WorldWideScience

Sample records for emergency surgery summer

  1. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    National reports recommended that peri-operative care should be improved for elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. Postoperative mortality and morbidity rates remain high, and indicate that emergency ruptured aneurysm repair, laparotomy and hip fracture fixation are high-risk procedures...... undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...

  2. Emergency surgery for Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smida, Malek; Miloudi, Nizar; Hefaiedh, Rania; Zaibi, Rabaa

    2016-03-01

    Surgery has played an essential role in the treatment of Crohn's disease. Emergency can reveal previously unknown complications whose treatment affects prognosis. Indicate the incidence of indications in emergent surgery for Crohn's disease. Specify the types of procedures performed in these cases and assess the Results of emergency surgery for Crohn's disease postoperatively,  in short , medium and long term. Retrospective analysis of collected data of 38 patients, who underwent surgical resection for Crohn's disease during a period of 19 years from 1992 to 2011 at the department of surgery in MONGI SLIM Hospital, and among them 17 patients underwent emergency surgery for Crohn's disease. In addition to socio-demographic characteristics and clinical presentations of our study population, we evaluated the indications, the type of intervention, duration of evolution preoperative and postoperative complications and overall prognosis of the disease. Of the 38 patients with Crohn's disease requiring surgical intervention, 17/38 patients underwent emergency surgery. Crohn's disease was inaugurated by the complications requiring emergency surgery in 11 patients. The mean duration of symptoms prior to surgery was 1.5 year. The most common indication for emergency surgery was acute intestinal obstruction (n=6) followed by perforation and peritonitis (n=5). A misdiagnosis of appendicitis was found in 4 patients and a complicated severe acute colitis for undiagnosed Crohn's disease was found in 2 cases. The open conventional surgery was performed for 15 patients. Ileocolic resection was the most used intervention. There was one perioperative mortality and 5 postoperative morbidities. The mean of postoperative hospital stay was 14 days (range 4-60 days). Six patients required a second operation during the follow-up period. The incidence of emergency surgery for Crohn's disease in our experience was high (17/38 patients), and is not as rare as the published estimates

  3. Emerging technologies in surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satava, R.M.; Gaspari, A.; Di Lorenzo, N.

    2007-01-01

    Tremendous acceleration and changes in scientific discovery and progress are presently occurring. These important emerging technologies that will affect the practicing surgeon within the next 10 to 20 years are illustrated in detail in this volume. Its purpose is not to review clinical experience of the common surgical practice of the past decade, but to outline and illustrate the future trends. International experts in this field demonstrate emerging procedures and significant advances. (orig.)

  4. Emergency general surgery in the geriatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desserud, K F; Veen, T; Søreide, K

    2016-01-01

    Emergency general surgery in the elderly is a particular challenge to the surgeon in charge of their care. The aim was to review contemporary aspects of managing elderly patients needing emergency general surgery and possible alterations to their pathways of care. This was a narrative review based on a PubMed/MEDLINE literature search up until 15 September 2015 for publications relevant to emergency general surgery in the geriatric patient. The number of patients presenting as an emergency with a general surgical condition increases with age. Up to one-quarter of all emergency admissions to hospital may be for general surgical conditions. Elderly patients are a particular challenge owing to added co-morbidity, use of drugs and risk of poor outcome. Frailty is an important potential risk factor, but difficult to monitor or manage in the emergency setting. Risk scores are not available universally. Outcomes are usually severalfold worse than after elective surgery, in terms of both higher morbidity and increased mortality. A care bundle including early diagnosis, resuscitation and organ system monitoring may benefit the elderly in particular. Communication with the patient and relatives throughout the care pathway is essential, as indications for surgery, level of care and likely outcomes may evolve. Ethical issues should also be addressed at every step on the pathway of care. Emergency general surgery in the geriatric patient needs a tailored approach to improve outcomes and avoid futile care. Although some high-quality studies exist in related fields, the overall evidence base informing perioperative acute care for the elderly remains limited. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Emergency Surgery and Treatments for Pneumothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    The primary care in terms of emergency for pneumothorax is chest drainage in almost cases. The following cases of pneumothorax and the complications need something of surgery and treatments. Pneumothorax with subcutaneous emphysema often needs small skin incisions around the drainage tube. Tension pneumothorax often needs urgent chest drainage. Pneumothorax with intractable air leakage often needs interventional treatments like endobroncheal occlusion (EBO) or thoracographic fibrin glue sealing method (TGF) as well as urgent thoracoscopic surgery. Pneumothorax with acute empyema also often needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery within 2 weeks if chest drainage or drug therapy are unsuccessful. It will probably become chronic empyema of thorax after then. Pneumothorax with bleeding needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery in case of continuous bleeding over 200 ml/2 hours. In any cases of emergency for pneumothorax, respiratory physicians should collaborate with respiratory surgeons at the 1st stage because it is important to timely judge conversion of surgical treatments from medical treatments.

  6. Emergency thoracic surgery in elderly patients

    OpenAIRE

    Limmer, Stefan; Unger, Lena; Czymek, Ralf; Kujath, Peter; Hoffmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Emergency thoracic surgery in the elderly represents an extreme situation for both the surgeon and patient. The lack of an adequate patient history as well as the inability to optimize any co-morbidities, which are the result of the emergent situation, are the cause of increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the outcome and prognostic factors for this selected group of patients. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Academic tertiary care referral center. Participants ...

  7. Emergency Surgery for Refractory Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botre, Abhijeet; Udani, Vrajesh; Desai, Neelu; Jagadish, Spoorthy; Sankhe, Milind

    2017-08-15

    Management of refractory status epilepticus in children is extremely challenging. Two children with medically refractory status epilepticus, both of whom had lesional pathology on MRI and concordant data on EEG and PET scan. Emergency hemispherotomy performed in both patients. A complete, sustained seizure freedom obtained postoperatively. Emergency surgery is a treatment option in selected cases of drug refractory status epilepticus with lesional pathology and concordant data.

  8. Emergency presentation of colon cancer is most frequent during summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, H; Holm, T; Ekholm, A; Olsson, L I

    2011-06-01

    The frequency of emergency colon cancer (ECC) was determined using a reproducible definition of 'emergency' to analyse the impact of mode of presentation on long-term prognosis and to search for risk factors for an emergency presentation. All patients with colon cancer treated at one Swedish GDH between 1996 and 2005 (N = 604) were eligible. Patients admitted through the emergency room, operated on within three days and with an emergency condition confirmed at surgery were classified as ECC. Survival was analysed by Kaplan-Meier estimates and risk of death by Cox regression. The rate of ECC was 97/585 (17%). Patients with ECC were older (median 77 vs 74, P = 0.02), they had more stage III and IV cancers (65%vs 47%; χ(2) = 9.4, P Emergency presentation of colon cancer is an independent and adverse risk factor for long-term survival. The causes of a seasonal variation need to be clarified. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Critical differences between elective and emergency surgery: identifying domains for quality improvement in emergency general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbus, Alexandra B; Morris, Megan A; Lilley, Elizabeth J; Harlow, Alyssa F; Haider, Adil H; Salim, Ali; Havens, Joaquim M

    2018-04-01

    The objective of our study was to characterize providers' impressions of factors contributing to disproportionate rates of morbidity and mortality in emergency general surgery to identify targets for care quality improvement. Emergency general surgery is characterized by a high-cost burden and disproportionate morbidity and mortality. Factors contributing to these observed disparities are not comprehensively understood and targets for quality improvement have not been formally developed. Using a grounded theory approach, emergency general surgery providers were recruited through purposive-criterion-based sampling to participate in semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Participants were asked to identify contributors to emergency general surgery outcomes, to define effective care for EGS patients, and to describe operating room team structure. Interviews were performed to thematic saturation. Transcripts were iteratively coded and analyzed within and across cases to identify emergent themes. Member checking was performed to establish credibility of the findings. A total of 40 participants from 5 academic hospitals participated in either individual interviews (n = 25 [9 anesthesia, 12 surgery, 4 nursing]) or focus groups (n = 2 [15 nursing]). Emergency general surgery was characterized by an exceptionally high level of variability, which can be subcategorized as patient-variability (acute physiology and comorbidities) and system-variability (operating room resources and workforce). Multidisciplinary communication is identified as a modifier to variability in emergency general surgery; however, nursing is often left out of early communication exchanges. Critical variability in emergency general surgery may impact outcomes. Patient-variability and system-variability, with focus on multidisciplinary communication, represent potential domains for quality improvement in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Emergency thoracic surgery in elderly patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Stefan; Unger, Lena; Czymek, Ralf; Kujath, Peter; Hoffmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Emergency thoracic surgery in the elderly represents an extreme situation for both the surgeon and patient. The lack of an adequate patient history as well as the inability to optimize any co-morbidities, which are the result of the emergent situation, are the cause of increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the outcome and prognostic factors for this selected group of patients. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Academic tertiary care referral center. Participants Emergency patients treated at the Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital of Luebeck, Germany. Main outcome measures Co-morbidities, mortality, risk factors and hospital length of stay. Results A total of 124 thoracic procedures were performed on 114 patients. There were 79 men and 36 women (average age 72.5 ±6.4 years, range 65–94). The overall operative mortality was 25.4%. The most frequent indication was thoracic/mediastinal infection, followed by peri- or postoperative thoracic complications. Risk factors for hospital mortality were a high ASA score, pre-existing diabetes mellitus and renal insufficiency. Conclusions Our study documents a perioperative mortality rate of 25% in patients over 65 who required emergency thoracic surgery. The main indication for a surgical intervention was sepsis with a thoracic/mediastinal focus. Co-morbidities and the resulting perioperative complications were found to have a significant effect on both inpatient length of stay and outcome. Long-term systemic co-morbidities such as diabetes mellitus are difficult to equalize with respect to certain organ dysfunctions and significantly increase mortality. PMID:21369531

  11. The EMERGE Summer Program: Supporting Incoming Freshmen's Success in Mathematics Developmental Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Katherine; Oppland-Cordell, Sarah; Hibdon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development, results, and future directions of the mathematics component of the EMERGE Summer Program at Northeastern Illinois University. Initiated summer 2014, EMERGE offered English and mathematics sessions for incoming freshmen. The mathematics session aimed to strengthen participants' mathematical foundations,…

  12. The ongoing emergence of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, S; Qassemyar, Q; Leymarie, N; Honart, J-F; Alkhashnam, H; De Fremicourt, K; Conversano, A; Schaff, J-B; Rimareix, F; Kolb, F; Sarfati, B

    2018-04-01

    Robot-assisted surgery is more and more widely used in urology, general surgery and gynecological surgery. The interest of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery, a discipline that operates primarily on surfaces, has yet to be conclusively proved. However, the initial applications of robotic surgery in plastic and reconstructive surgery have been emerging in a number of fields including transoral reconstruction of posterior oropharyngeal defects, nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction, microsurgery, muscle harvesting for pelvic reconstruction and coverage of the scalp or the extremities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) - The Evidence in Geriatric Emergency Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paduraru, Mihai; Ponchietti, Luca; Casas, Isidro Martinez

    2017-01-01

    Background: Geriatric surgery is rising and projected to continue at a greater rate. There is already concern about the poor outcomes for the emergency surgery in elderly. How to manage the available resources to improve outcomes in this group of patients is an important object of debate...... to conventional care. Emergency surgical patients also had fewer postoperative complications with ERAS compared to conventional care. Hospital stay was reduced in 2 out of 3 studies for emergency surgery.Conclusions:ERAS can be safely applied to elderly and emergency patients with a reduction in postoperative....... OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the feasibility and safety of applying ERAS pathways to emergency elderly surgical patients. METHOD: Two searches were undertaken for ERAS protocols in elderly patients and emergency surgery, in order to gather evidence in relation to ERAS in geriatric emergency patients...

  14. Nontrauma emergency surgery: optimal case mix for general surgery and acute care surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Miller, Barbra S; Doherty, Gerard M; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Hemmila, Mark R; Park, Pauline K; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Sihler, Kristen C; Wahl, Wendy L; Wang, Stewart C; Napolitano, Lena M

    2011-11-01

    To examine the case mix and patient characteristics and outcomes of the nontrauma emergency (NTE) service in an academic Division of Acute Care Surgery. An NTE service (attending, chief resident, postgraduate year-3 and postgraduate year-2 residents, and two physician assistants) was created in July 2005 for all urgent and emergent inpatient and emergency department general surgery patient consults and admissions. An NTE database was created with prospective data collection of all NTE admissions initiated from November 1, 2007. Prospective data were collected by a dedicated trauma registrar and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-intensive care unit (ICU) coordinator daily. NTE case mix and ICU characteristics were reviewed for the 2-year time period January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2009. During the same time period, trauma operative cases and procedures were examined and compared with the NTE case mix. Thousand seven hundred eight patients were admitted to the NTE service during this time period (789 in 2008 and 910 in 2009). Surgical intervention was required in 70% of patients admitted to the NTE service. Exploratory laparotomy or laparoscopy was performed in 449 NTE patients, comprising 37% of all surgical procedures. In comparison, only 118 trauma patients (5.9% of admissions) required a major laparotomy or thoracotomy during the same time period. Acuity of illness of NTE patients was high, with a significant portion (13%) of NTE patients requiring ICU admission. NTE patients had higher admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scores [61.2 vs. 58.8 (2008); 58.2 vs. 55.8 (2009)], increased mortality [(9.71% vs. 4.89% (2008); 6.78% vs. 5.16% (2009)], and increased readmission rates (15.5% vs. 7.4%) compared with the total surgical ICU (SICU) admissions. In an era of declining operative caseload in trauma, the NTE service provides ample opportunity for complex general surgery decision making and operative procedures for

  15. Does the emergency surgery score accurately predict outcomes in emergent laparotomies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peponis, Thomas; Bohnen, Jordan D; Sangji, Naveen F; Nandan, Anirudh R; Han, Kelsey; Lee, Jarone; Yeh, D Dante; de Moya, Marc A; Velmahos, George C; Chang, David C; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2017-08-01

    The emergency surgery score is a mortality-risk calculator for emergency general operation patients. We sought to examine whether the emergency surgery score predicts 30-day morbidity and mortality in a high-risk group of patients undergoing emergent laparotomy. Using the 2011-2012 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we identified all patients who underwent emergent laparotomy using (1) the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program definition of "emergent," and (2) all Current Procedural Terminology codes denoting a laparotomy, excluding aortic aneurysm rupture. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to measure the correlation (c-statistic) between the emergency surgery score and (1) 30-day mortality, and (2) 30-day morbidity after emergent laparotomy. As sensitivity analyses, the correlation between the emergency surgery score and 30-day mortality was also evaluated in prespecified subgroups based on Current Procedural Terminology codes. A total of 26,410 emergent laparotomy patients were included. Thirty-day mortality and morbidity were 10.2% and 43.8%, respectively. The emergency surgery score correlated well with mortality (c-statistic = 0.84); scores of 1, 11, and 22 correlated with mortalities of 0.4%, 39%, and 100%, respectively. Similarly, the emergency surgery score correlated well with morbidity (c-statistic = 0.74); scores of 0, 7, and 11 correlated with complication rates of 13%, 58%, and 79%, respectively. The morbidity rates plateaued for scores higher than 11. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that the emergency surgery score effectively predicts mortality in patients undergoing emergent (1) splenic, (2) gastroduodenal, (3) intestinal, (4) hepatobiliary, or (5) incarcerated ventral hernia operation. The emergency surgery score accurately predicts outcomes in all types of emergent laparotomy patients and may prove valuable as a bedside decision

  16. Summer of Seasons Workshop Program for Emerging Educators in Earth System Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, S. Raj

    2002-01-01

    Norfolk State University BEST Lab successfully hosted three Summer of Seasons programs from 1998-2001. The Summer of Seasons program combined activities during the summer with additional seminars and workshops to provide broad outreach in the number of students and teachers who participated. Lessons learned from the each of the first two years of this project were incorporated into the design of the final year's activities. The "Summer of Seasons" workshop program provided emerging educators with the familiarity and knowledge to utilize in the classroom curriculum materials developed through NASA sponsorship on Earth System Science. A special emphasis was placed on the use of advanced technologies to dispel the commonly held misconceptions regarding seasonal, climactic and global change phenomena.

  17. Changing trend in emergency surgery for perforated duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurteyik, E.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate changes in the emergency surgery of the duodenal ulcer. Subjects and Methods: Hospital records of 523 surgically treated patients, with duodenal ulcer perforation, during the period of 25 years 91975-1999) in the same surgical department, was retrospectively analysed. Changing aspects of emergency surgery of peptic ulcer disease, in the recent period, were determined in respect to number of operations per year and in the choice of operative methods. Results: The average number of patients and emergency operations per year was 21. No significant change was observed during the study period. Elective operations gradually decreased in the last ten years, and none was performed in the last 4 years. On the other hand, 226 emergency interventions for duodenal ulcer perforation were performed in the last ten years and 84 interventions in the last 4 years. Definitive anti-ulcer surgery was performed in 42% of patients between 1985 and 1994. Simple closure of the perforation plus treatment with proton pump inhibitors and with anti-Helicobacter pylori medication was the method in 80% during the last year. Conclusion: Emergency surgery for perforated duodenal ulcer preserves its steady rate despite disappearance of elective operations after tremendous progress in medical control of peptic ulcer disease. There is an obvious return from definitive anti-ulcer surgery to simple closure of the perforation followed by antisecretory and antibacterial medications in the recent years. (author)

  18. Emergency abdominal surgery in Zaria, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    high rate of emergency operations could be due to the large number of trauma ... of sanitation, which may trigger lymphoid tissue reaction in the appendix wall and .... future surgical training and help surgeons who practise in our setting to ...

  19. Summer school on radio monitoring as a part of radioecological education and emergency preparedness program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyarkov, V.; Kadenko, I.; Jordynsky, D.; Nazarov, A.; Dubchak, S. [Ministry of Emergemcies, Kiev (Ukraine). Ukrainian Radiation Trainig Center

    1997-12-31

    The International Summer School is organized by the Ukrainian Radiation Training Centre of the Ministry of Ukraine of Emergencies and Affairs of Population Protection from the Consequences of Chernobyl Catastrophe to provide training and experience in the techniques of environmental radiation monitoring and emergency preparedness training of students and to enhance knowledge`s of specialists in different fields of radioecology as well. It includes classroom instructions and training in areas affected by the Chernobyl accident. Within selected areas dose rates and gamma flux measurements have been conducted at two different heights. Ten measurements for dose rate and for gamma flux were done at each selected point of sites. The main results of summer school activities are briefly presented 4 refs., 1 fig., 8 tab.

  20. Summer school on radio monitoring as a part of radioecological education and emergency preparedness program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poyarkov, V.; Kadenko, I.; Jordynsky, D.; Nazarov, A.; Dubchak, S.

    1997-01-01

    The International Summer School is organized by the Ukrainian Radiation Training Centre of the Ministry of Ukraine of Emergencies and Affairs of Population Protection from the Consequences of Chernobyl Catastrophe to provide training and experience in the techniques of environmental radiation monitoring and emergency preparedness training of students and to enhance knowledge's of specialists in different fields of radioecology as well. It includes classroom instructions and training in areas affected by the Chernobyl accident. Within selected areas dose rates and gamma flux measurements have been conducted at two different heights. Ten measurements for dose rate and for gamma flux were done at each selected point of sites. The main results of summer school activities are briefly presented

  1. Improving outcomes of emergency bowel surgery using nela model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultan, R.; Zafar, H.

    2018-01-01

    To find outcomes of emergency bowel surgery and review the processes involved in the care of these patients on the same template used in National Emergency Laparotomy Audit (NELA). Study Design:An audit. Place and Duration of Study:Surgery Department, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from December 2013 to November 2014. Methodology:Patients undergone emergency bowel surgery during the review period were included. Demographic data, type of admission, ASA grade, urgency of surgery, P-POSSUM score, indication of surgery, length of stay and outcome was recorded. Data was then compared with the data published by NELA team in their first report. P-value for categorical variables was calculated using Chi-square tests. Results:Although the patients were younger with nearly same spectrum of disease, the mortality rate was significantly more than reported in NELA (24% versus 11%, p=0.004). Comparison showed that care at AKUH was significantly lacking in terms of proper preoperative risk assessment and documentation, case booking to operating room timing, intraoperative goal directed fluid therapy using cardiac output monitoring, postoperative intensive care for highest risk patients and review of elderly patients by MCOP specialist. Conclusion:This study helped in understanding the deficiencies in the care of patients undergoing emergency bowel surgery and alarmingly poor outcomes in a very systematic manner. In view of results of this study, it is planned to do interventions in the deficient areas to improve care given to these patients and their outcomes with the limited resources of a developing country. (author)

  2. Understanding the "Weekend Effect" for Emergency General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Richard S; Go, Derek E; Dhar, Vikrom K; Kim, Young; Hanseman, Dennis J; Wima, Koffi; Shah, Shimul A

    2018-02-01

    Several studies have identified a "weekend effect" for surgical outcomes, but definitions vary and the cause is unclear. Our aim was to better characterize the weekend effect for emergency general surgery using mortality as a primary endpoint. Using data from the University HealthSystem Consortium from 2009 to 2013, we identified urgent/emergent hospital admissions for seven procedures representing 80% of the national burden of emergency general surgery. Patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were compared between cases that were performed on weekdays vs weekends. Hospitals varied widely in the proportion of procedures performed on the weekend. Of the procedures examined, four had higher mortality for weekend cases (laparotomy, lysis of adhesions, partial colectomy, and small bowel resection; p < 0.01), while three did not (appendectomy, cholecystectomy, and peptic ulcer disease repair). Among the four procedures with increased weekend mortality, patients undergoing weekend procedures also had increased severity of illness and shorter time from admission to surgery (p < 0.01). Multivariate analysis adjusting for patient characteristics demonstrated independently higher mortality on weekends for these same four procedures (p < 0.01). For the first time, we have identified specific emergency general surgery procedures that incur higher mortality when performed on weekends. This may be due to acute changes in patient status that require weekend surgery or indications for urgent procedures (ischemia, obstruction) compared to those without a weekend mortality difference (infection). Hospitals that perform weekend surgery must acknowledge and identify ways to manage this increased risk.

  3. Macula-Sparing rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: Is emergent surgery necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Mahmoudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The status of the macula is a significant factor in determining final visual outcomes in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD and should be considered in the timing of surgical repair. Several studies have shown that macula-involving RRDs attain similar visual and anatomic outcomes when surgery is performed within seven days as compared to emergent surgery (within 24 hours. In contrast, surgery prior to macular detachment in macula-sparing RRDs generally yields the best visual outcomes. In the case of macula-sparing RRDs, it is not clear how long the macula may remain attached, therefore, standard practice dictates emergent surgery. Timing of presentation, examination findings, case complexity, co-existing medical conditions, surgeon expertise, and timing and quality of access to operating facilities and staff, however, should all be considered in determining whether a macula-sparing RRD requires immediate intervention or if equivalent visual and possibly better overall outcomes can be achieved with scheduled surgery within an appropriate time frame.

  4. Interhospital transfer delays emergency abdominal surgery and prolongs stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Alexandra M; Edye, Michael B

    2017-11-01

    Interhospital transfer of patients requiring emergency surgery is common practice. It has the potential to delay surgical intervention, increase rate of complications and thus length of hospital stay. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of adult patients who underwent emergency surgery for abdominal pain at a large metropolitan hospital in New South Wales (Hospital A) in 2013. The impact of interhospital transfer on time to surgical intervention, post-operative length of stay and overall length of stay was assessed. Of the 910 adult patients who underwent emergency surgery for abdominal pain at Hospital A in 2013, 31.9% (n = 290) were transferred by road ambulance from a local district hospital (Hospital B). The leading surgical procedures performed were appendicectomy (n = 299, 32.9%), cholecystectomy (n = 174, 19.1%), gastrointestinal endoscopy (n = 95, 10.4%), cystoscopy (n = 86, 9.5%), hernia repair (n = 45, 4.9%), salpingectomy (n = 19, 2.1%) and oversewing of perforated peptic ulcer (n = 13, 1.4%). Overall, interhospital transfer (n = 290, 31.9%) was associated with increases in mean time to surgical intervention (14.2 h, P < 0.001), post-operative length of stay (1.1 days, P = 0.001) and overall length of stay (1.6 days, P < 0.001). Delayed surgical intervention was observed across all procedure types except surgery for perforated peptic ulcer, where transferred patients underwent surgery within a comparable timeframe to direct admissions. Interhospital transfer delays surgical intervention and increases length of hospital stay. This mandates attention due to the implications for patient outcomes and added burden to the healthcare system. The system did, however, show capability to appropriately expedite surgery for acutely life-threatening cases. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. Mesenteric panniculitis patients requiring emergency surgery: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Mustafa; Koçak, Osman; Fazli, Olgaç; Koçak, Cengiz; Atici, Ali Emre; Duman, Uğur

    2012-04-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a rare, benign disease characterized by a chronic non-specific inflammatory process of mesenteric fat tissue with unknown etiology. The small bowel mesentery is affected mostly. This process rarely involves the large intestine mesentery. Mesenteric panniculitis includes symptoms as abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, and fever. In our cases, we had difficulty in the preoperative diagnosis as the clinical changes imitated an obstruction or ischemia of the small bowel. All the cases required emergency abdominal surgery and partial jejunal resection. The aim of this article was to present three cases of mesenteric panniculitis of the small bowel mesentery requiring emergency surgery together with a short review of the literature.

  6. Enhanced Recovery after Emergency Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduraru, Mihai; Ponchietti, Luca; Casas, Isidro Martinez; Svenningsen, Peter; Zago, Mauro

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the current scientific evidence for the applicability, safety and effectiveness of pathways of enhanced recovery after emergency surgery (ERAS). We undertook a search using PubMed and Cochrane databases for ERAS protocols in emergency cases. The search generated 65 titles; after eliminating the papers not meeting search criteria, we selected 4 cohort studies and 1 randomized clinical trial (RCT). Data extracted for analysis consisted of: patient age, type of surgery performed, ERAS elements implemented, surgical outcomes in terms of postoperative complications, mortality, length of stay (LOS) and readmission rate. The number of ERAS items applied was good, ranging from 11 to 18 of the 20 recommended by the ERAS Society. The implementation resulted in fewer postoperative complications. LOS for ES patients was shorter when compared to conventional care. Mortality, specifically reported in three studies, was equal or lower with ERAS. Readmission rates varied widely and were generally higher for the intervention group but without statistical significance. The studies reviewed agreed that ERAS in emergency surgery (ES) was feasible and safe with generally better outcomes. Lower compliance with some of the ERAS items shows the need for the protocol to be adapted to ES patients. More evidence is clearly required as to what can improve outcomes and how this can be formulated into an effective care pathway for the heterogeneous ES patient.

  7. Emergency general surgery: definition and estimated burden of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid; Aboutanos, Michel B; Agarwal, Suresh; Brown, Carlos V R; Crandall, Marie; Feliciano, David V; Guillamondegui, Oscar; Haider, Adil; Inaba, Kenji; Osler, Turner M; Ross, Steven; Rozycki, Grace S; Tominaga, Gail T

    2013-04-01

    Acute care surgery encompasses trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery (EGS). While the first two components are well defined, the scope of EGS practice remains unclear. This article describes the work of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma to define EGS. A total of 621 unique International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev. (ICD-9) diagnosis codes were identified using billing data (calendar year 2011) from seven large academic medical centers that practice EGS. A modified Delphi methodology was used by the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Committee on Severity Assessment and Patient Outcomes to review these codes and achieve consensus on the definition of primary EGS diagnosis codes. National Inpatient Sample data from 2009 were used to develop a national estimate of EGS burden of disease. Several unique ICD-9 codes were identified as primary EGS diagnoses. These encompass a wide spectrum of general surgery practice, including upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease, soft tissue infections, and hernias. National Inpatient Sample estimates revealed over 4 million inpatient encounters nationally in 2009 for EGS diseases. This article provides the first list of ICD-9 diagnoses codes that define the scope of EGS based on current clinical practices. These findings have wide implications for EGS workforce training, access to care, and research.

  8. Disparities in access to emergency general surgery care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jasmine A; Shen, Connie; Ayturk, Didem; Kiefe, Catarina I; Santry, Heena P

    2018-02-01

    As fewer surgeons take emergency general surgery call and hospitals decrease emergency services, a crisis in access looms in the United States. We examined national emergency general surgery capacity and county-level determinants of access to emergency general surgery care with special attention to disparities. To identify potential emergency general surgery hospitals, we queried the database of the American Hospital Association for "acute care general hospital," with "surgical services," and "emergency department," and ≥1 "operating room." Internet search and direct contact confirmed emergency general surgery services that covered the emergency room 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. Geographic and population-level emergency general surgery access was derived from Geographic Information Systems and US Census. Of the 6,356 hospitals in the 2013 American Hospital Association database, only 2,811 were emergency general surgery hospitals. Counties with greater percentages of black, Hispanic, uninsured, and low-education individuals and rural counties disproportionately lacked access to emergency general surgery care. For example, counties above the 75th percentile of African American population (10.2%) had >80% odds of not having an emergency general surgery hospital compared with counties below the 25th percentile of African American population (0.6%). Gaps in access to emergency general surgery services exist across the United States, disproportionately affecting underserved, rural communities. Policy initiatives need to increase emergency general surgery capacity nationwide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute care surgery: defining mortality in emergency general surgery in the state of Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Mayur; Tesoriero, Ronald; Bruns, Brandon R; Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Chen, Hegang; Diaz, Jose J

    2015-04-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) is a major component of acute care surgery, however, limited data exist on mortality with respect to trauma center (TC) designation. We hypothesized that mortality would be lower for EGS patients treated at a TC vs non-TC (NTC). A retrospective review of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission database from 2009 to 2013 was performed. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma EGS ICD-9 codes were used to identify EGS patients. Data collected included demographics, TC designation, emergency department admissions, and All Patients Refined Severity of Illness (APR_SOI). Trauma center designation was used as a marker of a formal acute care surgery program. Primary outcomes included in-hospital mortality. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed controlling for age. There were 817,942 EGS encounters. Mean ± SD age of patients was 60.1 ± 18.7 years, 46.5% were males; 71.1% of encounters were at NTCs; and 75.8% were emergency department admissions. Overall mortality was 4.05%. Mortality was calculated based on TC designation controlling for age across APR_SOI strata. Multivariable logistic regression analysis did not show statistically significant differences in mortality between hospital levels for minor APR_SOI. For moderate APR_SOI, mortality was significantly lower for TCs compared with NTCs (p surgery patients treated at TCs had lower mortality for moderate APR_SOI, but increased mortality for extreme APR_SOI when compared with NTCs. Additional investigation is required to better evaluate this unexpected finding. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased ICU resource needs for an academic emergency general surgery service*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Matthew E; Galvagno, Samuel M; Rock, Peter; Narayan, Mayur; Shah, Paulesh; Spencer, Heather; Hong, Caron; Diaz, Jose J

    2014-04-01

    ICU needs of nontrauma emergency general surgery patients are poorly described. This study was designed to compare ICU utilization of emergency general surgery patients admitted to an acute care emergency surgery service with other general surgery patients. Our hypothesis is that tertiary care emergency general surgery patients utilize more ICU resources than other general surgical patients. Retrospective database review. Academic, tertiary care, nontrauma surgical ICU. All patients admitted to the surgical ICU over age 18 between March 2004 and June 2012. None. Six thousand ninety-eight patients were evaluated: 1,053 acute care emergency surgery, 1,964 general surgery, 1,491 transplant surgery, 995 facial surgery/otolaryngology, and 595 neurosurgery. Acute care emergency surgery patients had statistically significantly longer ICU lengths of stay than other groups: acute care emergency surgery (13.5 ± 17.4 d) versus general surgery (8.7 ± 12.9), transplant (7.8 ± 11.6), oral-maxillofacial surgery (5.5 ± 4.2), and neurosurgery (4.47 ± 9.8) (all psurgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 73.4% versus general surgery 64.9%, transplant 63.3%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 58.4%, and neurosurgery 53.1% (all p surgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 10.8% versus general surgery 4.3%, transplant 6.6%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 0%, and neurosurgery 0.5% (all p surgery patients were more likely interhospital transfers for tertiary care services than general surgery or transplant (24.5% vs 15.5% and 8.3% respectively, p surgery (13.7% vs 6.7% and 3.5%, all p surgery and general surgery, whereas transplant had fewer. Emergency general surgery patients have increased ICU needs in terms of length of stay, ventilator usage, and continuous renal replacement therapy usage compared with other services, perhaps due to the higher percentage of transfers and emergent surgery required. These patients represent a distinct population. Understanding their resource needs

  11. Emergency surgery pre-operative delays - realities and economic impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, D P; Beecher, S; McLaughlin, R

    2014-12-01

    A key principle of acute surgical service provision is the establishment of a distinct patient flow process and an emergency theatre. Time-to-theatre (TTT) is a key performance indicator of theatre efficiency. The combined impacts of an aging population, increasing demands and complexity associated with centralisation of emergency and oncology services has placed pressure on emergency theatre access. We examined our institution's experience with running a designated emergency theatre for acute surgical patients. A retrospective review of an electronic prospectively maintained database was performed between 1/1/12 and 31/12/13. A cost analysis was conducted to assess the economic impact of delayed TTT, with every 24hr delay incurring the cost of an additional overnight bed. Delays and the economic effects were assessed only after the first 24 h as an in-patient had elapsed. In total, 7041 procedures were performed. Overall mean TTT was 26 h, 2 min. There were significant differences between different age groups, with those aged under 16 year and over 65 having mean TTT at 6 h, 34 min (95% C.I. 0.51-2.15, p 65 years age group had a mean TTT of 23 h, 41 min which was significantly longer than the overall mean TTT Vascular and urological emergencies are significantly disadvantaged in competition with other services for a shared emergency theatre. The economic impact of delayed TTT was calculated at €7,116,000, or €9880/day of additional costs generated from delayed TTT over a 24 month period. One third of patients waited longer than 24 h for emergency surgery, with the elderly disproportionately represented in this group. Aside from the clinical risks of delayed and out of hours surgery, such practices incur significant additional costs. New strategies must be devised to ensure efficient access to emergency theatres, investment in such services is likely to be financially and clinically beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier

  12. Increased Mortality for Elective Surgery during Summer Vacation: A Longitudinal Analysis of Nationwide Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Caillet

    Full Text Available Surgical safety during vacation periods may be influenced by the interplay of several factors, including workers' leave, hospital activity, climate, and the variety of patient cases. This study aimed to highlight an annually recurring peak of surgical mortality during summer in France and explore its main predictors. We selected all elective of open surgical procedures performed in French hospitals between 2007 and 2012. Surgical mortality variation was analyzed over time in relation to workers leaving on vacation, the volume of procedures performed by hospitals, and temperature changes. We ran a multilevel logistic regression for exploring the determinants of surgical mortality, taking into account the clustering of patients within hospitals and adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics. A total of 609 French hospitals had 8,926,120 discharges related to open elective surgery. During 6 years, we found a recurring mortality peak of 1.15% (95% CI 1.09-1.20 in August compared with 0.81% (0.79-0.82, p<.001 in other months. The incidence of worker vacation was 43.0% (38.9-47.2 in August compared with 7.3% (4.6-10.1, p<.001 in other months. Hospital activity decreased substantially in August (78,126 inpatient stays, 75,298-80,954 in relation to other months (128,142, 125,697-130,586, p<.001. After adjusting for all covariates, we found an "August effect" reflecting a higher risk to patients undergoing operations at this time (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.12-1.19, p<.001. The main study limitation was the absence of data linkage between surgical staffing and mortality at the hospital level. The observed, recurring mortality peak in August raises questions about how to maintain hospital activity and optimal staffing through better regulation of human activities.

  13. Emergency Backwards Whipple for Bleeding: Formidable and Definitive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Lupascu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. During the past decades, the safety of pancreatoduodenectomy has improved, with low mortality and reduced morbidity, particularly in centers with extensive experience. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy is an uncommon event, for treatment of pancreaticoduodenal trauma, bleeding, or perforation. We herein present a single center experience concerning nontrauma emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreaticoduodenal bleeding. Methods. From January 2007 to December 2015, from a population of 134 PD (70 males and 64 females, mean age 62.2, range 34–82, 5 patients (3.7%; 2 males and 3 females, mean age 64, range 57–70 underwent one-stage emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for uncontrollable nontrauma pancreaticoduodenal bleeding in our tertiary center. Results. All the 5 patients underwent a backwards Whipple with a morbidity of 60% and a mortality of 20% (1/5. The other 4 patients were recovered and discharged with a median postoperative length of stay of 17 days (range 14–23. Conclusion. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy is a definitive life-saving procedure allowing for a rapid control of bleeding when other less invasive approaches (transcatheter arterial embolization or interventional endoscopy are exhausted, unavailable, or unsafe. It should be particularly considered in neoplastic disease and tailored by surgeons with a high level of experience in pancreatic surgery.

  14. Emergency Backwards Whipple for Bleeding: Formidable and Definitive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupascu, Cristian; Trofin, Ana; Zabara, Mihai; Vornicu, Alexandra; Cadar, Ramona; Vlad, Nutu; Apopei, Oana; Grigorean, Valentin; Lupascu-Ursulescu, Corina

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, the safety of pancreatoduodenectomy has improved, with low mortality and reduced morbidity, particularly in centers with extensive experience. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy is an uncommon event, for treatment of pancreaticoduodenal trauma, bleeding, or perforation. We herein present a single center experience concerning nontrauma emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreaticoduodenal bleeding. From January 2007 to December 2015, from a population of 134 PD (70 males and 64 females, mean age 62.2, range 34-82), 5 patients (3.7%; 2 males and 3 females, mean age 64, range 57-70) underwent one-stage emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for uncontrollable nontrauma pancreaticoduodenal bleeding in our tertiary center. All the 5 patients underwent a backwards Whipple with a morbidity of 60% and a mortality of 20% (1/5). The other 4 patients were recovered and discharged with a median postoperative length of stay of 17 days (range 14-23). Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy is a definitive life-saving procedure allowing for a rapid control of bleeding when other less invasive approaches (transcatheter arterial embolization or interventional endoscopy) are exhausted, unavailable, or unsafe. It should be particularly considered in neoplastic disease and tailored by surgeons with a high level of experience in pancreatic surgery.

  15. Management of novel oral anticoagulants in emergency and trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana-Catarina; Hague, Adam; Ghosh, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The compelling safety, efficacy and predictable effect of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) is driving a rapid expansion in their therapeutic indications. Management of the increasing number of patients on those new agents in the setting of emergency or trauma surgery can be challenging and the absence of specific reversal agents has been a matter of concern. This review summarises the key principles that underpin the management of those patients with a particular emphasis on the recent development of specific antidotes. As of 2015, a new line of antidotes, specific for these drugs, are at different stages of their development with their release imminent. However, as NOACs are innately reversible due to their short half-life, the use of reversal agents will probably be restricted to a few exceptional cases. Post-marketing surveillance will be paramount to better clarify the role of these promising drugs. Management of patients on NOACs in the context of emergency or trauma surgery relies on best supportive care in combination with the blood products and/or specific antidotes as required. Familiarity with the new reversal agents is essential but further evidence on their indications, safety and efficacy as well as consensus guidelines are warranted prior to widespread adoption. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Emergency surgery on mentally impaired patients: standard in consenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Paduraru

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Emergency surgery is often performed on the elderly and susceptible patients with significant comorbidities; as a consequence, the risk of death or severe complications are high. Consent for surgery is a fundamental part of medical practice, in line with legal obligations and ethical principles. Obtaining consent for emergency services (for surgical patients with chronic or acute mental incapacity, due to surgical pathology is particularly challenging, and meeting the standards requires an up-to-date understanding of legislation, professional body guidelines, and ethical or cultural aspects. The guidance related to consent requires physicians and other medical staff to work with patients according to the process of ‘supported decision-making’. Despite principles and guidelines that have been exhaustively established, the system is sometimes vulnerable in actual clinical practice. The combination of an ‘emergency’ setting and a patient without mental ‘capacity’ is a challenge between patient-centered and ‘paternalistic’ approaches, involving legislation and guidelines on ‘best interests’ of the patient.

  17. Management of Complications Following Emergency and Elective Surgery for Diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmer, Christoph; Kreis, Martin E

    2015-04-01

    The clinical spectrum of sigmoid diverticulitis (SD) varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications. Sigmoid colectomy with restoration of continuity has been the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent SD, and is often performed as a laparoscopy-assisted procedure. For elective sigmoid colectomy, the postoperative morbidity rate is 15-20% whereas morbidity rates reach up to 30% in patients who undergo emergency surgery for perforated SD. Some of the more common and serious surgical complications after sigmoid colectomy are anastomotic leaks and peritonitis, wound infections, small bowel obstruction, postoperative bleeding, and injuries to the urinary tract structures. Regarding the management of complications, it makes no difference whether the complication is a result of an emergency or an elective procedure. The present work gives an overview of the management of complications in the surgical treatment of SD based on the current literature. To achieve successful management, early diagnosis is mandatory in cases of deviation from the normal postoperative course. If diagnostic procedures fail to deliver a correlate for the clinical situation of the patient, re-laparotomy or re-laparoscopy still remain among the most important diagnostic and/or therapeutic principles in visceral surgery when a patient's clinical status deteriorates. The ability to recognize and successfully manage complications is a crucial part of the surgical treatment of diverticular disease and should be mastered by any surgeon qualified in this field.

  18. Venous Thromboembolism Prevention in Emergency General Surgery: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick B; Vogt, Kelly N; Lau, Brandyn D; Aboagye, Jonathan; Parry, Neil G; Streiff, Michael B; Haut, Elliott R

    2018-05-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in US hospitals, and approximately 2.5% of emergency general surgery (EGS) patients will be diagnosed with a VTE event. Emergency general surgery patients are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality because of the nature of acute surgical conditions and the challenges related to prophylaxis. MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Collected Reviews were searched from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 2015. Nearly all operatively and nonoperatively treated EGS patients have a moderate to high risk of developing a VTE, and individual risk should be assessed at admission. Pharmacologic prophylaxis in the form of unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin should be considered unless an absolute contraindication, such as bleeding, exists. Patients should receive the first dose at admission to the hospital, and administration should continue until discharge without missed doses. Certain patient populations, such as those with malignant tumors, may benefit from prolonged VTE prophylaxis after discharge. Mechanical prophylaxis should be considered in all patients, particularly if pharmacologic prophylaxis is contraindicated. Studies that specifically target improved adherence with VTE prophylaxis in EGS patients suggest that efficacy and quality improvement initiatives should be undertaken from a system and institutional perspective. Operatively and nonoperatively treated EGS patients are at a comparatively high risk of VTE. Despite gaps in existing literature with respect to this increasing patient population, successful best practices can be applied. Best practices include assessment of VTE risk, optimal prophylaxis, and physician, nurse, and patient education regarding the use of mechanical and pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis and institutional policies.

  19. Use of National Burden to Define Operative Emergency General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John W; Olufajo, Olubode A; Brat, Gabriel A; Rose, John A; Zogg, Cheryl K; Haider, Adil H; Salim, Ali; Havens, Joaquim M

    2016-06-15

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) represents 11% of surgical admissions and 50% of surgical mortality in the United States. However, there is currently no established definition of the EGS procedures. To define a set of procedures accounting for at least 80% of the national burden of operative EGS. A retrospective review was conducted using data from the 2008-2011 National Inpatient Sample. Adults (age, ≥18 years) with primary EGS diagnoses consistent with the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma definition, admitted urgently or emergently, who underwent an operative procedure within 2 days of admission were included in the analyses. Procedures were ranked to account for national mortality and complication burden. Among ranked procedures, contributions to total EGS frequency, mortality, and hospital costs were assessed. The data query and analysis were performed between November 15, 2015, and February 16, 2016. Overall procedure frequency, in-hospital mortality, major complications, and inpatient costs calculated per 3-digit International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. The study identified 421 476 patient encounters associated with operative EGS, weighted to represent 2.1 million nationally over the 4-year study period. The overall mortality rate was 1.23% (95% CI, 1.18%-1.28%), the complication rate was 15.0% (95% CI, 14.6%-15.3%), and mean cost per admission was $13 241 (95% CI, $12 957-$13 525). After ranking the 35 procedure groups by contribution to EGS mortality and morbidity burden, a final set of 7 operative EGS procedures were identified, which collectively accounted for 80.0% of procedures, 80.3% of deaths, 78.9% of complications, and 80.2% of inpatient costs nationwide. These 7 procedures included partial colectomy, small-bowel resection, cholecystectomy, operative management of peptic ulcer disease, lysis of peritoneal adhesions, appendectomy, and laparotomy. Only 7 procedures account

  20. Proceedings of resources for optimal care of acute care and emergency surgery consensus summit Donegal Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugrue, M.; Maier, R.; Moore, E. E.; Boermeester, M.; Catena, F.; Coccolini, F.; Leppaniemi, A.; Peitzman, A.; Velmahos, G.; Ansaloni, L.; Abu-Zidan, F.; Balfe, P.; Bendinelli, C.; Biffl, W.; Bowyer, M.; DeMoya, M.; de Waele, J.; di Saverio, S.; Drake, A.; Fraga, G. P.; Hallal, A.; Henry, C.; Hodgetts, T.; Hsee, L.; Huddart, S.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Kluger, Y.; Lawler, L.; Malangoni, M. A.; Malbrain, M.; MacMahon, P.; Mealy, K.; O'Kane, M.; Loughlin, P.; Paduraru, M.; Pearce, L.; Pereira, B. M.; Priyantha, A.; Sartelli, M.; Soreide, K.; Steele, C.; Thomas, S.; Vincent, J. L.; Woods, L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Opportunities to improve emergency surgery outcomes exist through guided better practice and reduced variability. Few attempts have been made to define optimal care in emergency surgery, and few clinically derived key performance indicators (KPIs) have been published. A summit was

  1. General surgery 2.0: the emergence of acute care surgery in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, S. Morad; Brenneman, Frederick D.; Ball, Chad G.; Pagliarello, Joe; Razek, Tarek; Parry, Neil; Widder, Sandy; Minor, Sam; Buczkowski, Andrzej; MacPherson, Cailan; Johner, Amanda; Jenkin, Dan; Wood, Leanne; McLoughlin, Karen; Anderson, Ian; Davey, Doug; Zabolotny, Brent; Saadia, Roger; Bracken, John; Nathens, Avery; Ahmed, Najma; Panton, Ormond; Warnock, Garth L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, there has been a groundswell of support in Canada for the development of organized, focused and multidisciplinary approaches to caring for acutely ill general surgical patients. Newly forged acute care surgery (ACS) services are beginning to provide prompt, evidence-based and goal-directed care to acutely ill general surgical patients who often present with a diverse range of complex pathologies and little or no pre- or postoperative planning. Through a team-based structure with attention to processes of care and information sharing, ACS services are well positioned to improve outcomes, while finding and developing efficiencies and reducing costs of surgical and emergency health care delivery. The ACS model also offers enhanced opportunities for surgical education for students, residents and practicing surgeons, and it will provide avenues to strengthen clinical and academic bonds between the community and academic surgical centres. In the near future, cooperation of ACS services from community and academic hospitals across the country will lead to the formation of systems of acute surgical care whose development will be informed by rigorous data collection and research and evidence-based quality-improvement initiatives. In an era of increasing subspecialization, ACS is a strong unifying force in general surgery and a platform for collective advocacy for an important patient population. PMID:20334738

  2. Epidemiological approach to emergent cranial surgery of cranial traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülagü Kaptan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: In this study, we aim to define the emergent cranial surgery of cranial trauma cases in terms of the reason of occurance, diagnosis, prognostic factors and results. Methods: 153 cases hospitalized in our clinic during a four year period were statistically analysed in accordance with trauma etiology, age, gender, application GCS (Glascow Coma Score mortality rate, location and established patology.

    Results: 76% (116 of the 153 cases were male. The most frequent etiological reasons were, in descending order, traffic accident 52% (n = 80, fall 34% (n = 53, direct trauma to the head 14(n =20. 45% (n = 69 were diagnosed epidural haematomas, 26% (n = 40 were diagnosed depression fractures and 3% (n = 5 were diagnosed intracerebral haematomas. A meaningful statistical difference was found in the comparison of the diagnosis regarding gender (p=0,012 age group (p=0,0282 and GCS (p=0,0001.

    Conclusions: In order to prevent cranial traumas, studies aimed at minimizing traffic accidents should be undertaken. The most essential action after the accident has occured is triage, and this is of great importance in order to establish communication among the health institutions.

  3. Encountering Meckel's diverticulum in emergency surgery for ascaridial intestinal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Abid

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract. In children with intestinal ascariasis, the diverticulum remains asymptomatic or rarely the Ascaris lumbricoides may lead to its complications in the presence of massive intestinal roundworm load. Given that preoperative diagnosis is seldom carried out, when Meckel's diverticulum is found at laparotomy for obstructive intestinal complications of roundworm, the diverticulum should be removed as complications may occur at any time. The aim of this study was to describe the findings of concomitant presence of Meckel's diverticulum who had surgical intervention in symptomatic intestinal ascariasis in children. Methods A retrospective case review study of 14 children who had surgical intervention for symptomatic intestinal ascariasis having the presence of concomitant Meckel's diverticulum was done. The study was done at SMHS Hospital Srinagar, Kashmir. Results A total of the 14 children who had ascaridial intestinal obstruction with concomitant presence of Meckel's diverticulum were studied. Age of children ranged from 4-12 years, male:female ratio was 1.8:1. Nine patients had asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum, whereas 5 patients with symptomatic signs were found in the course of emergency surgery for ascaridial intestinal obstruction. Conclusion Meckel's diverticulum in intestinal ascariasis may pursue silent course or may be accompanied with complications of the diverticulitis, perforation or the gangrene. Incidental finding of the Meckel's diverticulum in the intestinal ascariasis should have removal.

  4. Current status and future options for trauma and emergency surgery in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviloğlu, Korhan; Ertekin, Cemalettin

    2008-01-01

    The number of trauma victims in Turkey is expected to increase as a consequence of the increasing vehicular traffic, potential for earthquakes, and risk of terrorist attacks. The Turkish Association for Trauma and Emergency Surgery monitors trauma cases, publishes a quarterly journal, organizes trauma courses and seminars for various health personnel nationwide. It is also extending efforts to improve in-hospital care by establishing trauma and emergency surgery fellowships and trauma and emergency surgery centers nationwide, which is run by General Surgeons currently. Turkey faces the same dilemma as the rest of the developed world regarding the future of trauma surgeons in the current era of nonoperative trauma management. We suggest that the field of trauma and emergency surgery be redefined to include emergency general surgery and cavitary trauma.

  5. Are You Ready for Emergency Medical Services in Your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Office?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Clive; Ragan, Michael R

    2018-05-01

    Efficient responses to emergencies in the oral and maxillofacial surgery office require preparation, communication, and thorough documentation of the event and response. The concept of team anesthesia is showcased with these efforts. Emergency medical services training and response times vary greatly. The oral and maxillofacial surgery office should be prepared to manage the patient for at least 15 minutes after making the call to 911. Patient outcomes are optimized when providers work together to manage and transport the patient. Oral and maxillofacial surgery offices should develop and rehearse emergency plans and coordinate these protocols with local Emergency medical services teams. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Emergency surgery for complicated colorectal cancer in central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Caetano dos Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to report clinical and pathological features of patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed during emergency abdominal surgery. Methods: records of 107 patients operated between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed. Results: there were 58 women and 49 men with mean age of 59.8 years. The most frequent symptoms were: abdominal pain (97.2%, no bowel movements (81.3%, vomiting (76.6%, and anorexia (40.2%. Patients were divided into five groups: obstructive acute abdomen (n = 68, obstructive acute perforation (n = 21, obstructive acute inflammation (n = 13, abdominal sepsis (n = 3, and severe gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 2. Tumors were located in the rectosigmoid (51.4%, transverse colon (19.6%, ascendent colon (12.1%, descendent colon (11.2%, and 5.6% of the cases presented association of two colon tumors (synchronic tumors. The surgical treatment was: tumor resection with colostomy (85%, tumor resection with primary anastomosis (10.3%, and colostomy without tumor resection (4.7%. Immediate mortality occurred in 33.4% of the patients. Bivariate analysis of sex, tumor location and stage showed no relation to death (p > 0.05%. Conclusions: colorectal cancer may be the cause of colon obstruction or perfuration in patients with nonspecific colonic complaints. Despite the high mortality rate, resection of tumor is feasible in most patients. Resumo: Objetivo: analisar os aspectos clinicos e patológicos de pacientes operados de cancer colorretal diagnosticados durante operações abdominais de urgencia. Métodos: foram estudados os prontuários de 107 pacientes operados entre 2006 e 2010. Resultados: Foram incluidos 58 mulheres e 49 homens com idade media de 59,8 anos. Os sintomas mais frequentes foram: dor abdominal (97,2%, parade de eliminação de gases e fezes (81,3%, vomitos (76,6% e anorexia (40,2%. Os pacientes foram divididos em cinco grupos: abdomen agudo obstrutivo (68, abdomen agudo perfurativo (21, abdomen agudo inflamatorio (13

  7. 30-Day, 90-day and 1-year mortality after emergency colonic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T; Watt, S K; Tolstrup, M-B

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Emergency surgery is an independent risk factor in colonic surgery resulting in high 30-day mortality. The primary aim of this study was to report 30-day, 90-day and 1-year mortality rates after emergency colonic surgery, and to report factors associated with 30-day, 90-day and 1-year...... mortality. Second, the aim was to report 30-day postoperative complications and their relation to in-hospital mortality. METHODS: All patients undergoing acute colonic surgery in the period from May 2009 to April 2013 at Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Denmark, were identified. Perioperative data...... postoperative deaths. CONCLUSION: Mortality and complication rates after emergency colonic surgery are high and associated with patient related risk factors that cannot be modified, but also treatment related outcomes that are modifiable. An increased focus on medical and other preventive measures should...

  8. Emergency Immigration Education Act Programs: Summer E.S.L. Welcome Plus Program for Students of Limited English Proficiency (LEP), Summer Bilingual Program, and Project Omega. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Diana L.

    This report presents findings of the evaluation by the New York City public school system's Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment of three programs (Summer E.S.L. Welcome Plus, Summer Bilingual, and Project Omega) for immigrant students. The Summer E.S.L. (English as a Second Language) Welcome Plus program operated at 19 sites in New York…

  9. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patie......, intermediate care patients felt hindered in doing so by continuous monitoring of vital signs. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Intermediate care may increase patient perceptions of quality and safety of care.......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating...

  10. Comparison of maintenance, emergence and recovery characteristics of sevoflurane and desflurane in pediatric ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish B Kotwani

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Desflurane provides faster emergence and recovery in comparison to sevoflurane when used for the maintenance of anesthesia through SGA in children. Both sevoflurane and desflurane can be safely used in children for lower abdominal surgeries.

  11. Laparoscopy in major abdominal emergency surgery seems to be a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Tengberg, Line Toft; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopy is well established in the majority of elective procedures in abdominal surgery. In contrast, it is primarily used in minor surgery such as appendectomy or cholecystectomy in the emergent setting. This study aimed to analyze the safety and effectiveness of a laparoscopic...

  12. Differences in emergency colorectal surgery in Medicaid and uninsured patients by hospital safety net status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Dahman, Bassam; Sabik, Lindsay M

    2015-02-01

    We examined whether safety net hospitals reduce the likelihood of emergency colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery in uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients. If these patients have better access to care through safety net providers, they should be less likely to undergo emergency resection relative to similar patients at non- safety net hospitals. Using population-based data, we estimated the relationship between safety net hospitals, patient insurance status, and emergency CRC surgery. We extracted inpatient admission data from the Virginia Health Information discharge database and matched them to the Virginia Cancer Registry for patients aged 21 to 64 years who underwent a CRC resection between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005 (n = 5488). We differentiated between medically defined emergencies and those that originated in the emergency department (ED). For each definition of emergency surgery, we estimated the linear probability models of the effects of being treated at a safety net hospital on the probability of having an emergency resection. Safety net hospitals reduce emergency surgeries among uninsured and Medicaid CRC patients. When defining an emergency resection as those that involved an ED visit, these patients were 15 to 20 percentage points less likely to have an emergency resection when treated in a safety net hospital. Our results suggest that these hospitals provide a benefit, most likely through the access they afford to timely and appropriate care, to uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients relative to hospitals without a safety net mission.

  13. Navigation in head and neck oncological surgery: an emerging concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, P; Mastronicola, R; Cortese, S; Phulpin, B; Sergeant, C; Guillemin, F; Eluecque, H; Perrot, C; Dolivet, G

    2011-01-01

    Navigation surgery, initially applied in rhinology, neurosurgery and orthopaedic cases, has been developed over the last twenty years. Surgery based on computed tomography data has become increasingly important in the head and neck region. The technique for hardware fusion between RMI and computed tomography is also becoming more useful. We use such device since 2006 in head and neck carcinologic situation. Navigation allows control of the resection in order to avoid and protect the precise anatomical structures (vessels and nerves). It also guides biopsy and radiofrequency. Therefore, quality of life is much more increased and morbidity is decreased for these patients who undergo major and mutilating head and neck surgery. Here we report the results of 33 navigation procedures performed for 31 patients in our institution.

  14. Mortality following emergency groin hernia surgery in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Jesper; Bay-Nielsen, M; Kehlet, H

    2010-01-01

    The mortality following emergency groin hernia repair in Denmark is more than twice as high (7%) as in comparable countries. This article describes in detail the population that died following emergency herniotomy in order to identify aspects of care that may improve outcome.......The mortality following emergency groin hernia repair in Denmark is more than twice as high (7%) as in comparable countries. This article describes in detail the population that died following emergency herniotomy in order to identify aspects of care that may improve outcome....

  15. Prediction of Outcome After Emergency High-Risk Intra-abdominal Surgery Using the Surgical Apgar Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cihoric, Mirjana; Toft Tengberg, Line; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With current literature quoting mortality rates up to 45%, emergency high-risk abdominal surgery has, compared with elective surgery, a significantly greater risk of death and major complications. The Surgical Apgar Score (SAS) is predictive of outcome in elective surgery, but has nev...... emergency high-risk abdominal surgery. Despite its predictive value, the SAS cannot in its current version be recommended as a standalone prognostic tool in an emergency setting....

  16. Emergency abdominal surgery in Zaria, Nigeria | Ahmed | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The causes of abdominal surgical emergencies in a particular setting may change because of alterations in demographic, socio-economic or geographical factors. We present the pattern, management and outcome of such emergencies in Zaria, Northern Nigeria. Methods. This is a retrospective review of ...

  17. Logistics and outcome in urgent and emergency colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elshove-Bolk, J.; Ellensen, V. S.; Baatrup, G.

    2010-01-01

    died were less likely to be operated by a subspecialized colorectal surgeon (17%. vs 30%, P = 0.001). The anaesthesiologist was a resident in most of the cases (> 75%) for both those who survived and those who died. Surgery performed out-of-office hours was common in both groups, although the patients...

  18. Complications of bariatric surgery: Presentation and emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassir, Radwan; Debs, Tarek; Blanc, Pierre; Gugenheim, Jean; Ben Amor, Imed; Boutet, Claire; Tiffet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic in obesity has led to an increase in number of so called bariatric procedures. Doctors are less comfortable managing an obese patient after bariatric surgery. Peri-operative mortality is less than 1%. The specific feature in the obese patient is that the classical signs of peritoneal irritation are never present as there is no abdominal wall and therefore no guarding or rigidity. Simple post-operative tachycardia in obese patients should be taken seriously as it is a WARNING SIGNAL. The most common complication after surgery is peritonitis due to anastomotic fistula formation. This occurs typically as an early complication within the first 10 days post-operatively and has an incidence of 1-6% after gastric bypass and 3-7% after sleeve gastrectomy. Post-operative malnutrition is extremely rare after restrictive surgery (ring, sleeve gastrectomy) although may occur after malabsorbative surgery (bypass, biliary pancreatic shunt) and is due to the restriction and change in absorption. Prophylactic cholecystectomy is not routinely carried out during the same procedure as the bypass. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis after bariatric surgery is a diagnosis which should be considered in the presence of any postoperative abdominal pain. Initially a first etiological assessment is performed (measurement of antithrombin III and of protein C and protein S, testing for activated protein C resistance). If the least doubt is present, a medical or surgical consultation should be requested with a specialist practitioner in the management of obese patients as death rates increase with delayed diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of intermediate care on mortality following emergency abdominal surgery. The InCare trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Morten; Waldau, Tina; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a 15% to 20% short-term mortality rate. Postoperative medical complications are strongly associated with increased mortality. Recent research suggests that timely recognition and effective management of complications may reduce mortality....... The aim of the present trial is to evaluate the effect of postoperative intermediate care following emergency major abdominal surgery in high-risk patients.Methods and design: The InCare trial is a randomised, parallel-group, non-blinded clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Patients undergoing emergency...... laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery with a perioperative Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 10 or above, who are ready to be transferred to the surgical ward within 24 h of surgery are allocated to either intermediate care for 48 h, or surgical ward care. The primary outcome measure...

  20. Outcome of Emergency Abdominal Surgery at Kigali University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is little information regarding the clinical spectrum of disease in these patients ... was a case series study of 229 patients who underwent emergency abdominal ... The most common operative findings were peritonitis (41.5%), intestinal ...

  1. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Chae

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing has been embraced by early adopters to produce medical imaging-guided 3D printed biomodels that facilitate various aspects of clinical practice. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. With increasing accessibility, investigators are now able to convert standard imaging data into Computer Aided Design (CAD files using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography (SLA, multijet modeling (MJM, selective laser sintering (SLS, binder jet technique (BJT, and fused deposition modeling (FDM. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without out-sourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. In this review the existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice, spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative aesthetics, are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, patient and surgical trainee education, and the development of intraoperative guidance tools and patient-specific prosthetics in everyday surgical practice.

  2. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  3. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  4. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embrac...

  5. Improving time to surgery for hip fracture patients. Impact of the introduction of an emergency theatre

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    French-O’Carroll, F

    2017-01-01

    Hip fractures are a major cause of morbidity and mortality1. Surgery performed on the day of or after admission is associated with improved outcome2,3. An audit cycle was performed examining time to surgery for hip fracture patients. Our initial audit identified lack of theatre space as one factor delaying surgery. A dedicated daytime emergency theatre was subsequently opened and a re-audit was performed to assess its impact on time to surgery. Following the opening of the theatre, the proportion of patients with a delay to hip fracture surgery greater than 36 hours was reduced from 49% to 26% with lack of theatre space accounting for 23% (3 of 13) of delayed cases versus 28.6% (9 of 32) previously. 44% of hip fracture surgeries were performed in the emergency theatre during daytime hours, whilst in-hospital mortality rose from 4.6% to 6%. We conclude that access to an emergency theatre during daytime hours reduced inappropriate delays to hip fracture surgery.

  6. Non-emergency small bowel obstruction: assessment of CT findings that predict need for surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Swati D.; Shin, David S.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Shin, Lewis; Jeffrey, R.B. [Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-05-15

    To identify CT findings predictive of surgical management in non-emergency small bowel obstruction (SBO). Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT of 129 patients with non-emergency SBO were evaluated for small bowel luminal diameter, wall thickness, presence of the small bowel faeces sign (intraluminal particulate matter in a dilated small bowel) and length, transition point, submucosal oedema, mesenteric stranding, ascites and degree of obstruction (low grade partial, high grade partial and complete obstruction). Medical records were reviewed for age, gender, management and history of abdominal surgery, abdominal malignancy, or SBO. Statistical analyses were performed with Stata Release 9.2. Degree of obstruction was the only predictor of need for surgery. Whereas 18.0% of patients with low-grade partial obstruction (n = 50) underwent surgery, 32.5% of patients with high-grade partial obstruction (n = 77) and 100% of patients with complete obstruction (n = 2) required surgery (P = 0.004). The small bowel faeces sign was inversely predictive of surgery (P = 0.018). In non-emergency SBO patients with contrast-enhanced CT imaging, grade of obstruction predicts surgery, while the small bowel faeces sign inversely predicts need for surgery. (orig.)

  7. Dexmedetomidine does not reduce emergence agitation in adults following orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, S Y; Kim, J E; Park, C; Shin, M J; Shim, Y H

    2014-09-01

    Patients undergoing orthognathic surgery are at high risk of developing emergence agitation. We hypothesised that a single-dose of dexmedetomidine would reduce emergence agitation in adults with nasotracheal intubation after orthognathic surgery. Seventy adults (20-45 years old) undergoing orthognathic surgery were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients received intravenous dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg (dex group) or normal saline (control group) for 10 min at the end of surgery. Remifentanil was infused at 0.02 μg/kg/min during emergence in both groups. The severity of emergence agitation was assessed with the Richmond agitation-sedation scale. Cough, haemodynamic and respiratory profiles, pain, and time to eye opening were evaluated. The incidence of emergence agitation was not different between dex group and control group (38% vs. 47%, P = 0.45). However, severe cough during emergence was reduced in the dex group (P = 0.04). Tachycardia during emergence and recovery phases was attenuated in the dex group. The verbal numeric rating of pain was lower in the dex group. There were no differences in respiratory rate between the two groups. Time to eye opening was prolonged in the dex group. The addition of a single dose of dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) to low-dose remifentanil infusion did not attenuate emergence agitation in intubated patients after orthognathic surgery compared with low-dose remifentanil infusion alone. However, single-dose dexmedetomidine suppressed coughing, haemodynamic changes, and pain during emergence and recovery phases, without respiratory depression. Delayed awakening might be associated with this treatment. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Outcomes following major emergency gastric surgery: the importance of specialist surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, O A; McGlone, E R; Mercer, S J; Somers, S S; Toh, S K C

    2015-01-01

    The increasing subspecialisation of general surgeons in their elective work may result in problems for the provision of expert care for emergency cases. There is very little evidence of the impact of subspecialism on outcomes following emergency major upper gastrointestinal surgery. This prospective study investigated whether elective subspecialism of general surgeon is associated with a difference in outcome following major emergency gastric surgery. Between February 1994 and June 2010, the data from all emergency major gastric procedures (defined as patients who underwent laparotomy within 12 hours of referral to the surgical service for bleeding gastroduodenal ulcer and/or undergoing major gastric resection) was prospectively recorded. The sub-specialty interest of operating surgeon was noted and related to post-operative outcomes. Over the study period, a total of 63 major gastric procedures were performed of which 23 (37%) were performed by specialist upper gastrointestinal (UGI) consultants. Surgery performed by a specialist UGI surgeon was associated with a significantly lower surgical complication (4% vs. 28% of cases; p=0.04) and in-patient mortality rate (22% vs. 50%; p=0.03). Major emergency gastric surgery has significantly better clinical outcomes when performed by a specialist UGI surgeon. These results have important implications for provision of an emergency general surgical service. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  9. The emergence of radiofrequency identification tags: applications in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaitzberg, S D

    2006-08-01

    Radiofrequency identification (RFID) is a wireless method of automatic identification. Currently, RFID tags are emerging into our environment in many aspects of our lives. Applications are being developed in a variety of fields, including health care. Aspects of surgical care will lend themselves to this approach. This technology could provide large amounts of data that not only carry the promise of improving health care, but also may have an impact on personal aspects of our daily lives. Each of us must become familiar with the risks and benefits of RFID use.

  10. Increased mortality in the elderly after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Peter; Manoharan, Thukirtha; Foss, Nicolai B

    2014-01-01

    was a retrospective analysis of patient charts and perioperative documentation in an unselected consecutive cohort of 131 patients. Covariates for survival outcomes were evaluated in a multivariate analysis. No external funding and no competing interests were declared. The study was approved by The Danish Data...... within 30 days post-operatively. CONCLUSION: Acute admission and emergency laparotomy is associated with a very high mortality, especially in elderly patients. However, delay in the surgical treatment exceeding six hours is not associated with a higher mortality. There may be a considerable potential...

  11. Increased risk environment for emergency general surgery in the context of regionalization and specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, S; O'Leary, D P; McLaughlin, R

    2015-09-01

    The pressures on tertiary hospitals with increased volume and complexity related to regionalization and specialization has impacted upon availability of operating theatres with consequent displacement of emergencies to high risk out of hours settings. A retrospective review of an electronic emergency theatre list prospectively maintained database was performed over a two year period. Data gathered included type of operation performed, Time to Theatre (TTT), operation start time and length of stay (LOS). Of 7041 emergency operations 25% were performed out of hours. 2949 patient had general surgical emergency procedures with 910 (30%) performed out of hours. 53% of all emergency laparotomies and 54% of appendicectomies were out of hours. 57% of cases operated on out of hours had been awaiting surgery during the day. Mean TTT was shorter for those admitted at the weekend compared to those admitted during the week (15.6 vs 24.9 h) (p emergency surgery is performed out of hours in a way unfavorable to good clinical outcomes. It is of concern that more than half of the most life threating procedures involving laparotomy, take place out of hours. Regionalization needs to be accompanied by infrastructure planning to accommodate emergency surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Geographic Diffusion and Implementation of Acute Care Surgery: An Uneven Solution to the National Emergency General Surgery Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jasmine A; Ingraham, Angela M; Daniel, Vijaya T; Ayturk, Didem; Kiefe, Catarina I; Santry, Heena P

    2018-02-01

    Owing to lack of adequate emergency care infrastructure and decline in general surgery workforce, the United States faces a crisis in access to emergency general surgery (EGS) care. Acute care surgery (ACS), an organized system of trauma, general surgery, and critical care, is a proposed solution; however, ACS diffusion remains poorly understood. To investigate geographic diffusion of ACS models of care and characterize the communities in which ACS implementation is lagging. A national survey on EGS practices was developed, tested, and administered at all 2811 US acute care hospitals providing EGS to adults between August 2015 and October 2015. Surgeons responsible for EGS coverage at these hospitals were approached. If these surgeons failed to respond to the initial survey implementation, secondary surgeons or chief medical officers at hospitals with only 1 general surgeon were approached. Survey responses on ACS implementation were linked with geocoded hospital data and national census data to determine geographic diffusion of and access to ACS. We measured the distribution of hospitals with ACS models of care vs those without over time (diffusion) and by US counties characterized by sociodemographic characteristics of county residents (access). Survey response rate was 60% (n = 1690); 272 responding hospitals had implemented ACS by 2015, steadily increasing from 34 in 2001 to 125 in 2010. Acute care surgery implementation has not been uniform. Rural regions have limited ACS access, with hospitals in counties with greater than the 75th percentile population having 5.4 times higher odds (95% CI, 1.66-7.35) of implementing ACS than hospitals in counties with less than 25th percentile population. Communities with greater percentages of adults without a college degree also have limited ACS access (OR, 3.43; 95% CI, 1.81-6.48). However, incorporating EGS into ACS models may be a potential equalizer for poor, black, and Hispanic communities. Understanding and

  13. Use of a Combination of Regional and General Anesthesia during Emergency Thoracic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kh. Sharipova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elaborate multimodal anesthetic regimens and to evaluate their efficiency during emergency thoracic surgeries for varying injuries. Subjects and methods. A total of 116 patients emergently admitted to the Republican Research Center for Emergency Medical Care for chest traumatic injuries were examined and divided into 3 groups according to the mode of anesthesia. Results. Perioperative multimodal anesthetic regimens for emergency thoracic surgery, which involved all components of the pathogenesis of pain, were elaborated. Conclusion. The combination of regional and general anesthesia contributes to the smooth course of an intra operative period with minimal hemodynamic stress and it is cost effective in decreasing the use of narcotic anal gesics in the intraoperative period. 

  14. Outcome of burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Soo; Hironaka, Yasuhiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Asai, Hideki; Watanabe, Tomoo; Nishio, Kenji; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    We have performed burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma from April 2007 in twenty five patients. All patients were deep comatose and showed cerebral herniation sign with bilateral pupillary abnormalities. Burr hole surgeries were performed as soon as possible after CT evaluation. Continually decomporresive craiectomies were followed if clinical improvements were achieved and mild baribiturate-moderate hypothermia combined (MB-MH) therapy was induced postoperatively in some cases. The mean average was 65.6 years (range 16-93). The causes of head injuries were traffic accident in 9, fall down in 13 and unknown in 3. The mean Glasgow coma scale (GCS) on admission was 4.4 (range 3-9). The mean time interval from arrival to burr hole surgery was 33.5 minutes (range 21-50 minutes). Decompressive craniectomy was indicated in 14 cases and MB-MH therapy was induced in 13 cases. The overall clinical outcome consisted of good recovery in 3, moderate disability in 2, severe disability in 3, persistent vegetative state in 3 and death in 14. Favorable results can be expected even in patients with serious acute subdural hematoma. Emergent burr hole surgery was effective to decrease intracranial pressure rapidly and to save time. So active burr hole surgery in the emergency room is strongly recommended to all cases of severe acute subdural hematoma. (author)

  15. Medical emergencies in the dental surgery. Part 1: Preparation of the office and basic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2015-12-01

    Medical emergencies can and do happen in the dental surgery. In the 20- to 30-year practice lifetime of the typical dentist, he/she will encounter between five and seven emergency situations. Being prepared in advance of the emergency increases the likelihood of a successful outcome. PURPOSE OF THE PAPER: To prepare members of the dental office staff to be able to promptly recognize and efficiently manage those medical emergency situations that can occur in the dental office environment. Preparation of the dental office to promptly recognize and efficiently manage medical emergencies is predicated on successful implementation of the following four steps: basic life support for ALL members of the dental office staff; creation of a dental office emergency team; activation of emergency medial services (EMS) when indicated; and basic emergency drugs and equipment. The basic emergency algorithm (P->C->A->B->D) is designed for implementation in all emergency situations. Prompt implementation of the basic emergency management protocol can significantly increase the likelihood of a successful result when medical emergencies occur in the dental office environment.

  16. Emerging risks and outcomes of blood transfusion in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shander, Aryeh

    2004-01-01

    Prior to 1900, blood transfusions were fraught with danger and often caused more complications than the underlying disease. Discovery of the ABO compatibility system in the early twentieth century opened the modern era of blood transfusion, yet ABO incompatibility-as a result of clerical error-remains a significant threat to the recipient today. The risk of disease transmission now includes new and emerging agents, such as Trepanosoma cruzii and West Nile Virus (WNV), as well as other existing pathogens. Transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM) presents a further risk to recipient patients. Confounding these problems are shortages of safe blood and the accelerated rise in the cost of blood due to increased testing. Outcome data on transfusion therapy have not always been favorable, particularly in the areas of postoperative infection, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), multiple organ failure (MOF), and mortality. Such data have generated extensive efforts to determine association versus underlying cause of post-transfusion complications. In addition, unprecedented global initiatives to minimize the use of allogeneic blood are on the way. Options may include, but are not limited to, the use of "blood substitutes," although validation of such products is still required. In the meantime, blood product conservation techniques should become part of routine transfusion medicine.

  17. Emergency canine surgery in a deployed forward surgical team: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitler, Alan L; Jeanette, Joseph P; McGraw, Andrew L; Butera, Jennifer R; Vanfosson, Christopher A; Seery, Jason M

    2011-04-01

    Forward surgical teams (FSTs) perform a variety of non-doctrinal functions. During their deployment to Afghanistan, the 541st FST (Airborne) performed emergency surgery on a German shepherd military working dog (MWD). Retrospective examination of a case of veterinary surgery in a deployed FST. A 5 1/2-year-old German shepherd MWD presented with extreme lethargy, tachycardia, excessive drooling, and a firm, distended abdomen. These conditions resulted from gastric dilatation with volvulus. Since evacuation to a veterinarian was untenable, emergency laparotomy was performed in the FST. The gastric dilatation with volvulus was treated by detorsion and gastropexy, and the canine patient fully recovered. Canine surgery can be safely performed in an FST. Based on the number of MWDs deployed throughout the theater, FSTs may be called upon to care for them in the absence of available veterinary care.

  18. Self-expandable metallic stent as a bridge to elective surgery versus emergency surgery for acute malignant colorectal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Xiong; Wu, Xiao-Hua; Wu, Hai-yan; Chang, Wen-Ju; Chang, Xiu-juan; Yi, Tuo; Shi, Qiang; Chen, Jing-Wen; Feng, Qing-Yang; Zhu, De-Xiang; Wei, Ye; Zhong, Yun-Shi; Xu, Jian-Min

    2016-03-01

    The efficacy and safety of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMSs) as a bridge for patients with acute malignant colorectal obstructions (AMCOs) are still controversial. We conducted this study to evaluate the outcomes of patients with AMCOs treated by different strategies. From January 2010 to March 2014, a total of 171 patients with AMCOs from Zhongshan Hospital were retrospectively enrolled in this study. One hundred twenty patients successfully received stent placement followed by one-stage laparoscopic or open resection in the stent group, and 51 patients received emergency operations in the emergency group. The operation duration and postoperative hospital stay were significantly shorter in the stent group (114.51 ± 28.65 vs. 160.39 ± 58.94 min, P stent group also had significantly reduced intraoperative blood loss and the incidence of postoperative complications compared with the emergency group (61.00 ± 43.70 vs. 121.18 ± 85.90 ml, P stent group was significantly longer than that in the emergency group (53 vs. 41 months, P = 0.034). In subgroup analysis of stent group, the stent laparoscopy group had significantly decreased postoperative complications (P = 0.025), and similar long-term survival (P = 0.81). Stent placement as a bridge to surgery is a safe and feasible procedure and provides significant advantages in terms of short-term outcomes and favorable prognoses for patients with AMCOs. Laparoscopic surgery could be considered as an optimal treatment after stent placement.

  19. Assessment of emergency general surgery care based on formally developed quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Angela; Nathens, Avery; Peitzman, Andrew; Bode, Allison; Dorlac, Gina; Dorlac, Warren; Miller, Preston; Sadeghi, Mahsa; Wasserman, Deena D; Bilimoria, Karl

    2017-08-01

    Emergency general surgery outcomes vary widely across the United States. The utilization of quality indicators can reduce variation and assist providers in administering care aligned with established recommendations. Previous quality indicators have not focused on emergency general surgery patients. We identified indicators of high-quality emergency general surgery care and assessed patient- and hospital-level compliance with these indicators. We utilized a modified Delphi technique (RAND Appropriateness Methodology) to develop quality indicators. Through 2 rankings, an expert panel ranked potential quality indicators for validity. We then examined historic compliance with select quality indicators after 4 nonelective procedures (cholecystectomy, appendectomy, colectomy, small bowel resection) at 4 academic centers. Of 25 indicators rated as valid, 13 addressed patient-level quality and 12 addressed hospital-level quality. Adherence with 18 indicators was assessed. Compliance with performing a cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis within 72 hours of symptom onset ranged from 45% to 76%. Compliance with surgery start times within 3 hours from the decision to operate for uncontained perforated viscus ranged from 20% to 100%. Compliance with exploration of patients with small bowel obstructions with ischemia/impending perforation within 3 hours of the decision to operate was 0% to 88%. For 3 quality indicators (auditing 30-day unplanned readmissions/operations for patients previously managed nonoperatively, monitoring time to source control for intra-abdominal infections, and having protocols for bypass/transfer), none of the hospitals were compliant. Developing indicators for providers to assess their performance provides a foundation for specific initiatives. Adherence to quality indicators may improve the quality of emergency general surgery care provided for which current outcomes are potentially modifiable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A comparative study of short- and medium-term outcomes comparing emergent surgery and stenting as a bridge to surgery in patients with acute malignant colonic obstruction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2013-04-01

    The use of self-expanding metal stents as a bridge to surgery in the setting of malignant colorectal obstruction has been advocated as an acceptable alternative to emergency surgery. However, concerns about the safety of stenting have been raised following recent randomized studies.

  1. Bariatric Surgery for Adolescents with Type 2 Diabetes: an Emerging Therapeutic Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefater, M A; Inge, T H

    2017-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a growing public health problem in youth, but conventional treatments are often insufficient to treat this disease and its comorbidities. We review evidence supporting an emerging role for bariatric surgery as a treatment for adolescent T2D. Paralleling what has been seen in adult patients, bariatric surgery dramatically improves glycemic control in patients with T2D. In fact, remission of T2D has been observed in as many as 95-100% of adolescents with diabetes after bariatric surgery, particularly vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. This striking outcome may be due to both weight-dependent- and weight-independent factors, and recent studies suggest that T2D-related comorbidities may also improve after surgery. Bariatric surgery including RYGB and VSG is a powerful therapeutic option for obese adolescents with T2D. Benefits must be weighed against risk for postoperative complications such as nutritional deficiencies, but earlier surgical intervention might lead to more complete metabolic remission in obese patients with T2D.

  2. Creation of an emergency surgery service concentrates resident training in general surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hesham M; Gale, Stephen C; Tinti, Meredith S; Shiroff, Adam M; Macias, Aitor C; Rhodes, Stancie C; Defreese, Marissa A; Gracias, Vicente H

    2012-09-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) is increasingly being provided by academic trauma surgeons in an acute care surgery model. Our tertiary care hospital recently changed from a model where all staff surgeons (private, subspecialty academic, and trauma academic) were assigned EGS call to one in which an emergency surgery service (ESS), staffed by academic trauma faculty, cares for all EGS patients. In the previous model, many surgeries were "not covered" by residents because of work-hour restrictions, conflicting needs, or private surgeon preference. The ESS was separate from the trauma service. We hypothesize that by creating a separate ESS, residents can accumulate needed and concentrated operative experience in a well-supervised academic environment. A prospectively accrued EGS database was retrospectively queried for the 18-month period: July 2010 to June 2011. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) databases were queried for operative numbers for our residency program and for national resident data for 2 years before and after creating the ESS. The ACGME operative requirements were tabulated from online sources. ACGME requirements were compared with surgical cases performed. During the 18-month period, 816 ESS operations were performed. Of these, 307 (38%) were laparoscopy. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy and appendectomy were most common (138 and 145, respectively) plus 24 additional laparoscopic surgeries. Each resident performed, on average, 34 basic laparoscopic cases during their 2-month rotation, which is 56% of their ACGME basic laparoscopic requirement. A diverse mixture of 70 other general surgical operations was recorded for the remaining 509 surgical cases, including reoperative surgery, complex laparoscopy, multispecialty procedures, and seldom-performed operations such as surgery for perforated ulcer disease. Before the ESS, the classes of 2008 and 2009 reported that only 48% and 50% of cases were performed at the main academic

  3. Emergency surgery due to complications during molecular targeted therapy in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, P.; Nowecki, Z. I.; Dziewirski, W.; Ruka, W.; Siedlecki, J. A.; Grzesiakowska, U.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency and results of disease/treatment-related emergency operations during molecular targeted therapy of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Methods. We analyzed emergency operations in patients with metastatic/inoperable GISTs treated with 1 st -line imatinib - IM (group I: 232 patients; median follow-up time 31 months) and 2 nd -line sunitinib - SU (group II: 43 patients; median follow-up 13 months; 35 patients in trial A6181036) enrolled into the Polish Clinical GIST Registry. Results. In group I 3 patients (1.3%) underwent emergency surgery due to disease/treatment related complications: one due to bleeding from a ruptured liver tumor (1 month after IM onset) and two due to bowel perforation on the tumor with subsequent intraperitoneal abscess (both 2 months after IM onset). IM was restarted 5-8 days after surgery and no complications in wound healing were observed. In group II 4 patients (9.5%) underwent emergency operations due to disease/treatment related complications: three due to bowel perforations on the tumor (2 days, 20 days and 10 months after SU onset; 1 subsequent death) and one due to intraperitoneal bleeding from ruptured, necrotic tumor (3.5 months after SU start). SU was restarted 12-18 days after surgery and no complications in wound healing were observed. Conclusions. Emergency operations associated with disease or therapy during imatinib treatment of advanced GISTs are rare. The frequency of emergency operations during sunitinib therapy is considered to be higher than during first line therapy with imatinib which may be associated with more advanced and more resistant disease or to the direct mechanism of sunitinib action, i.e. combining cytotoxic and antiangiogenic activity and thus leading to dramatic tumor response. Molecular targeted therapy in GISTs should always be conducted in cooperation with an experienced surgeon. (authors)

  4. The laparoscopic approach in emergency surgery: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionut Negoi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of laparoscopy in the acute care surgery had significantly increased during the latest years, both as a diagnostic and treatment method of all the upper or lower gastrointestinal pathologies. The objective of the present research is to review the current indications for laparoscopy in bdominal emergencies and to detail the benefits and complications associated with this approach. We have reviewed the relevant literature about this topic published between January 2005 and December 2017, using the PubMed/Medline and Web of Science Core Collection databases. According to the current evidence, we may conclude that the laparoscopic approach is an integral part of the emergency surgery for all the abdominal pathologies. Although laparoscopy requires specialized training and curricula, it brings all the benefits of minimal access in acute care arena.

  5. Process mapping as a framework for performance improvement in emergency general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGirolamo, Kristin; D'Souza, Karan; Hall, William; Joos, Emilie; Garraway, Naisan; Sing, Chad Kim; McLaughlin, Patrick; Hameed, Morad

    2018-02-01

    Emergency general surgery conditions are often thought of as being too acute for the development of standardized approaches to quality improvement. However, process mapping, a concept that has been applied extensively in manufacturing quality improvement, is now being used in health care. The objective of this study was to create process maps for small bowel obstruction in an effort to identify potential areas for quality improvement. We used the American College of Surgeons Emergency General Surgery Quality Improvement Program pilot database to identify patients who received nonoperative or operative management of small bowel obstruction between March 2015 and March 2016. This database, patient charts and electronic health records were used to create process maps from the time of presentation to discharge. Eighty-eight patients with small bowel obstruction (33 operative; 55 nonoperative) were identified. Patients who received surgery had a complication rate of 32%. The processes of care from the time of presentation to the time of follow-up were highly elaborate and variable in terms of duration; however, the sequences of care were found to be consistent. We used data visualization strategies to identify bottlenecks in care, and they showed substantial variability in terms of operating room access. Variability in the operative care of small bowel obstruction is high and represents an important improvement opportunity in general surgery. Process mapping can identify common themes, even in acute care, and suggest specific performance improvement measures.

  6. Surgery of the elderly in emergency room mode. Is there a place for laparoscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Maciej; Dowgiałło-Wnukiewicz, Natalia; Lech, Paweł; Zacharz, Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    An important yet difficult problem is qualification for surgery in elderly patients. With age the risk of comorbidities increases - multi-disease syndrome. Elderly patients suffer from frailty syndrome. Many body functions become impaired. All these factors make the elderly patient a major challenge for surgical treatment. Analysis of the possibility of developing the indications and contraindications and the criteria for surgical treatment of the elderly based on our own cases. Discussion whether there is a place for laparoscopy during surgery of the elderly in emergency room (ER) mode. The analysis was performed based on seven cases involving surgical treatment of elderly patients who were admitted to the hospital in emergency room mode. The patients were hospitalized in the General and Minimally Invasive Surgery Clinic in Olsztyn in 2016. Surgical treatment of elderly patients should be planned with multidisciplinary teams. Geriatric surgery centers should be developed to minimize the risk of overzealous treatment and potential complications. Laparoscopy should always be considered in the case of ER procedures or diagnostics. Elderly patients should not be treated as typical adults, but as a separate group of patients requiring special treatment. Due to the existing additional disease in the elderly, the frailty syndrome, any surgical intervention should be minimally invasive. The discussion about therapy should be conducted by a team of specialists from a variety of medical fields.

  7. Sarcopenia is a predictor of outcomes in very elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Karvellas, Constantine J; Baracos, Vickie; Williams, David C; Khadaroo, Rachel G

    2014-09-01

    With the increasing aging population, the number of very elderly patients (age ≥80 years) undergoing emergency operations is increasing. Evaluating patient-specific risk factors for postoperative morbidity and mortality in the acute care surgery setting is crucial to improving outcomes. We hypothesize that sarcopenia, a severe depletion of skeletal muscles, is a predictor of morbidity and mortality in very elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. A total of 170 patients older than the age of 80 underwent emergency surgery between 2008 and 2010 at a tertiary care facility; 100 of these patients had abdominal computed tomography images within 30 days of the operation that were adequate for the assessment of sarcopenia. The impact of sarcopenia on the operative outcomes was evaluated using both univariate and multivariate analysis. The mean patient age was 84 years, with an in-hospital mortality of 18%. Sarcopenia was present in 73% of patients. More sarcopenic patients had postoperative complications (45% sarcopenic versus 15% nonsarcopenic, P = .005) and more died in hospital (23 vs 4%, P = .037). There were no differences in duration of stay or requirement for intensive care unit postoperatively. After we controlled for confounding factors, increasing skeletal muscle index (per incremental cm(2)/m(2)) was associated with decreased in-hospital mortality (odds ratio ∼0.834, 95% confidence interval 0.731-0.952, P = .007) in multivariate analysis. Sarcopenia was independently predictive of greater complication rates, discharge disposition, and in-hospital mortality in the very elderly emergency surgery population. Using sarcopenia as an objective tool to identify high-risk patients would be beneficial in developing tailored preventative strategies and potentially resource allocation in the future. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Type of incision does not predict abdominal wall outcome after emergency surgery for colonic anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Oma, Erling; Harling, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    for anastomotic leakage were included with a median follow-up of 5.4 years. Incisional hernia occurred in 41 of 227 (15.3%) patients undergoing midline incision compared with 14 of 81 (14.7%) following transverse incision, P = 1.00. After adjusting for confounders, there was no association between the type...... not predict abdominal wall outcome after emergency surgery for colonic anastomotic leakage....

  9. 1950-nm diode laser-assisted microanastomoses (LAMA): an innovative surgical tool for hand surgery emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclère, Franck Marie; Schoofs, Michel; Vogt, Peter; Casoli, Vincent; Mordon, Serge

    2015-05-01

    Based on previous observations, the 1950-nm diode laser seems to be an ideal wavelength for laser microvascular anastomoses. The data presented here, part of a larger ongoing study, assess its use in emergency hand surgery. Between 2011 and 2014, 11 patients were operated on for hand trauma with laser-assisted microanastomoses (LAMA) and prospectively analysed. LAMA was performed with a 1950-nm diode laser after placement of equidistant stitches. For vessel size laser parameters were used: spot size 400 μm, five spots for each wall, power 125 mW, and arterial/venous fluence 100/90 J/cm(2) (spot duration 1/0.9 s). Mean operating time for arterial and venous microanastomoses was 7.3 ± 1.4 and 8.7 ± 1.0 min, respectively. Three anastomoses required a secondary laser application. Arterial and venous patency rates were 100 % at the time of surgery. The success rate for the 11 procedures assessed clinically and with the Doppler was 100 %. The technique is compared to the current literature. The 1950-nm LAMA is a reliable tool with excellent results in emergency hand surgery. The system is very compact and transportable for utilization in the emergency operating room.

  10. [Intra-anesthetic arterial hypotension in elderly patients during emergency surgery: what are the risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubacar Ba, El Hadji; Leye, Papa Alassane; Traoré, Mamadou Mour; Ndiaye, Pape Ibrahima; Gaye, Ibrahima; Bah, Mamadou Diawo; Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Diouf, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Emergency anesthesia in elderly patients aged 65 years and older is complex. The occurrence of intraoperative incidents and arterial hypotension is conditioned by patients' initial health status and by the quality of intraoperative management. This study aimed to determine the incidence of intra-anesthetic arterial hypotension in elderly patients during emergency surgery and to assess the involvement of certain factors in its occurrence: age, sex, patient's history, ASA class, anesthetic technique. We conducted a retrospective descriptive and analytical study in the Emergency Surgery Department at the Aristide Le Dantec University Hospital from 1 March 2014 to 28 February 2015. We collected data from 210 patients out of 224 elderly patients aged 65 years and older undergoing emergency anesthesias (10.93%). Data of 101 men and 109 women were included in the analysis, of whom 64.3% had at least one defect. Patients' preoperative status was assessed using American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) classification: 71% of patients were ASA class 1 and 2 and 29% were ASA class 3 and 4. Locoregional anesthesia was the most practiced anesthetic technique (56.7%). 28 patients (13.33%) had intra-anesthetic arterial hypotension, of whom 16 under general anesthesia and 12 under locoregional anesthesia. It was more frequent in patients with high ASA class and a little less frequent in patients with PAH and underlying heart disease. Arterial hypotension in elderly patients during emergency surgery exposes the subject to the risk of not negligible intraoperative hypotension, especially in patients with high ASA class. Prevention is based on adequate preoperative assessment and anesthetic management.

  11. Unplanned emergency department consultations and readmissions within 30 and 90 days of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskra, María P; Ramón, José M; Martínez-Serrano, Andrés; Serra, Carmen; Goday, Albert; Trillo, Lourdes; Lanzarini, Enrique; Pera, Manuel; Grande, Luis

    2018-04-01

    Hospital readmission is used as a measure of quality healthcare. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, causes, and risk factors related to emergency consultations and readmissions within 30 and 90 days in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Retrospective study of 429 patients operated on from January 2004 to July 2015 from a prospectively maintained database and electronic medical records. Demographic data, type of intervention, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay and records of emergency visits and readmissions were analyzed. Within the first 90 days postoperative, a total of 117 (27%) patients consulted the Emergency Department and 24 (6%) were readmitted. The most common reasons for emergency consultation were noninfectious problems related to the surgical wound (n=40, 34%) and abdominal pain (n=28, 24%), which was also the first cause of readmission (n=9, 37%). Postoperative complications, reintervention, associated surgery in the same operation and depression were risk factors for emergency consultation within the first 90 days of the postoperative period. Despite the high number of patients who visit the Emergency Department in the first 90 days of the postoperative period, few require readmission and none surgical reoperation. It is important to know the reasons for emergency consultation to establish preventive measures and improve the quality of care. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcomes of hospitalized patients undergoing emergency general surgery remote from admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharoky, Catherine E; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Sellers, Morgan M; Kaufman, Elinore J; Sinnamon, Andrew J; Wirtalla, Christopher J; Holena, Daniel N; Kelz, Rachel R

    2017-09-01

    Emergency general surgery during hospitalization has not been well characterized. We examined emergency operations remote from admission to identify predictors of postoperative 30-day mortality, postoperative duration of stay >30 days, and complications. Patients >18 years in The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2011-2014) who had 1 of 7 emergency operations between hospital day 3-18 were included. Patients with operations >95th percentile after admission (>18 days; n = 581) were excluded. Exploratory laparotomy only (with no secondary procedure) represented either nontherapeutic or decompressive laparotomy. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of study outcomes. Of 10,093 patients with emergency operations, most were elderly (median 66 years old [interquartile ratio: 53-77 years]), white, and female. Postoperative 30-day mortality was 12.6% (n = 1,275). Almost half the cohort (40.1%) had a complication. A small subset (6.8%) had postoperative duration of stay >30 days. Postoperative mortality after exploratory laparotomy only was particularly high (>40%). In multivariable analysis, an operation on hospital day 11-18 compared with day 3-6 was associated with death (odds ratio 1.6 [1.3-2.0]), postoperative duration of stay >30 days (odds ratio 2.0 [1.6-2.6]), and complications (odds ratio 1.5 [1.3-1.8]). Exploratory laparotomy only also was associated with death (odds ratio 5.4 [2.8-10.4]). Emergency general surgery performed during a hospitalization is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A longer hospital course before an emergency operation is a predictor of poor outcomes, as is undergoing exploratory laparotomy only. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Frailty as a predictor of mortality in the elderly emergency general surgery patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeteyn, Jens; Evans, Louis A; De Cleyn, Siem; Fauconnier, Sigrid; Damen, Caroline; Hewitt, Jonathan; Ceelen, Wim

    2017-12-01

    The number of surgical procedures performed in elderly and frail patients has greatly increased in the last decades. However, there is little research in the elderly emergency general surgery patient. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of frailty in the emergency general surgery population in Belgium. Secondly, we examined the length of hospital stay, readmission rate and mortality at 30 and 90 days. We conducted a prospective observational study at Ghent University Hospital. All patients older than 65 admitted to a general surgery ward from the emergency department were eligible for inclusion. Primary endpoint was mortality at 30 days. Secondary outcomes were mortality at 90 days, readmissions and length of stay. Cross-sectional observations were performed using the Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U-test, or one-way ANOVA. We performed a COX multivariable analysis to identify independent variables associated with mortality at 30 and 90 days as well as the readmission risk. Data were collected from 98 patients in a four-month period. 23.5% of patients were deemed frail. 79% of all patients underwent abdominal surgery. Univariate analyses showed that polypharmacy, multimorbidity, a history of falls, hearing impairment and urinary incontinence were statistically significantly different between the non-frail and the group. Frail patients showed a higher incidence for mortality within 30 days (9% versus 1.3% (p = .053)). There were no differences between the two groups for mortality at 90 days, readmission, length of stay and operation. Frailty was a predictor for mortality at 90 days (p= .025) (hazard ratio (HR) 10.83 (95%CI 1.34-87.4)). Operation (p= .084) (HR 0.16 (95%CI 0.16-1.29)) and the presence of chronic cardiac failure (p= .049) (HR 0.38 (95%CI 0.14-0.99)) were protective for mortality at 90 days. Frailty is a significant predictor for mortality for elderly patients undergoing emergency abdominal/general surgery. Level II therapeutic

  14. [Pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium after elective ambulatory surgery: etiology, risk factors and prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gololobov, Alik; Todris, Liat; Berman, Yakov; Rosenberg-Gilad, Zipi; Schlaeffer, Pnina; Kenett, Ron; Ben-Jacob, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2015-04-01

    Emergence delirium (ED) is a common problem among children and adults recovering from general anesthesia after surgery. Its symptoms include psychomotor agitation, hallucinations, and aggressive behavior. The phenomenon, which is most probably an adverse effect of general anesthesia agents, harms the recovery process and endangers the physical safety of patients and their health. Ranging between 10% and 80%, the exact prevalence of ED is unknown, and the risk factors of the phenomenon are unclear. The aim of the current retrospective study was to determine the prevalence rate of ED in 3947 children recovering from general anesthesia after short elective ambulatory surgery, and to map the influence of various risk factors on this phenomenon. Data were collected using electronic medical records. ED severity was assessed using the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale. Results showed the prevalence of ED among children. ED was significantly correlated with patients' age, type of surgery and premedication. ED was not correlated with severity of pain, type of anesthesia or with patients' sex.

  15. Analysis of 230 cases of emergent surgery for obstructing colon cancer--lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslar, Ahmet Kessaf; Ozdemir, Süleyman; Mahmoudi, Hatim; Kuzu, Mehmet Ayhan

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to identify prognostic factors affecting clinical outcomes in emergent primary resection. A retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data of 230 consecutive emergent patients between August 1994 and January 2005 were evaluated in this study. Sixty-nine patients applied with right colon obstruction and 161 patients with left. Resection and primary anastomosis was carried out in 128 patients and resection and stoma in 102 patients. The patients were divided into two cohorts: patients who developed poor outcome within 30 days after surgery and those who did not. Major morbidity or mortality were reported in 60 (26.1%) patients. Analysis revealed that the most important prognostic factors for poor outcome were American Anesthesiology Association (ASA) grade ≥3, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score ≥11, age >60 years, presence of peritonitis, and surgery during on-call hours. Age >60 years and on-call surgery were determinant factors in right-sided obstructions, whereas ASA grade ≥3, APACHE II score ≥11, and presence of peritonitis were determinant factors in left-sided obstructions. All these factors but the timing of the operation emphasize the pivotal role of the patient's physiological condition on admission. Accurate preoperative evaluation might predict the clinical outcome and help in establishing the most appropriate treatment.

  16. Emergency pediatric surgery: Comparing the economic burden in specialized versus nonspecialized children's centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasnovsky, Charlotte L; Lumpkins, Kimberly; Diaz, Jose J; Chun, Jeannie Y

    2018-05-01

    The American College of Surgeons has developed a verification program for children's surgery centers. Highly specialized hospitals may be verified as Level I, while those with fewer dedicated resources as Level II or Level III, respectively. We hypothesized that more specialized children's centers would utilize more resources. We performed a retrospective study of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC) database from 2009 to 2013. We assessed total charge, length of stay (LOS), and charge per day for all inpatients with an emergency pediatric surgery diagnosis, controlling for severity of illness (SOI). Using published resources, we assigned theoretical level designations to each hospital. Two hospitals would qualify as Level 1 hospitals, with 4593 total emergency pediatric surgery admissions (38.5%) over the five-year study period. Charges were significantly higher for children treated at Level I hospitals (all P<0.0001). Across all SOI, children at Level I hospitals had significantly longer LOS (all P<0.0001). Hospitals defined as Level II and Level III provided the majority of care and were able to do so with shorter hospitalizations and lower charges, regardless of SOI. As care shifts towards specialized centers, this charge differential may have significant impact on future health care costs. Level III Cost Effectiveness Study. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Current and emerging basic science concepts in bone biology: implications in craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Adam J; Mesa, John; Buchman, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing research in bone biology has brought cutting-edge technologies into everyday use in craniofacial surgery. Nonetheless, when osseous defects of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton are encountered, autogenous bone grafting remains the criterion standard for reconstruction. Accordingly, the core principles of bone graft physiology continue to be of paramount importance. Bone grafts, however, are not a panacea; donor site morbidity and operative risk are among the limitations of autologous bone graft harvest. Bone graft survival is impaired when irradiation, contamination, and impaired vascularity are encountered. Although the dura can induce calvarial ossification in children younger than 2 years, the repair of critical-size defects in the pediatric population may be hindered by inadequate bone graft donor volume. The novel and emerging field of bone tissue engineering holds great promise as a limitless source of autogenous bone. Three core constituents of bone tissue engineering have been established: scaffolds, signals, and cells. Blood supply is the sine qua non of these components, which are used both individually and concertedly in regenerative craniofacial surgery. The discerning craniofacial surgeon must determine the proper use for these bone graft alternatives, while understanding their concomitant risks. This article presents a review of contemporary and emerging concepts in bone biology and their implications in craniofacial surgery. Current practices, areas of controversy, and near-term future applications are emphasized.

  18. Sarcopenia increases risk of long-term mortality in elderly patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Erika L; Rios-Diaz, Arturo J; Uyeda, Jennifer W; Castillo-Angeles, Manuel; Cooper, Zara; Olufajo, Olubode A; Salim, Ali; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2017-12-01

    Frailty is associated with poor surgical outcomes in elderly patients but is difficult to measure in the emergency setting. Sarcopenia, or the loss of lean muscle mass, is a surrogate for frailty and can be measured using cross-sectional imaging. We sought to determine the impact of sarcopenia on 1-year mortality after emergency abdominal surgery in elderly patients. Sarcopenia was assessed in patients 70 years or older who underwent emergency abdominal surgery at a single hospital from 2006 to 2011. Average bilateral psoas muscle cross-sectional area at L3, normalized for height (Total Psoas Index [TPI]), was calculated using computed tomography. Sarcopenia was defined as TPI in the lowest sex-specific quartile. Primary outcome was mortality at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and mortality at 30, 90, and 180 days. The association of sarcopenia with mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression and model performance judged using Harrell's C-statistic. Two hundred ninety-seven of 390 emergency abdominal surgery patients had preoperative imaging and height. The median age was 79 years, and 1-year mortality was 32%. Sarcopenic and nonsarcopenic patients were comparable in age, sex, race, comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, procedure urgency and type, operative severity, and need for discharge to a nursing facility. Sarcopenic patients had lower body mass index, greater need for intensive care, and longer hospital length of stay (p Sarcopenia was independently associated with increased in-hospital mortality (risk ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-3.7) and mortality at 30 days (hazard ratio [HR], 3.7; 95% CI, 1.9-7.4), 90 days (HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8-6.0), 180 days (HR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.4-4.4), and 1 year (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-3.9). Sarcopenia is associated with increased risk of mortality over 1 year in elderly patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery. Sarcopenia defined by TPI is

  19. Recurrent sigmoid volvulus - early resection may obviate later emergency surgery and reduce morbidity and mortality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Larkin, J O

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Acute sigmoid volvulus is a well recognised cause of acute large bowel obstruction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed our unit\\'s experience with non-operative and operative management of this condition. A total of 27 patients were treated for acute sigmoid volvulus between 1996 and 2006. In total, there were 62 separate hospital admissions. RESULTS: Eleven patients were managed with colonoscopic decompression alone. The overall mortality rate for non-operative management was 36.4% (4 of 11 patients). Fifteen patients had operative management (five semi-elective following decompression, 10 emergency). There was no mortality in the semi-elective cohort and one in the emergency surgery group. The overall mortality for surgery was 6% (1 of 15). Five of the seven patients managed with colonoscopic decompression alone who survived were subsequently re-admitted with sigmoid volvulus (a 71.4% recurrence rate). The six deaths in our overall series each occurred in patients with established gangrene of the bowel. With early surgical intervention before the onset of gangrene, however, good outcomes may be achieved, even in patients apparently unsuitable for elective surgery. Eight of the 15 operatively managed patients were considered to be ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade 4. There was no postoperative mortality in this group. CONCLUSIONS: Given the high rate of recurrence of sigmoid volvulus after initial successful non-operative management and the attendant risks of mortality from gangrenous bowel developing with a subsequent volvulus, it is our contention that all patients should be considered for definitive surgery after initial colonoscopic decompression, irrespective of the ASA score.

  20. Anesthesia through an intraosseous line using an 18-gauge intravenous needle for emergency pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Riyadh Khudeir; Hartmans, Sharon; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2013-09-01

    To describe the success and complication rate of intraosseous (IO) access for delivery of anesthesia with the use of an 18-gauge (G) intravenous (IV) needle. Prospective study. Children's Welfare Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq. 300 critically ill infants and toddlers, age 3 weeks to 16 months, requiring emergency surgery for intra-abdominal or pelvic conditions, in whom peripheral or central access was not obtainable. Patients presented for surgery between 2007 and 2010. In 26 patients, the IO catheter was established when peripheral access was not obtained at the outset of surgery; in 4 patients standard peripheral vascular access failed during the surgical procedure and IO access was obtained. An 18-G IV needle was placed into the proximal tibia and attached to an extension set with a 3-way stopcock to deliver anesthesia. For 26 critically ill children and 4 other children, IV access failed during delivery of anesthesia; vascular access was successfully obtained within minutes in all 30 infants (100%) using the intraosseous route. Ninety percent (27/30) of patients awoke immediately postoperatively in good condition; 10% (3/30) went to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for further care due to their critical preoperative condition. Complications associated with use of the IO route were considered minor (3/30 pts [10%]) and included extravasation of fluid in two cases and cellulitis in one. The IO route provided for rapid delivery of anesthesia, induction, and maintenance in this series of critically ill infants undergoing emergency surgery when other vascular access routes failed. Few complications were noted. Intraosseous access was achieved through a simple technique using an 18-gauge IV needle. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Perioperative factors predicting poor outcome in elderly patients following emergency general surgery: a multivariate regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Mackenzie C.; Merani, Shaheed; Tauh, Keerit; Khadaroo, Rachel G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Older adults (≥ 65 yr) are the fastest growing population and are presenting in increasing numbers for acute surgical care. Emergency surgery is frequently life threatening for older patients. Our objective was to identify predictors of mortality and poor outcome among elderly patients undergoing emergency general surgery. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients aged 65–80 years undergoing emergency general surgery between 2009 and 2010 at a tertiary care centre. Demographics, comorbidities, in-hospital complications, mortality and disposition characteristics of patients were collected. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify covariate-adjusted predictors of in-hospital mortality and discharge of patients home. Results Our analysis included 257 patients with a mean age of 72 years; 52% were men. In-hospital mortality was 12%. Mortality was associated with patients who had higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class (odds ratio [OR] 3.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43–10.33, p = 0.008) and in-hospital complications (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.32–2.83, p = 0.001). Nearly two-thirds of patients discharged home were younger (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.85–0.99, p = 0.036), had lower ASA class (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.27–0.74, p = 0.002) and fewer in-hospital complications (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.53–0.90, p = 0.007). Conclusion American Society of Anesthesiologists class and in-hospital complications are perioperative predictors of mortality and disposition in the older surgical population. Understanding the predictors of poor outcome and the importance of preventing in-hospital complications in older patients will have important clinical utility in terms of preoperative counselling, improving health care and discharging patients home. PMID:26204143

  2. Emergency general surgery in a low-middle income health care setting: Determinants of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adil A; Latif, Asad; Zogg, Cheryl K; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Riviello, Robert; Halim, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Zia; Haider, Adil H; Zafar, Hasnain

    2016-02-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) has emerged as an important component of frontline operative care. Efforts in high-income settings have described its burden but have yet to consider low- and middle-income health care settings in which emergent conditions represent a high proportion of operative need. The objective of this study was to describe the disease spectrum of EGS conditions and associated factors among patients presenting in a low-middle income context. March 2009-April 2014 discharge data from a university teaching hospital in South Asia were obtained for patients (≥16 years) with primary International Classification of Diseases, 9(th) revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes consistent with an EGS condition as defined by the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. Outcomes included in-hospital mortality and occurrence of ≥1 major complication(s). Multivariable analyses were performed, adjusting for differences in demographic and case-mix factors. A total of 13,893 discharge records corresponded to EGS conditions. Average age was 47.2 years (±16.8, standard deviation), with a male preponderance (59.9%). The majority presented with admitting diagnoses of biliary disease (20.2%), followed by soft-tissue disorders (15.7%), hernias (14.9%), and colorectal disease (14.3%). Rates of death and complications were 2.7% and 6.6%, respectively; increasing age was an independent predictor of both. Patients in need of resuscitation (n = 225) had the greatest rates of mortality (72.9%) and complications (94.2%). This study takes an important step toward quantifying outcomes and complications of EGS, providing one of the first assessments of EGS conditions using American Association for the Surgery of Trauma definitions in a low-middle income health care setting. Further efforts in varied settings are needed to promote representative benchmarking worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Geriatric emergency general surgery: Survival and outcomes in a low-middle income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adil A; Haider, Adil H; Riviello, Robert; Zogg, Cheryl K; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Latif, Asad; Rios Diaz, Arturo J; Rehman, Zia; Zafar, Hasnain

    2015-08-01

    Geriatric patients remain largely unstudied in low-middle income health care settings. The purpose of this study was to compare the epidemiology and outcomes of older versus younger adults with emergency general surgical conditions in South Asia. Discharge data from March 2009 to April 2014 were obtained for all adult patients (≥16 years) with an International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes consistent with an emergency general surgery condition as defined by the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. Multivariable regression analyses compared patients >65 years of age with patients ≤65 years for differences in all-cause mortality, major complications, and duration of hospital stay. Models were adjusted for potential confounding owing to patient demographic and clinical case-mix data with propensity scores. We included 13,893 patients; patients >65 years constituted 15% (n = 2,123) of the cohort. Relative to younger patients, older adults were more likely to present with a number of emergency general surgery conditions, including gastrointestinal bleeding (odds ratio OR [95% CI], 2.63[1.99-3.46]), resuscitation (2.17 [1.67-2.80]), and peptic ulcer disease (2.09 [1.40-3.10]). They had an 89% greater risk-adjusted odds (1.89 [1.55-2.29]) of complications and a 63% greater odds (1.63 [1.21-2.20]) of mortality. Restricted to patients undergoing operative interventions, older adults had 95% greater odds (1.95 [1.29-2.94]) of complications and 117% greater odds (2.17 [1.62-2.91]) of mortality. Understanding unique needs of geriatric patients is critical to enhancing the management and prioritization of appropriate care in developing settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Emergency readmissions to paediatric surgery and urology: The impact of inappropriate coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeraully, R; Henderson, K; Davies, B

    2016-04-01

    Introduction In England, emergency readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge after an elective admission are not reimbursed if they do not meet Payment by Results (PbR) exclusion criteria. However, coding errors could inappropriately penalise hospitals. We aimed to assess the accuracy of coding for emergency readmissions. Methods Emergency readmissions attributed to paediatric surgery and urology between September 2012 and August 2014 to our tertiary referral centre were retrospectively reviewed. Payment by Results (PbR) coding data were obtained from the hospital's Family Health Directorate. Clinical details were obtained from contemporaneous records. All readmissions were categorised as appropriately coded (postoperative or nonoperative) or inappropriately coded (planned surgical readmission, unrelated surgical admission, unrelated medical admission or coding error). Results Over the 24-month period, 241 patients were coded as 30-day readmissions, with 143 (59%) meeting the PbR exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 98 (41%) patients, 24 (25%) were inappropriately coded as emergency readmissions. These readmissions resulted in 352 extra bed days, of which 117 (33%) were attributable to inappropriately coded cases. Conclusions One-quarter of non-excluded emergency readmissions were inappropriately coded, accounting for one-third of additional bed days. As a stay on a paediatric ward costs up to £500 a day, the potential cost to our institution due to inappropriate readmission coding was over £50,000. Diagnoses and the reason for admission for each care episode should be accurately documented and coded, and readmission data should be reviewed at a senior clinician level.

  5. Social media in plastic surgery practices: emerging trends in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Chad K; Said, Hakim; Prucz, Roni; Rodrich, Rod J; Mathes, David W

    2011-05-01

    Social media is a common term for web-based applications that offer a way to disseminate information to a targeted audience in real time. In the current market, many businesses are utilizing it to communicate with clients. Although the field of plastic surgery is constantly changing in response to innovative technologies introduced into the specialty, the utilization of social media in plastic surgery practices is currently unclear. The authors evaluate the current attitudes and practices of aesthetic surgeons to emerging social media technology and compare these to attitudes about more traditional modes of communication. A 19-question web-based survey was disseminated by e-mail to all board-certified or board-eligible American plastic surgeons (n = 4817). Respondents were asked to answer questions on three topics: (1) their use of social media in their personal and professional lives, (2) their various forms of practice marketing, and (3) their demographic information. There were 1000 responses (20.8%). Results showed that 28.2% of respondents used social media in their practice, while 46.7% used it in their personal life. Most plastic surgeons managed their social media themselves or through a staff member. The majority of respondents who used social media in their practice claimed that their efforts were directed toward patient referrals. The typical plastic surgery practice that used social media was a solo practice in a large city with a focus on cosmetic surgery. Local competition of plastic surgeons did not correlate with social media use. Most plastic surgeons (88%) advertised, but the form of marketing varied. The most common forms included websites, print, and search engine optimization, but other modalities, such as television, radio, and billboards, were still utilized. Social media represents a new avenue that many plastic surgeons are utilizing, although with trepidation. As social media becomes commonplace in society, its role in plastic surgery

  6. Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiskalioglu, Elif Oral; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Firinci, Binali; Dostbil, Aysenur; Aksoy, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergency surgery for lung cancer with abscess formation after transbronchial biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Yusuke; Miyashita, Koichi; Tajima, Shogo; Hayakawa, Takamitsu; Neyatani, Hiroshi; Funai, Kazuhito

    2017-03-01

    Abscess formation in lung cancer after transbronchial biopsy (TBB) is a rare complication with no standard consensus on a coping strategy or prophylaxis. We describe an instructive case of lung cancer which developed into an abscess after TBB. An 80-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus underwent TBB for diagnosing a mass lesion in the left upper lobe. The TBB specimen confirmed a diagnosis of lung cancer, and he was scheduled for radical surgery. However, the tumour was revealed to have progressed into an enlarged abscess 24 days after TBB. Prompt use of meropenem failed to relieve the infection, hence we performed emergency left upper lobectomy. Poorly controlled diabetes mellitus was considered to be a risk for the formation of a tumour abscess after TBB. It was difficult to control the infection with conservative treatment using antibiotics; emergency surgical resection was considered to be the safest strategy for recovery.

  8. Introduction of a fresh cadaver laboratory during the surgery clerkship improves emergency technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, Saman; Kaplan, Stephen J; Knapp, Christopher M; Ho, Hang; Alvarado, Jared; Viscusi, Rebecca; Adamas-Rappaport, William

    2015-08-01

    Student acquisition of technical skills during the clinical years of medical school has been steadily declining. To address this issue, the authors instituted a fresh cadaver-based Emergency Surgical Skills Laboratory (ESSL). Sixty-three medical students rotating through the third-year surgery clerkship participated in a 2-hour, fresh cadaver-based ESSL conducted during the first 2 days of the clerkship. The authors evaluated students utilizing both surgical skills and written examination before the ESSL and at 4 weeks post ESSL. Students demonstrated a mean improvement of 64% (±11) (P cadaver laboratory is an effective method to provide proficiency in emergency technical skills not acquired during the clinical years of medical school. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Oral Ahiskalioglu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives.

  10. Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Oral Ahiskalioglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives.

  11. Defining our destiny: trainee working group consensus statement on the future of emergency surgery training in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, A E; Gokani, V J; Harries, R L; Pearce, L; Smith, S R; Ali, O; Chu, H; Dubois, A; Ferguson, H; Humm, G; Marsden, M; Nepogodiev, D; Venn, M; Singh, S; Swain, C; Kirkby-Bott, J

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom National Health Service treats both elective and emergency patients and seeks to provide high quality care, free at the point of delivery. Equal numbers of emergency and elective general surgical procedures are performed, yet surgical training prioritisation and organisation of NHS institutions is predicated upon elective care. The increasing ratio of emergency general surgery consultant posts compared to traditional sub-specialities has yet to be addressed. How should the capability gap be bridged to equip motivated, skilled surgeons of the future to deliver a high standard of emergency surgical care? The aim was to address both training requirements for the acquisition of necessary emergency general surgery skills, and the formation of job plans for trainee and consultant posts to meet the current and future requirements of the NHS. Twenty nine trainees and a consultant emergency general surgeon convened as a Working Group at The Association of Surgeons in Training Conference, 2015, to generate a united consensus statement to the training requirement and delivery of emergency general surgery provision by future general surgeons. Unscheduled general surgical care provision, emergency general surgery, trauma competence, training to meet NHS requirements, consultant job planning and future training challenges arose as key themes. Recommendations have been made from these themes in light of published evidence. Careful workforce planning, education, training and fellowship opportunities will provide well-trained enthusiastic individuals to meet public and societal need.

  12. Randomized multicentre feasibility trial of intermediate care versus standard ward care after emergency abdominal surgery (InCare trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, M; Waldau, T; Wetterslev, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a considerable risk of death and postoperative complications. Early detection and timely management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim was to evaluate the effect and feasibility of intermediate care compared with standard ward care...... ward within 24 h of emergency abdominal surgery. Participants were randomized to either intermediate care or standard surgical ward care after surgery. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. RESULTS: In total, 286 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. The trial...... was terminated after the interim analysis owing to slow recruitment and a lower than expected mortality rate. Eleven (7·6 per cent) of 144 patients assigned to intermediate care and 12 (8·5 per cent) of 142 patients assigned to ward care died within 30 days of surgery (odds ratio 0·91, 95 per cent c.i. 0·38 to 2...

  13. Risks of cardiovascular adverse events and death in patients with previous stroke undergoing emergency noncardiac, nonintracranial surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mia N.; Andersson, Charlotte; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The outcomes of emergent noncardiac, nonintracranial surgery in patients with previous stroke remain unknown. Methods: All emergency surgeries performed in Denmark (2005 to 2011) were analyzed according to time elapsed between previous ischemic stroke and surgery. The risks of 30-day...... mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events were estimated as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs using adjusted logistic regression models in a priori defined groups (reference was no previous stroke). In patients undergoing surgery immediately (within 1 to 3 days) or early after stroke (within 4 to 14...... and general anesthesia less frequent in patients with previous stroke (all P Risks of major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality were high for patients with stroke less than 3 months (20.7 and 16.4% events; OR = 4.71 [95% CI, 4.18 to 5.32] and 1.65 [95% CI, 1.45 to 1.88]), and remained...

  14. Ankle Fracture Surgery on a Pregnant Patient Complicated by Intraoperative Emergency Caesarian Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Schwarzkopf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who sustained an ankle fracture dislocation that could not be adequately closed reduced. After discussions with the patient, her obstetrician, and the anesthesiologists, she was indicated for surgical fixation. A heart tone monitor was used to assess fetal health during the procedure. During surgical incision, the fetus went into distress, and an emergency caesarian section was performed. After delivery of the infant and abdominal closer, surgery was completed. Due to a cohesive team effort, both the patient and her infant had excellent outcomes. There are many important considerations in the surgical management of the pregnant patient with traumatic orthopaedic injuries. Of especial importance to the orthopaedic surgeon is the impact of patient positioning on uteroplacental blood flow. This report discusses factors that should be taken into account by any orthopaedist who plans to operate on a pregnant patient.

  15. Secondary Bleedings in Oral Surgery Emergency Service: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Igelbrink

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bleeding after dental surgery is still a common cause for emergency presentation in patients using anticoagulants. Our aim was to analyze pertinent characteristic features on the one hand and to bare existing problems in handling on the other. Materials and Methods. The study included 76 patients. We documented basic data, anticoagulant medication, type of surgery, and tooth socket sutures in respective patients. Results. The vast majority of patients took a coumarin derivative (41 and acetylsalicylic acid (27. Nine (12% of the patients had to be hospitalized due to ongoing bleeding despite local haemostyptic steps and/or circulatory dysregulation. Most patients could be successfully treated in outpatient settings. No statistically significant correlation between bleeding, level of INR value, number of extracted teeth, and sewed alveoli could be shown. Sixty-five percent of cases with tooth extractions did not have suture of tooth sockets. Eighty-seven percent of the patients denied being informed about possible self-treatment options by their surgeon/dentist, and none of the patients got presurgical-fabricated bandage plate(s. Conclusions. Patients taking coumarin derivative currently, furthermore, represent the biggest anticoagulant after-bleeding group in dentoalveolar surgery. The major part of after-bleedings (90% can be handled in an outpatient setting with simplest surgical interventions. Unfortunately, the biggest part of the patient collective got no suture, no prefabricated dental bandage plate(s, and no explanation by their dentist how to handle in case of after-bleeding. Therefore, dental practitioners should furthermore get enlightenment on how to prevent after-bleeding situations.

  16. Is case triaging a useful tool for emergency surgeries? A review of 106 trauma surgery cases at a level 1 trauma center in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sharfuddin; Nicol, Andrew John; Moydien, Mahammed Riyaad; Navsaria, Pradeep Harkison; Montoya-Pelaez, Luis Felipe

    2018-01-01

    The optimal timing for emergency surgical interventions and implementation of protocols for trauma surgery is insufficient in the literature. The Groote Schuur emergency surgery triage (GSEST) system, based on Cape Triaging Score (CTS), is followed at Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH) for triaging emergency surgical cases including trauma cases. The study aimed to look at the effect of delay in surgery after scheduling based on the GSEST system has an impact on outcome in terms of postoperative complications and death. Prospective audit of patients presenting to GSH trauma center following penetrating or blunt chest, abdominal, neck and peripheral vascular trauma who underwent surgery over a 4-month period was performed. Post-operative complications were graded according to Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications. One-hundred six patients underwent surgery during the study period. One-hundred two (96.2%) cases were related to penetrating trauma. Stab wounds comprised 71 (67%) and gunshot wounds (GSW) 31 (29.2%) cases. Of the 106 cases, 6, 47, 40, and 13 patients were booked as red, orange, yellow, and green, respectively. The median delay for green, yellow, and orange cases was within the expected time. The red patients took unexpectedly longer (median delay 48 min, IQR 35-60 min). Thirty-one (29.3%) patients developed postoperative complications. Among the booked red, orange, yellow, and green cases, postoperative complications developed in 3, 18, 9, and 1 cases, respectively. Only two (1.9%) postoperative deaths were documented during the study period. There was no statistically significant association between operative triage and post-operative complications ( p  = 0.074). Surgical case categorization has been shown to be useful in prioritizing emergency trauma surgical cases in a resource constraint high-volume trauma center.

  17. Assessing written communication during interhospital transfers of emergency general surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harl, Felicity N R; Saucke, Megan C; Greenberg, Caprice C; Ingraham, Angela M

    2017-06-15

    Poor communication causes fragmented care. Studies of transitions of care within a hospital and on discharge suggest significant communication deficits. Communication during transfers between hospitals has not been well studied. We assessed the written communication provided during interhospital transfers of emergency general surgery patients. We hypothesized that patients are transferred with incomplete documentation from referring facilities. We performed a retrospective review of written communication provided during interhospital transfers to our emergency department (ED) from referring EDs for emergency general surgical evaluation between January 1, 2014 and January 1, 2016. Elements of written communication were abstracted from referring facility documents scanned into the medical record using a standardized abstraction protocol. Descriptive statistics summarized the information communicated. A total of 129 patients met inclusion criteria. 87.6% (n = 113) of charts contained referring hospital documents. 42.5% (n = 48) were missing history and physicals. Diagnoses were missing in 9.7% (n = 11). Ninety-one computed tomography scans were performed; among 70 with reads, final reads were absent for 70.0% (n = 49). 45 ultrasounds and x-rays were performed; among 27 with reads, final reads were missing for 80.0% (n = 36). Reasons for transfer were missing in 18.6% (n = 21). Referring hospital physicians outside the ED were consulted in 32.7% (n = 37); consultants' notes were absent in 89.2% (n = 33). In 12.4% (n = 14), referring documents arrived after the patient's ED arrival and were not part of the original documentation provided. This study documents that information important to patient care is often missing in the written communication provided during interhospital transfers. This gap affords a foundation for standardizing provider communication during interhospital transfers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pre-operative risk scores for the prediction of outcome in elderly people who require emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bates Tom

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The decision on whether to operate on a sick elderly person with an intra-abdominal emergency is one of the most difficult in general surgery. A predictive risk-score would be of great value in this situation. Methods A Medline search was performed to identify those predictive risk-scores relevant to sick elderly patients in whom emergency surgery might be life-saving. Results Many of the risk scores for surgical patients include the operative findings or require tests which are not available in the acute situation. Most of the relevant studies include younger patients and elective surgery. The Glasgow Aneurysm Score and Hardman Index are specific to ruptured aortic aneurysm while the Boey Score and the Hacetteppe Score are specific to perforated peptic ulcer. The Reiss Index and Fitness Score can be used pre-operatively if the elements of the score can be completed in time. The ASA score, which includes a significant element of subjective clinical judgement, can be augmented with factors such as age and urgency of surgery but no test has a negative predictive value sufficient to recommend against surgical intervention without clinical input. Conclusion Risk scores may be helpful in sick elderly patients needing emergency abdominal surgery but an experienced clinical opinion is still essential.

  19. Monitoring equine visceral pain with a composite pain scale score and correlation with survival after emergency gastrointestinal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Johannes P A M; Jonckheer-Sheehy, Valerie S M; Back, Willem; van Weeren, René; Hellebrekers, Ludo J; Back, Wim

    Recognition and management of equine pain have been studied extensively in recent decades and this has led to significant advances. However, there is still room for improvement in the ability to identify and treat pain in horses that have undergone emergency gastrointestinal surgery. This study

  20. Factors affecting mortality in emergency surgery in cases of complicated colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızıltan, Remzi; Yılmaz, Özkan; Aras, Abbas; Çelik, Sebahattin; Kotan, Çetin

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate retrospectively demographic, clinical and histopathological variables effective on mortality in patients who had undergone emergency surgery due to complicated colorectal cancer. A total of 39 patients underwent urgent surgical interventions due to complicated colorectal cancer at the Department of General Surgery, Dursun Odabaş Medical Center, between January 2010 and January 2015. Thirty three of these were included in the study. Six patients were excluded because complete medical records had been missing. Medical records of the 33 cases were retrospectively reviewed. There were 14 (42.5%) male and 19 (57.5%) female patients. Mean age was 60 years (range: 32- 83 years); 14 (42.5%) patients were less than 60 years old , while 19 (57.5%) were 60 years old or older. Operations were performed due to perforation (39.3%) and obstruction (60.6%) in 13 and 20 patients, respectively. Tumor localization was in the right and transverse colon in nine (21.2%) and in the left colon in 24 cases (72.7%). Eleven (33.3%) patients underwent resection and anastomosis, 13 (39.3%) resection and ostomy, and nine (27.2%) patients underwent ostomy alone without any resection. Postoperative mortality occurred in nine cases (27.2%). High mortality should be expected in females older than 60 years with a left sided colon tumor or with another synchronous tumor and in perforated tumors. Unnecessary major resections should be avoided and primary pathology should be in the focus of treatment in order to decrease the mortality and morbidity rates. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  1. Factors affecting mortality in emergency surgery in cases of complicated colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remzi Kızıltan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To evaluate retrospectively demographic, clinical and histopathological variables effective on mortality in patients who had undergone emergency surgery due to complicated colorectal cancer. Methods A total of 39 patients underwent urgent surgical interventions due to complicated colorectal cancer at the Department of General Surgery, Dursun Odabaş Medical Center, between January 2010 and January 2015. Thirty three of these were included in the study. Six patients were excluded because complete medical records had been missing. Medical records of the 33 cases were retrospectively reviewed. Results There were 14 (42.5% male and 19 (57.5% female patients. Mean age was 60 years (range: 32- 83 years; 14 (42.5% patients were less than 60 years old , while 19 (57.5% were 60 years old or older. Operations were performed due to perforation (39.3% and obstruction (60.6% in 13 and 20 patients, respectively. Tumor localization was in the right and transverse colon in nine (21.2% and in the left colon in 24 cases (72.7%. Eleven (33.3% patients underwent resection and anastomosis, 13 (39.3% resection and ostomy, and nine (27.2% patients underwent ostomy alone without any resection. Postoperative mortality occurred in nine cases (27.2%. Conclusions High mortality should be expected in females older than 60 years with a left sided colon tumor or with another synchronous tumor and in perforated tumors. Unnecessary major resections should be avoided and primary pathology should be in the focus of treatment in order to decrease the mortality and morbidity rates.

  2. Recent summer precipitation trends in the Greater Horn of Africa and the emerging role of Indian Ocean sea surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States); University of California, Geography Department, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Funk, Chris [University of California, Geography Department, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS), Sioux Falls, SD (United States); Michaelsen, Joel [University of California, Geography Department, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Rauscher, Sara A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Robertson, Iain; Loader, Neil J. [Swansea University, Department of Geography, College of Science, Swansea (United Kingdom); Wils, Tommy H.G. [Rotterdam University, Department of Geography, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Koprowski, Marcin [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Laboratory of Dendrochronology, Institute of Ecology and Environment Protection, Torun (Poland); Eshetu, Zewdu [Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Forestry Research Centre, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia)

    2012-11-15

    We utilize a variety of climate datasets to examine impacts of two mechanisms on precipitation in the Greater Horn of Africa (GHA) during northern-hemisphere summer. First, surface-pressure gradients draw moist air toward the GHA from the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Congo Basin. Variability of the strength of these gradients strongly influences GHA precipitation totals and accounts for important phenomena such as the 1960s-1980s rainfall decline and devastating 1984 drought. Following the 1980s, precipitation variability became increasingly influenced by the southern tropical Indian Ocean (STIO) region. Within this region, increases in sea-surface temperature, evaporation, and precipitation are linked with increased exports of dry mid-tropospheric air from the STIO region toward the GHA. Convergence of dry air above the GHA reduces local convection and precipitation. It also produces a clockwise circulation response near the ground that reduces moisture transports from the Congo Basin. Because precipitation originating in the Congo Basin has a unique isotopic signature, records of moisture transports from the Congo Basin may be preserved in the isotopic composition of annual tree rings in the Ethiopian Highlands. A negative trend in tree-ring oxygen-18 during the past half century suggests a decline in the proportion of precipitation originating from the Congo Basin. This trend may not be part of a natural cycle that will soon rebound because climate models characterize Indian Ocean warming as a principal signature of greenhouse-gas induced climate change. We therefore expect surface warming in the STIO region to continue to negatively impact GHA precipitation during northern-hemisphere summer. (orig.)

  3. The financial burden of emergency general surgery: National estimates 2010 to 2060.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogola, Gerald O; Gale, Stephen C; Haider, Adil; Shafi, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    Adoption of the acute care surgery model has led to increasing volumes of emergency general surgery (EGS) patients at trauma centers. However, the financial burden of EGS services on trauma centers is unknown. This study estimates the current and future costs associated with EGS hospitalization nationwide. We applied the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma's DRG International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev. criteria for defining EGS to the 2010 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) data and identified adult EGS patients. Cost of hospitalization was obtained by converting reported charges to cost using the 2010 all-payer inpatient cost-to-charge ratio for all hospitals in the NIS database. Cost was modeled via a log-gamma model in a generalized linear mixed model to account for potential correlation in cost within states and hospitals in the NIS database. Patients' characteristics and hospital factors were included in the model as fixed effects, while state and hospital were included as random effects. The national incidence of EGS was calculated from NIS data, and the US Census Bureau population projections were used to estimate incidence for 2010 to 2060. Nationwide costs were obtained by multiplying projected incidences by estimated costs and reported in year 2010 US dollar value. Nationwide, there were 2,640,725 adult EGS hospitalizations in 2010. The national average adjusted cost per EGS hospitalization was $10,744 (95% confidence interval [CI], $10,615-$10,874); applying these cost data to the national EGS hospitalizations gave a total estimated cost of $28.37 billion (95% CI, $28.03-$28.72 billion). Older age groups accounted for greater proportions of the cost ($8.03 billion for age ≥ 75 years, compared with $1.08 billion for age 18-24 years). As the US population continues to both grow and age, EGS costs are projected to increase by 45% to $41.20 billion (95% CI, $40.70-$41.7 billion) by 2060. EGS constitutes a significant portion of US health

  4. Strategies to improve the outcome of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, K; Thorsen, K; Søreide, J A

    2014-01-01

    Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a common surgical emergency that carries high mortality and morbidity rates. Globally, one-quarter of a million people die from peptic ulcer disease each year. Strategies to improve outcomes are needed. PubMed was searched for evidence related to the surgical treatment of patients with PPU. The clinical registries of trials were examined for other available or ongoing studies. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs), systematic reviews and meta-analyses were preferred. Deaths from peptic ulcer disease eclipse those of several other common emergencies. The reported incidence of PPU is 3.8-14 per 100,000 and the mortality rate is 10-25 per cent. The possibility of non-operative management has been assessed in one small RCT of 83 patients, with success in 29 (73 per cent) of 40, and only in patients aged less than 70 years. Adherence to a perioperative sepsis protocol decreased mortality in a cohort study, with a relative risk (RR) reduction of 0.63 (95 per cent confidence interval (c.i.) 0.41 to 0.97). Based on meta-analysis of three RCTs (315 patients), laparoscopic and open surgery for PPU are equivalent, but patient selection remains a challenge. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori after surgical repair of PPI reduces both the short-term (RR 2.97, 95 per cent c.i. 1.06 to 8.29) and 1-year (RR 1.49, 1.10 to 2.03) risk of ulcer recurrence. Mortality and morbidity from PPU can be reduced by adherence to perioperative strategies. © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Acute mesenteric ischemia: guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Miklosh; Kashuk, Jeffry; Moore, Ernest E; Kluger, Yoram; Biffl, Walter; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Ben-Ishay, Offir; Rubinstein, Chen; Balogh, Zsolt J; Civil, Ian; Coccolini, Federico; Leppaniemi, Ari; Peitzman, Andrew; Ansaloni, Luca; Sugrue, Michael; Sartelli, Massimo; Di Saverio, Salomone; Fraga, Gustavo P; Catena, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is typically defined as a group of diseases characterized by an interruption of the blood supply to varying portions of the small intestine, leading to ischemia and secondary inflammatory changes. If untreated, this process will eventuate in life threatening intestinal necrosis. The incidence is low, estimated at 0.09-0.2% of all acute surgical admissions. Therefore, although the entity is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain, diligence is always required because if untreated, mortality has consistently been reported in the range of 50%. Early diagnosis and timely surgical intervention are the cornerstones of modern treatment and are essential to reduce the high mortality associated with this entity. The advent of endovascular approaches in parallel with modern imaging techniques may provide new options. Thus, we believe that a current position paper from World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) is warranted, in order to put forth the most recent and practical recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of AMI. This review will address the concepts of AMI with the aim of focusing on specific areas where early diagnosis and management hold the strongest potential for improving outcomes in this disease process. Some of the key points include the prompt use of CT angiography to establish the diagnosis, evaluation of the potential for revascularization to re-establish blood flow to ischemic bowel, resection of necrotic intestine, and use of damage control techniques when appropriate to allow for re-assessment of bowel viability prior to definitive anastomosis and abdominal closure.

  6. Fluorescence-guided surgery and intervention - An AAPM emerging technology blue paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W; Zhu, Timothy C; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Paulsen, Keith D; Wilson, Brian C; Pfefer, Joshua; Nordstrom, Robert J; Litorja, Maritoni; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Chen, Yu; Gioux, Sylvain; Tromberg, Bruce J; Yodh, Arjun G

    2018-04-10

    Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) and other interventions are rapidly evolving as a class of technologically driven interventional approaches in which many surgical specialties visualize fluorescent molecular tracers or biomarkers through associated cameras or oculars to guide clinical decisions on pathological lesion detection and excision/ablation. The technology has been commercialized for some specific applications, but also presents technical challenges unique to optical imaging that could confound the utility of some interventional procedures where real-time decisions must be made. Accordingly, the AAPM has initiated the publication of this Blue Paper of The Emerging Technology Working Group (TETAWG) and the creation of a Task Group from the Therapy Physics Committee within the Treatment Delivery Subcommittee. In describing the relevant issues, this document outlines the key parameters, stakeholders, impacts, and outcomes of clinical FGS technology and its applications. The presentation is not intended to be conclusive, but rather to inform the field of medical physics and stimulate the discussions needed in the field with respect to a seemingly low-risk imaging technology that has high potential for significant therapeutic impact. This AAPM Task Group is working toward consensus around guidelines and standards for advancing the field safely and effectively. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Colonic stenting as bridge to surgery versus emergency surgery for management of acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction: a multicenter randomized trial (Stent-in 2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholten Pieter

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute left-sided colonic obstruction is most often caused by malignancy and the surgical treatment is associated with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Moreover, these operated patients end up with a temporary or permanent stoma. Initial insertion of an enteral stent to decompress the obstructed colon, allowing for surgery to be performed electively, is gaining popularity. In uncontrolled studies stent placement before elective surgery has been suggested to decrease mortality, morbidity and number of colostomies. However stent perforation can lead to peritoneal tumor spill, changing a potentially curable disease in an incurable one. Therefore it is of paramount importance to compare the outcomes of colonic stenting followed by elective surgery with emergency surgery for the management of acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction in a randomized multicenter fashion. Methods/design Patients with acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction eligible for this study will be randomized to either emergency surgery (current standard treatment or colonic stenting as bridge to elective surgery. Outcome measurements are effectiveness and costs of both strategies. Effectiveness will be evaluated in terms of quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Quality of life will be measured with standardized questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-CR38, EQ-5D and EQ-VAS. Morbidity is defined as every event leading to hospital admission or prolonging hospital stay. Mortality will be analyzed as total mortality as well as procedure-related mortality. The total costs of treatment will be evaluated by counting volumes and calculating unit prices. Including 120 patients on a 1:1 basis will have 80% power to detect an effect size of 0.5 on the EORTC QLQ-C30 global health scale, using a two group t-test with a 0.05 two-sided significance level. Differences in quality of life and morbidity will be analyzed using mixed-models repeated measures

  8. Evaluation of the Effect of a Preoperative Single Dose of Gabapentin on Emergence Agitation in Patients Undergoing Breast Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Azemati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergence agitation is a transient confusional state that usuallyoccurs within 10 to 30 minutes of recovery from general anesthesia. It may lead to seriousconsequences and increasing hospital costs. This study evaluates the effect of gabapentinon emergence agitation in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery.Methods: This randomized, double blind controlled trial enrolled 100 femalepatients with American Society of Anesthesiologists' classifications I and II who werecandidates for breast cancer surgery. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups(n=50 that received either oral gabapentin 600 mg or placebo. Induction andmaintenance of anesthesia were similar in both groups. At the end of surgery, patient'sagitation score, pain score, and presence of nausea or vomiting were reported. In theward, the presence of headache or dizziness was checked during the first 8 h. Mann-Whitney test was used for comparison of agitation and pain scores between two groups.Chi-square test was used for comparing occurrence of nausea, vomiting and qualitative.The qualitative demographic variable and t-test compared quantitative demographicvariables.Results: There was a significantly lower incidence of emergence agitation in thegabapentin group before (P<0.001 and after (P=0.029 extubation. There weresignificantly lower mean agitation scores before (P<001 and after (P=0.006 extubationand in the pain score (P=0.005 in the gabapentin group. The need for remifentanilinfusion (P<0.05 during surgery was significantly lower in the gabapentin groupcompared with the placebo group. Occurrence of nausea and vomiting and gabapentinside effects that included headache or dizziness did not significantly differ between twogroups (P=0.126, P=1, P=0.629 respectively.Conclusion: Gabapentin not only decreased postoperative pain but also effectivelyreduced emergence agitation without any significant side effects in patients undergoingbreast cancer surgery.

  9. Impact of Targeted Preoperative Optimization on Clinical Outcome in Emergency Abdominal Surgeries: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Ashish; Debbarma, Miltan; Narang, Neeraj; Saxena, Anudeep; Mahobia, Mamta; Tomar, Gaurav Singh

    2018-01-01

    Perforation peritonitis continues to be one of the most common surgical emergencies that need a surgical intervention most of the times. Anesthesiologists are invariably involved in managing such cases efficiently in perioperative period. The assessment and evaluation of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score at presentation and 24 h after goal-directed optimization, administration of empirical broad-spectrum antibiotics, and definitive source control postoperatively. Outcome assessment in terms of duration of hospital stay and mortality in with or without optimization was also measured. It is a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study in hospital setting. One hundred and one patients aged ≥18 years, of the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I and II (E) with clinical diagnosis of perforation peritonitis posted for surgery were enrolled. Enrolled patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group A is optimized by goal-directed optimization protocol in the preoperative holding room by anesthesiology residents whereas in Group S, managed by surgery residents in the surgical wards without any fixed algorithm. The assessment of APACHE II score was done as a first step on admission and 24 h postoperatively. Duration of hospital stay and mortality in both the groups were also measured and compared. Categorical data are presented as frequency counts (percent) and compared using the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test. The statistical significance for categorical variables was determined by Chi-square analysis. For continuous variables, a two-sample t -test was applied. The mean APACHE II score on admission in case and control groups was comparable. Significant lowering of serial scores in case group was observed as compared to control group ( P = 0.02). There was a significant lowering of mean duration of hospital stay seen in case group (9.8 ± 1.7 days) as compared to control group ( P = 0

  10. Socioeconomic factors and mortality in emergency general surgery: trends over a 20-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenia, Sarah J; Pentakota, Sri Ram; Merchant, Aziz M

    2017-05-15

    Socioeconomic factors such as race, insurance, and income quartiles have been identified as independent risk factors in emergency general surgery (EGS), but this impact has not been studied over time. We sought to identify trends in disparities in EGS-related operative mortality over a 20-y period. The National Inpatient Sample was used to identify patient encounters coded for EGS in 1993, 2003, and 2013. Logistic regression models were used to examine the adjusted relationship between race, primary payer status, and median income quartiles and in-hospital mortality after adjusting for patients' age, gender, Elixhauser comorbidity score, and hospital region, size, and location-cum-teaching status. We identified 391,040 patient encounters. In 1993, Black race was associated with higher odds of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.35 [1.20-1.53]) than White race, although this difference dissipated in subsequent years. Medicare, Medicaid, and underinsured patients had a higher odds of mortality than those with private insurance for the entire 20-y period; only the disparity in the underinsured decreased over time (1993, 1.63 [1.35-1.98]; 2013, 1.41 [1.20-1.67]). In 2003 (1.23 [1.10-1.38]) and 2013 (1.23 [1.11-1.37]), patients from the lowest income quartile were more likely to die after EGS than patients from the highest income quartile. Socioeconomic disparities in EGS-related operative morality followed inconsistent trends. Over time, while gaps in in-hospital mortality among Blacks and Whites have narrowed, disparities among patients belonging to lowest income quartile have worsened. Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries continued to experience higher odds of in-hospital mortality relative to those with private insurance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Emerging technologies in coloproctology: results of the Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery Logbook of Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, L; Pescatori, M; La Torre, F; Destefano, I; Pulvirenti D'Urso, A; Infantino, A; Amato, A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of the Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery [or Società Italiana di Chirurgia Colorettale (SICCR)] Logbook of adverse events (AE) occurring in relation to emerging technologies in coloproctology (ETCs), over a 3-year period. A total of 245 AE were reported (patients age: mean = 49.6 years, range = 20-75 years; gender: 155 = F, 90 = M). The "observations" originated from the same institution of the AEs in 44 cases (18.0%), while 201 patients (82.0%) had been operated on somewhere else. The three most reported ETCs were: Procedure for prolapsed haemorrhoids (PPH) (n = 120-48.9%), stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR (n = 96-39.2%), and transanal haemorrhoidal dearterialization (THD) (n = 11-4.5%). PPH, STARR, and THD together accounted for n = 227 (92.6%) observations. For the three main reported ETCs, the various AEs are listed. Chronic pain after PPH was 46/120 (38.3%), and after STARR of 21/96 (21.9%). The overall re-operation rate was n = 135 (55.1%) versus n = 110 (44.9%) no reoperation. In particular, for the three main reported ETCs, n = 68/120 (56.7%) following an AE after PPH, n = 47/94 (50.0%) following an AE after STARR, and n = 6/11 (54.5) following an AE post-THD. The various types of treatment to solve AE after each of the three most observed ETCs are reported in the text. Our results do not allow us to draw statistical conclusions; however, this was not the aim of our survey. ETCs are important, yet they are not without major risks. Manufacturers should help colorectal surgeons to convey the right message to patients.

  12. Italian horticultural and culinary records of summer squash (Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbitaceae) and emergence of the zucchini in 19th-century Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Teresa A; Paris, Harry S

    2016-07-01

    Summer squash, the young fruits of Cucurbita pepo, are a common, high-value fruit vegetable. Of the summer squash, the zucchini, C. pepo subsp. pepo Zucchini Group, is by far the most cosmopolitan. The zucchini is easily distinguished from other summer squash by its uniformly cylindrical shape and intense colour. The zucchini is a relatively new cultivar-group of C. pepo, the earliest known evidence for its existence having been a description in a book on horticulture published in Milan in 1901. For this study, Italian-language books on agriculture and cookery dating from the 16th to 19th centuries have been collected and searched in an effort to follow the horticultural development and culinary use of young Cucurbita fruits in Italy. The results indicate that Cucurbita fruits, both young and mature, entered Italian kitchens by the mid-16th century. A half-century later, round and elongate young fruits of C. pepo were addressed as separate cookery items and the latter had largely replaced the centuries-old culinary use of young, elongate bottle gourds, Lagenaria siceraria Allusion to a particular, extant cultivar of the longest fruited C. pepo, the Cocozelle Group, dates to 1811 and derives from the environs of Naples. The Italian diminutive word zucchini arose by the beginning of the 19th century in Tuscany and referred to small, mature, desiccated bottle gourds used as containers to store tobacco. By the 1840s, the Tuscan word zucchini was appropriated to young, primarily elongate fruits of C. pepo The Zucchini Group traces its origins to the environs of Milan, perhaps as early as 1850. The word zucchini and the horticultural product zucchini arose contemporaneously but independently. The results confirm that the Zucchini Group is the youngest of the four cultivar-groups of C. pepo subsp. pepo but it emerged approximately a half-century earlier than previously known. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany

  13. Surgical management of acutely presenting gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach among elderly: experience of an emergency surgery department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Luigi; Arru, Giovanni Maria Antonio; Piras, Mario; Fiume, Stefania; Gemini, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), requiring often an emergency surgical management, is extremely rare among elderly. We aimed to present the experience of the Emergency Surgery Department, Brotzu Hospital, in the management of elderly patients with GIST related emergencies. This study was carried out on 12 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors who presented to in an emergency situation during the period from January 2010 to December 2013. All patients' data, clinical presentations, surgical procedures, complications, and survival data were collected and analyzed. Between 2010 and 2013, 12 patients (8 males and 4 females), with a mean age of 70 years (range: 65-79 years) were admitted with different emergency presentations of clinically and radiologically suspected GISTs. The incidence of proximal obstruction was 41.7% of all gastric GIST cases, resulting acute gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation in 41.7% and 16.6% respectively. The mean length of hospitalization was 9.1 ± 2.3 days and there were no posterative complications or mortalities. At a mean follow-up of 21 months, 11 patients (91.6%) were alive and disease free. Although GISTs are uncommon among elderly, their incidence is increasing especially in their emergency presentation and surgeon should be prepared to treat this condition following the principles of GIST surgery as stated by the GIST consensus conference. In conclusion our data demonstrate that age itself does not affect the outcome of surgical treatment of GISTs in emergency situation. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hematological Disorders following Gastric Bypass Surgery: Emerging Concepts of the Interplay between Nutritional Deficiency and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the associated metabolic syndrome are among the most common and detrimental metabolic diseases of the modern era, affecting over 50% of the adult population in the United States. Surgeries designed to promote weight loss, known as bariatric surgery, typically involve a gastric bypass procedure and have shown high success rates for treating morbid obesity. However, following gastric bypass surgery, many patients develop chronic anemia, most commonly due to iron deficiency. Deficiencies of vitamins B1, B12, folate, A, K, D, and E and copper have also been reported after surgery. Copper deficiency can cause hematological abnormalities with or without neurological complications. Despite oral supplementation and normal serum concentrations of iron, copper, folate, and vitamin B12, some patients present with persistent anemia after surgery. The evaluation of hematologic disorders after gastric bypass surgery must take into account issues unique to the postsurgery setting that influence the development of anemia and other cytopenias. In this paper, the clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis of the hematological disorders associated with gastric bypass surgery are reviewed, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are discussed.

  15. The incidence of emergence delirium and risk factors following sevoflurane use in pediatric patients for day case surgery, Kingston, Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gooden

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Emergence delirium is a distressing complication of the use of sevoflurane for general anesthesia. This study sought to determine the incidence of emergence delirium and risk factors in patients at a specialist pediatric hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, observational study including pediatric patients aged 3-10 years, ASA I and II, undergoing general anesthesia with sevoflurane for elective day-case procedures. Data collected included patients' level of anxiety pre-operatively using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale, surgery performed, anesthetic duration and analgesics administered. Postoperatively, patients were assessed for emergence delirium, defined as agitation with non-purposeful movement, restlessness or thrashing; inconsolability and unresponsiveness to nursing and/or parental presence. The need for pharmacological treatment and post-operative complications related to emergence delirium episodes were also noted. Results: One hundred and forty-five (145 children were included, with emergence delirium occurring in 28 (19.3%. Emergence delirium episodes had a mean duration of 6.9±7.8 min, required pharmacologic intervention in 19 (67.8% children and were associated with a prolonged recovery time (49.4±11.9 versus 29.7± 10.8 min for non-agitated children; p<0.001. Factors positively associated with emergence delirium included younger age (p = 0.01, OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-8.6 and moderate and severe anxiety prior to induction (p <0.001, OR 5.6, 95% CI 2.3-13.0. Complications of emergence delirium included intravenous line removal (n = 1, and surgical site bleeding (n = 3. Conclusion: Children of younger age with greater preoperative anxiety are at increased risk of developing emergence delirium following general anesthesia with sevoflurane. The overall incidence of emergence delirium was 19%.

  16. Comparison between sevoflurane and desflurane on emergence and recovery characteristics of children undergoing surgery for spinal dysraphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Rapid recovery is desirable after neurosurgery as it enables early post-operative neurological evaluation and prompt management of complications. Studies have been rare comparing the recovery characteristics in paediatric neurosurgical patients. Hence, this study was carried out to compare the effect of sevoflurane and desflurane anaesthesia on emergence and extubation in children undergoing spinal surgery. Methods: Sixty children, aged 1-12 years, undergoing elective surgery for lumbo-sacral spinal dysraphism were enrolled. Anaesthesia was induced with sevoflurane using a face mask. The children were then randomised to receive either sevoflurane or desflurane with oxygen and nitrous oxide, fentanyl (1 μg/kg/h and rocuronium. The anaesthetic depth was guided by bispectral index (BIS ® monitoring with a target BIS ® between 45 and 55. Perioperative data with regard to demographic profile, haemodynamics, emergence and extubation times, modified Aldrete score (MAS, pain (objective pain score, agitation (Cole′s agitation score, time to first analgesic and complications, thereof, were recorded. Statistical analysis was done using STATA 11.2 (StataCorp., College Station, TX, USA and data are presented as median (range or mean ± standard deviation. Results: The demographic profile, haemodynamics, MAS, pain and agitation scores and time to first analgesic were comparable in between the two groups (P > 0.05. The emergence time was shorter in desflurane group (2.75 [0.85-12] min as compared to sevoflurane (8 [2.5-14] min (P < 0.0001. The extubation time was also shorter in desflurane group (3 [0.8-10] min as compared to the sevoflurane group (5.5 [1.2-14] min (P = 0.0003. Conclusion: Desflurane provided earlier tracheal extubation and emergence as compared to sevoflurane in children undergoing surgery for lumbo-sacral spinal dysraphism.

  17. FREE ANTEROLATERAL FEMORAL FLAP IS THE FIRST CHOICE IN EMERGENCY RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY OF THE LOWER LIMB (ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Nevedrov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. Requirements for the graft used in microsurgery are simple retrieval, minimal anatomic variability, the possibility to operate on one surgical area, great length and diameter of flap vessels.PURPOSE OF STUDY. Evaluation of the results and advantages of revascularized free anterolateral muscle flap usage in emergency surgery.MATERIALS AND METHODS. Free muscle flap of the lateral vastus muscle on a vascular pedicle of the descending branch of the lateral femoral circumflex artery (anterolateral flap was used to replace the defect in 2 patients. In one case, a patient had open fractures of the lower leg, complicated with primary defects of soft tissue, and in the other case a patient had incomplete traumatic amputation of the left foot. All the victims underwent soft tissue defects restoration within the first hours after the injury, next to fixation of the fracture.RESULTS. All grafts have completely healed, total necrosis of muscle flaps hasn’t been observed. All patients had primary wound healing after the transfer. Cases of deep purulent infection after the surgery haven’t been noted.CONCLUSION. The transfer of a free anterolateral muscle flap is the best method for emergency plastic and reconstructive surgery of the lower limbs. The advantages are simple and prompt retreival, no need to turn the patient to the lateral position, large amount of the flap, great length and caliber of vessels. 

  18. Bilateral transversus abdominis plane block as a sole anesthetic technique in emergency surgery for perforative peritonitis in a high risk patient

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Lipi; Pani, Nibedita; Mishra, Debasis; Patel, Nupur

    2013-01-01

    Although transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is an effective way of providing analgesia in post-operative abdominal surgery patients; however, it can be considered as an anesthetic technique in high-risk cases for surgery. We report a case of a geriatric female with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the respiratory failure, hypotension, posted in an emergency with old perforation leading to peritonitis. The surgery was successfully conducted under bilateral TAP block, which was use...

  19. Future of uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery-emerging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Ng, Calvin S H

    2016-03-01

    Uniportal VATS poses unique difficulties to the surgeon, mainly as a consequence of operating through a small single incision. The instruments in uniportal VATS have limited movement through the small incision. In addition, the approach to the surgical operating site is unidirectional, which may restrict vision and retraction, and unavoidably suffers from instrument fencing. Recent thoracoscopic technology in the form of a wide variable angled lens has to some extent improved these shortcomings. The development of an extendable flexible thoracoscope and wireless steerable endoscope (WSE) systems can further improve the visualization for surgery and reduce or even remove fencing between endoscope and instruments. New single incision access platforms both derived from Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and robotic surgery approaches are on the horizon. These may allow uniportal VATS to be performed through an even smaller ultra-minimally invasive incision, with improved vision, more freedom of movement of the instruments and greater precision. However, a number of problems remain to be resolved, including provision of a stable platform and payload, applied force limitations and equipment sterilization. Advances in uniportal VATS major lung resection techniques have not only challenged the surgeon to acquire new skills and knowledge, but at the same time have rekindled the collaborative spirit between industry and clinician in developing novel equipment and technology to push the boundaries of minimally invasive surgery. These technological improvements and innovations may improve operating efficiency and safety during uniportal VATS surgery.

  20. Robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with this type of surgery give it some advantages over standard endoscopic techniques. The surgeon can make ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 87. Muller CL, Fried GM. Emerging technology in surgery: Informatics, electronics, robotics. In: ...

  1. Summer Appendicitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    The increasing number of “fast food” restaurants where mainly high‑carbohydrate ... factors, food culture and the effect of migration for touristic purposes during the summer. .... Lal A, Hales S, French N, Baker MG. Seasonality in human.

  2. Dexmedetomidine versus labetalol infusions for controlling emergence hypertension in cranial surgeries for supratentorial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Ahmed Mostafa Radwan

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Both dexmedetomidine and labetalol had favorable effects on hemodynamics at time of emergence from anesthesia in comparison with control group without prolongation of the time of extubation.

  3. Eye Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of retinal detachment, a ...

  4. Exposure in emergency general surgery in a time-based residency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This paper aimed to characterize the resident exposure to acute general surgical conditions during a three-months rotation in a general surgical unit. Setting: The Department of Surgery, University of Nairobi and Kenyatta National Referral and Teaching Hospital in Nairobi. MethodS: Four residents (in their first to ...

  5. Revision surgery due to magnet dislocation in cochlear implant patients: an emerging complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassepass, Frederike; Stabenau, Vanessa; Maier, Wolfgang; Arndt, Susan; Laszig, Roland; Beck, Rainer; Aschendorff, Antje

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the cause and effect of magnet dislocation in cochlear implant (CI) recipients requiring magnet revision surgery for treatment. Retrospective study. Tertiary referral center. Case reports from 1,706 CI recipients consecutively implanted from January 2000 to December 2011 were reviewed. The number of cases requiring magnet revision surgery was assessed. Revision surgery involving magnet removal or replacement was indicated in 1.23% (21/1,706), of all CI recipients. Magnet dislocation occurring during magnetic resonance tomography (MRI), at 1.5 Tesla (T), with the magnet in place and with the application of compression bandaging around the head, was the main cause for revision surgery in 47.62% (10/21) of the affected cases. All 10 cases were implanted with Cochlear Nucleus cochlear implants. These events occurred, despite adherence to current recommendations of the manufacturer. The present study underlines that MRI examination is the main cause of magnet dislocation. The use of compressive bandaging when using 1.5-T MRI does not eliminate the risk of magnet dislocation. Additional cautionary measures are for required for conditional MRI. We recommend X-ray examination after MRI to determine magnet dislocation and avoid major complications in all cases reporting pain during or after MRI. Additional research regarding silicon magnet pocket design for added retention is needed. Effective communication of guidelines for precautionary measures during MRI examination in CI patients is mandatory for all clinicians involved. MRI in CI recipients should be indicated with caution.

  6. Bilateral transversus abdominis plane block as a sole anesthetic technique in emergency surgery for perforative peritonitis in a high risk patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipi Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although transversus abdominis plane (TAP block is an effective way of providing analgesia in post-operative abdominal surgery patients; however, it can be considered as an anesthetic technique in high-risk cases for surgery. We report a case of a geriatric female with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the respiratory failure, hypotension, posted in an emergency with old perforation leading to peritonitis. The surgery was successfully conducted under bilateral TAP block, which was used as a sole anesthetic technique. TAP block can be considered as an anesthetic technique for abdominal surgery in moribund patients.

  7. Emerging role of functional brain MRI in low-grade glioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friismose, Ancuta; Traise, Peter; Markovic, Ljubo

    Learning objectives 1. To describe the use of functional MRI (fMRI) in cranial surgery planning for patients with low-grade gliomas (LGG). 2. To show the increasing importance of fMRI in the clinical setting. Background LGG include brain tumors classified by the World Health Organization as grade I...... be used to map eloquent cortex areas, thus minimizing postoperative deficits and improving surgical performance. Findings and procedure details Patients diagnosed with low-grade gliomas located in eloquent brain areas undergo fMRI prior to surgery. The exams are performed on a 3T MR system (Achieva TX....... Language comprehension and visual tasks can be added to visualize Wernicke’s area or the visual cortex. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used to map nerve tract course relative to the tumour. Conclusion FMRI has proven its clinical utility in locating eloquent brain areas with relation to tumor site...

  8. Chernobyl nuclear accident hydrologic analysis and emergency evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Dnieper River, Ukraine, during the 1993 summer flood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsekhovitch, O.V.; Zheleznyak, M.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes joint activities of Program 7.1.F, ''Radionuclide Transport in Water and Soil Systems,'' of the USA/Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety to study the hydrogeochemical behavior of radionuclides released to the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine. These joint activities included rapid evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Pripyat and Dnieper river system and field data evaluation and modeling for the 1993 summer flood to assist the Ukrainian government in their emergency response during the flood. In July-August 1993, heavy rainfall over the Pripyat River Catchment in Belarus and Ukraine caused severe flooding, significantly raising 90 Sr concentrations in the river. Near the Chernobyl area, the maximum 90 Sr concentration in the Pripyat River reached 20--25 PCi/L in early August; near the Pripyat River mouth, the concentration rose to 35 pCi/L. The peak 90 Sr concentration in the Kiev Reservoir (a major source of drinking water for Kiev) was 12 pCi/L. Based on these measured radionuclide levels, additional modeling results and the assumption of water purification in a water treatment station, 90 Sr concentrations in Kiev's drinking water were estimated to be less than 8 pCi/L. Unlike 90 Sr, 137 Cs concentrations in the Pripyat River during the flood did not rise significantly to the pre-flood levels. Estimated 137 Cs concentrations for the Kiev drinking water were two orders of magnitude lower than the drinking water standard of 500 pCi/L for 137 Cs

  9. Results of emergency surgery in patients with Moschowitz's disease refractory to hematological treatment: is splenectomy always advisable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronna, R; Cardi, M; Meloni, G; Mangioni, S; Spera, G; Benedetti, M; Frantellizzi, V; Layek, D; Catinelli, S; Schiratti, M; Chirletti, P

    2005-01-01

    Patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), Moschowitz's disease, run a high risk of perioperative bleeding and need intensive hematologic support. In some patients, TTP is associated with cancer but the surgical role in these patients is still unclear. To illustrate the surgical problems and outcome we present the case histories of three patients with TTP observed in our emergency department. Two patients had TTP secondary to cancer and one patient with primary TTP (no evidence of neoplasia) had emergency operation for gastric hemorrhage, occlusion and TTP unresponsive to plasmapheresis. The first two patients who had not radical resection of cancer and no splenectomy, died for TTP complications. The third patient who underwent emergency splenectomy, had an uneventful postoperative course and TTP completely regressed. These case reports suggest that patients with TTP should be screened to rule out cancer. In patients with acute cancer-related complications emergency surgery should aim to resect the cancer. An associated splenectomy may increase the effectiveness of postoperative hematologic therapy.

  10. Emergency general surgery in Rwandan district hospitals: a cross-sectional study of spectrum, management, and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpirimbanyi, Christophe; Nyirimodoka, Alexandre; Lin, Yihan; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Odhiambo, Jackline; Nkurunziza, Theoneste; Havens, Joaquim M; Omondi, Jack; Rwamasirabo, Emile; Ntirenganya, Faustin; Toma, Gabriel; Mubiligi, Joel; Bayitondere, Scheilla; Riviello, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Management of emergency general surgical conditions remains a challenge in rural sub-Saharan Africa due to issues such as insufficient human capacity and infrastructure. This study describes the burden of emergency general surgical conditions and the ability to provide care for these conditions at three rural district hospitals in Rwanda. This retrospective cross-sectional study included all patients presenting to Butaro, Kirehe and Rwinkwavu District Hospitals between January 1st 2015 and December 31st 2015 with emergency general surgical conditions, defined as non-traumatic, non-obstetric acute care surgical conditions. We describe patient demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes. In 2015, 356 patients presented with emergency general surgical conditions. The majority were male (57.2%) and adults aged 15-60 years (54.5%). The most common diagnostic group was soft tissue infections (71.6%), followed by acute abdominal conditions (14.3%). The median length of symptoms prior to diagnosis differed significantly by diagnosis type (p operated on at the district hospital, either by a general surgeon or general practitioner. Patients were more likely to receive surgery if they presented to a hospital with a general surgeon compared to a hospital with only general practitioners (75% vs 43%, p operation in a hospital with a general surgeon as opposed to a general practitioner. This provides evidence to support increasing the surgical workforce in district hospitals in order to increase surgical availability for patients.

  11. Emergency surgery for lung cancer with abscess formation after transbronchial biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Takanashi, Yusuke; Miyashita, Koichi; Tajima, Shogo; Hayakawa, Takamitsu; Neyatani, Hiroshi; Funai, Kazuhito

    2017-01-01

    Abscess formation in lung cancer after transbronchial biopsy (TBB) is a rare complication with no standard consensus on a coping strategy or prophylaxis. We describe an instructive case of lung cancer which developed into an abscess after TBB. An 80?year?old man with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus underwent TBB for diagnosing a mass lesion in the left upper lobe. The TBB specimen confirmed a diagnosis of lung cancer, and he was scheduled for radical surgery. However, the tumour was revea...

  12. [Effect of dexmedetomidine on emergence agitation after general anesthesia in children undergoing odontotherapy in day-surgery operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Luo; Yueming, Zhang; Meisheng, Li; Jiexue, Wang; Yang, Ji

    2017-12-01

    To study the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine used for general anesthesia maintenance in children undergoing odontotherapy in day-surgery operating room in reducing the incidence of emergence agitation (EA). Eighty children undergoing odontotherapy and under general anesthesia in day-surgery operating room were randomized into two groups, group A (n=40) and group B (n=40). Each patient in group A was administered with a bolus dose of dexmedetomidine (1.0 μg·kg⁻¹, saline diluted to 10 mL) pump-infused after intubation and a maintenance dose of 0.1-0.4 mL·(kg·h)⁻¹ followed-up until 45 min before the end of operation. Each patient in group B was administered with a bolus dose of normal saline 10 mL pump-infused after intubation and maintenance dose of 0.1-0.4 mL·(kg·h)⁻¹ followed-up until 45 min before the end of operation. Gender, age, weight, physical status according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists, perioperative heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), pulse oxygen saturation (SpO₂), sufentanil dosage, duration of surgery, time of extubation, time of regaining consciousness, and time to reach modified Aldrete's score≥12 were recorded. Behavior in postanesthesia care unit was rated on the four-point agitation scale. Compared with group B, decreases were observed in HR and MAP at the beginning of operation, in 10 and 30 min, 1 and 2 h after the beginning of operation, and after extubation of group A (Pgeneral anesthesia maintenance in children undergoing odontotherapy in day-surgery operating room, dexmedetomidine results in low incidence of EA during recovery and more stable vital signs.

  13. Ostomy-related complications after emergent abdominal surgery: a 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Elisabet; Persson, Eva; Carlsson, Eva; Hallén, Anne-Marie; Fingren, Jeanette; Berndtsson, Ina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate ostomy-related complications and describe ostomy configuration in patients undergoing acute abdominal surgery. The study sample comprised 144 patients with a median age of 67 years (IOR: 53.5-78 years) who underwent an intestinal ostomy as part of an acute abdominal surgical procedure. The research setting was the surgical and gynecological clinics at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden. Ostomy configuration, diameter, height, and the presence of stomal and peristomal complications were assessed by a WOC nurse 1 to 2 times while in hospital, once at the ostomy outpatient clinic 2 weeks after discharge, and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months following ostomy creation. The types of ostomies evaluated were end colostomy (58%), end ileostomy (18%), loop ileostomy (17%), and loop colostomy (7%). Most stomal or peristomal complications occurred within 1 year after surgery (31 of 57; 54.4%). Necrosis, separation, and stenosis were most common in patients with an end colostomy. Peristomal skin complications occurred in 45% of subjects during the first 6 months after surgery. The ostomy's diameter decreased significantly during the hospital course and over the first 2 weeks following hospital discharge in patients with end colostomy (Postomy had peristomal skin problems ranging between 21% and 57% over this time period. The frequency of using a pouching system that incorporated convexity was highest in the case of loop ileostomy, used in 67% at 6 months. During the first 2 weeks after discharge, the physical configuration of the ostomy evolves and the pouching system must be frequently adjusted by a WOC nurse. Stomal and peristomal complications are prevalent during the first 2 postoperative years and especially during the first 6 months.

  14. The effect of ketamine on the separation anxiety and emergence agitation in children undergoing brief ophthalmic surgery under desflurane general anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Won Ju; Kim, Woon Young; Moon, Man Gook; Min, Doo Jae; Lee, Yoon Sook; Kim, Jae Hwan; Park, Young Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Background Emergence agitation (EA) frequently occurs after desflurane anesthesia in children. Ketamine, because of its sedative and analgesic properties, might be useful for the management of separation anxiety and EA. We investigated the preventive effect of ketamine on separation anxiety and EA after desflurane anesthesia in children for brief ophthalmic surgery. Methods Sixty children, ranging in age from 2-8 years old, undergoing brief ophthalmic surgery were randomly allocated to one of...

  15. H1N1 infection in emergency surgery: A cautionary tale.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, J G

    2010-01-01

    Pandemic 2009 influenza A H1N1 has spread rapidly since its first report in Mexico in March 2009. This is the first influenza pandemic in over 40 years and it atypically affects previously healthy young adults, with higher rates of morbidity and mortality. The medical literature has been inundated with reports of H1N1 infection, the majority found in critical care and internal medicine journals with a relative paucity in the surgical literature. Despite this, it remains an important entity that can impact greatly on acute surgical emergencies. We present a case of previously healthy 31-year-old male who underwent open appendectomy. His post-operative recovery was complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to H1N1 infection. This case report highlights the impact that H1N1 virus can have on acute surgical emergencies and how it can complicate the post-operative course.

  16. Portal venous gas detected on computed tomography in emergency situations: surgery is still necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monneuse, Olivier; Pilleul, Frank; Barth, Xavier; Gruner, Laurent; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Valette, Pierre-Jean; Tissot, E

    2007-05-01

    Portal venous gas (PVG) has been reported to be associated with lethal surgical diagnosis. Recent studies tend to confirm the clinical significance of gas in the portal vein; however, some patients are managed without surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to assess both the diagnoses and the treatment of patients with PVG in an emergency surgical setting. We performed a retrospective chart review of 15 patients with PVG in the emergency setting detected by computed tomography (CT) between July 1999 and July 2004. Characteristics assessed included age, sex, clinical presentation, first CT diagnosis of both PVG and the underlying pathology, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, surgical findings, final clinical diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, and evolution of the illness/mortality. All patients were examined one month after operation. This series of 5 women and 10 men ranged in age from 38 to 90 years at the time they underwent emergency surgical treatment. The mean preoperative ASA score was 4.20. Computed tomography diagnosed the underlying pathology in all cases: bowel obstruction (4 cases), bowel necrosis (9 cases), and diffuse peritonitis (2 cases). The mean length of hospital stay was 12.4 days. The mortality rate was 46.6%; (7 patients). A wide range of pathologies can generate PVG. Computed tomography can detect both the presence of gas and the underlying pathology. In emergency situations, all the diagnosed causal pathologies required a surgical procedure without delay. We report that the prognosis was related to the pathology itself and was not influenced by the presence of PVG.

  17. Safe introduction of new procedures and emerging technologies in surgery: education, credentialing, and privileging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ajit K; Russell, Thomas R

    2007-08-01

    Ongoing horizon scanning is needed to identify new procedures and emerging technologies that should be evaluated for introduction into surgical practice. Following evidence-based evaluation, if a new modality is found ready for adoption in practice, surgeons need education in the safe and effective use of the new modality. The educational experience should include structured teaching and learning, verification of new knowledge and skills, preceptoring or proctoring, and monitoring of outcomes. Credentialing and privileging to perform a new procedure or use an emerging technology should be based on evaluation of knowledge and skills and outcomes of surgical care, and not merely on the numbers of procedures performed. Education of the surgical team is also essential. The entire process involving education, verification of knowledge and skills, credentialing, and privileging must be transparent. Patients need to play a central role in making informed decisions regarding their care that involves use of a new procedure or an emerging technology, and they should participate actively in their perioperative care.

  18. Obesity and contraception: metabolic changes, risk of thromboembolism, use of emergency contraceptives, and role of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, E P; Murthy, A S

    2013-06-01

    Rates of obesity are increasing worldwide. Due to the medical consequences of obesity, routine health care like family planning becomes complicated. Conflicting data exists regarding efficacy of hormonal contraceptives in obese women, while little data on efficacy of emergency contraception in obese women exists. Much of what is available suggests lower serum hormonal levels in obese women with little effect on ovulation inhibition. Contraceptive steroids can cause a number of deteriorating metabolic changes, particularly in obese women; whether these changes are clinically significant is unknown. Venous thromboembolic risk is increased with both obesity and use of hormonal contraceptives; however the question remains if the risk is additive or multiplicative. Bariatric surgery can lead to digestive changes which may affect absorption of contraceptive hormones. While long acting reversible contraceptives may be the best option in the post operative obese patient, little data, beyond a simple recommendation to avoid pregnancy for at least one year, exists to help guide appropriate contraceptive choice.

  19. Patient Decision-Making About Emergency and Planned Stoma Surgery for IBD: A Qualitative Exploration of Patient and Clinician Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibley, Lesley; Czuber-Dochan, Wladyslawa; Wade, Tiffany; Duncan, Julie; Burch, Jennie; Warusavitarne, Janindra; Norton, Christine; Artom, Micol; O'Sullivan, Liam; Verjee, Azmina; Cann, Denise

    2018-01-18

    Many inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients worry about stoma-forming surgery (SFS), sometimes enduring poor bowel-related quality of life to avoid it. Anticipation of SFS and whether expectations match experience is underreported. This qualitative study explored influences on patients' SFS decision-making and compared preoperative concerns with postoperative outcomes. We purposively recruited participants with IBD from UK hospital outpatient and community sources, and IBD clinicians from public hospitals. Four focus groups, 29 semistructured patient participant interviews, and 18 clinician interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Participants had a current temporary, recently-reversed, or permanent stoma, or were stoma naive. Four themes emerged: Preoperative concerns and expectations, Patient decision-making, Surgery and recovery, and Long-term outcomes. Participants and clinicians agreed about most preoperative concerns, that outcomes were often better than expected, and support from others with a stoma is beneficial. Patient decision-making involves multiple factors, including disease status. Some clinicians avoid discussing SFS, and the phrase 'last resort' can bias patient perceptions; others recommend early discussion, increasing dialogue when medical management becomes ineffective. The postoperative period is particularly challenging for patients. Stoma acceptance is influenced by personal perceptions and pre- and postoperative clinical and social support. Patients need balanced information on all treatment options, including surgery, from an early stage. Early multidisciplinary team dialogue about SFS, and contact with others living well with a stoma, could enable informed decision-making. Life with a stoma is often better than anticipated, improving quality of life and control. Ongoing specialist nursing support aids recovery and adjustment. © 2018 Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America. Published by Oxford University

  20. The Association of Frailty With Outcomes and Resource Use After Emergency General Surgery: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, Daniel I; Moloo, Husein; Bryson, Gregory L; van Walraven, Carl

    2017-05-01

    Older patients undergoing emergency general surgery (EGS) experience high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Studies focused primarily on elective surgery indicate that frailty is an important predictor of adverse outcomes in older surgical patients. The population-level effect of frailty on EGS is poorly described. Therefore, our objective was to measure the association of preoperative frailty with outcomes in a population of older patients undergoing EGS. We created a population-based cohort study using linked administrative data in Ontario, Canada, that included community-dwelling individuals aged >65 years having EGS. Our main exposure was preoperative frailty, as defined by the Johns Hopkins Adjusted Clinical Groups frailty-defining diagnoses indicator. The Adjusted Clinical Groups frailty-defining diagnoses indicator is a binary variable that uses 12 clusters of frailty-defining diagnoses. Our main outcome measures were 1-year all-cause mortality (primary), intensive care unit admission, length of stay, institutional discharge, and costs of care (secondary). Of 77,184 patients, 19,779 (25.6%) were frail. Death within 1 year occurred in 6626 (33.5%) frail patients compared with 11,366 (19.8%) nonfrail patients. After adjustment for sociodemographic and surgical confounders, this resulted in a hazard ratio of 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-1.33). The risk of death for frail patients varied significantly across the postoperative period and was particularly high immediately after surgery (hazard ratio on postoperative day 1 = 23.1, 95% CI 22.3-24.1). Frailty was adversely associated with all secondary outcomes, including a 5.82-fold increase in the adjusted odds of institutional discharge (95% CI 5.53-6.12). After EGS, frailty is associated with increased rates of mortality, institutional discharge, and resource use. Strategies that might improve perioperative outcomes in frail EGS patients need to be developed and tested.

  1. [A case of emergency surgery in a patient with bronchial asthma under continuous spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Keiichi; Ryo, Kenshu; Nakamoto, Ai

    2003-10-01

    A 78-year-old male, observed for bronchial asthma, underwent two emergency operations within eight days. The first operation was performed under general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. Anesthesia was maintained by sevoflurane-oxygen and continuous infusion of propofol in combination with epidural injection of lidocaine. During the operation, respiratory sound was almost clear. But wheezing occurred as he awoke after discontinuation of the anesthetics. He needed ventilatory support for three days for status asthmatics. The second operation was performed under continuous spinal anesthesia using hypobaric tetracaine and hyperbaric bupivacaine. No ventilatory support was necessary after the operation and he was discharged uneventfully.

  2. Lung Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at increased risk of sudden lung ...

  3. Robot-assisted surgery: an emerging platform for human neuroscience research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Michael Jarc

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Classic studies in human sensorimotor control use simplified tasks to uncover fundamental control strategies employed by the nervous system. Such simple tasks are critical for isolating specific features of motor, sensory, or cognitive processes, and for inferring causality between these features and observed behavioral changes. However, it remains unclear how these theories translate to complex sensorimotor tasks or to natural behaviors. Part of the difficulty in performing such experiments has been the lack of appropriate tools for measuring complex motor skills in real-world contexts. Robot-assisted surgery (RAS provides an opportunity to overcome these challenges by enabling unobtrusive measurements of user behavior. In addition, a continuum of tasks with varying complexity – from simple tasks such as those in classic studies to highly complex tasks such as a surgical procedure – can be studied using RAS platforms. Finally, RAS includes a diverse participant population of inexperienced users all the way to expert surgeons. In this perspective, we illustrate how the characteristics of RAS systems make them compelling platforms to extend many theories in human neuroscience, as well as, to develop new theories altogether.

  4. Managing hip fracture and lower limb surgery in the emergency setting: Potential role of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William

    2017-06-01

    Trauma, immobilization, and subsequent surgery of the hip and lower limb are associated with a high risk of developing venous thrombo-embolism (VTE). Individuals undergoing hip fracture surgery (HFS) have the highest rates of VTE among orthopedic surgery and trauma patients. The risk of VTE depends on the type and location of the lower limb injury. Current international guidelines recommend routine pharmacological thromboprophylaxis based on treatment with heparins, fondaparinux, dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonists and acetylsalicylic acid for patients undergoing emergency HFS; however, not all guidelines recommend pharmacological prophylaxis for patients with lower limb injuries. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are indicated for VTE prevention after elective hip or knee replacement surgery, but at present are not widely recommended for other orthopedic indications despite their advantages over conventional anticoagulants and promising real-world evidence. In patients undergoing HFS or lower limb surgery, decisions on whether to anticoagulate and the most appropriate anti-coagulation strategy can be guided by weighing the risk of thromboprophylaxis against the benefit in relation to each patient's medical history and age. In addition, the nature and location of the fracture, operating times and times before fracture fixation should be considered. The current review discusses the need for anticoagulation in patients undergoing emergency HFS or lower limb surgery together with the current guidelines and available evidence on the use of NOACs in this setting. Appropriate thromboprophylactic strategies and practical advice on the peri-operative management of patients who present to the Emergency Department on a NOAC before emergency surgery are further outlined.

  5. Emergency surgery for obstructing colonic cancer: a comparison between right-sided and left-sided lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheron, J-L; Paquette, B; Trilling, B; Heyd, B; Koch, S; Mantion, G

    2018-02-01

    Few studies compare management and outcomes of obstructive colonic cancer, depending on the tumor site. We aim to evaluate the differences in patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, and outcomes of emergency surgery for obstructive right-sided versus left-sided colonic cancers. Between 2000 and 2009, 71 consecutive patients had an emergency colectomy following strict and clear definition of obstruction in a single institution. We retrospectively analyzed pre, per, and postoperative data that were prospectively collected. There were 31 and 40 patients in the right and left group, respectively. Patients aged over 80 were more frequent in the right group (p = 0.03). At operation, ileocecal valve was less often competent in the right group (p = 0.03). The one-stage strategy was more frequent in the right group (p = 0.008). Patients in the right group had a higher rate of nodes invasion (p = 0.04). One- and two-year mortality rate in the right group had a tendency to be higher. Patients presenting with a right obstructive colonic cancer are older, have a more advanced locoregional disease, and are more often treated in a one-stage strategy than patients with a left obstructive tumor.

  6. Outcome after emergency surgery without angiography in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage after aneurysm rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdal, Ove; Springborg, Jacob; Hauerberg, John

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with large intracerebral haematomas (ICH) from aneurysm rupture often present in a poor clinical condition and have a poor prognosis. Time delay for preoperative angiography might in some cases be unappealing. We evaluated the outcome after immediate haematoma removal...... and aneurysm occlusion without preoperative angiography. METHODS: We retrospectively identified 13 consecutive patients. We recorded clinical data and evaluated mortality and morbidity with the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) and Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status (TICS). FINDINGS: At follow up seven...... of thirteen patients had favourable outcome assessed by GOS. Three patients had severe disability and three patients died. None of the survived patients interviewed had impaired cognition. CONCLUSIONS: In patients presented in a critical state with aneurysmal ICH, emergency haematoma removal and aneurysm...

  7. Emergency Surgery in a Patient with Scleroderma - Anaesthetic Challenges: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teena Bansal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma (progressive systemic sclerosis is a multisystem disease involving the skin, airway, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, renal and cardiac systems that can pose a significant challenge for the anaesthetist. The multisystem involvement of scleroderma can impact on every aspect of anaesthetic care especially airway management. There are no specific contraindications to the use of any type of anaesthesia, although the selection must be guided by identification of organ dysfunction. The anaesthetist must be aware of the organs involved, the severity of the disease and the associated anaesthetic considerations and potential risks in order to safely & skilfully manage the patient with scleroderma. We hereby present a case report of a patient with scleroderma for emergency orbital decompression because of orbital cellulitis.

  8. Emergence from anesthesia in children undergoing ambulatory surgery- a comparison between propofol and sevoflurane using single anesthetic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasha, A.K.; Kazi, W.A.; Farhat, K

    2013-01-01

    statistically significant. Conclusion: VIMA with sevoflurane provided quicker emergence and early recovery compared with TIVA with propofol, in children undergoing ambulatory surgery. (author)

  9. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 6 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. CERUTTI (CERN) Presentation of the Summer Student Programme D. Heagerty (CERN) Computer rules O. ULLALAND (CERN) Workshops presentation 10:15 - 11:00 D. SCHLATTER (CERN) Introduction to CERN 11:15 Film on CERN Thursday 7 July 09:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 14:45 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Facility 15:00 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Visit Friday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physi...

  10. Prevention of Cerebral Embolism Progression by Emergency Surgery of the Left Atrial Myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syuichi Tetsuka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old woman developed left hemiparesis during work and was hospitalized. Her National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 4. Hyperintense areas in the left basal ganglia, corona radiata, and cortex of the temporal lobe were found by brain diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, indicating acute cerebral infarction. Echocardiography showed a giant mass of diameter 7 × 4 cm in the left atrium. Therefore, she was diagnosed with cerebral embolism due to a left atrial myxoma. Currently, thrombolytic therapy may continue to be effective because the embolic source may be composed of tumor tissue itself. In case of atrial myxoma, we considered that the use of tPA as emergency treatment in all patients with infarction by atrial myxoma may be questioned. Thus, cardiac tumor extraction was performed the next day after hospitalization without thrombolytic therapy. The excised myxoma measured 7 × 6 × 4 cm. The patient recovered and her neurological symptoms also improved. Furthermore, her National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score improved to 0. Thirteen days after admission, the patient was discharged from our hospital. Cardiac myxoma is often associated with a high risk of embolic episodes, which emphasizes the need for prompt surgical excision as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed.

  11. Summer 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Strauss

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities and the Environment Editor, Eric Strauss, provides an introduction to the Summer 2011 issue. He discusses the journal's transition to its new home at Loyola Marymount University and the creation of the Center for Urban Resilience and Ecological Solution, while underscoring highlights of the special topics section on Urban Predators. The contributors to this section participated in the International Symposium on Urban Wildlife and the Environment hosted by the Wildlife Society at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in June of 2009. Finally, Dr. Strauss notes the breadth of our issue by mentioning the additional articles' focus on rain gardens, water quality, arthropod diversity, green roofs, and socio-ecological dynamics.

  12. Sevoflurane-emergence agitation: Effect of supplementary low-dose oral ketamine premedication in preschool children undergoing dental surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khattab Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    : Adding a low dose of oral ketamine to midazolam-based oral premedication in preschool children undergoing dental surgery reduced sevoflurane-related emergence agitation without delaying discharge.

  13. A procalcitonin-based algorithm to guide antibiotic therapy in secondary peritonitis following emergency surgery: a prospective study with propensity score matching analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Shuo; Huang, Shie-Shian; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Lee, Chun-Hui; Jwo, Shyh-Chuan; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Huang-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT)-based algorithms have been used to guide antibiotic therapy in several clinical settings. However, evidence supporting PCT-based algorithms for secondary peritonitis after emergency surgery is scanty. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether a PCT-based algorithm could safely reduce antibiotic exposure in this population. From April 2012 to March 2013, patients that had secondary peritonitis diagnosed at the emergency department and underwent emergency surgery were screened for eligibility. PCT levels were obtained pre-operatively, on post-operative days 1, 3, 5, and 7, and on subsequent days if needed. Antibiotics were discontinued if PCT was Advanced age, coexisting pulmonary diseases, and higher severity of illness were significantly associated with longer durations of antibiotic use. The PCT-based algorithm safely reduces antibiotic exposure in this study. Further randomized trials are needed to confirm our findings and incorporate cost-effectiveness analysis. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000601831.

  14. Comparing the Quality and Complications of Tube Thoracostomy by Emergency Medicine and Surgery Residents; a Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Kashani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tube thoracostomy complications depend on the operator’s skill, patients’ general condition and the place in which the procedure is done. The present study aimed to compare the quality and complications of tube thoracostomy carried out by emergency medicine residents (EMRs and surgery residents (SRs.Methods: This cohort study was conducted on 18-60 years old trauma patients in need of tube thoracostomy presenting to two academic emergency departments. Quality of tube placement and its subsequent complications until tube removal were compared between SRs and EMRs using SPSS 20.Results: 72 patients with the mean age of 37.1±14.1 years were studied (86.1% male. 23 (63.8% cases were complicated in SRs and 22 (61.1% cases in EMRs group (total= 62.5%. Chest drain dislodgement (22.2% in SRs vs. 22.2% EMRs; p>0.99, drainage failure (19.4% in SRs vs. 16.7% EMRs; p=0.50, and surgical site infection (11.1% in SRs vs. 19.4% EMRs; p=0.25 were among the most common observed complications. The overall odds ratio of complication development was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.35-2.25, p = 0.814 for SRs and 1.12 (95% CI: 0.28-4.53, p = 0.867 for EMRs.Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed no significant difference between SRs and EMRs regarding quality of tube thoracostomy placement and its subsequent complications for trauma patients. The rate of complications were interestingly high (>60% for both groups.

  15. Prevention and management of intraoperative crisis in VATS and open chest surgery: how to avoid emergency conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdie, Fernando M; Sanchez, Manuel Villa; Sarkaria, Inderpal S

    2017-01-01

    Video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has become a routinely utilized approach to complex procedures of the chest, such as pulmonary resection. It has been associated with decreased postoperative pain, shorter length of stay and lower incidence of complications such as pneumonia. Limitations to this modality may include limited exposure, lack of tactile feedback, and a two-dimensional view of the surgical field. Furthermore, the lack of an open incision may incur technical challenges in preventing and controlling operative misadventures leading to major hemorrhage or other intraoperative emergencies. While these events may occur in the best of circumstances, prevention strategies are the primary means of avoiding these injuries. Unplanned conversions for major intraoperative bleeding or airway injury during general thoracic surgical procedures are relatively rare and often can be avoided with careful preoperative planning, review of relevant imaging, and meticulous surgical technique. When these events occur, a pre-planned, methodical response with initial control of bleeding, assessment of injury, and appropriate repair and/or salvage procedures are necessary to maximize outcomes. The surgeon should be well versed in injury-specific incisions and approaches to maximize adequate exposure and when feasible, allow completion of the index operation. Decisions to continue with a minimally invasive approach should consider the comfort and experience level of the surgeon with these techniques, and the relative benefit gained against the risk incurred to the patient. These algorithms may be expected to shift in the future with increasing sophistication and capabilities of minimally invasive technologies and approaches.

  16. Association between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin and post-operative infections after non-emergent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankush, Joseph M; Leitman, I Michael; Soleiman, Aron; Tran, Trung

    2016-09-01

    A chronic state of impaired glucose metabolism affects multiple components of the immune system, possibly leading to an increased incidence of post-operative infections. Such infections increase morbidity, length of stay, and overall cost. This study evaluates the correlation between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and post-operative infections. Adult patients undergoing non-emergent procedures across all surgical subspecialties from January 2010 to July 2014 had a preoperative HbA1c measured as part of their routine pre-surgical assessment. 2200 patient charts (1100 operative infection (superficial surgical site infection, deep wound/surgical space abscess, pneumonia, and/or urinary tract infection as defined by Centers for Disease Control criteria) within 30 days of surgery. Patients with HbA1c infection rate (3.8% in the HbA1c infection. Elevated HbA1c was, however, predictive of significantly increased risk of post-operative infection when associated with increased age (≥81 years of age) or dirty wounds. The risk factors of post-operative infection are multiple and likely synergistic. While pre-operative HbA1c level is not independently associated with risk of post-operative infection, there are scenarios and patient subgroups where pre-operative HbA1c is useful in predicting an increased risk of infectious complications in the post-operative period.

  17. Effect of intermediate care on mortality following emergency abdominal surgery. The InCare trial: study protocol, rationale and feasibility of a randomised multicentre trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vester-Andersen Morten

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency abdominal surgery carries a 15% to 20% short-term mortality rate. Postoperative medical complications are strongly associated with increased mortality. Recent research suggests that timely recognition and effective management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim of the present trial is to evaluate the effect of postoperative intermediate care following emergency major abdominal surgery in high-risk patients. Methods and design The InCare trial is a randomised, parallel-group, non-blinded clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Patients undergoing emergency laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery with a perioperative Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 10 or above, who are ready to be transferred to the surgical ward within 24 h of surgery are allocated to either intermediate care for 48 h, or surgical ward care. The primary outcome measure is all-cause 30-day mortality. We aim to enrol 400 patients in seven Danish hospitals. The sample size allows us to detect or refute a 34% relative risk reduction of mortality with 80% power. Discussion This trial evaluates the benefits and possible harm of intermediate care. The results may potentially influence the survival of many high-risk surgical patients. As a pioneer trial in the area, it will provide important data on the feasibility of future large-scale randomised clinical trials evaluating different levels of postoperative care. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01209663

  18. Indian Summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, E. [Sho-Ban High School, Fort Hall, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  19. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Monday 8 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (3/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (1-2/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 9 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. GREY The GRID 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Wednesday 10 August 09:15 - 10:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (1-2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Thursday 11 August 09:15 - 11:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (3-4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 G. KALMUS The ILC Story 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 12 August 09:15 - 10:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (5/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. VENEZIANO String theory: has Einstein's dream come true? 11:00  Discussion...

  20. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. WELLS The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (1/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 2 August 09:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 4 August 09:15 - 11:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 A. WEINSTEIN Gravitation Waves 12:00 Discussion Session 16:30 - 18:00 Poster Session Friday 5 August 09:15 - 11:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JA...

  1. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 18 July 09:15 - 11:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (1-2/6) 11:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 20 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 F. RADEMAKERS ROOT 11:15 - 12:00 L. ROSSI Super-conducting magnet technology for particle accelerators and detectors 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 21 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (5/6) 10:15 - 12:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (1-2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (3/3) 10:15 -...

  2. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 25 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (2-3/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (4/8) 10:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 27 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (5-6/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J-P. DELAHAYE The CLIC Concept and Technology for an e+e-Collider at the Energy Frontier 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 28 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw data to Physics Results (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN Fr...

  3. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (2/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 12 July  09:15 - 11:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (1-2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (1/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 13 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 R. LANDUA (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 14 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (4/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 1...

  4. Safety and Feasibility of a Ketamine Package to Support Emergency and Essential Surgery in Kenya when No Anesthetist is Available: An Analysis of 1216 Consecutive Operative Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Thomas F; Suarez, Sebastian; Sessler, Daniel I; Senay, Ayla; Yusufali, Taha; Masaki, Charles; Guha, Moytrayee; Rogo, Debora; Jani, Pankaj; Nelson, Brett D; Rogo, Khama

    2017-12-01

    Lack of access to emergency and essential surgery is widespread in low- and middle-income countries. Scarce anesthesia services contribute to this unmet need. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of the Every Second Matters for Emergency and Essential Surgery-Ketamine (ESM-Ketamine) package for emergency and essential procedures when no anesthetist was available. From November 2013 to September 2017, the ESM-Ketamine package was used for patients requiring emergency or life-improving surgeries in fifteen selected facilities across Kenya when no anesthetist was available. A mixed-methods approach was used to assess safety and feasibility of the ESM-Ketamine package, including demand, acceptability, and practicality. The primary outcome was ketamine-related adverse events. Key-informant interviews captured perceptions of providers, hospital administrators, and surgeons/proceduralists. Non-anesthetist mid-level providers used ESM-Ketamine for 1216 surgical procedures across the fifteen study facilities. The median ketamine dose was 2.1 mg/kg. Brief (30 s) oxygen desaturations occurred in seven patients (0.6%). There were 157 (13%) reported cases of hallucinations and agitation which were treated with diazepam. All patients recovered uneventfully, and no ketamine-related deaths were reported. Twenty-seven key-informant interviews showed strong support for the program with four main themes: financial considerations, provision of services, staff impact, and scaling considerations. The ESM-Ketamine package appears safe and feasible and is capable of expanding access to emergency and essential surgeries in rural Kenya when no anesthetist is available.

  5. Flurbiprofen Axetil Enhances Analgesic Effects of Sufentanil and Attenuates Postoperative Emergence Agitation and Systemic Proinflammation in Patients Undergoing Tangential Excision Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wujun Geng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Our present study tested whether flurbiprofen axetil could reduce perioperative sufentanil consumption and provide postoperative analgesia with decrease in emergency agitation and systemic proinflammatory cytokines release. Methods. Ninety patients undergoing tangential excision surgery were randomly assigned to three groups: (1 preoperative dose of 100 mg flurbiprofen axetil and a postoperative dose of 2 μg/kg sufentanil and 10 mL placebo by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA pump, (2 preoperative dose of 100 mg flurbiprofen axetil and a postoperative dose of 2 μg/kg sufentanil and 100 mg flurbiprofen axetil by PCA pump, and (3 10 mL placebo and a postoperative dose of 2 μg/kg sufentanil and 10 mL placebo by PCA pump. Results. Preoperative administration of flurbiprofen axetil decreased postoperative tramadol consumption and the visual analog scale at 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after surgery, which were further decreased by postoperative administration of flurbiprofen axetil. Furthermore, flurbiprofen axetil attenuated emergency agitation score and Ramsay score at 0, 5, and 10 min after extubation and reduced the TNF-α and interleukin- (IL- 6 levels at 24 and 48 h after the operation. Conclusion. Flurbiprofen axetil enhances analgesic effects of sufentanil and attenuates emergence agitation and systemic proinflammation in patients undergoing tangential excision surgery.

  6. Flurbiprofen Axetil Enhances Analgesic Effects of Sufentanil and Attenuates Postoperative Emergence Agitation and Systemic Proinflammation in Patients Undergoing Tangential Excision Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Wujun; Hong, Wandong; Wang, Junlu; Dai, Qinxue; Mo, Yunchang; Shi, Kejian; Sun, Jiehao; Qin, Jinling; Li, Mei; Tang, Hongli

    2015-01-01

    Our present study tested whether flurbiprofen axetil could reduce perioperative sufentanil consumption and provide postoperative analgesia with decrease in emergency agitation and systemic proinflammatory cytokines release. Ninety patients undergoing tangential excision surgery were randomly assigned to three groups: (1) preoperative dose of 100 mg flurbiprofen axetil and a postoperative dose of 2 μg/kg sufentanil and 10 mL placebo by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump, (2) preoperative dose of 100 mg flurbiprofen axetil and a postoperative dose of 2 μg/kg sufentanil and 100 mg flurbiprofen axetil by PCA pump, and (3) 10 mL placebo and a postoperative dose of 2 μg/kg sufentanil and 10 mL placebo by PCA pump. Preoperative administration of flurbiprofen axetil decreased postoperative tramadol consumption and the visual analog scale at 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after surgery, which were further decreased by postoperative administration of flurbiprofen axetil. Furthermore, flurbiprofen axetil attenuated emergency agitation score and Ramsay score at 0, 5, and 10 min after extubation and reduced the TNF-α and interleukin- (IL-) 6 levels at 24 and 48 h after the operation. Flurbiprofen axetil enhances analgesic effects of sufentanil and attenuates emergence agitation and systemic proinflammation in patients undergoing tangential excision surgery.

  7. Emergency surgery data and documentation reporting forms for sudden-onset humanitarian crises, natural disasters and the existing burden of surgical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Frederick M; Nickerson, Jason W; von Schreeb, Johan; Redmond, Anthony D; McQueen, Kelly A; Norton, Ian; Roy, Nobhojit

    2012-12-01

    Following large-scale disasters and major complex emergencies, especially in resource-poor settings, emergency surgery is practiced by Foreign Medical Teams (FMTs) sent by governmental and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). These surgical experiences have not yielded an appropriate standardized collection of data and reporting to meet standards required by national authorities, the World Health Organization, and the Inter-Agency Standing Committee's Global Health Cluster. Utilizing the 2011 International Data Collection guidelines for surgery initiated by Médecins Sans Frontières, the authors of this paper developed an individual patient-centric form and an International Standard Reporting Template for Surgical Care to record data for victims of a disaster as well as the co-existing burden of surgical disease within the affected community. The data includes surgical patient outcomes and perioperative mortality, along with referrals for rehabilitation, mental health and psychosocial care. The purpose of the standard data format is fourfold: (1) to ensure that all surgical providers, especially from indigenous first responder teams and others performing emergency surgery, from national and international (Foreign) medical teams, contribute relevant and purposeful reporting; (2) to provide universally acceptable forms that meet the minimal needs of both national authorities and the Health Cluster; (3) to increase transparency and accountability, contributing to improved humanitarian coordination; and (4) to facilitate a comprehensive review of services provided to those affected by the crisis.

  8. [Financial analysis of a department of general surgery in a French hospital. The new "fee-for-service" reimbursement system results in a high deficit for emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdy, G; Dalban-Sillas, B; Leclerc, C; Bonnaventure, F; Roullet Audy, J-C; Frileux, P

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a detailed analysis of income and expense in a department of general surgery in a French hospital under the new system of funding based on a "fee-for-service" principle. All hospital stays of year 2006 were analysed retrospectively. The conditions of admission (elective vs. emergency), the principal diagnosis, and surgical procedures were examined. We determined hospital costs and the reimbursement for every admission. One thousand nine hundred and eighty-five hospitalizations generated an income of 8Meuros with a deficit of 1.3Meuros. The 775 elective admissions generated 50% of the income and 13% of the deficit (178,562euros). Seven hundred and forty-nine emergency admissions generated 45% of the income and 82% of deficit (1.1Meuros). Four hundred and sixty-one admissions for endoscopy generated 5% of the income and 5% of the deficit (67,249euros). Hospital stays of less than two days (the minimum duration of stay for total reimbursement) caused a loss of 122,624euros. Length of hospital stay below the lower limit caused a loss of 42,850euros. Elective surgical activity in digestive surgery can generate a balanced budget provided the length of hospital stay is reduced to the minimum, sometimes to the detriment of patient comfort. Emergency admissions result in a large deficit between cost and reimbursement; this fact may lead hospitals to avoid emergency activity in the future unless appropriate remedial measures are taken.

  9. MO-DE-202-00: Image-Guided Interventions: Advances in Intraoperative Imaging, Guidance, and An Emerging Role for Medical Physics in Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504

  10. Screening Models for Cardiac Risk Evaluation in Emergency Abdominal Surgery. I. Evaluation of the Intraoperative Period Risk based on Data from the Preoperative Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Matveev

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A classification of intraoperative cardio-vascular complications (CVC was performed, based on data from 466 patients subjected to emergency surgery, due to severe abdominal surgical diseases or traumas, in accordance with the severe criteria of ACC/AHA for CVC in noncardiac surgery. There were 370 intraoperative CVC registered, distributed as follows: groups with low risk (148, moderate risk (200, and high risk (22. Patient groups were formed, according to the CVC risk level, during the intraoperative period, for which the determinant factor for the group distribution of patients was the complication with the highest risk. Individual data was collected for each patient, based on 65 indices: age, physical status, diseases, surgical interventions, anaesthesiological information, intra and postoperative cardio-vascular complications, disease outcome, causes of death, cardiovascular disease anamnesis, anamnesis of all other nonsurgical diseases present, laboratory results, results from all imaging and instrumental examinations, etc. On the basis of these indices, a new distribution of the risk factors was implemented, into groups with different levels of risk of CVC during intraoperative period. This result is a solid argument, substantiating the proposal to introduce these adjustments for determining the severity of CVC in the specific conditions of emergency abdominal surgery.

  11. The Role of Radio Frequency Detection System Embedded Surgical Sponges in Preventing Retained Surgical Sponges: A Prospective Evaluation in Patients Undergoing Emergency Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kenji; Okoye, Obi; Aksoy, Hande; Skiada, Dimitra; Ault, Glenn; Sener, Stephen; Lam, Lydia; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2016-10-01

    To prospectively evaluate the ability of radio frequency detection (RFD) system-embedded sponges to mitigate the incidence of retained surgical sponges (RSS) after emergency surgery. Emergency surgery patients are at high risk for retained foreign bodies. All emergent trauma and nontrauma cavitary operations over a 5-year period (January 2010-December 2014) were prospectively enrolled. For damage-control procedures, only the definitive closure was included. RFD sponges were used exclusively throughout the study period. Before closure, the sponge and instrument count was followed by RFD scanning and x-ray evaluation for retained sponges. RSS and near-misses averted using the RFD system were analyzed. In all, 2051 patients [median (range)], aged 41 (1-101) years, 72.2% male, 46.8% trauma patients, underwent 2148 operations (1824 laparotomy, 100 thoracotomy, 30 sternotomy, and 97 combined). RFD detected retained sponges in 11 (0.5%) patients (81.8%laparotomy, 18.2% sternotomy) before cavitary closure. All postclosure x-rays were negative. No retained sponges were missed by the RFD system. Body mass index was 29 (23-43), estimated blood loss 1.0 L (0-23), and operating room time 160 minutes (71-869). Procedures started after 18:00 to 06:00 hours in 45.5% of the patients. The sponge count was incorrect in 36.4%, not performed due to time constraints in 45.5%, and correct in 18.2%. The additional cost of using RFD-embedded disposables was $0.17 for a 4X18 laparotomy sponge and $0.46 for a 10 pack of 12ply, 4X8. Emergent surgical procedures are high-risk for retained sponges, even when sponge counts are performed and found to be correct. Implementation of a RFD system was effective in preventing this complication and should be considered for emergent operations in an effort to improve patient safety.

  12. A rare case of small bowel volvulus after jenjunoileal bariatric bypass requiring emergency surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Pranav H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bariatric surgery is on the increase throughout the world. Jejunoileal bypass bariatric procedures have fallen out of favor in western surgical centers due to the high rate of associated complications. They are, however, performed routinely in other centers and as a consequence of health tourism, management of complications related to these procedures may still be encountered. Case presentation We describe a rare case of small bowel obstruction in a 45-year-old British Caucasian woman, secondary to a volvulus of the jejunoileal anastomosis following bariatric bypass surgery. The pre-operative diagnosis was confirmed by radiology. We describe a successful surgical technique for this rare complication. Conclusions Bariatric surgery may be complicated by bowel obstruction. Early imaging is vital for diagnosis and effective management. The use of our surgical technique provides a simple and effective approach for the successful management of this bariatric complication.

  13. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. Avoid contact sports (such as boxing and football) for the first 4 weeks after surgery. DO ... herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any ...

  14. Prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients receiving CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriphuwanun V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Visith Siriphuwanun,1 Yodying Punjasawadwong,1 Worawut Lapisatepun,1 Somrat Charuluxananan,2 Ketchada Uerpairojkit2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: To determine prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study approved by the Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai University Hospital Ethical Committee. Data used were taken from records of 751 cardiac arrest patients who received their first CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery between January 1, 2003 and October 31, 2011. The reviewed data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA physical status classification, anesthesia information, the timing of cardiac arrest, CPR details, and outcomes at 24 hours after CPR. Univariate and polytomous logistic regression analyses were used to determine prognostic factors associated with the outcome variable. P-values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The outcomes at 24 hours were death (638/751, 85.0%, survival with complications (73/751, 9.7%, and survival without complications (40/751, 5.3%. The prognostic factors associated with death were: age between 13–34 years (OR =3.08, 95% CI =1.03–9.19; ASA physical status three and higher (OR =6.60, 95% CI =2.17–20.13; precardiopulmonary comorbidity (OR =3.28, 95% CI =1.09–9.90; the condition of patients who were on mechanical ventilation prior to receiving anesthesia (OR =4.11, 95% CI =1.17–14.38; surgery in the upper abdominal site (OR =14.64, 95% CI =2.83–75.82; shock prior to cardiac arrest (OR =6.24, 95% CI =2.53–15

  15. Identifying Opportunities for Virtual Reality Simulation in Surgical Education: A Review of the Proceedings from the Innovation, Design, and Emerging Alliances in Surgery (IDEAS) Conference: VR Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasky, Jaisa; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Seymour, Neal E.; Magee, J. Harvey; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Lin, Ming C.; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Brunt, L. Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D.; Cao, Caroline G. L.; De, Suvranu; Jones, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a review of the state of virtual reality (VR) simulation technology, to identify areas of surgical education that have the greatest potential to benefit from it, and to identify challenges to implementation. Background Data Simulation is an increasingly important part of surgical training. VR is a developing platform for using simulation to teach technical skills, behavioral skills, and entire procedures to trainees and practicing surgeons worldwide. Questions exist regarding the science behind the technology and most effective usage of VR simulation. A symposium was held to address these issues. Methods Engineers, educators, and surgeons held a conference in November 2013 both to review the background science behind simulation technology and to create guidelines for its use in teaching and credentialing trainees and surgeons in practice. Results Several technologic challenges were identified that must be overcome in order for VR simulation to be useful in surgery. Specific areas of student, resident, and practicing surgeon training and testing that would likely benefit from VR were identified: technical skills, team training and decision-making skills, and patient safety, such as in use of electrosurgical equipment. Conclusions VR simulation has the potential to become an essential piece of surgical education curriculum but depends heavily on the establishment of an agreed upon set of goals. Researchers and clinicians must collaborate to allocate funding toward projects that help achieve these goals. The recommendations outlined here should guide further study and implementation of VR simulation. PMID:25925424

  16. Identifying Opportunities for Virtual Reality Simulation in Surgical Education: A Review of the Proceedings from the Innovation, Design, and Emerging Alliances in Surgery (IDEAS) Conference: VR Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasky, Jaisa; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Seymour, Neal E; Magee, J Harvey; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Lin, Ming C; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Brunt, L Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Cao, Caroline G L; De, Suvranu; Jones, Daniel B

    2015-10-01

    To conduct a review of the state of virtual reality (VR) simulation technology, to identify areas of surgical education that have the greatest potential to benefit from it, and to identify challenges to implementation. Simulation is an increasingly important part of surgical training. VR is a developing platform for using simulation to teach technical skills, behavioral skills, and entire procedures to trainees and practicing surgeons worldwide. Questions exist regarding the science behind the technology and most effective usage of VR simulation. A symposium was held to address these issues. Engineers, educators, and surgeons held a conference in November 2013 both to review the background science behind simulation technology and to create guidelines for its use in teaching and credentialing trainees and surgeons in practice. Several technologic challenges were identified that must be overcome in order for VR simulation to be useful in surgery. Specific areas of student, resident, and practicing surgeon training and testing that would likely benefit from VR were identified: technical skills, team training and decision-making skills, and patient safety, such as in use of electrosurgical equipment. VR simulation has the potential to become an essential piece of surgical education curriculum but depends heavily on the establishment of an agreed upon set of goals. Researchers and clinicians must collaborate to allocate funding toward projects that help achieve these goals. The recommendations outlined here should guide further study and implementation of VR simulation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Summer Meal Capacity Builder

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Agriculture — Allows users to search for summer meal sites from the previous summer by zip code, adding “layers” of information, such as free and reduced-price lunch participation...

  18. Antroduodenectomy with Gastroduodenal Anastomosis: Salvage Emergency Surgery for Complicated Peptic Ulcer Disease--Results of a Double Institution Study of 35 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereau, Nathalie; Chandeze, Marie-Maëlle; Tantardini, Camille; Trésallet, Christophe; Lefevre, Jérémie H; Parc, Yann; Menegaux, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic and interventional techniques are currently the mainstay of management of bleeding duodenal ulcer. As well, for patients with perforated duodenal ulcer, laparoscopic simple closure is nowadays usually performed. Although indications for emergency antroduodenectomy have declined, this procedure is still necessary as a salvage option when conservative management has failed or is not practicable. Our study aimed to evaluate indications and results of antroduodenectomy with gastroduodenal anastomosis in current practice and to examine the factors that predict operative outcomes. All patients who underwent emergency antroduodenectomy with gastroduodenal anastomosis in two surgical care departments specialized in emergency digestive surgery were studied from 2000 to 2015. Thirty-five patients (27 males, 77 %) with a median age of 68 years (20-90) underwent emergency antroduodenectomy with gastroduodenal anastomosis. Indications were bleeding and perforated duodenal ulcer in 24 and 11 patients, respectively. The overall complication rate was 69 %, especially because of a high rate of medical complications (57 %). Only two patients (6 %) required reoperation for anastomotic leakage. The overall mortality rate was 40 % (n = 14). According to the univariate analysis, age >70, >3 comorbidities, ASA score >2, and postoperative medical complications were associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality. In the multivariate analysis, age and ASA score remained independent risk factors. No recurrence of complicated duodenal disease was observed. Antroduodenectomy with gastroduodenal anastomosis is a safe and effective long-term strategy, with a low and acceptable rate of surgical complications, for complicated duodenal ulcer not responding to conservative measures.

  19. Effect-site concentration of remifentanil for preventing cough during emergence in elderly patients undergoing nasal surgery: a comparison with adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo JY

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ji Young Yoo,1 Jong Yeop Kim,1 Hyun Jeong Kwak,2 Dong Chul Lee,2 Go Wun Kim,1 Sook Young Lee,1 Yun Jeong Chae1 1Department of Anaesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, 2Department of Anaesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Gachon University, Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Korea Purpose: Prevention of cough during emergence after nasal surgery is important for avoiding surgical site bleeding. We investigated the remifentanil effect-site concentration in 50% (EC50 of the elderly patients undergoing nasal surgery for smooth emergence without cough and compared it with that of adult patients.Methods: Twenty-two elderly (aged 65–80 years and 25 adult patients (aged 20–60 years with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I/II undergoing nasal surgery were enrolled. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. Remifentanil EC50 and EC95 for preventing cough were determined using the modified Dixon’s up-and-down method and isotonic regression with bootstrapping approach. Recovery profiles were also recorded.Results: With Dixon’s up-and-down method, the EC50 of remifentanil in elderly patients (2.40±0.25 ng/mL was not significantly different from that of adults (2.33±0.30 ng/mL (P=0.687. With isotonic regression, the EC95 of remifentanil in elderly patients (3.32 [95% confidence interval: 3.06–3.38] ng/mL was not significantly different from that of adults (3.30 [95% confidence interval: 2.96–3.37] ng/mL. However, eye opening time (14.1±3.8 vs 12.0±2.9 seconds, extubation time (17.2±4.1 vs 14.0±3.0 seconds, and postanesthesia care unit duration (44.5±7.6 vs 38.7±3.4 minutes in elderly patients were significantly longer than those in adults (P<0.05.Conclusion: Remifentanil EC50 for preventing cough after nasal surgery with sevoflurane anesthesia did not differ between elderly and adult patients. However, delayed awakening and respiratory adverse events may warrant attention

  20. Association between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin and post-operative infections after non-emergent surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Blankush, Joseph M.; Leitman, I. Michael; Soleiman, Aron; Tran, Trung

    2016-01-01

    Background: A chronic state of impaired glucose metabolism affects multiple components of the immune system, possibly leading to an increased incidence of post-operative infections. Such infections increase morbidity, length of stay, and overall cost. This study evaluates the correlation between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and post-operative infections. Study design: Adult patients undergoing non-emergent procedures across all surgical subspecialties from January...

  1. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF PREOPERATIVE SKIN PREPARATION WITH AQUEOUS POVIDONE IODINE ONLY AND IN COMBINATION WITH ALCHOLIC CHLORHEXIDINE IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latchu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Many techniques are there for skin preparation before surgery, the commonest being initial scrub with antiseptic soap solution, followed by painting the prepared area with antiseptic paint solution. But degerming of the skin can be done with antiseptics us ed for less than one minute which is as effective as five minute scrub with germicidal soap solution followed by painting with antiseptics . AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : 1. To evaluate the efficacy of povidone iodine alone and antiseptic agent containing alcoholic chlorhexidine with povidone iodine in preoperative skin preparation by taking swab culture. 2. To compare the rate of postoperative wound infection in both the groups . METHODS: STUDY DESIGN: Comparative study conducted on 100 patients in two groups. STUDY SETTING: Sri Venkateswara Medical College Tirupathi SOURCE OF DATA: 100 Patients (50 in each Group undergoing elective and emergency surgery admitted in the Department of General Surgery in S.V.R.R. Government General Hospital, Tirupati from 2013 to 2014. INCLUSION CRITERIA: 1. Patients undergoing elective & emergency surgery in department of general surgery. 2. Patients with no focus of infection anywhere on the body. 3. Patients irrespective of their age and sex. 4. Patients neither immunocompromised nor on any long term steroids. 5. Patients undergoing mes h repair of hernia are also included. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: 1. Immuno compromised patients and patients on long term steroids. 2. Patients with septicemia. 3. Patients suffering from malignancies or undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy. 4. Contaminat ed surgeries in which viscus was opened were excluded from the study. 5. Patients with co - morbid medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension etc. METHOD OF COLLECTION OF DATA: In each case preoperatively, detailed history was taken and routine investiga tions like haemoglobin, total count, differential count, ESR, RBS and chest X - ray, ultrasound were done to

  2. Single-incision video-assisted thoracoscopic evaluation and emergent surgery for severe lung and chest wall injury after thoracic trauma in a water park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesma, Julio; Alvarez, Melodie; Lirio, Francisco; Galvez, Carlos; Galiana, Maria; Baschwitz, Benno; Fornes, Francisca; Bolufer, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    Thoracic trauma is a challenging situation with potential severe chest wall and intrathoracic organ injuries. We present a case of emergent surgery in a 23-year-old man with hemorrhagic shock due to massive lung and chest wall injury after thoracic trauma in a water slide. We performed a SI-VATS approach in order to define intrathoracic and chest wall injuries, and once checked the extension of the chest wall injury, we added a middle size thoracotomy just over the affected area in order to stabilize rib fractures with Judet plates, that had caused massive laceration in left lower lobe (LLL) and injured the pericardium causing myocardical tear. After checking bronchial and vascular viability of LLL we suggested a lung parenchyma preserving technique with PTFE protected pulmonary primary suture in order to avoid a lobectomy. Chest tubes were removed on 3 rd postoperative day and patient was discharged on 14 th postoperative day. He has already recovered his normal activity 6 months after surgery.

  3. Relationship between admission blood glucose level and prognosis in elderly patients without previously known diabetes who undergo emergency non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinling; He, Lei; Wang, Xiujie; Gao, Meng; Zhao, Yuexiang; Liu, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Elevated blood glucose levels on admission are important as a marker for adverse events in patients who undergo surgery. This study aims to evaluate the relationship between admission glucose level and adverse outcome during the 30-day follow-up period in elderly patients without previously known diabetes who undergo emergency non-cardiac surgery. The primary and secondary end points were all-cause and major adverse cardiac event (MACE) mortalities, respectively, during the 30-day postoperative follow-up period. Higher 30-day all-cause (24.1 %) and MACE (13.7 %) mortalities were observed in patients with an admission glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/L than in patients with admission glucose blood glucose level is an independent predictor for the development of the 30-day all-cause mortality [odds ratio (OR), 1.91; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.746-2.082; p blood glucose level ≥ 11.1 mmol/L has worse event-free survival than an admission blood glucose level <11.1 mmol/L.

  4. Pitfalls in communication that lead to nonbeneficial emergency surgery in elderly patients with serious illness: description of the problem and elements of a solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Zara; Courtwright, Andrew; Karlage, Ami; Gawande, Atul; Block, Susan

    2014-12-01

    To provide a description of communication breakdowns and to identify interventions to improve surgical decision making for elderly patients with serious illness and acute, life-threatening surgical conditions. Communication between surgeons, patients, and surrogates about goals of treatment plays an important and understudied role in determining the surgical interventions elderly patients with serious illness receive. Communication breakdowns may lead to nonbeneficial procedures in acute events near the end of life. We review the available literature on factors that lead to communication challenges and nonbeneficial surgery at the end of life. We use this review to identify solutions for navigating surgical decision making for seriously ill elderly patients with acute surgical conditions. Surgeon, patient, surrogate, and systemic factors-including time constraints, inadequate provider communication skills and training, uncertainty about prognosis, patient and surrogate anxiety and fear of inaction, and limitations in advance care planning-contribute to communication challenges and nonbeneficial surgery at the end of life. Surgeons could accomplish more effective communication with seriously ill elderly patients if they had a structured, standardized approach to exploring patients' preferences and to integrating those preferences into surgical decisions in the acute setting. Improved communication among surgeons, patients, and surrogates is necessary to ensure that patients receive the care that they want and to avoid nonbeneficial treatment. Further research is needed to learn how to best structure these conversations in the emergency surgical setting.

  5. Emergency surgery and Limitation of therapeutic effort in relation to neurologic deterioration in elderly patients – a survey of European surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Păduraru

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. In emergency surgery, a very heterogeneous approach is required in the decision making process, especially when considering the patient’s postoperative quality of life as well as medical, ethical, and legal factors. In some cases, the presence of an Advance Directive (AD form may potentially help resolve the surgeon’s dilemma. Objectives. The primary objective of this survey was to investigate the opinions of surgeons across a representative cross-section of European countries regarding the decision making process using a specific case scenario so as to identify similarities and differences in practice. A secondary objective was to identify the possibility of establishing a more uniform approach and best practice. Method. A survey was conducted of surgeons from a range of European countries. Questionnaires were designed to obtain an overview of decision making in relation to the Limitation of Therapeutic Effort (LTE using a specific case study and the level of awareness and practical use of ADs. Surveys were distributed via email to the members of the ESTES (European Society for Trauma and Emergency Surgery and AEC (Association of Spanish surgeons, with voluntary, anonymous participation. Conclusions. Clear and additional support in the form of legal and ethical guidance with clinical protocols for surgical practice in such case scenarios is necessary. Wider use of ADs, together with education about their role and support for patients and relatives, would benefit the type of patient described in our scenario. A multidisciplinary team should play a more active role in decision making in order to avoid surgical procedures that are potentially futile. The concepts of LTE and Quality of life need a broader understanding among surgeons as well as more consistent application.

  6. Cirurgia cardíaca de emergência para ressecção de mixoma atrial esquerdo Cardiac surgery of emergency for resection of left atrial myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Augusto Ramalho Motta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available É descrito caso de paciente do sexo feminino que apresentava manifestações pulmonares e sistêmicas inespecíficas há vários meses, as quais resultaram em várias internações hospitalares com a hipótese diagnóstica de fibrose pulmonar. Estudo ecocardiográfico evidenciou a presença de grande mixoma pediculado no átrio esquerdo, que prolapsava, através da valva mitral, para o ventrículo esquerdo. Em condições clínicas bastante desfavoráveis, a paciente foi encaminhada ao nosso Serviço para tratamento cirúrgico, evoluindo durante o preparo pré-operatório com edema agudo pulmonar e instabilidade hemodinâmica, sendo submetida a cirurgia de emergência, com sucesso, para ressecção da tumoração. A paciente encontra-se assintomática.We report case of a female patient who during months presented pulmonary manifestation associated with nonspecific systemic symptoms resulting in several hospitalizations with the diagnostic hypothesis of pulmonary fibrosis. The echocardiographic study showed a great pedunculated left atrial myxoma prolapsing through the mitral valve for the left ventricle. In quite unfavorable clinical conditions the patient was sent to our Service for surgical treatment, evolving during the preparation for surgery with acute pulmonary edema and hemodinamic instability being submitted to a successfully surgery of emergency for resection of the tumor. The patient is asymptomatic.

  7. Your Best Summer Ever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    "It must be nice to have summers off." Only other teachers know just how short summer is, with much of August devoted to planning for the new school year. This article offers 17 fresh ideas for exploring, making money, and preparing for next year. Plus, a reading list that hits all the marks!

  8. Indian Summer Arts Festival


    OpenAIRE

    Martel, Yann; Tabu; Tejpal, Tarun; Kunzru, Hari

    2011-01-01

    The SFU Woodward's Cultural Unit partnered with the Indian Summer Festival Society to kick off the inaugural Indian Summer Festival. Held at the Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, it included an interactive Literature Series with notable authors from both India and Canada, including special guests Yann Martel, Bollywood superstar Tabu, journalist Tarun Tejpal, writer Hari Kunzru, and many others.

  9. Research summer camp in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyanovskaya, Elizaveta; Melnik, Maksim; Egorov, Vladimir; Gleim, Artur; Lukishova, Svetlana; Kozlov, Sergei; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    ITMO University and the University of Rochester became close partners several years ago. One of the first outcomes of this mutually beneficial partnership was the creation of International Institute of Photonics and Optical Information Technologies led by Prof. Sergei Kozlov and Prof. Xi-Cheng Zhang. Universities have created a double Masters-degree program in optics in 2014, and several ITMO students have been awarded degrees from Rochester. At the same time ITMO University organizes Summer Research camp in Photonics for University of Rochester students. Students spent two weeks in the Northern Capital of Russia learning about the emerging practical applications of femtosecond optics, terahertz biomedicine and quantum information technologies.

  10. Do instability markers predict satisfactory reduction and requirement for later surgery in emergency department patients with wrist fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winayak, Amar; Gossat, Alyza; Cooper, Jenny; Ritchie, Peter; Lim, Wei; Klim, Sharon; Kelly, Anne-Maree

    2018-02-01

    Research suggests that the presence of instability markers in patients with displaced distal radial fractures is associated with poorer outcome. Our aims were to determine whether the presence of previously defined instability markers could predict the likelihood of successful ED reduction and requirement for a secondary procedure after ED reduction. Retrospective cohort study performed by medical record review. Adult ED patients coded as having an isolated wrist fracture and having fracture reduction in ED were eligible for inclusion. Data collected included demographics, history of osteoporosis, mechanism of injury, radiological features on X-rays and performance of a secondary procedure. Outcomes of interest were the rate of successful fracture reduction in ED (against defined radiological criteria), the rate of secondary procedures and the association between the number of defined instability risk factors and successful reduction and performance of a secondary surgical procedure. Analysis was by χ 2 test, receiver operating characteristic curve, logistic regression analyses. Three hundred and nineteen patients were studied; median age 62 years, 77% female. Sixty-five per cent of patients had satisfactory fracture reduction in ED (95% CI 59%-70%). Eighty-six patients underwent a secondary procedure to reduce/stabilise their fracture (28%, 95% CI 23%-33%). Younger age, lack of satisfactory ED reduction and increased number of instability factors were independently predictive of the performance of a secondary procedure. Instability risk factors are common in patients with wrist fractures requiring reduction in ED. The number of instability factors is not a strong predictor of the performance of secondary procedures. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Guidelenines in the management of obstructing cancer of the left colon: consensus conference of the world society of emergency surgery (WSES) and peritoneum and surgery (PnS) society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Obstructive left colon carcinoma (OLCC) is a challenging matter in terms of obstruction release as well of oncological issues. Several options are available and no guidelines are established. The paper aims to generate evidenced based recommendations on management of OLCC. Methods The PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were queried for publications focusing on OLCC published prior to April 2010. A extensive retrieval, analyses, and grading of the literature was undertaken. The findings of the research were presented and largely discussed among panellist and audience at the Consensus Conference of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) and Peritoneum and Surgery (PnS) Society held in Bologna July 2010. Comparisons of techniques are presented and final committee recommendation are enounced. Results Hartmann's procedure should be preferred to loop colostomy (Grade 2B). Hartmann's procedure offers no survival benefit compared to segmental colonic resection with primary anastomosis (Grade 2C+); Hartmann's procedure should be considered in patients with high surgical risk (Grade 2C). Total colectomy and segmental colectomy with intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity, however total colectomy is associated with higher rates impaired bowel function (Grade 1A). Segmental resection and primary anastomosis either with manual decompression or intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity rate (Grade 1A). In palliation stent placement is associated with similar mortality/morbidity rates and shorter hospital stay (Grade 2B). Stents as a bridge to surgery seems associated with lower mortality rate, shorter hospital stay, and a lower colostomy formation rate (Grade 1B). Conclusions Loop colostomy and staged procedure should be adopted in case of dramatic scenario, when neoadjuvant therapy could be expected. Hartmann's procedure should be performed in case of high risk of anastomotic

  12. Guidelenines in the management of obstructing cancer of the left colon: consensus conference of the world society of emergency surgery (WSES and peritoneum and surgery (PnS society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinna Antonio D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstructive left colon carcinoma (OLCC is a challenging matter in terms of obstruction release as well of oncological issues. Several options are available and no guidelines are established. The paper aims to generate evidenced based recommendations on management of OLCC. Methods The PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were queried for publications focusing on OLCC published prior to April 2010. A extensive retrieval, analyses, and grading of the literature was undertaken. The findings of the research were presented and largely discussed among panellist and audience at the Consensus Conference of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES and Peritoneum and Surgery (PnS Society held in Bologna July 2010. Comparisons of techniques are presented and final committee recommendation are enounced. Results Hartmann's procedure should be preferred to loop colostomy (Grade 2B. Hartmann's procedure offers no survival benefit compared to segmental colonic resection with primary anastomosis (Grade 2C+; Hartmann's procedure should be considered in patients with high surgical risk (Grade 2C. Total colectomy and segmental colectomy with intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity, however total colectomy is associated with higher rates impaired bowel function (Grade 1A. Segmental resection and primary anastomosis either with manual decompression or intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity rate (Grade 1A. In palliation stent placement is associated with similar mortality/morbidity rates and shorter hospital stay (Grade 2B. Stents as a bridge to surgery seems associated with lower mortality rate, shorter hospital stay, and a lower colostomy formation rate (Grade 1B. Conclusions Loop colostomy and staged procedure should be adopted in case of dramatic scenario, when neoadjuvant therapy could be expected. Hartmann's procedure should be performed in case of high risk of

  13. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients

  14. Registration Summer Camp 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Reminder: registration for the CERN Staff Association Summer Camp is now open for children from 4 to 6 years old.   More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/. The summer camp is open to all children. The proposed cost is 480.-CHF/week, lunch included. The camp will be open weeks 27, 28, 29 and 30, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For further questions, you are welcome to contact us by email at Summer.Camp@cern.ch. CERN Staff Association

  15. Emergency Department Visits Following Elective Total Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery: Identifying Gaps in Continuity of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Micaela A; Shaffer, Robyn; Remington, Austin; Kwong, Jereen; Curtin, Catherine; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina

    2017-06-21

    Major joint replacement surgical procedures are common, elective procedures with a care episode that includes both inpatient readmissions and postoperative emergency department (ED) visits. Inpatient readmissions are well studied; however, to our knowledge, little is known about ED visits following these procedures. We sought to characterize 30-day ED visits following a major joint replacement surgical procedure. We used administrative records from California, Florida, and New York, from 2010 through 2012, to identify adults undergoing total knee and hip arthroplasty. Factors associated with increased risk of an ED visit were estimated using hierarchical regression models controlling for patient variables with a fixed hospital effect. The main outcome was an ED visit within 30 days of discharge. Among the 152,783 patients who underwent major joint replacement, 5,229 (3.42%) returned to the inpatient setting and 8,883 (5.81%) presented to the ED for care within 30 days. Among ED visits, 17.94% had a primary diagnosis of pain and 25.75% had both a primary and/or a secondary diagnosis of pain. Patients presenting to the ED for subsequent care had more comorbidities and were more frequently non-white with public insurance relative to those not returning to the ED (p care insurance coverage expansions are uncertain; however, there are ongoing attempts to improve quality across the continuum of care. It is therefore essential to ensure that all patients, particularly vulnerable populations, receive appropriate postoperative care, including pain management. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  16. 2003 SOLAS Summer School

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGillis, Wade R

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, the United States provided support for the participation of 18 students, three research assistants, and seven lecturers in the first Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) Summer School...

  17. Summer Meal Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Information pertaining to Summer Meal Sites, as collected by Citiparks in the City of Pittsburgh Department of Parks and Recreation. This dataset includes the...

  18. Summer Steelhead Distribution [ds341

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Summer Steelhead Distribution October 2009 Version This dataset depicts observation-based stream-level geographic distribution of anadromous summer-run steelhead...

  19. Cognitive Style and Mobile E-Learning in Emergent Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Disorders for Millennial Undergraduate Medical Students: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Chao, Yi-Ping; Huang, Chung-Guei; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Wang, Shu-Ling; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Kang, Chung-Jan; Hsin, Li-Jen; Lin, Wan-Ni; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2018-02-13

    Electronic learning (e-learning) through mobile technology represents a novel way to teach emergent otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) disorders to undergraduate medical students. Whether a cognitive style of education combined with learning modules can impact learning outcomes and satisfaction in millennial medical students is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of cognitive styles and learning modules using mobile e-learning on knowledge gain, competence gain, and satisfaction for emergent ORL-HNS disorders. This randomized controlled trial included 60 undergraduate medical students who were novices in ORL-HNS at an academic teaching hospital. The cognitive style of the participants was assessed using the group embedded figures test. The students were randomly assigned (1:1) to a novel interactive multimedia (IM) group and conventional Microsoft PowerPoint show (PPS) group matched by age, sex, and cognitive style. The content for the gamified IM module was derived from and corresponded to the textbook-based learning material of the PPS module (video lectures). The participants were unblinded and used fully automated courseware containing the IM or PPS module on a 7-inch tablet for 100 min. Knowledge and competence were assessed using multiple-choice questions and multimedia situation tests, respectively. Each participant also rated their global satisfaction. All of the participants (median age 23 years, range 22-26 years; 36 males and 24 females) received the intended intervention after randomization. Overall, the participants had significant gains in knowledge (median 50%, interquartile range [IQR]=17%-80%, Plearning modules (IM or PPS) had significant effects on both knowledge gain (both adjusted Plearning is an effective modality to improve knowledge of emergent ORL-HNS in millennial undergraduate medical students. Our findings suggest the necessity of developing various modules for undergraduate medical students with

  20. Management of diabetes at summer camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciambra, Roberta; Locatelli, Chiara; Suprani, Tosca; Pocecco, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience in the organization of diabetic children summer-camps since 1973. Guidelines for organization have been recently reported by the SIEDP (Società Italiana di Endocrinologia e Diabetologia Pediatrica). Our attention is focused on diabetes management at camp, organization and planning, medical staff composition and staff training, treatment of diabetes-related emergencies, written camp management plan, diabetes education and psychological issues at camp, prevention of possible risks, assessment of effectiveness of education in summer camps and research at camp.

  1. Summer Camp Registrations 2018

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Registration for the CERN SA Summer camp, for children from 4 to 6 years old, is now open. The general conditions are available on the EVE and School website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch For further questions, please contact us by email at  Summer.Camp@cern.ch An inscription per week is proposed, for 450.-CHF/week, lunch included. The camp will be open on weeks 27, 28, 29 and 30, from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm. This year the theme will be Vivaldi’s Four Seasons.

  2. Emergency cardiac surgery during transfemoral and transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation: incidence, reasons, management, and outcome of 411 patients from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griese, Daniel P; Reents, Wilko; Kerber, Sebastian; Diegeler, Anno; Babin-Ebell, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is increasingly performed in high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Incidence and impact of emergency cardiac surgery (ECS) during TAVI is unclear. Two-hundred twenty one transapical (TA) and 190 transfemoral (TF) TAVIs were performed at our hospital between 01/2009 and 12/2012. Twenty patients (4.9%) required ECS, more frequently in the TF- (n = 11; 5.8%) than in the TA-group (n = 9; 4.1%; P = 0.017). ECS-cases were evenly distributed throughout the 4 years. Baseline characteristics of the ECS-patients were not different from the non-ECS-patients. Reasons were acute cardiac failure, coronary obstruction, annular rupture, valve migration, right- and left-ventricular perforation, severe paravalvular leakage, aortic dissection, and mitral valve damage. Surgical intervention consisted of peripheral CPB, switch to TA, thoracotomy and suture of perforated cardiac chambers and conventional aortic valve replacement with concomitant repair of associated cardiovascular injury. Thirty-day mortality was 35.0%, and 55.0% could be salvaged to hospital discharge. Kaplan-Meier 1-year survival curves were significantly impaired for patients requiring ECS (TF: P proportion during TAVI. ECS dramatically affects early and late outcome after TAVI. Under optimal conditions more than half of the ECS-patients can be salvaged. With the current technology of THV-systems ECS should be an integral part of the logistic conditions surrounding TAVI and is far from being futile in this patient population. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients' relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants' demographic data, the participants' opinions regarding their support for the family's presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants' attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients' families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities were not open

  4. ASHRAE Summer Meeting 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbeck, Claus Christian

    1998-01-01

    ASHRAE's (American Society for Heating, Refrigerating and Air- Condition Engineering) summer meeting was visited in June in Toronto. ASHRAE is an American organization dealing with American problems in HVAC, but many results can be used under Danish conditions. It is therefore essential that Danish...

  5. Summer of history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2017-01-01

    This summer, the University of Groningen will host three events—yes, three—that will be of special interest to the historically- and theoretically-inclined. The meeting of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science (HOPOS) will be held on July 9-12, a workshop exploring the

  6. Books for Summer Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phi Delta Kappan, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Advises administrators to use their summers to relax and recharge their intellectual batteries. Reading suggestions include Edith Wharton's "House of Mirth," Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper," Amy Tan's "Joy Luck Club," China Achebe's "Things Fall Apart," Paule Marshall's "The Chosen…

  7. Mobile Technology in E-Learning for Undergraduate Medical Education on Emergent Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Disorders: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Wang, Shu-Ling; Chao, Yi-Ping; Tsai, Ming-Shao; Hsin, Li-Jen; Kang, Chung-Jan; Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Chao, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Guei; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Chuang, Cheng-Keng

    2018-03-08

    The use of mobile technology in e-learning (M-TEL) can add new levels of experience and significantly increase the attractiveness of e-learning in medical education. Whether an innovative interactive e-learning multimedia (IM) module or a conventional PowerPoint show (PPS) module using M-TEL to teach emergent otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) disorders is feasible and efficient in undergraduate medical students is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of a novel IM module with a conventional PPS module using M-TEL for emergent ORL-HNS disorders with regard to learning outcomes, satisfaction, and learning experience. This pilot study was conducted at an academic teaching hospital and included 24 undergraduate medical students who were novices in ORL-HNS. The cognitive style was determined using the Group Embedded Figures Test. The participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to one of the two groups matched by age, sex, and cognitive style: the IM group and the PPS group. During the 100-min learning period, the participants were unblinded to use the IM or PPS courseware on a 7-inch tablet. Pretests and posttests using multiple-choice questions to evaluate knowledge and multimedia situational tests to evaluate competence were administered. Participants evaluated their satisfaction and learning experience by the AttrakDiff2 questionnaire, and provided feedback about the modules. Overall, the participants had significant gains in knowledge (median of percentage change 71, 95% CI 1-100, Plearning. Although there was no significant difference in knowledge gain between the two groups (median of difference of percentage change 24, 95% CI -75 to 36; P=.55), competence gain was significantly lower in the IM group compared with the PPS group (median of difference of percentage change -41, 95% CI -67 to -20; P=.008). However, the IM group had significantly higher scores of satisfaction (difference 2, 95% CI 2-4; P=.01), pragmatic quality

  8. Mobile Technology in E-Learning for Undergraduate Medical Education on Emergent Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Disorders: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Wang, Shu-Ling; Chao, Yi-Ping; Tsai, Ming-Shao; Hsin, Li-Jen; Kang, Chung-Jan; Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Chao, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Guei; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2018-01-01

    Background The use of mobile technology in e-learning (M-TEL) can add new levels of experience and significantly increase the attractiveness of e-learning in medical education. Whether an innovative interactive e-learning multimedia (IM) module or a conventional PowerPoint show (PPS) module using M-TEL to teach emergent otorhinolaryngology–head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) disorders is feasible and efficient in undergraduate medical students is unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the impact of a novel IM module with a conventional PPS module using M-TEL for emergent ORL-HNS disorders with regard to learning outcomes, satisfaction, and learning experience. Methods This pilot study was conducted at an academic teaching hospital and included 24 undergraduate medical students who were novices in ORL-HNS. The cognitive style was determined using the Group Embedded Figures Test. The participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to one of the two groups matched by age, sex, and cognitive style: the IM group and the PPS group. During the 100-min learning period, the participants were unblinded to use the IM or PPS courseware on a 7-inch tablet. Pretests and posttests using multiple-choice questions to evaluate knowledge and multimedia situational tests to evaluate competence were administered. Participants evaluated their satisfaction and learning experience by the AttrakDiff2 questionnaire, and provided feedback about the modules. Results Overall, the participants had significant gains in knowledge (median of percentage change 71, 95% CI 1-100, P<.001) and competence (median of percentage change 25, 95% CI 0-33, P=.007) after 100 min of learning. Although there was no significant difference in knowledge gain between the two groups (median of difference of percentage change 24, 95% CI −75 to 36; P=.55), competence gain was significantly lower in the IM group compared with the PPS group (median of difference of percentage change −41, 95% CI −67 to

  9. Cognitive Style and Mobile E-Learning in Emergent Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Disorders for Millennial Undergraduate Medical Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yi-Ping; Huang, Chung-Guei; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Wang, Shu-Ling; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Kang, Chung-Jan; Hsin, Li-Jen; Lin, Wan-Ni; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2018-01-01

    Background Electronic learning (e-learning) through mobile technology represents a novel way to teach emergent otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) disorders to undergraduate medical students. Whether a cognitive style of education combined with learning modules can impact learning outcomes and satisfaction in millennial medical students is unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of cognitive styles and learning modules using mobile e-learning on knowledge gain, competence gain, and satisfaction for emergent ORL-HNS disorders. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 60 undergraduate medical students who were novices in ORL-HNS at an academic teaching hospital. The cognitive style of the participants was assessed using the group embedded figures test. The students were randomly assigned (1:1) to a novel interactive multimedia (IM) group and conventional Microsoft PowerPoint show (PPS) group matched by age, sex, and cognitive style. The content for the gamified IM module was derived from and corresponded to the textbook-based learning material of the PPS module (video lectures). The participants were unblinded and used fully automated courseware containing the IM or PPS module on a 7-inch tablet for 100 min. Knowledge and competence were assessed using multiple-choice questions and multimedia situation tests, respectively. Each participant also rated their global satisfaction. Results All of the participants (median age 23 years, range 22-26 years; 36 males and 24 females) received the intended intervention after randomization. Overall, the participants had significant gains in knowledge (median 50%, interquartile range [IQR]=17%-80%, P<.001) and competence (median 13%, IQR=0%-33%, P=.006). There were no significant differences in knowledge gain (40%, IQR=13%-76% vs 60%, IQR=20%-100%, P=.42) and competence gain (0%, IQR= −21% to 38% vs 25%, IQR=0%-33%, P=.16) between the IM and PPS groups. However, the IM group had

  10. Summer 2014 Pathways Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Over the summer I had the exciting opportunity to work for NASA at the Kennedy Space Center as a Mission Assurance Engineering intern. When I was offered a position in mission assurance for the Safety and Mission Assurance directorate's Launch Services Division, I didn't really know what I would be doing, but I knew it would be an excellent opportunity to learn and grow professionally. In this report I will provide some background information on the Launch Services Division, as well as detail my duties and accomplishments during my time as an intern. Additionally, I will relate the significance of my work experience to my current academic work and future career goals. This report contains background information on Mission Assurance Engineering, a description of my duties and accomplishments over the summer of 2014, and relates the significance of my work experience to my school work and future career goals. It is a required document for the Pathways program.

  11. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  12. Summer and Autumn activities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Time to recharge the batteries, and much more… The summer holidays are an ideal opportunity to spend more time with the family, to discover new countries, make new friends, in other words to take time away from the daily grind. This recharging is essential to your work-life balance, and CERN, as a modern and socially responsible employer, has recognized this as a central part of its human resources policy.Nevertheless we should not forget that, while many of you enjoy a well-deserved summer break, some of our colleagues are hard at work making LS1 (first Long Shutdown) a success in order to guarantee that at the beginning of 2015 the LHC will be able to start physics in an energy range never before reached by mankind. Preparing the questionnaire and the elections to the Staff Council During this summer your delegates in the Staff Council are hard at work preparing for the upcoming five-yearly review whose content will be decided by CERN Council in June 2014. Therefore, as every five years, to ...

  13. Controls on summer low flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, C. B.; McNamara, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Summer low flow has significant impacts on aquatic flora and fauna, municipal water use, and power generation. However, the controls on the minimum annual summer discharge are complex, including a combination of snowmelt dynamics, summer evapotranspiration demand, and spring, summer precipitation patterns and surface - groundwater interactions. This is especially true in the Rocky Mountain West of the United States, where snowpack provides the majority of water available for spring runoff and groundwater replenishment. In this study, we look at summer low flow conditions at four snow dominated catchments (26 km2 - 2200 km2) in South-central Idaho currently feeling the effects of climate change. Measures of snowmelt dynamics, summer evapotranspiration demand and spring and summer precipitation are used to determine the dominant controls on late summer low flow magnitude, timing and duration. These analyses show that the controls vary between watersheds, with significant implications for the impacts of climate change in snow dominated areas of the Rocky Mountain West.

  14. Allegheny County Summer Food Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data set shows the Summer Food Sites located within Allegheny County for children (18 years and younger) for breakfast and lunch during summer recess. OPEN...

  15. [Analysis of projects received and funded in fields of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery from National Natural Science Foundation of China during 2010-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kun; Wang, Linlin; Chen, Xulin; Cao, Yongqian; Xiang, Chuan; Xue, Lixiang; Yan, Zhangcai

    2014-01-01

    To summarized the projects received and funded in the fields of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery from National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) during 2010-2013, put forward the thinking and perspective of this future trend in these fields. The number of the funded project and total funding in the fields of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery from NSFC during 2010-2013 had been statistical analyzed, in the meantime, the overview situation of various branches in basic research and further preliminary analysis the research frontier and hot issues have been analyzed. (1) The number of funded project were 581 in H15 of NSFC during 2010-2013, total funding reached to 277.13 million RMB, including 117 projects in H1511 (emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery and other science issue), 96 projects in H1507 (wound healing and scar), 88 projects in H1502 (multi-organ failure), 71 projects in H1505 (burn), 61 projects in H1504 (trauma). (2) The top 10 working unit for project funding in the field of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery present as Third Military Medical University (70), Shanghai Jiao tong University (69), Second Military Medical University (40), Chinese PLA General Hospital (36), Forth Military Medical University (35), Zhejiang University (22), Sun Yat-Sen University (18), Southern Medical University (14), China Medical University (11), Capital Medical University (11) respectively, the number of funded project positive correlated with funding. (3) The funded research field in H15 covered almost all important organs and system injury or repair research, our scientists reached a fairly high level in some research field, for example, sepsis, trauma, repair, et al. "Sepsis" was funded 112 projects in H15 for 4 years, the growth rate became rapid and stable comparing to shock, burns and cardiopulmonary resuscitation funded projects

  16. Next Generation Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2013-04-01

    On 21.06.2010 the "Next Generation" Summer School has opened the doors for its first students. They were introduced in the astronomy world by astronomical observations, astronomy and radio-astronomy lectures, laboratory projects meant to initiate them into modern radio astronomy and radio communications. The didactic programme was structure as fallowing: 1) Astronomical elements from the visible spectrum (lectures + practical projects) 2) Radio astronomy elements (lectures + practical projects) 3) Radio communication base (didactic- recreative games) The students and professors accommodation was at the Agroturistic Pension "Popasul Iancului" situated at 800m from the Marisel Observatory. First day (summer solstice day) began with a practical activity: determination of the meridian by measurements of the shadow (the direction of one vertical alignment, when it has the smallest length). The experiment is very instructive and interesting because combines notions of physics, spatial geometry and basic astronomy elements. Next day the activities took place in four stages: the students processed the experimental data obtained on first day (on sheets of millimetre paper they represented the length of the shadow alignments according the time), each team realised its own sun quadrant, point were given considering the design and functionality of these quadrant, the four teams had to mimic important constellations on carton boards with phosphorescent sticky stars and the students, accompanied by the professors took a hiking trip to the surroundings, marking the interest point coordinates, using a GPS to establish the geographical coronations and at the end of the day the students realised a small map of central Marisel area based on the GPS data. On the third day, the students were introduced to basic notions of radio astronomy, the principal categories of artificial Earth satellites: low orbit satellites (LEO), Medium orbit satellites (MEO) and geostationary satellites (GEO

  17. Summer Camp, July 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    During the month of July, the Staff Association’s Children’s Day-Care Centre and School EVEE held a summer camp for 4- to 6-year-olds. 24 children altogether joined in on the adventures. On the summer camp, the children got to “travel” to a different continent of the world every week. Day after day, they would pass through make-believe Customs upon arrival and get their passports stamped by a “customs officer”. For the first week, we went on a trip to Africa. In the spirit of the theme, the children got to do plenty of crafts and coloring, make their own little bindles and play various games. They even had the chance to visit the Museum of Ethnography in Geneva (MEG), learn to play the balafon and make musical instruments with Sterrenlab. For the second week, we set off to discover the Americas, exploring both the South and the North. Alongside different workshops (singing, dancing, storytelling, crafts), the children could enjoy several special ac...

  18. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery; Nasal obstruction - turbinate surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or ... This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  19. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often. Each type of surgery has advantages and disadvantages. Bariatric Surgery Benefits Bariatric surgery can improve many ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Workshops Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  20. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Robotic surgery may also be used. Lung surgery using ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  1. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Plastic Surgery KidsHealth / For Teens / Plastic Surgery What's in ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  2. Evaluation of Summer Bridge Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lisa D.; Paz, Chiara C.

    2009-01-01

    Many colleges and universities in the United States offer summer programs for their incoming students. While programs are structured and administered in a variety of ways and target various student populations, the most common type of summer bridge program aims to serve historically underrepresented students and students of low socioeconomic…

  3. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 P. WELLS Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 R. ASSMANN The CLIC Concept for a Future Particle Collider at the Energy Frontier Tuesday 30 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (1/2) 10:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (1&2/4) Wednesday 31 July  09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK / F. ANTINORI Discussion Session Thursday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (1/2) Friday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (2/4) 10:15 ? 11:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (2/2) 11:15 ? 12:00 F. BEDESCHI / T. NAKADA Di...

  4. Summer music festivals

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Although July is set to be a crucial time in the working life of the Laboratory, the CERN clubs have organised musical events to make sure that there’s also a chance to chill out and relax. The group Blend at the 2007 Hardronic Festival. From left to right (on stage): Eric Pfirsch, Stephan Petit, Frédéric Lejal, Niklaus Hirt, Paulo Dos Santos with Laurent Tarrano filming.If you have a strong appetite for music the ‘Monts Jura Jazz Festival’, might tempt you this summer. Sponsored by both the CERN Administration and the Staff Association, it is an established highlight of the local arts calendar and will this year be held on 4 and 5 July in Crozet, France. For the third year running established musicians, stars of the jazz scene, and rising talent from France, Switzerland and Brazil will be joining forces to perform an exiting mixture of jazz music. A ‘master class’ in improvisation methods will also be held on Saturda...

  5. Summer student final report

    CERN Document Server

    Guzik, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    During my time spent at CERN I worked under the Technology Department of CERN, in the Machine Protection and Electrical Integrity (MPE) Group. The MPE Group supports LHC operations and maintains state of the art technology for magnet circuit protection and interlock systems for the present and future accelerators, magnet test facilities and CERN hosted experiments[1]. As a member of Magnet Powering Interlocks & Software (TE-MPE-MS) section I was involved in three different projects and used not only CERN developed tools like FESA Framework, but also open source C++ frameworks, Google Test and Google Mock. I had a chance to work with Programmable Logic Controllers and real-time devices known as Front End Computers. I was part of a software developer team, and familiarized myself with the Scrum agile software development methodology. The description and results of my work are presented in three parts of this report. Each part describes a separate project created during my participation in the CERN Summer St...

  6. Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Date Time Title Speaker 05/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Presentation of the Summer Student Programme F. CERUTTI Information on Computing Rules D. HEAGERTY Workshops presentation O. ULLALAND 10:15 - 11:00 Introduction to CERN J. ENGELEN 11:15 Film on CERN 11:00 Introduction to Particle Physics F. CLOSE 11:15 - 12:00 Accelerators (1/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 12:00 Discussion Session 7/07/2006 09:15 - 11:00 Introduction to Particle Physics F. CLOSE 11:15 - 12:00 Accelerators (2/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 12:00 Discussion Session 09:15 - 10:00 Accelerators (3/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 10:15 - 12:00 Detectors (1-2/5) O. ULLALAND 12:00 Discussion Session 11/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Accelerators (4/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 10:15 - 11:00 Detectors (3/5) O. ULLALAND 11:15 - 12:00 Introduction to Nuclear Physics (1/4) P. CHOMAZ P. CHOMAZ 10:15 - 11:00 Accelerators (5/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 11:15 - 12:00 Detectors (4/5) O. ULLALAND 12:00 Discus...

  7. Summer School on Spintronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Stuart; Idzerda, Yves

    2003-01-01

    Stuart Wolf This book originated as a series of lectures that were given as part of a Summer School on Spintronics in the end of August, 1998 at Lake Tahoe, Nevada. It has taken some time to get these lectures in a form suitable for this book and so the process has been an iterative one to provide current information on the topics that are covered. There are some topics that have developed in the intervening years and we have tried to at least alert the readers to them in the Introduction where a rather complete set of references is provided to the current state of the art. The field of magnetism, once thought to be dead or dying, has seen a remarkable rebirth in the last decade and promises to get even more important as we enter the new millennium. This rebirth is due to some very new insight into how the spin degree of freedom of both electrons and nucleons can play a role in a new type of electronics that utilizes the spin in addition to or in place of the charge. For this new field to mature and prosper, ...

  8. Challenging a classic myth: pneumoperitoneum associated with acute diverticulitis is not an indication for open or laparoscopic emergency surgery in hemodynamically stable patients. A 10-year experience with a nonoperative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costi, Renato; Cauchy, François; Le Bian, Alban; Honart, Jean-François; Creuze, Nicolas; Smadja, Claude

    2012-07-01

    In patients presenting with acute diverticulitis (AD) and signs of acute peritonitis, the presence of extradigestive air (EDA) on a computer tomography (CT) scan is often considered to indicate the need for emergency surgery. Although the traditional management of "perforated" AD is open sigmoidectomy, more recently, laparoscopic drainage/lavage (usually followed by delayed elective sigmoidectomy) has been reported. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the results of nonoperative management of emergency patients presenting with AD and EDA. The outcomes of 39 consecutive hemodynamically stable patients (23 men, mean age = 54.7 years) who were admitted with AD and EDA and were managed nonoperatively (antibiotic and supportive treatment) at a tertiary-care university hospital between January 2001 and June 2010 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. These included morbidity (Clavien-Dindo) and treatment failure (need for emergency surgery or death). A univariate analysis of clinical, radiological, and laboratory criteria with respect to treatment failure was performed. Results of delayed elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy were also analyzed. There was no mortality. Thirty-six of the 39 patients (92.3%) did not need surgery (7 patients required CT-guided abscess drainage). Mean hospital stay was 8.1 days. Duration of symptoms, previous antibiotic administration, severe sepsis, PCR level, WBC concentration, and the presence of abdominal collection were associated with treatment failure, whereas "distant" location of EDA and free abdominal fluid were not. Five patients had recurrence of AD and were treated medically. Seventeen patients (47.2%) underwent elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for which mean operative time was 246 min (range = 100-450) and the conversion rate was 11.8%. Mortality was nil and the morbidity rate was 41.2%. Mean postoperative stay was 7.1 days (range = 4-23). Nonoperative management is a viable option in most emergency

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  10. The effect of ranitidine on postoperative infectious complications following emergency colorectal surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, F; Jensen, L S; Christiansen, P M

    1998-01-01

    AND TREATMENT: One hundred and ninety-four consecutive patients undergoing acute colorectal surgery for perforated and/or obstructed large bowel were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive ranitidine 100 mg i.v. twice a day commencing at induction of anesthesia and continued for five days (group I...... patients were withdrawn from the study (for reasons such as other diagnosis, refused to continue, medication not given as prescribed). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients were observed for signs of infectious complications; such as wound infection, intra-abdominal abscess, septicemia, and pneumonia. RESULTS...

  11. Clinical Comparison of Sinus Lift via Summers Osteotomy and Piezosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Radvar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sinus lift is a process that could be performed by two methods. In the closed sinus lift, hybrid materials enter a suitable position through a created cavity. Afterwards, the materials are pressed without damaging the sinus membrane, and the implants are usually placed at the same time. Closed sinus lift is carried out via osteotomy and piezosurgery, and each of the techniques has certain advantages and limitations. The present study aimed to compare the clinical results of closed sinus lift using the summers osteotomy and piezosurgery. Materials and Methods: In this study, 20 patients requiring dental implants in the posterior segment of the maxilla via sinus lift surgery were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received piezosurgery, and the second group underwent summers osteotomy for sinus lift. Postoperative Schneiderian membrane perforation, inflammation, pain, bone gain, and bone loss were compared between the groups six months after the surgery using Mann-Whitney U test and two-sample t-test. Results: In the groups receiving piezosurgery and summers osteotomy, mean sinus lift was 3.6±0.9 and 4.0±2.2 mm, pain score was 1.1±1.2 and 0.9±0.8, bone gain was 2.2±0.8 and 3.1±1.3 mm, and crestal bone loss was 1.1±1.2 and 0.9±0.8 mm, respectively. Moreover, no Schneiderian membrane perforation was observed in the two methods, and the differences between the groups were not considered significant (P>0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, the clinical outcomes of piezosurgery in sinus lift are similar to those of summers osteotomy. Therefore, piezosurgery could be a proper alternative to summers osteotomy in sinus lift surgery.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDY OF PHENOTYPIC FEATURES OF S. EPIDERMIDIS STRAINS AND THEIR ROLE IN THE EMERGENCE AND DEVELOPMENT OF IMPLANT-ASSOCIATED INFECTION AFTER ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bozhkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available S. epidermidis is one of the most common cause of implant-associated infections. Infections due to S. epidermidis rarely develops into life-threatening, however, its prevalence and the difficulties in treating constitute a serious financial burden to the health care system. This study is based on the investigation of phenotypic features (ability to biofilm formation and resistance to antibiotics of S. epidermidis strains isolated from patients with deep surgical site infection after implantation of orthopaedic devices, and on the investigation of the dynamics of clinical and morphological changes during the development of implant-associated infection due to S. epidermidis based on in vivo experimental models. Multidrug-resistance was found in 23% MSSE isolates and 97,3% - MRSE. Vancomycin, linezolid and fosfomycin were the most active in relation to these pathogens. About 40% of the tested isolates were strong biofilm-producing strains. 43,2% of MRSE strains and only 21,4% of MSSE isolates demonstrated strong biofilm production. The proposed experimental model shows that intra-operative infection of implant by multidrug-resistant clinical MRSE strain led to the development of osteomyelitis in rats for 4 weeks after surgery, in spite of the revision operation and installation of antimicrobial cement spacer in the area of bone defect. Thus, S. epidermidis is a clinically significant aetiological factor with high risk of development of infections after major orthopaedic surgery.

  13. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The

  14. Nose Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly ... Terms of Use © Copyright 2018. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, ...

  15. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  16. CERN Summer Student Project Report

    CERN Document Server

    Parton, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    My Summer Student project was divided between two areas: work on Thin Gap Chamber (TGC) Level-1 muon triggers for the ATLAS experiment, and data acquisition (DAQ) for an RPC muon detector at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++)

  17. The year without a summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luterbacher, J.; Pfister, C.

    2015-04-01

    The 1815 eruption of Tambora caused an unusually cold summer in much of Europe in 1816. The extreme weather led to poor harvests and malnutrition, but also demonstrated the capability of humans to adapt and help others in worse conditions.

  18. Summer Student Report - AV Workflow

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Jessie

    2014-01-01

    The AV Workflow is web application which allows cern users to publish, update and delete videos from cds. During my summer internship I implemented the backend of the new version of the AV Worklow in python using the django framework.

  19. Winter/Summer Monsoon Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Winter/Summer Monsoon Experiment (MONEX) was conducted during the First Global GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Experiment (FGGE). An international...

  20. Summer Research Fellowship Programme–2015

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. Summer Research Fellowship Programme - 2015. Information and Announcements Volume 19 Issue 12 December 2014 pp 1199-1199. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. The Burnout on Nurses in ICU, Emergency and Surgery at Teaching Hospital Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences and Relationship with Perceived Stress

    OpenAIRE

    MK Fakhri; A Aslipoor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Nursing Profession is stressful and the stress of the job, it will eventually cause burnout but people's different perception of stressful event can adjust this relation. The purpose of study is to assessment burnout on nurses in ICU, emergency and surgical and relationship with perceived stress. Methods: This is a descriptive analytically cross-sectional study. The population of study were all male and female nurses who are working in 4 teaching hospitals which ...

  2. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hypothyroidism in Children and Adolescents Pediatric Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Nodules in Children and Adolescents Thyroid Surgery Resources Thyroid Surgery Brochure PDF Thyroid Surgery FAQs PDF En Español Cirugia De La Tiroides El folleto de Cirugia De La Tiroides Search Thyroid ...

  3. Summer Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makidi, Nitou

    2012-01-01

    The summer of 2012 has been filled with many memorable events and activities. As an intern, I had responsibilities that had to be fulfilled. My tour of duty was completed as an administrative student trainee in the Information Technology and Communications Services Business Office (IT-A). In accordance with the Business Objectives and Agreement of the Business Office and my performance plan, I was to provide business office support, improve business, project management, and technical work processes. With this being stated, I supported a project called "The Big Move Project" (TBMP), which will take course over the next several years. The Big Move Project is the planning of the Information Technology (IT) Directorate's relocation to various buildings in the course of upcoming years, when designs and the building of Central Campus have been completed. Working directly with my supervisor and the project manager, I was responsible for gathering both administrative and operational area requirements for the Information Technology (IT) Directorate, along with its outsourced support and contractors, such as IMCS, NICS, and ACES. My first action was to create rubrics that will serve as a guideline for the information that should be given by each branch of IT. After receiving that information via a few KAITS actions, I was able to start the consolidation process, and begin working on a presentation. A SharePoint was created shortly after for others to view the progression of the project, which I managed. During the consolidation ofthis information, I would occasionally present to the IT Deputy Director and IT Chiefs. The draft of this presentation was shown to employees of Center Operations (T A) and stakeholders-IT Chief Officers and contractor managers-in the relocation of IT to make them aware of what requirements must be met that will enable IT to be accommodated appropriately in the design of Central Campus Phase 11-the time in which IT and its contractors are scheduled

  4. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned

  5. Cirugía laparoscópica de urgencia en el embarazo ectópico Emergency laparoscopic surgery in ectopic pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Manuel Luzardo Silveira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo y prospectivo de 32 pacientes con embarazo ectópico, tratadas por medio de cirugía laparoscópica en el Hospital Clinicoquirúrgico Docente "Dr. Joaquín Castillo Duany" de Santiago de Cuba desde enero de 2003 hasta diciembre de 2008. Esa gestación anormal prevaleció en mujeres de 15-31 años, en las trompas (tubárico y en la forma complicada (roto. La técnica quirúrgica fue radical en la totalidad de la serie, lo cual garantizó la pronta recuperación de sus integrantes y el alta hospitalaria precoz, sin aumentar el riesgo de complicaciones.A descriptive and prospective study of 32 patients with ectopic pregnancy treated through laparoscopic surgery at "Dr Joaquín Castillo Duany" Teaching Clinical Surgical Hospital in Santiago de Cuba was carried out from January, 2003 to December, 2008. The abnormal gestation, which prevailed in the Fallopian tubes (uterotubal and in the complicated form (broken, was observed in women aged 15-31 years. Surgical technique was radical in the whole series. This guaranteed to patients their soon recovery as well as their earlier discharge from hospital, without increasing complication risks.

  6. Sowing properties of summer rape seeds depending on fertilizers and terms of harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. В. Юник

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the results of research of sowing properties - emergence rate and laboratory germinating capacity seeds summer rape are resulted depending on variants of fertilizers and terms of harvesting.

  7. Emergency procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed - Emergency Procedures: emergency equipment, emergency procedures; emergency procedure involving X-Ray equipment; emergency procedure involving radioactive sources

  8. CERN openlab Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN openlab is currently taking applications for its summer student programme. The closing date for applications is 30 March 2012.   The openlab Summer Student Programme is open for applications from bachelor, master and PhD students in computer science and physics. Successful applicants will spend 8 weeks at CERN, during the period June to September 2012, to work with some of the latest hardware and software technologies. The programme is more than just a summer at CERN: it can lead to follow-on projects at the home institute and may even inspire the students to become entrepreneurs in cutting-edge computing technologies. A series of lectures will be given by experts in various domains of CERN related high-throughput computing. Study tours to external companies and universities as well as to CERN facilities are also part of the programme. Please visit www.cern.ch/openlab-students for more information.

  9. CERN openlab summer student programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    CERN openlab is currently taking applications for its summer student programme. The closing date for applications is 31 March 2013.   The openlab summer student programme is open for applications from bachelor, master and PhD students in computer science and physics. Successful applicants will spend 9 weeks at CERN, during the period from June to September 2013, working with some of the latest hardware and software technologies. The programme is more than just a summer at CERN: it can lead to follow-on projects at the home institute and may even inspire students to become entrepreneurs in cutting-edge computing technologies. A series of lectures will be given by experts in various domains of CERN-related high-throughput computing. Study tours of external companies and universities as well as of CERN facilities are also part of the programme. Please visit the CERN openlab website for more information.

  10. Summer Schools In Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Sue; Herbert, Mieva; Mantica, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This the report for the 5 year activities for the ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry. The American Chemical Society's Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry were held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and San Jose State University (San Jose, CA) during the award period February 1, 2002 to January 31, 2007. The Summer Schools are intensive, six-week program involving both a lecture component covering fundamental principles of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry and a laboratory component allowing hands-on experience for the students to test many of the basic principles they learn about in lecture. Each site hosted 12 undergraduate students annually, and students received coursework credits towards their undergraduate degrees. Up to 7 student credit hours were earned at San Jose State University, and Brookhaven students received up to 6 college credits through BNL's management partner, SUNY Stony Brook. Funding from the award period covered travel, housing, educational expenses, and student stipends, for the 24 undergraduate participants. Furthermore, funding was also used to cover expenses for lecturers and staff to run the programs at the two facilities. The students were provided with nuclear and radiochemistry training equivalent to a three-hour upper-level undergraduate course along with a two-hour hands-on laboratory experience within the six-week summer period. Lectures were held 5 days per week. Students completed an extensive laboratory sequence, as well as radiation safety training at the start of the Summer Schools. The summer school curriculum was enhanced with a Guest Lecture series, as well as through several one-day symposia and organized field trips to nuclear-related research and applied science laboratories. This enrichment afforded an opportunity for students to see the broader impacts of nuclear science in today's world, and to experience some of the future challenges through formal and informal discussions with

  11. Errors and complications in laparoscopic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Liviu Drăghici; Mircea Lițescu; Rubin Munteanu; Constantin Pătru; Carmen L. Gorgan; Radu Mirică; Isabela Drăghici

    2017-01-01

    Background. In laparoscopic surgery errors are unavoidable and require proper acknowledgment to reduce the risk of intraoperative and accurately assess the appropriate therapeutic approach. Fortunately, their frequency is low and cannot overshadow the benefits of laparoscopic surgery. Materials and Methods. We made an epidemiological investigation in General Surgery Department of Emergency Clinical Hospital "St. John" Bucharest, analyzing 20 years of experience in laparoscopic surgery, during...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ...

  13. Summer Student Report - Project Kryolize

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdowski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work and results obtained by the author during his summer student internship at CERN. The author of this document was attached to the project Kryolize as a software developer, overtaking the job from a recently departed technical student.

  14. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in the endoscopy room. GENERAL SURGERY. T du Toit, O C Buchel, S J A Smit. Department of Surgery, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, ... The lack of video instrumentation in developing countries: Redundant fibre-optic instruments (the old. “eye scope”) are still being used. This instrument brings endoscopists ...

  15. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mean time to first surgery post burn was 11.5 days with a median volume of 0.73 mls/kg/% ..... Mode. Mean (SD). Upper limit. 95% CI. Lower limit. 95% CI. Mode. Elective surgery .... evaluating single-unit red blood cell transfusions in reducing.

  16. Choosing surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstensson, Carina; Lohmander, L; Frobell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    -depth qualitative interviews were conducted with young (aged 18-35), physically active individuals with ACL rupture who were participating in a RCT comparing training and surgical reconstruction with training only. 22/34 were randomised to training only but crossed over to surgery. Of these, 11 were interviewed......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective was to understand patients' views of treatment after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and their reasons for deciding to request surgery despite consenting to participate in a randomised controlled trial (to 'cross-over'). METHODS: Thirty-four in...... before surgery, and 11 were interviewed at least 6 months after surgery. To provide additional information, 12 patients were interviewed before randomisation. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using the Framework approach. RESULTS: Strong preference for surgery was commonplace...

  17. Summer Camp July 2017 - Registration

    CERN Multimedia

    EVE et École

    2017-01-01

    The CERN Staff Association’s Summer Camp will be open for children from 4 to 6 years old during four weeks, from 3 to 28 July. Registration is offered on a weekly basis for 450 CHF, lunch included. This year, the various activities will revolve around the theme of the Four Elements. Registration opened on 20 March 2017 for children currently attending the EVE and School of the Association. It will be open from 3 April for children of CERN Members of Personnel, and starting from 24 April for all other children. The general conditions are available on the website of the EVE and School of CERN Staff Association: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch. For further questions, please contact us by email at Summer.Camp@cern.ch.

  18. National Nuclear Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 National Nuclear Physics Summer School (NNPSS) will be held from Monday July 18 through Friday July 29, 2016, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The summer school is open to graduate students and postdocs within a few years of their PhD (on either side) with a strong interest in experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. The program will include the following speakers: Accelerators and Detectors - Elke-Caroline Aschenauer, Brookhaven National Laboratory Data Analysis - Michael Williams, MIT Double Beta Decay - Lindley Winslow, MIT Electron-Ion Collider - Abhay Deshpande, Stony Brook University Fundamental Symmetries - Vincenzo Cirigliano, Los Alamos National Laboratory Hadronic Spectroscopy - Matthew Shepherd, Indiana University Hadronic Structure - Jianwei Qiu, Brookhaven National Laboratory Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 1 - Jamie Nagle, Colorado University Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 2 - Wilke van der Schee, MIT Lattice QCD - Sinead Ryan, Trinity College Dublin Neutrino Theory - Cecil...

  19. Summer Mini Atomiade June 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    The Mini Atomiade are coming to CERN! Members of Clubs supported by the CERN Staff Association and in conjunction with ASCERI (Association of the Sports Communities of the European Research Institutes) will be organising the summer games at the beginning of June. ASCERI aims to contribute to a united Europe through regular sports meetings, bringing together members of public Research Institutes at European level. The Association's members come from over 40 Research Institutes spanning 16 countries. Numerous sports and leisure activities are represented at regular events and each tournament is organised by a different research institute. Clubs in conjunction with the CERN Staff Association have sent teams to previous winter and summer games and now, the CERN Club’s Coordination Committee (CCC) has now taken on the challenge of organising a Mini Atomiade from Friday June 3rd to Monday June 6th 2016 in Divonne-les-Bains. The games are made up of four different tournaments/competitions: Small Fi...

  20. SNOWMASS (DPF Community Summer Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin-Hennessy, et al, Daniel

    2013-08-06

    The 2013 Community Summer Study, known as Snowmass," brought together nearly 700 physicists to identify the critical research directions for the United States particle physics program. Commissioned by the American Physical Society, this meeting was the culmination of intense work over the past year by more than 1000 physicists that defined the most important questions for this field and identified the most promising opportunities to address them. This Snowmass study report is a key resource for setting priorities in particle physics.

  1. Artists Paint ... Summer: Grade 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    A humid summer haze covers the River Seine and the grassy bank where young men and boys go swimming on Sunday. Everything seems so quiet, still, and very hot. They wear hats to protect them from the hot sun. The artist Georges Seurat used warm tones to give viewers the feeling of the hot sun. Seurat was trying to catch the dazzle of hot sunlight…

  2. My Summer with Science Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Marissa

    This past summer I interned at the American Institute of Physics and helped research and write articles for the FYI Science Policy Bulletin. FYI is an objective digest of science policy developments in Washington, D.C. that impact the greater physical sciences community. Over the course of the summer, I independently attended, analyzed, and reported on a variety of science, technology, and funding related events including congressional hearings, government agency advisory committee meetings, and scientific society events. I wrote and co-wrote three articles on basic energy research legislation, the National Institute of Standards and Technology improvement act, and the National Science Foundation's big ideas for future investment. I had the opportunity to examine some challenging questions such as what is the role of government in funding applied research? How should science priorities be set? What is the right balance of funding across different agencies and programs? I learned about how science policy is a two-way street: science is used to inform policy decisions and policy is made to fund and regulate the conduct of science. I will conclude with how my summer working with FYI showed me the importance of science advocacy, being informed, and voting. Society of Physics Students.

  3. Enhanced interdisciplinary care improves self-care ability and decreases emergency department visits for older Taiwanese patients over 2 years after hip-fracture surgery: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Yea-Ing L; Liang, Jersey; Tseng, Ming-Yueh; Li, Hsiao-Juan; Wu, Chi-Chuan; Cheng, Huey-Shinn; Chou, Shih-Wei; Chen, Ching-Yen; Yang, Ching-Tzu

    2016-04-01

    the 2-year follow-up. Comprehensive care, with enhanced rehabilitation, management of malnutrition and depressive symptoms, and fall prevention, improved self-care ability and decreased emergency department visits for elders up to 2 years after hip-fracture surgery, above and beyond the effects of usual care and interdisciplinary care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cataract Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Are Cataracts? Pediatric Cataracts Cataract Diagnosis and Treatment Cataract Surgery IOL Implants: Lens Replacement After Cataracts ...

  5. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  6. Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coding trends along with compliance guidelines and practice marketing materials, APMA has you covered whether you are ... crutches after the surgery or in a cast. Fusions: Fusions are usually performed to treat arthritic or ...

  7. Hemorrhoid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002939.htm Hemorrhoid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemorrhoids are swollen veins around the anus. They may ...

  8. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Sefako Makgatho Health Science University, ... We report on a pilot study on the use of a circumareolar excision and the use of .... and 1 gynecomastia patient) requested reduction in NAC size.

  9. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    influence medical students in pursuing a career in surgery. ... training, females reported significantly higher levels of agreement that surgical training would be better overseas when ..... mentoring surgical research or educational lectures and.

  10. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Department of Surgery, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of ... in 51 reports. Four reports were illegible; one was conducted by a junior consultant, two by a fourth year trainee specialist ... The study period was 12 months from.

  11. Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sinus computed tomography (CT) scan (without contrast), nasal physiology (rhinomanometry and nasal cytology), smell testing, and selected ... altered anatomical landmarks, or where a patient’s sinus anatomy is very unusual, making typical surgery difficult. Image ...

  12. Incidence and hospital mortality of vascular surgery patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Central Hospital (IALCH) intensive care unit (ICU) following vascular surgery between 1 January ... patients have a perioperative myocardial infarction (PMI) and 4.6 .... Emergency surgery was performed in 17.8% of the ..... area is needed.

  13. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Souza, Camila Ribeiro; Maia, Polyana Mendes; Siqueira, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. A utilização de robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos tem sido cada vez mais frequente na atualidade, o que permite a emergência de inúmeras questões bioéticas nesse âmbito. Apresentar revisão sobre os aspectos éticos dos usos de robôs em cirurgia. Realizou-se revisão nas bases de dados Pubmed, SciELO e Lilacs cruzando-se os descritores "bioética", "cirurgia", "ética", "laparoscopia" e "robótica". Do total de citações obtidas, selecionou-se 17 artigos, os quais foram utilizados para a elaboração do artigo. Ele contém breve apresentação sobre a robótica, sua inserção na saúde e os aspectos bioéticos da utilização dos robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos. A cirurgia robótica é uma realidade, hoje, em muitas unidades hospitalares, o que torna essencial a reflexão bioética sobre as relações entre profissionais da saúde, autômatos e pacientes.

  14. Close the Achievement Gap with Summer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Summer vacation from school can bring afternoons at the swimming pool, family vacations, and maybe a spirit-filled summer camp that ignites a passion for art or rock climbing. But for many children, summer also means setbacks in learning that take a tremendous toll on teaching and student performance over time. PTA leaders can make a vital…

  15. Finding Funds to Move Summer Learning Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Summer learning loss creates a permanent drag on the US education system. With the generous support of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) developed "Moving Summer Learning Forward: A Strategic Roadmap for Funding in Tough Times" to provide out-of-school time programs, school districts,…

  16. Tennis elbow surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis - surgery; Lateral tendinosis - surgery; Lateral tennis elbow - surgery ... Surgery to repair tennis elbow is often an outpatient surgery. This means you will not stay in the hospital overnight. You will be given ...

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  18. Mohs micrographic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Basal cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Squamous cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery ... Mohs surgery usually takes place in the doctor's office. The surgery is started early in the morning and is ...

  19. Single-port access laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer: initial experience with 10 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Orhan; Nielsen, Claus B; Jespersen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Single-port access laparoscopic surgery is emerging as a method to improve the morbidity and cosmetic benefits of conventional laparoscopic surgery and minimize the surgical trauma. However, the feasibility of this procedure in rectal surgery has not yet been determined.......Single-port access laparoscopic surgery is emerging as a method to improve the morbidity and cosmetic benefits of conventional laparoscopic surgery and minimize the surgical trauma. However, the feasibility of this procedure in rectal surgery has not yet been determined....

  20. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaigns Share this! EmergencyCareForYou » Emergency 101 » Diabetic Emergencies Diabetic Emergencies It is estimated that more than 20 ... they have it. The best way to prevent diabetic emergencies is to effectively manage the disease through ...

  1. Emergency presurgical visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castro Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective has been to create a Protocol of Structured Presurgical Visit applicable to the patients who are undergoing an emergency surgery, to provide the user and his family all the necessary cares on the basis of those nursing diagnosis that prevail in all the cases of surgical emergency interventions. The used method has been an analysis of the emergency surgical interventions more prevalent from February 2007 until October 2008 in our area (a regional hospital, and statistic of those nursing diagnosis that more frequently appeared in these interventions, the previous moment to the intervention and in addition common to all of them. The results were the following ones: the more frequent emergency operations were: Caesarean, ginecological curettage, laparotomy, help in risk childbirth, orthopaedic surgery and appendectomy. The more frequent nursing diagnosis in all the emergency operations at the previous moment of the intervention were: risk of falls, pain, anxiety, deficit of knowledge, risk of infection, movement stress syndrome, risk of hemorrhage, cutaneous integrity deterioration. The conclusion is that users present at the previous moment to an emergency operation several problems, which force to the emergency surgical ward nurse to the introduction of the nursing methodology, in order to identify the problems, to mark results and to indicate the interventions to achieve those results, besides in a humanitarian way and with quality. This can be obtained by performing a Structured Emergency Presurgical Visit.

  2. Emergency War Surgery: Third United States Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    hospitals in the rear. Though one can hope that major strides in these and other areas of trauma resuscitation will be reflected in a future edition, our...more fervent hope is for mankind’s dream of peace and the exercise of his better Angels, … whereby this Handbook becomes altogether unnecessary. Dave... Ostomy Patients: Vent collection bags to avoid excess gas dislodging the bag from the stoma wafer. Use a straight pin to put two holes in the bag

  3. Maltomas and emergency surgery in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baeza Herrera Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The MALT tumor or maltoma, is a lymphoma type not yet well defined because it seems to be from the lymphatic tissue, but it is not included in that variety. It is more common in adults, the most frequent location is in the stomach. In children this tumor located in the small intestine is rare. We report our surgical experience in three patients who had a MALT tumor located one in the mucosa of the ileum and two in the serosa and mesentery of the small in- testine. Each one had a complication: intussusceptions, bleeding, bowel obstruction. They had to be operated urgently. All three patients are alive, two under surveillance and one under chemotherapy.

  4. SAAPMB summer school and congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Medical and health physics are greatly stimulated by the exchange of personal experiences and research results among scientists working in their particular fields of interests. Individual contact is of exceptional importance in those rapidly developing areas of high technology which we find in hospitals and industry and therefor the social exchange of ideas at the Summer School and Congress is very important. Research in the fields of medical and health physics is covered by the papers and posters presented. 53 articles have been indexed (27 papers and 26 poster presentations), and 14 articles have been considered to be out of scope for INIS

  5. The Vulcano 1994 summer campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, P.; Valenza, M. [CNR, Palermo (Italy). Istituto Geochimica dei Fluidi; Graziani, G.; Martilli, A.; Mosca, S. [JRC Environment Institute, Ispra, Varese (Italy); Pareschi, M.T. [CNR, Pisa, (Italy). Centro di Studio per la Geologia Strutturale e Dinamica dell`Appennino

    1996-03-01

    A set of measurements from various sources was collected for the island of Vulcano (Aeolian archipelago, South Tyrrhenian sea) during summer 1994 with the scope of characterising the circulation pattern and the volcanic emission of the island. Ground meteorological stations were activated, wind profiles from pilot balloons were obtained, ground temperature measurements were produced. Furthermore, temperature and humidity data from satellite (Landsat TM) were also derived. A critical analysis of the data on the gathered information was performed to quantify the volcanic risk related to the toxic-volcanic-gas release in foreseeable paroxysmal events.

  6. Summer Oral Expression English course

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place this summer from 20 August to 29 September.   Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enroll through this link. Please be sure to indicate your planned absences in the comments field so we can schedule the course. If you need more information please send a message to English.training@cern.ch

  7. Summer Oral Expression English course

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place this summer at some time between 25 June and 28 September. The exact dates will be decided according to the preferences of the students.   Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enroll through this link. Please be sure to indicate your planned absences in the comments field so we can schedule the course. If you need more information please send a message to English.training@cern.ch

  8. Summer Oral Expression English course

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place this summer at some time between August 19 and October 4.   Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enroll through this link. Please be sure to indicate your planned absences in the comments field so we can schedule the course. If you need more information please send a message to English.training@cern.ch.

  9. Safe summers: Adapting evidence-based injury prevention into a summer curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Melody; Cioni, Claire; Kozma, Nicole; Rains, Catherine; Todd, Greta

    2017-11-01

    Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death for those aged 0 years to 19 years. St. Louis Children's Hospital created Safety Land, a comprehensive injury prevention intervention which is provided during summer months. This program uses a life-size board game to teach safety education to children in ages 5 years to 11 years. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Safety Land on safety knowledge in children that participated in the intervention. St. Louis Children's Hospital identified ZIP codes with the highest use of the emergency room for injury. Daycares and summer camps within these ZIP codes were targeted for the Safety Land intervention. A multiple choice pretest and posttest survey was designed to measure knowledge change within program participants. Students were selected for testing based on site availably. Within these sites, a convenience sample of children was selected for pretesting and posttesting. Safety Land staff conducted the pretest a week before the intervention, and the posttest was administered the week after the intervention. A total knowledge score was calculated to determine overall knowledge change. Descriptive statistics and independent-samples t tests were conducted to determine statistical significance of change in knowledge (p changes in these youth.

  10. Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Thygesen, Torben Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The literature shows that the indications for orthognathic surgery (OS) are often functional problems and unsatisfactory facial esthetics. This study investigated the esthetic outcomes and overall satisfaction following OS. Somatosensory change is a relatively common complication and its influence...... on the level of satisfaction was studied. The social-networking web site Facebook was used to identify the study population. An online questionnaire was performed using the website SurveyMonkey. In all, 105 (9%) respondents from the Danish Facebook group about OS, called Kaebeoperation (jaw surgery), were...... in beauty than women (P = 0.030). Sixty-four percent replied that their attractiveness had been increased after OS. Eighty-six percent were happy with the results and 89% would recommend the surgery to others in need. No significant differences in esthetic results and satisfaction were seen with regard...

  11. Intestinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, André; Anderson, David E

    2016-11-01

    A wide variety of disorders affecting the intestinal tract in cattle may require surgery. Among those disorders the more common are: intestinal volvulus, jejunal hemorrhage syndrome and more recently the duodenal sigmoid flexure volvulus. Although general principles of intestinal surgery can be applied, cattle has anatomical and behavior particularities that must be known before invading the abdomen. This article focuses on surgical techniques used to optimize outcomes and discusses specific disorders of small intestine. Diagnoses and surgical techniques presented can be applied in field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Emergency Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Calendar Search Contacts Resources » Emergency Communication Emergency Communication Stay informed of emergencies, weather delays, closures, other alerts. Find links to

  13. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgery. Since the first laparoscopic treatment of hydatid disease was described in 1992,14 there has been a steady growth in reports of the laparoscopic treatment of hydatid cysts of liver. Although early reported laparoscopic treatment of liver hydatid disease was confined to simple drainage, more advanced laparoscopic ...

  14. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Surgery, University of Cape Town Health Sciences Faculty, Groote Schuur Hospital, Observatory, Cape Town,. South Africa ... included all district, regional and tertiary hospitals in the nine provinces. Clinics and so-called ..... large contingency of senior general surgeons from countries such as Cuba, who have ...

  15. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    meet the criteria for damage control surgery, and ligation of the AVC is a .... There were two vertebral body fractures, one penetrating brain injury from a gunshot wound to the head, one ... two hand fractures, three haemothoraces, one pelvic fracture, .... One patient with an intimal flap injury to his left common iliac artery ...

  16. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwab , using a three-phase approach.5 In 1998, Moore et al. extended the concept and described the five-stage approach.6. The aim of damage control surgery is to prevent severely injured patients from developing the “lethal triad” of hypothermia, coagulopathy and worsening acidosis, as this confers a dismal prognosis ...

  17. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physical activity prior to surgery,  Length of the operation; anesthesia issues,  Reason for the choice of rod,  Time in the hospital,  Length of recovery time at home,  Pain management including control of muscle spasms,  The rehabilitation plan. ...

  18. Achalasia: Dilation, Injection or Surgery?

    OpenAIRE

    Peracchia, Alberto; Bonavina, Luigi

    2000-01-01

    Achalasia results from irreversible alterations of the esophageal myenteric plexus. The target of treatment in this setting is to reduce lower esophageal sphincter resistance to passage of the bolus. Definitive treatment of the disease requires pneumatic dilation or Heller myotomy. Although no controlled studies comparing modern endoscopic and surgical techniques are available, laparoscopic surgery is emerging as the initial intervention of choice.

  19. The Summer Monsoon of 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, T. N.; Bedi, H. S.; Subramaniam, M.

    1989-04-01

    In this paper we have examined the evolution of a number of parameters we believe were important for our understanding of the drought over India during the summer of 1987. The list of parameters includes monthly means or anomalies of the following fields: sea surface temperatures, divergent circulations, outgoing longwave radiation, streamfunction of the lower and upper troposphere, and monthly precipitation (expressed as a percentage departure from a long-term mean). The El Niño related warm sea surface temperature anomaly and a weaker warm sea surface temperature anomaly over the equatorial Indian Ocean provide sustained convection, as reflected by the negative values of the outgoing longwave radiation. With the seasonal heating, a pronounced planetary-scale divergent circulation evolved with a center along the western Pacific Ocean. The monsoonal divergent circulation merged with that related to the El Niño, maintaining most of the heavy rainfall activity between the equatorial Pacific Ocean and east Asia. Persistent convective activity continued south of India during the entire monsoon season. Strong Hadley type overturnings with rising motions over these warm SST anomaly regions and descent roughly near 20° to 25°S was evident as early as April 1987. The subtropical high pressure areas near 20° to 25°S showed stronger than normal circulations. This was revealed by the presence of a counterclockwise streamfunction anomaly at 850 mb during April 1987. With the seasonal heating, this anomaly moved northwards and was located over the Arabian Sea and India. This countermonsoon circulation anomaly at the low levels was associated with a weaker than normal Somali jet and Arabian Sea circulation throughout this summer. The monsoon remained active along northeast India, Bangladesh, northern lndochina, and central China during the summer monsoon season. This was related to the eastward shift of the divergent circulation. An eastward shift of the upper tropospheric

  20. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  1. Energy market barometer report - Summer 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleich, Joachim; Cartel, Melodie; Cateura, Olivier; Faure, Corinne; Grover, David; Jacob, Jojo; Javaudin, Laurent; Molecke, Greg; Olsthoorn, Mark; Shomali, Azadeh; Vernay, Anne-Lorene

    2015-01-01

    This Summer 2015 edition of the Grenoble Ecole de Management (GEM) Energy Market Barometer explored the expectations of French Energy experts regarding the Climate Summit (COP21) in Paris next December, and the future evolution of CO_2 certificate prices. The experts were also asked about the development of energy prices. Key findings: - 62 % of the French energy experts do not expect a legally binding agreement to emerge from the Paris Climate Summit - this share was 77 % among the German experts; - A majority of the French energy experts think that failing to reach a legally binding agreement at the Paris Climate Summit would not change the French climate policy targets; - A legally binding agreement would have positive effects on investment in the energy sector and, in particular, the electrical industry; - Two-thirds of the French energy experts believe that an agreement in Paris would generate a momentum for climate innovation in OECD countries, but less so in non-OECD countries; - CO_2 certificate prices rise only in the medium to long term but levels remain rather low. The announced intention of the G7 to phase out all fossil fuels by the end of this century did not affect the experts' expectations about CO_2 certificate prices or medium-term fuel prices; - Electricity and coal prices are expected to remain stable over the next six months. The majority of the experts consider the current low oil and gas prices to be a rather temporary phenomenon

  2. Can regional climate engineering save the summer Arctic sea ice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, S.; Jahn, Alexandra; Kay, Jennifer E.; Holland, Marika; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2014-02-01

    Rapid declines in summer Arctic sea ice extent are projected under high-forcing future climate scenarios. Regional Arctic climate engineering has been suggested as an emergency strategy to save the sea ice. Model simulations of idealized regional dimming experiments compared to a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emission simulation demonstrate the importance of both local and remote feedback mechanisms to the surface energy budget in high latitudes. With increasing artificial reduction in incoming shortwave radiation, the positive surface albedo feedback from Arctic sea ice loss is reduced. However, changes in Arctic clouds and the strongly increasing northward heat transport both counteract the direct dimming effects. A 4 times stronger local reduction in solar radiation compared to a global experiment is required to preserve summer Arctic sea ice area. Even with regional Arctic dimming, a reduction in the strength of the oceanic meridional overturning circulation and a shut down of Labrador Sea deep convection are possible.

  3. Childhood Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SUBSCRIBE Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Childhood Emergencies Keeping children healthy and safe is every ... and tools to prevent, recognize and address a childhood emergency is the first step in keeping your ...

  4. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... IUD placed inside the uterus CHOICES FOR EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION Two emergency contraceptive pills may be bought without a prescription. ...

  5. Summer Programming: What Do Children Say?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nila Cobb

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies document that low-income children lose academic skills over the summer. Six years of reading achievement data collected by Energy Express, a nationally recognized summer reading and nutrition program in West Virginia, has established the efficacy of the intervention. The purpose of this study was to examine characteristics of a voluntary summer program that foster participation. Interview data indicates that children attend because they perceive the program as fun; large creative art (for example, full-body portraits, appliance box castles, wall murals seems particularly important. Energy Express gives children both the fun they want and the enrichment they need in the summer.

  6. General Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bbshehu

    Methods: We reviewed all case-notes, radiological records and histology reports of ... contamination, anastomotic technique, emergency ... identified at laparotomy for peritonitis or during post mortem; 3) Clinical features of a leak confirmed by.

  7. Metabolic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Schauer, Philip R; Kaplan, Lee M

    2018-01-01

    The alarming rise in the worldwide prevalence of obesity is paralleled by an increasing burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolic surgery is the most effective means of obtaining substantial and durable weight loss in individuals with obesity. Randomized trials have recently shown...... the superiority of surgery over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms seem to extend beyond the magnitude of weight loss alone and include improvements in incretin profiles, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity....... Moreover, observational data suggest that the reduction in cardiovascular risk factors translates to better patient outcomes. This review describes commonly used metabolic surgical procedures and their current indications and summarizes the evidence related to weight loss and glycemic outcomes. It further...

  8. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preparing for Surgery Home For Patients Search FAQs Preparing for Surgery ... Surgery FAQ080, August 2011 PDF Format Preparing for Surgery Gynecologic Problems What is the difference between outpatient ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ...

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  12. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  13. Heart bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  14. Inadequate emergence after anesthesia: emergence delirium and hypoactive emergence in the Postanesthesia Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xará, Daniela; Silva, Acácio; Mendonça, Júlia; Abelha, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the frequency, determinants, and outcome of inadequate emergence after elective surgery in the Postanesthesia Care Unit (PACU). Prospective observational study. 12-bed PACU of a tertiary-care hospital in a major metropolitan area. 266 adult patients admitted to the PACU. To evaluate inadequate emergence, the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (RASS) was administered to patients 10 minutes after their admission to the PACU. Demographic data, perioperative variables, and postoperative length of stay (LOS) in the PACU and the hospital were recorded. 40 (15%) patients showed symptoms of inadequate emergence: 17 patients (6.4%) screened positive for emergence delirium and 23 patients (8.6%) showed hypoactive emergence. Determinants of emergence delirium were longer duration of preoperative fasting (P = 0.001), higher visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain (P = 0.002), and major surgical risk (P = 0.001); these patients had a higher frequency of postoperative delirium (P = 0.017) and had higher nausea VAS score 6 hours after surgery (P = 0.001). Determinants of hypoactive emergence were duration of surgery (P = 0.003), amount of crystalloids administered during surgery (P = 0.002), residual neuromuscular block (P < 0.001), high-risk surgery (P = 0.002), and lower core temperature on PACU admission (P = 0.028); these patients also had more frequent residual neuromuscular block (P < 0.001) postoperative delirium (P < 0.001), and more frequent adverse respiratory events (P = 0.02). Patients with hypoactive emergence had longer PACU and hospital LOS. Preventable determinants for emergence delirium were higher postoperative pain scores and longer fasting times. Hypoactive emergence was associated with longer postoperative PACU and hospital LOSs. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Breast cancer survival and season of surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Dorthe; Bjerre, Karsten D; Tjønneland, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    Background Vitamin D has been suggested to influence the incidence and prognosis of breast cancer, and studies have found better overall survival (OS) after diagnosis for breast cancer in summer-autumn, where the vitamin D level are expected to be highest. Objective To compare the prognostic...... outcome for early breast cancer patients operated at different seasons of the year. Design Open population-based cohort study. Setting Danish women operated 1978-2010. Cases 79 658 adjusted for age at surgery, period of surgery, tumour size, axillary lymph node status and hormone receptor status...

  16. The Plastic Surgery Hand Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Levin, L Scott; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Designing an effective hand rotation for plastic surgery residents is difficult. The authors address this limitation by elucidating the critical components of the hand curriculum during plastic surgery residency. Hand questions on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam for six consecutive years (2008 to 2013) were characterized by presence of imaging, vignette setting, question taxonomy, answer domain, anatomy, and topic. Answer references were quantified by source and year of publication. Two hundred sixty-six questions were related to hand surgery (22.7 percent of all questions; 44.3 per year) and 61 were accompanied by an image (22.9 percent). Vignettes tended to be clinic- (50.0 percent) and emergency room-based (35.3 percent) (p < 0.001). Questions required decision-making (60.5 percent) over interpretation (25.9 percent) and recall skills (13.5 percent) (p < 0.001). Answers focused on interventions (57.5 percent) over anatomy/pathology (25.2 percent) and diagnoses (17.3 percent) (p < 0.001). Nearly half of the questions focused on the digits. The highest yield topics were trauma (35.3 percent), reconstruction (24.4 percent), and aesthetic and functional problems (14.2 percent). The Journal of Hand Surgery (American volume) (20.5 percent) and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (18.0 percent) were the most-cited journals, and the median publication lag was 7 years. Green's Operative Hand Surgery was the most-referenced textbook (41.8 percent). These results will enable trainees to study hand surgery topics with greater efficiency. Faculty can use these results to ensure that tested topics are covered during residency training. Thus, a benchmark is established to improve didactic, clinical, and operative experiences in hand surgery.

  17. Summer Matters: Advocating for Summer Learning That Can Weather Political Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that an idle summer is not just boring; it can cost a student as much as two to three months of educational progress. Summer is critical to each child's development, both mind and body. Any meaningful attempts to get at America's equity divide and the consequent gap in opportunities for kids must include summer education as a…

  18. Summer Camp of Mathematical Modeling in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoxi; Xie, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The Summer Camp of Mathematical Modeling in China is a recently created experience designed to further Chinese students' academic pursuits in mathematical modeling. Students are given more than three months to research on a mathematical modeling project. Researchers and teams with outstanding projects are invited to the Summer Camp to present…

  19. TREsPASS Book 2: Summer School

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Peter; Coles-Kemp, Lizzie

    2016-01-01

    The talks presented in this book were delivered as part of a summer school held at Royal Holloway University of London between the 20th and the 23rd of June 2016. The focus of the summer school was social aspects of cyber security risk and was an engagement and dissemination activity for the EU FP7

  20. Good-bye Summer Students 2009!

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    In its 47th edition, the CERN Summer Student programme has welcomed almost 200 young students from around the world. As it proves to do each year, the programme has provided a unique experience for all participants. CERN Summer Students 2009 in the Microcosm garden.During the summer months between June and August, your normal lunchtime routine is inevitably disrupted by the small stampede of students that leaves the Main Auditorium just around midday and starts queuing in Restaurant 1. When this happens, you can’t help but notice that the CERN Summer Students have arrived! With its rich lecture series, inspirational visits and actual work experience, the Summer Student programme provides a real chance to get acquainted with a career in particle physics, engineering and computation. The programme includes a morning lecture series that covers a large variety of topics, from particle physics to engineering, information technology and ...

  1. The economics of pancreas surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Charles M

    2013-06-01

    Pancreas surgery is a paradigm for high-acuity surgical specialization. Given the current intrigue over containing health care expenditures, pancreas surgery provides an ideal model to investigate the cost of care. This article explores the economics of this field from literature accrued over the last 2 decades. The cost of performing a pancreatic resection is established and then embellished with a discussion of the effects of clinical care paths. Then the influence of complications on costs is explored. Next, cost is investigated as an emerging outcome metric regarding variations in pancreatic surgical care. Finally, the societal-level fiscal impact is considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... One of the principles integrated into the South African state healthcare system is the ... care. Similarly, the types and severity of surgical conditions which should be ... Emergency admissions constituted 62.4% and elective admissions ... development of information technology (IT) has allowed the creation of ...

  3. Summer 2017 Microfluidics Research Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcculloch, Quinn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-25

    Liquid-liquid Extraction (LLE), also known as solvent extraction, represents a large subset of chemistry where one or more solutes are transferred across an interface between two immiscible liquids. This type of chemistry is used in industrial scale processes to purify solvents, refine ore, process petroleum, treat wastewater, and much more. Although LLE has been successfully employed at the macroscale, where many liters/kgs of species are processed at large flow rates, LLE stands to benefit from lab-on-a-chip technology, where reactions take place quickly and efficiently at the microscale. A device, called a screen contactor, has been invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform solvent extraction at the microscale. This invention has been submitted to LANL’s Feynman Center for Innovation, and has been filed for provisional patent under U.S. Patent Application No. 62/483,107 1. The screen contactor consists of a housing that contains two different screen materials, flametreated stainless steel and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) thermoplastic, that are uniquely wetted by either an aqueous or an organic liquid phase, respectively. Liquids in this device flow longitudinally through the screens. The fine pore size of the screens (tens of microns) provide large capillary/adhesional forces while maintaining small hydraulic pressure drops. These physical characteristics are paramount to efficient microscale liquid phase separation. To demonstrate mass transfer using the screen contactor, a well-known chemical system 2 consisting of water and n-decane as solvents and trimethylamine (TEA) as a solute was selected. TEA is basic in water so its concentration can easily be quantified using a digital pH meter and an experimentally determined base dissociation constant. Characterization of this solvent system and its behavior in the screen contactor have been the focus of my research activities this summer. In the following sections, I have detailed

  4. Guidelines for emergency laparoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauerland Stefan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute abdominal pain is a leading symptom in many surgical emergency patients. Laparoscopy allows for accurate diagnosis and immediate therapy of many intraabdominal pathologies. The guidelines of the EAES (European Association for Endoscopic Surgery provides scientifically founded recommendations about the role of laparoscopy in the different situations. Generally, laparoscopy is well suited for the therapy of the majority of diseases that cause acute abdominal pain.

  5. Entrepreneurship, Emerging Technologies, Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thukral, Inderpreet S.; Von Ehr, James; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Groen, Arend J.; van der Sijde, Peter; Adham, Khairul Akmaliah

    2008-01-01

    Academics and practitioners alike have long understood the benefits, if not the risks, of both emerging markets and emerging technologies.Yet it is only recently that foresighted firms have embraced emerging technologies and emerging markets through entrepreneurial activity. Emerging technologies

  6. The inter-decadal correlation between summer arctic oscillation and summer drought and moist characteristic of northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengxiang; Zheng, Youfei; Sun, Landong; Ren, Zhenhe; He, Jinhai; Zhang, Qiang

    2007-09-01

    In the context of 1960~2003 summertime rainfall and small-sized pan evaporations from 131 stations distributed over NW China covering Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu, Ningxia, Shaanxi as well as western Nei Mongolia, and Arctic Oscillation Indices (AOI) we define a homogenized index for aridity or wetness feature, with which to examine the relations between AOI and NW China aridity-wetness regime, indicating their noticeable relations on an interdecadal basis. It is found that during the decade of summer Arctic oscillation stronger than mean, the sea level pressure field shows positive (negative) anomalies over Asian landmass, a stronger anticyclonic anomaly circulation appears at 700 hPa over Lake Baikal and to the south, westerly (northerly) departure emerges in the westerly (monsoon) portion of NW China, as well as over NW China there appears a structure with a low in the west and a high in the east at the 500 hPa height field, suggestive of east-Asian summer monsoon weaker than normal such that westerly flows prevail in the westerly zone of NW China, leading to rainfall more than mean for a wetter climate while in its monsoon area the northerly winds are dominant, with precipitation less than normal, resulting in a climate drier in comparison to mean and v.v. for the decade with summer AO weaker than normal.

  7. Summer Students: getting professional at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The summer season at CERN is known for the traditional visit of Summer Students coming from Member and non-Member States. This time, a total of 176 future scientists are spending part of their summer with us, learning and working in the laboratory. Summer Students enjoying a lecture on particle physics by Ronald Kleiss. Now that summer has finally arrived, you'll have noticed some changes at CERN: longer queues at the bar, faces you don't recognise in the corridors, and a breath of fresh air, but where is it coming from? The answer is easy: the Summer Students are here! Aged between 20 and 27, this group of 176 future scientists has been selected from 600 candidates to spend their summer at the Laboratory. This year, there are 24 more 'Summies' than last following a recommendation in the 2000 5-yearly review to increase the number of students. The Summies mainly come from Member States, but this year there are also 11 Americans, two Mexicans, an Armenian, a Turk, a Pakistani and two South Africans. Judith N...

  8. Atmospheric circulation characteristics associated with the onset of Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chongyin; Pan, Jing

    2006-12-01

    The onset of the Asian summer monsoon has been a focus in the monsoon study for many years. In this paper, we study the variability and predictability of the Asian summer monsoon onset and demonstrate that this onset is associated with specific atmospheric circulation characteristics. The outbreak of the Asian summer monsoon is found to occur first over the southwestern part of the South China Sea (SCS) and the Malay Peninsula region, and the monsoon onset is closely related to intra-seasonal oscillations in the lower atmosphere. These intra-seasonal oscillations consist of two low-frequency vortex pairs, one located to the east of the Philippines and the other over the tropical eastern Indian Ocean. Prior to the Asian summer monsoon onset, a strong low-frequency westerly emerges over the equatorial Indian Ocean and the low-frequency vortex pair develops symmetrically along the equator. The formation and evolution of these low-frequency vortices are important and serve as a good indicator for the Asian summer monsoon onset. The relationship between the northward jumps of the westerly jet over East Asia and the Asian summer monsoon onset over SCS is investigated. It is shown that the northward jump of the westerly jet occurs twice during the transition from winter to summer and these jumps are closely related to the summer monsoon development. The first northward jump (from 25° 28°N to around 30°N) occurs on 8 May on average, about 7 days ahead of the summer monsoon onset over the SCS. It is found that the reverse of meridional temperature gradient in the upper-middle troposphere (500 200 hPa) and the enhancement and northward movement of the subtropical jet in the Southern Hemispheric subtropics are responsible for the first northward jump of the westerly jet.

  9. Risky Drinking Can Put a Chill on Your Summer Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Your Summer Fun Print version Risky Drinking Can Put a Chill on Your Summer Fun Summer ... adults involve the use of alcohol. 1 Swimmers can get in over their heads. Alcohol impairs judgment ...

  10. A basic introduction to surgery theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueck, W [Fachbereich Mathematik und Informatik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2002-08-15

    This manuscript contains extended notes of the lectures presented by the author at the summer school 'High-dimensional Manifold Theory' in Trieste in May/June 2001. It is written not for experts but for talented and well educated graduate students or Ph.D. students who have some backgroin algebraic and differential topology. Surgery theory has been and is a very successful and well established theory. It was initiated and developed by Browder, Kervaire, Milnor, Novikov, Sullivan, Wall and others and is still a very active research area. The idea of these notes is to give young mathematicians the possibility to get access to the field and to see at least a small part of the results which have grown out of surgery theory. Of course there are other good text books and survey articles about surgery theory, some of them are listed in the references. Chapters 1 and 2 contain interesting and beautiful results such as the s-Cobordism Theorem and the classification of lens spaces including their illuminating proofs. If one wants to start with the surgery machinery immediately, one may skip these chapters and pass directly to Chapters 3, 4 and 5. As an application we present the classification of homotopy spheres in Chapter 6. Chapters 7 and 8 contain material which is directly related to the main topic of the summer school.

  11. Visiting summer students enhance research skills

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Seven undergraduate students from universities across the nation and one from Virginia Tech are working side by side with Virginia Tech professors this summer on research projects related to sustainable management of resources.

  12. Summer võistleb jalgpalli MMil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Rocklaulja Indrek Raadik (Summer) on sooloprojektiga tuuril koos bändidega Traffic ja Mees, juuni lõpul aga koos ansamblitega esindamas Eestit Sotšis toimuval artistide esimesel maailmameistrivõistlusel jalgpallis

  13. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 11. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for Students and Teachers - 2018. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 11 November 2017 pp 1100-1100 ...

  14. Relationship between summer monsoon rainfall and cyclogenesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    relationship between Indian Ocean Dipole Mode. Index (IODMI) and the ... 2013) in the cyclogenesis over north Indian Ocean ..... Indian summer monsoon; J. Climate 17 3141–3155. ... Murakami H, Wang B and Kitoh A 2011 Future change.

  15. Opening of a summer camp at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Nursery School

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Association has the pleasure to announce the opening of a summer camp in l’EVE et Ecole de l’AP du CERN. With a capacity of 40 children, aged 4 to 6 years, it will be open from July 6 to 30. Registration Summer camp 2015 Registration for the CERN SA Summer camp for children aged 4 to 6 is open 16 to 30 April 2015 More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/ The Summer camp is open to all children of CERN Staff. An inscription per week is proposed, cost 480.-CHF/week, lunch included. The camp will be open weeks 28, 29, 30 and 31, from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm.

  16. Surgery, public health, and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Syed Nabeel; McQueen, K A Kelly

    2011-12-01

    Surgical healthcare is rapidly gaining recognition as a major public health issue. Surgical disparities are large, with poorest populations receiving the least amount of emergency and essential surgical care. In light of recent evidence, developing countries, such as Pakistan, must acknowledge surgical disease as a major public health issue and prioritize research and intervention accordingly. We review information from various sources and describe the current situation of surgical health care in Pakistan and highlight areas of neglect. Pakistan suffers an annual deficit of 17 million surgeries. Surgical disease kills more people than infectious diseases inclusive of tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, diarrheal disease, and childhood infections. The incidence of trauma and maternal mortality ratio are staggeringly high. There is a severe dearth of surgical and anesthesia-related epidemiological data. Important information that would help to drive policy and planning is not available. Corruption and neglect have led to a dilapidated health care infrastructure. Surgical care is largely inaccessible to the poor, especially those living in rural areas. The country faces a dearth of healthcare professionals, especially paramedics, anesthetists, and surgeons. Unsafe surgery and anesthesia poses a significant risk to patients. There is no national policy on surgical illness and the preventive aspects of surgery are nonexistent. Consistent with other underdeveloped countries, surgical care in Pakistan is dismal. Neglecting surgery and safe anesthesia has led to countless deaths and disability. Physicians, researchers, policy makers, and the government health care system must engage and commit to provide access to emergency, essential, and safe surgical care.

  17. S'Cool LAB Summer CAMP 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Woithe, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The S’Cool LAB Summer CAMP is an opportunity for high-school students (aged 16-19) from all around the world to spend 2 weeks exploring the fascinating world of particle physics. The 24 selected participants spend their summer at S’Cool LAB, CERN’s hands-on particle physics learning laboratory, for an epic programme of lectures and tutorials, team research projects, visits of CERN’s research installations, and social activities.

  18. Achalasia: Dilation, Injection or Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Peracchia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia results from irreversible alterations of the esophageal myenteric plexus. The target of treatment in this setting is to reduce lower esophageal sphincter resistance to passage of the bolus. Definitive treatment of the disease requires pneumatic dilation or Heller myotomy. Although no controlled studies comparing modern endoscopic and surgical techniques are available, laparoscopic surgery is emerging as the initial intervention of choice.

  19. Delayed Tension Pneumothorax During Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lun Chen

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Tension pneumothorax is a life-threatening emergency that rapidly results in cardiopulmonary arrest. It requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. We present 2 cases from our practice, 1 caused by blunt chest trauma and the other resulting from laparoscopic surgery. Both were successfully treated by insertion of a chest tube. The diagnosis and treatment of intraoperative pneumothorax is discussed together with a review of the literature.

  20. SUMMER CONFERENCES: Heavy on flavour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-10-15

    Afocus of attention at the major international high energy physics conferences this summer in Brussels and in Beijing was the latest batch of precision information from major experiments at electronpositron colliders - the four big detectors at CERN's LEP storage ring and the SLD experiment at the SLC linear collider at SLAC (Stanford). These experiments study the decay of the Z particle - the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force - produced when the colliding electron and positron beams are tuned to the Z resonance. This precision data is a stringent test of the six-quark Standard Model, and as the weight of evidence builds up, physicists look hard for any cracks in the theoretical foundations. In 1994, the LEP experiments almost doubled their accumulated score of Z particles (an integrated luminosity of 64.5 inverse picobarns in 1994 compared with 93.5 in the previous 4 years). In addition to the increased mass of data, improved precision came from better determinations of key parameters (beam energy, luminosity, electromagnetic coupling strength,....). SLD Z data has more than doubled over the past year. SLC also provides spin oriented (polarized) beams and the machine's polarization level has improved from 63 to 77%. The intercorrelation of the different parameters of the six-quark Standard Model was also boosted this year by the discovery of the sixth ('top') quark at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider (April/May, page 1). In the electron-positron sector, although the LEP experiments provide the mass of the data, the SLC's polarized beams mean that the delicate asymmetries seen in SLD provide the most precise single measurement of the vital electroweak mixing parameter. Last year, it was difficult to reconcile these SLD asymmetry results from those from LEP, and some people were whispering about possible nonconformist physics effects, but with a year's additional data, the gap between the two sets of results has narrowed. To

  1. SUMMER CONFERENCES: Heavy on flavour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Afocus of attention at the major international high energy physics conferences this summer in Brussels and in Beijing was the latest batch of precision information from major experiments at electronpositron colliders - the four big detectors at CERN's LEP storage ring and the SLD experiment at the SLC linear collider at SLAC (Stanford). These experiments study the decay of the Z particle - the electrically neutral carrier of the weak nuclear force - produced when the colliding electron and positron beams are tuned to the Z resonance. This precision data is a stringent test of the six-quark Standard Model, and as the weight of evidence builds up, physicists look hard for any cracks in the theoretical foundations. In 1994, the LEP experiments almost doubled their accumulated score of Z particles (an integrated luminosity of 64.5 inverse picobarns in 1994 compared with 93.5 in the previous 4 years). In addition to the increased mass of data, improved precision came from better determinations of key parameters (beam energy, luminosity, electromagnetic coupling strength,....). SLD Z data has more than doubled over the past year. SLC also provides spin oriented (polarized) beams and the machine's polarization level has improved from 63 to 77%. The intercorrelation of the different parameters of the six-quark Standard Model was also boosted this year by the discovery of the sixth ('top') quark at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider (April/May, page 1). In the electron-positron sector, although the LEP experiments provide the mass of the data, the SLC's polarized beams mean that the delicate asymmetries seen in SLD provide the most precise single measurement of the vital electroweak mixing parameter. Last year, it was difficult to reconcile these SLD asymmetry results from those from LEP, and some people were whispering about possible nonconformist physics effects, but with a year's additional data, the gap between the two sets

  2. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... long as you are told. This helps ensure tennis elbow will not return. You may be prescribed a ...

  3. Lung surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge ... milk) for 2 weeks after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and 6 to 8 weeks after open surgery. ...

  4. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Gastric Sleeve Surgery KidsHealth / For Teens / Gastric Sleeve Surgery What's in ... or buying healthy food ) Preparing for Gastric Sleeve Surgery Preparing for this major operation takes months of ...

  5. Hip Replacement Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Outreach Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Hip Replacement Surgery Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB ... PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Hip Replacement Surgery Hip replacement surgery removes damaged or ...

  6. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  9. 40 ANAESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF SURGICAL EMERGENCIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... *Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City,. Nigeria ... anaesthesia for emergency surgery. This expose seeks .... and the hospital's capacity for ... planning and clinical prudence in the.

  10. New Zealand Summer of Code/Summer of Technology: an industry, student and tertiary engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Komisarczuk, Peter; Clegg, John; McDavitt, Ruth; Linton, Andy

    2011-01-01

    In 2006 the Wellington Summer of Code was brought to life engaging ICT undergraduates with innovative Wellington employers, it has developed into a thriving talent pipeline engaging all levels of tertiary students and industry in the Wellington region. Summer of Code engages students during term time through industry led learning and a summer seminar and workshop series that are open to all. It has worked with the NZCS to integrate the Evening with Industry where undergraduates see young IT p...

  11. Conductive and Mixed Hearing Losses: A Comparison between Summer and Autumn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickbakht, Mansoureh; Borzoo, Samira

    2014-04-01

    Conductive hearing loss is common among children and adults. This study aims at comparing the results of conductive hearing loss in summer and autumn. Puretone audiometry and tympanometry tests were done for all patients who referred to the Iranian-based audiology center of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Ahvaz. Data on the patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss were analyzed. The impacts of season, age, and etiology of the disease were analyzed on the patients who visited the audiology clinic due to the conductive hearing loss in summer and autumn. One hundred and fifty nine patients in summer and 123 patients in autumn had conductive or mixed hearing loss. Their age ranged from four to 82 years, with the average age of 35. The percentage of the patients, with acute otitis media and chronic otitis media (COM), who visited this clinic, was significantly higher than those with middle ear problems. COM and mastoid surgeries rate was higher in summer than autumn among adults. There is no relationship between season and middle ear diseases between children and juveniles, but COM and mastoid problems are more common in summer among adults visiting this clinic. Most of the patients had mild conductive hearing loss and bilateral middle ear impairments.

  12. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... considering breast reduction surgery, consult a board-certified plastic surgeon. It's important to understand what breast reduction surgery entails — including possible risks and complications — as ...

  13. CERN SUMMER STUDENT PROJECT 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Ramlee, Nurdyana

    2017-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in CERN is one of the main particle accelerator in the world that produces two proton beam and accelerating then before merging them at several collision point. Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is second biggest detector located at one of the collision point purposed as a big camera to record all the events emerges during the high impact collision of the protons that is accelerated nearly speed of light. There are a lot of Standard Model (SM) particle produced during the collision and the trajectories of nearly all the particles are captured by the huge precision detector. This is also how Higgs Boson was discovered 5 years ago. Particles of matter for example like fermions and force particles such as gauge bosons are indeed SM particles. Neverthless, Higgs is quite different from all gauge bosons (W, Z and gluon)[1]. Protons are made up of quarks, anti-quarks and gluons. During the high energy collisions in LHC we produce Higgs from many interaction of matter and anti-matter particle...

  14. Control de la glucemia en el postoperatorio de cirugía cardíaca: Informe del Consejo de Emergencias de la Sociedad Argentina de Cardiología Blood glucose control during cardiac surgery: Report of the Emergency Council of the Argentine Society of Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano N. Benzadón

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available La hiperglucemia en el postoperatorio de cirugía cardÍaca es un hallazgo frecuente asociado a peor evolución, que afecta tanto a diabéticos como no diabéticos. A pesar de las múltiples publicaciones disponibles, aún no existe un abordaje universalmente aceptado a este problema. En una iniciativa originada en el Consejo de Emergencias de la Sociedad Argentina de Cardiología, se convocó a expertos de nuestro medio con el propósito de debatir cómo debe ser el manejo de la glucemia en el paciente crítico cardiovascular. Este documento refleja lo discutido en este evento académico con la intención de resumir los principales aspectos del control de la glucemia en el postoperatorio de cirugía cardíaca.Hyperglycemia after cardiac surgery is a common finding associated with the worse outcomes affecting both diabetic and non diabetic patients. Despite the large number of publications available, there is no universally accepted approach to this problem. In an initiative of the Emergency Council of the Argentine Society of Cardiology, local experts gathered to discuss the management of hyperglycemia after adult cardiac surgery. The main objective of the present paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding glycemic control in postoperative cardiac surgery.

  15. Meteorological conditions in the central Arctic summer during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tjernström

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the rapidly changing climate in the Arctic is limited by a lack of understanding of underlying strong feedback mechanisms that are specific to the Arctic. Progress in this field can only be obtained by process-level observations; this is the motivation for intensive ice-breaker-based campaigns such as the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS, described here. However, detailed field observations also have to be put in the context of the larger-scale meteorology, and short field campaigns have to be analysed within the context of the underlying climate state and temporal anomalies from this.

    To aid in the analysis of other parameters or processes observed during this campaign, this paper provides an overview of the synoptic-scale meteorology and its climatic anomaly during the ASCOS field deployment. It also provides a statistical analysis of key features during the campaign, such as key meteorological variables, the vertical structure of the lower troposphere and clouds, and energy fluxes at the surface. In order to assess the representativity of the ASCOS results, we also compare these features to similar observations obtained during three earlier summer experiments in the Arctic Ocean: the AOE-96, SHEBA and AOE-2001 expeditions.

    We find that these expeditions share many key features of the summertime lower troposphere. Taking ASCOS and the previous expeditions together, a common picture emerges with a large amount of low-level cloud in a well-mixed shallow boundary layer, capped by a weak to moderately strong inversion where moisture, and sometimes also cloud top, penetrate into the lower parts of the inversion. Much of the boundary-layer mixing is due to cloud-top cooling and subsequent buoyant overturning of the cloud. The cloud layer may, or may not, be connected with surface processes depending on the depths of the cloud and surface-based boundary layers and on the relative strengths of surface-shear and

  16. Observations of the summer Red Sea circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianos, Sarantis S.; Johns, William E.

    2007-06-01

    Aiming at exploring and understanding the summer circulation in the Red Sea, a cruise was conducted in the basin during the summer of 2001 involving hydrographic, meteorological, and direct current observations. The most prominent feature, characteristic of the summer circulation and exchange with the Indian Ocean, is a temperature, salinity, and oxygen minimum located around a depth of 75 m at the southern end of the basin, associated with Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water inflowing from the Gulf of Aden during the summer season as an intruding subsurface layer. Stirring and mixing with ambient waters lead to marked increases in temperature (from 16.5 to almost 33°C) and salinity (from 35.7 to more than 38 psu) in this layer by the time it reaches midbasin. The observed circulation presents a very vigorous pattern with strong variability and intense features that extend the width of the basin. A permanent cyclone, detected in the northern Red Sea, verifies previous observations and modeling studies, while in the central sector of the basin a series of very strong anticyclones were observed with maximum velocities exceeding 1 m/s. The three-layer flow pattern, representative of the summer exchange between the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, is observed in the strait of Bab el Mandeb. In the southern part of the basin the layer flow is characterized by strong banking of the inflows and outflows against the coasts. Both surface and intermediate water masses involved in the summer Red Sea circulation present prominent spatial variability in their characteristics, indicating that the eddy field and mixing processes play an important role in the summer Red Sea circulation.

  17. Emerging Hopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China looks to strategically important emerging industries for innovation-driven economic growthc hina will soon announce a decision to rev up seven strategically impor- tant emerging industries,said the National

  18. Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silber, Herbert B. [San Jose State University

    2013-06-20

    The ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry (herein called “Summer Schools”) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and held at San Jose State University (SJSU) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Summer Schools offer undergraduate students with U.S. citizenship an opportunity to complete coursework through ACS accredited chemistry degree programs at SJSU or the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SBU). The courses include lecture and laboratory work on the fundamentals and applications of nuclear and radiochemistry. The number of students participating at each site is limited to 12, and the low student-to-instructor ratio is needed due to the intense nature of the six-week program. To broaden the students’ perspectives on nuclear science, prominent research scientists active in nuclear and/or radiochemical research participate in a Guest Lecture Series. Symposia emphasizing environmental chemistry, nuclear medicine, and career opportunities are conducted as a part of the program. The Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) renewed the five-year proposal for the Summer Schools starting March 1, 2007, with contributions from Biological and Environmental Remediation (BER) and Nuclear Physics (NP). This Final Technical Report covers the Summer Schools held in the years 2007-2011.

  19. Emergent Expertise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The concept of emergence appears in various places within the literature on expertise and expert practice. Here, I examine some of these applications of emergence in the light of two prominent accounts of emergence from the philosophy of science and philosophy of mind. I evaluate these accounts with respect to several specific contexts in which…

  20. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  1. Effective Summer Programming: What Educators and Policymakers Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachin, Andrew; Augustine, Catherine H.; McCombs, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The evidence suggests that many types of summer learning programs have the potential to reduce summer learning losses and perhaps create learning gains. However, implementing a summer program does not guarantee positive effects on students' learning. A key question then is: What factors make a summer learning program effective? This article, drawn…

  2. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  3. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  4. International Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  5. Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

  6. Modelling the Asian summer monsoon using CCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Kim Chi; McGregor, John L. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale, VIC (Australia)

    2009-02-15

    A ten-year mean (1989-1998) climatology of the Asian summer monsoon is studied using the CSIRO Conformal-Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM) to downscale NCEP reanalyses. The aim of the current study is to validate the model results against previous work on this topic, in order to identify model strengths and weaknesses in simulating the Asian summer monsoon. The model results are compared with available observations and are presented in two parts. In the first part, the mean summer rainfall, maximum and minimum temperatures and winds are compared with the observations. The second part focuses on validation of the monsoon onset. The model captures the mean characteristics such as the cross-equatorial flow of low-level winds over the Indian Ocean and near the Somali coast, rainfall patterns, onset indices, northward movements, active-break and revival periods. (orig.)

  7. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures

  8. Summer camp course in nuclear operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.; James, J.Z.; Terrell, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new kind of nuclear engineering curriculum that echoes an old method of professional training - the intensive summer camp. For many years a staple of the training of civil engineers and foresters, summer camp courses immerse the student in an intensive, focused experience, isolated from the familiar campus and resembling the actual work environment for which the student is being trained. With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy, University of California-Berkeley (UCB) and Pacific Gas ampersand Electric (PG ampersand E) have launched such a course for UCB nuclear engineering undergraduates

  9. The World Nuclear University Summer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, D.; McIntyre, M.

    2007-01-01

    The World Nuclear University (WNU) Summer Institute is a six weeks intensive training program aimed to develop a global leadership in the field of nuclear sciences and technologies. The topics covered include global setting, international regimes, technology innovation and nuclear industry operations. This event has been held annually since 2005. Mark McIntyre and Dominic Rivard attended this activity as a personal initiative. In this paper they will present the WNU and its Summer Institute, share their participation experience and discuss as well of some technical content covered during the Institute, highlighting the benefits this brought to their careers. (author)

  10. Improving Urban Minority Girls' Health Via Community Summer Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Amy M; Bates, Carolyn R; Heard, Amy M; Burdette, Kimberly A; Ward, Amanda K; Silton, Rebecca L; Dugas, Lara R

    2017-12-01

    Summertime has emerged as a high-risk period for weight gain among low-income minority youth who often experience a lack of resources when not attending school. Structured programming may be an effective means of reducing risk for obesity by improving obesogenic behaviors among these youth. The current multi-method study examined sedentary time, physical activity, and dietary intake among low-income urban minority girls in two contexts: an unstructured summertime setting and in the context of a structured 4-week community-based summer day camp program promoting physical activity. Data were analyzed using paired-sample t tests and repeated-measure analyses of variance with significance at the p time of over 2 h/day and dairy consumption when engaged in structured summer programming. All improvements were independent of weight status and age, and African-American participants evidenced greater changes in physical activity during programming. The study concludes that structured, community-based summertime programming may be associated with fewer obesogenic behaviors in low-income urban youth and may be a powerful tool to address disparities in weight gain and obesity among high-risk samples.

  11. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Jean; Pearson, F Griffith; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Canada's contributions toward the 21st century's practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  13. Current perspectives in robotic assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binet, Aurélien; Ballouhey, Quentin; Chaussy, Yann; de Lambert, Guénolée; Braïk, Karim; Villemagne, Thierry; Becmeur, François; Fourcade, Laurent; Lardy, Hubert

    2018-02-23

    From classical surgery to Robotic Assisted Surgery, there is a long way allowed by Minimal Invasive Surgery' improvements. The last three decades have witnessed a prodigious development of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and especially in the field of laparoscopic pediatric surgery but there are several limitations in the use of conventional laparoscopic surgery and Robotic Assisted Surgery was developed to relieve these drawbacks. This new technology enables today the performance of a wide variety of procedures in children with a minimally invasive approach. As for all new technologies, an objective evaluation is essential with the need to respond to several questions: Is the technology feasible? Is the technology safe? Is the technology efficient? Does it bring about benefits compared with current technology? What are the procedures derived from most benefits of robotic assistance? How to assume the transition from open surgery to Minimal Invasive access for RAS? In the first part of this article, the authors give details about technical concerns and then describe the implementation process with its organization, pitfalls, successes, and issues from human resources and financial standpoints. The learning curve is then described and a special focus on small children weighing less than 15 Kg is developed. Finally, the concept of evaluation of this emerging technology is evocated and financial concerns are developed.

  14. Macroeconomic landscape of refractive surgery in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Kevin J

    2015-07-01

    This review examines the economic history of refractive surgery and the decline of laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the USA, and the emergence of refractive cataract surgery as an area of growth. Since it peaked in 2007 at 1.4 million procedures per year, LASIK has declined 50% in the USA, whereas refractive cataract surgery, including presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses (IOLs), astigmatism-correcting IOLs, and femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery, has grown to 350 000 procedures per year, beginning in 2003. Patients are price-sensitive and responsive to publicity (good or bad) about refractive surgery and refractive cataract surgery. LASIK's decline has been partially offset by the emergence of refractive cataract surgery. About 11% of all cataract surgery in the USA involves presbyopia-correcting IOLs, astigmatism-correcting IOLs, or a femtosecond laser. From the surgeon's perspective, there are high barriers to entry into the marketplace for refractive surgery and refractive cataract surgery due to the high capital cost of excimer and femtosecond lasers, the high skill level required to deliver spectacular results to demanding patients who pay out of pocket, and the necessity to perform a high volume of surgeries to satisfy both of these requirements. Probably, less than 7% of US cataract surgeons can readily meet all of these requirements.

  15. US PARTICLE ACCELERATOR SCHOOL: Summer schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-11-15

    Continuing it's educational efforts, the US Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) held two summer schools this year. The USPAS has two basic purposes — education in accelerator physics and technology, in particular to train apprentices and update experts; and to encourage US universities and Laboratories to offer programmes in accelerator physics by developing textbooks, training faculty, and organizing schools.

  16. Soviet Union: Summer school goes international

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The traditional annual Soviet Summer School, held in June in Dubna on the banks of the Volga, this year had international participation for the first time. Initiated by Moscow's Physical Engineering Institute and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, the school has rotating themes, with the accent this year on developments in high energy physics.

  17. Soviet Union: Summer school goes international

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The traditional annual Soviet Summer School, held in June in Dubna on the banks of the Volga, this year had international participation for the first time. Initiated by Moscow's Physical Engineering Institute and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, the school has rotating themes, with the accent this year on developments in high energy physics

  18. Summer Bridge's Effects on College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bir, Beth; Myrick, Mondrail

    2015-01-01

    This study considered whether participation in a rigorous, intense summer bridge program had a significant effect on the academic success of African-American male and female students in developmental education, compared to nonparticipants, at a four-year Historically Black University in terms of retention, progression, and graduation from…

  19. Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2013-11-30

    Nov 30, 2013 ... Science Academies' Summer Research Fellowship Programme for. Students and Teachers – 2014. Sponspored by. Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore. Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi. The National Academy of Sciences, India, Allahabad. The three national science academies offer ...

  20. Summer Session: A Time for Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Monty

    2013-05-01

    Summer is almost here (at least for those of us who teach semesters). Many of us are taking a well-deserved break to spend time with our families, conduct research, travel, and myriad other activities. Some of us, however, will be teaching summer school. For those of us lucky enough to be teaching this summer, we have one suggestion: Be bold! Summer is the ideal time to try something new with your teaching. We have known for some time that alternative pedagogies and engaging teaching strategies can be more effective than traditional lectures as student learning environments. However, even with headlines in The Washington Post proclaiming that the lecture is dead,2 inroads of physics education research-based curricula have been slow to diffuse into the classrooms for the greater population of college physics instructors.3 Many instructors of traditional physics courses see the use of research-based instructional strategies (RBIS) as desirable but risky and time consuming.3 Assuming a traditional physics course structure, both the where and the when each component takes place can also limit the types of engaging pedagogies used.4

  1. Summer Principals'/Directors' Orientation Training Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Robert L.; Garcia, Richard L.

    Intended to provide current or potential project principals/directors with the basic knowledge, skills, abilities, and sensitivities needed to manage a summer migrant school project in the local educational setting, this module provides instruction in the project management areas of planning, preparation, control, and termination. The module…

  2. The importance of the Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    As every year, the summer months see the arrival at CERN of summer students. Over a seven-week period beginning on the first Tuesday in June, students arrive at CERN for stays that will last from 8 to 13 weeks. This means that some of them are already coming to the end of their stay.   The 2010 Summer Students gathered in front of the Globe for the souvenir picture. For 2010, a total of almost 1 650 applications was received: 950 from students coming from Member States and 700 from other countries. Of these, 237 applications were accepted: 127 from the Member States,10  from the USA, 5 from Japan and 4 from Israel, and 91 from other countries. Each year, there are students from new countries, and this year CERN is welcoming students from the Philippines for the first time. “The number of applications has been growing steadily since the programme started in 1962,” reports Sharon Hobson, coordinator of the Summer Student Programme in the Recruitment Service. &ldqu...

  3. Can Text Messages Mitigate Summer Melt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Benjamin L.; Page, Lindsay C.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education officials have long been familiar with the concept of "summer melt," where students who have paid a deposit to attend one college or university instead matriculate at a different institution, usually presumed to be of comparable quality. In previous research, drawing on longitudinal data from various urban school…

  4. The Johns Hopkins Hospital: A Summer Internship

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Adam Smith, a native of Richmond, Indiana, is an advanced pharmacy practice student in the College of Pharmacy at Purdue University. In this article, he describes how career exploration through a summer internship with The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland solidified his desire to pursue a career in pharmacy administration.

  5. Tri-District Arts Consortium Summer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Charlotte O.

    1990-01-01

    The Tri-District Arts Consortium in South Carolina was formed to serve artistically gifted students in grades six-nine. The consortium developed a summer program offering music, dance, theatre, and visual arts instruction through a curriculum of intense training, performing, and hands-on experiences with faculty members and guest artists. (JDD)

  6. What Is Summer Vacation Costing Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Tara

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the standard traditional summer vacation model; this includes the accompanying food insecurity, loss of nutrition and the lost knowledge that must be re-taught at the beginning of each new academic year. It compares the number of academic days attended in various Industrialized Nations compared to the United States. Also,…

  7. US PARTICLE ACCELERATOR SCHOOL: Summer schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Continuing it's educational efforts, the US Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) held two summer schools this year. The USPAS has two basic purposes — education in accelerator physics and technology, in particular to train apprentices and update experts; and to encourage US universities and Laboratories to offer programmes in accelerator physics by developing textbooks, training faculty, and organizing schools

  8. Summer Research Fellowship Programme – 2015

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research invites applications for its Summer. Research Fellowship Programme – 2015, for motivated and talented Indian students in Science and Engineering. Detailed information and application form can be downloaded from http://www.jncasr.ac.in/fe/srfp.

  9. "What I Did over My Summer Vacation..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techniques: Making Education and Career Connections, 1997

    1997-01-01

    A tech prep summer camp was designed to give ninth graders a taste of tech prep before they were asked to choose a high school path. Parents were invited to dinner to learn about tech prep programs and their potential for successful careers. (JOW)

  10. Snowmass Fusion Summer Study Group workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Snowmass Fusion Summer Study Group workshop, has taken place at Snowmass, Colorado, 11-23 July 1999. Its purpose was to discuss opportunities and directions in fusion energy science for the next decade. About 300 experts from all fields in the magnetic and inertial fusion communities attended, coming mostly from the US, but with some foreign participation

  11. Report on Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Charles Elroy

    This resource packet was compiled by a participant in the Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia. The materials provide information for teaching about the diaspora of Hinduism and Islamic beliefs throughout the southeast Asia archipelagoes and their influence on art and culture. The handouts supplement information on Indonesia as part of an Asian…

  12. Summer ecology of Indiana bats in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a tree roosting species found throughout the eastern United States that is federally listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. A more detailed understanding of summer roosting and foraging habitat...

  13. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  14. Activities of the summer party of the 37th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition 1995-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kanda

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The summer activities in the 1995/1996 austral summer of the 37th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE-37 are reported. The JARE-37 consisted of 16 members of the summer party, one news reporter and one graduate student. The Antarctic research vessel, SHIRASE, left Tokyo on 14th November 1995 and arrived at Fremantle, West Australia on 28th November. She reached the pack ice edge near Lutzow-Holm Bay on 14th December and anchored at Syowa Station on 24th December. Transportation of cargo by helicopter to Syowa Station and to the transport point (S16 for Dome Fuji Station was carried out between 16th December 1995 and 9th January 1996. A total of 1069.5 tons of cargo, including light oil transported by pipe and freight by oversnow vehicles, were transported. Construction to replace old buildings and facilities at Syowa Station were carried out. Main construction, a building for storage, continued throughout the summer at Syowa Station. In addition, an emergency power house and a seismographic hut were built, and the old power house was torn down. Summer research programs included a marine physical survey, atmospheric work, and field surveys in ice-free areas along the Soya Coast. All of the summer party left Syowa Station on 12th February and headed to Sydney, East Australia. En route, a geodesic survey, geological and biological research were carried out at ice-free areas along the Prince Olav Coast and oceanographic, marine biological observations, geomagnetism and other work were carried out on board. Members of the summer party of JARE-37 returned to Narita by air on 27th March 1996.

  15. Earliest signs and management of leakage after bariatric surgeries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Bekheit

    2012-10-25

    Oct 25, 2012 ... b Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt c Department of ... of sepsis or hemodynamic instability require emergent exploration. .... One failed LGB underwent conversion to LGBP and.

  16. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomar Akhlesh; Tempe Deepak; Banerjee A; Hegde R; Cooper A; Khanna S

    2003-01-01

    Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and diff...

  17. On a definition of the appropriate timing for surgical intervention in orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Alfaro, F; Guijarro-Martínez, R

    2014-07-01

    Together with the introduction of new orthodontic techniques and minimally invasive surgery protocols, the emergence of modern patient prototypes has given way to novel timing schemes for the handling of dento-maxillofacial deformities. The aim of this study was to define, justify, and systematize the appropriate timing for orthognathic surgery. A retrospective analysis of orthognathic surgery procedures carried out over a 3-year period was performed. Six timing schemes were defined: 'surgery first', 'surgery early', 'surgery late', 'surgery last', 'surgery only', and 'surgery never'. Gender, age at surgery, main motivation for treatment, orthodontic treatment length, and number of orthodontic appointments were evaluated. A total of 362 orthognathic procedures were evaluated. The most common approach was 'surgery late'. While aesthetic improvement was the leading treatment motivation in 'surgery first', 'surgery early', and 'surgery last' cases, occlusal optimization was the chief aim of 'surgery late'. Sleep-disordered breathing was the main indication for treatment in 'surgery only'. Compared to 'surgery late', orthodontic treatment was substantially shorter in 'surgery early' and 'surgery first' cases, but the number of orthodontic appointments was similar. In conclusion, the skilful management of dento-maxillofacial deformities requires a comprehensive analysis of patient-, orthodontist-, and surgeon-specific variables. Each timing approach has well-defined indications, treatment planning considerations, and orthodontic and surgical peculiarities. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 67 Ambulatory Surgery: Current Status and Future Trends

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    selected patients to hospital for a planned, non emergency, surgical procedure, returning home on the same day. Minor outpatient ... Some examples of the procedures of the basket are the following: • Hernia repair,. • Varicose vein surgery,. • Mastectomy,. • Cataract surgery,. • Tonsillectomy,. • Knee arthroscopy and ...

  19. Development of a Pilot Telehealth Bariatric Surgery Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Carin K.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States continues to grow. Bariatric surgery is becoming more common and accepted in the treatment of obesity. Clinical candidates for bariatric surgery should have a BMI > 40 kg/m[superscript 2] alone, or a BMI > 35 kg/m[superscript 2] plus one comorbidity. A trend is emerging in the literature showing…

  20. What's It Like to Have Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If your surgery is not an emergency, it will be planned in advance. You will make a visit to the hospital or outpatient ... you're not. Your doctor or a nurse will give you instructions on what to ... let your doctor know well in advance if you are taking any herbal or other ...

  1. [Thymus surgery in a general surgery department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Raquel; Coelho, Fátima; Pimentel, Teresa; Ribero, Rui; Matos, Novo de; Araújo, António

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of thymectomy cases between 1990-2003, in a General Surgery Department. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy in Miastenia Gravis patients. Retrospective study based on evaluation of data from Serviço de Cirurgia, Neurologia and Consult de Neurology processes, between 1990-2003, of 15 patients submitted to total thymectomy. 15 patients, aged 17 to 72, 11 female and 4 male. Miastenia Gravis was the main indication for surgery, for uncontrollable symptoms or suspicion of thymoma. In patients with myasthenia, surgery was accomplish after compensation of symptoms. There weren't post-surgery complications. Pathology were divided in thymic hyperplasia and thymoma. Miastenia patients have there symptoms diminished or stable with reduction or cessation of medical therapy. Miastenia was the most frequent indication for thymectomy. Surgery was good results, with low morbimortality, as long as the protocols are respected.

  2. European summer temperatures since Roman times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luterbacher, J; Werner, J P; Smerdon, J E; Fernández-Donado, L; González-Rouco, F J; Barriopedro, D; Ljungqvist, F C; Büntgen, U; Frank, D; Zorita, E; Wagner, S; Esper, J; McCarroll, D; Toreti, A; Jungclaus, J H; Bothe, O; Barriendos, M; Bertolin, C; Camuffo, D; Brázdil, R

    2016-01-01

    The spatial context is critical when assessing present-day climate anomalies, attributing them to potential forcings and making statements regarding their frequency and severity in a long-term perspective. Recent international initiatives have expanded the number of high-quality proxy-records and developed new statistical reconstruction methods. These advances allow more rigorous regional past temperature reconstructions and, in turn, the possibility of evaluating climate models on policy-relevant, spatio-temporal scales. Here we provide a new proxy-based, annually-resolved, spatial reconstruction of the European summer (June–August) temperature fields back to 755 CE based on Bayesian hierarchical modelling (BHM), together with estimates of the European mean temperature variation since 138 BCE based on BHM and composite-plus-scaling (CPS). Our reconstructions compare well with independent instrumental and proxy-based temperature estimates, but suggest a larger amplitude in summer temperature variability than previously reported. Both CPS and BHM reconstructions indicate that the mean 20th century European summer temperature was not significantly different from some earlier centuries, including the 1st, 2nd, 8th and 10th centuries CE. The 1st century (in BHM also the 10th century) may even have been slightly warmer than the 20th century, but the difference is not statistically significant. Comparing each 50 yr period with the 1951–2000 period reveals a similar pattern. Recent summers, however, have been unusually warm in the context of the last two millennia and there are no 30 yr periods in either reconstruction that exceed the mean average European summer temperature of the last 3 decades (1986–2015 CE). A comparison with an ensemble of climate model simulations suggests that the reconstructed European summer temperature variability over the period 850–2000 CE reflects changes in both internal variability and external forcing on multi-decadal time

  3. Alpbach Summer School - a unique learning experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K.; Aulinas, J.; Clifford, D.; Krejci, D.; Topham, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Alpbach Summer School is a ten-day program that provides a unique opportunity for young european science and engineering students, both undergraduate and graduate, to learn how to approach the entire design process of a space mission. The theme of the 2010 Summer School was "New Space Missions to Understand Climate Change", a current, challenging, very broad and complex topic. The program was established more than 35 years ago and is organised in two interrelated parts: a series of lectures held by renowned experts in the field (in the case of this specific year, climate change and space engineering experts) that provides a technical and scientific background for the workshops that follow, the core of the Summer School. For the workshops the students are split into four international, interdisciplinary teams of about 15 students. In 2010 every team had to complete a number of tasks, four in total: (1) identify climate change research gaps and design a space mission that has not yet been flown or proposed, (2) define the science objectives and requirements of the mission, (3) design a spacecraft that meets the mission requirements, which includes spacecraft design and construction, payload definition, orbit calculations, but also the satellite launch, operation and mission costs and (4) write up a short mission proposal and present the results to an expert review panel. Achieving these tasks in only a few days in a multicultural, interdisciplinary team represents a major challenge for all participants and provides an excellent practical learning experience. Over the course of the program, students do not just learn facts about climate change and space engineering, but scientists also learn from engineers and engineers from scientists. The participants have to deepen their knowledge in an often unfamiliar field, develop organisational and team-work skills and work under pressure. Moreover, teams are supported by team and roving tutors and get the opportunity to

  4. Arctic summer school onboard an icebreaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Vladimir A.; Repina, Irina A.

    2014-05-01

    The International Arctic Research Center (IARC) of the University of Alaska Fairbanks conducted a summer school for PhD students, post-docs and early career scientists in August-September 2013, jointly with an arctic expedition as a part of NABOS project (Nansen and Amundsen Basin Observational System) onboard the Russian research vessel "Akademik Fedorov". Both the summer school and NABOS expedition were funded by the National Science Foundation. The one-month long summer school brought together graduate students and young scientists with specialists in arctic oceanography and climate to convey to a new generation of scientists the opportunities and challenges of arctic climate observations and modeling. Young scientists gained hands-on experience during the field campaign and learned about key issues in arctic climate from observational, diagnostic, and modeling perspectives. The summer school consisted of background lectures, participation in fieldwork and mini-projects. The mini-projects were performed in collaboration with summer school instructors and members of the expedition. Key topics covered in the lectures included: - arctic climate: key characteristics and processes; - physical processes in the Arctic Ocean; - sea ice and the Arctic Ocean; - trace gases, aerosols, and chemistry: importance for climate changes; - feedbacks in the arctic system (e.g., surface albedo, clouds, water vapor, circulation); - arctic climate variations: past, ongoing, and projected; - global climate models: an overview. An outreach specialist from the Miami Science Museum was writing a blog from the icebreaker with some very impressive statistics (results as of January 1, 2014): Total number of blog posts: 176 Blog posts written/contributed by scientists: 42 Blog views: 22,684 Comments: 1,215 Number of countries who viewed the blog: 89 (on 6 continents) The 33-day long NABOS expedition started on August 22, 2013 from Kirkenes, Norway. The vessel ("Akademik Fedorov") returned to

  5. Influence of Western Tibetan Plateau Summer Snow Cover on East Asian Summer Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibiao; Wu, Renguang; Chen, Shangfeng; Huang, Gang; Liu, Ge; Zhu, Lihua

    2018-03-01

    The influence of boreal winter-spring eastern Tibetan Plateau snow anomalies on the East Asian summer rainfall variability has been the focus of previous studies. The present study documents the impacts of boreal summer western and southern Tibetan Plateau snow cover anomalies on summer rainfall over East Asia. Analysis shows that more snow cover in the western and southern Tibetan Plateau induces anomalous cooling in the overlying atmospheric column. The induced atmospheric circulation changes are different corresponding to more snow cover in the western and southern Tibetan Plateau. The atmospheric circulation changes accompanying the western Plateau snow cover anomalies are more obvious over the midlatitude Asia, whereas those corresponding to the southern Plateau snow cover anomalies are more prominent over the tropics. As such, the western and southern Tibetan Plateau snow cover anomalies influence the East Asian summer circulation and precipitation through different pathways. Nevertheless, the East Asian summer circulation and precipitation anomalies induced by the western and southern Plateau snow cover anomalies tend to display similar distribution so that they are more pronounced when the western and southern Plateau snow cover anomalies work in coherence. Analysis indicates that the summer snow cover anomalies over the Tibetan Plateau may be related to late spring snow anomalies due to the persistence. The late spring snow anomalies are related to an obvious wave train originating from the western North Atlantic that may be partly associated with sea surface temperature anomalies in the North Atlantic Ocean.

  6. Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BACK Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer Diet and Nutrition Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Ver esta página en ...

  7. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000367.htm Blood donation before surgery To use the sharing features on ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Blood Transfusion and Donation Surgery Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  8. Cosmetic ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  9. Open heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002950.htm Open heart surgery To use the sharing features on this ... large arteries connected to the heart. The term "open heart surgery" means that you are connected to a ...

  10. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... misalignment of jaws and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient's appearance may ... indicate the need for corrective jaw surgery: Difficulty chewing, or biting food Difficulty swallowing Chronic jaw or ...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. ... more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ...

  14. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... laparoscopically (using a tiny video camera) or using robotic surgery depends on: The extent of the surgery ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  15. Anti-reflux surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. You may need another surgery in the future if you develop new reflux symptoms or swallowing ... Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Blepharoplasty (Eyelid Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blepharoplasty (BLEF-uh-roe-plas-tee) is a type of surgery that repairs droopy eyelids and may involve ... tobacco and drugs. Your expectations. An honest discussion of your hopes and motivation for surgery will help set the stage for ...

  17. Smoking and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery - quitting smoking; Surgery - quitting tobacco; Wound healing - smoking ... Tar, nicotine, and other chemicals from smoking can increase your risk of many health problems. These include heart and blood vessel problems, such as: Blood clots and aneurysms in ...

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jaw Surgery Download Download the ebook for further information Corrective jaw, or orthognathic surgery is performed by ... your treatment. Correction of Common Dentofacial Deformities ​ ​ The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  19. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had cosmetic breast surgery to change the size or shape ...

  20. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000179.htm Shoulder surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had shoulder surgery to repair the tissues inside or around your ...

  1. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight ... obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food you ...

  2. Cardiac surgery in the parturient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Shobana; Cook, Christopher R; Collard, Charles D

    2009-03-01

    Heart disease is the primary cause of nonobstetric mortality in pregnancy, occurring in 1%-3% of pregnancies and accounting for 10%-15% of maternal deaths. Congenital heart disease has become more prevalent in women of childbearing age, representing an increasing percentage (up to 75%) of heart disease in pregnancy. Untreated maternal heart disease also places the fetus at risk. Independent predictors of neonatal complications include a maternal New York Heart Association heart failure classification >2, anticoagulation use during pregnancy, smoking, multiple gestation, and left heart obstruction. Because cardiac surgical morbidity and mortality in the parturient is higher than nonpregnant patients, most parturients with cardiac disease are first managed medically, with cardiac surgery being reserved when medical management fails. Risk factors for maternal mortality during cardiac surgery include the use of vasoactive drugs, age, type of surgery, reoperation, and maternal functional class. Risk factors for fetal mortality include maternal age >35 yr, functional class, reoperation, emergency surgery, type of myocardial protection, and anoxic time. Nonetheless, acceptable maternal and fetal perioperative mortality rates may be achieved through such measures as early preoperative detection of maternal cardiovascular decompensation, use of fetal monitoring, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester. Additionally, fetal morbidity may be reduced during cardiopulmonary bypass by optimizing maternal oxygen-carrying capacity and uterine blood flow. Current maternal bypass recommendations include: 1) maintaining the pump flow rate >2.5 L x min(-1) x m(-2) and perfusion pressure >70 mm Hg; 2) maintaining the hematocrit > 28%; 3) using normothermic perfusion when feasible; 4) using pulsatile flow; and 5) using alpha-stat pH management.

  3. Robotic liver surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  4. Assessing Disaster Preparedness Among Select Children's Summer Camps in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Megan; Sielaff, Alan; Bradin, Stuart; Walker, Kevin; Ambrose, Michael; Hashikawa, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Children's summer camps are at risk for multiple pediatric casualties during a disaster. The degree to which summer camps have instituted disaster preparedness is unknown. We assessed disaster preparedness among selected camps nationally for a range of disasters. We partnered with a national, web-based electronic health records system to send camp leadership of 315 camp organizations a 14-question online survey of disaster preparedness. One response from each camp was selected in the following order of importance: owner, director, physician, nurse, medical technician, office staff, and other. The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. A total of 181 camps responses were received, 169 of which were complete. Camp types were overnight (60%), day (21%), special/medical needs (14%), and other (5%). Survey respondents were directors (52%), nurses (14%), office staff (10%), physicians (5%), owners (5%), emergency medical technicians (2%), and other (12%). Almost 18% of camps were located >20 mi from a major medical center, and 36% were >5 mi from police/fire departments. Many camps were missing emergency supplies: car/booster seats for evacuation (68%), shelter (35%), vehicles for evacuation (26%), quarantine isolation areas (21%), or emergency supplies of extra water (20%) or food (17%). Plans were unavailable for the following: power outages (23%); lockdowns (15%); illness outbreaks (15%); tornadoes (11%); evacuation for fire, flood, or chemical spill (9%); and other severe weather (8%). Many camps did not have online emergency plans (53%), plans for children with special/medical needs (38%), methods to rapidly communicate information to parents (25%), or methods to identify children for evacuation/reunification with parents (40%). Respondents reported that staff participation in disaster drills varied for weather (58%), evacuations (46%), and lockdowns (36%). The majority (75%) of respondents had not collaborated with medical organizations for planning. A

  5. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  6. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may ... front, or side Facial injury Birth defects Receding lower jaw and ...

  7. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  8. Emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) continued in systematic development of its activities in the field of emergency planning according to the concept adopted by the Authority and according to the concept for building Emergency headquarters (EH) adopted after establishing of Emergency Response Centre (ERC). Major efforts were focused not only on building up a quality EH, but also tasks associated with completion and incorporation of ERC into emergency planning and emergency managing. An important role in building ERC was played by international missions. Significant position among these missions was taken by missions from Great Britain, which in the past years made a significant contribution to building up ERC. These missions focused on review of newly created standard procedures, preparation and implementation of first emergency exercises of the EH. The emergency exercises in which NRA SR took place in 1996 are reviewed. In order to make the co-operation of the Authority with the selected Army units of SR more effective in solving extraordinary situations in nuclear energy, an agreement was signed between NRA SR and the Headquarters of the Army of SR, which will help significantly to the objective

  9. Legal and ethical issues in robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroforou, A; Michalodimitrakis, E; Hatzitheo-Filou, C; Giannoukas, A

    2010-02-01

    With the rapid introduction of revolutionary technologies in surgical practice, such as computer-enhanced robotic surgery, the complexity in various aspects, including medical, legal and ethical, will increase exponentially. Our aim was to highlight important legal and ethical implications emerged from the application of robotic surgery. Search of the pertinent medical and legal literature. Robotic surgery may open new avenues in the near future in surgical practice. However, in robotic surgery, special training and experience along with high quality assessment are required in order to provide normal conscientious care and state-of-the-art treatment. While the legal basis for professional liability remains exactly the same, litigation with the use of robotic surgery may be complex. In case of an undesirable outcome, in addition to physician and hospital, the manufacturer of the robotic system may be sued. In respect to ethical issues in robotic surgery, equipment safety and reliability, provision of adequate information, and maintenance of confidentiality are all of paramount importance. Also, the cost of robotic surgery and the lack of such systems in most of the public hospitals may restrict the majority from the benefits offered by the new technology. While surgical robotics will have a significant impact on surgical practice, it presents challenges so much in the realm of law and ethics as of medicine and health care.

  10. Pilot ETSON/JSP Summer School succeeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, A. de; Weber, S.

    2013-01-01

    The ETSON Summer School on 'nuclear reactor safety assessment' took place on 25 to 29 August 2008 at the GRS premises in Garching near Munich. The lecturers, coming from IRSN, GRS, Bel V and NNL, brought the participants insights in the similarities, as well as differences in European reactor concepts and their safety assessments. The most technical presentations dealt with the safety of nuclear reactors, nuclear accidents and their analysis, safety assessment and multilateral tools. 45 participants attended this summer school. Besides the lectures and group work, an optional technical visit of the new research reactor FRM-II (Heinz Maier-Leibnitz research neutron source) or a presentation of the GRS Simulation Centre was offered

  11. Ventures in science status report, Summer 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The Ventures in Science summer program is directed towards students who are from underrepresented minority groups in mathematics and science professions. The target group of 40 was drawn from eligible students who will be entering high school freshman in the fall of 1992. 450 students applied. The theme for the summer is Chicago as an Ecosystem. The students are instructed in integrated math and science (2 hours), English/ESL (1 1/2 hrs.), counseling (1 hr.) and, physical education (1 hr.) each day four days a week. Integrated math and science are team taught. Parents are invited to participate in two workshops that will be presented based on their input. Parents may also visit the program at any time and participate in any field trip.

  12. Summer Mini Atomiade in June 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The Mini Atomiade are coming to CERN! Members of Clubs supported by the CERN Staff Association and in conjunction with ASCERI (Association of the Sports Communities of the European Research Institutes) will be organising the summer games at the beginning of June.   ASCERI aims to contribute to a united Europe through regular sports meetings, bringing together members of public Research Institutes at European level. The Association's members come from over 40 Research Institutes spanning 16 countries. Numerous sports and leisure activities are represented at regular events and each tournament is organised by a different research institute.  Clubs in conjunction with the CERN Staff Association have sent teams to previous winter and summer games and now, the CERN Club’s Coordination Committee (CCC) has taken on the challenge of organising a Mini Atomiade from Friday 3 June to Monday 6 June 2016 in Divonne-les-Bains. The ga...

  13. 2015 CERN-Fermilab HCP Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the tenth edition, from 24 June to 3 July 2015. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Lecture Topics include: Statistics in HEP, Heavy Flavour, Heavy Ion, Standard Model, Higgs searches and measurements, BSM theory, BSM searches, Top physics, QCD and Monte Carlos, Accelerators, Detectors for the future, Trigger and DAQ, Dark Matter Astroparticle, and two special lectures on Future Colliders, and 20 years after the top discovery. Calendar and Details: Mark your calendar for  24 June - 3 July 2015, when CERN will welcome students to t...

  14. Developing High School Geoscientists through Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J.

    2012-12-01

    High school students in the San Francisco Bay Area have the opportunity to contribute to Earth sciences research during the summer at Stanford University. The School of Earth Sciences hosts about 25 high school students each summer to support ongoing research, through more than just washing glassware. To increase diversity in the geosciences, we select students from diverse backgrounds through an application process which lessens the burden on busy faculty. The students work for 15-20 hours per week under the supervision of graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. The supervisors come to value the interns for a few reasons: not only are they getting some extra help with their research, but they are getting teaching experience in an informal but powerful way and supervising the interns' work over the summer. Another key part of the internship is bringing all of the interns together regularly. Whether it is for career talks, lab tours or field trip, high school students find kindred spirits in the group. Another important reason for weekly gatherings is to introduce the students to the wide field of Earth sciences and the different approaches and paths that scientists take. The summer ends with a culminating event where interns make short informal presentations about their research which give them an opportunity to articulate the big questions they have been helping to answer. Some interns are also invited to present a poster in a session for high school students at the Fall AGU meeting. These experiences of working in the laboratory and communicating about the research are part of the world of Earth sciences that are absent for most youth. The high school internships foster good will between Stanford and the local communities, help develop a more Earth and environmentally knowledgeable public and may have a long-term affect on diversifying the geosciences by exposing more young people to these fields.

  15. Closeout Report for CTEQ Summer School 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Tao [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-05-30

    The CTEQ Collaboration is an informal group of 37 experimental and theoretical high energy physicists from 20 universities and 5 national labs, engaged in a program to advance research in and understanding of QCD. This program includes the well-known collaborative project on global QCD analysis of parton distributions, the organization of a variety of workshops, periodic collaboration meetings, and the subject of this proposal: the CTEQ Summer Schools on QCD Analysis and Phenomenology.

  16. Studying Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Selin, Cynthia; Rodegher, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The Emerge event, held in Tempe, AZ in March 2012, brought together a range of scientists, artists, futurists, engineers and students in order to experiment with innovative methods for thinking about the future. These methodological techniques were tested through nine workshops, each of which made...... use of a different format; Emerge as a whole, then, offered an opportunity to study a diverse set of future-oriented engagement practices. We conducted an event ethnography, in which a team of 11 researchers collaboratively developed accounts of the practices at play within Emerge and its workshops...

  17. Chemical Emergencies - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chemical Emergencies - bosanski (Bosnian) PDF Chemical Emergencies - English MP3 Chemical Emergencies - bosanski (Bosnian) MP3 Chemical Emergencies - English MP4 Chemical Emergencies - bosanski (Bosnian) ...

  18. Developing expertise in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, David

    2010-01-01

    The concept of expertise is widely embraced but poorly defined in surgery. Dictionary definitions differentiate between authority and experience, while a third view sees expertise as a mind-set rather than a status. Both absolute and relative models of expertise have been developed, and each allows a richer understanding of the application of these concepts to emerge. Trainees must develop both independent and interdependent expertise, and an appreciation of the essentially constructivist and uncertain nature of medical knowledge. Approach may be more important than innate talent; the concepts of 'flow', sustained 'deliberate practice' and 'adaptive expertise' are examples of expert approaches to learning. Non-analytical reasoning plays a key role in decision making at expert levels of practice. A technically gifted surgeon may be seen as a safety hazard rather than an expert if inter-dependent expertise has not been developed. Key roles of a surgical educator are to facilitate the development of an expert approach to education and to enable entry into and movement towards the centre of an expert community of practice.

  19. Innovation in medical education: summer studentships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Engel, Naomi; Dunlop, Ross; Kay, Christine

    2010-03-01

    few doctors choose academic medicine as a career. Reasons suggested for this include a lack of exposure. Thus, we wished to broaden the opportunities available for undergraduate medical students to experience academic medicine, specifically medical education. The approach selected was to establish a programme of competitive Teaching Development Awards: the 'Summer Studentship Scheme'. this article describes the approach taken, including an overview of the organisation of the Summer Studentship Scheme, and provides preliminary data on gains from the programme. Twenty studentships were funded over a 3-year period. The projects covered a wide range of topics. Information on what the students gained from the projects and supervisor views of the programme were sought by questionnaire and self-reflective statements. the academic gains to date include nine presentations at national conferences and four published papers. All student respondents (87%) agreed that they would recommend a summer studentship to another student. Supervising a studentship (86% response rate) was seen as a positive experience. a relatively small level of funding can lead to great gains, in terms of academic output, internally, and in terms of external dissemination, as well as in gains to participating students and staff. We plan to track the career developments of participating students to see if they are more likely to pursue academic medicine as their peers. Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  20. Center for Computing Research Summer Research Proceedings 2015.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Andrew Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parks, Michael L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-18

    The Center for Computing Research (CCR) at Sandia National Laboratories organizes a summer student program each summer, in coordination with the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) and Cyber Engineering Research Institute (CERI).

  1. Using your shoulder after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulder surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder surgery - after ... rotator cuff surgery or other ligament or labral surgery, you need to be careful with your shoulder. Ask the surgeon what arm movements are safe ...

  2. Optimizing transfusion in vascular surgery: is bloodless surgery an option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shander, Aryeh

    2008-01-01

    The prospect of surgery without blood loss is an emerging reality. Use of a blood conservation strategy is gaining increasing recognition as a sound and practical approach, especially for the majority of large blood loss surgeries. However, critical situations still occur in which transfusions are necessary or unavoidable for the short-term survival of the patient. The decision-making processes for determining when to transfuse, which blood products to give, and how much are presented here with an evaluation of the risks of transfusion and a discussion on blood conservation strategies. Modalities that may be used in such strategies include restricted phlebotomy, the implementation of restrictive transfusion triggers, acute normovolemic hemodilution, intraoperative and postoperative blood salvage, and refined operative techniques to achieve meticulous hemostasis. In addition, the proper use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents well before surgery can reduce the number of units transfused. The risks and costs of allogeneic blood transfusions underscore the need for and value of blood conservation techniques. Increasingly, hospitals are adopting blood conservation strategies as part of their routine practice. Blood conservation is a rapidly evolving field in which active research is expanding our understanding of the molecular, physiologic, and clinical aspects of hematopoiesis, circulatory response, coagulation enigmas, artificial oxygen carriers, and the impact of anemia on organ function. Ongoing research offers the possibility of replacement or elimination of allogeneic blood transfusions in a variety of clinical settings.

  3. Emerging images

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.; Chu, Hungkuo; Lee, Tongyee; Wolf, Lior; Yeshurun, Hezy; Cohen-Or, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Emergence refers to the unique human ability to aggregate information from seemingly meaningless pieces, and to perceive a whole that is meaningful. This special skill of humans can constitute an effective scheme to tell humans and machines apart

  4. A River Summer on the Hudson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Selleck, B.; Son, L.; Land, M.; Cronin, J.

    2006-12-01

    River Summer is a month-long faculty development program extending from the continental shelf off New York City to the headwaters of the Hudson in the Adirondack Mountains. During the program, faculty from the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities teach each other about the Hudson environment, using innovative methods of teaching and learning, with a focus on incorporation of hands-on approaches from the perspective of multiple disciplines. Over four weeks, faculty from research universities, community colleges, liberal arts institutions, and middle and high schools work and live together, on board a research vessel or in a remote tent campsite, for several days at a time. Using the geology, hydrology, and landscape of the River as a foundation, River Summer focuses on understanding development of the Hudson within the context of its natural resources and cultural history. Participants conduct field sampling and analyses and consider issues through approaches that are common to many disciplines: scaling for problem solving; sampling and assessing bias and representation; observing and documenting; representing and depicting; interpretation and assessing relationships and causality; and evaluation. They also get a chance to experience, first-hand, the complexity and often open-ended nature of doing science. By allowing individuals, many of whom come from non-science disciplines, to experience these methods and processes in a safe learning environment, science is made more meaningful and accessible. The program's pedagogy is based on the principles of cognitive psychology and immersive field-, place- and inquiry-based learning. Field programs have been found to provide memorable, transformative experiences for undergraduate students, and our experience with River Summer 2005 and 2006 suggests they are equally effective with faculty. Evaluation shows that River Summer has a significant impact on its participants. Participants develop new

  5. Emergent emotion

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Elaine Finbarr

    2016-01-01

    I argue that emotion is an ontologically emergent and sui generis. I argue that emotion meets both of two individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for ontological emergence. These are, (i) that emotion necessarily has constituent parts to which it cannot be reduced, and (ii) that emotion has a causal effect on its constituent parts (i.e. emotion demonstrates downward causation).\\ud \\ud I argue that emotion is partly cognitive, partly constituted by feelings and partly perceptu...

  6. Dermatologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Simón Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologic emergencies represent about 8–20% of the diseases seen in the Emergency Department of hospitals. It is often a challenge for primary care physicians to differentiate mundane skin ailments from more serious, life threatening conditions that require immediate intervention. In this review we included the following conditions: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrosis, pemphigus vulgaris, toxic shock syndrome, fasciitis necrotising, angioedema/urticaria, meningococcemia, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  7. Socioeconomic outcome of epilepsy surgery: A controlled national study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Sabers, Anne; Christensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    severely affected by their disease as indicated by health care use and social impact before the surgical procedure. Patients who underwent epilepsy surgery had a significantly lower costs associated with the use of medication, outpatient services, inpatient admissions, and accident and emergency visits...... after surgery. The surgical intervention had no significant effects on social status in terms of occupation and educational level. CONCLUSION: Although epilepsy surgery was followed by a reduction in inpatient and outpatient health care use, medication and use of accident and emergency facilities...

  8. EMERGENCY CALLS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors ...

  9. Emerging images

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2009-01-01

    Emergence refers to the unique human ability to aggregate information from seemingly meaningless pieces, and to perceive a whole that is meaningful. This special skill of humans can constitute an effective scheme to tell humans and machines apart. This paper presents a synthesis technique to generate images of 3D objects that are detectable by humans, but difficult for an automatic algorithm to recognize. The technique allows generating an infinite number of images with emerging figures. Our algorithm is designed so that locally the synthesized images divulge little useful information or cues to assist any segmentation or recognition procedure. Therefore, as we demonstrate, computer vision algorithms are incapable of effectively processing such images. However, when a human observer is presented with an emergence image, synthesized using an object she is familiar with, the figure emerges when observed as a whole. We can control the difficulty level of perceiving the emergence effect through a limited set of parameters. A procedure that synthesizes emergence images can be an effective tool for exploring and understanding the factors affecting computer vision techniques. © 2009 ACM.

  10. Anorectal emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2016-01-01

    Anorectal emergencies refer to anorectal disorders presenting with some alarming symptoms such as acute anal pain and bleeding which might require an immediate management. This article deals with the diagnosis and management of common anorectal emergencies such as acutely thrombosed external hemorrhoid, thrombosed or strangulated internal hemorrhoid, bleeding hemorrhoid, bleeding anorectal varices, anal fissure, irreducible or strangulated rectal prolapse, anorectal abscess, perineal necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene), retained anorectal foreign bodies and obstructing rectal cancer. Sexually transmitted diseases as anorectal non-surgical emergencies and some anorectal emergencies in neonates are also discussed. The last part of this review dedicates to the management of early complications following common anorectal procedures that may present as an emergency including acute urinary retention, bleeding, fecal impaction and anorectal sepsis. Although many of anorectal disorders presenting in an emergency setting are not life-threatening and may be successfully treated in an outpatient clinic, an accurate diagnosis and proper management remains a challenging problem for clinicians. A detailed history taking and a careful physical examination, including digital rectal examination and anoscopy, is essential for correct diagnosis and plan of treatment. In some cases, some imaging examinations, such as endoanal ultrasonography and computerized tomography scan of whole abdomen, are required. If in doubt, the attending physicians should not hesitate to consult an expert e.g., colorectal surgeon about the diagnosis, proper management and appropriate follow-up. PMID:27468181

  11. 76 FR 23177 - Exchange Visitor Program-Summer Work Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ...--Summer Work Travel AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Interim final rule with request for comment... below, this rule modifies the Summer Work Travel regulations by establishing different employment..., the Department is establishing a new Summer Work Travel framework that recognizes potential underlying...

  12. Specialized Summer Camps: Provide Benefits for Children and Families Alike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The arrival of summer signals a season of endless days of swimming, fishing, summer camps, and other outdoor activities. For children with chronic or terminal illnesses, it can be difficult to participate in many of these activities as well as challenging for parents to find summer camps that not only engage their children, but also offer the…

  13. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. Goodbye to Summer Vacation? The Effects of Summer Enrollment on College and Employment Outcomes. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Vivian Yuen Ting

    2016-01-01

    Despite rich evidence on the benefit of summer enrollment at the K-12 level, the college completion literature has so far focused on college readiness, remediation, and financial aid, and has largely overlooked the potential benefits of taking summer courses among college students. Academic momentum theory suggests that summer enrollment may…

  15. Emergency treatment of complicated colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tebala,Giovanni Domenico; Natili,Andrea; Gallucci,Antonio; Brachini,Gioia; Khan,Abdul Qayyum; Tebala,Domenico; Mingoli,Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Giovanni Domenico Tebala,1 Andrea Natili,1,2 Antonio Gallucci,1 Gioia Brachini,2 Abdul Qayyum Khan,1 Domenico Tebala,3 Andrea Mingoli2 1Colorectal Team, Noble’s Hospital, Strang, Douglas, Isle of Man, UK; 2Emergency Surgery Unit, “P.Valdoni” Department of Surgery, “Umberto I” University Hospital, Rome, Italy; 3National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT), Catanzaro, Italy Aim: To find evidence to suggest the best approach in patients admitted as ...

  16. A Comparative Study of Single-Port Laparoscopic Surgery Versus Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levic, Katarina; Donatsky, Anders Meller; Bulut, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Conventional laparoscopic surgery is the treatment of choice for many abdominal procedures. To further reduce surgical trauma, new minimal invasive procedures such as single-port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) and robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) have emerged. The aim...... in either of the groups. There was no difference in median follow-up time between groups (P = .58). CONCLUSION: Both SPLS and RALS may have a role in rectal surgery. The short-term oncological outcomes were similar, although RALS harvested more lymph nodes than the SPLS procedure. However, SPLS seems...

  17. Hematologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Vallisa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the surprising progress made in other areas of hematology (advances in the understanding of leukemogenesis, improved transplant techniques has been conspicuously absent in the management of hematologic emergencies. And yet, every step toward greater knowledge, every new treatment option will be of little value unless we are able to manage the acute complications of hematologic diseases. These complications are better defined as hematologic emergencies, and they are characterized by a high rate of mortality. This review is based on a search of the literature that was initially confined to articles published in the journal Hematology from 2000 to 2009. The search was then extended to the Cochrane Library and to Pub Med in February 2010 with the following Keywords emergencies; urgencies; hematology. The same key words were employed in a search of the archives of Blood and the New England Journal of Medicine from 2000 to 2010. The results confirm that hematologic emergencies can be caused by hematologic malignancies as well as by non-neoplastic hematologic diseases. Within the former category; this review examines the causes; manifestations; treatment and prevention of disseminated intravascular coagulation; superior vena caval syndrome; spinal cord compression; tumor lysis syndrome; hyperleukocytosis; and hypercalcemia. We also review emergency situations associated with non-neoplatic haematological diseases; such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; drug-induced hemolytic anemia; and acute sickle-cell crisis.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija Đ

    2015-01-01

    Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  19. Should bariatric surgery be performed in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Andrew J; Reinehr, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent obesity has markedly increased worldwide in both its extent and prevalence in recent decades and obesity prevention strategies are failing. As a result, effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. As behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches have only moderate effects in severe obesity, bariatric surgery has begun to emerge as a treatment option. In this debate article, we offer arguments opposing and supporting bariatric surgery in the treatment of severe obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has superior therapeutic outcomes with respect to weight loss and resolution of comorbid diseases over other existing treatments. However, long-term outcomes after bariatric surgery in adolescents are only just beginning to emerge. Furthermore, the procedures are generally considered irreversible, apart from gastric banding. Most importantly, not all adolescents seem to benefit greatly from bariatric surgery and we are not yet able to reliably identify those who stand to gain the greatest benefit. The authors agree that adolescent bariatric surgery should be offered exclusively within formal adolescent obesity programs, delivered by specialist multidisciplinary child/adolescent obesity teams, and within specialist centers, in order to optimize outcomes and minimize potential detrimental effects. Patients and their family/carers must be educated regarding the benefits and risks, potential side effects, expected changes in eating behavior and the lifelong requirement for regular medical follow-up after surgery. Before embarking upon a surgical treatment pathway in adolescents with severe obesity, it may also be beneficial to ensure compliance to treatment is demonstrated, in order to minimize the risk of nutritional deficiencies and associated potential complications. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  20. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for 'hands-on' projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the "1"2C(d,p)"1"3C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  1. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  2. Emergency preparedness

    CERN Document Server

    Cennini, E; Oortman Gerlings, P

    2009-01-01

    On September 19th 2008, a technical fault was at the centre of a sequence of events which hampered the performance of certain equipments of the LHC 3-4 sector. Once the first effects of this sequence of events were detected, the behaviour of the CERN staff confronted to this complex and critical situation became the centre of the risk control process. During such a downward spiral the preparation of all stakeholders is essential and should respect the (apparently) basic principles of emergency preparedness. Preparedness towards normal operation of CERN facilities towards minor up to major emergency situations will be presented. The main technical, organisational and legal frameworks of the CERN emergency preparedness will be recalled, highlighting the CERN risk management and risk control strategy. Then, the sequence of events experienced by different stakeholders on September 19th will be reported, thus starting the learned lessons process.

  3. Emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear activities are exercised so as to prevent the accidents. They are subjected to a rule whom application is controlled by the Asn. The risk of grave accident is so limited to a very low level of probability. He cannot be however completely pushed aside. The expression ' radiological emergency situation ' indicates a situation which ensues from an incident or of an accident risking to lead to an emission of radioactive materials or a level of radioactivity susceptible to strike a blow at the public health. The term ' nuclear crisis ' is used for the events which can lead to a radiological emergency situation on a nuclear basic installation or during a transport of radioactive materials. The preparation and the management of emergency situations, that they are of natural, accidental or terrorist origin, became a major concern of our society. We propose you of to know more about it in this file. (N.C.)

  4. Emergency neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarabino, T.; Hospital of Andria; Salvolini, U.; Jinkins, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The book is directed at emergency radiologists and neuroradiologists. It aims at providing exhaustive information that will help the reader understand the clinical problems in the full range of neurological emergencies and to select the methodological and technical options that will ensure prompt and effective response and correct interpretation of the clinical findings. The various chapters address the most common neuroradiological emergencies, summarize their fundamental physiopathological features, describe the main semiological and differential diagnostic features, and provide operative suggestions for the selection of the appropriate techniques to be applied in a sequential order. The book addresses the application of state-of-the-art techniques and their implications for clinical practice (particularly the contributions of standard and functional MRI and of spiral and multislice CT). The illustrations provide not only training but also reference material for routine clinical work. (orig.)

  5. 2016 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Program is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8–10 weeks for a hands-on research experience. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students also have the opportunity to meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  6. Joint Force Quarterly. Number 19, Summer 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    with original pagina - tion and issue markings at the bottom corner of each folio. However, a ring folios8 has been added at the bottom center which...Defense University World Wide Web (http://www.ndu.edu/inss/books/books.html). 0719 Owens Pgs 11/17/98 6:16 PM Page 27 72 JFQ / Summer 1993 28 roles...World Wide Web . However, contentious issues remain in certain areas which must be resolved at service chief or CINC level. Moreover, the best hope for

  7. 2017 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Internship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-13

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Internship Program (NFSIP) is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8-10 weeks of hands-on research. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students can also meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  8. 2017 Landsat Science Team Summer Meeting Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Christopher J.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Wulder, Michael A.; Irons, James R.

    2018-01-01

    The summer meeting of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)-NASA Landsat Science Team (LST) was held June 11-13, 2017, at the USGS’s Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center near Sioux Falls, SD. This was the final meeting of the Second (2012-2017) LST.1 Frank Kelly [EROS—Center Director] welcomed the attendees and expressed his thanks to the LST members for their contributions. He then introduced video-recorded messages from South Dakota’s U.S. senators, John Thune and Mike Rounds, in which they acknowledged the efforts of the team in advancing the societal impacts of the Landsat Program.

  9. Algebraic Geometry and Number Theory Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Sarıoğlu, Celal; Soulé, Christophe; Zeytin, Ayberk

    2017-01-01

    This lecture notes volume presents significant contributions from the “Algebraic Geometry and Number Theory” Summer School, held at Galatasaray University, Istanbul, June 2-13, 2014. It addresses subjects ranging from Arakelov geometry and Iwasawa theory to classical projective geometry, birational geometry and equivariant cohomology. Its main aim is to introduce these contemporary research topics to graduate students who plan to specialize in the area of algebraic geometry and/or number theory. All contributions combine main concepts and techniques with motivating examples and illustrative problems for the covered subjects. Naturally, the book will also be of interest to researchers working in algebraic geometry, number theory and related fields.

  10. Summer Student Report Paula Aschenbrenner VITO

    CERN Document Server

    Aschenbrenner, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The L’APOLLINE (LAser POLarized LINE) is set up at VITO (Versatile Ion-polarized Techniques Online) beam line at ISOLDE. It will provide laser-induced spin-polarized beams of atoms or ions to an end station. In this report the L’APOLLINE setup is explained and the current status is stated. Furthermore the summer student work and the most important results are summarized. The project was mainly connected to the generation of the magnetic field in the drift tube for optical polarization. The field is created by a set of Helmholtz Coils.

  11. 2016 LLNL Nuclear Forensics Summer Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavarin, Mavrik

    2016-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nuclear Forensics Summer Program is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to come to LLNL for 8-10 weeks for a hands-on research experience. Students conduct research under the supervision of a staff scientist, attend a weekly lecture series, interact with other students, and present their work in poster format at the end of the program. Students also have the opportunity to meet staff scientists one-on-one, participate in LLNL facility tours (e.g., the National Ignition Facility and Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry), and gain a better understanding of the various science programs at LLNL.

  12. European summer temperatures since Roman times

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luterbacher, J.; Werner, J. P.; Smerdon, J. E.; Fernandez-Donado, L.; González-Rouco, J. F.; Barriopedro, D.; Ljungqvist, F. C.; Büntgen, Ulf; Zorita, E.; Wagner, S.; Esper, J.; McCarroll, D.; Toreti, A.; Frank, D.; Jungclaus, J.; Barriendos, M.; Bertolin, C.; Bothe, O.; Brázdil, Rudolf; Camuffo, D.; Dobrovolný, Petr; Gagen, M.; Garica-Bustamante, E.; Ge, Q.; Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Guiot, J.; Hao, Z.; Hegerl, G.; Holmgren, K.; Klimenko, V. V.; Martin-Chivelet, J.; Pfister, C.; Roberts, N.; Schindler, A.; Schurer, A.; Solomina, O.; von Gunten, L.; Wahl, E.; Wanner, H.; Wetter, O.; Xoplaki, E.; Yuan, N.; Zanchettin, D.; Zhang, H.; Zerefos, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2016), č. článku 024001. ISSN 1748-9326 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-04291S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : reconstructing climate anomalies * high-resolution paleoclimatology * northern-hemisphere temperature * tree-ring chronologies * last 1000 years * volcanic - eruptions * forcing reconstructions * bayesian algorithm * pmip simulations * past millennium * Common Era * heat waves * paleoclimatology * Bayesian hierarchical modelling * European summer temperature reconstruction * ensemble of climate model simulations * Medieval Climate Anomaly Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.404, year: 2016

  13. Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. The students are offered research topics at the Medical University in the scientific areas of pharmacology and toxicology, epidemiology and risk assessment, environmental microbiology, and marine sciences. Students are also afforded the opportunity to work with faculty at the University of Charleston, SC, on projects with an environmental theme. Ten well-qualified students from colleges and universities throughout the eastern United States were accepted into the program.

  14. EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Pantić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception refers to any device or drug that is used as an emergency procedure to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse.The first method of emergency contraception was high dose of estrogen. Concern about side effects led to subsequent development of the so-called Yuzpe regimen which combined ethinil estradiol with levonorgestrel and levonorgestrel alone. Less convenient to use is the copper intauterine contraceptive device.It is known that in some women sexual steroids may inhibit or delay ovulation and may interfere with ovum and sperm transport and implantation. Copper intrauterine device causes a foreign-body effect on the endometrium and a direct toxic effect to sperm and blastocyst.The Yuzpe regimen reduces the risk of pregnancy after a single act of sexual intercourse by about 75% and the levonorgestrel alone by about 85%. The copper intrauterine device is an extremely effective method for selected patients.Nausea and vomiting are common among women using the Yuzpe regimen and considerably less common among women using levonorgestrel alone regimen.Emergency contraception is relatively safe with no contraindications except pregnancy. It is ineffective if a woman is pregnant. There is no need for a medical hystory or a phisical examination before providing emergency contraceptive pills. They are taken long before organogenesis starts, so they should not have a teratogenic effect.Counseling should include information about correct use of the method, possible side effects and her preferences for regular contraception.Unintended pregnancy is a great problem. Several safe, effective and inexpensive methods of emergency contraception are available including Yuzpe regimen, levonorges-trel-only regimen and copper intrauterine device.

  15. Summer fallow soil management - impact on rainfed winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fucui; Wang, Zhaohui; Dai, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Summer fallow soil management is an important approach to improve soil and crop management in dryland areas. In the Loess Plateau regions, the annual precipitation is low and varies annually and seasonally, with more than 60% concentrated in the summer months from July to September, which...... is the summer fallow period in the winter wheat-summer fallow cropping system. With bare fallow in summer as a control, a 3-year location-fixed field experiment was conducted in the Loess Plateau to investigate the effects of wheat straw retention (SR), green manure (GM) planting, and their combination on soil...... water retention (WR) during summer fallow, winter wheat yield, and crop water use and nitrogen (N) uptake. The results showed that SR increased soil WR during summer fallow by 20 mm on average compared with the control over 3 experimental years but reduced the grain yield by 8% in the third year...

  16. Nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This leaflet, which is in the form of a fold-up chart, has panels of text which summarize the emergencies that could arise and the countermeasures and emergency plans that have been prepared should nuclear accident occur or affect the United Kingdom. The levels of radiation doses at which various measures would be introduced are outlined. The detection and monitoring programmes that would operate is illustrated. The role of NRPB and the responsible government departments are set out together with an explanation of how the National Arrangements for Incidents involving Radioactivity would be coordinated. (UK)

  17. EMERGING MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHEORGHE CARALICEA-MĂRCULESCU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The emerging markets are winning the currency war, because at this very moment its the battle of global financial institutions , as to who is more vulnerable and more exposed to the debt crisis and have their hands in more risky assets. US and Euro with their intertwining the financial stuff of the nation, the banks and the corporations are in a deep mess. One goes down, takes the other ones too. Right now , they all are struggling and getting beaten up , while the emerging markets are quiet and not really expressing their stands on the current situation except are reacting by all only putting their own houses in order.

  18. Emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the German, translated version of the original published in 1984 in the U.S.A., entitled 'Emergency Radiology'. The publication for the most part is made up as an atlas of the radiological images presenting the findings required for assessment of the emergency cases and their first treatment. The test parts' function is to explain the images and give the necessary information. The material is arranged in seven sections dealing with the skull, the facial part of the skull, the spine, thorax, abdominal region, the pelvis and the hip, and the limbs. With 690 figs [de

  19. Errors and complications in laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Drăghici

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. In laparoscopic surgery errors are unavoidable and require proper acknowledgment to reduce the risk of intraoperative and accurately assess the appropriate therapeutic approach. Fortunately, their frequency is low and cannot overshadow the benefits of laparoscopic surgery. Materials and Methods. We made an epidemiological investigation in General Surgery Department of Emergency Clinical Hospital "St. John" Bucharest, analyzing 20 years of experience in laparoscopic surgery, during 1994-2014. We wanted to identify evolution trends in complications of laparoscopic surgery, analyzing the dynamic of errors occurred in all patients with laparoscopic procedures. Results. We recorded 26847 laparoscopic interventions with a total of 427 intra-or postoperative complications that required 160 conversions and 267 reinterventions to resolve inconsistencies. The average frequency of occurrence of complications was 15.9‰ (15.9 of 1,000 cases. In the period under review it was a good momentum of laparoscopic procedures in our department. Number of minimally invasive interventions increased almost 10 times, from 266 cases operated laparoscopically in 1995 to 2638 cases in 2008. Annual growth of the number of laparoscopic procedures has surpassed the number of complications. Conclusions. Laborious work of laparoscopic surgery and a specialized centre with well-trained team of surgeons provide premises for a good performance even in the assimilation of new and difficult procedures.

  20. Ergonomics in laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supe Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comfortable in the operating room but also reduce physical strains on surgeon.