicopter Emergency Medical System (HEMS) project in western Denmark was initiated...

  11. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    National reports recommended that peri-operative care should be improved for elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. Postoperative mortality and morbidity rates remain high, and indicate that emergency ruptured aneurysm repair, laparotomy and hip fracture fixation are high-risk procedures...... undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...

  12. Does the knowledge of emergency contraception affect its use among high school adolescents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Borges do Nascimento Chofakian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to test how knowledge on emergency contraception (according to age at sexual initiation, type of school, and knowing someone that has already used emergency contraception influences the method’s use. This was a cross-sectional study in a probabilistic sample of students 15-19 years of age enrolled in public and private middle schools in a medium-sized city in Southeast Brazil (n = 307. Data were collected in 2011 using a self-administered questionnaire. A structural equations model was used for the data analysis. Considering age at sexual initiation and type of school, knowledge of emergency contraception was not associated with its use, but knowing someone that had used the method showed a significant mean effect on use of emergency contraception. Peer group conversations on emergency contraception appear to have greater influence on use of the method than knowledge itself, economic status, or sexual experience.

  13. Conditional embryonic lethality to improve the sterile insect technique in Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetelig, Marc F; Caceres, Carlos; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Franz, Gerald; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2009-01-01

    Background The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an environment-friendly method used in area-wide pest management of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae). Ionizing radiation used to generate reproductive sterility in the mass-reared populations before release leads to reduction of competitiveness. Results Here, we present a first alternative reproductive sterility system for medfly based on transgenic embryonic lethality. This system is dependent on newly isolated medfly promoter/enhancer elements of cellularization-specifically-expressed genes. These elements act differently in expression strength and their ability to drive lethal effector gene activation. Moreover, position effects strongly influence the efficiency of the system. Out of 60 combinations of driver and effector construct integrations, several lines resulted in larval and pupal lethality with one line showing complete embryonic lethality. This line was highly competitive to wildtype medfly in laboratory and field cage tests. Conclusion The high competitiveness of the transgenic lines and the achieved 100% embryonic lethality causing reproductive sterility without the need of irradiation can improve the efficacy of operational medfly SIT programs. PMID:19173707

  14. Tolerization with BLP down-regulates HMGB1 a critical mediator of sepsis-related lethality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tolerization with bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) affords a significant survival benefit in sepsis. Given that high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is a recognized mediator of sepsis-related lethality, we determined if tolerization with BLP leads to alterations in HMGB1. In vitro, BLP tolerization led to a reduction in HMGB1 gene transcription. This was mirrored at the protein level, as HMGB1 protein expression and release were reduced significantly in BLP-tolerized human THP-1 monocytic cells. BLP tolerance in vivo led to a highly significant, long-term survival benefit following challenge with lethal dose BLP in C57BL\\/6 mice. This was associated with an attenuation of HMGB1 release into the circulation, as evidenced by negligible serum HMGB1 levels in BLP-tolerized mice. Moreover, HMGB1 levels in peritoneal macrophages from BLP-tolerized mice were reduced significantly. Hence, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1 protein synthesis and release. The improved survival associated with BLP tolerance could thus be explained by a reduction in HMGB1, were the latter associated with lethality in BLP-related sepsis. In testing this hypothesis, it was noted that neutralization of HMGB1, using anti-HMGB1 antibodies, abrogated BLP-associated lethality almost completely. To conclude, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1, thus offering a novel means of targeting the latter. HMGB1 is also a mediator of lethality in BLP-related sepsis.

  15. Conditional embryonic lethality to improve the sterile insect technique in Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sterile insect technique (SIT is an environment-friendly method used in area-wide pest management of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann; Diptera: Tephritidae. Ionizing radiation used to generate reproductive sterility in the mass-reared populations before release leads to reduction of competitiveness. Results Here, we present a first alternative reproductive sterility system for medfly based on transgenic embryonic lethality. This system is dependent on newly isolated medfly promoter/enhancer elements of cellularization-specifically-expressed genes. These elements act differently in expression strength and their ability to drive lethal effector gene activation. Moreover, position effects strongly influence the efficiency of the system. Out of 60 combinations of driver and effector construct integrations, several lines resulted in larval and pupal lethality with one line showing complete embryonic lethality. This line was highly competitive to wildtype medfly in laboratory and field cage tests. Conclusion The high competitiveness of the transgenic lines and the achieved 100% embryonic lethality causing reproductive sterility without the need of irradiation can improve the efficacy of operational medfly SIT programs.

  16. High Risk of Graft Failure in Emerging Adult Heart Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B J; Dahhou, M; Zhang, X; Dharnidharka, V; Ng, V; Conway, J

    2015-12-01

    Emerging adulthood (17-24 years) is a period of high risk for graft failure in kidney transplant. Whether a similar association exists in heart transplant recipients is unknown. We sought to estimate the relative hazards of graft failure at different current ages, compared with patients between 20 and 24 years old. We evaluated 11 473 patients recorded in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients who received a first transplant at <40 years old (1988-2013) and had at least 6 months of graft function. Time-dependent Cox models were used to estimate the association between current age (time-dependent) and failure risk, adjusted for time since transplant and other potential confounders. Failure was defined as death following graft failure or retransplant; observation was censored at death with graft function. There were 2567 failures. Crude age-specific graft failure rates were highest in 21-24 year olds (4.2 per 100 person-years). Compared to individuals with the same time since transplant, 21-24 year olds had significantly higher failure rates than all other age periods except 17-20 years (HR 0.92 [95%CI 0.77, 1.09]) and 25-29 years (0.86 [0.73, 1.03]). Among young first heart transplant recipients, graft failure risks are highest in the period from 17 to 29 years of age. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  17. High Emergence of ESBL-Producing E. coli Cystitis: Time to Get Smarter in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantas, Leon; Suer, Kaya; Guler, Emrah; Imir, Turgut

    2015-01-01

    Widespread prevalence of extended-spectrum βeta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-producing E. coli) limits the infection therapeutic options and is a growing global health problem. In this study our aim was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profile of the E. coli in hospitalized and out-patients in Cyprus. During the period 2010-2014, 389 strains of E. coli were isolated from urine samples of hospitalized and out-patients in Cyprus. ESBL-producing E. coli, was observed in 53% of hospitalized and 44% in out-patients, latest one being in 2014. All ESBL-producing E. coli remained susceptible to amikacin, carbapenems except ertapenem (in-patients = 6%, out-patients = 11%). High emerging ESBL-producing E. coli from urine samples in hospitalized and out-patients is an extremely worrisome sign of development of untreatable infections in the near future on the island. We therefore emphasize the immediate need for establishment of optimal therapy guidelines based on the country specific surveillance programs. The need for new treatment strategies, urgent prescription habit changes and ban of over-the-counter sale of antimicrobials at each segment of healthcare services is also discussed in this research.

  18. [Effects of high +Gx during simulated spaceship emergency return on learning and memory in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-peng; Sun, Xi-qing; Liu, Ting-song; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Shu; Wu, Ping

    2005-02-01

    To observe the effects of high +Gx during simulated spaceship emergency return on learning and memory in rats. Thirty two male SD rats were randomly divided into control group, 7 d simulated weightlessness group, +15 Gx/180 s group and +15 Gx/180 s exposure after 7 d simulated weightlessness group, with 8 rats in each group. The changes of learning and memory in rats were measured after stresses by means of Y-maze test and step-through test. In Y-maze test, as compared with control group, percentage of correct reactions decreased significantly (Pstress; as compared with +15 Gx group or simulated weightlessness group, percentage of correct reactions decreased significantly (Pstress. In step-through test, as compared with control group, total time increased significantly (Pstress; latent time decreased significantly (Pstress. As compared with +15 Gx group, total time increased significantly (Pstress. As compared with simulated weightlessness group, total time and number of errors increased significantly (Pstress. It is suggested that +15 Gx/180 s and simulated weightlessness may affect the ability of learning and memory of rats. Simulated weightlessness for 7 d can aggravate the effect of +Gx on learning and memory ability in rats.

  19. Issues surrounding lethal injection as a means of capital punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Frank; Whisman, Tyler; Fink, Joseph L

    2008-12-01

    Lethal injection as a method of state-sanctioned capital punishment was initially proposed in the United States in 1977 and used for the first time in 1982. Most lethal injection protocols use a sequential drug combination of sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide, and potassium chloride. Lethal injection was originally introduced as a more humane form of execution compared with existing mechanical methods such as electrocution, toxic gassing, hanging, or firing squad. Lethal injection has not, however, been without controversy. Several states are considering whether lethal injection meets constitutional scrutiny forbidding cruel and unusual punishment. Recently in the case of Ralph Baze and Thomas C. Bowling, Petitioners, v John D. Rees, Commissioner, Kentucky Department of Corrections et al, the United States Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the lethal injection protocol as carried out in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Most of the debate has surrounded the dosing and procedures used in lethal injection and whether the drug combinations and measures for administering the drugs truly produce a timely, pain-free, and fail-safe death. Many have also raised issues regarding the "medicalization" of execution and the ethics of health care professionals' participation in any part of the lethal injection process. As a result of all these issues, the future of lethal injection as a means of execution in the United States is under significant scrutiny. Outcomes of ongoing legislative and judicial reviews might result in cessation of lethal injection in totality or in alterations involving specific drug combinations or administration procedures.

  20. Firearm Violence Among High-Risk Emergency Department Youth After an Assault Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Maureen A.; Roehler, Douglas R.; Goldstick, Jason; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Blow, Frederic C.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk for firearm violence among high-risk youth after treatment for an assault is unknown. METHODS: In this 2-year prospective cohort study, data were analyzed from a consecutive sample of 14- to 24-year-olds with drug use in the past 6 months seeking assault-injury care (AIG) at an urban level 1 emergency department (ED) compared with a proportionally sampled comparison group (CG) of drug-using nonassaulted youth. Validated measures were administered at baseline and follow-up (6, 12, 18, 24 months). RESULTS: A total of 349 AIG and 250 CG youth were followed for 24 months. During the follow-up period, 59% of the AIG reported firearm violence, a 40% higher risk than was observed among the CG (59.0% vs. 42.5%; relative risk [RR] = 1.39). Among those reporting firearm violence, 31.7% reported aggression, and 96.4% reported victimization, including 19 firearm injuries requiring medical care and 2 homicides. The majority with firearm violence (63.5%) reported at least 1 event within the first 6 months. Poisson regression identified baseline predictors of firearm violence, including male gender (RR = 1.51), African American race (RR = 1.26), assault-injury (RR = 1.35), firearm possession (RR = 1.23), attitudes favoring retaliation (RR = 1.03), posttraumatic stress disorder (RR = 1.39), and a drug use disorder (RR = 1.22). CONCLUSIONS: High-risk youth presenting to urban EDs for assault have elevated rates of subsequent firearm violence. Interventions at an index visit addressing substance use, mental health needs, retaliatory attitudes, and firearm possession may help decrease firearm violence among urban youth. PMID:25847808

  1. High-Performing Local Health Departments Relate Their Experiences at Community Engagement in Emergency Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch-Spana, Monica; Ravi, Sanjana; Meyer, Diane; Biesiadecki, Laura; Mwaungulu, Geoffrey

    2017-10-27

    Local health departments (LHDs) are implementing a national mandate to engage community partners, including individuals, businesses, and community- and faith-based organizations in the larger public health emergency preparedness (PHEP) enterprise. Investigate how LHDs of varying size and resource levels successfully engage the community in PHEP to help uncover "best practices" that aspiring agencies can replicate, particularly in low-resource environments. In-depth, semistructured qualitative interviews with practitioners from 9 highly performing LHDs. Participating agencies comprised equal amounts of small (serving 500 000 residents) LHDs and were diverse in terms of geographic region, rural-urban environment, and governance structure. A cross section of LHD staff (n = 34) including agency leaders, preparedness coordinators, public information officers, and health educators/promoters. Local health department performance at community engagement as determined by top scores in 2 national LHD surveys (2012, 2015) regarding community engagement in PHEP. Based on key informant accounts, high-performing LHDs show a holistic, organization-wide commitment to, rather than discrete focus on, community engagement. Best practices clustered around 5 domains: administration (eg, top executive who models collaborative behavior), organizational culture (eg, solicitous rather than prescriptive posture regarding community needs), social capital (eg, mining preexisting community connections held by other LHD programs), workforce skills (eg, cultural competence), and methods/tactics (eg, visibility in community events unrelated to PHEP). For LHDs that wish to enhance their performance at community engagement in PHEP, change will entail adoption of evidence-based interventions (the technical "what") as well as evidence-based administrative approaches (the managerial "how"). Smaller, rural LHDs should be encouraged that, in the case of PHEP community engagement, they have unique social

  2. Firearm violence among high-risk emergency department youth after an assault injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Patrick M; Walton, Maureen A; Roehler, Douglas R; Goldstick, Jason; Zimmerman, Marc A; Blow, Frederic C; Cunningham, Rebecca M

    2015-05-01

    The risk for firearm violence among high-risk youth after treatment for an assault is unknown. In this 2-year prospective cohort study, data were analyzed from a consecutive sample of 14- to 24-year-olds with drug use in the past 6 months seeking assault-injury care (AIG) at an urban level 1 emergency department (ED) compared with a proportionally sampled comparison group (CG) of drug-using nonassaulted youth. Validated measures were administered at baseline and follow-up (6, 12, 18, 24 months). A total of 349 AIG and 250 CG youth were followed for 24 months. During the follow-up period, 59% of the AIG reported firearm violence, a 40% higher risk than was observed among the CG (59.0% vs. 42.5%; relative risk [RR] = 1.39). Among those reporting firearm violence, 31.7% reported aggression, and 96.4% reported victimization, including 19 firearm injuries requiring medical care and 2 homicides. The majority with firearm violence (63.5%) reported at least 1 event within the first 6 months. Poisson regression identified baseline predictors of firearm violence, including male gender (RR = 1.51), African American race (RR = 1.26), assault-injury (RR = 1.35), firearm possession (RR = 1.23), attitudes favoring retaliation (RR = 1.03), posttraumatic stress disorder (RR = 1.39), and a drug use disorder (RR = 1.22). High-risk youth presenting to urban EDs for assault have elevated rates of subsequent firearm violence. Interventions at an index visit addressing substance use, mental health needs, retaliatory attitudes, and firearm possession may help decrease firearm violence among urban youth. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Prediction of lethal pulmonary hypoplasia by means fetal lung volume in skeletal dysplasias: a three-dimensional ultrasound assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Carolina Amorim; Rezende, Guilherme de Castro; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Tonni, Gabriele; Pereira, Alamanda Kfoury

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) for predicting lethality in fetuses with skeletal dysplasia. Twenty-four fetuses between 20 and 32 weeks of gestation were assessed. Bilateral lung volume scans were performed three times in each fetus during one ultrasound session. The virtual organ computer-aided analysis method was used to obtain a sequence of six sections of each lung around a fixed axis, and a rotation angle of 30° was adopted. Fetal lung volume measurements were analyzed according to the reference range. After birth, lung hypoplasia was diagnosed considering clinical and radiological criteria. Of all cases of skeletal dysplasia, 18 (75%) were lethal. Among the lethal cases, after postnatal diagnosis, four were osteogenesis imperfecta type II, three were thanatophoric dysplasia and two were campomelic dysplasia. The remaining nine cases remained without a definitive diagnosis. The accuracy of 3DUS in predicting lethality in fetuses with skeletal dysplasia was high, with a sensitivity of 83.3%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 66.7%. The kappa index of 0.174 showed a good agreement between the possibility of lethality when the 3DUS volume measurement was altered and real lethality after birth (p lung volume measurement is a good predictor of lethal pulmonary hypoplasia in fetuses with skeletal dysplasia, with high accuracy.

  4. Activated protein C ameliorates Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin-induced lethal pathogenesis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kau Jyh-Hwa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lethal toxin (LT is a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis. Sprague Dawley rats manifest pronounced lung edema and shock after LT treatments, resulting in high mortality. The heart failure that is induced by LT has been suggested to be a principal mechanism of lung edema and mortality in rodents. Since LT-induced death occurs more rapidly in rats than in mice, suggesting that other mechanisms in addition to the heart dysfunction may be contributed to the fast progression of LT-induced pathogenesis in rats. Coagulopathy may contribute to circulatory failure and lung injury. However, the effect of LT on coagulation-induced lung dysfunction is unclear. Methods To investigate the involvement of coagulopathy in LT-mediated pathogenesis, the mortality, lung histology and coagulant levels of LT-treated rats were examined. The effects of activated protein C (aPC on LT-mediated pathogenesis were also evaluated. Results Fibrin depositions were detected in the lungs of LT-treated rats, indicating that coagulation was activated. Increased levels of plasma D-dimer and thrombomodulin, and the ameliorative effect of aPC further suggested that the activation of coagulation-fibrinolysis pathways plays a role in LT-mediated pathogenesis in rats. Reduced mortality was associated with decreased plasma levels of D-dimer and thrombomodulin following aPC treatments in rats with LT-mediated pathogenesis. Conclusions These findings suggest that the activation of coagulation in lung tissue contributes to mortality in LT-mediated pathogenesis in rats. In addition, anticoagulant aPC may help to develop a feasible therapeutic strategy.

  5. Close is dead: determinants of firearm injury lethality in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay-Morreale, Heather E; Tsuei, Betty J; Fisher, Bonnie S; Davis, Kenneth; Johannigman, Jay A

    2009-04-01

    Accurate data regarding intimate partner violence is difficult to obtain, particularly when examining only homicides or trauma registries. This study characterizes firearm violence against women by examining data from both the county coroner and an urban level I trauma center. The Trauma Registry and Coroners database were reviewed for female victims of firearm assault from 1998 to 2006. Data collected included age, race, location of assault (home, public, unknown), mortality, and injuries. Assailants were categorized as intimate partners (IP), acquaintances, strangers, or undetermined. Adjusted odds ratios for effects of assailant and location were calculated using logistic regression analysis, with statistical significance at alpha = 0.05. Of 115 victims identified, 51 (44%) were fatally injured. Forty-two (37%) of assailants were IP. Fatalities occurred in 71% of IP, 50% of acquaintance, and 20% of stranger assaults. Firearm assault by IP was 10 times more lethal than injury by stranger (p firearm assaults against women may be underrepresented in current databases. These assaults are highly lethal, frequently occur at home, and often involve head injury. These observations may lend to strategies for trauma prevention.

  6. Injury risk assessment of non-lethal projectile head impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as "force wall approach" suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the "force wall approach" and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics.

  7. Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems.

  8. Emergence of a phase transition for the required amount of storage in highly renewable electricity systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Vissing; Greiner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Due to global environmental concerns, our electricity supply will transform from mostly conventional power generation to mostly fluctuating renewable power generation. The transition will require combined backup from conventional sources and storage. A phase transition emerges during the ramp...

  9. The bureaucratization of war: moral challenges exemplified by the covert lethal drone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Adams

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article interrogates the bureaucratization of war, incarnate in the covert lethal drone. Bureaucracies are criticized typically for their complexity, inefficiency, and inflexibility. This article is concerned with their moral indifference. It explores killing, which is so highly administered, so morally remote, and of such scale, that we acknowledge a covert lethal program. This is a bureaucratized program of assassination in contravention of critical human rights. In this article, this program is seen to compromise the advance of global justice. Moreover, the bureaucratization of lethal force is seen to dissolve democratic ideals from within. The bureaucracy isolates the citizens from lethal force applied in their name. People are killed, in the name of the State, but without conspicuous justification, or judicial review, and without informed public debate. This article gives an account of the risk associated with the bureaucratization of the State's lethal power. Exemplified by the covert drone, this is power with formidable reach. It is power as well, which requires great moral sensitivity. Considering the drone program, this article identifies challenges, which will become more prominent and pressing, as technology advances.

  10. Comparative effects of insecticides with different mechanisms of action on Chrysoperla externa (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae): lethal, sublethal and dose-response effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joao Zotti, Moises; Dionel Grutzmacher, Anderson; Heres Lopes, Isac; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-12-01

    The comprehensive knowledge that the delayed systemic and reproduction side effects can be even more deleterious than acute toxicity, has caused a shift in focus toward sublethal effects assessment on physiology and behavior of beneficial insects. In this study, we assessed the risks posed by some insecticides with different mode of action through lethal and delayed systemic sublethal effects on the pupation, adult emergence, and reproduction of the chrysopid Chrysoperla externa (Hagen, 1861; Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), an important predator in pest biological control. The maximum field recommended dose (MFRD) and twice (2×MFRD) for chlorantraniliprole, tebufenozide, and pyriproxyfen were harmless to C. externa. In contrast, all the tested chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSIs) were highly detrimental to the predator, despite of their lack of acute lethal toxicity. Therefore, the safety assumed by using IGRs toward beneficial insects is not valid for chrysopids. Dose-response data showed that although all CSIs have a similar mechanism of action, the relative extent of toxicity may differ (novaluron > lufenuron > teflubenzuron). For CSIs, the delayed systemic effects became obvious at adult emergence, where the predicted no observable effect dose (NOED) was 1/2 048 of the MFRD for novaluron (0.085 ng/insect), and 1/256 of the MFRD for both lufenuron (0.25 ng/insect) and teflubenzuron (0.6 ng/insect). Finally, this work emphasized the significance of performing toxicity risk assessments with an adequate posttreatment period to avoid underestimating the toxicities of insecticides, as the acute lethal toxicity assays may not provide accurate information regarding the long-range effects of hazardous compounds. © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of the fungicide chlorothalonil on three life stages of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Peter B; Meyer, Shelli L; Chung, Katy W

    2003-09-01

    Chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloroisophthalonitrile) is the second most widely used fungicide in the United States. Due to the widespread use of chlorothalonil, it is important to investigate the effects chlorothalonil may have on estuarine species such as the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. This study examined the toxicity of chlorothalonil to three life-history stages (embryo, larvae, adult) of the grass shrimp. Also, molting frequency, growth response and metamorphosis from a larval life cycle pulsed exposure assay were examined as sub-lethal indicators of chlorothalonil exposure. Results showed embryos were the least sensitive with a 96-h Median Lethal Concentration (LC50) of 396.0 microg/L (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 331.3-472.4 microg/L). The adult 96-h LC50 was 152.9 microg/L (95% CI 120.3-194.5 microg/L). Larvae were the most sensitive to chlorothalonil exposure with a 96-h LC50 of 49.5 microg/L (95% CI 44.4-55.27 microg/L). In the life cycle pulsed exposure assay, all surviving larvae in the treatments required significantly more molts to reach postlarvae than the control. Other measured parameters showed differences between treatments and control but there was no statistical significance. This research demonstrated that chlorothalonil is highly toxic to grass shrimp and that larval grass shrimp would be the most appropriate life stage to use for chlorothalonil risk assessments since that stage is the most sensitive.

  12. Identifying adolescent females at high risk of pregnancy in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernick, Lauren; Kharbanda, Elyse Olshen; Santelli, John; Dayan, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) care for adolescent females with unmet reproductive health care needs. Our objective was, among adolescents presenting to a pediatric ED, to estimate pregnancy risk, describe pregnancy intentions, and identify potentially modifiable factors associated with pregnancy risk. Using a paper-based questionnaire, we surveyed females aged 15-19 years presenting to our ED, assessing health care access, sexual behaviors, pregnancy intentions, and receptivity to interventions. We calculated the pregnancy risk index (PRI), which estimates pregnancy risk in the subsequent 12 months, by assessing recent sexual activity, contraception at last intercourse, and known contraceptive failure rates. Independent sample t tests and analysis of variance were used to identify risk factors associated with increased PRI. Of 459 females enrolled, 13% were pregnant and 20% reported prior pregnancy. Among 399 nonpregnant females, 238 (60%) had intercourse in the prior 3 months and 73 (31%) used no contraception at last intercourse. Among nonpregnant adolescents, the PRI was 19.5, which equates to 19.5 expected pregnancies per 100 females per year. Factors associated with higher PRI included lacking a primary provider, prior ED visits, wanting a baby now, and reported partner wantedness of pregnancy. Half believed ED doctors should discuss pregnancy prevention, and one-quarter were interested in starting contraception in the ED. Nearly one-third of adolescent females in a pediatric ED were either pregnant or could be expected to become pregnant within a year. Screening questions can identify adolescents at high risk of pregnancy in the ED setting. These females should be the target for future pregnancy prevention interventions. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis brazing for emergency repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Luo, Zhen; Fan, Naifeng; Ao, Sansan

    2011-05-01

    It is of great significance to fast weld and repair damaged parts in electroless and gasless field. So, based on Selfpropagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS), this paper investigates the SHS brazing of thermit reaction. It is found that the heat obtained by SHS thermit reaction can not melt the base metal, however the silver solder with the melting temperature of 595°C to 605°C can all just melt in the middle of the base metal to achieve SHS brazing. In the experiment, as the surface tension, the molten solder is more likely to wet the slag which is with a larger surface tension, resulting in the poor wettability between solder and base metal. By adding a certain amount of silver brazing flux into the powder can solve the problem of base metal wetting. When the silver brazing flux and the powder are in a ratio of 10:1, solder melt completely, and can be separated with slag, there is a good weld surface. With the increase of silver brazing flux, the slag is more loose and easy to removal. The solder and base metal coating is better. However, with further increase in silver brazing flux, the heat from the reaction reduces, solder can not melt. And with the increase of the powder, the slag and the solder can not be separated. SHS brazing combines the thermit reaction heat with the brazing technology to achieve the low carbon steel welding. Using the heat of thermit reaction to melt the solder then weld the steel can overcome the defects of poor quality of traditional welding which use the reaction products. And the operation is simple. SHS brazing achieve the emergency equipment welding under the condition of no electricity, no gas and equipment.

  14. Care of the high school athlete: prevention and treatment of medical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Constance M

    2006-01-01

    An important duty of any sports medicine physician is the care of athletes on the field and at the sidelines. Orthopaedic surgeons, who are trained to treat most musculoskeletal injuries, may not be as well prepared to treat the variety of medical issues and emergencies that are encountered in the "on-the-field" setting. In treating adolescent and high school athletes, advance preparation by the physician is critical for such entities as exercise-induced asthma, anaphylaxis, certain cardiac conditions, seizures, diabetes, and heat illnesses. The initial approach to the athlete who "goes to ground" always remains the same--management of the airway (with cervical spine precautions); establishment and maintenance of breathing and circulation; a limited neurologic examination to assess function; and removal of the athlete from the hazardous environment. Additional treatment is dictated by the specific illness or injury. As is usually the case, prevention is the best form of treatment. Many conditions can be detected at the preparticipation physical examination, which includes a thorough history and focused physical examination. Specific cardiovascular conditions that may be screened for include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Marfan syndrome, some congenital coronary artery abnormalities, and electrophysiologic rhythm disturbances. This examination also offers one of the best opportunities to provide information to athletes regarding optimal management of any chronic medical diseases. In preparation for an athletic event, excessive environmental heat and humidity may be addressed with several preventive strategies. Physicians also may be asked to provide counseling and make decisions about return to play for athletes who have had certain infectious diseases, including upper and lower respiratory infections and infectious mononucleosis.

  15. On Asymmetry of Magnetic Helicity in Emerging Active Regions: High-resolution Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lirong; Démoulin, Pascal; Alexander, David; Zhu, Chunming

    2011-01-01

    We employ the DAVE (differential affine velocity estimator) tracking technique on a time series of Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI)/1 minute high spatial resolution line-of-sight magnetograms to measure the photospheric flow velocity for three newly emerging bipolar active regions (ARs). We separately calculate the magnetic helicity injection rate of the leading and following polarities to confirm or refute the magnetic helicity asymmetry, found by Tian & Alexander using MDI/96 minute low spatial resolution magnetograms. Our results demonstrate that the magnetic helicity asymmetry is robust, being present in the three ARs studied, two of which have an observed balance of the magnetic flux. The magnetic helicity injection rate measured is found to depend little on the window size selected, but does depend on the time interval used between the two successive magnetograms being tracked. It is found that the measurement of the magnetic helicity injection rate performs well for a window size between 12 × 10 and 18 × 15 pixels and at a time interval Δt = 10 minutes. Moreover, the short-lived magnetic structures, 10-60 minutes, are found to contribute 30%-50% of the magnetic helicity injection rate. Comparing with the results calculated by MDI/96 minute data, we find that the MDI/96 minute data, in general, can outline the main trend of the magnetic properties, but they significantly underestimate the magnetic flux in strong field regions and are not appropriate for quantitative tracking studies, so provide a poor estimate of the amount of magnetic helicity injected into the corona.

  16. Epidemiologic comparison of injured high school basketball athletes reporting to emergency departments and the athletic training setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Erica N; McKenzie, Lara B; Comstock, R Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Basketball is a popular US high school sport with more than 1 million participants annually. To compare patterns of athletes with basketball-related injuries presenting to US emergency departments from 2005 through 2010 and the high school athletic training setting from the 2005-2011 seasons. Descriptive epidemiology study. Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission and the High School Reporting Information Online database. Complex sample weights were used to calculate national estimates of basketball-related injuries for comparison. Adolescents from 13 to 19 years of age treated in US emergency departments for basketball-related injuries and athletes from 13 to 19 years of age from schools participating in High School Reporting Information Online who were injured while playing basketball. Nationally, an estimated 1,514,957 (95% confidence interval = 1,337,441, 1,692,474) athletes with basketball-related injuries reported to the emergency department and 1,064,551 (95% confidence interval = 1,055,482, 1,073,620) presented to the athletic training setting. Overall, the most frequent injuries seen in the emergency department were lacerations and fractures (injury proportion ratios [IPRs] = 3.45 and 1.72, respectively), whereas those seen in the athletic training setting were more commonly concussions and strains/sprains (IPRs = 2.23 and 1.19, respectively; all P values basketball players presenting for treatment in the emergency department and the athletic training setting. Understanding differences specific to clinical settings is crucial to grasping the full epidemiologic and clinical picture of sport-related injuries. Certified athletic trainers play an important role in identifying, assessing, and treating athletes with sport-related injuries who might otherwise present to clinical settings with higher costs, such as the emergency department.

  17. Emergency preparedness in high school-based athletics: a review of the literature and recommendations for sport health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P; Brady, Jodi

    2013-05-01

    Approximately 7.6 million high school students in the United States participate in sports. Although most sport-related injuries in adolescents are considered minor emergencies, life-threatening illnesses or injuries may occur, such as sudden cardiac arrest, heat stroke, status asthmaticus and exercise-induced asthma, catastrophic brain injuries, cervical spine injuries, heat- and cold-related illness, blunt chest/abdominal injuries, and extremity fractures resulting in compartment syndrome. Emergency preparedness in athletics involves the identification of and planning for medical services to promote the safety of the athlete, to limit injury, and to provide medical care at the site of practice or competition. Several national organizations have published guidelines for emergency preparedness in school-based athletics. Our article reviews guidelines for emergency preparedness put forth by the Sideline Preparedness collaboration (comprised of 6 major professional associations, including the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, American College of Sports Medicine, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, and American Osteopathic Academy of Sports Medicine), the National Athletic Trainers' Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics' Committee on School Health, and the American Heart Association. Additionally, we review published data examining compliance of US high schools with these recommendations for emergency preparedness in school-based athletics, determine deficiencies, and provide recommendations for improvement based on these deficiencies.

  18. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-10-17

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  19. A Case Study: What Doses of Amanita phalloides and Amatoxins Are Lethal to Humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ismail; Ermis, Fatih; Akata, Ilgaz; Kaya, Ertugrul

    2015-12-01

    There are few data estimating the human lethal dose of amatoxins or of the toxin level present in ingested raw poisonous mushrooms. Here, we present a patient who intentionally ingested several wild collected mushrooms to assess whether they were poisonous. Nearly 1 day after ingestion, during which the patient had nausea and vomiting, he presented at the emergency department. His transaminase levels started to increase starting from hour 48 and peaking at hour 72 (alanine aminotransferase 2496 IU/L; aspartate aminotransferase 1777 IU/L). A toxin analysis was carried out on the mushrooms that the patient said he had ingested. With reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, an uptake of approximately 21.3 mg amatoxin from nearly 50 g mushroom was calculated; it consisted of 11.9 mg alpha amanitin, 8.4 mg beta amanitin, and 1 mg gamma amanitin. In the urine sample taken on day 4, 2.7 ng/mL alpha amanitin and 1.25 ng/mL beta amanitin were found, and there was no gamma amanitin. Our findings suggest that the patient ingested approximately 0.32 mg/kg amatoxin, and fortunately recovered after serious hepatotoxicity developed. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of the performance of three elastomers for non-lethal projectile applications

    OpenAIRE

    Thota N.; Epaarachchi J.; Lau K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Less lethal kinetic ammunitions with soft noses such as eXact iMpact 1006, National Sports Spartan and B&T have been commonly used by military and law enforcement officers in the situations where lethal force is not warranted. In order to explore new materials to be used as nose in such ammunitions, a scholastic study using finite element simulations has been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of two rubber like elastomers and a polyolefinic foam (low density, highly compressible, stif...

  1. Lethal fish hook attachment - An unusual occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W

    2013-02-01

    A 39-year-old fisherman is reported who was dragged into the water from a boat after he became entangled in fishing line. His death was attributed to salt water drowning. At autopsy the cause of death was confirmed and the mechanism of the lethal event elucidated. Specifically, a large fish hook attached to line was embedded in his right wrist. The hook had passed beneath flexor tendons and had firmly attached him to fishing line that was being dropped from the vessel. There were no other significant injuries or underlying diseases present. This case demonstrates another rare situation in the commercial fishing industry that may result in a victim being dragged from a boat and drowned. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. Emergent nanoscale fluctuations in high rock-salt PbTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinge, Simon

    2013-03-01

    Lead Telluride is one of the most promising thermoelectric materials in the temperature range just above room temperature. It is a narrow band gap semiconductor with a high Seebeck coefficient and a low thermal conductivity. It is structurally much simpler than many other leading candidates for high performance thermoelectrics being a binary rock-salt, isostructural to NaCl. The thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, can be markedly improved by alloying with various other elements by forming quenched nanostructures. The undoped endmember, PbTe, does not have any such quenched nanostructure, yet has a rather low intrinsic thermal conductivity. There are also a number of interesting and non-canonical behaviors that it exhibits, such as an increasing measured band-gap with increasing temperature, exactly opposite to what is normally seen due to Fermi smearing of the band edge, and an unexpected non-monotonicity of the band gap in the series PbTe - PbSe - PbS. The material is on the surface simple, but hides some interesting complexity. We have investigated in detail the PbTe endmember using x-ray and neutron diffraction and neutron inelastic scattering. To our surprise, using the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron powder diffraction data we found that an interesting and non-trivial local structure that appears on warming. with the Pb atoms moving off the high-symmetry rock-salt positions towards neighboring Te ions. No evidence for the off-centering of the Pb atoms is seen at low temperature. The crossover from the locally undistorted to the locally distorted state occurs on warming between 100 K and 250 K. This unexpected emergence of local symmetry broken distortions from an undistorted ground-state we have called emphanisis, from the Greek for appearing from nothing. We have also investigated the lattice dynamics of the system to search for a dynamical signature of this behavior and extended the studies to doped systems and I will also

  3. Overexpression of kermit/dGIPC is associated with lethality in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.B. Pereira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Insertional mutagenesis is an important tool for functional genomics in Drosophila melanogaster. The insertion site in the KG00562 mutant fly line has been mapped to the CG8709 (herein named DmLpin locus and to the 3’ of kermit (also called dGIPC. This mutant line presents a high lethality rate resulting from a gain of function. To obtain some insight into the biological role of the mutated locus, we have characterized the mutation and its relation to the high mortality of the KG00562 fly line. In this mutant, we did not detect one of the DmLpin transcripts, namely DmLpinK, but we did detect an unusual 2.3-kb mRNA (LpinK-w. Further investigation revealed that the LpinK-w transcript results from an aberrant splicing between the untranslated first exon of DmLpinK and the mini-white marker gene. Lack of DmLpinK or LpinK-w expression does not contribute to lethality, since heterozygous KG00562/Def7860 animals presented lethality rates comparable to those of the wild type. In contrast, the overexpression of kermit was associated with lethality of the KG00562 fly line. Significantly higher levels of kermit were detected in the Malpighian tubules of KG00562/+ flies that presented higher lethality rates than wild-type or KG00562/Def7860 animals, in which the lethality was rescued. In agreement with a recently reported study, our data support the hypothesis that misexpression of kermit/dGIPC could interfere with Drosophila development, with further investigations being needed in this direction.

  4. Prediction of Outcome After Emergency High-Risk Intra-abdominal Surgery Using the Surgical Apgar Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihoric, Mirjana; Toft Tengberg, Line; Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Bang Foss, Nicolai

    2016-12-01

    With current literature quoting mortality rates up to 45%, emergency high-risk abdominal surgery has, compared with elective surgery, a significantly greater risk of death and major complications. The Surgical Apgar Score (SAS) is predictive of outcome in elective surgery, but has never been validated exclusively in an emergency setting. A consecutive prospective single-center cohort study of 355 adults undergoing emergency high-risk abdominal surgery between June 2013 and May 2014 is presented. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcome measures were postoperative major complications, defined according to the Clavien-Dindo scale as well as the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program guidelines, and intensive care unit admission. The SAS was calculated postoperatively. Cochran-Armitage test for trend was used to evaluate the incidence of both outcomes. Area under the curve was used to demonstrate the scores' discriminatory power. One hundred eighty-one (51.0%) patients developed minor or no complications. The overall incidence of major complications was 32.7% and the overall death rate was 16.3%. Risk of major complications, death, and intensive care unit admission increased significantly with decreasing SAS (P high-risk abdominal surgery. Despite its predictive value, the SAS cannot in its current version be recommended as a standalone prognostic tool in an emergency setting.

  5. Realism in paediatric emergency simulations: A prospective comparison of in situ, low fidelity and centre-based, high fidelity scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Fenton; Pegiazoglou, Ioannis; McGarvey, Kathryn; Novakov, Ruza; Wolfsberger, Ingrid; Peat, Jennifer

    2017-11-16

    To measure scenario participant and faculty self-reported realism, engagement and learning for the low fidelity, in situ simulations and compare this to high fidelity, centre-based simulations. A prospective survey of scenario participants and faculty completing in situ and centre-based paediatric simulations. There were 382 responses, 276 from scenario participants and 106 from faculty with 241 responses from in situ and 141 from centre-based simulations. Scenario participant responses showed significantly higher ratings for the centre-based simulations for respiratory rate (P = 0.007), pulse (P = 0.036), breath sounds (P = 0.002), heart sounds (P realism for engagement and learning. © 2017 The Authors Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  6. Emergency rabies control in a community of two high-density hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rabies is a fatal viral disease that potentially can affect all mammals. Terrestrial rabies is not present in the United Kingdom and has been eliminated from Western Europe. Nevertheless the possibility remains that rabies could be introduced to England, where it would find two potentially suitable hosts, red foxes and badgers. With the aim to analyse the spread and emergency control of rabies in this two species host community, a simulation model was constructed. Different control strategies involving anti-rabies vaccination and population culling were developed, considering control application rates, spatial extent and timing. These strategies were evaluated for efficacy and feasibility to control rabies in hypothetical rural areas in the South of England immediately after a disease outbreak. Results The model confirmed that both fox and badger populations, separately, were competent hosts for the spread of rabies. Realistic vaccination levels were not sufficient to control rabies in high-density badger populations. The combined species community was a very strong rabies host. However, disease spread within species appeared to be more important than cross-species infection. Thus, the drivers of epidemiology depend on the potential of separate host species to sustain the disease. To control a rabies outbreak in the two species, both species had to be targeted. Realistic and robust control strategies involved vaccination of foxes and badgers, but also required badger culling. Although fox and badger populations in the UK are exceptionally dense, an outbreak of rabies can be controlled with a higher than 90% chance, if control response is quick and follows a strict regime. This requires surveillance and forceful and repeated control campaigns. In contrast, an uncontrolled rabies outbreak in the South of England would quickly develop into a strong epizootic involving tens of thousands of rabid foxes and badgers. Conclusions If

  7. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  8. High-sensitivity troponin assays in the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Michael; Bertsch, Thomas; Popp, Steffen; Bahrmann, Philipp; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Müller, Christian

    2011-09-06

    Evaluating patients with acute chest pain presenting to the emergency department remains an ongoing challenge. The spectrum of etiologies in acute chest pain ranges from minor disease entities to life-threatening diseases, such as pulmonary embolism, acute aortic dissection or acute myocardial infarction (MI). The diagnosis of acute MI is usually made integrating the triad of patient history and clinical presentation, readings of 12-lead ECG and measurement of cardiac troponins (cTn). Introduction of high-sensitivity cTn assays substantially increases sensitivity to identify patients with acute MI even at the time of presentation to the emergency department at the cost of specificity. However, the proportion of patients presenting with cTn positive, non-vascular cardiac chest pain triples with the implementation of new sensitive cTn assays increasing the difficulty for the emergency physician to identify those patients who are at need for invasive diagnostics. The main objectives of this mini-review are 1) to discuss elements of disposition decision made by the emergency physician for the evaluation of chest pain patients, 2) to summarize recent advances in assay technology and relate these findings into the clinical context, and 3) to discuss possible consequences for the clinical work and suggest an algorithm for the clinical evaluation of chest pain patients in the emergency department.

  9. The effectiveness of high fidelity simulation on medical-surgical registered nurses' ability to recognise and respond to clinical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Thomas; Gordon, Christopher

    2011-10-01

    There is a paucity of evidence regarding the efficacy in preparing medical-surgical nurses to respond to patients with acutely deteriorating conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate registered nurses' ability to respond to the deteriorating patient in clinical practise following training using immersive simulation and use of a high fidelity simulator. This study was a follow-up survey of medical-surgical graduate nurses following immersive high fidelity simulation training. Thirty eight registered nurses practising in medical-surgical areas completed the simulation as part of university graduate study. A follow-up survey of the graduate medical-surgical registered nurses conducted three months following completion of a high fidelity simulation-based learning experience. Outcomes consisted of the number of times skills were used in practise and the usefulness of simulation in preparing for actual emergency events. Participants reported a total of 164 clinical patient emergencies in the follow-up time period including: 46% cardiac, 32% respiratory, 10% neurological, 7% cardiac arrest and 5% related to electrolyte disturbances. The ability to respond in a systematic way, handover to the emergency team and airway management were identified as the skills most improved during patient emergencies following simulation. The most useful aspects of the simulation experience identified were scenario debriefing and assertiveness training. Participants with less years of clinical experience were more likely to report practising the team leader role and debriefing as the most useful aspects of simulation. The skills practised in simulation were highly relevant to participants practise in medical-surgical areas. Non-technical skills, including assertiveness skills should be considered in future emergency training courses for nurses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dose–response tests and semi-field evaluation of lethal and sub-lethal effects of slow release pyriproxyfen granules (Sumilarv®0.5G) for the control of the malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae sensu lato

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently research has shown that larviciding can be an effective tool for integrated malaria vector control. Nevertheless, the uptake of this intervention has been hampered by the need to re-apply larvicides frequently. There is a need to explore persistent, environmentally friendly larvicides for malaria vector control to reduce intervention efforts and costs by reducing the frequency of application. In this study, the efficacy of a 0.5% pyriproxyfen granule (Surmilarv®0.5G, Sumitomo Chemicals) was assessed for the control of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Anopheles arabiensis, the major malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Dose–response and standardized field tests were implemented following standard procedures of the World Health Organization’s Pesticide Evaluation Scheme to determine: (i) the susceptibility of vectors to this formulation; (ii) the residual activity and appropriate retreatment schedule for field application; and, (iii) sub-lethal impacts on the number and viability of eggs laid by adults after exposure to Sumilarv®0.5G during larval development. Results Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis were highly susceptible to Sumilarv®0.5G. Estimated emergence inhibition (EI) values were very low and similar for both species. The minimum dosage that completely inhibited adult emergence was between 0.01-0.03 parts per million (ppm) active ingredient (ai). Compared to the untreated control, an application of 0.018 ppm ai prevented 85% (95% confidence interval (CI) 82%-88%) of adult emergence over six weeks under standardized field conditions. A fivefold increase in dosage of 0.09 ppm ai prevented 97% (95% CI 94%-98%) emergence. Significant sub-lethal effects were observed in the standardized field tests. Female An. gambiae s.s. that were exposed to 0.018 ppm ai as larvae laid 47% less eggs, and females exposed to 0.09 ppm ai laid 74% less eggs than females that were unexposed to the treatment. Furthermore, 77

  11. Low cost, high yield: simulation of obstetric emergencies for family medicine training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Susanna R; Shields, Robin; Nothnagle, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Simulation is now the educational standard for emergency training in residency and is particularly useful on a labor and delivery unit, which is often a stressful environment for learners given the frequency of emergencies. However, simulation can be costly. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of low-cost simulated obstetrical emergencies in training family medicine residents. The study took place in a community hospital in an urban underserved setting in the northeast United States. Low-cost simulations were developed for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) and preeclampsia/eclampsia (PEC). Twenty residents were randomly assigned to the intervention (simulated PPH or PEC followed by debriefing) or control (lecture on PPH or PEC) group, and equal numbers of residents were assigned to each scenario. All participants completed a written test at baseline and an oral exam 6 months later on the respective scenario to which they were assigned. The participants provided written feedback on their respective teaching interventions. We compared performance on pretests and posttests by group using Wilcoxon Rank Sum. Twenty residents completed the study. Both groups performed similarly on baseline tests for both scenarios. Compared to controls, intervention residents scored significantly higher on the examination on the management of PPH but not for PEC. All intervention group participants reported that the simulation training was "extremely useful," and most found it "enjoyable." We demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of two low-cost obstetric emergency simulations and found that they may result in persistent increases in trainee knowledge.

  12. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics of Daphnia magna responses after sub-lethal exposure to triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Vera; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2016-09-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products are a class of emerging contaminants that are present in wastewater effluents, surface water, and groundwater around the world. There is a need to determine rapid and reliable bioindicators of exposure and the toxic mode of action of these contaminants to aquatic organisms. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was used to determine the metabolic profile of Daphnia magna after exposure to a range of sub-lethal concentrations of triclosan (6.25-100μg/L), carbamazepine (1.75-14mg/L) and ibuprofen (1.75-14mg/L) for 48h. Sub-lethal triclosan exposure suggested a general oxidative stress condition and the branched-chain amino acids, glutamine, glutamate, and methionine emerged as potential bioindicators. The aromatic amino acids, serine, glycine and alanine are potential bioindicators for sub-lethal carbamazepine exposure that may have altered energy metabolism. The potential bioindicators for sub-lethal ibuprofen exposure are serine, methionine, lysine, arginine and leucine, which showed a concentration-dependent response. The differences in the metabolic changes were related to the dissimilar modes of toxicity of triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics gave an improved understanding of how these emerging contaminants impact the keystone species D. magna. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Emergency repair of inguinal hernia in the premature infant is associated with high direct medical costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, J; de Goede, B; van Kempen, B J H; Langeveld, H R; Poley, M J; Kazemier, G; Jeekel, J; Wijnen, R M H; Lange, J F

    2016-08-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is frequently performed in premature infants. Evidence on optimal management and timing of repair, as well as related medical costs is still lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the direct medical costs of inguinal hernia, distinguishing between premature infants who had to undergo an emergency procedure and those who underwent elective inguinal hernia repair. This cohort study based on medical records concerned premature infants with inguinal hernia who underwent surgical repair within 3 months after birth in a tertiary academic children's hospital between January 2010 and December 2013. Two groups were distinguished: patients with incarcerated inguinal hernia requiring emergency repair and patients who underwent elective repair. Real medical costs were calculated by multiplying the volumes of healthcare use with corresponding unit prices. Nonparametric bootstrap techniques were used to derive a 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the difference in mean costs. A total of 132 premature infants were included in the analysis. Emergency surgery was performed in 29 %. Costs of hospitalization comprised 65 % of all costs. The total direct medical costs amounted to €7418 per premature infant in the emergency repair group versus €4693 in the elective repair group. Multivariate analysis showed a difference in costs of €1183 (95 % CI -1196; 3044) in favor of elective repair after correction for potential risk factors. Emergency repair of inguinal hernia in premature infants is more expensive than elective repair, even after correction for multiple confounders. This deserves to be taken into account in the debate on timing of inguinal hernia repair in premature infants.

  14. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Smith, Luke D; Cooper, Timothy F; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1) TSS (25 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1) TSS (83 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue.

  15. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora. The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1 TSS (25 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1 TSS (83 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue.

  16. Adapted Lethality: What We Can Learn from Guinea Pig-Adapted Ebola Virus Infection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Cheresiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of small animal models of Ebola virus (EBOV infection is important both for the study of genetic determinants involved in the complex pathology of EBOV disease and for the preliminary screening of antivirals, production of therapeutic heterologic immunoglobulins, and experimental vaccine development. Since the wild-type EBOV is avirulent in rodents, the adaptation series of passages in these animals are required for the virulence/lethality to emerge in these models. Here, we provide an overview of our several adaptation series in guinea pigs, which resulted in the establishment of guinea pig-adapted EBOV (GPA-EBOV variants different in their characteristics, while uniformly lethal for the infected animals, and compare the virologic, genetic, pathomorphologic, and immunologic findings with those obtained in the adaptation experiments of the other research groups.

  17. Bioavailability of recombinant tumor necrosis factor determines its lethality in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameloot, Paul; Takahashi, Nozomi; Everaerdt, Bart; Hostens, Jeroen; Eugster, Hans-Pietro; Fiers, Walter; Brouckaert, Peter

    2002-10-01

    In mice, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) displays a selective species specificity. In contrast to murine TNF (mTNF), human TNF (hTNF) only induces lethality at extremely high doses of about 500 microg/mouse, whereas it still has a powerful antitumor activity in combination with interferon-gamma. The observation that hTNF does not interact with the p75 mTNF receptor seemed to provide a plausible explanation for these species-specific biological effects. Experiments in TNF receptor knockout mice and tests with hTNF muteins in baboons did not, however, support this hypothesis. We here show that an mTNF mutein selective for the p55 mTNF receptor induces lethality in a manner comparable to wild-type mTNF, and conclude that other differences between hTNF and mTNF must account for the reduced lethality of hTNF. Pharmacokinetics showed that hTNF is cleared much faster than mTNF or the mTNF mutein used. In contrast to the hardly lethal effect(s) of a bolus administration of hTNF, fractionated repetitive administration of the same total hTNF dose induced lethality. This suggests that prolonged exposure rather than peak levels determine the lethal effects of hTNF in mice. Experiments with receptor and ligand knockouts demonstrated that the difference in pharmacokinetics is independent of an interaction with (soluble) TNF receptor, TNF-induced effects or induction of endogenous TNF. These results show that manipulation of the clearance rate of TNF may broaden the therapeutic range of systemic treatments with TNF.

  18. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Labs (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the equipment, the Marines were given training in sticky foam characterization, toxicology, safety issues, cleanup and waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin cleanup, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  19. Can Telescopes Help Leo Satellites Dodge Most Lethal Impacts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUDIEL, ANDREA; Carroll, Joseph; Rowe, David

    2018-01-01

    Authors: Joseph Carroll and David RoweABSTRACT LEO objects are tracked by radar because it works day and night, in all weather. This fits military interest in potentially hostile objects. There is less interest in objects too small to be credible active threats. But accidental hypervelocity impact by even 5-10 mm objects can disable most LEO satellites. Such “cm-class” objects greatly outnumber objects of military interest, and will cause most accidental impact losses.Under good viewing conditions, a sunlit 5mm sphere with 0.15 albedo at 800 km altitude is a 19th magnitude object. A ground-based 0.5m telescope tracking it against a 20 mag/arcsec2 sky can see it in seconds, and provide population can be tracked frequently, accurately, and affordably enough to be avoided. The value of a conjunction warning service should scale with the number of lethal objects in its catalog. This should motivate a commercial service to find and catalog most lethal objects. There may already be >1 million such objects in LEO, nearly all debris fragments, mostly cm-class and at 600-1200 km altitude.Maintaining a ~million-item catalog requires a world-wide network of several dozen telescope sites with several telescopes at each site. Each telescope needs a mount capable of ~1,000,000 fast slews/year without wearing out.The paper discusses recent advances that make such a service far more feasible:1. Automated tasking and remote control of distributed telescope networks,2. Direct-drive mounts that can make millions of fast slews without wearing out,3. Telescope optics with low focal curvature that are in focus across large imagers,4. CMOS imagers with 95% peak QE and 1.5e- noise at 2E8 pix/sec readout rates,5. Methods for uncued detection of most lethal LEO debris (eg., >5 mm at 800 km),6. Initial orbit determination using 3 alt-az fixes made during the discovery pass,7. High-speed photometry to infer debris spin axis, to predict drag area changes,8. Better conjunction predictions

  20. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Siemann, Stefan, E-mail: ssiemann@laurentian.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  1. Team training in obstetric and neonatal emergencies using highly realistic simulation in Mexico: impact on process indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dilys; Cohen, Susanna; Fritz, Jimena; Olvera, Marisela; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Hector; Cowan, Jessica Greenberg; Hernandez, Dolores Gonzalez; Dettinger, Julia C; Fahey, Jenifer O

    2014-11-20

    Ineffective management of obstetric emergencies contributes significantly to maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in Mexico. PRONTO (Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) is a highly-realistic, low-tech simulation-based obstetric and neonatal emergency training program. A pair-matched hospital-based controlled implementation trial was undertaken in three states in Mexico, with pre/post measurement of process indicators at intervention hospitals. This report assesses the impact of PRONTO simulation training on process indicators from the pre/post study design for process indicators. Data was collected in twelve intervention facilities on process indicators, including pre/post changes in knowledge and self-efficacy of obstetric emergencies and neonatal resuscitation, achievement of strategic planning goals established during training and changes in teamwork scores. Authors performed a longitudinal fixed-effects linear regression model to estimate changes in knowledge and self-efficacy and logistic regression to assess goal achievement. A total of 450 professionals in interprofessional teams were trained. Significant increases in knowledge and self-efficacy were noted for both physicians and nurses (p <0.001- 0.009) in all domains. Teamwork scores improved and were maintained over a three month period. A mean of 58.8% strategic planning goals per team in each hospital were achieved. There was no association between high goal achievement and knowledge, self-efficacy, proportion of doctors or nurses in training, state, or teamwork score. These results suggest that PRONTO's highly realistic, locally appropriate simulation and team training in maternal and neonatal emergency care may be a promising avenue for optimizing emergency response and improving quality of facility-based obstetric and neonatal care in resource-limited settings. NCT01477554.

  2. Automated External Defibrillators and Emergency Planning for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Vermont High Schools: A Rural State's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilko, Scott M; Lisle, David K

    2013-11-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) events are tragic. Secondary prevention of SCD depends on availability of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). High school athletes represent a high-risk group for SCD, and current efforts aim to place AEDs in all high schools. The prevalence of AEDs and emergency planning for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in Vermont high schools is similar to other states. Understanding specific needs and limitations in rural states may prevent SCD in rural high schools. Cross-sectional survey. A survey was distributed to all 74 Vermont high school athletic directors. Outcome measures included AED prevalence, AED location, individuals trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and AED utilization, funding methods for AED attainment, and the establishment of an emergency action plan (EAP) for response to SCA. All schools (100%, 74 of 74) completed the survey. Of those, 60 (81%) schools have at least 1 AED on school premises, with the most common location for AED placement being the main office or lobby (50%). Larger sized schools were more likely to have an AED on the premises than smaller sized schools (P = 0.00). School nurses (77%) were the most likely individuals to receive formal AED training. Forty-one schools (55%) had an EAP in place for response to SCA, and 71% of schools coordinated AED placement with local emergency medical services (EMS) responders. In Vermont, more than two-thirds of high schools have at least 1 AED on school premises. However, significant improvement in the establishment of EAPs for SCA and training in CPR and AED utilization is essential given the rural demography of the state of Vermont. Rural high schools inherently have longer EMS response times. In addition to obtaining AEDs, high schools must develop a public access to defibrillation program to maximize the chance of survival following cardiac arrest, especially in rural settings.

  3. The role of minority stress in second-generation Black emerging adult college students' high-risk drinking behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Delishia M; Cho Kim, Sara; Hunter, Carla D; Obasi, Ezemenari M

    2017-07-01

    This study used a minority stress framework to investigate the relationships between multiple stressors (e.g., general life stress, race related stress, and acculturative stress) and high-risk drinking behaviors in a sample of second-generation Black emerging adult college students across the United States. Participants (n = 148) were recruited from U.S. colleges and universities as part of a large, multiwave cross-sectional study. Findings from this study mirrored those in the extant literature: the positive relationship between race-related stress and high-risk drinking behaviors found in other marginalized groups. However, when all stressors were entered into the model, acculturative stress accounted for significant variance in high-risk drinking behaviors above and beyond general life and race-related stressors in second generation Black emerging adult college students. Findings underscore the need to better understand the influence of acculturative stress on high-risk drinking behaviors among second-generation Black emerging adult college students: an understudied population in both the acculturation and alcohol use literatures. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Identifying Adolescents at Highly Elevated Risk for Suicidal Behavior in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    King, Cheryl A.; Berona, Johnny; Czyz, Ewa; Horwitz, Adam G; Gipson, Polly Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The feasibility and concurrent validity of adolescent suicide risk screening in medical emergency departments (EDs) has been documented. The objectives of this short-term prospective study of adolescents who screened positive for suicide risk in the ED were: 1) to examine adolescents' rate of suicidal behavior during the 2 months following their ED visits and compare it with reported rates for psychiatric samples; and 2) to identify possible predictors of acute risk for suicidal be...

  5. Genetic interaction motif finding by expectation maximization – a novel statistical model for inferring gene modules from synthetic lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ping

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic lethality experiments identify pairs of genes with complementary function. More direct functional associations (for example greater probability of membership in a single protein complex may be inferred between genes that share synthetic lethal interaction partners than genes that are directly synthetic lethal. Probabilistic algorithms that identify gene modules based on motif discovery are highly appropriate for the analysis of synthetic lethal genetic interaction data and have great potential in integrative analysis of heterogeneous datasets. Results We have developed Genetic Interaction Motif Finding (GIMF, an algorithm for unsupervised motif discovery from synthetic lethal interaction data. Interaction motifs are characterized by position weight matrices and optimized through expectation maximization. Given a seed gene, GIMF performs a nonlinear transform on the input genetic interaction data and automatically assigns genes to the motif or non-motif category. We demonstrate the capacity to extract known and novel pathways for Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast. Annotations suggested for several uncharacterized genes are supported by recent experimental evidence. GIMF is efficient in computation, requires no training and automatically down-weights promiscuous genes with high degrees. Conclusion GIMF effectively identifies pathways from synthetic lethality data with several unique features. It is mostly suitable for building gene modules around seed genes. Optimal choice of one single model parameter allows construction of gene networks with different levels of confidence. The impact of hub genes the generic probabilistic framework of GIMF may be used to group other types of biological entities such as proteins based on stochastic motifs. Analysis of the strongest motifs discovered by the algorithm indicates that synthetic lethal interactions are depleted between genes within a motif, suggesting that synthetic

  6. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of five pesticides used in rice farming on the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Sabater, Consuelo; Castillo, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of five pesticides typically used in rice farming (trichlorfon, dimethoate, carbendazim, tebuconazole and prochloraz) was evaluated on different lethal and sub-lethal endpoints of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The evaluated endpoints included: avoidance behaviour after an exposure

  7. LEOMA and the US laser industry the good and bad moves for trade associations in emerging high-tech industries

    CERN Document Server

    Hitz, C

    2015-01-01

    Hitz addresses the urgent issues that the Laser and Electro-Optics Manufacturer’s Association (LEOMA) tackled in the late 1980s, which will help guide future trade associations to handle related political and infrastructural issues from the industry. LEOMA- the Laser and Electro-Optics Manufacturers’ Association – is in many ways similar to trade associations that exist, or will exist, in other emerging, high-technology industries. Having dealt successfully with these initial obstacles, LEOMA went on to tackle other issues, perhaps less urgent, that confronted the industry. LEOMA and the US Laser Industry: The Good and Bad Moves for Trade Associations in Emerging High-Tech Industries describes the approaches, both successful and not, to the political and infrastructure issues addressed by the trade association. The intent is to provide guidance to those confronting similar issues, and help them avoid unsuccessful approaches. The key fea ures highlight the problems that were dealt with, and solutions,...

  8. Seasonal cycles enhance disparities between low- and high-income countries in exposure to monthly temperature emergence with future warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Luke J.; Frame, David J.; Hawkins, Ed; Joshi, Manoj

    2017-11-01

    A common proxy for the adaptive capacity of a community to the impacts of future climate change is the range of climate variability which they have experienced in the recent past. This study presents an interpretation of such a framework for monthly temperatures. Our results demonstrate that emergence into genuinely ‘unfamiliar’ climates will occur across nearly all months of the year for low-income nations by the second half of the 21st century under an RCP8.5 warming scenario. However, high income countries commonly experience a large seasonal cycle, owing to their position in the middle latitudes: as a consequence, temperature emergence for transitional months translates only to more-frequent occurrences of heat historically associated with the summertime. Projections beyond 2050 also show low-income countries will experience 2–10 months per year warmer than the hottest month experienced in recent memory, while high-income countries will witness between 1–4 months per year hotter than any month previously experienced. While both results represent significant departures that may bring substantive societal impacts if greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, they also demonstrate that spatial patterns of emergence will compound existing differences between high and low income populations, in terms of their capacity to adapt to unprecedented future temperatures.

  9. Association between surgical delay and survival in high-risk emergency abdominal surgery. A population-based Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Morten; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Buck, David Levarett

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with perforated peptic ulcer, surgical delay has recently been shown to be a critical determinant of survival. The aim of the present population-based cohort study was to evaluate the association between surgical delay by hour and mortality in high-risk patients undergoing ...... abdominal surgery, no statistically significant adjusted association between mortality and surgical delay was found. Additional research in diagnosis-specific subgroups of high-risk patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery is warranted....... emergency abdominal surgery in general. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All in-patients aged ≥18 years having emergency abdominal laparotomy or laparoscopy performed within 48 h of admission between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010 in 13 Danish hospitals were included. Baseline and clinical data, including......OBJECTIVE: In patients with perforated peptic ulcer, surgical delay has recently been shown to be a critical determinant of survival. The aim of the present population-based cohort study was to evaluate the association between surgical delay by hour and mortality in high-risk patients undergoing...

  10. Emergent Structural Mechanisms for High-Density Collective Motion Inspired by Human Crowds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottinelli, Arianna; Sumpter, David T. J.; Silverberg, Jesse L.

    2016-11-01

    Collective motion of large human crowds often depends on their density. In extreme cases like heavy metal concerts and black Friday sales events, motion is dominated by physical interactions instead of conventional social norms. Here, we study an active matter model inspired by situations when large groups of people gather at a point of common interest. Our analysis takes an approach developed for jammed granular media and identifies Goldstone modes, soft spots, and stochastic resonance as structurally driven mechanisms for potentially dangerous emergent collective motion.

  11. Transversus abdominis plane block for an emergency laparotomy in a high-risk, elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha S Patil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old male patient with gall bladder perforation and small intestinal obstruction from impacted gall stone was posted for emergency laparotomy. He had congestive heart failure, severe hypertension at admission and history of multiple other coexisting diseases. On admission, he developed pulmonary oedema from systolic hypertension which was controlled by ventilatory support, nitroglycerine and furosemide. Preoperative international normalized ratio was 2.34 and left ventricular ejection fraction was only 20%. Because of risk of exaggerated fall in blood pressure during induction of anaesthesia (general or neuraxial, a transversus abdominis plane block via combined Petit triangle and subcostal technique was administered and supplemented with Propofol sedation.

  12. Association between surgical delay and survival in high-risk emergency abdominal surgery. A population-based Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vester-Andersen, Morten; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Buck, David Levarett; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2016-01-01

    In patients with perforated peptic ulcer, surgical delay has recently been shown to be a critical determinant of survival. The aim of the present population-based cohort study was to evaluate the association between surgical delay by hour and mortality in high-risk patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery in general. All in-patients aged ≥ 18 years having emergency abdominal laparotomy or laparoscopy performed within 48 h of admission between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010 in 13 Danish hospitals were included. Baseline and clinical data, including surgical delay and 90-day mortality were collected. The crude and adjusted association between surgical delay by hour and 90-day mortality was assessed by binary logistic regression. A total of 2803 patients were included. Median age (interquartile range [IQR]) was 66 (51-78) years, and 515 patients (18.4%) died within 90 days of surgery. Over the first 24 h after hospital admission, each hour of surgical delay beyond hospital admission was associated with a median (IQR) decrease in 90-day survival of 2.2% (1.9-3.3%). No statistically significant association between surgical delay by hour and 90-day mortality was shown; crude and adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence interval 1.016 (1.004-1.027) and 1.003 (0.989-1.017), respectively. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the primary finding. In the present population-based cohort study of high-risk patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery, no statistically significant adjusted association between mortality and surgical delay was found. Additional research in diagnosis-specific subgroups of high-risk patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery is warranted.

  13. Can the ABCD Score be dichotomised to identify high-risk patients with transient ischaemic attack in the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet E; Coughlan, Kelly; Bladin, Christopher

    2007-02-01

    Recent evidence shows a substantial short-term risk of ischaemic stroke after transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Identification of patients with TIA with a high short-term risk of stroke is now possible through the use of the "ABCD Score", which considers age, blood pressure, clinical features and duration of symptoms predictive of stroke. To evaluate the ability of dichotomising the ABCD Score to predict stroke at 7 and 90 days in a population with TIA presenting to an emergency department. A retrospective audit was conducted on all probable or definite TIAs presenting to the emergency department of a metropolitan hospital from July to December 2004. The ABCD Score was applied to 98 consecutive patients with TIA who were reviewed for subsequent strokes within 90 days. Patients obtaining an ABCD Score > or = 5 were considered to be at high risk for stroke. Dichotomising the ABCD Score categorised 48 (49%) patients with TIA at high risk for stroke (ABCD Score > or = 5). This high-risk group contained all four strokes that occurred within 7 days (sensitivity 100% (95% confidence interval (CI) 40% to 100%), specificity 53% (95% CI 43% to 63%), positive predictive value 8% (95% CI 3% to 21%) and negative predictive value 100% (95% CI 91% to 100%)), and six of seven occurring within 90 days (sensitivity 86% (95% CI 42% to 99%), specificity 54% (95% CI 43% to 64%), positive predictive value 12.5% (95% CI 5% to 26%) and negative predictive value 98% (95% CI 88% to 100%)). Removal of the "age" item from the ABCD Score halved the number of false-positive cases without changing its predictive value for stroke. In this retrospective analysis, dichotomising the ABCD Score was overinclusive but highly predictive in identifying patients with TIA at a high short-term risk of stroke. Use of the ABCD Score in the emergency care of patients with TIA is simple, efficient and provides a unique opportunity to prevent stroke in this population of patients.

  14. Determining optimum flash patterns for emergency service vehicles: an experimental investigation using high definition film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sally; Wylde, Julie; Langham, Martin; Morrow, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    An investigation of how emergency vehicle lighting (EVL) can be improved is reported with reference to an analysis of police vehicle road traffic accidents (Study 1). In Study 2, 37 regular drivers were shown film clips of a marked police vehicle, in which flash rate (1 Hz, 4 Hz) and pattern (single, triple pulse) were varied on the blue Light Emitting Diode (LED) roofbar. Results indicate a 4 Hz flash rate conveys greater urgency than a 1 Hz rate, while a 1 Hz, single flash combination was ranked the least urgent of all combinations. Participants claimed they would leave significantly more space before pulling out in front of an approaching police car (gap acceptance) in the 4 Hz single pulse condition in comparison to other EVL combinations. The preliminary implications for which flash characteristics could prove most optimal for emergency service use are discussed with regard to effects on driver perception and expected driving behaviour. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel model of lethal Hendra virus infection in African green monkeys and the effectiveness of ribavirin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockx, Barry; Bossart, Katharine N; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B; Hickey, Andrew C; Brining, Douglas; Callison, Julie; Safronetz, David; Marzi, Andrea; Kercher, Lisa; Long, Dan; Broder, Christopher C; Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2010-10-01

    The henipaviruses, Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV), are emerging zoonotic paramyxoviruses that can cause severe and often lethal neurologic and/or respiratory disease in a wide variety of mammalian hosts, including humans. There are presently no licensed vaccines or treatment options approved for human or veterinarian use. Guinea pigs, hamsters, cats, and ferrets, have been evaluated as animal models of human HeV infection, but studies in nonhuman primates (NHP) have not been reported, and the development and approval of any vaccine or antiviral for human use will likely require efficacy studies in an NHP model. Here, we examined the pathogenesis of HeV in the African green monkey (AGM) following intratracheal inoculation. Exposure of AGMs to HeV produced a uniformly lethal infection, and the observed clinical signs and pathology were highly consistent with HeV-mediated disease seen in humans. Ribavirin has been used to treat patients infected with either HeV or NiV; however, its utility in improving outcome remains, at best, uncertain. We examined the antiviral effect of ribavirin in a cohort of nine AGMs before or after exposure to HeV. Ribavirin treatment delayed disease onset by 1 to 2 days, with no significant benefit for disease progression and outcome. Together our findings introduce a new disease model of acute HeV infection suitable for testing antiviral strategies and also demonstrate that, while ribavirin may have some antiviral activity against the henipaviruses, its use as an effective standalone therapy for HeV infection is questionable.

  16. High dose rate prostate brachytherapy: an overview of the rationale, experience and emerging applications in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challapalli, A; Jones, E; Harvey, C; Hellawell, G O; Mangar, S A

    2012-01-01

    The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy places this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in radiotherapy. This review article will explore the rationale for HDR brachytherapy as a highly conformal method of dose delivery and safe dose escalation to the prostate, in addition to the particular radiobiological advantages it has over low dose rate and external beam radiotherapy. The encouraging outcome data and favourable toxicity profile will be discussed before looking at emerging applications for the future and how this procedure will feature alongside stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:23118099

  17. Myxoma virus M130R is a novel virulence factor required for lethal myxomatosis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, John W; Werden, Steven J; Wang, Fuan; McKillop, William M; Jimenez, June; Villeneuve, Danielle; McFadden, Grant; Dekaban, Gregory A

    2009-09-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) is a highly lethal, rabbit-specific poxvirus that induces a disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits. In an effort to understand the function of predicted immunomodulatory genes we have deleted various viral genes from MV and tested the ability of these knockout viruses to induce lethal myxomatosis. MV encodes a unique 15 kD cytoplasmic protein (M130R) that is expressed late (12h post infection) during infection. M130R is a non-essential gene for MV replication in rabbit, monkey or human cell lines. Construction of a targeted gene knockout virus (vMyx130KO) and infection of susceptible rabbits demonstrate that the M130R knockout virus is attenuated and that loss of M130R expression allows the rabbit host immune system to effectively respond to and control the lethal effects of MV. M130R expression is a bona fide poxviral virulence factor necessary for full and lethal development of myxomatosis.

  18. Models for pulmonary lethality and morbidity after irradiation from internal and external sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.; Filipy, R.E.; Hahn, E.F.

    1989-05-01

    This report provides a hazard-function model for estimating the risk of death from radiation pneumonitis and/or pulmonary fibrosis following a light-water nuclear power accident. A similar model is also provided for estimating the prevalence of respiratory functional morbidity among those that survive death from acute effects. Hazard-function models for lethality and for morbidity were constructed using the cumulative hazard estimator H, which is related to the risk estimator R through the equation R = 1-exp(-H). The estimator H can be calculated using information provided in the report. The method of calculation depends on the exposure scenario. In general, the total normalized dose X for lethality or for morbidity is calculated. For lethality, X = 1 corresponds to a median lethal dose (LD/sub 50/); for morbidity, X = 1 corresponds to a median effective dose (ED/sub 50/). H is related to X by the equation H = 1n(2)X/sup V/, where V depends on the type of radiation (or radiations) involved. Contributions to X can arise from each of two main modes of exposure: (1) brief exposure of the lung, at a relatively high dose rate, to mainly external gammas, followed by (2) chronic internal alpha, and/or beta, and/or gamma irradiation of the lung. Equations are provided for calculating the contributions to X from both modes of exposure. 73 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A Power System Emergency Control Scheme in the Presence of High Wind Power Penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseinzadeh, Bakhtyar

    . Utilization of all of locally measurable variables, e.g. frequency, its rate of change, voltage drop, power flow direction under an integrated decentralized plan is done in this project, in order to improve the grid reliability. The proposed scheme benefits from a decentralized strategy, which reduces....... The load-frequency control as an ancillary service provided by renewable energy sources and load shedding as an emergency control should be localized. It means that the active power deficit should be compensated locally at vicinity of event location in order to avoid transferring the demanded active power...... from distant units to the incidence place. In this thesis, localization of both load-frequency control an load shedding are fulfilled using locally measured voltage drop data in the decentralized control strategy. The proposed load shedding scheme is coordinated with existing plant protection relays...

  20. Lethal and sub-lethal responses of native freshwater mussels exposed to granular Bayluscide®, a sea lamprey larvicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Teresa; Boogaard, Michael A.; Gray, Brian R.; Hubert, Terrance D.; Schloesser, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) poses a substantial threat to fish communities in the Great Lakes. Efforts to control sea lamprey populations typically involve treating tributary streams with lampricides on a recurring cycle. The presence of a substantial population of larval sea lampreys in the aquatic corridor between Lakes Huron and Erie prompted managers to propose a treatment using the granular formulation of Bayluscide® that targets larval sea lampreys that reside in sediments. However, these treatments could cause adverse effects on native freshwater mussels—imperiled animals that also reside in sediments. We estimated the risk of mortality and sub-lethal effects among eight species of adult and sub-adult mussels exposed to Bayluscide® for durations up to 8 h to mimic field applications. Mortality was appreciable in some species, especially in sub-adults (range, 23–51%). The lethal and sub-lethal effects were positively associated with the duration of exposure in most species and life stage combinations. Estimates of the median time of exposure that resulted in lethal and sub-lethal effects suggest that sub-adults were often affected by Bayluscide® earlier than adults. Siphoning activity and burrowing position of mussels during exposure may have moderated the uptake of Bayluscide® and may have influenced lethal and sub-lethal responses. Given that the various species and life stages were differentially affected, it will be difficult to predict the effects of Bayluscide® treatments on mussels.

  1. Lethal and sublethal effects of an insect growth regulator, pyriproxyfen, on obliquebanded leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sial, Ashfaq A; Brunner, Jay F

    2010-04-01

    The obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is one of the most destructive pests of tree fruit in Washington. The development of insecticide resistance in C. rosaceana has led us to explore new management tactics. The use of very low doses of insecticides that have strong sublethal effects represents an environmentally friendly option to improve existing integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. We tested the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen to determine its lethal and sublethal effects on growth and development of C. rosaceana. A leaf-disk bioassay was used to test seven concentrations of pyriproxyfen ranging from 0 to 30 ppm on fifth-instar C. rosaceana. Male and female larvae were assessed separately for mortality as well as other parameters of growth and development. The LC, values for males and females were 2.4 and 4.8 ppm, respectively. The response to pyriproxyfen was concentration-dependent: only 5-6% of the larvae treated with the highest concentration emerged as morphologically normal adults compared with 86% emergence in the controls. The pupation and adult emergence was significantly delayed at concentrations higher than 1 ppm. The weights of C. rosaceana pupae and adults were significantly increased, whereas fecundity and fertility were significantly reduced at a sublethal concentration of 0.3 ppm. We conclude that both lethal and sublethal effects might exhibit significant impacts on the population dynamics of C. rosaceana in tree fruit orchards treated with low concentrations of pyriproxyfen.

  2. Lethal effects of selected novel pesticides on immature stages of Trichogramma pretiosum (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Ashraf; Ruberson, John R

    2017-12-01

    Trichogramma pretiosum Riley is an important egg parasitoid and biological control agent of caterpillar pests. We studied the acute toxicity of 20 pesticides (14 insecticides/miticides, three fungicides and three herbicides) exposed to recommended field rates. Egg, larval, and pupal stages of the parasitoid in their hosts were dipped in formulated solutions of the pesticides and evaluated 10 days later for percentage of host eggs with holes, number of parasitoids emerged per egg with holes, and stage-specific mortality of immature as well as adult wasps within the host eggs. Seven insecticides (buprofezin, chlorantraniliprole, spirotetramat, flonicamid, flubendiamide) and miticides (spiromesifen, cyflumetofen), one herbicide (nicosulfuron), and three fungicides (myclobutanil, pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin + tebuconazole) caused no significant mortality to immature stages or pre-emergent adult parasitoids relative to controls. By contrast, seven insecticides/miticides (abamectin, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, fipronil, novaluron, spinetoram, tolfenpyrad) adversely affected immature and pre-emergent adult T. pretiosum, with tolfenpyrad being particularly lethal. Two herbicides had moderate (glufosinate ammonium) to severe (s-metolachlor) acute lethal effects on the immature parasitoids. This study corroborates earlier findings with adult T. pretiosum. Over half of the pesticides - and all the fungicides - tested in the current study would appear to be compatible with the use of T. pretiosum in integrated pest management programs, with respect to acute parasitoid mortality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Overproduced ethylene causes programmed cell death leading to temperature-sensitive lethality in hybrid seedlings from the cross Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Marubashi, Wataru

    2003-09-01

    Reproductive isolation mechanisms (RIMs) often become obstacles in crossbreeding. Hybrid lethality is a subtype of RIM but its physiological mechanism remains poorly elucidated. Interspecific hybrids of Nicotiana suaveolens Lehm. x N. tabacum L. cv. Hicks-2 expressed temperature-sensitive lethality. This lethality was induced by programmed cell death (PCD) that was accompanied by the characteristic changes of animal apoptosis in hybrid seedlings at 28 degrees C but not at 36 degrees C. When hybrid seedlings were cultured at 28 degrees C, DNA fragmentation started in the cotyledon, and nuclear fragmentation subsequently progressed with lethal symptoms spreading throughout the seedlings. At 28 degrees C, ethylene production in hybrid seedlings was detectable at a high level compared with the level in parental seedlings. In contrast, the ethylene production rate in hybrid seedlings cultured at 36 degrees C was equal to that in parental seedlings. Treatment with ethylene biosynthetic inhibitors, amino-oxyacetic acid and amino-ethoxyvinyl glycine, suppressed lethal symptoms and apoptotic changes, and also prolonged survival of hybrid seedlings. Thus, the increase in the ethylene production rate correlated closely with expression of lethal symptoms and apoptotic changes in hybrid seedlings. From these observations, we conclude that overproduced ethylene acts as an essential factor mediating PCD and subsequent lethality in hybrid seedlings. Furthermore, the present study has provided the first evidence that ethylene is involved in the phenomenon of hybrid lethality.

  4. Facile induction of apoptosis into plant cells associated with temperature-sensitive lethality shown on interspecific hybrid from the cross Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T; Marubashi, W; Niwa, M

    2001-02-01

    Two lines of suspension culture cells were obtained from a hybrid seedling of Nicotiana suaveolens Lehm. x N. tabacum L. cv. Hicks-2 expressing temperature-sensitive lethality. One of them (LH line) was inducible cell death in accordance with the lethality at 28 degrees C but not under high-temperature conditions (36 degrees C). Another one (SH line) lost the lethality and survived at 28 degrees C. The cells of LH line showed apoptotic changes when they were cultured at 28 degrees C. Fragmentation of nuclei was correlated with the lethality in the cells, as confirmed by fluorimetry of the nuclear DNA using laser scanning cytometry. Agarose gel analysis of DNA extracted from the cells expressing the lethality revealed a specific ladder pattern suggesting nucleosomal fragmentation that is one of the biochemical characteristics of apoptosis. From these facts, we confirmed that the process of cell death leading to hybrid lethality in the cells is certainly apoptosis. Hybrid cells were used in the experiments to estimate the point of no return in temperature-sensitive lethality and to examine the influence of cation in DNA fragmentation during apoptosis. The utility of hybrid cells as an experimental system for studies of hybrid lethality and apoptosis in plants was confirmed.

  5. Lethal Surveillance: Drones and the Geo-History of Modern War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindervater, Katharine Hall

    Interdisciplinary both in scope and method, my dissertation, Lethal Surveillance: Drones and the Geo-History of Modern War, examines the history of drone technology from the start of the 20th century to the present in order to understand the significance of the increasing centrality of drones to current American military engagements and security practices more generally. Much of the scholarship on drones and many other contemporary military technologies tends to view the technology as radically new, missing both the historical development of these objects as well as the perspectives and rationalities that are embedded in their use. For this research, I focused on three main periods of drone research and development: the early years of World War I and II in the UK, the Cold War, and the 1990s. In studying this history of the drone, I found that two key trends emerge as significant: the increasing importance of information to warfare under the rubric of intelligence, reconnaissance and surveillance; and a shift toward more dynamic, speedier, and individualized targeting practices. I argue that the widespread use of drones today thus represents the culmination of attempts in war to effectively link these two trends, creating a practice I call lethal surveillance -- with the armed Predator effectively closing the loop between identifying and killing targets. The concept of lethal surveillance, which in my dissertation I place squarely within the histories of modern scientific thinking and Western liberal governance, allows us to see how techniques of Western state power and knowledge production are merging with practices of killing and control in new ways, causing significant changes to both the operations of the state and to practices of war. Framing the drone through the lens of lethal surveillance, therefore, allows us to see the longer histories the drone is embedded in as well as other security practices it is connected to.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, Torrance type

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause platyspondylic lethal skeletal dysplasia, torrance type, and define a novel subfamily within the type 2 collagenopathies. ... What is newborn screening? New Pages type 2 diabetes mitochondrial complex I deficiency mitochondrial complex V deficiency ...

  7. High health satisfaction among emerging adults with diabetes: Factors predicting resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corathers, Sarah D; Kichler, Jessica C; Fino, Nora F; Lang, Wei; Lawrence, Jean M; Raymond, Jennifer K; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P; Dabelea, Dana; Liese, Angela D; Saydah, Sharon H; Seid, Michael; Dolan, Lawrence M

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to identify factors contributing to health satisfaction outcomes among emerging adults (ages 18-25) with diabetes. SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study participants whose diabetes was prevalent in 2001 and were ≥18 years of age when they completed a 2008-2009 follow-up survey (n = 340) were included. We developed a health resilience model (HRM) to identify potentially modifiable factors (anticipatory guidance, social support, physical activity, quality of life) associated with health outcomes (satisfaction with health care, overall personal health, self-report of hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]). Proportional odds logistic regression models were used to examine relationships between modifiable factors and health outcomes while adjusting for predetermined characteristics; linear regression models were used for reported HbA1c. Comparison of participants who reported HbA1c versus nonreporters was conducted. A majority (70%) of participants rated satisfaction with health care ≥7 out of 10, and most (71%) rated overall health as good, very good, or excellent. Satisfaction with health care was independent of change in provider between the ages of 17 and 24. After controlling for predetermined characteristics, we found that the odds of increased satisfaction with health care and overall personal health were 1.3 and 1.2 greater, respectively, when participants discussed additional diabetes-related anticipatory guidance topics with a provider and 1.3 and 2.1, respectively, for each 10-unit change in quality of life score. Relationship between HbA1c level and modifiable factors was not significant; however, participants reporting HbA1c had higher ratings of health care and overall health versus nonreporters. HRM describes relationships between modifiable factors and patient-reported outcomes of satisfaction with health care and overall personal health among a cohort of ethnically and racially diverse emerging adults with longstanding diabetes, over half of

  8. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    OpenAIRE

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiatio...

  9. Re-emergence of amantadine-resistant variants among highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Bagato, Ola; Kandeil, Ahmed; Mostafa, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Sara H; Hassanneen, Hamdi M; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A; Kayali, Ghazi

    2016-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus continues to undergo substantial evolution. Emergence of antiviral resistance among H5N1 avian influenza viruses is a major challenge in the control of pandemic influenza. Numerous studies have focused on the genetic and evolutionary dynamics of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes; however, studies on the susceptibility of HPAI H5N1 viruses to amantadine and genetic diversity of the matrix (M) gene are limited. Accordingly, we studied the amantadine susceptibility of the HPAI H5N1 viruses isolated in Egypt during 2006-2015 based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. We analyzed data on 253 virus sequences and constructed a phylogenetic tree to calculate selective pressures on sites in the M2 gene associated with amantadine-resistance among different clades. Selection pressure was identified in the transmembrane domain of M2 gene at positions 27 and 31. Amantadine-resistant variants emerged in 2007 but were not circulating between 2012 and 2014. By 2015, amantadine-resistant HPAI H5N1 viruses re-emerged. This may be associated with the uncontrolled prescription of amantadine for prophylaxis and control of avian influenza infections in the poultry farm sector in Egypt. More epidemiological research is required to verify this observation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. mRNA Expression Signature of Gleason Grade Predicts Lethal Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Kathryn L.; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Fall, Katja; Pawitan, Yudi; Hoshida, Yujin; Kraft, Peter; Stark, Jennifer R.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Perner, Sven; Finn, Stephen; Calza, Stefano; Flavin, Richard; Freedman, Matthew L.; Setlur, Sunita; Sesso, Howard D.; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Martin, Neil; Kantoff, Philip W.; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Rubin, Mark A.; Loda, Massimo; Golub, Todd R.; Andrén, Ove; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Prostate-specific antigen screening has led to enormous overtreatment of prostate cancer because of the inability to distinguish potentially lethal disease at diagnosis. We reasoned that by identifying an mRNA signature of Gleason grade, the best predictor of prognosis, we could improve prediction of lethal disease among men with moderate Gleason 7 tumors, the most common grade, and the most indeterminate in terms of prognosis. Patients and Methods Using the complementary DNA–mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay, we measured the mRNA expression of 6,100 genes in prostate tumor tissue in the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort (n = 358) and Physicians' Health Study (PHS; n = 109). We developed an mRNA signature of Gleason grade comparing individuals with Gleason ≤ 6 to those with Gleason ≥ 8 tumors and applied the model among patients with Gleason 7 to discriminate lethal cases. Results We built a 157-gene signature using the Swedish data that predicted Gleason with low misclassification (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.91); when this signature was tested in the PHS, the discriminatory ability remained high (AUC = 0.94). In men with Gleason 7 tumors, who were excluded from the model building, the signature significantly improved the prediction of lethal disease beyond knowing whether the Gleason score was 4 + 3 or 3 + 4 (P = .006). Conclusion Our expression signature and the genes identified may improve our understanding of the de-differentiation process of prostate tumors. Additionally, the signature may have clinical applications among men with Gleason 7, by further estimating their risk of lethal prostate cancer and thereby guiding therapy decisions to improve outcomes and reduce overtreatment. PMID:21537050

  11. Acquisition Challenges of a Lethal Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    nearly two decades, and I am leading an organi- zation charged with developing drugs, vaccines and medical devices to treat emerging infectious diseases...tious diseases. Infectious diseases—whether naturally occurring or engi- neered with intent to harm —can cause serious consequences for a fighting force...rate associated with drug and vaccine development, our strategy is to advance several promising candidates concur- rently so that if one MCM fails

  12. Power System Planning: Emerging Practices Suitable for Evaluating the Impact of High-Penetration Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bebic, J.

    2008-02-01

    This report explores the impact of high-penetration renewable generation on electric power system planning methodologies and outlines how these methodologies are evolving to enable effective integration of variable-output renewable generation sources.

  13. [Application of non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring on high-risk surgical patients in the early stages after emergency admission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun-qiang; Li, Chun-sheng; Yang, Jia-yong; Zhu, Jay; Wo, Charles; Shoemaker, Willaim

    2003-12-01

    Pulmonary artery (PA) catheterization monitoring (Swan-Ganz) is usually not available to critically high-risk surgical patients before admission to ICU, where action to correct values derived from such monitoring may be too late. To explored the effect of non-invasive monitoring systems that allow hemodynamic monitoring during the early stages after trauma. The early temporal hemodynamic patterns after high-risk trauma with non-invasive monitoring systems were evaluated, and compared these to invasive PA monitoring. The study included 156 patients monitored shortly after admission to the emergency department. The non-invasive impedance cardiac output estimations under extenuating emergency conditions were similar to those of the thermodilution method: r=0.69, r(2)=0.87, Parterial hemoglobin desaturation, low transcutaneous oxygen and high transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension, and low oxygen consumption during initial resuscitation. Low flow and poor tissue perfusion were more pronounced in non-survivors by both METHODS. Multicomponent non-invasive monitoring systems offer continuous on-line, real-time display of hemodynamic data, they allow early recognition of circulatory dysfunction. Such systems provide information similar to that provided by the invasive thermodilution method, and are more effective and safer.

  14. Impact of high coverage of monovalent human rotavirus vaccine on Emergency Department presentations for rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Heather M; Muscatello, David J; Wood, James G; Snelling, Thomas L; Ferson, Mark J; Macartney, Kristine K

    2015-03-30

    Australia was one of the first countries to introduce nationally funded rotavirus vaccination. The program has had a substantial impact on both rotavirus and all-cause acute gastroenteritis (AGE) hospitalisations and rotavirus laboratory tests. Evidence for an impact on Emergency Department (ED) presentations is limited. This study assessed changes in ED presentations for rotavirus in children aged rotavirus vaccine (RV1, Rotarix(®), GlaxoSmithKline Australia Pty Ltd., Victoria, Australia). A time series analysis to examine trends in total non-admitted ED presentations for all-cause AGE and in the rotavirus-attributable fraction using data on rotavirus positive laboratory tests. A decline in the rate of non-admitted ED presentations for all-cause AGE was observed for all ages, being most notable in 1 year old children. Compared with the pre-vaccination period, we estimated the average weekly rate was lower across the first 4.5 years of the program for both all-cause AGE (18.3%; 70.5 versus 57.5 per 100,000 population) and rotavirus attributable (55.4%; 17.3 versus 7.7 per 100,000 population) presentations. In the fourth year of the program, estimated annual rotavirus attributable presentations were 77% lower than the pre-vaccination annual mean (996 versus 4300 per year). The program was associated with a substantial decline in rotavirus attributable non-admitted AGE presentations to ED among children aged <5 years. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lethality of MalE-LacZ hybrid protein shares mechanistic attributes with oxidative component of antibiotic lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriko; Gruber, Charley C; Yang, Jason H; Liu, Xiaobo; Braff, Dana; Yashaswini, Chittampalli N; Bhubhanil, Sakkarin; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Andreescu, Silvana; Collins, James J; Walker, Graham C

    2017-08-09

    Downstream metabolic events can contribute to the lethality of drugs or agents that interact with a primary cellular target. In bacteria, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been associated with the lethal effects of a variety of stresses including bactericidal antibiotics, but the relative contribution of this oxidative component to cell death depends on a variety of factors. Experimental evidence has suggested that unresolvable DNA problems caused by incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into nascent DNA followed by incomplete base excision repair contribute to the ROS-dependent component of antibiotic lethality. Expression of the chimeric periplasmic-cytoplasmic MalE-LacZ72-47 protein is an historically important lethal stress originally identified during seminal genetic experiments that defined the SecY-dependent protein translocation system. Multiple, independent lines of evidence presented here indicate that the predominant mechanism for MalE-LacZ lethality shares attributes with the ROS-dependent component of antibiotic lethality. MalE-LacZ lethality requires molecular oxygen, and its expression induces ROS production. The increased susceptibility of mutants sensitive to oxidative stress to MalE-LacZ lethality indicates that ROS contribute causally to cell death rather than simply being produced by dying cells. Observations that support the proposed mechanism of cell death include MalE-LacZ expression being bacteriostatic rather than bactericidal in cells that overexpress MutT, a nucleotide sanitizer that hydrolyzes 8-oxo-dGTP to the monophosphate, or that lack MutM and MutY, DNA glycosylases that process base pairs involving 8-oxo-dGTP. Our studies suggest stress-induced physiological changes that favor this mode of ROS-dependent death.

  16. Vigor and field emergence in "high oleic" sunflower seeds, in southeast of Buenos Aires province

    OpenAIRE

    Murcia, Mónica; Peretti, Anna; San Martino, Silvina; Pérez, Alejandra; del Longo, Olga; Argüello, Juan; Pereyra, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Sunflower crop was based, as yet, on high linoleic cultivars, but in the last years request for oil with higher content of oleic acid has increased, due to their dietary characteristics. At the beginning, high oleic cultivars were used to be sown in warm regions, but then the concern about growing it in temperate areas, as the south-east of Buenos Aires Province, was posed. In this region, early sowings are recommended, so that grain filling matches with a period of appropriate hydric and lig...

  17. High mortality after emergency room laparotomy in haemodynamically unstable trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Helle; Kofoed, Steen Christian; Hillingsø, Jens Georg

    2011-01-01

    Hypovolaemic shock is a major course of death in trauma patients. The mortality in patients in profound shock at the time of arrival is extremely high and we wanted to investigate the outcome of patients undergoing laparotomy at the Trauma Care Unit (TCU).......Hypovolaemic shock is a major course of death in trauma patients. The mortality in patients in profound shock at the time of arrival is extremely high and we wanted to investigate the outcome of patients undergoing laparotomy at the Trauma Care Unit (TCU)....

  18. A helicopter emergency medical service may allow faster access to highly specialised care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzali, Monika; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Centralization of the hospital system entails longer transport for some patients. A physician-staffed helicopter may provide effective triage, advanced management and fast transport to highly specialized treatment for time-critical patients. The aim of this study was to describe activity and poss......Centralization of the hospital system entails longer transport for some patients. A physician-staffed helicopter may provide effective triage, advanced management and fast transport to highly specialized treatment for time-critical patients. The aim of this study was to describe activity...... and possible beneficial effect of a physician-staffed helicopter in a one-year trial period in eastern Denmark....

  19. Comparison of Oral Health Status in Asia: Results for Eight Emerging and Five High Income Countries or Regions and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saekel, Ruediger

    To review the burden of oral disease by investigating the current situation of oral health status in selected countries within the regions of South, East and South-East Asia, with a view to determining which countries are performing better than others and why. The study is descriptive and observational in nature and the material is derived from existing databases. As this is a cross-sectional investigation, it offers evidence about relationships and influencing factors. If available, the longitudinal data is integrated. Amongst the emerging countries, the Chinese enjoy a relatively favourable dental health status and amongst the high income countries, the South Koreans exhibit the best dental health status by comparison. In contrast to the above-mentioned perception, caries levels are relatively low and occur in the early stages in most of the emerging Asian countries investigated, even though, for the most part, caries and periodontitis remain untreated. The hypothesis that, when countries climb the socioeconomic development ladder, caries levels increase and worsen if left untreated, leading to edentulousness, cannot be confirmed for most of the developing Asian countries under investigation. Probable reasons for this surprising finding is discussed and found to be in line with current knowledge in cariology. Interestingly, the high income Asian countries under investigation perform better than many Western European countries. Under the specific circumstances prevailing in the Asian countries under investigation, a preventive and tooth preserving dental strategy for the entire population should offer emerging countries great opportunities to maintain a relatively low level of caries. Utilising a strategy of this ilk, these countries could achieve improved dental health across the population with comparatively low resources.

  20. Combating highly resistant emerging pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis with novel salicylanilide esters and carbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, Zsuzsa; Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Szabó, Nóra; Senoner, Zsuzsanna; Horváti, Kata; Stolaříková, Jiřina; Dávid, Sándor; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-08-28

    In the Mycobacterium genus over one hundred species are already described and new ones are periodically reported. Species that form colonies in a week are classified as rapid growers, those requiring longer periods (up to three months) are the mostly pathogenic slow growers. More recently, new emerging species have been identified to lengthen the list, all rapid growers. Of these, Mycobacterium abscessus is also an intracellular pathogen and it is the most chemotherapy-resistant rapid-growing mycobacterium. In addition, the cases of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection are also increasing. Therefore there is an urgent need to find new active molecules against these threatening strains. Based on previous results, a series of salicylanilides, salicylanilide 5-chloropyrazinoates and carbamates was designed, synthesized and characterised. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro activity on M. abscessus, susceptible M. tuberculosis H37Rv, multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis MDR A8, M. tuberculosis MDR 9449/2006 and on the extremely-resistant Praha 131 (XDR) strains. All derivatives exhibited a significant activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the low micromolar range. Eight salicylanilide carbamates and two salicylanilide esters exhibited an excellent in vitro activity on M. abscessus with MICs from 0.2 to 2.1 μM, thus being more effective than ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. This finding is potentially promising, particularly, as M. abscessus is a threateningly chemotherapy-resistant species. M. tuberculosis H37Rv was inhibited with MICs from 0.2 μM, and eleven compounds have lower MICs than isoniazid. Salicylanilide esters and carbamates were found that they were effective also on MDR and XDR M. tuberculosis strains with MICs ≥1.0 μM. The in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50) was also determined on human MonoMac-6 cells, and selectivity index (SI) of the compounds was established. In general, salicylanilide

  1. Emerging High School Students' Problem Solving Trajectories Based on the Use of Dynamic Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Cristobal-Escalante, Cesar

    2008-01-01

    This study documents problem solving approaches that high school students develop as a result of using systematically Cabri-Geometry software. Results show that the use of the software becomes an important tool for students to construct dynamic representations of the problems that were used to identify and examine different mathematical relations.…

  2. Cartography of Emergency Department Visits for Asthma – Targeting High-Morbidity Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Lajoie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthma education should be offered with priority to populations with the highest asthma-related morbidity. In the present study, the aim was to identify populations with high-morbidity for asthma from the Quebec Health Insurance Board Registry, a large administrative database, to help the Quebec Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Network target its interventions.

  3. Emerging Consumerism and the Accelerated "Education Divide": The Case of Specialized High Schools in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyu-Yong

    2007-01-01

    This paper criticizes the neoliberal shift in Korean education toward educational consumerism by analyzing the boom in Specialized High schools (SHs). For its theoretical background, this paper discusses the issues of freedom, equal opportunity, and choice in education, and investigates how neoliberal consumerism has been encouraging the boom in…

  4. The emergence and effects of deviants in low and high status groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, D; Branscombe, NR; Spears, R; Doosje, B

    2002-01-01

    We test the proposition, derived from social identity theory and the subjective group dynamics model, that a group member who undermines the in-group's quest for positive status will be perceived as a "deviant." Using a minimal group paradigm, participants (N = 104) were assigned to either a high or

  5. Latino Emergent Bilingual Youth in High Schools: Transcaring Strategies for Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ofelia; Woodley, Heather Homonoff; Flores, Nelson; Chu, Haiwen

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the results of a study of Latino youth in New York City public high schools. We propose that the common element among the schools is what we call here "transcaring," an overarching culture of care that allows for the creation of third spaces within school, transcending traditional dichotomies around language,…

  6. A helicopter emergency medical service may allow faster access to highly specialised care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzali, Monika; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Centralization of the hospital system entails longer transport for some patients. A physician-staffed helicopter may provide effective triage, advanced management and fast transport to highly specialized treatment for time-critical patients. The aim of this study was to describe activity and poss...

  7. Life After High School Adjustment of Popular Teens in Emerging Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandstrom, M.J.; Cillessen, A.H.N.

    2010-01-01

    This project examines the adjustment sequelae of perceived popularity beyond high school, and the moderating role of relational aggression (RA) in this process. Yearly sociometric measures of popularity and RA were gathered across grades 9-12 for a sample of 264 adolescents in a lower-middle-class

  8. Evaluating sub-lethal effects of orchard-applied pyrethroids using video-tracking software to quantify honey bee behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Erin M; Augustin, Julie; Ellis, Marion D; Siegfried, Blair D

    2015-09-01

    Managed honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colonies are contracted to pollinate fruit and nut orchards improving crop quality and yield. Colonies placed in orchards are potentially exposed to pyrethroid insecticides used for broad-spectrum pest control. Pyrethroids have been reported to pose minimal risk to bees due to their low application rates in the field and putative repellent properties. This repellency is believed to alter foraging behavior with the benefit of preventing bees from encountering a lethal dose in the field. However, sub-lethal exposure to pyrethroids may adversely impact bee behavior potentially resulting in social dysfunction or disruption of foraging. This study quantified behaviors associated with sub-lethal exposure to orchard-applied pyrethroids including, lambda-cyhalothrin, esfenvalerate, and permethrin, using video tracking software, Ethovision XT (Noldus Information Technologies). Bee locomotion, social interaction, and time spent near a food source were measured over a 24-h period. Bees treated with a pyrethroid traveled 30-71% less than control bees. Social interaction time decreased by 43% for bees treated with a high sub-lethal dose of esfenvalerate. Bees exposed to a high sub-lethal dose of permethrin spent 67% less time in social interaction and spent more than 5 times as long in the food zone compared to control bees. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A live gI/gE-deleted pseudorabies virus (PRV) protects weaned piglets against lethal variant PRV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yue; Xu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiaowan; Li, Ping; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Jun; Fan, Yi; Sun, Xiangang; Zhu, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Emerging pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant has led to frequent outbreaks of PRV infection among Bartha-K61-vaccinated swine population in Chinese swine farms and caused high mortality in pigs of all age since late 2011. Here, we generated a gE/gI-deleted PRV (rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP) based on PRV variant strain (PRV-XJ) through homologous DNA recombination. Compared to parental strain, rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP showed similar growth kinetics in vitro. Its safety and immunogenicity were evaluated in weaned piglets. Our results showed that piglets immunized with rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP did not exhibit any clinical symptoms, and a high level of gB-specific antibody was detected. After lethal challenge with variant PRV (PRV-FJ strain), all vaccinated piglets survived without showing any clinical symptoms except slight fever within 7 days post-challenge. In unvaccinated piglets, typical clinical symptoms of pseudorabies were observed, and the piglets were all died at 5 days post-challenge. These results indicated that a live rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP vaccine could be a maker vaccine candidate to control the currently epidemic pseudorabies in China.

  10. The emerging biofuel crop Camelina sativa retains a highly undifferentiated hexaploid genome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagale, Sateesh; Koh, Chushin; Nixon, John; Bollina, Venkatesh; Clarke, Wayne E; Tuteja, Reetu; Spillane, Charles; Robinson, Stephen J; Links, Matthew G; Clarke, Carling; Higgins, Erin E; Huebert, Terry; Sharpe, Andrew G; Parkin, Isobel A P

    2014-04-23

    Camelina sativa is an oilseed with desirable agronomic and oil-quality attributes for a viable industrial oil platform crop. Here we generate the first chromosome-scale high-quality reference genome sequence for C. sativa and annotated 89,418 protein-coding genes, representing a whole-genome triplication event relative to the crucifer model Arabidopsis thaliana. C. sativa represents the first crop species to be sequenced from lineage I of the Brassicaceae. The well-preserved hexaploid genome structure of C. sativa surprisingly mirrors those of economically important amphidiploid Brassica crop species from lineage II as well as wheat and cotton. The three genomes of C. sativa show no evidence of fractionation bias and limited expression-level bias, both characteristics commonly associated with polyploid evolution. The highly undifferentiated polyploid genome of C. sativa presents significant consequences for breeding and genetic manipulation of this industrial oil crop.

  11. Scapulothoracic dissociation: An emerging high-energy trauma in medical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew McCague

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Scapulothoracic dissociation (STD is a devastating consequence of high-energy trauma sustained by the shoulder girdle that can easily result in rapid mortality. Since described by Oreck et al. in 1984, STD has been reported in a handful of journals and individual case series, though is still considered a rare occurrence in the context of shoulder injuries. In this report, we examine the case of a 25-year-old female involved in a high-speed rollover auto accident. Unique to this case was the discovery of a completely transected axillary artery and vein with intracorporeal bleeding and complete avulsion of the ipsilateral brachial plexus requiring immediate ligation of the vessels followed by interval above-elbow-amputation and later glenohumeral disarticulation.

  12. Emerging Role of High-Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) in Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ruochan; Hou, Wen; Zhang, Qiuhong; Kang, Rui; Fan, Xue-Gong; Tang, Daolin

    2013-01-01

    Damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules are essential for the initiation of innate inflammatory responses to infection and injury. The prototypic DAMP molecule, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is an abundant architectural chromosomal protein that has location-specific biological functions: within the nucleus as a DNA chaperone, within the cytosol to sustain autophagy and outside the cell as a DAMP molecule. Recent research indicates that aberrant activation of HMGB1 signaling ...

  13. Lethal altruists: itineraries along the dark outskirts of moralistic prosociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobeña, Adolf

    2009-06-01

    Suicide bombers are the most spectacular example of an impregnable morality toward one's own group that co-exists alongside a radical amorality toward members of another group. Suicide bombers carry out massacres with the utter conviction that they are acting in accordance with values associated with the greatest good. Suicidal attacks are conceived as a form of lethal altruism, a damaging drift from human cooperative tendencies and one that requires a detailed understanding. Strong altruism is a main component of a cluster of temperamental traits that may distinguish individuals with propensities to put themselves at the threshold of major progroupal sacrifices. Among all populations there will be pockets of extreme moralizing altruists willing to make high investments in others, investments involving great personal risk. A research framework is outlined to study other constitutionally based traits (dominance, boldness, aggressiveness, machiavellianism, narcissism, messianism, credulity/religiosity) that may also contribute to the different roles played by self-recruited members in combative cells that in turn are crucial for the ties they establish and the tactics employed. Individually oriented research may reveal profiles distinguishing between potential inducers and performers of martyrdom. As a rule, machiavellistic leaders do not usually squander their personal choices on group commitments; on the contrary, their gift for simulating altruism is used for individual gains. Potential martyrs, on the other hand, are by definition squanderers. Evidence accrued in recent years in fields going from behavioral economics to cognitive neuroimaging makes such an endeavor feasible.

  14. The emerging process of Top Down mass spectrometry for protein analysis: biomarkers, protein-therapeutics, and achieving high throughput†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellie, John F.; Tran, John C.; Lee, Ji Eun; Ahlf, Dorothy R.; Thomas, Haylee M.; Ntai, Ioanna; Catherman, Adam D.; Durbin, Kenneth R.; Zamdborg, Leonid; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Thomas, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Top Down mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as an alternative to common Bottom Up strategies for protein analysis. In the Top Down approach, intact proteins are fragmented directly in the mass spectrometer to achieve both protein identification and characterization, even capturing information on combinatorial post-translational modifications. Just in the past two years, Top Down MS has seen incremental advances in instrumentation and dedicated software, and has also experienced a major boost from refined separations of whole proteins in complex mixtures that have both high recovery and reproducibility. Combined with steadily advancing commercial MS instrumentation and data processing, a high-throughput workflow covering intact proteins and polypeptides up to 70 kDa is directly visible in the near future. PMID:20711533

  15. Exploring the Behaviour of Emerging Contaminants in the Water Cycle using the Capabilities of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollender, Juliane; Bourgin, Marc; Fenner, Kathrin B; Longrée, Philipp; Mcardell, Christa S; Moschet, Christoph; Ruff, Matthias; Schymanski, Emma L; Singer, Heinz P

    2014-11-01

    To characterize a broad range of organic contaminants and their transformation products (TPs) as well as their loads, input pathways and fate in the water cycle, the Department of Environmental Chemistry (Uchem) at Eawag applies and develops high-performance liquid chromatography (LC) methods combined with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS). In this article, the background and state-of-the-art of LC-HRMS/MS for detection of i) known targets, ii) suspected compounds like TPs, and iii) unknown emerging compounds are introduced briefly. Examples for each approach are taken from recent research projects conducted within the department. These include the detection of trace organic contaminants and their TPs in wastewater, pesticides and their TPs in surface water, identification of new TPs in laboratory degradation studies and ozonation experiments and finally the screening for unknown compounds in the catchment of the river Rhine.

  16. On-pump beating heart coronary surgery for high risk patients requiring emergency multiple coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Segesser Ludwig K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB with aortic cross-clamping and cardioplegic arrest remains the method of choice for patients requiring standard myocardial revascularization. Therefore, very high-risk patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome, unstable angina, onset of cardiac decompensation and requiring emergency multiple myocardial revascularization, can have a poor outcome. The on-pump beating heart technique can reduce the mortality and the morbidity in such a selected group of patients and this report describes our clinical experience. Methods Out of 290 patients operated for CABG from January 2005 to January 2006, 25 (8.6% selected high-risk patients suffering from life threatening coronary syndrome (mean age 69 ± 7 years and requiring emergency multiple myocardial revascularization, underwent on-pump beating heart surgery. The mean pre-operative left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF was 27 ± 8%. The majority of them (88% suffered of tri-vessel coronary disease and 6 (24% had a left main stump disease. Nine patients (35% were on severe cardiac failure and seven among them (28% received a pre-operative intra-aortic balloon pump. The pre-operative EuroScore rate was equal or above 8 in 18 patients (73%. Results All patients underwent on-pump-beating heart coronary revascularization. The mean number of graft/patient was 2.9 ± 0.6 and the internal mammary artery was used in 23 patients (92%. The mean CPB time was 84 ± 19 minutes. Two patients died during the recovery stay in the intensive care unit, and there were no postoperative myocardial infarctions between the survivors. Eight patients suffered of transitorily renal failure and 1 patient developed a sternal wound infection. The mean hospital stay was 12 ± 7 days. The follow-up was complete for all 23 patients survived at surgery and the mean follow-up time was 14 ± 5 months. One patient died during the follow-up for cardiac arrest and 2 patients required an

  17. High-energy radiation and polymers: A review of commercial processes and emerging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has been found to be widely applicable in modifying the structure and properties of polymers, and can be used to tailor the performance of either bulk materials or surfaces. Fifty years of research in polymer radiation chemistry has led to numerous applications of commercial and economic importance, and work remains active in the application of radiation to practical uses involving polymeric materials. This paper provides a survey of radiation-processing methods of industrial interest, ranging from technologies already commercially well established, through innovations in the active R&D stage which show exceptional promise for future commercial use. Radiation-processing technologies are discussed under the following categories: cross-linking of plastics and rubbers, curing of coatings and inks, heat-shrink products, fiber-matrix composites, chain-scission for processing control, surface modification, grafting, hydrogels, sterilization, natural product enhancement, plastics recycling, ceramic precursors, electronic property materials, ion-track membranes and lithography for microdevice production. In addition to new technological innovations utilizing conventional gamma and e-beam sources, a number of promising new applications make use of novel radiation types which include ion beams (heavy ions, light ions, highly focused microscopic beams and high-intensity pulses), soft X-rays which are focused, coherent X-rays (from a synchrotron) and e-beams which undergo scattering to generate patterns.

  18. An emerging adolescent health risk: caffeinated energy drink consumption patterns among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagba, Sunday; Langille, Donald; Asbridge, Mark

    2014-05-01

    To examine the prevalence, patterns, and correlates of energy drink use among adolescents, and determine whether more frequent use of energy drinks is associated with poorer health and behavioral outcomes. Data were from a 2012 cross-sectional survey of 8210 students in grades 7, 9, 10 and 12 attending public schools in Atlantic Canada. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine correlates of energy drink use patterns, including substance use, sensation seeking, risk of depression, and socioeconomic status. Nearly two-thirds of survey respondents (62%) reported consuming energy drinks at least once in the previous year, with about 20% reporting use once or more per month. Sensation seeking, depression, and substance use were all higher among energy drink users relative to non-users, and in higher frequency users relative to lower frequency users. The prevalence of energy drink consumption among high school students was high. The association of energy drinks with other potential negative health and behavioral outcomes suggests that use of these products may represent a marker for other activities that may negatively affect adolescent development, health and well-being. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The emergence of Clostridium thermocellum as a high utility candidate for consolidated bioprocessing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur eRagauskas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available First isolated in 1926, Clostridium thermocellum has recently received increased attention as a high utility candidate for use in consolidated bioprocessing applications. These applications, which seek to process lignocellulosic biomass directly into useful products such as ethanol, are gaining traction as economically feasible routes towards the production of fuel and other high value chemical compounds as the shortcomings of fossil fuels become evident. This review evaluates C. thermocellum’s role in this transitory process by highlighting recent discoveries relating to its genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic responses to varying biomass sources, with a special emphasis placed on providing an overview of its unique, multivariate enzyme cellulosome complex and the role that this structure performs during biomass degradation. Both naturally evolved and genetically engineered strains are examined in light of their unique attributes and responses to various biomass treatment conditions, and the genetic tools that have been employed for their creation are presented. Several future routes for potential industrial usage are presented, and it is concluded that, although there have been many advances to significantly improve C. thermocellum’s amenability to industrial use, several hurdles still remain to be overcome as this unique organism enjoys increased attention within the scientific community.

  20. Psychiatric emergency "surge capacity" following acts of terrorism and mass violence with high media impact: what is required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Cindy; Kashner, T Michael; Kashner, Tetyana K; Xuan, Lei; Larkin, Gregory L

    2011-01-01

    Adequate preparedness for acts of terrorism and mass violence requires a thorough understanding of the postdisaster mental health needs of all exposed groups, including those watching such events from a distance. This study examined emergency psychiatric treatment-seeking patterns following media exposure to four national terrorist or mass casualty events. An event was selected for study if (a) it precipitated local front-page headlines for >5 consecutive days and (b) emergency service psychiatrists identified it as specifically precipitating help-seeking in the study hospital. Four events qualified: the Oklahoma City bombing (1995), the Columbine High School (1999) and Wedgewood Baptist Church (1999) shootings and the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Time-series analyses were used to correct for autocorrelation in visit patterns during the postdisaster week, and equivalent time periods from years before and after each event were used as control years. Overall, disaster week census did not differ significantly from predisaster weeks, although 3-day nonsignificant decreases in visit rate were observed following each disaster. Treatment-seeking for anxiety-related issues showed a nonsignificant increase following each disaster, which became significant in the "all disaster" model (t=5.17; P=.006). Intensity of media coverage did not impact rate of help-seeking in any analysis. Although these sentinel US disasters varied in scope, method, geographic proximity to the study site, perpetrator characteristics, public response, sequelae and degree of media coverage, the extent to which they impacted emergency department treatment-seeking was minimal. Geographically distant mass violence and disaster events of the type and scope studied here may require only minimal mental health "surge capacity" in the days following the event. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High-pressure processing as emergent technology for the extraction of bioactive ingredients from plant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Xi

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure processing is a food processing technique that has shown great potentials in the food industry. Recently, it was developed to extract bioactive ingredients from plant materials, known as ultrahigh pressure extraction (UPE), taking advantages of time saving, higher extraction yields, fewer impurities in the extraction solution, minimal heat and can avoid thermal degradation on the activity and structure of bioactive components, and so on. This review provides an overview of the developments in the UPE of bioactive ingredients from plant material. Apart from a brief presentation of the theories of UPE and extraction equipment systems, the principal parameters that influence the extraction efficiency to be optimized in the UPE (e.g., solvent, pressure, temperature, extraction time, and the number of cycle) were discussed in detail, and finally the more recent applications of UPE for the extraction of active compounds from plant materials were summarized.

  2. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Current Status of an Emerging Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoli, Alessandro, E-mail: napoli.alessandro@gmail.com; Anzidei, Michele, E-mail: michele.anzidei@gmail.com; Ciolina, Federica, E-mail: federica.ciolina@gmail.com; Marotta, Eugenio, E-mail: eugenio.marotta@gmail.com; Cavallo Marincola, Beatrice, E-mail: beatrice.cavalloamarincola@gmail.com; Brachetti, Giulia, E-mail: giuliabrachetti@gmail.com; Mare, Luisa Di, E-mail: luisadimare@gmail.com; Cartocci, Gaia, E-mail: gaia.cartocci@gmail.com; Boni, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizioboni00@gmail.com; Noce, Vincenzo, E-mail: vinc.noce@hotmail.it; Bertaccini, Luca, E-mail: lucaone84@libero.it; Catalano, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.catalano@uniroma1.it [Sapienza, University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    The concept of ideal tumor surgery is to remove the neoplastic tissue without damaging adjacent normal structures. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was developed in the 1940s as a viable thermal tissue ablation approach. In clinical practice, HIFU has been applied to treat a variety of solid benign and malignant lesions, including pancreas, liver, prostate, and breast carcinomas, soft tissue sarcomas, and uterine fibroids. More recently, magnetic resonance guidance has been applied for treatment monitoring during focused ultrasound procedures (magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound, MRgFUS). Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging provides the best possible tumor extension and dynamic control of energy deposition using real-time magnetic resonance imaging thermometry. We introduce the fundamental principles and clinical indications of the MRgFUS technique; we also report different treatment options and personal outcomes.

  3. Age-associated changes in cognitive function in highly educated adults: emerging myths and realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, D M; Bachman, L D; Brand, D; Avet, T L

    2000-01-01

    The effects of education and continued intellectual engagement on age-associated cognitive change were investigated in a sample of 102 members of the professional and college communities in the metro Atlanta Georgia area (ages 30-76). All participants were administered a 60-minute battery that measured different aspects of memory, intelligence and cognitive performance. Age-associated declines in performance were detected on the digit symbol measure of intelligence. Conversely, positive but non-significant trends were detected on the picture completion, arithmetic and similarities subtests. Age effects were also noted on some measures of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and both versions of the Trail Making Test. The findings suggest that at least among the highly educated, certain cognitive abilities may receive some degree of amelioration as a consequence of continued intellectual engagement. However, the effects may be associated more with compensation rather than protection against the effects of ageing. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Defining "high-frequency" emergency department use: Does one size fit all for urban and rural areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Cai Lei; O'Driscoll, Teresa; Madden, Sharen; Blakelock, Brittany; Lawrance, Jennifer; Kelly, Len

    2017-09-01

    To suggest a functional definition for identification of "high-frequency" emergency department (ED) users in rural areas. Retrospective analysis of secondary data. Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre in northwestern Ontario. All ED visitors (N = 7121) in 2014 (N = 17 911 visits) in one rural hospital. The number of patients and visits identified using different definitions of high-frequency use. RESULTS: By using the most common definition of high-frequency use (≥ 4 annual visits) for our hospital data, we identified 16.7% of ED patients. Using 6 or more annual visits as the definition, we identified 7.9% of ED patients; these patients accounted for 31.3% of the ED visit workload. Using the definition of 6 or more identifies less than 10% of the patients, which is a similar result to using the lower visit standard (≥ 4) in urban centres. We suggest that the definition for high-frequency visitors to a rural ED should be 6 or more annual visits. Other useful subsets might include very high-frequency users (12 to 19 annual visits) and super users (≥ 20 annual visits). Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  5. Emerging flow injection mass spectrometry methods for high-throughput quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanita, Sergio C; Kaldon, Laura G

    2016-01-01

    Where does flow injection analysis mass spectrometry (FIA-MS) stand relative to ambient mass spectrometry (MS) and chromatography-MS? Improvements in FIA-MS methods have resulted in fast-expanding uses of this technique. Key advantages of FIA-MS over chromatography-MS are fast analysis (typical run time method simplicity, and FIA-MS offers high-throughput without compromising sensitivity, precision and accuracy as much as ambient MS techniques. Consequently, FIA-MS is increasingly becoming recognized as a suitable technique for applications where quantitative screening of chemicals needs to be performed rapidly and reliably. The FIA-MS methods discussed herein have demonstrated quantitation of diverse analytes, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, environmental contaminants, and endogenous compounds, at levels ranging from parts-per-billion (ppb) to parts-per-million (ppm) in very complex matrices (such as blood, urine, and a variety of foods of plant and animal origin), allowing successful applications of the technique in clinical diagnostics, metabolomics, environmental sciences, toxicology, and detection of adulterated/counterfeited goods. The recent boom in applications of FIA-MS for high-throughput quantitative analysis has been driven in part by (1) the continuous improvements in sensitivity and selectivity of MS instrumentation, (2) the introduction of novel sample preparation procedures compatible with standalone mass spectrometric analysis such as salting out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) with volatile solutes and NH4(+) QuEChERS, and (3) the need to improve efficiency of laboratories to satisfy increasing analytical demand while lowering operational cost. The advantages and drawbacks of quantitative analysis by FIA-MS are discussed in comparison to chromatography-MS and ambient MS (e.g., DESI, LAESI, DART). Generally, FIA-MS sits 'in the middle' between ambient MS and chromatography-MS, offering a balance between analytical capability and

  6. Meta-Analyses of Developing Brain Function in High-Risk and Emerged Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Soo eLee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Identifying early markers of brain function among those at high risk for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD could serve as a screening measure when children and adolescents present with sub-syndromal clinical symptoms prior to the conversion to bipolar disorder. Studies on the offspring of patients with bipolar disorder who are genetically at high risk (HR have each been limited in establishing a biomarker, while an analytic review in summarizing the findings offers an improvised opportunity towards that goal. Methods: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of mixed cognitive and emotional activities using the GingerALE software from the BrainMap Project was completed. The meta-analysis of all fMRI studies contained a total of 29 reports and included PBD, HR and typically developing (TD groups.Results: The HR group showed significantly greater activation relative to the TD group in the right DLPFC-insular-parietal-cerebellar regions. Similarly, the HR group exhibited greater activity in the right DLPFC and insula as well as the left cerebellum compared to patients with PBD. Patients with PBD, relative to TD, showed greater activation in regions of the right amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus, medial PFC, left ventral striatum, and cerebellum and lower activation in the right VLPFC and the DLPFC.Conclusions: The HR population showed increased activity, presumably indicating greater compensatory deployment, in relation to both the TD and the PBD, in the key cognition and emotion processing regions, such as the DLPFC, insula and parietal cortex. In contrast, patients with PBD, relative to HR and TD, showed decreased activity, which could indicate a decreased effort in multiple PFC regions in addition to widespread subcortical abnormalities, which are suggestive of a more entrenched disease process.

  7. Rural Indian tribal communities: an emerging high-risk group for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galwankar Sagar

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rural Indian tribes are anthropologically distinct with unique cultures, traditions and practices. Over the years, displacement and rapid acculturation of this population has led to dramatic changes in their socio-cultural and value systems. Due to a poor health infrastructure, high levels of poverty and ignorance, these communities are highly vulnerable to various health problems, especially, communicable diseases including HIV/AIDS. Our study sought to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding sexuality, and the risk factors associated with the spread of HIV/AIDS and STDs among these communities. Methods A nested cross sectional study was undertaken as part of the on going Reproductive and Child Health Survey. A total of 5,690 participants age 18–44 were recruited for this study. Data were obtained through home interviews, and focused on socio-demographics, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors regarding sexuality, HIV/AIDS and other STDs. Results The study revealed that only 22% of adults had even heard of AIDS, and 18 % knew how it is transmitted. In addition, only 5% knew that STDs and AIDS were related to each other. AIDS awareness among women was lower compared to men (14% vs.30 %. Regarding sexual practices, 35% of the respondents reported having had extramarital sexual encounters, with more males than females reporting extramarital affairs. Conclusion Lack of awareness, permissiveness of tribal societies for premarital or extra-marital sexual relationships, and sexual mixing patterns predispose these communities to HIV/AIDS and STD infections. There is a dire need for targeted interventions in order to curtail the increasing threat of HIV and other STDs among these vulnerable populations.

  8. Presence of Virus Neutralizing Antibodies in Cerebral Spinal Fluid Correlates with Non-Lethal Rabies in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyson, Christina M.; Huang, Chien-tsun; Salyards, Gregory; Harvey, Stephen B.; Chen, Zhenhai; He, Biao; Yang, Yang; Hooper, D. C.; Dietzchold, Berhnard; Fu, Zhen F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rabies is traditionally considered a uniformly fatal disease after onset of clinical manifestations. However, increasing evidence indicates that non-lethal infection as well as recovery from flaccid paralysis and encephalitis occurs in laboratory animals as well as humans. Methodology/Principal Findings Non-lethal rabies infection in dogs experimentally infected with wild type dog rabies virus (RABV, wt DRV-Mexico) correlates with the presence of high level of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and mild immune cell accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS). By contrast, dogs that succumbed to rabies showed only little or no VNA in the serum or in the CSF and severe inflammation in the CNS. Dogs vaccinated with a rabies vaccine showed no clinical signs of rabies and survived challenge with a lethal dose of wild-type DRV. VNA was detected in the serum, but not in the CSF of immunized dogs. Thus the presence of VNA is critical for inhibiting virus spread within the CNS and eventually clearing the virus from the CNS. Conclusions/Significance Non-lethal infection with wt RABV correlates with the presence of VNA in the CNS. Therefore production of VNA within the CNS or invasion of VNA from the periphery into the CNS via compromised blood-brain barrier is important for clearing the virus infection from CNS, thereby preventing an otherwise lethal rabies virus infection. PMID:24069466

  9. Brine shrimp lethality and acute oral toxicity studies on Swietenia mahagoni (Linn.) Jacq. seed methanolic extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahgal, Geethaa; Ramanathan, Surash; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Mordi, Mohd. Nizam; Ismail, Sabariah; Mansor, Sharif Mahsufi

    2010-01-01

    Background: The seeds of Swietenia mahagoni have been applied in folk medicine for the treatment of hypertension, diabetes, malaria, amoebiasis, cough, chest pain, and intestinal parasitism. Here we are the first to report on the toxicity of the Swietenia mahagoni crude methanolic (SMCM) seed extract. Methods: SMCM seed extract has been studied for its brine shrimp lethality and acute oral toxicity, in mice. Results: The brine shrimp lethality bioassay shows a moderate cytotoxicity at high concentration. The LC50 for the extract is 0.68 mg/ml at 24 hours of exposure. The LD50 of the SMCM seed extract for acute oral toxicity in mice is greater than 5000 mg/kg. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that Swietenia mahagoni crude methanolic seed extract may contain bioactive compounds of potential therapeutic significance which are relatively safe from toxic effects, and can compromise the medicinal use of this plant in folk medicine. PMID:21808570

  10. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting.

  11. Emergence and Stability of High-Pressure Resistance in Different Food-Borne Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlint, Dietrich; Rutten, Nele; Michiels, Chris W.

    2012-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing is becoming a valuable nonthermal food pasteurization technique, although there is reasonable concern that bacterial HHP resistance could compromise the safety and stability of HHP-processed foods. While the degree of natural HHP resistance has already been shown to vary greatly among and within bacterial species, a still unresolved question remains as to what extent different food-borne pathogens can actually develop HHP resistance. In this study, we therefore examined and compared the intrinsic potentials for HHP resistance development among strains of Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Listeria innocua using a selective enrichment approach. Interestingly, of all strains examined, the acquisition of extreme HHP resistance could be detected in only some of the E. coli strains, indicating that a specific genetic predisposition might be required for resistance development. Furthermore, once acquired, HHP resistance proved to be a very stable trait that was maintained for >80 generations in the absence of HHP exposure. Finally, at the mechanistic level, HHP resistance was not necessarily linked to derepression of the heat shock genes and was not related to the phenomenon of persistence. PMID:22344661

  12. Emergence and stability of high-pressure resistance in different food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlint, Dietrich; Rutten, Nele; Michiels, Chris W; Aertsen, Abram

    2012-05-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing is becoming a valuable nonthermal food pasteurization technique, although there is reasonable concern that bacterial HHP resistance could compromise the safety and stability of HHP-processed foods. While the degree of natural HHP resistance has already been shown to vary greatly among and within bacterial species, a still unresolved question remains as to what extent different food-borne pathogens can actually develop HHP resistance. In this study, we therefore examined and compared the intrinsic potentials for HHP resistance development among strains of Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Listeria innocua using a selective enrichment approach. Interestingly, of all strains examined, the acquisition of extreme HHP resistance could be detected in only some of the E. coli strains, indicating that a specific genetic predisposition might be required for resistance development. Furthermore, once acquired, HHP resistance proved to be a very stable trait that was maintained for >80 generations in the absence of HHP exposure. Finally, at the mechanistic level, HHP resistance was not necessarily linked to derepression of the heat shock genes and was not related to the phenomenon of persistence.

  13. Engineered repressible lethality for controlling the pink bollworm, a lepidopteran pest of cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil I Morrison

    Full Text Available The sterile insect technique (SIT is an environmentally friendly method of pest control in which insects are mass-produced, irradiated and released to mate with wild counterparts. SIT has been used to control major pest insects including the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saunders, a global pest of cotton. Transgenic technology has the potential to overcome disadvantages associated with the SIT, such as the damaging effects of radiation on released insects. A method called RIDL (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal is designed to circumvent the need to irradiate insects before release. Premature death of insects' progeny can be engineered to provide an equivalent to sterilisation. Moreover, this trait can be suppressed by the provision of a dietary antidote. In the pink bollworm, we generated transformed strains using different DNA constructs, which showed moderate-to-100% engineered mortality. In permissive conditions, this effect was largely suppressed. Survival data on cotton in field cages indicated that field conditions increase the lethal effect. One strain, called OX3402C, showed highly penetrant and highly repressible lethality, and was tested on host plants where its larvae caused minimal damage before death. These results highlight a potentially valuable insecticide-free tool against pink bollworm, and indicate its potential for development in other lepidopteran pests.

  14. The population genetics of X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Joseph; Johnson, Norman A; True, John R

    2011-11-01

    Epistatic interactions are widespread, and many of these interactions involve combinations of alleles at different loci that are deleterious when present in the same individual. The average genetic environment of sex-linked genes differs from that of autosomal genes, suggesting that the population genetics of interacting X-linked and autosomal alleles may be complex. Using both analytical theory and computer simulations, we analyzed the evolutionary trajectories and mutation-selection balance conditions for X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles. Allele frequencies follow a set of fundamental trajectories, and incompatible alleles are able to segregate at much higher frequencies than single-locus expectations. Equilibria exist, and they can involve fixation of either autosomal or X-linked alleles. The exact equilibrium depends on whether synthetic alleles are dominant or recessive and whether fitness effects are seen in males, females, or both sexes. When single-locus fitness effects and synthetic incompatibilities are both present, population dynamics depend on the dominance of alleles and historical contingency (i.e., whether X-linked or autosomal mutations occur first). Recessive synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency X-linked alleles, and dominant synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency autosomal alleles. Many X-autosome incompatibilities in natural populations may be cryptic, appearing to be single-locus effects because one locus is fixed. We also discuss the implications of these findings with respect to standing genetic variation and the origins of Haldane's rule.

  15. Overexpression of dilp2 causes nutrient-dependent semi-lethality in Drosophila

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    Yukiko eSato-Miyata

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF plays an important role as a systemic regulator of metabolism in multicellular organisms. Hyperinsulinemia, a high level of blood insulin, is often associated with impaired physiological conditions such as hypoglycemia, insulin resistance, and diabetes. However, due to the complex pathophysiology of hyperinsulinemia, the causative role of excess insulin/IGF signaling has remained elusive. To investigate the biological effects of a high level of insulin in metabolic homeostasis and physiology, we generated flies overexpressing Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2, which has the highest potential of promoting tissue growth among the Ilp genes in Drosophila. In this model, a UAS-Dilp2 transgene was overexpressed under control of sd-Gal4 that drives expression predominantly in developing imaginal wing discs. Overexpression of Dilp2 caused semi-lethality, which was partially suppressed by mutations in the insulin receptor (InR or Akt1, suggesting that dilp2-induced semi-lethality is mediated by the PI3K/Akt1 signaling. We found that dilp2-overexpressing flies exhibited intensive autophagy in fat body cells. Interestingly, the dilp2-induced autophagy as well as the semi-lethality was partially rescued by increasing the protein content relative to glucose in the media. Our results suggest that excess insulin/IGF signaling impairs the physiology of animals, which can be ameliorated by controlling the nutritional balance between proteins and carbohydrates, at least in flies.

  16. Accuracy assessment of time-concentration-effect models in predicting chronic lethality from acute toxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Foster L; Ellersieck, Mark R; Slaughter, Andrew R

    2011-03-01

    Acute-to-chronic (ACE) models (accelerated life testing, ALT; linear regression analysis, LRA) are used to estimate chemical concentrations resulting in low levels of chronic mortality from acute toxicity data, thereby greatly increasing the inferential value of acute data. We applied the ACE models to test data from 72 chemicals and 14 aquatic species (131 acute and 97 chronic tests) and then compared the results with reported chronic no observed effect concentrations (NOEC) and lowest observed effect concentrations (LOEC), as determined by traditional analysis of variance techniques. Acute-to-chronic models produced highly accurate chronic lethality estimates compared with reported chronic NOEC and LOEC values. Lethality estimates fell within two times reported NOEC-LOEC values 71% of the time and within five times 98% of the time. Therefore, ACE models are very appropriate for estimating chronic lethality from acute toxicity data when chronic data are absent and have high applicability in probability-based hazard and risk assessments. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  17. AIDS-related malignancies: emerging challenges in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Matthew C; Pantanowitz, Liron; Dezube, Bruce J

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are at increased risk of developing cancer, particularly in the later stages of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Despite the advent of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), malignancy in this population is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (ARL) are the most common AIDS-defining malignancies. AIDS-related KS varies from minimal to fulminant disease. Treatment decisions for AIDS-related KS are guided largely by the presence and extent of symptomatic disease. In addition to HAART, excellent treatments exist for both localized disease (topical gel, radiotherapy, and intralesional therapy) and advanced disease (liposomal anthracyclines, paclitaxel). Novel therapies that have become available to treat AIDS-related KS include angiogenesis inhibitors and antiviral agents. ARL comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies. With the immune restoration afforded by HAART, standard-dose chemotherapies now can be safely administered to treat ARL with curative intent. The role of analogous treatments used in HIV-negative patients, including monoclonal antibodies and autologous stem cell transplantation, requires further clarification in HIV-positive patients. HIV-infected patients also appear to be at increased risk for developing certain non-AIDS-defining cancers, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the optimal treatment of these neoplasms is at present uncertain, recent advances in chemotherapy, antiretroviral drugs, and supportive care protocols are allowing for more aggressive management of many of the AIDS-related cancers. This article provides an up-to-date review of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment of various AIDS-related malignancies that are likely to be encountered by an oncologist practicing in the current HAART era.

  18. Apoptotic cell death induces temperature-sensitive lethality in hybrid seedlings and calli derived from the cross of Nicotiana suaveolens x N. tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T; Marubashi, W; Niwa, M

    2000-10-01

    Hybrid lethality expressed in the interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana suaveolens Lehm. x N. tabacum L. cv. Hicks-2 is one of the mechanisms for reproductive isolation and it is temperature-sensitive. Apoptotic changes were detected in the cells of hybrid seedlings and calli expressing lethality at 28 degrees C but not under high-temperature conditions (36 degrees C), when the lethality is suppressed. Condensation of chromatin, fragmentation of nuclei and cytoplasmic reduction are the cytological changes associated with apoptosis leading to hybrid lethality. Fragmentation of nuclei was correlated with the lethal symptoms in both hybrid seedlings and calli, as confirmed by fluorimetry of the nuclear DNA using laser scanning cytometry. Agarose gel analysis of DNA extracted from hybrid seedlings and calli showing lethal symptoms revealed a specific ladder pattern suggesting nucleosomal fragmentation which is one of the biochemical changes of apoptosis. In-situ detection using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end labeling (TUNEL) showed that this process occurred in distinct stages on each organ of hybrid seedlings and centripetally in hybrid calli. From these results, we confirmed that cell death inducing hybrid lethality was indeed apoptosis.

  19. Prevention and control of emergent infectious disease with high specific antigen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongzhe; Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Nan

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the application of a new type of high specificity antigen sensor in detecting the viruses in sudden infectious diseases. Influenza A (H1N1) virus immunosensor was used for the respective determination of the six kinds of antigens of H1N1, H3N2 viral protein, HA protein of H7N9, influenza B virus, adenovirus, and EV71 virus of same dilution degree on the Screen Printed Carbon Electrode (SPCE), so as to test the specificity of the detection method. In addition, various batches of chick embryo allantoic saliva dilution simulation samples were also detected on their recovery (accuracy), repeatability (precision), and stability. The results were as follows: the linear equation was y = 121.33x + 168; the slope of the linear equation was 121.33 nA/HA unit, representing the sensitivity; correlation coefficient was R(2)=0.9921 > 0.90. Using Statistical Analysis System (SAS) software, we found that: the W values of seven sets of data after Shapiro-Wilk detection were 0.853, 0.991, 0.901, 0.906, 0.825, 0.974, and 0.992, respectively; P values were 0.247, 0.831, 0.386, 0.405, 0.174, 0.691, and 0.821, respectively, all of which were greater than 0.05, suggesting that normality was met. The results of homogeneity test for variance were as follows: F = 2.44, P = 0.0775 > 0.05, suggesting that homogeneity of variance was met. The parametric test results were as follows: F = 19114.0, P accuracy which can realize the accurate determination of A (H1N1) influenza virus in actual detection. Thus, the requirement of precision measurement of A (H1N1) flu virus detection can be met. Therefore, H1N1 electrochemical immune biosensors can be used in actual detection with good stability.

  20. Imaging Tasks Scheduling for High-Altitude Airship in Emergency Condition Based on Energy-Aware Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhimeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to the imaging tasks scheduling problem on high-altitude airship in emergency condition, the programming models are constructed by analyzing the main constraints, which take the maximum task benefit and the minimum energy consumption as two optimization objectives. Firstly, the hierarchy architecture is adopted to convert this scheduling problem into three subproblems, that is, the task ranking, value task detecting, and energy conservation optimization. Then, the algorithms are designed for the sub-problems, and the solving results are corresponding to feasible solution, efficient solution, and optimization solution of original problem, respectively. This paper makes detailed introduction to the energy-aware optimization strategy, which can rationally adjust airship’s cruising speed based on the distribution of task’s deadline, so as to decrease the total energy consumption caused by cruising activities. Finally, the application results and comparison analysis show that the proposed strategy and algorithm are effective and feasible.

  1. Sustained High HIV Incidence in Young Women in Southern Africa: Social, Behavioral and Structural Factors and Emerging Intervention Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Abigail; Colvin, Christopher J.; Kuo, Caroline; Swartz, Alison; Lurie, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Young women in southern Africa experience some of the highest incidence rates of HIV infection in the world. Across southern Africa, HIV prevalence among women increases rapidly between the teenage years and young adulthood. Adult HIV prevalence is 16.8 percent in South Africa, 23 percent in Botswana, 23 percent in Lesotho and 26.5 percent in Swaziland. Existing research has illuminated some of the key social, behavioral and structural factors associated with young women's disproportionate HIV risk, including gendered social norms that advantage male power in sexual relationships, and age disparities in relationships between younger women and older male partners. Important structural factors include the region's history of labor migration and legacy of family disruption, and entrenched social and economic inequalities. New interventions are emerging to address these high levels of HIV risk in the key population of young women, including structural interventions, biomedical prevention such as PrEP, and combined HIV prevention approaches. PMID:25855338

  2. Enhancing the antibiotic antibacterial effect by sub lethal tellurite concentrations: tellurite and cefotaxime act synergistically in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto C Molina-Quiroz

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria during the last decades has become a public health concern worldwide. Aiming to explore new alternatives to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria and given that the tellurium oxyanion tellurite is highly toxic for most microorganisms, we evaluated the ability of sub lethal tellurite concentrations to strengthen the effect of several antibiotics. Tellurite, at nM or µM concentrations, increased importantly the toxicity of defined antibacterials. This was observed with both gram negative and gram positive bacteria, irrespective of the antibiotic or tellurite tolerance of the particular microorganism. The tellurite-mediated antibiotic-potentiating effect occurs in laboratory and clinical, uropathogenic Escherichia coli, especially with antibiotics disturbing the cell wall (ampicillin, cefotaxime or protein synthesis (tetracycline, chloramphenicol, gentamicin. In particular, the effect of tellurite on the activity of the clinically-relevant, third-generation cephalosporin (cefotaxime, was evaluated. Cell viability assays showed that tellurite and cefotaxime act synergistically against E. coli. In conclusion, using tellurite like an adjuvant could be of great help to cope with several multi-resistant pathogens.

  3. Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) prediction rules in identifying high risk children with mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhjavan-Shahraki, B; Yousefifard, M; Hajighanbari, M J; Oraii, A; Safari, S; Hosseini, M

    2017-06-22

    Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) traumatic brain injury (TBI) prognostic rules is a scoring system for prediction of the need for computed tomography (CT) scanning in children with mild TBI. However, its validation has not been assessed in developing countries. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess the value of PECARN rule in identification of children with clinically important TBI (ciTBI). In this prospective cross-sectional study, 594 children (mean age: 7.9 ± 5.3 years; 79.3% boys) with mild TBI brought to emergency ward of two healthcare centers in Tehran, Iran were assessed. PECARN checklist was filled for all patients and children were divided to three groups of low, intermediate and high risks. Patients were followed for 2 weeks by phone to assess their ciTBI status. At the end, discrimination power, calibration and overall performance of PECARN rule were assessed. PECARN had a sensitivity and specificity of 92.3 and 40.6%, respectively, in predicting ciTBI in children under 2 years and 100.0 and 57.8%, respectively, in individuals between the ages of 2 and 18. PECARN rule had a proper calibration in prediction of ciTBI and CT scan findings. Brier score (overall performance) of PECARN rule in predicting ciTBI in children under 2 and 2-18 years were 1.5 and 1.2, respectively. PECARN prediction rule has a proper validity in the prediction of ciTBI. Therefor it can be used for screening and identification of high risk children with mild TBI.

  4. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India - A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiksha Singh

    Full Text Available Emergency obstetric care (EmOC within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls, six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate

  5. A screen for F1 hybrid male rescue reveals no major-effect hybrid lethality loci in the Drosophila melanogaster autosomal genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuykendall, Tawny N; Satyaki, P; Ji, Shuqing; Clay, Derek M; Edelman, Nathaniel B; Kimchy, Alexandra; Li, Ling-Hei; Nuzzo, Erin A; Parekh, Neil; Park, Suna; Barbash, Daniel A

    2014-10-27

    Hybrid sons between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males die as 3rd instar larvae. Two genes, D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) on the X chromosome, and D. simulans Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr) on chromosome II, interact to cause this lethality. Loss-of-function mutations in either gene suppress lethality, but several pieces of evidence suggest that additional factors are required for hybrid lethality. Here we screen the D. melanogaster autosomal genome by using the Bloomington Stock Center Deficiency kit to search for additional regions that can rescue hybrid male lethality. Our screen is designed to identify putative hybrid incompatibility (HI) genes similar to Hmr and Lhr which, when removed, are dominant suppressors of lethality. After screening 89% of the autosomal genome, we found no regions that rescue males to the adult stage. We did, however, identify several regions that rescue up to 13% of males to the pharate adult stage. This weak rescue suggests the presence of multiple minor-effect HI loci, but we were unable to map these loci to high resolution, presumably because weak rescue can be masked by genetic background effects. We attempted to test one candidate, the dosage compensation gene male specific lethal-3 (msl-3), by using RNA interference with short hairpin microRNA constructs targeted specifically against D. simulans msl-3 but failed to achieve knockdown, in part due to off-target effects. We conclude that the D. melanogaster autosomal genome likely does not contain additional major-effect HI loci. We also show that Hmr is insufficient to fully account for the lethality associated with the D. melanogaster X chromosome, suggesting that additional X-linked genes contribute to hybrid lethality. Copyright © 2014 Cuykendall et al.

  6. Emergent property of high hardness for C-rich ruthenium carbides: partial covalent Ru-Ru bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunhong; Yu, Hongyu; Kuo, Bao; Ma, Shuailing; Xiao, Xuehui; Li, Da; Duan, Defang; Jin, Xilian; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2018-02-14

    Hard materials are being investigated all the time by combining transition metals with light elements. Combining a structure search with first-principles functional calculations, we first discovered three stable stoichiometric C-rich ruthenium carbides in view of three synthesis routes, namely, the ambient phases of Ru 2 C 3 and RuC, and two high pressure phases of RuC 4 . There is a phase transition of RuC 4 from the P3[combining macron]m1 structure to the R3[combining macron]m structure above 98 GPa. The calculations of elastic constants and phonon dispersions show their mechanical and dynamical stability. The large elastic modulus, high Debye temperature and the estimated hardness values suggest that these hard ruthenium carbides have good mechanical properties. The analyses of electronic structure and chemical bonding indicate that chemical bonding, not carbon content, is the key factor for the hardness in these metallic C-rich ruthenium carbides. The partial covalent Ru-C bonds and strong covalent C-C bonds are responsible for the high hardness. Moreover, the emergence of partial covalent Ru-Ru bonds can enhance the hardness of RuC, while the ionic Ru-Ru bonds can weaken the hardness of Ru 2 C 3 .

  7. Using a Lethality Index to Assess Susceptibility of Tribolium confusum and Oryzaephilus surinamensis to Insecticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Agrafioti

    Full Text Available We evaluated knockdown caused by four insecticides: alpha-cypermethrin, chlorfenapyr, pirimiphos-methyl and fipronil against adults of Tribolium confusum Jacquelin Duval, the confused flour beetle and Oryzaephilus surinamensis (L., the sawtoothed grain beetle. Bioassays were conducted on concrete and metal surfaces. Adults of the tested species were exposed on both surfaces treated with the above insecticides at two doses (low and high. Knockdown assessment was done after 15, 30 and 60 min of adult exposure in the treated surfaces. Also, after 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 d of exposure, a lethality index was calculated with an equation resulting to values from 0 to 100, where 100 indicated complete mortality and 0 complete survival. We also developed a lethality index by ranking each adult on each surface from 0 to 4, 0: adults moved normally, 1: adults were knocked down, but were able to walk for short intervals, 2: adults were knocked down and unable to walk, but with visible movement of antennae etc., 3: adults were knocked down, with very minimal movement of the tarsi and the antennae and 4: adults were dead (no movement. Knockdown of adults immediately after exposure (15-60 min was higher for pirimiphos-methyl followed by alpha-cypermethrin, for both dose rates tested and species, but only on the metal surface. The lethality index was nearly 100 for all insecticides after 5d of exposure for O. surinamensis, while for T. confusum the adult lethality index was considerably lower for alpha-cypermethrin, suggesting that that recovery from knockdown occurred. Chlorfenapyr was the only insecticide that was more effective on concrete than on metal, while the reverse was noted for the other three insecticides. These results show that knockdown has different levels, which can be used as indicators of insect mortality or recovery.

  8. The population genetics of human disease: The case of recessive, lethal mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Carlos Eduardo G; Gao, Ziyue; Baker, Zachary; Diesel, José Francisco; Simons, Yuval B; Haque, Imran S; Pickrell, Joseph; Przeworski, Molly

    2017-09-01

    Do the frequencies of disease mutations in human populations reflect a simple balance between mutation and purifying selection? What other factors shape the prevalence of disease mutations? To begin to answer these questions, we focused on one of the simplest cases: recessive mutations that alone cause lethal diseases or complete sterility. To this end, we generated a hand-curated set of 417 Mendelian mutations in 32 genes reported to cause a recessive, lethal Mendelian disease. We then considered analytic models of mutation-selection balance in infinite and finite populations of constant sizes and simulations of purifying selection in a more realistic demographic setting, and tested how well these models fit allele frequencies estimated from 33,370 individuals of European ancestry. In doing so, we distinguished between CpG transitions, which occur at a substantially elevated rate, and three other mutation types. Intriguingly, the observed frequency for CpG transitions is slightly higher than expectation but close, whereas the frequencies observed for the three other mutation types are an order of magnitude higher than expected, with a bigger deviation from expectation seen for less mutable types. This discrepancy is even larger when subtle fitness effects in heterozygotes or lethal compound heterozygotes are taken into account. In principle, higher than expected frequencies of disease mutations could be due to widespread errors in reporting causal variants, compensation by other mutations, or balancing selection. It is unclear why these factors would have a greater impact on disease mutations that occur at lower rates, however. We argue instead that the unexpectedly high frequency of disease mutations and the relationship to the mutation rate likely reflect an ascertainment bias: of all the mutations that cause recessive lethal diseases, those that by chance have reached higher frequencies are more likely to have been identified and thus to have been included in

  9. The population genetics of human disease: The case of recessive, lethal mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ziyue; Baker, Zachary; Diesel, José Francisco; Simons, Yuval B.; Haque, Imran S.; Pickrell, Joseph; Przeworski, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Do the frequencies of disease mutations in human populations reflect a simple balance between mutation and purifying selection? What other factors shape the prevalence of disease mutations? To begin to answer these questions, we focused on one of the simplest cases: recessive mutations that alone cause lethal diseases or complete sterility. To this end, we generated a hand-curated set of 417 Mendelian mutations in 32 genes reported to cause a recessive, lethal Mendelian disease. We then considered analytic models of mutation-selection balance in infinite and finite populations of constant sizes and simulations of purifying selection in a more realistic demographic setting, and tested how well these models fit allele frequencies estimated from 33,370 individuals of European ancestry. In doing so, we distinguished between CpG transitions, which occur at a substantially elevated rate, and three other mutation types. Intriguingly, the observed frequency for CpG transitions is slightly higher than expectation but close, whereas the frequencies observed for the three other mutation types are an order of magnitude higher than expected, with a bigger deviation from expectation seen for less mutable types. This discrepancy is even larger when subtle fitness effects in heterozygotes or lethal compound heterozygotes are taken into account. In principle, higher than expected frequencies of disease mutations could be due to widespread errors in reporting causal variants, compensation by other mutations, or balancing selection. It is unclear why these factors would have a greater impact on disease mutations that occur at lower rates, however. We argue instead that the unexpectedly high frequency of disease mutations and the relationship to the mutation rate likely reflect an ascertainment bias: of all the mutations that cause recessive lethal diseases, those that by chance have reached higher frequencies are more likely to have been identified and thus to have been included in

  10. Palliative homecare is associated with reduced high- and low-acuity emergency department visits at the end of life: A population-based cohort study of cancer decedents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Rinku; Barbera, Lisa; Seow, Hsien-Yeang

    2017-05-01

    Prior work shows that palliative homecare services reduce the subsequent need for hospitalizations and emergency services; however, no study has investigated whether this association is present for emergency department visits of high acuity or whether it only applies to low-acuity emergency department visits. To examine the association between palliative versus standard homecare nursing and the rate of high-acuity and low-acuity emergency department visits among cancer decedents during their last 6 months of life. This is a retrospective cohort study of end-of-life homecare patients in Ontario, Canada, who had confirmed cancer cause of death from 2004 to 2009. A multivariable Poisson regression analysis was implemented to examine the association between the receipt of palliative homecare nursing (vs standard homecare nursing) and the rate of high- and low-acuity emergency department visits, separately. There were 54,743 decedents who received homecare nursing in the last 6 months of life. The receipt of palliative homecare nursing decreased the rate of low-acuity emergency department visits (relative rate = 0.53, 95% confidence interval = 0.50-0.56) and was significantly associated with a larger decrease in the rate of high-acuity emergency department visits (relative rate = 0.37, 95% confidence interval = 0.35-0.38). Receiving homecare nursing with palliative intent may decrease the need for dying cancer patients to visit the emergency department, for both high and low-acuity visits, compared to receiving general homecare nursing. Policy implications include building support for additional training in palliative care to generalist homecare nurses and increasing access to palliative homecare nursing.

  11. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of cypermethrin and glyphosate on the freshwater’s copepod, Acanthocyclops robustus

    OpenAIRE

    AM Houssou; EJ Daguégué; E Montchowui

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to evaluate the acute and chronic toxicity of cypermethrin and glyphosate to a freshwater’s copepod, Arcanthocyclops robustus. The acute sensibility was assessed by estimating lethal concentrations. Then the chronic exposure allowed to assess the effects of low concentrations (0.2489 ppb and 0.4978 ppb respectively 10 % and 20 % of LC50 at 48 h of cypermethrin and 1.3 ppm and 2.6 ppm respectively for glyphosate) on the species. The estimated lethal concentrations at...

  12. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Diabetic Emergencies It is estimated that more than 20 ... they have it. The best way to prevent diabetic emergencies is to effectively manage the disease through ...

  13. Molecular Epidemiology Investigation of Obesity and Lethal Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    diet, lifestyle behaviors, medical history , and disease outcomes • Medical records and pathology reports were reviewed to confirm prostate cancer ...Shah, T. E. Eling, P. A. Wade, Obesity, rather than diet, drives epigenomic alterations in colonic epithelium resembling cancer progression. Cell...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0250 TITLE: Molecular Epidemiology Investigation of Obesity and Lethal Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ericka

  14. The Lethal "Femme Fatale" in the Noir Tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Traces the lethal seductress through Hollywood's "noir" history from "Double Indemnity" (1944) to "The Last Seduction" (1996). Examines how this figure largely abjures traditional romance and passive domesticity, choosing instead to apply her sexuality to homicidal plots toward greed. Argues that her narrative…

  15. Median lethal dose (LD 50 ) evaluation of some polyherbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The polyherbal preparations reported here are traditionally used in Northern Nigeria for the treatment of wide range of illnesses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity potential of 70% ethanol extracts of forty polyherbal products by determining their median lethal dose (LD50) estimates intraperitoneally and ...

  16. Papaya Lethal Yellowing Virus (PLYV) Infects Vasconcellea cauliflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, P.P.R.; Resende, de R.O.; Souza, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Papaya lethal yellowing virus (PLYV) é um dos três vírus descritos infectando mamoeiros (Carica papaya L.) no Brasil. Vasconcellea cauliflora (Jacq.) A. DC., antes denominada de Carica cauliflora (Jacq.), é uma reconhecida fonte de resistência natural ao Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), causador da

  17. Some Pathological studies on Indomethacin-Induced Lethality in Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the lethal doses, indomethacin increased bleeding time but not more than a therapeutic dose of aspirin. Mean weight and locomotor activity were reduced significantly by the third day following the administration of 12mgkg-1 of indomethacin. The studies show that other injuries aside from GIT lesions contribute to ...

  18. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  19. Lethal head entrapment--a problem characteristic of early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W; Charlwood, Cheryl

    2009-08-01

    Accidental deaths in infancy and early childhood often result from young childrens' lack of understanding of the dangers of certain situations and their physical inability to extricate themselves from potentially lethal circumstances. Two cases are reported to demonstrate an age-related susceptibility in the young to lethal head entrapment. Case 1: a 5-month-old girl smothered when she slipped down in her stroller, trapping her head beneath the frame and forcing her face into the soft material of the base. Case 2: a 14-month-old boy was hanged while exploring a filing cabinet when his head became caught between two lower drawers. Additional mental and physical characteristics that predispose young children and infants to lethal head entrapment include an inability to effectively problem solve once confronted with a hazardous situation, and relatively large heads and weak neck musculature. Because of these features lethal head entrapment represents a particular circumstance that may predispose to accidental asphyxial deaths in the very young. A combination of careful death scene and autopsy evaluations will be required to confirm the alleged circumstances of death in these cases, including mortuary re-enactments and assessment of the deceased infant's level of physical maturity and mobility.

  20. Perforated appendicitis presenting as a thigh abscess: A lethal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typical cases of acute appendicitis have excellent treatment outcomes, if managed appropriately.1 We discuss an unusual case of perforated retrocaecal appendicitis that presented as a right thigh abscess without prominent abdominal symptoms, which highlights the lethal nature of advanced appendicitis even when ...

  1. Brine shrimp lethality and antimicrobial studies on the seeds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Garcinia kola (Family, Guttiferae) is employed in a variety of therapies ranging from skin, gastrointestinal, chest to tumour problems. Preparations of the stem and roots are used as antitumour in traditional medicine but the potential of the seeds as antitumour had not yet been investigated hence the brine-shrimp lethality and ...

  2. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

  3. Conditional lethality strains for the biological control of Anastrepha species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pro-apoptotic cell death genes are promising candidates for biologically-based autocidal control of pest insects as demonstrated by tetracycline (tet)-suppressible systems for conditional embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and the medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Cc). However, for medfly...

  4. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report | Ayadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy ...

  5. Comment on "Lethally hot temperatures during the Early Triassic greenhouse".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudemand, N; Romano, C; Brayard, A; Hochuli, P A; Bucher, H

    2013-03-01

    Sun et al. (Reports, 19 October 2012, p. 366) reconstructed Permian to Middle Triassic equatorial seawater temperatures. After correct temporal positioning of their data points, their presumed trends of temperature changes, and hence their assumption of a one-to-one relationship between putative "lethally hot" seawater temperatures and a disputable equatorial "eclipse" of some organisms, are no longer supported by their data.

  6. Brine Shrimp Lethality of Alkaloids from Croton sylvaticus Hoechst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Euphorbiaceae) and evaluated for their brine shrimp lethality. Julocrotine, a glutarimide alkaloid, was very toxic in vitro with a LC50 (95% confidence interval) value of 0.074 (0.052-0.105) μg/ml. Lupeol and penduliflaworosin were not toxic. The structures ...

  7. Fighting Lethal Yellowing Disease for Coconut Farmers (CIFSRF ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Understanding lethal yellowing disease. The project will: map the geographic extent of the disease;; identify distinct local vectors and secondary plant hosts;; characterize and compare local strains with African and Caribbean strains of the disease; and; develop effective, practical disease management strategies. The project ...

  8. Radiographic and prenatal ultrasound features of perinatal lethal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (22 mm) at 27 weeks and polyhydramnios, platyspondyly and a small thoracic cavity at 36 weeks' gestation. Radiographic and prenatal ultrasound features of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia – differentia- tion from osteogenesis imperfecta type II. S Wiebe, MD, FRCPC. Department of Medical Imaging, Royal University ...

  9. Drosophila simulans Lethal hybrid rescue mutation (Lhr) rescues ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our results reveal that the phenotypes of the 'Lhr dependent rescued' hybrids were largely dependent on the genetic background and the dominance in species and hybrids, and not on Lhr. Cytological examination reveal that while the salivary chromosome of 'larval lethal' male carrying melanogaster X chromosome was ...

  10. Antidotes to lethal cocaine toxicity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouvé, R; Nahas, G G

    1990-01-01

    Cocaine, like catecholamines or angiotensin II, may induce lethal cardiac or cerebral damage. Restrained rats were fitted with a caudal arterial catheter for on-line cardiovascular monitoring and antidote administration. They were given 60 mg/kg of cocaine i.p., a dose which produces behavioral and cardiovascular effects, convulsions and death in an average time of 10 min. Selected antidotes were administered 5 min after the lethal dose of cocaine. Incidence of lethality was not changed by propranolol, prazosin, labetalol, diazepam or enalaprilat, a converting enzyme inhibitor. Animals treated with any one of the following agents, alpha- or beta-blockers, diazepam or competitive inhibitors of angiotensin II [Sar-1-ile-8] and [Sar-1-thr-8] angiotensin II, presented myocardial infarction. All animals treated with calcium channel antagonists or enalaprilat, whether they survived or not, did not present myocardial infarction. Treatment with nitrendipine, flunarizine or diltiazem, resulted in survival of the animals with no observable aftereffects. Similar results were observed when enalaprilat was administered, with diazepam as an antidote, to a lethal dose of cocaine. Antagonists to the sympatho-adrenal system and to the renin angiotensin system appear to be effective antidotes to cocaine toxicity in the present experimental model.

  11. Antioxidant, icthyotoxicity and brine shrimp lethality tests of Magonia glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Telma L G; Machado, Luciana L; Souza, João S N; Fonseca, Aluisio M; Maia, Juliana L; Pessoa, Otilia D L

    2006-09-01

    The ethanolic extract of the fruit bark from Magonia glabrata yielded shikimic acid, scopoletin, sitosterol glycoside and 2-O-methyl-l-inositol. Antioxidant, icthyotoxicity and brine shrimp lethality activities were observed in this extract. The major constituent, 2-O-methyl-l-inositol, was found to be inactive in two assays but showed moderate activity as a radical scavenger.

  12. Brave New Warfare: Autonomy in Lethal UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    However, the mission was aborted because the Air Force was concerned that the Soviet Union would discover the U.S. capability for unmanned...perfectly legal, but may also be perceived as being highly immoral .68 There are two levels of effective ethical arguments for and against the...RECOMMENDATIONS A. SUMMARY Arguing that any use of violence is immoral does not solve the ethical questions and dilemmas of societies and

  13. EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Pantić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception refers to any device or drug that is used as an emergency procedure to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse.The first method of emergency contraception was high dose of estrogen. Concern about side effects led to subsequent development of the so-called Yuzpe regimen which combined ethinil estradiol with levonorgestrel and levonorgestrel alone. Less convenient to use is the copper intauterine contraceptive device.It is known that in some women sexual steroids may inhibit or delay ovulation and may interfere with ovum and sperm transport and implantation. Copper intrauterine device causes a foreign-body effect on the endometrium and a direct toxic effect to sperm and blastocyst.The Yuzpe regimen reduces the risk of pregnancy after a single act of sexual intercourse by about 75% and the levonorgestrel alone by about 85%. The copper intrauterine device is an extremely effective method for selected patients.Nausea and vomiting are common among women using the Yuzpe regimen and considerably less common among women using levonorgestrel alone regimen.Emergency contraception is relatively safe with no contraindications except pregnancy. It is ineffective if a woman is pregnant. There is no need for a medical hystory or a phisical examination before providing emergency contraceptive pills. They are taken long before organogenesis starts, so they should not have a teratogenic effect.Counseling should include information about correct use of the method, possible side effects and her preferences for regular contraception.Unintended pregnancy is a great problem. Several safe, effective and inexpensive methods of emergency contraception are available including Yuzpe regimen, levonorges-trel-only regimen and copper intrauterine device.

  14. Negative D-dimer testing excludes pulmonary embolism in non-high risk patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harringa, John B; Bracken, Rebecca L; Nagle, Scott K; Schiebler, Mark L; Pulia, Michael S; Svenson, James E; Repplinger, Michael D

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of d-dimer testing to obviate the need for cross-sectional imaging for patients at "non-high risk" for pulmonary embolism (PE). This is a retrospective study of emergency department patients at an academic medical center who underwent cross-sectional imaging (MRA or CTA) to evaluate for PE from 2008 to 2013. The primary outcome was the NPV of d-dimer testing when used in conjunction with clinical decision instruments (CDIs = Wells', Revised Geneva, and Simplified Revised Geneva Scores). The reference standard for PE status included image test results and a 6-month chart review follow-up for venous thromboembolism as a proxy for false negative imaging. Secondary analyses included ROC curves for each CDI and calculation of PE prevalence in each risk stratum. Of 459 patients, 41 (8.9%) had PE. None of the 76 patients (16.6%) with negative d-dimer results had PE. Thus, d-dimer testing had 100% sensitivity and NPV, and there were no differences in CDI performance. Similarly, when evaluated independently of d-dimer results, no CDI outperformed the others (areas under the ROC curves ranged 0.53-0.55). There was a significantly higher PE prevalence in the high versus "non-high risk" groups when stratified by the Wells' Score (p = 0.03). Negative d-dimer testing excluded PE in our retrospective cohort. Each CDI had similar NPVs, whether analyzed in conjunction with or independently of d-dimer results. Our results confirm that PE can be safely excluded in patients with "non-high risk" CDI scores and a negative d-dimer.

  15. Psychosocial influences on prisoner suicide: a case-control study of near-lethal self-harm in women prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Lisa; Hawton, Keith; Rivlin, Adrienne; Fazel, Seena

    2011-03-01

    We examined the psychosocial influences on female prisoner suicide by carrying out a study of near-lethal self-harm. We interviewed 60 women prisoners who had recently engaged in near-lethal self-harm (cases) and 60 others who had never carried out near-lethal acts in prison (controls) from all closed female prison establishments in England and Wales, using mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. We gathered information on socio-demographic and criminological variables, life events and childhood trauma, exposure to suicidal behaviour, contributory and precipitating factors for near-lethal self-harm, social support and psychological characteristics. While socio-demographic factors were only modestly associated with near-lethal self-harm, being on remand, in single cell accommodation, and reporting negative experiences of imprisonment were strong correlates. Recent life events and past trauma, including different forms of childhood abuse, were also significantly associated with near-lethal self-harm, as were a family history of suicide and high scores on measures of depression, aggression, impulsivity and hostility, and low levels of self-esteem and social support. Our findings underline the importance of both individual and prison-related factors for suicide in custody, and hence the need for a comprehensive approach to suicide prevention in women's prisons. Given the multiple needs of female prisoners at-risk of self-harm and suicide, complex psychosocial interventions are likely to be required, including interventions for abused and bereaved women, and initiatives to improve staff-prisoner relationships and reduce bullying. The findings of this research may provide insights into factors leading to suicidal behaviour in other forensic and institutional settings, such as detention centres and psychiatric hospitals, and may assist in developing suicide prevention policies for prisoners and other at-risk populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GOOLSBY,TOMMY D.; SCOTT,STEVEN H.

    1999-09-15

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might

  17. Annotating novel genes by integrating synthetic lethals and genomic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faty Mahamadou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large scale screening for synthetic lethality serves as a common tool in yeast genetics to systematically search for genes that play a role in specific biological processes. Often the amounts of data resulting from a single large scale screen far exceed the capacities of experimental characterization of every identified target. Thus, there is need for computational tools that select promising candidate genes in order to reduce the number of follow-up experiments to a manageable size. Results We analyze synthetic lethality data for arp1 and jnm1, two spindle migration genes, in order to identify novel members in this process. To this end, we use an unsupervised statistical method that integrates additional information from biological data sources, such as gene expression, phenotypic profiling, RNA degradation and sequence similarity. Different from existing methods that require large amounts of synthetic lethal data, our method merely relies on synthetic lethality information from two single screens. Using a Multivariate Gaussian Mixture Model, we determine the best subset of features that assign the target genes to two groups. The approach identifies a small group of genes as candidates involved in spindle migration. Experimental testing confirms the majority of our candidates and we present she1 (YBL031W as a novel gene involved in spindle migration. We applied the statistical methodology also to TOR2 signaling as another example. Conclusion We demonstrate the general use of Multivariate Gaussian Mixture Modeling for selecting candidate genes for experimental characterization from synthetic lethality data sets. For the given example, integration of different data sources contributes to the identification of genetic interaction partners of arp1 and jnm1 that play a role in the same biological process.

  18. Annotating novel genes by integrating synthetic lethals and genomic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöner, Daniel; Kalisch, Markus; Leisner, Christian; Meier, Lukas; Sohrmann, Marc; Faty, Mahamadou; Barral, Yves; Peter, Matthias; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bühlmann, Peter

    2008-01-14

    Large scale screening for synthetic lethality serves as a common tool in yeast genetics to systematically search for genes that play a role in specific biological processes. Often the amounts of data resulting from a single large scale screen far exceed the capacities of experimental characterization of every identified target. Thus, there is need for computational tools that select promising candidate genes in order to reduce the number of follow-up experiments to a manageable size. We analyze synthetic lethality data for arp1 and jnm1, two spindle migration genes, in order to identify novel members in this process. To this end, we use an unsupervised statistical method that integrates additional information from biological data sources, such as gene expression, phenotypic profiling, RNA degradation and sequence similarity. Different from existing methods that require large amounts of synthetic lethal data, our method merely relies on synthetic lethality information from two single screens. Using a Multivariate Gaussian Mixture Model, we determine the best subset of features that assign the target genes to two groups. The approach identifies a small group of genes as candidates involved in spindle migration. Experimental testing confirms the majority of our candidates and we present she1 (YBL031W) as a novel gene involved in spindle migration. We applied the statistical methodology also to TOR2 signaling as another example. We demonstrate the general use of Multivariate Gaussian Mixture Modeling for selecting candidate genes for experimental characterization from synthetic lethality data sets. For the given example, integration of different data sources contributes to the identification of genetic interaction partners of arp1 and jnm1 that play a role in the same biological process.

  19. Differential expression of the lethal gene Luteus-Pa in cacao of the Parinari series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehem, B C; Almeida, A-A F; Figueiredo, G S F; Gesteira, A S; Santos, S C; Corrêa, R X; Yamada, M M; Valle, R R

    2016-02-22

    The recessive lethal character Luteus-Pa is found in cacao (Theobroma cacao) genotypes of the Parinari series (Pa) and is characterized by expression of leaf chlorosis and seedling death. Several genotypes of the Pa series are bearers of the gene responsible for the expression of the Luteus-Pa character, which can be used as a tool for determining relationships between genotypes of this group. To evaluate this phenomenon, we analyzed the differential expression of genes between mutant seedlings and wild-type hybrid Pa 30 x 169 seedlings, with the aim of elucidating the possible lethal mechanisms of the homozygous recessive character Luteus-Pa. Plant material was harvested from leaves of wild and mutant seedlings at different periods to construct a subtractive library and perform quantitative analysis using real-time PCR. The 649 sequences obtained from the subtractive library had an average length of 500 bp, forming 409 contigs. The probable proteins encoded were grouped into 10 functional categories. Data from ESTs identified genes associated with Rubisco, peroxidases, and other proteins and enzymes related to carbon assimilation, respiration, and photosystem 2. Mutant seedlings were characterized by synthesizing defective PsbO and PsbA proteins, which were overexpressed from 15 to 20 days after seedling emergence.

  20. Lethal drugs in capital punishment in USA: History, present, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Kristen; Yim, Richard; Traore, Salematou; ElFadaly, Marwa; Lang, Lynn; Freeman, Robert A; Parmar, Jayesh R; Kharel, Madan K

    Lethal injection is the preferred method for the execution of condemned prisoners in the United States. A recent decision of The European Union to prohibit the export of drugs used in capital punishment to the USA along with domestic firms ceasing to manufacture these drugs has resulted in a drug shortage and a search for alternative drugs and new drug combinations that have not been previously validated for inducing death. As a consequence, some of the executions did not proceed as expected and sparked public debate regarding whether recent executions by lethal injection serve the purpose of avoiding "cruel and unusual punishment" in executions. Moreover, a cottage industry comprised of compounding pharmacies as emerged as a source of drug combinations used in capital punishment. Although there is a growing trend toward the abolishment of capital punishment in United States, the controversy concerning the efficacy of drug and involvement of health care professionals in the execution procedure is far from over. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ecstasy tablets intoxication with lethal autcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Snežana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ecstasy, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, is a synthetic compound increasingly popular as a recreational drug. Tablets known as ecstasy contain MDMA, but may also contain caffeine, ephedrine, paramethoxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and ketamine. After absorption MDMA is metabolized to MDA, 4-hydroxy-3- metoxymetamphetamine (HMMA and 4-hydroxy-3- metoxyamphetamine (HMA. After that HMMA and HMA are conjugated and excreted by urine. The aim of this report was to confirm by toxicological post mortem analyses of poisoned person organs that ecstasy had been the cause of his death. Case report. We reported the death of a 17-year-old boy after the ingestion of ecstasy. MDMA and metabolites were determined by multicolumn high performance liquid chromatography with UV spectral detection (HPLC-UV. Toxicological tests showed the presence of MDMA in all samples. When examining post mortem material (the organs, the highest concentrations were measured in the stomach (835,97 μg/g and kidney (801,14 μg/g. The minimal concentration was in the liver (22,26 μg/g. Conclusion. The obtained results of MDMA and its metabolites concentrations showed abuse of a high dose of ecstasy. .

  2. LRP5 and LRP6 are not required for protective antigen-mediated internalization or lethality of anthrax lethal toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Young

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax toxin (AnTx plays a key role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. AnTx is composed of three proteins: protective antigen (PA, edema factor, and lethal factor (LF. PA is not toxic but serves to bind cells and translocate the toxic edema factor or LF moieties to the cytosol. Recently, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein LRP6 has been reported to mediate internalization and lethality of AnTx. Based on its similarity to LRP6, we hypothesized that LRP5 may also play a role in cellular uptake of AnTx. We assayed PA-dependent uptake of anthrax LF or a cytotoxic LF fusion protein (FP59 in cells and mice harboring targeted deletions of Lrp5 or Lrp6. Unexpectedly, we observed that uptake was unaltered in the presence or absence of either Lrp5 or Lrp6 expression. Moreover, we observed efficient PA-mediated uptake into anthrax toxin receptor (ANTXR-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells (PR230 that had been stably engineered to express either human ANTXR1 or human ANTXR2 in the presence or absence of siRNA specific for LRP5 or LRP6. Our results demonstrate that neither LRP5 nor LRP6 is necessary for PA-mediated internalization or lethality of anthrax lethal toxin.

  3. The repair of sub-lethal damage and the stimulated repair of potentially lethal damage in Saintpaulia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, H P; Sijsma, M J; Litwiniszyn, M; Chadwick, K H

    1981-10-01

    The repair of sublethal and potentially lethal damage in stationary resting epidermal cells of Saintpaulia has been investigated. Fractionation experiments reveal an efficient repair of sublethal damage with a half-life of 1.9 hours. No repair of potentially lethal damage was noted when cultivation of the leaves was delayed for 24 hours after irradiation. At delay times of 2, 3 and 4 days some repair of potentially lethal damage has been found. A small pre-dose given 24 hours before a challenging dose improved the cells' chance to regenerate and the improvement has been shown to be compatible with an improved repair of potentially lethal damage induced by X-rays and fast neutrons. It hs been shown that the stimulated repair process takes 12 to 24 hours to develop, is dependent on the size of the pre-dose, has single-hit dose kinetics, and an r.b.e. of 1 for neutrons. With delayed cultivation of 2 days the stimulated repair process leads to an alteration in the shape of the regeneration (survival)-dose relationship which increases the low dose r.b.e. for neutrons from 10 to 35.

  4. Less-than-lethal "flashbang" diversionary device.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Kevin James; Melof, Brian Matthew; Ingram, Brian V.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann; Broyles, Theresa A.; Anderson, Heidi M. (K-Tech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Covert, Timothy Todd; Mulligan, Edward J.; Steyskal, Michele D.

    2003-11-01

    Diversionary devices such as flashbang grenades are used in a wide variety of military and law-enforcement operations. They function to distract and/or incapacitate adversaries in scenarios ranging from hostage rescue to covert strategic paralysis operations. There are a number of disadvantages associated with currently available diversionary devices. Serious injuries and fatalities have resulted from their use both operationally and in training. Because safety is of paramount importance, desired improvements to these devices include protection against inadvertent initiation, the elimination of the production of high-velocity fragments, less damaging decibel output and increased light output. Sandia National Laboratories has developed a next-generation diversionary flash-bang device that will provide the end user with these enhanced safety features.

  5. Congenital heart disease beyond the age of 60: emergence of a new population with high resource utilization, high morbidity, and high mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutarel, Oktay; Kempny, Aleksander; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Jabbour, Richard; Li, Wei; Uebing, Anselm; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Swan, Lorna; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2014-03-01

    The population of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) is growing and ageing. Limited information about the diagnostic spectrum of this emerging population, its resource utilization at tertiary ACHD centres, and especially about prognostic parameters is available. Retrospective cohort study on all ACHD patients ≥60 years of age under active follow-up. All-cause mortality was the primary outcome measure. Out of a total population of 7315 ACHD patients, 375 [190 females (50.7%), mean age 64.8 ± 5.9 years] fulfilled the inclusion criteria. During a median follow-up of 5.5 (IQR 3.1-8.6) years, 55 of the 375 patients died. The number of interventions (P = 0.0006), the number and length of hospitalization (P congenital heart defects had worse survival prospects than their age- and gender-matched comparison population. On multivariate Cox analysis, coronary artery disease [hazard ratio (HR): 5.04; 95%CI: 1.88-13.51, P = 0.0014], symptoms of heart failure (HR: 2.36; 95%CI: 1.05-5.29, P disease, seem to be key determinants of outcome in this older population in conjunction with the underlying congenital heart disease.

  6. An H5N1 M2e-based multiple antigenic peptide vaccine confers heterosubtypic protection from lethal infection with pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A 2009 global influenza pandemic caused by a novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus has posted an increasing threat of a potential pandemic by the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus, driving us to develop an influenza vaccine which confers cross-protection against both H5N1 and H1N1 viruses. Previously, we have shown that a tetra-branched multiple antigenic peptide (MAP vaccine based on the extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e from H5N1 virus (H5N1-M2e-MAP induced strong immune responses and cross-protection against different clades of HPAI H5N1 viruses. In this report, we investigated whether such M2e-MAP presenting the H5N1-M2e consensus sequence can afford heterosubtypic protection from lethal challenge with the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus. Results Our results demonstrated that H5N1-M2e-MAP plus Freund's or aluminum adjuvant induced strong cross-reactive IgG antibody responses against M2e of the pandemic H1N1 virus which contains one amino acid variation with M2e of H5N1 at position 13. These cross-reactive antibodies may maintain for 6 months and bounced back quickly to the previous high level after the 2nd boost administered 2 weeks before virus challenge. H5N1-M2e-MAP could afford heterosubtypic protection against lethal challenge with pandemic H1N1 virus, showing significant decrease of viral replications and obvious alleviation of histopathological damages in the challenged mouse lungs. 100% and 80% of the H5N1-M2e-MAP-vaccinated mice with Freund's and aluminum adjuvant, respectively, survived the lethal challenge with pandemic H1N1 virus. Conclusions Our results suggest that H5N1-M2e-MAP has a great potential to prevent the threat from re-emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza and possible novel influenza pandemic due to the reassortment of HPAI H5N1 virus with the 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus.

  7. Ecdysone receptor agonism leading to lethal molting ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molting is a key biological process in growth, development, reproduction and survival in arthropods. Complex neuroendocrine pathways are involved in the regulation of molting and may potentially become targets of environmental endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). For example, several classes of pesticides used in agriculture and aquaculture specifically target key endocrine regulators of the molting process. These chemicals may also pose hazards to non-target species by causing molting defects, thus affecting the health of the ecosystems. The present review summarized the available knowledge on molting-related endocrine regulation and disruption in arthropods (with special focus on insects and crustaceans), in order to identify research gaps and develop a toxicity mechanism-based model for environmental hazard and risk assessment. Based on the review, multiple targets in the molting processes that EDCs can interact with were characterized to inform future studies. An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) describing ecdysone receptor agonism leading to incomplete ecdysis associated mortality was developed according to the OECD guideline and evaluated for weight of evidence using the Evolved Bradford Hill Criteria. This review proposed the first invertebrate endocrine disruption AOP and may serve as a knowledge foundation for future environmental studies and AOP development. Development of high throughput toxicology (HTT) programs (e.g., ToxCast, Tox21) and potential a

  8. Rapidly Progressive and Almost Lethal Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Juancarlo; Robles-Arias, Carlos; Rodríguez-Cintrón, William

    2017-03-01

    We herein describe the case of a 65-year-old male patient who presented with Osler's triad, which is the combination of endocarditis, pneumonia, and meningitis. This report is even more unusual since the pathogen isolated was the invasive and virulent strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3. The clinical entity described is also called Austrian syndrome. Even though rare in this antibiotic era, the syndrome remains one of high morbidity and mortality. This particular case is of paramount importance for the clinician reader. First, it documents the clinical features associated with invasive pneumococcal disease and the Austrian syndrome. Second, and equally important, it highlights why following the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines saves lives. For this case, the following steps were taken: 1. As a surrogate for perfusion, early and aggressive fluid resuscitation therapy (guided by lactic acid levels) was instituted; 2. also early in the treatment, broad spectrum antibiotics were administered; 3. to guide antibiotic therapy, microbiological cultures were obtained. The patient subsequently improved and was transferred to the internal medicine ward to complete 4 weeks of antibiotic therapy.

  9. Comparative toxicity and efficacy of engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants with broad anti-tumor activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Diane E. [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Program of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Hoover, Benjamin [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cloud, Loretta Grey [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Liu, Shihui [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Molinolo, Alfredo A. [Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Leppla, Stephen H. [Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bugge, Thomas H., E-mail: thomas.bugge@nih.go [Proteases and Tissue Remodeling Section, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We have previously designed and characterized versions of anthrax lethal toxin that are selectively cytotoxic in the tumor microenvironment and which display broad and potent anti-tumor activities in vivo. Here, we have performed the first direct comparison of the safety and efficacy of three engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants requiring activation by either matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or co-localized MMP/uPA activities. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with six doses of engineered toxins via intraperitoneal (I.P.) or intravenous (I.V.) dose routes to determine the maximum tolerated dose for six administrations (MTD6) and dose-limiting toxicities. Efficacy was evaluated using the B16-BL6 syngraft model of melanoma; mice bearing established tumors were treated with six I.P. doses of toxin and tumor measurements and immunohistochemistry, paired with terminal blood work, were used to elaborate upon the anti-tumor mechanism and relative efficacy of each variant. We found that MMP-, uPA- and dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxins exhibited the same dose-limiting toxicity; dose-dependent GI toxicity. In terms of efficacy, all three toxins significantly reduced primary B16-BL6 tumor burden, ranging from 32% to 87% reduction, and they also delayed disease progression as evidenced by dose-dependent normalization of blood work values. While target organ toxicity and effective doses were similar amongst the variants, the dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin exhibited the highest I.P. MTD6 and was 1.5–3-fold better tolerated than the single MMP- and uPA-activated toxins. Overall, we demonstrate that this dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin can be administered safely and is highly effective in a preclinical model of melanoma. This modified bacterial cytotoxin is thus a promising candidate for further clinical development and evaluation for use in treating human cancers. - Highlights: • Toxicity and anti

  10. Genetic loci with parent-of-origin effects cause hybrid seed lethality in crosses between Mimulus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Austin G; Kenney, Amanda M; Fishman, Lila; Sweigart, Andrea L

    2016-07-01

    In flowering plants, F1 hybrid seed lethality is a common outcome of crosses between closely related diploid species, but the genetic basis of this early-acting and potentially widespread form of postzygotic reproductive isolation is largely unknown. We intercrossed two closely related species of monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus and Mimulus tilingii, to characterize the mechanisms and strength of postzygotic reproductive isolation. Then, using a reciprocal backcross design, we performed high-resolution genetic mapping to determine the genetic architecture of hybrid seed lethality and directly test for loci with parent-of-origin effects. We found that F1 hybrid seed lethality is an exceptionally strong isolating barrier between Mimulus species, with reciprocal crosses producing < 1% viable seeds. This form of postzygotic reproductive isolation appears to be highly polygenic, indicating that multiple incompatibility loci have accumulated rapidly between these closely related Mimulus species. It is also primarily caused by genetic loci with parent-of-origin effects, suggesting a possible role for imprinted genes in the evolution of Mimulus hybrid seed lethality. Our findings suggest that divergence in loci with parent-of-origin effects, which is probably driven by genomic coevolution within lineages, might be an important source of hybrid incompatibilities between flowering plant species. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Integration of coal gasification and waste heat recovery from high temperature steel slags: an emerging strategy to emission reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongqi; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous urbanization and industrialization in the world, energy saving and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction have been serious issues to be addressed, for which heat recovery from traditional energy-intensive industries makes up a significant strategy. Here we report a novel approach to extract the waste heat and iron from high temperature steel slags (1450–1650 oC) produced in the steel industry, i.e., integration of coal gasification and steel slag treatment. Both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the pertinent reactions were identified. It was clarified that the kinetic mechanism for gasification varied from A2 model to A4 model (Avrami-Erofeev) in the presence of slags. Most importantly, the steel slags acted not only as good heat carriers but also as effective catalysts where the apparent activation energy for char gasification got remarkably reduced from 95.7 kJ/mol to 12.1 kJ/mol (A2 model). Furthermore, the FeO in the slags was found to be oxidized into Fe3O4, with an extra energy release, which offered a potential for magnetic separation. Moreover, based on the present research results, an emerging concept, composed of multiple industrial sectors, was proposed, which could serve as an important route to deal with the severe environmental problems in modern society. PMID:26558350

  12. Integration of coal gasification and waste heat recovery from high temperature steel slags: an emerging strategy to emission reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongqi; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2015-11-01

    With the continuous urbanization and industrialization in the world, energy saving and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction have been serious issues to be addressed, for which heat recovery from traditional energy-intensive industries makes up a significant strategy. Here we report a novel approach to extract the waste heat and iron from high temperature steel slags (1450-1650 oC) produced in the steel industry, i.e., integration of coal gasification and steel slag treatment. Both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the pertinent reactions were identified. It was clarified that the kinetic mechanism for gasification varied from A2 model to A4 model (Avrami-Erofeev) in the presence of slags. Most importantly, the steel slags acted not only as good heat carriers but also as effective catalysts where the apparent activation energy for char gasification got remarkably reduced from 95.7 kJ/mol to 12.1 kJ/mol (A2 model). Furthermore, the FeO in the slags was found to be oxidized into Fe3O4, with an extra energy release, which offered a potential for magnetic separation. Moreover, based on the present research results, an emerging concept, composed of multiple industrial sectors, was proposed, which could serve as an important route to deal with the severe environmental problems in modern society.

  13. Infection with non-lethal West Nile virus Eg101 strain induces immunity that protects mice against the lethal West Nile virus NY99 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; O'Connell, Maile; Namekar, Madhuri; Nerurkar, Vivek R

    2014-06-06

    Herein we demonstrate that infection of mice with West Nile virus (WNV) Eg101 provides protective immunity against lethal challenge with WNV NY99. Our data demonstrated that WNV Eg101 is largely non-virulent in adult mice when compared to WNV NY99. By day 6 after infection, WNV-specific IgM and IgG antibodies, and neutralizing antibodies were detected in the serum of all WNV Eg101 infected mice. Plaque reduction neutralization test data demonstrated that serum from WNV Eg101 infected mice neutralized WNV Eg101 and WNV NY99 strains with similar efficiency. Three weeks after infection, WNV Eg101 immunized mice were challenged subcutaneously or intracranially with lethal dose of WNV NY99 and observed for additional three weeks. All the challenged mice were protected against disease and no morbidity and mortality was observed in any mice. In conclusion, our data for the first time demonstrate that infection of mice with WNV Eg101 induced high titers of WNV specific IgM and IgG antibodies, and cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, and the resulting immunity protected all immunized animals from both subcutaneous and intracranial challenge with WNV NY99. These observations suggest that WNV Eg101 may be a suitable strain for the development of a vaccine in humans against virulent strains of WNV.

  14. Fast terrain modelling for hydrogeological risk mapping and emergency management: the contribution of high-resolution satellite SAR imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nascetti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Geomatic tools fast terrain modelling play a relevant role in hydrogeological risk mapping and emergency management. Given their complete independence from logistic constraints on the ground (as for airborne data collection, illumination (daylight, and weather (clouds conditions, synthetic aperture radar (SAR satellite systems may provide important contributions in terms of digital surface models (DSMs and digital elevation models (DEMs. For this work we focused on the potential of high-resolution SAR satellite imagery for DSM generation using an interferometric (InSAR technique and using a revitalized radargrammetric stereomapping approach. The goal of this work was just methodological. Our goal was to illustrate both the fundamental advantages and drawbacks of the radargrammetric approach with respect to the InSAR technique for DSM generation, and to outline their possible joint role in hydrogeological risk mapping and emergency management. Here, it is worth mentioning that radargrammetry procedures are independent of image coherence (unlike the interferometric approach and phase unwrapping, as well as of parsimony (only a few images are necessary. Therefore, a short time is required for image collection (from tens of minutes to a few hours, thanks to the independence from illumination and weather. The most relevant obstacles of the technique are speckle and the lack of texture impact on image matching, as well as the well-known deformations of SAR imagery (layover and foreshortening, which may produce remarkable difficulties with complex morphologies and that must be accounted for during acquisition planning. Here, we discuss results obtained with InSAR and radargrammetry applied to a COSMO-SkyMed SpotLight triplet (two stereopairs suited for radargrammetry and InSAR, sharing one common image acquired over suburbs of San Francisco (United States, which are characterized by mixed morphology and land cover. We mainly focused on urban areas and

  15. Highly sensitive troponin and coronary computed tomography angiography in the evaluation of suspected acute coronary syndrome in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencik, Maros; Hoffmann, Udo; Bamberg, Fabian; Januzzi, James L

    2016-08-07

    The evaluation of patients presenting to the emergency department with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a clinical challenge. The traditional assessment includes clinical risk assessment based on cardiovascular risk factors with serial electrocardiograms and cardiac troponin measurements, often followed by advanced cardiac testing as inpatient or outpatient (i.e. stress testing, imaging). Despite this costly and lengthy work-up, there is a non-negligible rate of missed ACS with an increased risk of death. There is a clinical need for diagnostic strategies that will lead to rapid and reliable triage of patients with suspected ACS. We provide an overview of the evidence for the role of highly sensitive troponin (hsTn) in the rapid and efficient evaluation of suspected ACS. Results of recent research studies have led to the introduction of hsTn with rapid rule-in and rule-out protocols into the guidelines. Highly sensitive troponin increases the sensitivity for the detection of myocardial infarction and decreases time to diagnosis; however, it may decrease the specificity, especially when used as a dichotomous variable, rather than continuous variable as recommended by guidelines; this may increase clinician uncertainty. We summarize the evidence for the use of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the rapid diagnostic tool in this population when used with conventional troponin assays. Coronary CTA significantly decreases time to diagnosis and discharge in patients with suspected ACS, while being safe. However, it may lead to increase in invasive procedures and includes radiation exposure. Finally, we outline the opportunities for the combined use of hsTn and coronary CTA that may result in increased efficiency, decreased need for imaging, lower cost, and decreased radiation dose. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW CHARTS OF CAPACITANCE-RESISTANCE DEFENSE OF HIGH-VOLTAGE CAPACITORS OF POWERFUL CAPACITY STORES OF ENERGY FROM EMERGENCY CURRENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of new charts of capacitance-resistance defense of high-voltage capacitors of powerful capacity stores of energy (CSE from emergency large impulsive currents (LIC at the electric hasp of one of condensers of such CSE on the stage of their charge or discharge. Methodology. Electrophysics bases of the technique of high-voltage and large pulsed currents, and also scientific and technical bases of planning of devices of high-voltage impulse technique. Results. Two new charts of capacitance-resistance defense of high-voltage impulsive capacitors are offered for powerful CSE of one- and multimodule execution from emergency LIC, being based on the use of high-voltage permanent graphite-ceramic resistors of type of TVO-60 a face value from 24 to 100 Ohm, set on the high-voltage conclusions of all of condensers of CSE. One of the developed capacitance-resistance charts of defense of condensers for powerful one-module CSE passed practical approbation. Originality. It is shown that application of the developed charts of capacitance-resistance defense of high-voltage condensers of powerful CSE is provided by frequent limitation of amplitude of emergency LIC, flowing through broken through an electric discharge condenser of CSE on the stage of his charge or discharge. Such limitation emergency LIC is prevented by explosion destruction of the damaged condenser of high-voltage CSE. Practical value. The use of the developed charts of capacitance-resistance defense of high-voltage capacitors from emergency LIC allows substantially to promote functional safety of powerful CSE of one- and multi-module execution and provide the safe terms of labour for a scientific and technical personnel, attendant similar CSE.

  17. Parents' Experiences With Ultrasound During Pregnancy With a Lethal Fetal Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney-Koelsch, Erin M; Côté-Arsenault, Denise; Lemcke-Berno, Erin

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal naturalistic study sought to describe parent experiences of ultrasounds during pregnancies with lethal fetal diagnoses (LFDs). We interviewed 16 mothers and 14 partners twice during pregnancy and twice after birth and death of their infant. Parents reported that ultrasound providers had a profound impact on their experiences with LFDs. Within three stages of pregnancy (pre-diagnosis, learning the diagnosis, and living with the diagnosis), themes of optimistic expectation, hearing bad news, need to know, and time with baby emerged. The dynamics of interactions with ultrasound providers included differing goals and expectations, and compatibility of interactions. These interactions were either satisfying or added to parents' burden. Ultrasound providers have the opportunity to share valuable knowledge and facilitate understanding and precious time with the baby. Providers of obstetrical care can improve communication with parents with LFDs at critical time periods by matching their interaction to parents' needs.

  18. Parents’ Experiences With Ultrasound During Pregnancy With a Lethal Fetal Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M. Denney-Koelsch

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal naturalistic study sought to describe parent experiences of ultrasounds during pregnancies with lethal fetal diagnoses (LFDs. We interviewed 16 mothers and 14 partners twice during pregnancy and twice after birth and death of their infant. Parents reported that ultrasound providers had a profound impact on their experiences with LFDs. Within three stages of pregnancy (pre-diagnosis, learning the diagnosis, and living with the diagnosis, themes of optimistic expectation, hearing bad news, need to know , and time with baby emerged. The dynamics of interactions with ultrasound providers included differing goals and expectations , and compatibility of interactions . These interactions were either satisfying or added to parents’ burden. Ultrasound providers have the opportunity to share valuable knowledge and facilitate understanding and precious time with the baby. Providers of obstetrical care can improve communication with parents with LFDs at critical time periods by matching their interaction to parents’ needs.

  19. An Overview of Crowd Control Theory and Considerations for the Employment of Non-Lethal Weapons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grieger, Dion

    2003-01-01

    .... In campaigns such as these, there is a case for the use of non-lethal weapons to complement the existing range of traditional weapons in order to help bridge the gap between responding with lethal...

  20. High-Intensity Telemedicine Decreases Emergency Department Use for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions by Older Adult Senior Living Community Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish N; Wasserman, Erin B; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Wood, Nancy E; Wang, Hongyue; Noyes, Katia; Nelson, Dallas; Dozier, Ann; McConnochie, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Emergency department (ED) visits for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are common among older adults. The high-intensity telemedicine model of care has been proposed as an innovative approach to expand access to acute illness care, thereby preventing ED visits. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a high-intensity telemedicine program for senior living community (SLC) residents on the rate of ED use for ACSCs. We performed a prospective cohort study at a primary care geriatrics practice that provides care to 22 SLCs. Six SLCs selected as intervention facilities, with the remaining SLCs serving as controls. Consenting practice patients at intervention facilities could have patient-to-provider, real-time, or store-and-forward high-intensity telemedicine services to diagnose and treat illnesses. The primary outcome was the rate of ED visits for which the primary diagnosis was an "ambulatory-care-sensitive" condition by the Institute of Medicine, which we compared between control and intervention participants. During the study period, control participants had 310 ED visits for ACSCs, for a rate of 0.195 visits/person-year. Intervention participants visited the ED for ACSCs 85 times, for a rate of 0.138 visits/person-year [unadjusted rate ratio (RR): 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53-0.94]. Among intervention participants, ED use for ACSCs decreased at an annual rate of 34% (RR: 0.661, 95% CI: 0.444-0.982), whereas, in the control group there was no statistically significant change in ED use over time (RR: 1.01, 95% CI: 0.90-1.14). Providing acute illness care by high-intensity telemedicine to older adults residing in SLCs significantly decreases the rate of ED use for ACSCs over 1 year, compared with no change in the rate of ED use for ACSCs among the control group. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Metagenomic detection of viral pathogens in Spanish honeybees: co-infection by Aphid Lethal Paralysis, Israel Acute Paralysis and Lake Sinai Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Granberg

    Full Text Available The situation in Europe concerning honeybees has in recent years become increasingly aggravated with steady decline in populations and/or catastrophic winter losses. This has largely been attributed to the occurrence of a variety of known and "unknown", emerging novel diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that colonies often can harbour more than one pathogen, making identification of etiological agents with classical methods difficult. By employing an unbiased metagenomic approach, which allows the detection of both unexpected and previously unknown infectious agents, the detection of three viruses, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus (ALPV, Israel Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV, and Lake Sinai Virus (LSV, in honeybees from Spain is reported in this article. The existence of a subgroup of ALPV with the ability to infect bees was only recently reported and this is the first identification of such a strain in Europe. Similarly, LSV appear to be a still unclassified group of viruses with unclear impact on colony health and these viruses have not previously been identified outside of the United States. Furthermore, our study also reveals that these bees carried a plant virus, Turnip Ringspot Virus (TuRSV, potentially serving as important vector organisms. Taken together, these results demonstrate the new possibilities opened up by high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis to study emerging new diseases in domestic and wild animal populations, including honeybees.

  2. Development of non-lethal methods for investigation of actinide uptake by wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, M.; Child, D.; Davis, E.; Harrison, J.; Hotchkis, M.; Payne, T.; Thiruvoth, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Org. (Australia); Wood, M. [University of Salford (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    There is growing interest in the use of non-lethal methods in radioecology and an International Union of Radioecology Task Group has been established to facilitate international cooperation in this field (http://iur-uir.org/en/task-groups/id-19-non-lethal-methods-in-radioecology). In this paper, we evaluate the use of lethally-, and non-lethally obtained samples (various body tissues, excreta and blood withdrawals as well as parasites and found bones) as indicators of contamination. Samples of mammals and reptiles were collected from the semi-arid former weapons test site at Maralinga, Australia and analysed for thorium, plutonium, and uranium isotopes by accelerator mass spectrometry and alpha-spectrometry. Most samples were of low mass and presented analytical challenges as a result. The plutonium concentrations in blood withdrawn from the marginal ear veins of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit) were successfully analysed using small samples (0.2 -7.9 ml, below the ∼10 ml threshold for safe extraction of blood from these rabbits). The results demonstrate that small-volume blood samples can serve as indicators of the presence of plutonium absorbed within other tissues (e.g., muscle, bone). However, the magnitude of the blood plutonium masses were poorly correlated with those in muscle and bone due to the presence of a small number of outliers (without the outliers, correlations improved to r = +0.66 and r = +0.51 for muscle and bone respectively). The activity concentrations in parasitic ticks were relatively high compared with those of their hosts Pseudomys hermannsburgensis (sandy inland mouse) and Ctenophorus cristatus (crested dragon lizard). Successful measurement of tick samples indicates a potential for use of parasites as general indicators of contamination within host organisms. The concentrations of actinides in found bones of Macropus rufus (red kangaroo) and O. cuniculus demonstrated potential for their use as indicators of the areal extent of

  3. Emergent geometry, emergent forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    We give a brief account of some aspects of Finkelstein’s quantum relativity, namely an extension of it that derives elements of macroscopic geometry and the Lagrangians of the standard model including gravity from a presumed quantum version of spacetime. These emerge as collective effects in this quantal substrate. Our treatment, which is largely self-contained, differs mathematically from that originally given by Finkelstein. Dedicated to the memory of David Ritz Finkelstein

  4. Susac's syndrome, a rare, potentially severe or lethal neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saux, A; Niango, G; Charif, M; Morales, R; Mura, F; Bonafe, A; Mourand, I

    2010-10-15

    Susac's syndrome (SS) is a rare, immune-mediated endotheliopathy affecting the microvasculature of the brain, the inner ear and the retina. Clinical presentation is characterised by a triad: encephalopathy, hearing loss and branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO). Given the rarity of this disease, its natural history still remains partially unknown, but lethal cases appear to be extremely rare since there has never been, to our knowledge, a report of SS leading to death. We report 2 cases of SS illustrating the multiplicity of neurological symptomatology and its unpredictable course. One case is particularly unusual due to its severe neurological evolution, leading to death despite treatments. This report presents clinical and paraclinical findings contributory to SS diagnosis and offers an innovative perspective on disease management. These cases represent the potential severity of this disease. Early, aggressive treatment strategies may be warranted for SS in order to avoid neurological deterioration and lethal evolution. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Emerging boom in nano magnetic particle incorporated high-Tc superconducting materials and technologies - A South African perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Srinivasu, VV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available With a strategy to establish and embrace the emerging nano particle incorporated superconductivity technology (based on the HTS materials and nano magnetic particles) in South Africa, the author has initiated the following research activity in South...

  6. CA-074Me Protection against Anthrax Lethal Toxin▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zachary L Newman; Stephen H Leppla; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2009-01-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) activates the NLRP1b (NALP1b) inflammasome and caspase-1 in macrophages from certain inbred mouse strains, but the mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. We report here that similar to several NLRP3 (NALP3, cryopyrin)-activating stimuli, LT activation of the NLRP1b inflammasome involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent cytoplasmic cathepsin B activity. CA-074Me, a potent cathepsin B inhibitor, protects LT-sensitive macrophages fr...

  7. Autopsy observations in lethal short-rib polydactyly syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiro, Patricia; Wainwright, Helen; Spranger, Jürgen; Beighton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The short rib-polydactyly syndromes are a heterogeneous group of lethal autosomal recessive disorders (SRP I-IV), which result from cellular ciliary dysfunction during embryogenesis. Diagnosis is conventionally based on radiographic imaging. Since 1976, postmortem investigations of 5 affected fetuses or stillbirths have been undertaken and the visceral abnormalities have been documented. These anomalies are discussed in the context of prenatal differential diagnosis and prognostication following imaging in pregnancy and at autopsy following miscarriage or stillbirth.

  8. Lethal Autonomous Weapons: Take the Human Out of the Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-16

    necessarily endorsed by the US Naval War College or the Department of the Navy. 16 June 2017 3 4 Table of Contents Introduction ... Introduction Lethal Autonomous Weapons (LAWS) should be employed by the United States on the field of battle. LAWS will save lives because they are... philosophy and my training guidance, they’ll know the 28 Ibid. 29 Ibid. 18 lessons that I

  9. Meckel-Gruber syndrome: A rare and lethal anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheir, Abdelmoneim E M; Imam, Abdelmutalab; Omer, Ilham M; Hassan, Ibtsama M A; Elamin, Sara A; Awadalla, Esra A; Gadalla, Mohammed H; Hamdoon, Tagwa A

    2012-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome is a rare and lethal autosomal recessive disorder characterized by occipital encephalocele, postaxial polydactyly and bilateral dysplastic cystic kidneys. It can be associated with many other conditions. Antenatal ultrasound examination establishes the diagnosis by identifying at least two of the major features described. We describe a female baby who had the typical triad of Meckel-Gruber syndrome and died shortly after birth.

  10. Meckel-Gruber syndrome: A rare and lethal anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Kheir, Abdelmoneim E. M.; Imam, Abdelmutalab; Omer, Ilham M.; Hassan, Ibtsama M.A.; Elamin, Sara A.; Awadalla, Esra A.; Gadalla, Mohammed H.; Hamdoon, Tagwa A.

    2012-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome is a rare and lethal autosomal recessive disorder characterized by occipital encephalocele, postaxial polydactyly and bilateral dysplastic cystic kidneys. It can be associated with many other conditions. Antenatal ultrasound examination establishes the diagnosis by identifying at least two of the major features described. We describe a female baby who had the typical triad of Meckel-Gruber syndrome and died shortly after birth.

  11. [Emergence of high-level resistance to gentamicin and streptomycin in Streptococcus agalactiae in Buenos Aires, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Hugo Edgardo; Jugo, Mónica Beatriz

    2013-06-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae has become recognized as a cause of serious illness in newborns, pregnant women, and adults with chronic medical conditions. Optimal antimicrobial therapy for serious infections requires the use of synergistic combinations of a cell wall-active agent, such as a penicillin, with an aminoglycoside, which results in bactericidal activity against this organism. The synergistic effect is eliminated by the acquisition of high-level resistance (HLR) to aminoglycosides. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of HLR to gentamicin (GEN) and streptomycin (EST).The ability to detect HLR using a standard agar screen plate and high-content discs was investigated. This study was conducted with 141 strains of S. agalactiae isolated from vaginal and rectal swabs of pregnant women at term. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to GEN and STR were determined by the E-test method. Disks of GEN (120 μg) and STR (300 μg) were used to detect HLR. Agar screening plates were performed with GEN 100 mg/L, GEN 500 mg/L and STR 2000 mg/L. The HLR to GEN and STR was detected in 13.5% and 16.3% of the isolates respectively. Among 141 strains, 7.8% were simultaneously resistant to GEN and STR. With 120-μg GEN and 300-μg STR disks, strains for which MICs were ≥ 512 mg/L and ≥ 1024 mg/L had no zones of inhibition. Isolates with inhibitory zones for GEN and STR of ≥13 mm showed a MICs ≤ 64 mg/L and ≤ 512 mg/L. All the screening plates were negative for these isolates. HLR to aminoglycosides was associated (83.9%) with resistance to erythromycin and/or clindamycin. This study highlights the emergence of strains with HLR to aminoglycosides. The disk-agar diffusion test performed with high-content aminoglycoside disks and screening plates can provide laboratories with a convenient and reliable method for detecting S. agalactiae isolates that are resistant to aminoglycoside-betalactam synergy.

  12. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing ...

  13. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrewin, Aisha N.; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M.; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-07-01

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980-2012. Lethality - deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013-1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003-1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000-2012 period versus 1980-1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615-8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG).

  14. Induction of Synthetic Lethality by Natural Compounds Targeting Cancer Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrand, Lee; Byun, Sanguine

    2017-11-16

    Despite the breakthroughs that have been achieved, significant unmet needs relating to the inadequate efficacy and toxicity of currently-available cancer therapies remain. Kinase inhibitors are a class of agents that target signaling factors responsible for the survival of malignant cells, and may address at least some of these issues. The concept of synthetic lethality provides a potential solution to counteract pathway redundancies, and refers to situations in which a mutation in one of two particular genes alone permits cell survival, while simultaneous mutation in both results in cell death. When exploited in the context of cancer therapy, pathways that are uniquely upregulated in cancer cells become selective targets, with reduced off-target toxicity toward their healthy counterparts. Natural compounds represent a large and readily-accessible library of bioactive structures that can be screened for synthetically lethal interactions by testing for the inhibition of kinases relevant to cancer cell survival. In this review, we discuss the concept of synthetic lethality and focus on scenarios in which natural compounds that target kinases may be applied to tip the balance in favor of cancer cell death during therapeutic challenge. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Ophthalmic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Deborah C; Holt, Elaine

    2005-03-01

    Ophthalmic emergencies are common presenting complaints in an emergency room. Most ophthalmic emergencies can be treated and stabilized until an ophthalmologist can be consulted. Most ocular emergencies involve loss of vision, compromised globe integrity, or severe ocular pain. Delay in treating true emergencies may result ina blind eye or loss of an eye. This article discusses the clinical signs,diagnosis, and treatment as well as the prognosis of some of the more common ophthalmic emergencies.

  16. Entrepreneurship, Emerging Technologies, Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thukral, Inderpreet S.; Von Ehr, James; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Groen, Arend J.; van der Sijde, Peter; Adham, Khairul Akmaliah

    2008-01-01

    Academics and practitioners alike have long understood the benefits, if not the risks, of both emerging markets and emerging technologies.Yet it is only recently that foresighted firms have embraced emerging technologies and emerging markets through entrepreneurial activity. Emerging technologies

  17. Inter-association task force recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of sudden cardiac arrest in high school and college athletic programs: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezner, Jonathan A; Courson, Ron W; Roberts, William O; Mosesso, Vincent N; Link, Mark S; Maron, Barry J

    2007-04-01

    To assist high school and college athletic programs prepare for and respond to a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). This consensus statement summarizes our current understanding of SCA in young athletes, defines the necessary elements for emergency preparedness, and establishes uniform treatment protocols for the management of SCA. Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in young athletes. The increasing presence of and timely access to automated external defibrillators (AEDs) at sporting events provides a means of early defibrillation and the potential for effective secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. An Inter-Association Task Force was sponsored by the National Athletic Trainers' Association to develop consensus recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of SCA in athletes. Comprehensive emergency planning is needed for high school and college athletic programs to ensure an efficient and structured response to SCA. Essential elements of an emergency action plan include establishing an effective communication system, training of anticipated responders in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and AED use, access to an AED for early defibrillation, acquisition of necessary emergency equipment, coordination and integration of onsite responder and AED programs with the local emergency medical services system, and practice and review of the response plan. Prompt recognition of SCA, early activation of the emergency medical services system, the presence of a trained rescuer to initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and access to early defibrillation are critical in the management of SCA. In any collapsed and unresponsive athlete, SCA should be suspected and an AED applied as soon as possible for rhythm analysis and defibrillation if indicated.

  18. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  19. Observed improvements in an intern's ability to initiate critical emergency skills in different cardiac arrest scenarios using high-fidelity simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starmer, David J; Duquette, Sean A; Guiliano, Dominic; Tibbles, Anthony; Miners, Andrew; Finn, Kevin; Stainsby, Brynne E

    2014-10-01

    Objective : The objective of this study was to report observed changes in an intern's ability to initiate critical emergency skills in different cardiac arrest scenarios with high-fidelity simulation over a 10-month period. Methods : One intern's performance was retrospectively analyzed using video recordings of 4 simulations at different stages in the training program. The key outcome was the duration of time expired for 4 critical skills, including activating the emergency response system, initiating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), using an automated external defibrillator (AED), and passively administrating oxygen. Results : The intern became more efficient in each subsequent simulation for activating the emergency response system and initiating CPR. The time to use the AED stayed relatively constant. The administration of oxygen was inconsistent. Conclusion : An improvement in the speed of applying emergency critical skills was observed with this intern. These improvements in skill may improve patient outcomes and survival rates. We propose further educational research with high-fidelity simulation in the area of assessing emergency skills.

  20. Lack of dominant lethality in mice following 1-bromopropane treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wook-Joon; Kim, Jong-Choon; Chung, Moon-Koo

    2008-03-29

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is widely used in spray adhesives, precision cleaner, and degreaser. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of 1-BP to induce dominant lethality in mice. 1-BP was orally administered to males at doses of 300 and 600 mg/kg for 10 days before mating. Cyclophosphamide was used as a positive control (PC), which was administered intraperitoneally to males at 40 mg/kg for 5 days. The vehicle control (VC) group received corn oil only. Thereafter, males were mated with untreated females during six sequential mating periods of a week each. Males were sacrificed at the end of mating and so were the pregnant females on days 15-17 of gestation. Clinical signs, gross findings, mating index, gestation index, the numbers of corpora lutea, implantations, live fetuses, resorptions and dead fetuses, pre- and post-implantation losses, and dominant lethal mutation rate were examined. There were no treatment-related changes in clinical signs, gross findings, mating index, gestation index, number of corpora lutea and implantations, pre-implantation loss, live fetuses, resorptions, dead fetuses, post-implantation loss at any 1-BP doses tested. In the PC group, there were no treatment-related changes in mating index, gestation index, number of corpora lutea, and dead fetuses. However, a decrease in the number of implantations and an increase in pre-implantation loss were observed during the first 2 weeks as compared to those of the VC group. No treatment-related changes were observed in the third to sixth weeks. Increases in resorptions, fetal deaths and post-implantation loss, and a decrease in the number of live fetuses were observed in the first 3 weeks of the PC group compared to those of the VC group. However, no treatment-related changes were observed during the forth to sixth weeks. An increase in dominant lethal mutation rate was observed in 1-3 weeks of mating of the PC group, but there was no significant difference in 1-6 weeks of mating of

  1. Detection of the recently emerged synthetic cannabinoid 5F-MDMB-PICA in 'legal high' products and human urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogler, Lukas; Franz, Florian; Rentsch, Daniel; Angerer, Verena; Weinfurtner, Georg; Longworth, Mitchell; Banister, Samuel D; Kassiou, Michael; Moosmann, Bjoern; Auwärter, Volker

    2017-03-31

    Indole or indazole-based synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) bearing substituents derived from valine or tert-leucine are frequently abused new psychoactive substances (NPS). The emergence of 5F-MDMB-PICA (methyl N-{[1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]carbonyl}-3-methylvalinate) on the German drug market is a further example of a substance synthesized in the context of scientific research being misused by clandestine laboratories by adding it to 'legal high' products. In this work, we present the detection of 5F-MDMB-PICA in several legal high products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. To detect characteristic metabolites suitable for a proof of 5F-MDMB-PICA consumption by urine analysis, pooled human liver microsome (pHLM) assays were performed and evaluated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QToF-MS) techniques to generate reference spectra of the in vitro phase I metabolites. The in vivo phase I metabolism was investigated by the analysis of more than 20 authentic human urine specimens and compared to the data received from the pHLM assay. Biotransformation of the 5-fluoropentyl side chain and hydrolysis of the terminal methyl ester bond are main phase I biotransformation steps. Two of the identified main metabolites formed by methyl ester hydrolysis or mono-hydroxylation at the indole ring system were evaluated as suitable urinary biomarkers and discussed regarding the interpretation of analytical findings. Exemplary analysis of one urine sample for 5F-MDMB-PICA phase II metabolites showed that two of the main phase I metabolites are subject to extensive glucuronidation prior to renal excretion. Therefore, conjugate cleavage is reasonable for enhancing sensitivity. Commercially available immunochemical pre-tests for urine proved to be unsuitable for the detection of 5F-MDMB-PICA consumption. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright

  2. Lengthening of insect development on Bt zone results in adult emergence asynchrony: does it influence the effectiveness of the high dose/refuge zone strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryspeirt, Aiko; Grégoire, Jean-Claude

    2012-11-15

    The “High Dose/Refuge” strategy (HD/R) is the currently recommended Insect Resistance Management strategy (IRM) to limit resistance development to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) plants. This strategy requires planting a “refuge zone” composed of non-Bt plants suitable for the target insect and in close proximity to a “Bt zone” expressing a high toxin concentration. One of the main assumptions is that enough susceptible adults mate with resistant insects. However, previous studies have suggested that the high toxin concentration produced by Bt plants induces slower insect development, creating an asynchrony in emergence between the refuge and the Bt zone and leading to assortative mating between adults inside each zone. Here, we develop a deterministic model to estimate the impact of toxin concentration, emergence asynchrony and refuge zone size on the effectiveness of the HD/R strategy. We conclude that emergence asynchrony only affects resistance when toxin concentration is high and resistance is recessive. Resistance develops more rapidly and survival of susceptible insects is higher at lower toxin concentration, but in such situations, resistance is insensitive to emergence asynchrony.

  3. Are There Jewish Digital Badges?: A Study of Religious Middle- and High-School Girls' Perception of an Emerging Educational Technology-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovich, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    For Jewish education, digital badges can provide an alternative to traditional assessments. However, the emerging research on badges suggests a complex relationship between learning opportunities, the learner, and the design of the badge. An investigation of a digital badge system at an ultra-Orthodox Jewish middle and high school for girls…

  4. A "Neurological Emergency Trolley" reduces turnaround time for high-risk medications in a general intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajzenberg, Henry; Newman, Paula; Harris, Gail-Anne; Cranston, Marnie; Boyd, J Gordon

    2018-02-01

    To reduce medication turnaround times during neurological emergencies, a multidisciplinary team developed a neurological emergency crash trolley in our intensive care unit. This trolley includes phenytoin, hypertonic saline and mannitol, as well as other equipment. The aim of this study was to assess whether the cart reduced turnaround times for these medications. In this retrospective cohort study, medication delivery times for two year epochs before and after its implementation were compared. Eligible patients were identified from our intensive care unit screening log. Adults who required emergent use of phenytoin, hypertonic saline or mannitol while in the intensive care unit were included. Groups were compared with nonparametric analyses. 33-bed general medical-surgical intensive care unit in an academic teaching hospital. Time to medication administration. In the pre-intervention group, there were 43 patients with 66 events. In the post-intervention group, there were 45 patients with 80 events. The median medication turnaround time was significantly reduced after implementation of the neurological emergency trolley (25 vs. 10minutes, p=0.003). There was no statistically significant difference in intensive care or 30-day survival between the two cohorts. The implementation of a novel neurological emergency crash trolley in our intensive care unit reduced medication turnaround times. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Carbon dioxide as an under-ice lethal control for invasive fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupp, Aaron R.; Woiak, Zebadiah; Erickson, Richard A.; Amberg, Jon; Gaikowski, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Resource managers need effective tools to control invasive fish populations. In this study, we tested under-ice carbon dioxide (CO2) injection as a novel piscicide method for non-native Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), Bighead Carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) and native Bigmouth Buffalo (Ictiobus cyprinellus). Fish were held overwinter in nine outdoor ponds (0.04 ha surface area; 340,000 L volume) treated with no CO2 (control), 43.5–44.0 kg CO2 (low treatment), and 87.5–88.5 kg CO2 (high treatment). Ponds were harvested immediately after ice-out to assess survival and condition. Resulting survival in low (mean = 32%) and high (mean = 5%) CO2-treated ponds was significantly lower than untreated control ponds (mean = 84%). Lethal efficacy varied across species with no Bighead Carp, Silver Carp, or Bigmouth Buffalo surviving the high CO2 treatment. External infections were observed more frequently after CO2 treatments (means = 49–67%) relative to untreated ponds (mean = 2%), suggesting a secondary mechanism for poor survival. This study demonstrates that CO2 can be used as a lethal control for invasive fishes, but effectiveness may vary by species and CO2concentration.

  6. Hot off the Press: Embedded Clinical Decision Support in Electronic Health Record Decreases Use of High-cost Imaging in the Emergency Department: EmbED Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, Corey; Morgenstern, Justin; Milne, William K

    2017-09-15

    This longitudinal before/after study of embedded clinical decision rules assessed the effects of clinical decision support on use of common imaging studies. Among high users, rates of computed tomograhy (CT) scan of the brain and CT of the cervical spine were reduced after implementation of embedded clinical decision instruments, while in low users, rates increased. This article summarizes the manuscript and the Skeptics Guide to Emergency Medicine podcast, as well as the ensuing social media/online discussion. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  7. Lethal and behavioral impacts of diesel and fuel oil on the Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathryn E; King, Catherine K; Harrison, Peter L

    2017-09-01

    Toxicity testing with Antarctic species is required for risk assessment of fuel spills in Antarctic coastal waters. The lethal and sublethal (movement behavior) sensitivities of adults and juveniles of the Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri to the water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of 3 fuels were estimated in extended-duration tests at -1 °C to 21 d. Response of P. walkeri for lethal hydrocarbon concentrations was slow, with 50% lethal concentrations (LC50s) first able to be estimated at 7 d for adults exposed to Special Antarctic Blend diesel (SAB), which had the highest hydrocarbon concentrations of the 3 fuel WAFs. Juveniles showed greater response to marine gas oil (MGO) and intermediate residual fuel oil (IFO 180) at longer exposure durations and were most sensitive at 21 d to IFO 180 (LC50 = 12 μg/L). Adults were initially more sensitive than juveniles; at 21 d, however, juveniles were more than twice as sensitive as adults to SAB (LC50 = 153 μg/L and 377 μg/L, respectively). Significant effects on movement behavior were evident at earlier time points and lower concentrations than was mortality in all 3 fuel WAFs, and juveniles were highly sensitive to sublethal effects of MGO. These first estimates of Antarctic amphipod sensitivity to diesel and fuel oils in seawater contribute to the development of ecologically relevant risk assessments for management of hydrocarbon contamination in the region. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2444-2455. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  8. Lethality of sortase depletion in Actinomyces oris caused by excessive membrane accumulation of a surface glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenggang; Huang, I-Hsiu; Chang, Chungyu; Reardon-Robinson, Melissa Elizabeth; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2014-12-01

    Sortase, a cysteine-transpeptidase conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, anchors on the cell wall many surface proteins that facilitate bacterial pathogenesis and fitness. Genetic disruption of the housekeeping sortase in several Gram-positive pathogens reported thus far attenuates virulence, but not bacterial growth. Paradoxically, we discovered that depletion of the housekeeping sortase SrtA was lethal for Actinomyces oris; yet, all of its predicted cell wall-anchored protein substrates (AcaA-N) were individually dispensable for cell viability. Using Tn5-transposon mutagenesis to identify factors that upend lethality of srtA deletion, we uncovered a set of genetic suppressors harbouring transposon insertions within genes of a locus encoding AcaC and a LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP)-like protein. AcaC was shown to be highly glycosylated and dependent on LCP for its glycosylation. Upon SrtA depletion, the glycosylated form of AcaC, hereby renamed GspA, was accumulated in the membrane. Overexpression of GspA in a mutant lacking gspA and srtA was lethal; conversely, cells overexpressing a GspA mutant missing a membrane-localization domain were viable. The results reveal a unique glycosylation pathway in A. oris that is coupled to cell wall anchoring catalysed by sortase SrtA. Significantly, this novel phenomenon of glyco-stress provides convenient cell-based assays for developing a new class of inhibitors against Gram-positive pathogens. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Clinical features and prognosis of patients with acute non-specific chest pain in emergency and cardiology departments after the introduction of high-sensitivity troponins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilangkovan, Nivethitha; Mickley, Hans; Diederichsen, Axel

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of clinical, cardiac-related endpoints and mortality among patients presenting to an emergency or cardiology department with non-specific chest pain (NSCP), and who receive testing with a high-sensitivity troponin. A second objective was to identify risk...... factors for the above-noted endpoints during 12 months of follow-up. DESIGN: A prospective multicentre study. SETTING: Emergency and cardiology departments in Southern Denmark. SUBJECTS: The study enrolled 1027 patients who were assessed for acute chest pain in an emergency or cardiology department......, and in whom a myocardial infarction or another obvious reason for chest pain had been ruled out. Patients were enrolled from September 2014 to June 2015 and followed for 1 year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical, cardiac-related endpoints (cardiac-related death, acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina...

  10. Lethal and sub-lethal evaluation of Indigo Carmine dye and byproducts after TiO2 photocatalysis in the immune system of Eisenia andrei earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genázio Pereira, Patrícia Christina; Reimão, Roberta Valoura; Pavesi, Thelma; Saggioro, Enrico Mendes; Moreira, Josino Costa; Veríssimo Correia, Fábio

    2017-09-01

    The Indigo carmine (IC) dye has been widely used in textile industries, even though it has been considered toxic for rats, pigs and humans. Owing to its toxicity, wastes containing this compound should be treated to minimize or eliminate their toxic effects on the biota. As an alternative to wastewater treatment, advanced oxidative processes (AOPs) have been highlighted due to their high capacity to destruct organic molecules. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate Indigo Carmine toxicity to soil organisms using the earthworm Eisenia andrei as a model-organism and also verify the efficiency of AOP in reducing its toxicity to these organisms. To this end, lethal (mortality) and sub-lethal (loss or gain of biomass, reproduction, behavior, morphological changes and immune system cells) effects caused by this substance and its degradation products in these annelids were evaluated. Morphological changes were observed even in organisms exposed to low concentrations, while mortality was the major effect observed in individuals exposed to high levels of indigo carmine dye. The organisms exposed to the IC during the contact test showed mortality after 72h of exposure (LC50 = 75.79mgcm-2), while those exposed to photoproducts showed mortality after 48h (LC50 = 243min). In the chronic study, the organisms displayed a mortality rate of 14%, while those exposed to the photoproduct reached up to 32.7%. A negative influence of the dye on the reproduction rate was observed, while by-products affected juvenile survival. A loss of viability and alterations in the cellular proportion was verified during the chronic test. However, the compounds did not alter the behavior of the annelids in the leak test (RL ranged from 20% to 30%). Although photocatalysis has been presented as an alternative technology for the treatment of waste containing the indigo carmine dye, this process produced byproducts even more toxic than the original compounds to E. andrei. Copyright © 2017

  11. Evaluation of the performance of three elastomers for non-lethal projectile applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thota N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Less lethal kinetic ammunitions with soft noses such as eXact iMpact 1006, National Sports Spartan and B&T have been commonly used by military and law enforcement officers in the situations where lethal force is not warranted. In order to explore new materials to be used as nose in such ammunitions, a scholastic study using finite element simulations has been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of two rubber like elastomers and a polyolefinic foam (low density, highly compressible, stiff and closed cell type of thermos plastic elastomer. State-of-the art thorax surrogate MTHOTA has been employed for the evaluation of blunt thoracic trauma. Force-rigid wall method was employed for the evaluation of head damage curves for each material. XM 1006 has been used as the benchmark projectile for the purpose of comparison. Both blunt thoracic trauma and head damage criterion point of view, both rubbers (R1 and R2 have yielded high values of VCmax and peak impact force. Polyolefinic foam (F1 considered in the study has yielded very promising VCmax values and very less peak impact force when compared with those of bench mark projectile XM 1006.

  12. Evaluation of the performance of three elastomers for non-lethal projectile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, N.; Epaarachchi, J.; Lau, K. T.

    2015-09-01

    Less lethal kinetic ammunitions with soft noses such as eXact iMpact 1006, National Sports Spartan and B&T have been commonly used by military and law enforcement officers in the situations where lethal force is not warranted. In order to explore new materials to be used as nose in such ammunitions, a scholastic study using finite element simulations has been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of two rubber like elastomers and a polyolefinic foam (low density, highly compressible, stiff and closed cell type of thermos plastic elastomer). State-of-the art thorax surrogate MTHOTA has been employed for the evaluation of blunt thoracic trauma. Force-rigid wall method was employed for the evaluation of head damage curves for each material. XM 1006 has been used as the benchmark projectile for the purpose of comparison. Both blunt thoracic trauma and head damage criterion point of view, both rubbers (R1 and R2) have yielded high values of VCmax and peak impact force. Polyolefinic foam (F1) considered in the study has yielded very promising VCmax values and very less peak impact force when compared with those of bench mark projectile XM 1006.

  13. Successful vaccination strategies that protect aged mice from lethal challenge from influenza virus and heterologous severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, Timothy; Whitmore, Alan; Long, Kristin; Ferris, Martin; Rockx, Barry; Funkhouser, William; Donaldson, Eric; Gralinski, Lisa; Collier, Martha; Heise, Mark; Davis, Nancy; Johnston, Robert; Baric, Ralph S

    2011-01-01

    Newly emerging viruses often circulate as a heterogeneous swarm in wild animal reservoirs prior to their emergence in humans, and their antigenic identities are often unknown until an outbreak situation. The newly emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and reemerging influenza virus cause disproportionate disease in the aged, who are also notoriously difficult to successfully vaccinate, likely due to immunosenescence. To protect against future emerging strains, vaccine platforms should induce broad cross-reactive immunity that is sufficient to protect from homologous and heterologous challenge in all ages. From initial studies, we hypothesized that attenuated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particle (VRP) vaccine glycoproteins mediated vaccine failure in the aged. We then compared the efficacies of vaccines bearing attenuated (VRP(3014)) or wild-type VEE glycoproteins (VRP(3000)) in young and aged mice within novel models of severe SARS-CoV pathogenesis. Aged animals receiving VRP(3000)-based vaccines were protected from SARS-CoV disease, while animals receiving the VRP(3014)-based vaccines were not. The superior protection for the aged observed with VRP(3000)-based vaccines was confirmed in a lethal influenza virus challenge model. While the VRP(3000) vaccine's immune responses in the aged were sufficient to protect against lethal homologous and heterologous challenge, our data suggest that innate defects within the VRP(3014) platform mediate vaccine failure. Exploration into the mechanism(s) of successful vaccination in the immunosenescent should aid in the development of successful vaccine strategies for other viral diseases disproportionately affecting the elderly, like West Nile virus, influenza virus, norovirus, or other emerging viruses of the future.

  14. Extended hypoxia in the alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, increases survival but causes sub-lethal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, H; Rinehart, J P; Yocum, G D; Greenlee, K J; Helm, B R; Kemp, W P; Schulz, C H; Bowsher, J H

    2014-05-01

    Many insects are tolerant of hypoxic conditions, but survival may come at a cost to long-term health. The alfalfa leaf-cutting bee, Megachile rotundata, develops in brood cells inside natural cavities, and may be exposed to hypoxic conditions for extended periods of time. Whether M. rotundata is tolerant of hypoxia, and whether exposure results in sub-lethal effects, has never been investigated. Overwintering M. rotundata prepupae were exposed to 10%, 13%, 17%, 21% and 24% O2 for 11 months. Once adults emerged, five indicators of quality - emergence weight, body size, feeding activity, flight performance, and adult longevity, - were measured to determine whether adult bees that survived past exposure to hypoxia were competent pollinators. M. rotundata prepupae are tolerant of hypoxic condition and have higher survival rates in hypoxia, than in normoxia. Under hypoxia, adult emergence rates did not decrease over the 11 months of the experiment. In contrast, bees reared in normoxia had decreased emergence rates by 8 months, and were dead by 11 months. M. rotundata prepupae exposed to extended hypoxic conditions had similar emergence weight, head width, and cross-thorax distance compared to bees reared in standard 21% oxygen. Despite no significant morphological differences, hypoxia-exposed bees had lower feeding rates and shorter adult lifespans. Hypoxia may play a role in post-diapause physiology of M. rotundata, with prepupae showing better survival under hypoxic conditions. Extended exposure to hypoxia, while not fatal, causes sub-lethal effects in feeding rates and longevity in the adults, indicating that hypoxia tolerance comes at a cost. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. The population genetics of human disease: The case of recessive, lethal mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo G Amorim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Do the frequencies of disease mutations in human populations reflect a simple balance between mutation and purifying selection? What other factors shape the prevalence of disease mutations? To begin to answer these questions, we focused on one of the simplest cases: recessive mutations that alone cause lethal diseases or complete sterility. To this end, we generated a hand-curated set of 417 Mendelian mutations in 32 genes reported to cause a recessive, lethal Mendelian disease. We then considered analytic models of mutation-selection balance in infinite and finite populations of constant sizes and simulations of purifying selection in a more realistic demographic setting, and tested how well these models fit allele frequencies estimated from 33,370 individuals of European ancestry. In doing so, we distinguished between CpG transitions, which occur at a substantially elevated rate, and three other mutation types. Intriguingly, the observed frequency for CpG transitions is slightly higher than expectation but close, whereas the frequencies observed for the three other mutation types are an order of magnitude higher than expected, with a bigger deviation from expectation seen for less mutable types. This discrepancy is even larger when subtle fitness effects in heterozygotes or lethal compound heterozygotes are taken into account. In principle, higher than expected frequencies of disease mutations could be due to widespread errors in reporting causal variants, compensation by other mutations, or balancing selection. It is unclear why these factors would have a greater impact on disease mutations that occur at lower rates, however. We argue instead that the unexpectedly high frequency of disease mutations and the relationship to the mutation rate likely reflect an ascertainment bias: of all the mutations that cause recessive lethal diseases, those that by chance have reached higher frequencies are more likely to have been identified and thus to

  16. Species-specific heterochromatin prevents mitotic chromosome segregation to cause hybrid lethality in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M Ferree

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Postzygotic reproductive barriers such as sterility and lethality of hybrids are important for establishing and maintaining reproductive isolation between species. Identifying the causal loci and discerning how they interfere with the development of hybrids is essential for understanding how hybrid incompatibilities (HIs evolve, but little is known about the mechanisms of how HI genes cause hybrid dysfunctions. A previously discovered Drosophila melanogaster locus called Zhr causes lethality in F1 daughters from crosses between Drosophila simulans females and D. melanogaster males. Zhr maps to a heterochromatic region of the D. melanogaster X that contains 359-bp satellite repeats, suggesting either that Zhr is a rare protein-coding gene embedded within heterochromatin, or is a locus consisting of the noncoding repetitive DNA that forms heterochromatin. The latter possibility raises the question of how heterochromatic DNA can induce lethality in hybrids. Here we show that hybrid females die because of widespread mitotic defects induced by lagging chromatin at the time during early embryogenesis when heterochromatin is first established. The lagging chromatin is confined solely to the paternally inherited D. melanogaster X chromatids, and consists predominantly of DNA from the 359-bp satellite block. We further found that a rearranged X chromosome carrying a deletion of the entire 359-bp satellite block segregated normally, while a translocation of the 359-bp satellite block to the Y chromosome resulted in defective Y segregation in males, strongly suggesting that the 359-bp satellite block specifically and directly inhibits chromatid separation. In hybrids produced from wild-type parents, the 359-bp satellite block was highly stretched and abnormally enriched with Topoisomerase II throughout mitosis. The 359-bp satellite block is not present in D. simulans, suggesting that lethality is caused by the absence or divergence of factors in the D

  17. Queueing models of potentially lethal damage repair in irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasnikova, E M; Rachev, S T; Yakovlev, A Y

    1996-07-01

    Some of the ideas arising in queueing theory are applied to describe the repair mechanisms responsible for recovery of cells from potentially lethal radiation damage. Two alternative versions are presented of a queueing model of damage repair after a single dose of irradiation. The first version represents a linear misrepair model, and the second invokes the idea of spontaneous lesion fixation. They are pieced together in the third model, allowing for both mechanisms. The consistency of the proposed models with published experimental data is tested.

  18. Intimate partner homicide: new insights for understanding lethality and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Brynn E; Murphy, Sharon B; Moynihan, Mary M; Dudley-Fennessey, Erin; Stapleton, Jane G

    2015-02-01

    Research on covictims, family members, and close friends who have lost loved ones to intimate partner homicide (IPH) is a neglected area of study. We conducted phenomenological interviews with covictims to gain insights into risk and lethality, examined affidavits from criminal case files, and reviewed news releases. The data uncovered acute risk factors prior to the homicide, identified changes in the perpetrators' behavior and the perpetrators' perceived loss of control over the victim, and described barriers that victims faced when attempting to gain safety. Findings suggest that recognizing acute risk factors is an important area for future IPH research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Mining of lethal recessive genetic variation in Danish cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of artificial insemination in cattle breeding Worldwide leads to reduced effective population sizes and increased inbreeding levels. Increased inbreeding result in increased probalility of expression of recessive defective alleles, which probably is reflected in a decline...... in fertility. The primary objective of this PhD projekt was to identify recessive lethal gentic variants in the main Danish dairy cattle breed. Holstein-Friesian utilzing next generation sequencing (NGS) data. This study shows a potential for the use of the NGS-based reverse genetic approach in identifying...

  20. Lethal subarachnoid bleeding under immunosuppressive therapy due to mycotic arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigel, S.; Kloska, S.; Freund, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Kehl, H.G. [Dept. of Pediatric Cardiology, Univ. Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    A subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) occurred 67 days after cardiac transplantation in 10-year-old girl with consecutive immunocompromising therapy. Neither digital subtraction angiography (DSA) nor computed tomographic angiography showed signs of intracranial vascular malformations. One month before the lethal SAH occurred, she had developed arterial hypertension and attacks of severe headache with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis while CT scans showed an infarct of the left thalamus. Pathologic findings established the rare diagnosis of SAH due to aspergillosis-related mycotic arteritis. Imaging characteristics are presented. (orig.)

  1. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Hamida, Emira Ben; Rebeh, Rania Ben; Chaouachi, Sihem; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy termination; they felt that the diagnosis was late. At birth, the newborn presented immediate respiratory distress. Postnatal examination and bone radiography confirmed the diagnosis of OI type IIA. Death occurred on day 25 of life related to respiratory failure.

  2. Papaya Lethal Yellowing Virus (PLYV) Infects Vasconcellea cauliflora

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, P.P.R.; Resende MR; Souza, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Papaya lethal yellowing virus (PLYV) é um dos três vírus descritos infectando mamoeiros (Carica papaya L.) no Brasil. Vasconcellea cauliflora (Jacq.) A. DC., antes denominada de Carica cauliflora (Jacq.), é uma reconhecida fonte de resistência natural ao Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), causador da "Mancha Anelar" ou "Mosaico" do mamoeiro. Neste estudo é demonstrado que V. cauliflora pode ser infectada por PLYV mediante inoculação mecânica. Esta é a segunda hospedeira de PLYV descrita até o mome...

  3. [Refractory status epilepticus in two children with lethal rhabdomyolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreft, Andreas; Rasmussen, Niels; Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård

    2008-10-13

    We are reporting two cases of SE with lethal rhabdomyolysis. Both were treated according to the guidelines on antiepileptic drug management by the Danish Paediatric Society, with one and two hours' delay, respectively. Intubation and midazolam infusion were needed to control seizures. After approximately one day both developed severe rhabdomyolysis with progressive DIC and acute renal failure, causing death despite intensive care, including acute hemodialysis. The aim of this case report is to emphasise one of the rare but severe consequences of SE and also to suggest that patients with known repetitive SE may benefit from written individual treatment schedules to avoid wasting time.

  4. Family Relationship In Gabrielle Lord`s Lethal Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Sri Kinanti

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Jenis karya sastra cerita detektif bukan hal baru dalam kesusastraan Australia. Salah satu penulis cerita detektif, Gabrielle Lord, menampilkan masalah yang tidak pernah diangkat oleh penulis lainnya, yaitu masalah hubungan keluarga. Novel yang akan dikaji dalam tulisan ini adalah Lethal Factor. Dalam karya ini masalah keluarga dan penyalahgunaan anak dibahas dan dilibatkan dalam kasus kriminal yang terjadi dalam kehidupan penyidik forensic, Jack McCain. Kasus kriminal terjadi dalam beberapa kasus yang menggunakan senjata tajam yang menimpa seorang biarawati dan senjata racun kimia yang menimpa teman McCain. Persoalan menjadi menarik dan penting ketika McCain juga harus menyelesaikan kasusnya dengan istri dan terancamnya jiwa anaknya.

  5. Emergence of a daptomycin-non-susceptible Enterococcus faecium strain that encodes mutations in DNA repair genes after high-dose daptomycin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matono, Takashi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Hirai, Risen; Tanimura, Akira; Yamamoto, Kei; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Momoko; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Ohmagari, Norio; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2016-04-01

    An increasing number of reports have documented the emergence of daptomycin-nonsusceptible Enterococcus in patients during daptomycin therapy. Even though several mechanisms for daptomycin-nonsusceptibility have been suggested, the potential genetic mutations which might contribute to the daptomycin-nonsusceptibility are not fully understood. We isolated a vancomycin-susceptible, daptomycin nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecium strain from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia who received high-dose daptomycin therapy for E. faecium endocarditis. Whole-genome sequencing analysis revealed mutations within genes encoding DNA repair proteins MutL and RecJ of the daptomycin-nonsusceptible Enterococcus strain which might have facilitated its emergence. We identified the mutations of DNA mismatch repair genes in a clinical isolate of daptomycin nonsusceptible E. faecium which emerged in spite of high-dose daptomycin therapy. The finding implicates the possible association of DNA repair mechanism and daptomycin resistance. Careful monitoring is necessary to avoid the emergence of daptomycin non-susceptible isolates of E. faecium and particularly in cases of long-term daptomycin use or in immunocompromised patients.

  6. Thrombomodulin contributes to gamma tocotrienol-mediated lethality protection and hematopoietic cell recovery in irradiated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Pathak

    Full Text Available Systemic administration of recombinant thrombomodulin (TM confers radiation protection partly by accelerating hematopoietic recovery. The uniquely potent radioprotector gamma tocotrienol (GT3, in addition to being a strong antioxidant, inhibits the enzyme hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR and thereby likely modulates the expression of TM. We hypothesized that the mechanism underlying the exceptional radioprotective properties of GT3 partly depends on the presence of endothelial TM. In vitro studies confirmed that ionizing radiation suppresses endothelial TM (about 40% at 4 hr after 5 Gy γ-irradiation and that GT3 induces TM expression (about 2 fold at the mRNA level after 5 μM GT3 treatment for 4 hr. In vivo survival studies showed that GT3 was significantly more effective as a radioprotector in TM wild type (TM+/+ mice than in mice with low TM function (TMPro/-. After exposure to 9 Gy TBI, GT3 pre-treatment conferred 85% survival in TM+/+ mice compared to only 50% in TMPro/-. Thus, GT3-mediated radiation lethality protection is partly dependent on endothelial TM. Significant post-TBI recovery of hematopoietic cells, particularly leukocytes, was observed in TM+/+ mice (p = 0.003, but not in TMPro/- mice, despite the fact that GT3 induced higher levels of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in TMPro/- mice (p = 0.0001. These data demonstrate a critical, G-CSF-independent, role for endothelial TM in GT3-mediated lethality protection and hematopoietic recovery after exposure to TBI and may point to new strategies to enhance the efficacy of current medical countermeasures in radiological/nuclear emergencies.

  7. A case of lethal soft tissue injuries due to assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanagawa Y

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Youichi Yanagawa,1 Yoshimasa Kanawaku,2 Jun Kanetake21Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, 2Department of Forensic Medicine, National Defense Medical College, Saitama, JapanAbstract: A 42-year-old male had been assaulted by his family over the two previous days and went into a deep coma. When the emergency technician arrived, the patient was in a state of cardiopulmonary arrest. On arrival, his electrocardiogram showed asystole. His body showed swelling with subcutaneous hemorrhage, suggesting multiple contusional wounds. Serum biochemistry evaluation revealed blood urea nitrogen of 80 mg/dL, creatinine of 5.99 mg/dL, creatine phosphokinase of 10,094 IU/L, and potassium of 11.0 mEq/L. Advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation failed to obtain a return of spontaneous circulation. Laboratory findings revealed rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and hyperkalemia. Autopsy did not indicate the direct cause of death to be traumatic organ injuries. Because trauma was not the direct reason of death, we speculated that the patient died of hyperkalemia induced by multiple contusional soft tissue injuries, following rhabdomyolysis, hemolysis, and acute renal failure. The physician should maintain a high index of suspicion for hyperkalemia induced by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, especially in patients presenting with symptoms of multiple soft tissue injuries with massive subcutaneous hemorrhaging.Keywords: contusion, rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, hyperkalemia

  8. Single-dose treatment with a humanized neutralizing antibody affords full protection of a human transgenic mouse model from lethal Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hongjie; Sun, Shihui; Xiao, He; Feng, Jiannan; Guo, Yan; Tai, Wanbo; Wang, Yufei; Du, Lanying; Zhao, Guangyu; Zhou, Yusen

    2016-08-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is continuously spreading and causing severe and fatal acute respiratory disease in humans. Prophylactic and therapeutic strategies are therefore urgently needed to control MERS-CoV infection. Here, we generated a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated hMS-1, which targeted the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain (RBD) with high affinity. hMS-1 significantly blocked MERS-CoV RBD binding to its viral receptor, human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (hDPP4), potently neutralized infection by a prototype MERS-CoV, and effectively cross-neutralized evolved MERS-CoV isolates through recognizing highly conserved RBD epitopes. Notably, single-dose treatment with hMS-1 completely protected hDPP4 transgenic (hDPP4-Tg) mice from lethal infection with MERS-CoV. Taken together, our data suggest that hMS-1 might be developed as an effective immunotherapeutic agent to treat patients infected with MERS-CoV, particularly in emergent cases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Straightening Beta: Overdispersion of Lethal Chromosome Aberrations following Radiotherapeutic Doses Leads to Terminal Linearity in the Alpha–Beta Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent technological advances allow precise radiation delivery to tumor targets. As opposed to more conventional radiotherapy—where multiple small fractions are given—in some cases, the preferred course of treatment may involve only a few (or even one large dose(s per fraction. Under these conditions, the choice of appropriate radiobiological model complicates the tasks of predicting radiotherapy outcomes and designing new treatment regimens. The most commonly used model for this purpose is the venerable linear-quadratic (LQ formalism as it applies to cell survival. However, predictions based on the LQ model are frequently at odds with data following very high acute doses. In particular, although the LQ predicts a continuously bending dose–response relationship for the logarithm of cell survival, empirical evidence over the high-dose region suggests that the survival response is instead log-linear with dose. Here, we show that the distribution of lethal chromosomal lesions among individual human cells (lymphocytes and fibroblasts exposed to gamma rays and X rays is somewhat overdispersed, compared with the Poisson distribution. Further, we show that such overdispersion affects the predicted dose response for cell survival (the fraction of cells with zero lethal lesions. This causes the dose response to approximate log-linear behavior at high doses, even when the mean number of lethal lesions per cell is well fitted by the continuously curving LQ model. Accounting for overdispersion of lethal lesions provides a novel, mechanistically based explanation for the observed shapes of cell survival dose responses that, in principle, may offer a tractable and clinically useful approach for modeling the effects of high doses per fraction.

  10. Non-obstructive mesenteric ischemia: a potentially lethal complication after cardiovascular surgery: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazui, Toshinobu; Yamasaki, Manabu; Abe, Kohei; Watanabe, Sunao; Kawazoe, Kohei

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of non-obstructive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI), a rare but potentially lethal complication after cardiovascular surgery, which was successfully managed. In both cases (a 74-year-old chronic hemodialysis patient who underwent emergency aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and a 74-year-old patient who underwent emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm operation), NOMI occurred early postoperatively (on day 8 and 22, respectively). They suffered from severe abdominal pain, confusion, and metabolic acidosis. Contrast-enhanced multi-detector CT (MDCT) scan and subsequent selective mesenteric angiography revealed characteristic signs of NOMI, for which selective papaverine infusion through the angiography catheter was performed. It was effective in both cases to halt progressive bowel ischemia and bided our time to perform a hemicolectomy of the necrotic segment. Contrast-enhanced MDCT scan and subsequent selective angiography are vital for diagnosis. If the condition does not improve after selective papaverine infusion, exploratory laparotomy and resection of necrotic intestinal segment should be performed immediately.

  11. High-sensitivity troponin assays in the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Christ, Michael; Bertsch, Thomas; Popp, Steffen; Bahrmann, Philipp; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Müller, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating patients with acute chest pain presenting to the emergency department remains an ongoing challenge. The spectrum of etiologies in acute chest pain ranges from minor disease entities to life-threatening diseases, such as pulmonary embolism, acute aortic dissection or acute myocardial infarction (MI). The diagnosis of acute MI is usually made integrating the triad of patient history and clinical presentation, readings of 12-lead ECG and measurement of cardiac troponins (cTn). Introdu...

  12. Prioritizing High-Risk Practices and Exploring New Emerging Ones Associated With Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, Ammal; Mohsen, Amira; Saleh, Rehan; Foaud, Walaa; Ibrahim, Nihad; Rabaah, Thanaa; El-Sayed, Manal

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and prioritize the risky behaviors and explore the newly emerging pi related to Egyptian habits that may lead to HCV transmission. From January 2011 until January 2012, a case control study matched on socio demographic factors was conducted comparing 540 hepatitis C patients and their contacts who were HCV serologically negative (102 subjects). They were randomly selected from six governorates representing Upper Egypt, Lower Egypt, Middle and Canal regions. The questionnaire covered demographic data, risk exposures, behaviors, and practices for HCV infection. Focus group discussions were done with groups of professionals in Hepatology to discuss the observed emerging risk practices in Egypt. In univariate analysis, invasive medical procedures, wound stitches, illiteracy and marriage were significantly associated with HCV infection. Among women, delivery at home by traditional birth attendant was associated with 3 times (OR=2.91, CI=1.23-6.98) and 4 times (OR=3.94, CI=1.44-11.35) increase in HCV risk than delivery at hospital and by doctors respectively. Among males, shaving at barbershops was associated with 2 fold increase in the risk of infection (OR=2.6, CI=1.44-4.89). Newly observed emerging risk practices were: sharing scarves' pins by veiled women in same houses, sharing loofah for personal cleaning and sharing toothpaste among family members. Increasing risk of HCV infection in Egypt reinforces the need for strict implementation of effective HCV prevention programs according to the prevailing risk behaviours.

  13. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine benthic invertebrates and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changkeun; Hong, Seongjin; Kwon, Bong-Oh; Lee, Jung-Ho; Ryu, Jongseong; Park, Young-Gyu; Kang, Seong-Gil; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-08-01

    Concern about leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep-sea storage in geological reservoirs is increasing because of its possible adverse effects on marine organisms locally or at nearby coastal areas both in sediment and water column. In the present study, we examined how elevated CO2 affects various intertidal epibenthic (benthic copepod), intertidal endobenthic (Manila clam and Venus clam), sub-tidal benthic (brittle starfish), and free-living (marine medaka) organisms in areas expected to be impacted by leakage. Acute lethal and sub-lethal effects were detected in the adult stage of all test organisms exposed to varying concentrations of CO2, due to the associated decline in pH (8.3 to 5.2) during 96-h exposure. However, intertidal organisms (such as benthic copepods and clams) showed remarkable resistance to elevated CO2, with the Venus clam being the most tolerant (LpH50 = 5.45). Sub-tidal species (such as brittle starfish [LpH50 = 6.16] and marine medaka [LpH50 = 5.91]) were more sensitive to elevated CO2 compared to intertidal species, possibly because they have fewer defensive capabilities. Of note, the exposure duration might regulate the degree of acute sub-lethal effects, as evidenced by the Venus clam, which showed a time-dependent effect to elevated CO2. Finally, copper was chosen as a model toxic element to find out the synergistic or antagonistic effects between ocean acidification and metal pollution. Combination of CO2 and Cu exposure enhances the adverse effects to organisms, generally supporting a synergistic effect scenario. Overall, the significant variation in the degree to which CO2 adversely affected organisms (viz., working range and strength) was clearly observed, supporting the general concept of species-dependent effects of elevated CO2.

  14. Lethal hypophosphatasia successfully treated with enzyme replacement from day 1 after birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Yoko; Kitajima, Hiroyuki; Mochizuki, Narutaka; Kitaoka, Taichi; Michigami, Toshimi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-03-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare metabolic bone disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene ALPL encoding the tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP). There is a broad range of severity in the phenotype of HPP, and the most severe form exhibits perinatal lethality without mineralization of the skeleton. Here, we describe a female infant with perinatal lethal HPP diagnosed in utero. She was treated with a recombinant ALP (asfotase alfa) as an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which started from 1 day after birth. She required invasive ventilation immediately upon birth and demonstrated severe hypomineralization of whole body bone. Severe respiratory insufficiency was controlled by intensive respiratory care with high-frequency oscillation ventilation and nitric oxide inhalation and deep sedation just after birth. Bone mineralization improved with treatment; improvements were visible by 3 weeks of age and continued with treatment. Serum calcium levels decreased following treatment, resulting in hypocalcemia and convulsion, and calcium supplementation was required until 3 months of treatment. She was weaned from mechanical ventilation and has now survived more than 1 year. This case demonstrates the success of ERT in treating the severest HPP and highlights the importance of early diagnosis and intervention for these patients.

  15. Severe hypoglycemia-induced lethal cardiac arrhythmias are mediated by sympathoadrenal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reno, Candace M; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Chen, Y Stefanie; VanderWeele, Jennifer; Jethi, Krishan; Fisher, Simon J

    2013-10-01

    For people with insulin-treated diabetes, severe hypoglycemia can be lethal, though potential mechanisms involved are poorly understood. To investigate how severe hypoglycemia can be fatal, hyperinsulinemic, severe hypoglycemic (10-15 mg/dL) clamps were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats with simultaneous electrocardiogram monitoring. With goals of reducing hypoglycemia-induced mortality, the hypotheses tested were that: 1) antecedent glycemic control impacts mortality associated with severe hypoglycemia; 2) with limitation of hypokalemia, potassium supplementation could limit hypoglycemia-associated deaths; 3) with prevention of central neuroglycopenia, brain glucose infusion could prevent hypoglycemia-associated arrhythmias and deaths; and 4) with limitation of sympathoadrenal activation, adrenergic blockers could prevent hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmic deaths. Severe hypoglycemia-induced mortality was noted to be worsened by diabetes, but recurrent antecedent hypoglycemia markedly improved the ability to survive an episode of severe hypoglycemia. Potassium supplementation tended to reduce mortality. Severe hypoglycemia caused numerous cardiac arrhythmias including premature ventricular contractions, tachycardia, and high-degree heart block. Intracerebroventricular glucose infusion reduced severe hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmias and overall mortality. β-Adrenergic blockade markedly reduced cardiac arrhythmias and completely abrogated deaths due to severe hypoglycemia. Under conditions studied, sudden deaths caused by insulin-induced severe hypoglycemia were mediated by lethal cardiac arrhythmias triggered by brain neuroglycopenia and the marked sympathoadrenal response.

  16. Severe Hypoglycemia–Induced Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias Are Mediated by Sympathoadrenal Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reno, Candace M.; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Chen, Y. Stefanie; VanderWeele, Jennifer; Jethi, Krishan; Fisher, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    For people with insulin-treated diabetes, severe hypoglycemia can be lethal, though potential mechanisms involved are poorly understood. To investigate how severe hypoglycemia can be fatal, hyperinsulinemic, severe hypoglycemic (10–15 mg/dL) clamps were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats with simultaneous electrocardiogram monitoring. With goals of reducing hypoglycemia-induced mortality, the hypotheses tested were that: 1) antecedent glycemic control impacts mortality associated with severe hypoglycemia; 2) with limitation of hypokalemia, potassium supplementation could limit hypoglycemia-associated deaths; 3) with prevention of central neuroglycopenia, brain glucose infusion could prevent hypoglycemia-associated arrhythmias and deaths; and 4) with limitation of sympathoadrenal activation, adrenergic blockers could prevent hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmic deaths. Severe hypoglycemia–induced mortality was noted to be worsened by diabetes, but recurrent antecedent hypoglycemia markedly improved the ability to survive an episode of severe hypoglycemia. Potassium supplementation tended to reduce mortality. Severe hypoglycemia caused numerous cardiac arrhythmias including premature ventricular contractions, tachycardia, and high-degree heart block. Intracerebroventricular glucose infusion reduced severe hypoglycemia–induced arrhythmias and overall mortality. β-Adrenergic blockade markedly reduced cardiac arrhythmias and completely abrogated deaths due to severe hypoglycemia. Under conditions studied, sudden deaths caused by insulin-induced severe hypoglycemia were mediated by lethal cardiac arrhythmias triggered by brain neuroglycopenia and the marked sympathoadrenal response. PMID:23835337

  17. Interference from ordinarily used solvents in the outcomes of Artemia salina lethality test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahgal Geethaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol, ethanol, Tween 20 and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO are widely used as dissolving agents in Artemia salina lethality test (aka brine shrimp lethality test [BSLT] to screen the pharmaceutical properties of natural products. Nevertheless, there is lack of toxicity level of these solvents against brine shrimp. High concentration of these organic solvent might be toxic for this zoology invertebrate and interfere in the experimental outcomes. To avoid this, permissible concentration of the solvents used in BSLT was identified. BSLT was performed to evaluate the toxicity effect of Tween 20, methanol, ethanol and DMSO at 24 h post-treatment time point against A. salina. The suggested maximum working concentration (v/v for DMSO, methanol, ethanol was found to be 1.25% and that for Tween 20 was 0.16%. LC 50 for the solvents were 8.5% (DMSO, 6.4% (methanol, 3.4% (ethanol and 2.5% (Tween 20. The findings have shown a toxicity level among the solvents in descending order as Tween 20 > ethanol > methanol > DMSO. DMSO is a safer solvent to be used in BSLT compared with other tested solvents, whereas Tween 20 has been shown to be the most stringent solvent among the tested solvents. The findings are resourcefully useful to avoid interference of solvents in the assessment of natural products using BSLT.

  18. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solé Ricard V

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since existent SL data is mainly restricted to yeast screenings, the road towards human SL candidates is limited to inference methods. Results In the present work, we use phylogenetic analysis and database manipulation (BioGRID for interactions, Ensembl and NCBI for homology, Gene Ontology for GO attributes in order to reconstruct the phylogenetically-inferred SL gene network for human. In addition, available data on cancer mutated genes (COSMIC and Cancer Gene Census databases as well as on existent approved drugs (DrugBank database supports our selection of cancer-therapy candidates. Conclusions Our work provides a complementary alternative to the current methods for drug discovering and gene target identification in anti-cancer research. Novel SL screening analysis and the use of highly curated databases would contribute to improve the results of this methodology.

  19. Using photopigment biomarkers to quantify sub-lethal effects of petroleum pollution on natural phytoplankton assemblages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swistak, J.; Pinckney, J.; Piehler, M.; Paerl, H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Morehead City, NC (United States). Inst. of Marine Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Although much work has been undertaken to determine the toxicity of petroleum pollutants to phytoplankton, most studies have used pure cultures to monitor growth of selected phytoplankton species. Fewer have considered the net effect on entire microalgal communities. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to characterize diagnostic microalgal pigments, the authors were able to simultaneously assess sub-lethal pollutant effects on entire communities as well as on individual phytoplankton functional groups. Incubations of natural water samples with diesel fuel, an important contributor to coastal petroleum pollution, revealed significant changes in photopigments and relative abundance of taxonomic groups at sub-lethal concentrations. Differential rates of change of indicator pigment concentrations suggest a range of sensitivity among phytoplankton groups. In preliminary experiments, cyanobacteria exhibited the greatest overall tolerance to the diesel fuel concentrations tested, while cryptomonads displayed the most sensitivity. The authors are currently evaluating the responses of seasonal phytoplankton populations from 3 sites exposed to varied levels of petroleum pollution. HPLC will be used to characterize phytoplankton populations and to determine if the most abundant groups are also the most tolerant of diesel fuel. Preliminary experiments indicate that diesel fuel pollution may modify the structure and function of phytoplankton communities and subsequently alter the trophodynamics of impacted systems.

  20. Gene expression and mutation-guided synthetic lethality eradicates proliferating and quiescent leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Sullivan, Katherine; Dasgupta, Yashodhara; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Hoser, Grazyna; Maifrede, Silvia; Martinez, Esteban; Di Marcantonio, Daniela; Bolton-Gillespie, Elisabeth; Cramer-Morales, Kimberly; Lee, Jaewong; Li, Min; Slupianek, Artur; Gritsyuk, Daniel; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Seferynska, Ilona; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Bullinger, Lars; Zhao, Huaqing; Gorbunova, Vera; Piwocka, Katarzyna; Valent, Peter; Civin, Curt I; Muschen, Markus; Dick, John E; Wang, Jean Cy; Bhatia, Smita; Bhatia, Ravi; Eppert, Kolja; Minden, Mark D; Sykes, Stephen M; Skorski, Tomasz

    2017-06-01

    Quiescent and proliferating leukemia cells accumulate highly lethal DNA double-strand breaks that are repaired by 2 major mechanisms: BRCA-dependent homologous recombination and DNA-dependent protein kinase-mediated (DNA-PK-mediated) nonhomologous end-joining, whereas DNA repair pathways mediated by poly(ADP)ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1) serve as backups. Here we have designed a personalized medicine approach called gene expression and mutation analysis (GEMA) to identify BRCA- and DNA-PK-deficient leukemias either directly, using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR, microarrays, and flow cytometry, or indirectly, by the presence of oncogenes such as BCR-ABL1. DNA-PK-deficient quiescent leukemia cells and BRCA/DNA-PK-deficient proliferating leukemia cells were sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors that were administered alone or in combination with current antileukemic drugs. In conclusion, GEMA-guided targeting of PARP1 resulted in dual cellular synthetic lethality in quiescent and proliferating immature leukemia cells, and is thus a potential approach to eradicate leukemia stem and progenitor cells that are responsible for initiation and manifestation of the disease. Further, an analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas database indicated that this personalized medicine approach could also be applied to treat numerous solid tumors from individual patients.

  1. [Persistent type 2 lepra reaction (erythema nodosum) and clofazimine-induced lethal enteropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Gerzain; Pinto, Rafael; López, Fernando; Gómez, Yenny

    2009-03-01

    Clofazimine enterophathy is a serious complication of clofazimine when used at high doses for treatment of type 2 lepra or or erythema nodosum leprosum. Objective. A woman is presented who had a delayed diagnosis of leprosy, persistent type 2 lepra reaction and lethal clofazimine enteropathy. A 31-year-old woman presented leprosy symptoms over a 16-year period without medical diagnosis of her disease. During this period, type 2 lepra episodes occurred, but were not accurately diagnosed. These episodes became more severe during her second pregnancy. The patient and her family were interviewed, and her clinical history reviewed. After twelve years of medical consults, lepromatous leprosy was diagnosed, based on perforation of her nasal septum, with a bacterial index of 5. Her husband and a 12-year-old daughter have leprosy symptoms. During multidrug therapy, she presented with repeated type 2 lepra reaction episodes for which she received daily clofazimine 400 mg doses. Two months after this treatment, severe and frequent episodes of intense abdominal pain began to occur. These persisted for more than a year and were managed with in-hospital administration of several classes of painkillers and antispasmodic medication, including morphine. She also presented with sporadic diarrhea, constipation, nausea, weight loss and mesenteric adenopathies. She died finally due to this intestinal condition. No autopsy was performed. The patient's clinical presentation suggested a clofazimine-induced lethal enteropathy, a complication not previously seen in Colombia. This connection was not recognized by the medical officers that treated the patient.

  2. Defective sister chromatid cohesion is synthetically lethal with impaired APC/C function

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Job; Faramarz, Atiq; Oostra, Anneke B.; de Menezes, Renee X.; van der Meulen, Ida H.; Rooimans, Martin A.; Rockx, Davy A.; Brakenhoff, Ruud H.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; King, Randall W.; de Winter, Johan P.; Wolthuis, Rob M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Warsaw breakage syndrome (WABS) is caused by defective DDX11, a DNA helicase that is essential for chromatid cohesion. Here, a paired genome-wide siRNA screen in patient-derived cell lines reveals that WABS cells do not tolerate partial depletion of individual APC/C subunits or the spindle checkpoint inhibitor p31comet. A combination of reduced cohesion and impaired APC/C function also leads to fatal mitotic arrest in diploid RPE1 cells. Moreover, WABS cell lines, and several cancer cell lines with cohesion defects, display a highly increased response to a new cell-permeable APC/C inhibitor, apcin, but not to the spindle poison paclitaxel. Synthetic lethality of APC/C inhibition and cohesion defects strictly depends on a functional mitotic spindle checkpoint as well as on intact microtubule pulling forces. This indicates that the underlying mechanism involves cohesion fatigue in response to mitotic delay, leading to spindle checkpoint re-activation and lethal mitotic arrest. Our results point to APC/C inhibitors as promising therapeutic agents targeting cohesion-defective cancers. PMID:26423134

  3. The lethal effects of Cyperus iria on Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, A M; Paskewitz, S M; Orth, A P; Tesch, M J; Toong, Y C; Goodman, W G

    1998-03-01

    The sedge Cyperus iria, a common weed in rice, contains large amounts of the insect hormone (10R) juvenile hormone III (JH III). Given its widespread distribution in Asia and Africa, we examined the possibility that C. iria could be used as a safe, inexpensive, and readily available mosquito larvicide. Plants of varying ages were harvested and leaves tested for lethal effects on larvae of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The median lethal doses (LD50s) for frozen leaves from 1- and 2-month-old plants were 267 and 427 mg/100 ml of water, respectively. Leaves from 1-month-old C. iria contained 193 micrograms JH III/g fresh weight, whereas leaves from 2-month-old plants contained 143 micrograms JH III/g fresh weight. Larval sensitivity to the plant differed with age; 4-day-old larvae displayed the greatest mortality followed in decreasing sensitivity by larvae 5, 6, 3, and 2 days old. Six Cyperus species (C. albostriatus, C. alternifolius, C. esculentus, C. iria, C. miliifolius, and C. papyrus) of similar developmental stage were assayed for JH III content. Only C. iria was found to contain significant levels of JH III.

  4. Synthetically lethal nanoparticles for treatment of endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeid, Kareem; Meng, Xiangbing; Thiel, Kristina W.; Do, Anh-Vu; Geary, Sean M.; Morris, Angie S.; Pham, Erica L.; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Chhonker, Yashpal S.; Murry, Daryl J.; Leslie, Kimberly K.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2018-01-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma, one of the most aggressive types of endometrial cancer, is characterized by poor outcomes and mutations in the tumour suppressor p53. Our objective was to engender synthetic lethality to paclitaxel (PTX), the frontline treatment for endometrial cancer, in tumours with mutant p53 and enhance the therapeutic efficacy using polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). First, we identified the optimal NP formulation through comprehensive analyses of release profiles and cellular-uptake and cell viability studies. Not only were PTX-loaded NPs superior to PTX in solution, but the combination of PTX-loaded NPs with the antiangiogenic molecular inhibitor BIBF 1120 (BIBF) promoted synthetic lethality specifically in cells with the loss-of-function (LOF) p53 mutation. In a xenograft model of endometrial cancer, this combinatorial therapy resulted in a marked inhibition of tumour progression and extended survival. Together, our data provide compelling evidence for future studies of BIBF- and PTX-loaded NPs as a therapeutic opportunity for LOF p53 cancers.

  5. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I de Ávila

    Full Text Available Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705 is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50. Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens.

  6. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay of selected gymnosperm and angiosperm species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaćković Peđa T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol extracts of selected species of flowering plants Anthemis cotula, A. ruthenica, Centaurea dubia (Asteraceae, Ajuga genevensis, A. chamaepitys, A. reptans, Micromeria albanica, M. cristata, M. dalmatica, M. juliana, Thymus tosevii (Lamiaceae and conifers - Abies alba, Picea omorika, Pinus heldreichii (Pinaceae and Taxus baccata (Taxaceae, as well as diethyl ether extracts of ten species Anthemis cotula, A. ruthenica, Centaurea dubia, Ajuga genevensis, A. chamaepitys, A. reptans, Micromeria albanica, M. cristata, M. dalmatica and M. juliana from two flowering plant families (Asteraceae and Lamiaceae were tested for general bioactivity using brine shrimp (Artemia salina lethality test. Lethal concentration (LC50 and 95% confidence intervals were determined by computer program LdP line. Out of fifteen tested methanol extracts, three possessed cytotoxic effect. Taxus baccata methanol extract showed the highest effect (LC50 = 18.60 μg/ml, while Thymus tosevii methanol extract expressed the lowest (LC50 = 842.50 μg/ml. All other analyzed species did not express significant cytotoxicity. Also, diethyl ether extracts of all tested species did not show significant cytotoxicity. The obtained results for methanol extracts which show certain cytotoxic effect could be guide for further phytochemical and pharmacological investigations. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 173029

  7. Experimental evaluation of the relationship between lethal or non-lethal virulence and transmission success in malaria parasite infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithiuthai S

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary theory suggests that the selection pressure on parasites to maximize their transmission determines their optimal host exploitation strategies and thus their virulence. Establishing the adaptive basis to parasite life history traits has important consequences for predicting parasite responses to public health interventions. In this study we examine the extent to which malaria parasites conform to the predicted adaptive trade-off between transmission and virulence, as defined by mortality. The majority of natural infections, however, result in sub-lethal virulent effects (e.g. anaemia and are often composed of many strains. Both sub-lethal effects and pathogen population structure have been theoretically shown to have important consequences for virulence evolution. Thus, we additionally examine the relationship between anaemia and transmission in single and mixed clone infections. Results Whereas there was a trade-off between transmission success and virulence as defined by host mortality, contradictory clone-specific patterns occurred when defining virulence by anaemia. A negative relationship between anaemia and transmission success was found for one of the parasite clones, whereas there was no relationship for the other. Notably the two parasite clones also differed in a transmission phenotype (gametocyte sex ratio that has previously been shown to respond adaptively to a changing blood environment. In addition, as predicted by evolutionary theory, mixed infections resulted in increased anaemia. The increased anaemia was, however, not correlated with any discernable parasite trait (e.g. parasite density or with increased transmission. Conclusions We found some evidence supporting the hypothesis that there is an adaptive basis correlating virulence (as defined by host mortality and transmission success in malaria parasites. This confirms the validity of applying evolutionary virulence theory to biomedical

  8. Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after unprotected sex. Often called the morning-after pill, emergency contraception pills (ECPs) are hormone pills that women ... Does It Cost? Depending on the types of pills, the emergency contraception pill costs between $10 and $80. An ...

  9. Emergency Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Week National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Emergency Checklist If someone may have been poisoned, call ... may save you from a visit to the emergency room. Below is a checklist to help you ...

  10. Obstetrical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, D; Macintire, D K

    2000-05-01

    This article discusses different techniques that can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of obstetrical emergencies. Female reproductive emergencies commonly encountered by small animal practitioners include pyometra, dystocia, cesarean section, mastitis, eclampsia, uterine torsion, and uterine prolapse. A thorough knowledge of normal and abnormal reproductive behavior will aid the emergency veterinarian in successfully managing such cases. Timely diagnosis and treatment of these emergencies will often give a good outcome.

  11. Emergency management of blunt chest trauma in children: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzé, Denis R; Pauzé, Daniel K

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric trauma is commonly encountered in the emergency department, and trauma to the head, chest, and abdomen may be a source of significant morbidity and mortality. As children have unique thoracic anatomical and physiological properties, they may present with diagnostic challenges that the emergency clinician must be aware of. This review examines the effects of blunt trauma to the pediatric chest, as well as its relevant etiologies and associated mortality. Diagnostic and treatment options for commonly encountered injuries such as pulmonary contusions, rib fractures, and pneumothoraces are examined. Additionally, this review discusses rarely encountered--yet highly lethal--chest wall injuries such as blunt cardiac injuries, commotio cordis, nonaccidental trauma, and aortic injuries.

  12. Emergence of a two-dimensional macrospin liquid in a highly frustrated three-dimensional quantum magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkenk, Tycho S.; Coester, Kris; Buhrandt, Stefan; Fritz, Lars; Schmidt, Kai P.

    2017-02-01

    The classical Ising model on the frustrated three-dimensional (3D) swedenborgite lattice has disordered spin liquid ground states for all ratios of inter- and intraplanar couplings. Quantum fluctuations due to a transverse field give rise to several exotic phenomena. In the limit of weakly coupled kagome layers we find a 3D version of disorder by disorder degeneracy lifting. For large out-of-plane couplings one-dimensional macrospins are formed, which realize a disordered macrospin liquid phase on an emerging two-dimensional triangular lattice. We speculate about a possibly exotic version of quantum criticality that connects the polarized phase to the macrospin liquid.

  13. Larvicidal and adult emergence inhibition effect of Centella asiatica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethanolic extract of Centella asiatica leaves were evaluated for the larvicidal and adult emergence inhibition activity against mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus under five constant temperatures 19, 22, 25, 28 and 31°C in the laboratory. Toxicity of this extract increased with temperature. The 50% medium lethal concentrations ...

  14. Spatial distribution of loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) emergences along a highly dynamic beach in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Margaret M.; Houser, Chris

    2014-01-01

    As coastlines change due to sea level rise and an increasing human presence, understanding how species, such as marine turtles, respond to alterations in habitat is necessary for proper management and conservation. Survey data from a major nesting beach in the northern Gulf of Mexico, where a revetment was installed, was used to assess spatial distribution of loggerhead emergences. Through use of Quadrat analysis and piecewise linear regression with breakpoint, we present evidence to suggest that nest site selection in loggerheads is determined in the nearshore environment, and by characteristics such as wave height, alongshore currents, depth and patterns of erosion and accretion. Areas of relatively dense nesting were found in areas with relatively strong alongshore currents, relatively small waves, a steep offshore slope and the largest historical rates of erosion. Areas of relatively dense nesting also corresponded to areas of low nesting success. Both nesting and non-nesting emergences were clustered immediately adjacent to the revetment and at other eroding sites along the beach. These results suggest that alterations to the nearshore environment from activities such as construction of a jetty, dredging or installation of pilings, may impact sea turtle nest distribution alongshore. We also show that piecewise linear regression with breakpoint is a technique that can be used with geomorphological and oceanographic data to predict locations of nest clumping and may be useful for managers at other nesting beaches.

  15. Efficiency of haplotype-based methods to fine-map QTLs and embryonic lethals variants affecting fertility: illustration with a deletion segregating in Nordic Red cattle Corresponding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Naveen Kumar; Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt

    2014-01-01

    to identify such embryonic lethal variants. We first show that haplotypes can be used in traditional QTL mapping approaches and that they present very high linkage disequilibrium with underlying variants. Haplotypes can also be used in scan for lack of homozygosity. Indeed, if a haplotype is associated...... to a recessive lethal variant, significantly fewer living individuals will be homozygote for that haplotype than expected. For both approaches, haplotype-based methods were particularly efficient. The lack of homozygosity approach achieved higher significance than the QTL approach. Only frequent variants can...

  16. Calcium antagonists protect mice against lethal doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floersheim, G.L. (University Hospitals, Basel (Switzerland). Dept. of Research)

    1992-11-01

    Currently available radioprotectors are poorly tolerated in man and the general use of aminothiol radioprotectors is compromised by side-effects. In a search for less toxic radioprotective agents, diltiazem, a calcium antagonist with a benzothiazepine structure, was found to protect mice against a lethal (LD[sub 100]) [gamma] radiation dose allowing survival of up to 93%. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists such as nifedipine, nimodipine, isradipine and nitrendipine also provided radioprotection. Calcium antagonists might attenuate radiation-induced injury by inhibiting cellular calcium overload, subsequent to cell membrane damage caused by radiation-generated free radicals. In view of their good tolerance, calcium antagonists may be applied safely in situations of radiation exposure, including radiotherapy and internal radionuclide contamination. These calcium antagonists may also be viewed in other contexts where free radicals are implicated in pathological processes. (Author).

  17. Autotaxin overexpression causes embryonic lethality and vascular defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yukiura

    Full Text Available Autotaxin (ATX is a secretory protein, which converts lysophospholipids to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, and is essential for embryonic vascular formation. ATX is abundantly detected in various biological fluids and its level is elevated in some pathophysiological conditions. However, the roles of elevated ATX levels remain to be elucidated. In this study, we generated conditional transgenic (Tg mice overexpressing ATX and examined the effects of excess LPA signalling. We found that ATX overexpression in the embryonic period caused severe vascular defects and was lethal around E9.5. ATX was conditionally overexpressed in the neonatal period using the Cre/loxP system, which resulted in a marked increase in the plasma LPA level. This resulted in retinal vascular defects including abnormal vascular plexus and increased vascular regression. Our findings indicate that the ATX level must be carefully regulated to ensure coordinated vascular formation.

  18. Autotaxin Overexpression Causes Embryonic Lethality and Vascular Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukiura, Hiroshi; Kano, Kuniyuki; Kise, Ryoji; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2015-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secretory protein, which converts lysophospholipids to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and is essential for embryonic vascular formation. ATX is abundantly detected in various biological fluids and its level is elevated in some pathophysiological conditions. However, the roles of elevated ATX levels remain to be elucidated. In this study, we generated conditional transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing ATX and examined the effects of excess LPA signalling. We found that ATX overexpression in the embryonic period caused severe vascular defects and was lethal around E9.5. ATX was conditionally overexpressed in the neonatal period using the Cre/loxP system, which resulted in a marked increase in the plasma LPA level. This resulted in retinal vascular defects including abnormal vascular plexus and increased vascular regression. Our findings indicate that the ATX level must be carefully regulated to ensure coordinated vascular formation PMID:25992708

  19. BRINE SHRIMP LETHALITY BIOASSAY OF GLAUCIUM GRANDIFLORUM VAR. GRANDIFLORUM

    OpenAIRE

    A. SARI, Ç. ÜNSAL, İ. SARIOĞLU, A. SARI, Ç. ÜNSAL, İ. SARIOĞLU

    2013-01-01

    Türkiye'nin 3 farklı bölgesinden toplanan Glaucium grandiflorum Boiss. et Huet var. grandiflorum örneklerinin toprak üstü kısımlarından elde edilen alkaloit ekstreleri ve bu ekstrelerden elde edilen majör alkaloitler allokriptopin, protopİn, (+)-izokoridin, (+)-korİdin üzerinde brİne shrimp lethality testi yapılarak sitotoksisiteleri İncelenmiştir. Glaucium grandiflorum var. grandiflorum türünün 3 örneği de önemli oranda sitotoksik aktİvite göstermiştir. Allokriptopin, protopin, (+)-izok...

  20. Evaluation of Lethal Giant Larvae as a Schistosomiasis Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufan Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of humans, and it is considered to be the second most devastating parasitic disease after malaria. Eggs produced by normally developed female worms are important in the transmission of the parasite, and they responsible for the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The tumor suppressor gene lethal giant larvae (lgl has an essential function in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. In our earlier study, downregulation of the lgl gene induced a significant reduction in the egg hatching rate of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj eggs. In this study, the Sjlgl gene was used as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis, and vaccination achieved and maintained a stable reduction of the egg hatching rate, which is consistent with previous studies, in addition to reducing the worm burden and liver egg burden in some trials.

  1. Mechanisms of Lethal Cerebrovascular Accidents in Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W

    2016-05-01

    A case of intracerebral hemorrhage in Turner syndrome is reported with an analysis of possible causes of cerebrovascular accidents in this condition. A 42-year-old woman with known Turner syndrome died soon after hospital admission having been found unconscious at her home address. At autopsy, she showed typical features of Turner syndrome with short stature, webbing of the neck, underdeveloped breasts, and an increased carrying angle of the arm. Death was due to a large left-sided intracerebral hemorrhage extending from the left basal ganglia into the white matter of the frontal lobe and lateral ventricle. Cases of unexpected death in Turner syndrome may arise from occult cerebrovascular accidents which may be hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic. Associated features include hypertension, vascular malformations, accelerated atherogenesis, cystic medial necrosis, and moyamoya syndrome. The possibility of Turner syndrome should be considered in cases where there has been a lethal cerebrovascular event in a younger woman. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Variation in yield and lethality of venoms from Iranian snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, M

    1984-01-01

    The dangerous venomous terrestrial snakes of Iran belong to three groups: the Elapidae (cobras); the Viperinae (true vipers); the Crotalinae (pit vipers). Geographical distribution of each species was determined. Studies on the venoms extracted from the following Iranian snakes, Oxus cobra, Naja naja oxiana, Levantine viper (Afyi), Vipera lebetina, Carpet viper, Echis carinatus, Persian horned viper, Pseudocerastes persicus, Latifii viper, Vipera latifii, Mountain viper, Vipera xanthina and Caucasus pit viper (Agkistrodon halys), indicated that the yield of venom varies in each species. Venoms were compared for their lethality (i.v. LD50 in mice) and their rate of production. The antigenic components of the venoms were compared with their antisera by gel diffusion tests. To obtain the best results from antivenom treatment, the serum should be made against the venom of the local population of snakes or, at least, the commercial antivenom should be controlled for potency by testing with local reference venom.

  3. Development and validation of predictive MoSaiCo (Modello Statistico Combinato on emergency admissions: can it also identify patients at high risk of frailty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Falasca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The prospective historical cohort study develops and validates a method of identifying patients at high risk of emergency admission to hospital in the population of the Province of Ravenna (no. = 296 641. The main outcome measure is: emergency hospital admission analyzed using multivariate logistic regression (MoSaiCo - Modello Statistico Combinato. To validate the findings, the coefficients for 30 most powerful variables found on half of the population (derivation data set were then applied to the rest of the population (validation data set. The key predicting factors included some demographic variables, social variables, clinical variables and use of health/social services. Discriminatory power and validation both reached good results. Risk score increases when variables indicating the individual vulnerability raise. The predictive frailty risk resulting from MoSaiCo allows to stratify the population, to organize care services, to provide a practical planning tool in the field of case management and management of frail patients.

  4. Imperfect Vaccination Can Enhance the Transmission of Highly Virulent Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Read

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Could some vaccines drive the evolution of more virulent pathogens? Conventional wisdom is that natural selection will remove highly lethal pathogens if host death greatly reduces transmission. Vaccines that keep hosts alive but still allow transmission could thus allow very virulent strains to circulate in a population. Here we show experimentally that immunization of chickens against Marek's disease virus enhances the fitness of more virulent strains, making it possible for hyperpathogenic strains to transmit. Immunity elicited by direct vaccination or by maternal vaccination prolongs host survival but does not prevent infection, viral replication or transmission, thus extending the infectious periods of strains otherwise too lethal to persist. Our data show that anti-disease vaccines that do not prevent transmission can create conditions that promote the emergence of pathogen strains that cause more severe disease in unvaccinated hosts.

  5. Emergence of a 2d macro-spin liquid in a highly frustrated 3d quantum magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkenk, Tycho; Coester, Kris; Buhrandt, Stefan; Fritz, Lars; Schmidt, Kai

    The classical Ising model on the frustrated 3d swedenborgite lattice has disordered spin liquid ground states for all ratios of inter- and intra-planar couplings. Quantum fluctuations due to a transverse field give rise to several exotic phenomena. In the limit of weakly coupled kagome layers we find a 3d version of disorder by disorder degeneracy lifting. For large out-of-plane couplings 1d macro-spins are formed, which realize a disordered macro-spin liquid phase on an emerging 2d triangular lattice. We speculate about a possibly exotic version of quantum criticality that connects the polarized phase to the macro-spin liquid. DFG FR 2627/3-1, D-ITP consortium.

  6. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downward, Julian

    2015-04-15

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacologic approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be "undruggable." This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS-mutant but not wild-type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS-mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a reevaluation of the approaches taken. On the basis of experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS-mutant cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1802-9. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Geo-Correction of High-Resolution Imagery Using Fast Template Matching on a GPU in Emergency Mapping Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Giovalli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of satellite imagery acquired by existing and new sensors allows a wide variety of new applications that depend on the use of diverse spectral and spatial resolution data sets. One of the pre-conditions for the use of hybrid image data sets is a consistent geo-correction capacity. We demonstrate how a novel fast template matching approach implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU allows us to accurately and rapidly geo-correct imagery in an automated way. The key difference with existing geo-correction approaches, which do not use a GPU, is the possibility to match large source image segments (8,192 by 8,192 pixels with relatively large templates (512 by 512 pixels significantly faster. Our approach is sufficiently robust to allow for the use of various reference data sources. The need for accelerated processing is relevant in our application context, which relates to mapping activities in the European Copernicus emergency management service. Our new method is demonstrated over an area northwest of Valencia (Spain for a large forest fire event in July 2012. We use the Disaster Monitoring Constellation’s (DMC DEIMOS-1 and RapidEye imagery for the delineation of burnt scar extent. Automated geo-correction of each full resolution image set takes approximately one minute. The reference templates are taken from the TerraColor data set and the Spanish national ortho-imagery database, through the use of dedicated web map services. Geo-correction results are compared to the vector sets derived in the Copernicus emergency service activation request.

  8. Emerging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  9. Sub-lethal effects of essential oil of Lippia sidoides on drywood termite Cryptotermes brevis (Blattodea: Termitoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Abraão Almeida; de Oliveira, Bruna Maria Santos; Melo, Carlisson Ramos; Lima, Ana Paula Santana; Santana, Emile Dayara Rabelo; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho; Araújo, Ana Paula Albano; Cristaldo, Paulo Fellipe; Bacci, Leandro

    2017-11-01

    The drywood termite Cryptotermes brevis (Walker, 1853) (Kalotermitidae) is one of the most important wood structural pest in the world. Substances from the secondary metabolism of plants (e.g., essential oils) have been considered an environmentally safer form of control for urban pests, such as termites. In the present study, we analyzed the lethal and sub-lethal effects of essential oil of Lippia sidoides and its major components on C. brevis pseudergates in two routes of exposure (contact and fumigation). The essential oil of L. sidoides and thymol were more toxic to C. brevis pseudergates when applied by contact (LD50 = 9.33 and 8.20µgmg(-1), respectively) and by fumigation (LC50 = 9.10 and 23.6µLL(-1), respectively). In general, treatments changed the individual and collective behaviors of C. brevis pseudergates, as well as the displacement and walking speed. The essential oil of L. sidoides and its major components showed a high potential to control C. brevis pseudergates, due to the bioactivity in the two routes of exposure and the sub-lethal effects on the behavior and walking, important activities for the cohesion of C. brevis colonies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mediators of protection against lethal systemic vesicular stomatitis virus infection in hamsters: defective interfering particles, polyinosinate-polycytidylate, and interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fultz, P.N.; Shadduck, J.A.; Kang, C.Y.; Streilein, J.W.

    1982-08-01

    Homologous defective interfering (DI) particles protected adult Syrian hamsters against lethal systemic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) serotype Indiana. The DI particles had to be biologically active, but did not have to be administered at the same inoculation site as the infectious virus. Serum and tissue levels of VSV postinoculation were significantly lower in DI-protected animals than in unprotected controls, suggesting that true autointerference was occurring. However, some aspects of protection also must be mediated through nonspecific mechanisms, since susceptible hamsters could be protected against VSV Indiana by coinjection with heterologous DI particles prepared from VSV serotype New Jersey or by simultaneous administration of polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid. By measuring serum levels of putative hamster interferon (type 1), we found that animals coinjected with VSV and DI particles or polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid produced significant levels of interferon. Since similarly high serum levels of interferon were measured in recipients of VSV alone (animals that eventually died from infection), there appeared to be no correlation between protection against lethal disease and induced levels of serum interferon. Instead, serum interferon levels correlated positively with amounts of VSV PFU found in serum and tissues of infected animals, the lowest levels being found in serum of animals protected with homologous DI particles. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that autointerference by DI particles as well as various host defense mechanisms (possibly including induction of interferon) participates in protecting hamsters against lethal VSV infection.

  11. Dual Acting Neuraminidase Inhibitors Open New Opportunities to Disrupt the Lethal Synergism between Streptococcus pneumoniae and Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eWalther

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae cause severe pneumonia and enhance lethality during influenza epidemics and pandemics. Structural and functional similarities with viral neuraminidase (NA suggest that the highly prevalent pneumococcal NAs, NanA and NanB, might contribute to this lethal synergism by supporting viral replication and that dual acting NA inhibitors (NAIs will disrupt it. To verify this hypothesis, NanA and NanB were expressed in E. coli. After confirming their activity in enzyme assays, in vitro models with influenza virus A/Jena/8178/09 (Jena/8178 and the recombinant NanA or NanB (rNanA and rNanB were established in A549 and MDCK cells to mimic the role of these pneumococcal NAs during co-infection. Studies on the influence of both NAs on viral receptor expression, spread, and yield revealed a distinct effect of NanA and NanB on viral replication in these in vitro models. Both enzymes were able to support Jena/8178 replication at certain concentrations. This synergism was disrupted by the NAIs oseltamivir, DANA, katsumadain A, and artocarpin exerting an inhibitory effect on viral NA and NanA. Interestingly, katsumadain A and artocarpin inhibited rNanA and rNanB similarly. Zanamivir did not show activity. These results demonstrate a key role of pneumococcal NAs in the lethal synergism with influenza viruses and reveal opportunities for its effective disruption.

  12. The Wiggle Index: An Open Source Bioassay to Assess Sub-Lethal Insecticide Response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Shane; Nowell, Cameron J; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Trent; Batterham, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological assays measuring mortality are routinely used to describe insecticide response, but sub-lethal exposures to insecticides can select for resistance and yield additional biological information describing the ways in which an insecticide impacts the insect. Here we present the Wiggle Index (WI), a high-throughput method to quantify insecticide response by measuring the reduction in motility during sub-lethal exposures in larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. A susceptible wild type strain was exposed to the insecticides chlorantraniliprole, imidacloprid, spinosad, and ivermectin. Each insecticide reduced larval motility, but response times and profiles differed among insecticides. Two sets of target site mutants previously identified in mortality studies on the basis of imidacloprid or spinosad resistance phenotypes were tested. In each case the resistant mutant responded significantly less than the control. The WI was also able to detect a spinosad response in the absence of the primary spinosad target site. This response was not detected in mortality assays suggesting that spinosad, like many other insecticides, may have secondary targets affecting behaviour. The ability of the WI to detect changes in insecticide metabolism was confirmed by overexpressing the imidacloprid metabolizing Cyp6g1 gene in digestive tissues or the central nervous system. The data presented here validate the WI as an inexpensive, generic, sub-lethal assay that can complement information gained from mortality assays, extending our understanding of the genetic basis of insecticide response in D. melanogaster.

  13. Protective Immunity against Lethal F. tularensis holarctica LVS Provided by Vaccination with Selected Novel CD8+ T Cell Epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Haim, Erez; Bar-On, Liat; Ehrlich, Sharon; Shafferman, Avigdor

    2014-01-01

    Recently we described an unbiased bacterial whole-genome immunoinformatic analysis aimed at selection of potential CTL epitopes located in “hotspots” of predicted MHC-I binders. Applying this approach to the proteome of the facultative intra-cellular pathogen Francisella tularensis resulted in identification of 170 novel CTL epitopes, several of which were shown to elicit highly robust T cell responses. Here we demonstrate that by DNA immunization using a short DNA fragment expressing six of the most prominent identified CTL epitopes a potent and specific CD8+ T cell responses is being induced, to all encoded epitopes, a response not observed in control mice immunized with the DNA vector alone Moreover, this CTL-specific mediated immune response prevented disease development, allowed for a rapid clearance of the bacterial infection and provided complete protection against lethal challenge (10LD50) with F. tularensis holarctica Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) (a total to 30 of 30 immunized mice survived the challenge while all control DNA vector immunized mice succumbed). Furthermore, and in accordance with these results, CD8 deficient mice could not be protected from lethal challenge after immunization with the CTL-polyepitope. Vaccination with the DNA poly-epitope construct could even protect mice (8/10) against the more demanding pulmonary lethal challenge of LVS. Our approach provides a proof-of-principle for selecting and generating a multi-epitpoe CD8 T cell-stimulating vaccine against a model intracellular bacterium. PMID:24400128

  14. Protective immunity against lethal F. tularensis holarctica LVS provided by vaccination with selected novel CD8+ T cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Shahar; Cohen, Ofer; Bar-Haim, Erez; Bar-On, Liat; Ehrlich, Sharon; Shafferman, Avigdor

    2014-01-01

    Recently we described an unbiased bacterial whole-genome immunoinformatic analysis aimed at selection of potential CTL epitopes located in "hotspots" of predicted MHC-I binders. Applying this approach to the proteome of the facultative intra-cellular pathogen Francisella tularensis resulted in identification of 170 novel CTL epitopes, several of which were shown to elicit highly robust T cell responses. Here we demonstrate that by DNA immunization using a short DNA fragment expressing six of the most prominent identified CTL epitopes a potent and specific CD8+ T cell responses is being induced, to all encoded epitopes, a response not observed in control mice immunized with the DNA vector alone Moreover, this CTL-specific mediated immune response prevented disease development, allowed for a rapid clearance of the bacterial infection and provided complete protection against lethal challenge (10LD50) with F. tularensis holarctica Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) (a total to 30 of 30 immunized mice survived the challenge while all control DNA vector immunized mice succumbed). Furthermore, and in accordance with these results, CD8 deficient mice could not be protected from lethal challenge after immunization with the CTL-polyepitope. Vaccination with the DNA poly-epitope construct could even protect mice (8/10) against the more demanding pulmonary lethal challenge of LVS. Our approach provides a proof-of-principle for selecting and generating a multi-epitpoe CD8 T cell-stimulating vaccine against a model intracellular bacterium.

  15. Social mechanisms in the population genetics of Tay-Sachs and other lethal autosomal recessive diseases: a computer simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKusick, K B; Schach, S R; Koeslag, J H

    1990-06-01

    A computer simulation model was developed to study the effects of various feudal social customs on the incidence of lethal autosomal recessive genes. Populations of 500 individuals were created in which each person was characterized by sibship, genotype, and sex. The numbered sibships were sorted into numerical order. Each individual then sought a mate from 6 or 12 sibships on either side of his or her own sibship. The resulting couples were sorted in order of the husband's sibship number, after which the couples produced children in accordance with the prevailing birth rate. This ordering of sibships made the probability of a gene remaining in one locality higher than the probability of it drifting to distant localities. A lethal autosomal recessive gene was introduced into populations at a starting carrier rate of 10%. This fell after 20 generations to 2.54 +/- 0.17% (SEM) which was significantly less than the 5.00% carrier rate predicted by a deterministic model in which random mating occurred in an infinite population. The excessive loss of the lethal gene was caused by the high incidence of consanguineous marriages and by the occurrence of random inequalities in the distribution of the gene. The avoidance of sib marriages raised the final carrier frequency (3.28 +/- 0.19%) as did reproductive compensation (4.33 +/- 0.26%). The combination of the incest taboo and reproductive compensation raised the final carrier rate to 5.05 +/- 0.28%. It is concluded that the social factors which may have operated over a period of many centuries in the past have had a significant effect on the population genetics of lethal autosomal recessive genes.

  16. Sub-lethal doses of photodynamic therapy affect biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, M; Chiniforush, N; Shahabi, S; Ghorbanzadeh, R; Bahador, A

    2016-09-01

    During photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of a primary endodontic infection, it is extremely likely that microorganisms would be exposed to sub-lethal doses of PDT (sPDT). Although sPDT cannot kill microorganisms, it can considerably influence microbial virulence. This study was conducted to characterize the effect of sPDT using toluidine blue O (TBO), methylene blue (MB), and indocyanine green (ICG) on biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of Enterococcus faecalis. The antimetabolic and antibiofilm potential of ICG-, TBO-, and MB-sPDT against E. faecalis was analyzed at sub-lethal doses (1/2-1/64 minimum inhibitory concentration) using the XTT reduction assay, crystal violet assay, and scanning electron microscopy. Higher doses of sPDT adversely affected biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity. ICG-, TBO-, and MB-PDT at a maximum sub-lethal dose markedly reduced the formation of biofilm up to 42.8%, 22.6%, and 19.5%, respectively. ICG-, TBO-, and MB-sPDT showed a marked reduction in bacterial metabolic activity by 98%, 94%, and 82%, respectively. ICG-PDT showed a stronger inhibitory effect on biofilm formation in E. faecalis than MB- and TBO-PDT at sub-lethal levels. Interestingly, a gradual increase in metabolic activity and biofilm formation upon exposure to a lower dose of test sPDT were observed. sPDT showed dual effect on biofilm formation ability and metabolic activity of E. faecalis. High doses revealed antimetabolic and antibiofilm potential activity, whereas lower doses had conflicting results. Hence, when PDT is prescribed in clinical settings, the dose of PDT used in vivo should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation lethality potentiation in total body irradiated mice by a commonly prescribed proton pump inhibitor, Pantoprazole sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biju, Prabath G; Gubrij, Igor; Garg, Sarita; Gupta, Prem K; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Burnett, Alexander F

    2014-07-01

    Pantoprazole sodium (Protonix) is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) widely used to treat peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux due to its ability to inhibit gastric acid secretion. Therefore, a large group of the population exposed to total body irradiation (TBI) in the event of a nuclear disaster would be on this or similar medications. We investigated the effect of pantoprazole on TBI-induced lethality in mice. Male CD2F1 mice were exposed to various doses of uniform TBI using a (137)Cs irradiator. Pantoprazole was administered by twice daily subcutaneous injection in saline from 4 days before to 5 days after irradiation. Effects on gastric pH, and gastrointestinal (GI) and hematopoietic toxicity were evaluated. Pantoprazole administration significantly exacerbated 30 day lethality and gastrointestinal toxicity. Median survival after 9.0 Gy TBI was reduced from 22 days to 12 days (p = 0.006). Pantoprazole adversely effected intestinal crypt survival and mucosal surface area. In contrast, equivalent doses of a histamine type-2(H2) receptor blocker (cimetidine) did not alter TBI-induced lethality. The adverse effect of pantoprazole on TBI-induced lethality is highly important because of the widespread use of PPI in the general population, as well as use of these drugs for acid suppression in individuals exposed to radiation. Further studies of the mechanisms underlying the adverse effect of PPI after exposure to TBI are clearly warranted. Until results from such studies are available, other acid-suppressing strategies should be preferred in the context of radiation exposure.

  18. Fast-SL: an efficient algorithm to identify synthetic lethal sets in metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratapa, Aditya; Balachandran, Shankar; Raman, Karthik

    2015-10-15

    Synthetic lethal sets are sets of reactions/genes where only the simultaneous removal of all reactions/genes in the set abolishes growth of an organism. Previous approaches to identify synthetic lethal genes in genome-scale metabolic networks have built on the framework of flux balance analysis (FBA), extending it either to exhaustively analyze all possible combinations of genes or formulate the problem as a bi-level mixed integer linear programming (MILP) problem. We here propose an algorithm, Fast-SL, which surmounts the computational complexity of previous approaches by iteratively reducing the search space for synthetic lethals, resulting in a substantial reduction in running time, even for higher order synthetic lethals. We performed synthetic reaction and gene lethality analysis, using Fast-SL, for genome-scale metabolic networks of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Fast-SL also rigorously identifies synthetic lethal gene deletions, uncovering synthetic lethal triplets that were not reported previously. We confirm that the triple lethal gene sets obtained for the three organisms have a precise match with the results obtained through exhaustive enumeration of lethals performed on a computer cluster. We also parallelized our algorithm, enabling the identification of synthetic lethal gene quadruplets for all three organisms in under 6 h. Overall, Fast-SL enables an efficient enumeration of higher order synthetic lethals in metabolic networks, which may help uncover previously unknown genetic interactions and combinatorial drug targets. The MATLAB implementation of the algorithm, compatible with COBRA toolbox v2.0, is available at https://github.com/RamanLab/FastSL CONTACT: kraman@iitm.ac.in Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Acute and chronic effects of the synthetic neuroactive steroid, ganaxolone, against the convulsive and lethal effects of pentylenetetrazol in seizure-kindled mice : comparison with diazepam and valproate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasior, M; Ungard, JT; Beekman, M; Carter, RB; Witkin, JM

    2000-01-01

    A high-affinity positive modulator of the GABA, receptor complex, ganaxolone, is a 3 beta-methylated analog of the naturally occurring neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone. in the present study, ganaxolone was tested for its ability to (1) suppress seizures (clonic and tonic) and lethality induced

  20. Reproductive emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkowitz, L Ari

    2005-03-01

    The emergency clinician is frequently called on to manage problems relating to the female reproductive tract. Because owners sel-dom have the medical knowledge needed to differentiate normal from abnormal reproductive behaviors, they frequently look to the emergency veterinarian for guidance and information during and after parturition. For this reason, it is essential that the veterinarian have a good understanding of the normal reproductive cycle as well as the common emergencies that may occur. This article reviews the events surrounding normal parturition in the dog and cat and the reproductive emergencies seen most commonly in practice.

  1. Lethal and pre-lethal effects of a fungal biopesticide contribute to substantial and rapid control of malaria vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Blanford

    Full Text Available Rapidly emerging insecticide resistance is creating an urgent need for new active ingredients to control the adult mosquitoes that vector malaria. Biopesticides based on the spores of entomopathogenic fungi have shown considerable promise by causing very substantial mortality within 7-14 days of exposure. This mortality will generate excellent malaria control if there is a high likelihood that mosquitoes contact fungi early in their adult lives. However, where contact rates are lower, as might result from poor pesticide coverage, some mosquitoes will contact fungi one or more feeding cycles after they acquire malaria, and so risk transmitting malaria before the fungus kills them. Critics have argued that 'slow acting' fungal biopesticides are, therefore, incapable of delivering malaria control in real-world contexts. Here, utilizing standard WHO laboratory protocols, we demonstrate effective action of a biopesticide much faster than previously reported. Specifically, we show that transient exposure to clay tiles sprayed with a candidate biopesticide comprising spores of a natural isolate of Beauveria bassiana, could reduce malaria transmission potential to zero within a feeding cycle. The effect resulted from a combination of high mortality and rapid fungal-induced reduction in feeding and flight capacity. Additionally, multiple insecticide-resistant lines from three key African malaria vector species were completely susceptible to fungus. Thus, fungal biopesticides can block transmission on a par with chemical insecticides, and can achieve this where chemical insecticides have little impact. These results support broadening the current vector control paradigm beyond fast-acting chemical toxins.

  2. Emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Rabe, Thomas; Cheng, Linan

    2013-03-01

    There have been numerous attempts to control fertility after unprotected sexual intercourse (UPSI). From very bizarre methods like the vaginal application of Coca Cola to the more serious attempts using calcium antagonists influencing fertility parameters in sperm to hormonal methods or intrauterine devices. So far, hormonal methods preventing or delaying ovulation have proved to be the most popular starting with the combination of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (LNG), known as the Yuzpe regimen. The first dose had to be taken within 72 hours of UPSI, a second one 12 hours later. Later on, LNG alone, at first in a regimen similar to the Yuzpe method (2 × 0.75 mg 12 hours apart) showed to be more successful, eventually resulting in the development of a 1.5 mg LNG pill that combined good efficacy with a high ease of use. Several efficacious and easy to use methods for emergency contraception (EC) are available on the market today with the most widely spread being LNG in a single dose of 1.5 mg (given as one tablet of 1.5 mg or 2 tablets of 0.75 mg each) for administration up to 3 days (according to WHO up to 5 days) after UPSI. Its limitations are the non-optimal efficacy which is decreasing the later the drug is taken and the fact that it is only approved for up to 72 hours after UPSI. This regimen has no effect on the endometrium, corpus luteum function and implantation, is not abortive and don't harm the fetus if accidentally taken in early pregnancy. It has no impact on the rate of ectopic pregnancies. It has become the standard method used up to this day in most countries. Since the mid 1970s copper IUDs have been used for EC, which show a high efficacy. Their disadvantages lie in the fact that EC is considered an off label use for most IUDs (not for the GynFix copper IUD in the European Union) and that they might not be acceptable for every patient. Furthermore IUD-insertion is an invasive procedure and it is required trained providers and

  3. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; Stemler, Kristina M; White, Lynn S; Loza, Andrew J; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-12-22

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

  4. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  5. "Rickettsia amblyommii" induces cross protection against lethal Rocky Mountain spotted fever in a guinea pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Lucas S; Mendell, Nicole L; Walker, David H; Bouyer, Donald H

    2014-08-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a severe illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii for which there is no available vaccine. We hypothesize that exposure to the highly prevalent, relatively nonpathogenic "Rickettsia amblyommii" protects against R. rickettsii challenge. To test this hypothesis, guinea pigs were inoculated with "R. amblyommii." After inoculation, the animals showed no signs of illness. When later challenged with lethal doses of R. rickettsii, those previously exposed to "R. amblyommii" remained well, whereas unimmunized controls developed severe illness and died. We conclude that "R. amblyommii" induces an immune response that protects from illness and death in the guinea pig model of RMSF. These results provide a basis for exploring the use of low-virulence rickettsiae as a platform to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to prevent severe rickettsioses.

  6. Perinatally lethal short rib-polydactyly syndromes. Pt. 1. Variability in known syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sillence, D.; Kozlowski, K.; Bar-ziv, J.; Fuhrmann-Rieger, A.; Fuhrmann, W.; Pascu, F.

    1987-10-01

    Thirteen newborns with lethal short rib-polydactyly (SRP) have been reviewed, 11 with SRP type 3 (Verma-Naumoff) and 2 with SRP tye 2 (Majewski). In the former group there were three sets of siblings. The excess of males with SRP type III (Verma-Naumoff) is confirmed in this present study. A high frequency of phenotypic females including sex-reversed constitutional males with SRP type 1 (Saldino-Noonan) is in marked contrast to these findings in SRP type 3. Possible hypotheses include variable expressivity in non-Majewski short rib-polydactyly syndromes with sex-reversed and constitutional female cases tending to show more severe phenotypic expression both in terms of major anomalies and skeletal dysplastic effects.

  7. Increase in pertussis cases along with high prevalence of two emerging genotypes of Bordetella pertussis in Perú, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailon, H; León-Janampa, N; Padilla, C; Hozbor, D

    2016-08-17

    As has occurred in many regions worldwide, in 2012 the incidence of pertussis increased in Perú. This epidemiologic situation has been associated with a waning vaccine-induced immunity and the adaptation of Bordetella pertussis to vaccine-induced immunity along with improved diagnostic methods. The study comprised a total of 840 pertussis-suspected cases reported in Perú during 2012. We summarize here the distribution of pertussis cases according to age and immunization status along with the immunization-coverage rate. Laboratory diagnosis was performed by culture test and real-time polymerase-chain reaction (PCR). B. pertussis bacteria recovered from infected patients were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the DNA sequencing of the pertussis-toxin (promoter and subunit A), pertactin, and fimbriae (fim2 and fim3) genes. From the total pertussis-suspected cases, 191 (22.7 %) infections were confirmed by real-time PCR and 18 through cultivation of B. pertussis (2.1 %), while one infection of B. parapertussis (0.11 %) was also detected by culture. Pertussis was significantly higher in patients that had had 0-3 vaccine doses (pentavalent vaccine alone) than in those who had had 4-5 vaccine doses (pentavalent plus DwPT boosters) at 94.3 vs. 5.7 %, respectively (p < 0.00001). The relative risk (RR) for patients with 4-5 doses compared to those with fewer than 4 doses or no dose was 0.23 (95 % Confidence Interval: 0.11-0.44), while the vaccine effectiveness was 77 % and coverage 50.5 %. Genetic analysis of B. pertussis isolates from different Peruvian regions detected two clonal groups as identified by PFGE. Those two groups corresponded to the B. pertussis genotypes emerging worldwide ptxP3-ptxA1-prn2 or 9-fim3-1 and ptxP3-ptxA1-prn2 or 9-fim3-2. Two emerging B. pertussis genotypes similar to isolates involved in worldwide epidemics were detected in Perú. Low vaccine coverage (<50 %) and genetic divergence between the vaccine

  8. Mapping evaporative water loss in desert passerines reveals an expanding threat of lethal dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Thomas P; Mutiibwa, Denis; Gerson, Alexander R; Smith, Eric Krabbe; Talbot, William A; O'Neill, Jacqueline J; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2017-02-28

    Extreme high environmental temperatures produce a variety of consequences for wildlife, including mass die-offs. Heat waves are increasing in frequency, intensity, and extent, and are projected to increase further under climate change. However, the spatial and temporal dynamics of die-off risk are poorly understood. Here, we examine the effects of heat waves on evaporative water loss (EWL) and survival in five desert passerine birds across the southwestern United States using a combination of physiological data, mechanistically informed models, and hourly geospatial temperature data. We ask how rates of EWL vary with temperature across species; how frequently, over what areas, and how rapidly lethal dehydration occurs; how EWL and die-off risk vary with body mass; and how die-off risk is affected by climate warming. We find that smaller-bodied passerines are subject to higher rates of mass-specific EWL than larger-bodied counterparts and thus encounter potentially lethal conditions much more frequently, over shorter daily intervals, and over larger geographic areas. Warming by 4 °C greatly expands the extent, frequency, and intensity of dehydration risk, and introduces new threats for larger passerine birds, particularly those with limited geographic ranges. Our models reveal that increasing air temperatures and heat wave occurrence will potentially have important impacts on the water balance, daily activity, and geographic distribution of arid-zone birds. Impacts may be exacerbated by chronic effects and interactions with other environmental changes. This work underscores the importance of acute risks of high temperatures, particularly for small-bodied species, and suggests conservation of thermal refugia and water sources.

  9. Prevention of peritoneal dialysis catheter infections in Saudi peritoneal dialysis patients: the emergence of high-level mupirocin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hwiesh, Abdullah K; Abdul-Rahman, Ibrahiem Saeed; Al-Muhanna, Fahd Abdulaziz; Al-Sulaiman, Mohammed Hamad; Al-Jondebi, Mohammed Shami; Divino-Filho, Jose Carolino

    2013-07-01

    Exit-site infection (ESI) and peritonitis remain the major causes of morbidity and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. This study compared the effectiveness of local mupirocin ointment and gentamicin cream in preventing both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial infections in PD patients. Patients from two centers (n = 203) were assigned to daily mupirocin ointment or gentamicin cream application. Infections were tracked prospectively by organisms and expressed as episodes per patient-year for both ESI and peritonitis. The rate of gram-positive ESI was 0.31/episode/patient-year and 0.22 episodes/patient-year (pgentamicin group, respectively. Gram-positive ESI occurred in 17.1% vs 10.2% of patients (presistance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured in 21.8% of ESI in the mupirocin group, and in only 6.7% in the gentamicin group (pgentamicin cream, 0.17 episode/patient-year compared with mupirocin, 0.39 episode/patient-year (pgentamicin exit-site use was a significant predictor for lower catheter infection rate. Prolonged use of mupirocin for ESI-prophylaxis is associated with the emergence of mupirocin-resistant S. aureus. Gentamicin cream is superior to mupirocin ointment in the prevention of PD catheter infections.

  10. Highly sensitive ligand-binding assays in pre-clinical and clinical applications: immuno-PCR and other emerging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Mark; Adler, Michael; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2015-09-21

    Recombinant DNA technology and corresponding innovations in molecular biology, chemistry and medicine have led to novel therapeutic biomacromolecules as lead candidates in the pharmaceutical drug development pipelines. While monoclonal antibodies and other proteins provide therapeutic potential beyond the possibilities of small molecule drugs, the concomitant demand for supportive bioanalytical sample testing creates multiple novel challenges. For example, intact macromolecules can usually not be quantified by mass-spectrometry without enzymatic digestion and isotopically labeled internal standards are costly and/or difficult to prepare. Classical ELISA-type immunoassays, on the other hand, often lack the sensitivity required to obtain pharmacokinetics of low dosed drugs or pharmacodynamics of suitable biomarkers. Here we summarize emerging state-of-the-art ligand-binding assay technologies for pharmaceutical sample testing, which reveal enhanced analytical sensitivity over classical ELISA formats. We focus on immuno-PCR, which combines antibody specificity with the extremely sensitive detection of a tethered DNA marker by quantitative PCR, and alternative nucleic acid-based technologies as well as methods based on electrochemiluminescence or single-molecule counting. Using case studies, we discuss advantages and drawbacks of these methods for preclinical and clinical sample testing.

  11. Protective effect of Cl-amidine against CLP-induced lethal septic shock in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Pan, Baihong; Alam, Hasan B; Liu, Baoling; Bronson, Roderick T; Deng, Qiufang; Wu, Erxi; Li, Yongqing

    2016-11-07

    Production of innate and adaptive immune cells from hematopoietic stem cells, and maturation of T lymphocytes are effective immune responses to fight severe microbial infection. In sepsis, this emergency myelopoiesis is damaged, leading to failure of bacterial clearance, and excessive stress-induced steroids cause immature T-lymphocyte apoptosis in thymus. We recently found that Cl-amidine, a peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) inhibitor, improves survival in a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced septic shock. In the present study we investigated how Cl-amidine promotes survival, focusing on protective effects of Cl-amidine on immune response. We confirmed survival-improving effect of Cl-amidine and are the first to explore the role of Cl-amidine in immune response. CLP caused bone marrow (BM) and thymus atrophy, decreased innate immune cells in BM. CLP increased levels of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and bacteria load in blood/liver. In primary splenocyte culture, lipopolysaccharide increased TNF-α production. In contrast, Cl-amidine attenuated these CLP and lipopolysaccharide-induced alterations. Moreover, Cl-amidine increased circulating monocytes. Collectively, our results demonstrate Cl-amidine plays protective roles by significantly decreasing BM and thymus atrophy, restoring innate immune cells in BM, increasing blood monocytes and blood/liver bacteria clearance, and attenuating pro-inflammatory cytokine production in a murine model of lethal sepsis.

  12. Abrogation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor decreases West Nile virus lethality by limiting viral neuroinvasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Alvaro; Foellmer, Harald G; Town, Terrence; Leng, Lin; McDonald, Courtney; Wang, Tian; Wong, Susan J; Montgomery, Ruth R; Fikrig, Erol; Bucala, Richard

    2007-10-01

    The flavivirus West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging pathogen that causes life-threatening encephalitis in susceptible individuals. We investigated the role of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is an upstream mediator of innate immunity, in WNV immunopathogenesis. We found that patients suffering from acute WNV infection presented with increased MIF levels in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid. MIF expression also was induced in WNV-infected mice. Remarkably, abrogation of MIF action by 3 distinct approaches (antibody blockade, small molecule pharmacologic inhibition, and genetic deletion) rendered mice more resistant to WNV lethality. Mif(-/-) mice showed a reduced viral load and inflammatory response in the brain when compared with wild-type mice. Our results also indicate that MIF favors viral neuroinvasion by compromising the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. In conclusion, the data obtained from this study provide direct evidence for the involvement of MIF in viral pathogenesis and suggest that pharmacotherapeutic approaches targeting MIF may hold promise for the treatment of WNV encephalitis.

  13. Emergency Shelters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic Larsen, Olga; Lee, Daniel Sang-Hoon; Eskemose Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The report gives all the research, teaching, seminars carried in the duration of the shelter cluster. It concludes with proposing relevant research agendas in the field of emergency architecture......The report gives all the research, teaching, seminars carried in the duration of the shelter cluster. It concludes with proposing relevant research agendas in the field of emergency architecture...

  14. Indirect effects of non-lethal predation on bivalve activity and sediment reworking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maire, O.; Merchant, J.N.; Bulling, M.; Teal, L.R.; Gremare, A.; Duchene, J.C.; Solan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Deposit-feeders are the dominant bioturbators of aquatic sediments, where they profoundly impact biogeochemical processes, but they are also vulnerable to both lethal and non-lethal predation by a large variety of predators. In this study, we performed a series of experiments to test the effects of

  15. Toxicity bioassay and effects of sub-lethal exposure of malathion on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clarias gariepinus were exposed to different concentrations of malathion to determine the 96 h LC50 value and its sub-lethal effects on haematological parameters and biochemical composition were also investigated. The 96 h LC50 value concluded was 8.22 mg/L. Specimens of C. gariepinus were exposed to sub-lethal ...

  16. Foal with Overo lethal white syndrome born to a registered quarter horse mare

    OpenAIRE

    Lightbody, Tamara

    2002-01-01

    A 16-hour-old white foal, born to a registered quarter horse mare, was examined for signs of colic. The foal had Overo lethal white syndrome, which causes ileocolonic agangliosis. This was confirmed by DNA testing. Since there is no treatment for Overo lethal white syndrome, the foal was euthanized.

  17. Foal with Overo lethal white syndrome born to a registered quarter horse mare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Tamara

    2002-09-01

    A 16-hour-old white foal, born to a registered quarter horse mare, was examined for signs of colic. The foal had Overo lethal white syndrome, which causes ileocolonic agangliosis. This was confirmed by DNA testing. Since there is no treatment for Overo lethal white syndrome, the foal was euthanized.

  18. 76 FR 7875 - Nonessential Experimental Populations of Gray Wolves in the Northern Rocky Mountains; Lethal Take...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Nonessential Experimental Populations of Gray Wolves in the Northern Rocky Mountains; Lethal Take of Wolves in the Lolo Elk Management Zone of Idaho; Draft Environmental Assessment... environmental assessment (EA) of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game's (IDFG) proposal to lethally take wolves...

  19. The Danger Assessment: Validation of a Lethality Risk Assessment Instrument for Intimate Partner Femicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Webster, Daniel W.; Glass, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    The Danger Assessment (DA) is an instrument designed to assess the likelihood of lethality or near lethality occurring in a case of intimate partner violence. This article describes the development, psychometric validation, and suggestions for use of the DA. An 11-city study of intimate partner femicide used multivariate analysis to test the…

  20. Acceptability of Lethal Control of Wildlife that Damage Agriculture in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsma, M.T.J.; Vaske, J.J.; Jacobs, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The use of lethal control of wildlife is controversial. We examined the acceptability of using lethal control to minimize the impacts of geese and deer on agricultural crops in the Netherlands. Two sets of predictors were examined: wildlife value orientations (WVOs) and demographics. The two

  1. Examining the Impact of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Comorbidity on the Medical Lethality of Adolescent "Suicide Attempts"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Manama O'Brien, Kimberly H.; Berzin, Stephanie C.

    2012-01-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of "suicide attempts" among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N = 375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without…

  2. Foal with Overo lethal white syndrome born to a registered quarter horse mare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Tamara

    2002-01-01

    A 16-hour-old white foal, born to a registered quarter horse mare, was examined for signs of colic. The foal had Overo lethal white syndrome, which causes ileocolonic agangliosis. This was confirmed by DNA testing. Since there is no treatment for Overo lethal white syndrome, the foal was euthanized. PMID:12240532

  3. Distinct dictation of Japanese encephalitis virus-induced neuroinflammation and lethality via triggering TLR3 and TLR4 signal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young Woo; Choi, Jin Young; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Kim, Seong Bum; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Bum Seok; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2014-09-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is major emerging neurologic disease caused by JE virus. To date, the impact of TLR molecules on JE progression has not been addressed. Here, we determined whether each TLR modulates JE, using several TLR-deficient mouse strains (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7, TLR9). Surprisingly, among the tested TLR-deficient mice there were contrasting results in TLR3(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice, i.e. TLR3(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to JE, whereas TLR4(-/-) mice showed enhanced resistance to JE. TLR3 ablation induced severe CNS inflammation characterized by early infiltration of inflammatory CD11b(+)Ly-6Chigh monocytes along with profoundly increased viral burden, proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression as well as BBB permeability. In contrast, TLR4(-/-) mice showed mild CNS inflammation manifested by reduced viral burden, leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Interestingly, TLR4 ablation provided potent in vivo systemic type I IFN innate response, as well as ex vivo type I IFN production associated with strong induction of antiviral PRRs (RIG-I, MDA5), transcription factors (IRF-3, IRF-7), and IFN-dependent (PKR, Oas1, Mx) and independent ISGs (ISG49, ISG54, ISG56) by alternative activation of IRF3 and NF-κB in myeloid-derived DCs and macrophages, as compared to TLR3(-/-) myeloid-derived cells which were more permissive to viral replication through impaired type I IFN innate response. TLR4 ablation also appeared to mount an enhanced type I IFN innate and humoral, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses, which were mediated by altered immune cell populations (increased number of plasmacytoid DCs and NK cells, reduced CD11b(+)Ly-6C(high) monocytes) and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg number in lymphoid tissue. Thus, potent type I IFN innate and adaptive immune responses in the absence of TLR4 were closely coupled with reduced JE lethality. Collectively, these results suggest that a balanced triggering of TLR signal array by viral components

  4. Distinct dictation of Japanese encephalitis virus-induced neuroinflammation and lethality via triggering TLR3 and TLR4 signal pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woo Han

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE is major emerging neurologic disease caused by JE virus. To date, the impact of TLR molecules on JE progression has not been addressed. Here, we determined whether each TLR modulates JE, using several TLR-deficient mouse strains (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7, TLR9. Surprisingly, among the tested TLR-deficient mice there were contrasting results in TLR3(-/- and TLR4(-/- mice, i.e. TLR3(-/- mice were highly susceptible to JE, whereas TLR4(-/- mice showed enhanced resistance to JE. TLR3 ablation induced severe CNS inflammation characterized by early infiltration of inflammatory CD11b(+Ly-6Chigh monocytes along with profoundly increased viral burden, proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression as well as BBB permeability. In contrast, TLR4(-/- mice showed mild CNS inflammation manifested by reduced viral burden, leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Interestingly, TLR4 ablation provided potent in vivo systemic type I IFN innate response, as well as ex vivo type I IFN production associated with strong induction of antiviral PRRs (RIG-I, MDA5, transcription factors (IRF-3, IRF-7, and IFN-dependent (PKR, Oas1, Mx and independent ISGs (ISG49, ISG54, ISG56 by alternative activation of IRF3 and NF-κB in myeloid-derived DCs and macrophages, as compared to TLR3(-/- myeloid-derived cells which were more permissive to viral replication through impaired type I IFN innate response. TLR4 ablation also appeared to mount an enhanced type I IFN innate and humoral, CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses, which were mediated by altered immune cell populations (increased number of plasmacytoid DCs and NK cells, reduced CD11b(+Ly-6C(high monocytes and CD4(+Foxp3(+ Treg number in lymphoid tissue. Thus, potent type I IFN innate and adaptive immune responses in the absence of TLR4 were closely coupled with reduced JE lethality. Collectively, these results suggest that a balanced triggering of TLR signal array by viral components

  5. Oncologic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endicott, Melissa

    2003-05-01

    Cancer can lead to emergencies either due to the primary disease, or as a result of therapy. Appropriate diagnosis and rapid treatment of these conditions can result in survival of the patient. Whether chemotherapy is implemented or not, the clinician may be presented with a patient in need of emergency stabilization. Common occurring emergencies are related to effects of the cancer, ranging from immune dysfunction due to marrow infiltration to brain herniation due to increased intracranial pressure from neoplasia. Often adverse effects secondary to chemotherapy can cause emergency situations such as sepsis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment may result in a favorable outcome. Addressed in this chapter are commonly occurring emergencies and specific stabilizing treatments.

  6. Convergence of obesity and high glycemic diet on compounding diabetes and cardiovascular risks in modernizing China: An emerging public health dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Vasanti S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As China is undergoing dramatic development, it is also experiencing major societal changes, including an emerging obesity epidemic, with the prevalence of overweight and obesity doubling in the past decade. However, the implications of a high glycemic index (GI and glycemic load (GL traditional Chinese diet are adversely changing in modern times, as a high-glycemic diet is becoming a greater contributor to diabetes and cardiovascular risks in a population with rising obesity and decreasing physical activity. Specifically, a high GI diet adversely impacts metabolism and appetite control regulation, and notably confers substantially greater risk of weight gain, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers among overweight and obese individuals (P

  7. Impact of the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion on emergency department high utilizers with ambulatory care sensitive conditions: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingold, Daniel B; Pierre-Mathieu, Rachelle; Cole, Brandon; Miller, Andrew C; Khaldun, Joneigh S

    2017-05-01

    The effect of the Affordable Care Act on emergency department (ED) high utilizers has not yet been thoroughly studied. We sought to determine the impact of changes in insurance eligibility following the 2014 Medicaid expansion on ED utilization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) by high ED utilizers in an urban safety net hospital. High utilizers were defined as patients with ≥4 visits in the 6months before their most recent visit in the study period (July-December before and after Maryland's Medicaid expansion in January 2014). A differences-in-differences approach using logistic regression was used to investigate if differences between high and low utilizer cohorts changed from before and after the expansion. During the study period, 726 (4.1%) out of 17,795 unique patients in 2013 and 380 (2.4%) of 16,458 during the same period in 2014 were high utilizers (p-value <0.001). ACSC-associated visit predicted being a high utilizer in 2013 (OR 1.66 (95% CI [1.37, 2.01])) and 2014 (OR 1.65 (95% CI [1.27, 2.15])) but this was not different between years (OR ratio 0.99, 95% CI [0.72, 1.38], p-value 0.97). Although the proportion of high utilizers decreased significantly after Maryland's Medicaid expansion, ACSC-associated ED visits by high ED utilizers were unaffected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ATR Kinase Inhibition Protects Non-cycling Cells from the Lethal Effects of DNA Damage and Transcription Stress*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Michael G.; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad-3-related) is a protein kinase that maintains genome stability and halts cell cycle phase transitions in response to DNA lesions that block DNA polymerase movement. These DNA replication-associated features of ATR function have led to the emergence of ATR kinase inhibitors as potential adjuvants for DNA-damaging cancer chemotherapeutics. However, whether ATR affects the genotoxic stress response in non-replicating, non-cycling cells is currently unknown. We therefore used chemical inhibition of ATR kinase activity to examine the role of ATR in quiescent human cells. Although ATR inhibition had no obvious effects on the viability of non-cycling cells, inhibition of ATR partially protected non-replicating cells from the lethal effects of UV and UV mimetics. Analyses of various DNA damage response signaling pathways demonstrated that ATR inhibition reduced the activation of apoptotic signaling by these agents in non-cycling cells. The pro-apoptosis/cell death function of ATR is likely due to transcription stress because the lethal effects of compounds that block RNA polymerase movement were reduced in the presence of an ATR inhibitor. These results therefore suggest that whereas DNA polymerase stalling at DNA lesions activates ATR to protect cell viability and prevent apoptosis, the stalling of RNA polymerases instead activates ATR to induce an apoptotic form of cell death in non-cycling cells. These results have important implications regarding the use of ATR inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26940878

  9. Examining the impact of psychiatric diagnosis and comorbidity on the medical lethality of adolescent suicide attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManama O'Brien, Kimberly H; Berzin, Stephanie C

    2012-08-01

    Specific psychiatric diagnoses and comorbidity patterns were examined to determine if they were related to the medical lethality of suicide attempts among adolescents presenting to an urban general hospital (N=375). Bivariate analysis showed that attempters with substance abuse disorders had higher levels of lethality than attempters without substance abuse. Regression results indicated having depression comorbid with any other diagnosis was not associated with medical lethality. However, having a substance abuse disorder was associated with higher suicide attempt lethality, highlighting the importance of substance abuse as a risk factor for lethal suicide attempts in adolescents. This finding stimulates critical thinking around the understanding of suicidal behavior in youth and the development and implementation of treatment strategies for suicidal adolescents with substance abuse disorders. © 2012 The American Association of Suicidology.

  10. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misako Yoneda

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G. Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi. Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans.

  11. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Misako; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Ikeda, Fusako; Ishii, Miho; Nagata, Noriyo; Jacquot, Frederic; Raoul, Hervé; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV) vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G). Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi). Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans.

  12. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Insecticides Used on Citrus, on the Ectoparasitoid Tamarixia radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloti, Vitor Hugo; Alves, Gustavo Rodrigues; Araújo, Diogo Feliciano Dias; Picoli, Mateus Manara; Moral, Rafael de Andrade; Demétrio, Clarice Garcia Borges; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2015-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a disease associated with the bacteria "Candidatus Liberibacter spp." and has been devastating citrus orchards around the world. Its management involves control of the insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. However, the indiscriminate use of chemicals has caused pest outbreaks and eliminated the natural enemies of the vector, such as the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Waterston), the main agent for biological control of D. citri. This study assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of insecticides recommended for integrated production of citrus on the parasitoid T. radiata. When adult parasitoids were exposed to residues of 25 insecticides, 20% of them, i.e., gamma-cyhalothrin, etofenprox, azadirachtin, tebufenozide and pyriproxyfen, were considered as harmless (Class 1), 12% as slightly harmful (Class 2), 12% as moderately harmful (Class 3) and 56% as harmful (Class 4), according to the classification proposed by the IOBC/WPRS. Afterward, 14 insecticides (5 harmless and 9 harmful) were sprayed on the parasitoid pupae. Of the 14 insecticides tested, only the organophosphates dimethoate and chlorpyrifos affected the parasitoid emergence. The effects of insecticides on the parasitism capacity of adults exposed to residues of azadirachtin, etofenprox, gamma-cyhalothrin, pyriproxyfen and tebufenozide (harmless) were also evaluated. Tebufenozide and gamma-cyhalothrin affected the parasitism of the F0 generation, but did not affect the emergence of the F1 and F2 generations. Therefore, for an effective IPM program, selective insecticides or harmful pesticides to adult parasitoids could be used in the field, provided that the adults do not occur naturally and the chemical applications do not coincide with parasitoid releases.

  13. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Insecticides Used on Citrus, on the Ectoparasitoid Tamarixia radiata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Hugo Beloti

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB is a disease associated with the bacteria "Candidatus Liberibacter spp." and has been devastating citrus orchards around the world. Its management involves control of the insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. However, the indiscriminate use of chemicals has caused pest outbreaks and eliminated the natural enemies of the vector, such as the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Waterston, the main agent for biological control of D. citri. This study assessed the lethal and sublethal effects of insecticides recommended for integrated production of citrus on the parasitoid T. radiata. When adult parasitoids were exposed to residues of 25 insecticides, 20% of them, i.e., gamma-cyhalothrin, etofenprox, azadirachtin, tebufenozide and pyriproxyfen, were considered as harmless (Class 1, 12% as slightly harmful (Class 2, 12% as moderately harmful (Class 3 and 56% as harmful (Class 4, according to the classification proposed by the IOBC/WPRS. Afterward, 14 insecticides (5 harmless and 9 harmful were sprayed on the parasitoid pupae. Of the 14 insecticides tested, only the organophosphates dimethoate and chlorpyrifos affected the parasitoid emergence. The effects of insecticides on the parasitism capacity of adults exposed to residues of azadirachtin, etofenprox, gamma-cyhalothrin, pyriproxyfen and tebufenozide (harmless were also evaluated. Tebufenozide and gamma-cyhalothrin affected the parasitism of the F0 generation, but did not affect the emergence of the F1 and F2 generations. Therefore, for an effective IPM program, selective insecticides or harmful pesticides to adult parasitoids could be used in the field, provided that the adults do not occur naturally and the chemical applications do not coincide with parasitoid releases.

  14. Recombinant thrombomodulin protects mice against histone-induced lethal thromboembolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Nakahara

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have shown that histones, the chief protein component of chromatin, are released into the extracellular space during sepsis, trauma, and ischemia-reperfusion injury, and act as major mediators of the death of an organism. This study was designed to elucidate the cellular and molecular basis of histone-induced lethality and to assess the protective effects of recombinant thrombomodulin (rTM. rTM has been approved for the treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in Japan, and is currently undergoing a phase III clinical trial in the United States. METHODS: Histone H3 levels in plasma of healthy volunteers and patients with sepsis and DIC were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Male C57BL/6 mice were injected intravenously with purified histones, and pathological examinations were performed. The protective effects of rTM against histone toxicity were analyzed both in vitro and in mice. RESULTS: Histone H3 was not detectable in plasma of healthy volunteers, but significant levels were observed in patients with sepsis and DIC. These levels were higher in non-survivors than in survivors. Extracellular histones triggered platelet aggregation, leading to thrombotic occlusion of pulmonary capillaries and subsequent right-sided heart failure in mice. These mice displayed symptoms of DIC, including thrombocytopenia, prolonged prothrombin time, decreased fibrinogen, fibrin deposition in capillaries, and bleeding. Platelet depletion protected mice from histone-induced death in the first 30 minutes, suggesting that vessel occlusion by platelet-rich thrombi might be responsible for death during the early phase. Furthermore, rTM bound to extracellular histones, suppressed histone-induced platelet aggregation, thrombotic occlusion of pulmonary capillaries, and dilatation of the right ventricle, and rescued mice from lethal thromboembolism. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular histones cause massive

  15. High-resolution imaging spectroscopy of two micro-pores and an arch filament system in a small emerging-flux region

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Manrique, S. J.; Bello González, N.; Denker, C.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Emerging flux regions mark the first stage in the accumulation of magnetic flux eventually leading to pores, sunspots, and (complex) active regions. These flux regions are highly dynamic, show a variety of fine structure, and in many cases live only for a short time (less than a day) before dissolving quickly into the ubiquitous quiet-Sun magnetic field. Aims: The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the temporal evolution of a minute emerging flux region, the associated photospheric and chromospheric flow fields, and the properties of the accompanying arch filament system. We aim to explore flux emergence and decay processes and investigate if they scale with structure size and magnetic flux contents. Methods: This study is based on imaging spectroscopy with the Göttingen Fabry-Pérot Interferometer at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain on 2008 August 7. Photospheric horizontal proper motions were measured with Local correlation tracking using broadband images restored with multi-object multi-frame blind deconvolution. Cloud model (CM) inversions of line scans in the strong chromospheric absorption Hαλ656.28 nm line yielded CM parameters (Doppler velocity, Doppler width, optical thickness, and source function), which describe the cool plasma contained in the arch filament system. Results: The high-resolution observations cover the decay and convergence of two micro-pores with diameters of less than one arcsecond and provide decay rates for intensity and area. The photospheric horizontal flow speed is suppressed near the two micro-pores indicating that the magnetic field is already sufficiently strong to affect the convective energy transport. The micro-pores are accompanied by a small arch filament system as seen in Hα, where small-scale loops connect two regions with Hα line-core brightenings containing an emerging flux region with opposite polarities. The Doppler width, optical thickness, and source

  16. A lethal model of disseminated dengue virus type 1 infection in AG129 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Gregg N; Sarathy, Vanessa V; White, Mellodee M; Greenberg, M Banks; Campbell, Gerald A; Pyles, Richard B; Barrett, Alan D T; Bourne, Nigel

    2017-10-01

    The mosquito-borne disease dengue is caused by four serologically and genetically related flaviviruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. Dengue is a global public health concern, with both the geographical range and burden of disease increasing rapidly. Clinically, dengue ranges from a relatively mild self-limiting illness to a severe life-threatening and sometimes fatal disease. Infection with one DENV serotype produces life-long homotypic immunity, but incomplete and short-term heterotypic protection. The development of small-animal models that recapitulate the characteristics of the disseminated disease seen clinically has been difficult, slowing the development of vaccines and therapeutics. The AG129 mouse (deficient in interferon alpha/beta and gamma receptor signalling) has proven to be valuable for this purpose, with the development of models of disseminated DENV-2,-3 and -4 disease. Recently, a DENV-1 AG129 model was described, but it requires antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) to produce lethality. Here we describe a new AG129 model utilizing a non-mouse-adapted DENV-1 strain, West Pacific 74, that does not require ADE to induce lethal disease. Following high-titre intraperitoneal challenge, animals experience a virus infection with dissemination to multiple visceral tissues, including the liver, spleen and intestine. The animals also become thrombocytopenic, but vascular leakage is less prominent than in AG129 models with other DENV serotypes. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that this model is an important addition to dengue research, particularly for understanding the pathological basis of the disease between DENV serotypes and allowing the full spectrum of activity to test comparisons for putative vaccines and antivirals.

  17. Hormone-dependence of sarin lethality in rats: Sex differences and stage of the estrous cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Carl D., E-mail: carl.d.smith179.mil@mail.mil; Wright, Linnzi K.M.; Garcia, Gregory E.; Lee, Robyn B.; Lumley, Lucille A.

    2015-09-15

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are highly toxic compounds that cause a cascade of symptoms and death, if exposed casualties are left untreated. Numerous rodent models have investigated the toxicity and mechanisms of toxicity of CWNAs, but most are limited to male subjects. Given the profound physiological effects of circulating gonadal hormones in female rodents, it is possible that the daily cyclical fluctuations of these hormones affect females' sensitivity to the lethal effects of CWNAs, and previous reports that included female subjects did not control for the stage of the hormonal cycle. The aim of the current study was to determine the 24-hour median lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) of the CWNA sarin in male, ovariectomized (OVEX) female, and female rats during different stages of the estrous cycle (diestrus, proestrus, and estrus). Additionally, baseline activity levels of plasma acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, and carboxylesterase were measured to determine differences among the groups. Results indicated that females in proestrus had a significantly higher LD{sub 50} of sarin compared to OVEX and estrous females. Although some sex differences were observed in the activity levels of plasma esterases, they were not consistent and likely not large enough to significantly affect the LD{sub 50}s. These results suggest that hormonal cyclicity can influence the outcome of CWNA-related studies using female rodents, and that this variability can be minimized by controlling for the stage of the cycle. Additional research is necessary to determine the precise mechanism of the observed differences because it is unlikely to be solely explained by plasma esterase activity. - Highlights: • The LD{sub 50} of sarin was determined in female rats throughout the stages of the estrous cycle. • Females in proestrus had a significantly higher LD{sub 50} compared to estrous or ovariectomized females. • No sex differences were observed between male and female

  18. Compared chemical properties of dermonecrotic and lethal toxins from spiders of the genus Loxosceles (Araneae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, K C; Sousa, M V; Morhy, L; Eickstedt, V R; Mota, I

    1996-05-01

    Loxosceles spider venom usually causes a typical dermonecrotic lesion in bitten patients, but it may also cause systemic effects that may be lethal. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 of Loxosceles gaucho, L. laeta, or L. intermedia spider venoms resulted in three fractions (A, containing higher molecular mass components. B containing intermediate molecular mass components, and C with lower molecular mass components). The dermonecrotic and lethal activities were detected exclusively in fraction A of all three species. Analysis by SDS-PAGE showed that the major protein contained in fraction A has molecular weight approximately 35 kDa in L. gaucho and L. intermedia, but 32 kDa in L. laeta venom. These toxins were isolated from venoms of L. gaucho, L. laeta, and L. intermedia by SDS-PAGE followed by blotting to PVDF membrane and sequencing. A database search showed a high level of identity between each toxin and a fragment of the L. reclusa (North American spider) toxin. A multiple sequence alignment of the Loxosceles toxins showed many common identical residues in their N-terminal sequences. Identities ranged from 50.0% (L. gaucho and L. reclusa) to 61.1% (L. intermedia and L. reclusa). The purified toxins were also submitted to capillary electrophoresis peptide mapping after in situ partial hydrolysis of the blotted samples. The results obtained suggest that L. intermedia protein is more similar to L. laeta toxin than L. gaucho toxin and revealed a smaller homology between L. intermedia and L. gaucho. Altogether these findings suggest that the toxins responsible for most important activities of venoms of Loxosceles species have a molecular mass of 32-35 kDa and are probably homologous proteins.

  19. Chinese High School Students' Perceptions of Freedom of Expression: Implications for Researching Emerging Civil Liberties in Global Educational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Mario S.; Qin, Lixia

    2017-01-01

    This study explored attitudes and perceptions of Chinese high school students regarding freedom of expression in their country. A survey capturing perceptions over various forms of free speech (e.g., student publication, dress code) was administered to a sample of 838, which included students from both urban and rural areas within Shaanxi Province…

  20. An emerging avian influenza A virus H5N7 is a genetic reassortant of highly pathogenic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, K.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    We full genome characterised the newly discovered avian influenza virus H5N7 subtype combination isolated from a stock of Danish game ducks to investigate the composition of the genome and possible features of high pathogenicity. It was found that the haemagglutinin and the acidic polymerase genes...... low pathogenic avian influenza A viruses. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....