WorldWideScience

Sample records for emergency search team

  1. Neutron detector suitcase for the Nuclear Emergency Search Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdy, E.J.; Henry, C.N.; Hastings, R.D.; France, S.W.

    1978-02-01

    A portable high-efficiency neutron detection system has been constructed for the Nuclear Emergency Search Team. It includes an alarm system based on time interval measurements of the incoming neutron detection pulses. The system is designed for transportation by vehicle in searching for neutron-emitting radioactive materials

  2. [Medical rescue of China National Earthquake Disaster Emergency Search and Rescue Team in Lushan earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-hua; Yang, Hui-ning; Liu, Hui-liang; Wang, Fan; Hu, Li-bin; Zheng, Jing-chen

    2013-05-01

    To summarize and analyze the medical mission of China National Earthquake Disaster Emergency Search and Rescue Team (CNESAR) in Lushan earthquake, to promote the medical rescue effectiveness incorporated with search and rescue. Retrospective analysis of medical work data by CNESAR from April 21th, 2013 to April 27th during Lushan earthquake rescue, including the medical staff dispatch and the wounded case been treated. The reasonable medical corps was composed by 22 members, including 2 administrators, 11 doctors [covering emergency medicine, orthopedics (joints and limbs, spinal), obstetrics and gynecology, gastroenterology, cardiology, ophthalmology, anesthesiology, medical rescue, health epidemic prevention, clinical laboratory of 11 specialties], 1 ultrasound technician, 5 nurses, 1 pharmacist, 1 medical instrument engineer and 1 office worker for propaganda. There were two members having psychological consultants qualifications. The medical work were carried out in seven aspects, including medical care assurance for the CNESAR members, first aid cooperation with search and rescue on site, clinical work in refugees' camp, medical round service for scattered village people, evacuation for the wounded, mental intervention, and the sanitary and anti-epidemic work. The medical work covered 24 small towns, and medical staff established 3 medical clinics at Taiping Town, Shuangshi Town of Lushan County and Baoxing County. Medical rescue, mental intervention for the old and kids, and sanitary and anti-epidemic were performed at the above sites. The medical corps had successful evacuated 2 severe wounded patients and treated the wounded over thousands. Most of the wounded were soft tissue injuries, external injury, respiratory tract infections, diarrhea, and heat stroke. Compared with the rescue action in 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, the aggregation and departure of rescue team in Lushan earthquake, the traffic control order in disaster area, the self-aid and buddy aid

  3. Emergency team personnel and technical equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralt, R.

    1989-01-01

    The most important requirements for the emergency team can be summarized in three points. 1) The emergency team must be made up of top personnel from all fields and it should be functionally equiped. 2) The emergency teams must have complete command of their equipment. 3) The members of the team must be well motivated. 1 fig

  4. The Regional Environmental Emergency Team (REET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddock, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper outlined the approach taken in Ontario to set up the Regional Environmental Emergency Team (REET) teams and the progress made in developing partnerships and coordination in response to environmental emergencies in Ontario. Environment Canada has been involved with the Ontario Regional Environmental Emergency Team (REET) Program for the past decade in order to review emergency response roles and responsibilities. REET is designed to enhance communication between emergency response agencies, foster recognition of the various responsibilities involved in an environmental emergency response and to increase the basic understanding of emergency response techniques and procedures within the emergency response community. During emergency response situations REET operates as a flexible and expandable multi-disciplinary and multi-agency team that provides comprehensive and coordinated environmental advice, information and assistance. The Ontario REET program currently consists of 18 area teams throughout the province with informal partnerships with Environment Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Emergency Measures Ontario and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. The program was inspired in 1970 and continues to provide an appropriate forum for environmental emergency planning and response. 6 refs., 1 fig

  5. Training teams for emergency management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafstal, A.M.; Johnston, J.H.; Oser, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Emergency management (EM), the decision making involved in directing the relief operation after a disaster or otherwise catastrophic accident is an issue of great public and private concern because of the high stakes involved. Due to the nature of emergencies, and especially mass emergencies, EM

  6. Assessing Team Leadership in Emergency Medicine: The Milestones and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenman, Elizabeth D.; Branzetti, Jeremy B.; Fernandez, Rosemarie

    2016-01-01

    Background Team leadership is a critical skill for emergency medicine physicians that directly affects team performance and the quality of patient care. There exists a robust body of team science research supporting team leadership conceptual models and behavioral skill sets. However, to date, this work has not been widely incorporated into health care team leadership education. Objective This narrative review has 3 aims: (1) to synthesize the team science literature and to translate important concepts and models to health care team leadership; (2) to describe how team leadership is currently represented in the health care literature and in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones for emergency medicine; and (3) to propose a novel, evidence-based framework for the assessment of team leadership in emergency medicine. Methods We conducted a narrative review of the team science and health care literature. We summarized our findings and identified a list of team leadership behaviors that were then used to create a framework for team leadership assessment. Results Current health care team leadership measurement tools do not incorporate evidence-based models of leadership concepts from other established domains. The emergency medicine milestones include several team leadership behaviors as part of a larger resident evaluation program. However, they do not offer a comprehensive or cohesive representation of the team leadership construct. Conclusions Despite the importance of team leadership to patient care, there is no standardized approach to team leadership assessment in emergency medicine. Based on the results of our review, we propose a novel team leadership assessment framework that is supported by the team science literature. PMID:27413434

  7. Assessing Team Leadership in Emergency Medicine: The Milestones and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenman, Elizabeth D; Branzetti, Jeremy B; Fernandez, Rosemarie

    2016-07-01

    Team leadership is a critical skill for emergency medicine physicians that directly affects team performance and the quality of patient care. There exists a robust body of team science research supporting team leadership conceptual models and behavioral skill sets. However, to date, this work has not been widely incorporated into health care team leadership education. This narrative review has 3 aims: (1) to synthesize the team science literature and to translate important concepts and models to health care team leadership; (2) to describe how team leadership is currently represented in the health care literature and in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones for emergency medicine; and (3) to propose a novel, evidence-based framework for the assessment of team leadership in emergency medicine. We conducted a narrative review of the team science and health care literature. We summarized our findings and identified a list of team leadership behaviors that were then used to create a framework for team leadership assessment. Current health care team leadership measurement tools do not incorporate evidence-based models of leadership concepts from other established domains. The emergency medicine milestones include several team leadership behaviors as part of a larger resident evaluation program. However, they do not offer a comprehensive or cohesive representation of the team leadership construct. Despite the importance of team leadership to patient care, there is no standardized approach to team leadership assessment in emergency medicine. Based on the results of our review, we propose a novel team leadership assessment framework that is supported by the team science literature.

  8. Training van crisismanagement-teams [Training of emergency management teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlo, M.P.W. van; Stroomer, S.; Bosch, K. van den

    2003-01-01

    Een rampenplan of bedrijfsnoodplan bestaat veelal slechts uit een lijst met telefoonnummers, of het is een plan dat niet is geactualiseerd. Bovendien is het trainen van crisismanagement-teams lastig omdat crises vaak een onvoorspelbaar karakter hebben. in deze bijdrage worden twee methoden

  9. Team knowledge research: emerging trends and critical needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, Jessica L; Thayer, Amanda L; Pavlas, Davin; Salas, Eduardo; Stewart, John E; Howse, William R

    2012-02-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the team knowledge literature and guidance for further research. Recent research has called attention to the need for the improved study and understanding of team knowledge. Team knowledge refers to the higher level knowledge structures that emerge from the interactions of individual team members. We conducted a systematic review of the team knowledge literature, focusing on empirical work that involves the measurement of team knowledge constructs. For each study, we extracted author degree area, study design type, study setting, participant type, task type, construct type, elicitation method, aggregation method, measurement timeline, and criterion domain. Our analyses demonstrate that many of the methodological characteristics of team knowledge research can be linked back to the academic training of the primary author and that there are considerable gaps in our knowledge with regard to the relationships between team knowledge constructs, the mediating mechanisms between team knowledge and performance, and relationships with criteria outside of team performance, among others. We also identify categories of team knowledge not yet examined based on an organizing framework derived from a synthesis of the literature. There are clear opportunities for expansion in the study of team knowledge; the science of team knowledge would benefit from a more holistic theoretical approach. Human factors researchers are increasingly involved in the study of teams. This review and the resulting organizing framework provide researchers with a summary of team knowledge research over the past 10 years and directions for improving further research.

  10. Manned-Unmanned Teaming of Aircraft - Literature Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    restricted to 2003 2013. Literature searches were conducted in eight databases Aerospace and High Technology, Scopus , NTIS, Inspec, Compendex, DTIC, Jane’si...Buddy Unmanned wingman Manned-Unmanned Teaming Dec 2013 Page 35 of 37 7.1.2 Sources Online databases • Scopus • Aerospace and High Technology

  11. Employee Knowledge Sharing in Work Teams: Effects of Team Diversity, Emergent States, and Team Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jae Hang

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge sharing in work teams is one of the critical team processes. Without sharing of knowledge, work teams and organizations may not be able to fully utilize the diverse knowledge brought into work teams by their members. The purpose of this study was to investigate antecedents and underlying mechanisms influencing the extent to which team…

  12. Job satisfaction among mental healthcare professionals: The respective contributions of professional characteristics, team attributes, team processes, and team emergent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Grenier, Guy; Bamvita, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the respective contribution of professional characteristics, team attributes, team processes, and team emergent states on the job satisfaction of 315 mental health professionals from Quebec (Canada). Methods: Job satisfaction was measured with the Job Satisfaction Survey. Independent variables were organized into four categories according to a conceptual framework inspired from the Input-Mediator-Outcomes-Input Model. The contribution of each category of variables was assessed using hierarchical regression analysis. Results: Variations in job satisfaction were mostly explained by team processes, with minimal contribution from the other three categories. Among the six variables significantly associated with job satisfaction in the final model, four were team processes: stronger team support, less team conflict, deeper involvement in the decision-making process, and more team collaboration. Job satisfaction was also associated with nursing and, marginally, male gender (professional characteristics) as well as with a stronger affective commitment toward the team (team emergent states). Discussion and Conclusion: Results confirm the importance for health managers of offering adequate support to mental health professionals, and creating an environment favorable to collaboration and decision-sharing, and likely to reduce conflicts between team members. PMID:29276591

  13. Job satisfaction among mental healthcare professionals: The respective contributions of professional characteristics, team attributes, team processes, and team emergent states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Grenier, Guy; Bamvita, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the respective contribution of professional characteristics, team attributes, team processes, and team emergent states on the job satisfaction of 315 mental health professionals from Quebec (Canada). Job satisfaction was measured with the Job Satisfaction Survey. Independent variables were organized into four categories according to a conceptual framework inspired from the Input-Mediator-Outcomes-Input Model. The contribution of each category of variables was assessed using hierarchical regression analysis. Variations in job satisfaction were mostly explained by team processes, with minimal contribution from the other three categories. Among the six variables significantly associated with job satisfaction in the final model, four were team processes: stronger team support, less team conflict, deeper involvement in the decision-making process, and more team collaboration. Job satisfaction was also associated with nursing and, marginally, male gender (professional characteristics) as well as with a stronger affective commitment toward the team (team emergent states). Results confirm the importance for health managers of offering adequate support to mental health professionals, and creating an environment favorable to collaboration and decision-sharing, and likely to reduce conflicts between team members.

  14. Protecting front-line survey and rescue teams during emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresise, H.

    1980-01-01

    Means of protecting front-line survey and rescue teams during emergencies are described. The team composition, their apparatus, the selection of the incident control point, the use of guidelines and breathing apparatus and control point trolley and equipment are discussed. (H.K.)

  15. Team Performance in Emergency Medicine (MedTeams), Draft 3, Instructor Guide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Unlike traditional team development which focuses more on improving group dynamics and interpersonal relationships, this program focuses on a concrete set of understandings and behavioral skills applicable in the emergency care environment.

  16. Leadership emergence in engineering design teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Leaders emerge from leaderless groups as part of a more complex emerging social structure. Several studies have shown that the emerging structure is aptly described by a swallowtail catastrophe model where the control parameters differ depending on whether creative problem solving, production, coordination-intensive, or emergency management groups are involved. The present study explored creative problem solving further where the participants were engaged in real-world tasks extending over several months rather than short laboratory tasks. Participants were engineering students who were organized into groups of to people who designed, built, and tested a prototype product that would solve a real-world problem. At the th week of work they completed a questionnaire indicating who was most like the leader of their group, second most like the leader, along with other questions about individuals' contributions to the group process. Results showed that the swallowtail model (R = .) exhibited a strong advantage over the linear alternative model (R = .) for predicting leadership emergence. The three control variables were control of the task, creative contributions to the group's work, and facilitating the creative contributions of others.

  17. Code Blue Emergencies: A Team Task Analysis and Educational Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James W; Applegarth, Oliver; Vu, Mark; Price, John R

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that have a positive or negative influence on resuscitation team performance during emergencies in the operating room (OR) and post-operative recovery unit (PAR) at a major Canadian teaching hospital. This information was then used to implement a team training program for code blue emergencies. In 2009/10, all OR and PAR nurses and 19 anesthesiologists at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH) were invited to complete an anonymous, 10 minute written questionnaire regarding their code blue experience. Survey questions were devised by 10 recovery room and operation room nurses as well as 5 anesthesiologists representing 4 different hospitals in British Columbia. Three iterations of the survey were reviewed by a pilot group of nurses and anesthesiologists and their feedback was integrated into the final version of the survey. Both nursing staff (n = 49) and anesthesiologists (n = 19) supported code blue training and believed that team training would improve patient outcome. Nurses noted that it was often difficult to identify the leader of the resuscitation team. Both nursing staff and anesthesiologists strongly agreed that too many people attending the code blue with no assigned role hindered team performance. Identifiable leadership and clear communication of roles were identified as keys to resuscitation team functioning. Decreasing the number of people attending code blue emergencies with no specific role, increased access to mock code blue training, and debriefing after crises were all identified as areas requiring improvement. Initial team training exercises have been well received by staff.

  18. Constructing Common Information Space across Distributed Emergency Medical Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhan; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Bossen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines coordination and real-time information sharing across four emergency medical teams in a high-risk and distributed setting as they provide care to critically injured patients within the first hour after injury. Through multiple field studies we explored how common understanding...... of critical patient data is established across these heterogeneous teams and what coordination mechanisms are being used to support information sharing and interpretation. To analyze the data, we drew on the concept of Common Information Spaces (CIS). Our results showed that teams faced many challenges...... in achieving efficient information sharing and coordination, including difficulties in locating and assembling team members, communicating and interpreting information from the field, and accommodating differences in team goals and information needs, all while having minimal technology support. We reflect...

  19. Emohawk: Searching for a "Good" Emergent Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Cyril; Bída, Michal; Gemrot, Jakub; Kadlec, Rudolf; Plch, Tomáš

    We report on the progress we have achieved in development of Emohawk, a 3D virtual reality application with an emergent narrative for teaching high-school students and undergraduates the basics of virtual characters control, emotion modelling, and narrative generation. Besides, we present a new methodology, used in Emohawk, for purposeful authoring of emergent narratives of Façade's complexity. The methodology is based on massive automatic search for stories that are appealing to the audience whilst forbidding the unappealing ones during the design phase.

  20. Code Blue Emergencies: A Team Task Analysis and Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Price

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to identify factors that have a positive or negative influence on resuscitation team performance during emergencies in the operating room (OR and post-operative recovery unit (PAR at a major Canadian teaching hospital. This information was then used to implement a team training program for code blue emergencies. Methods: In 2009/10, all OR and PAR nurses and 19 anesthesiologists at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH were invited to complete an anonymous, 10 minute written questionnaire regarding their code blue experience. Survey questions were devised by 10 recovery room and operation room nurses as well as 5 anesthesiologists representing 4 different hospitals in British Columbia. Three iterations of the survey were reviewed by a pilot group of nurses and anesthesiologists and their feedback was integrated into the final version of the survey. Results: Both nursing staff (n = 49 and anesthesiologists (n = 19 supported code blue training and believed that team training would improve patient outcome. Nurses noted that it was often difficult to identify the leader of the resuscitation team. Both nursing staff and anesthesiologists strongly agreed that too many people attending the code blue with no assigned role hindered team performance. Conclusion: Identifiable leadership and clear communication of roles were identified as keys to resuscitation team functioning. Decreasing the number of people attending code blue emergencies with no specific role, increased access to mock code blue training, and debriefing after crises were all identified as areas requiring improvement. Initial team training exercises have been well received by staff.

  1. Improving the non-technical skills of hospital medical emergency teams: The Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cant, Robyn P; Porter, Joanne E; Cooper, Simon J; Roberts, Kate; Wilson, Ian; Gartside, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    This prospective descriptive study aimed to test the validity and feasibility of the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM™) for assessing real-world medical emergency teams' non-technical skills. Second, the present study aimed to explore the instrument's contribution to practice regarding teamwork and learning outcomes. Registered nurses (RNs) and medical staff (n = 104) in two hospital EDs in rural Victoria, Australia, participated. Over a 10 month period, the (TEAM™) instrument was completed by multiple clinicians at medical emergency episodes. In 80 real-world medical emergency team resuscitation episodes (283 clinician assessments), non-technical skills ratings averaged 89% per episode (39 of a possible 44 points). Twenty-one episodes were rated in the lowest quartile (i.e. ≤37 points out of 44). Ratings differed by discipline, with significantly higher scores given by medical raters (mean: 41.1 ± 4.4) than RNs (38.7 ± 5.4) (P = 0.001). This difference occurred in the Leadership domain. The tool was reliable with Cronbach's alpha 0.78, high uni-dimensional validity and mean inter-item correlation of 0.45. Concurrent validity was confirmed by strong correlation between TEAM™ score and the awarded Global Rating (P technical skills of medical emergency teams are known to often be suboptimal; however, average ratings of 89% were achieved in this real-world study. TEAM™ is a valid, reliable and easy to use tool, for both training and clinical settings, with benefits for team performance when used as an assessment and/or debriefing tool. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  2. On-call emergency workload of a general surgical team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawaid, Masood; Raza, Syed Muhammad; Alam, Shams Nadeem; Manzar, S

    2009-01-01

    To examine the on-call emergency workload of a general surgical team at a tertiary care teaching hospital to guide planning and provision of better surgical services. During six months period from August to January 2007; all emergency calls attended by general surgical team of Surgical Unit II in Accident and Emergency department (A and E) and in other units of Civil, Hospital Karachi, Pakistan were prospectively recorded. Data recorded includes timing of call, diagnosis, operation performed and outcome apart from demography. Total 456 patients (326 males and 130 females) were attended by on-call general surgery team during 30 emergency days. Most of the calls, 191 (41.9%) were received from 8 am to 5 pm. 224 (49.1%) calls were of abdominal pain, with acute appendicitis being the most common specific pathology in 41 (9.0%) patients. Total 73 (16.0%) calls were received for trauma. Total 131 (28.7%) patients were admitted in the surgical unit for urgent operation or observation while 212 (46.5%) patients were discharged from A and E. 92 (20.1%) patients were referred to other units with medical referral accounts for 45 (9.8%) patients. Total 104 (22.8%) emergency surgeries were done and the most common procedure performed was appendicectomy in 34 (32.7%) patients. Major workload of on-call surgical emergency team is dealing with the acute conditions of abdomen. However, significant proportion of patients are suffering from other conditions including trauma that require a holistic approach to care and a wide range of skills and experience. These results have important implications in future healthcare planning and for the better training of general surgical residents.

  3. On-call emergency workload of a general surgical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawaid Masood

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To examine the on-call emergency workload of a general surgical team at a tertiary care teaching hospital to guide planning and provision of better surgical services. Patients and Methods: During six months period from August to January 2007; all emergency calls attended by general surgical team of Surgical Unit II in Accident and Emergency department (A and E and in other units of Civil, Hospital Karachi, Pakistan were prospectively recorded. Data recorded includes timing of call, diagnosis, operation performed and outcome apart from demography. Results: Total 456 patients (326 males and 130 females were attended by on-call general surgery team during 30 emergency days. Most of the calls, 191 (41.9% were received from 8 am to 5 pm. 224 (49.1% calls were of abdominal pain, with acute appendicitis being the most common specific pathology in 41 (9.0% patients. Total 73 (16.0% calls were received for trauma. Total 131 (28.7% patients were admitted in the surgical unit for urgent operation or observation while 212 (46.5% patients were discharged from A and E. 92 (20.1% patients were referred to other units with medical referral accounts for 45 (9.8% patients. Total 104 (22.8% emergency surgeries were done and the most common procedure performed was appendicectomy in 34 (32.7% patients. Conclusion: Major workload of on-call surgical emergency team is dealing with the acute conditions of abdomen. However, significant proportion of patients are suffering from other conditions including trauma that require a holistic approach to care and a wide range of skills and experience. These results have important implications in future healthcare planning and for the better training of general surgical residents.

  4. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Ester H; Draaisma, Jos M; den Hamer, Sabien; Loeffen, Jan L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often report having little opportunity to perform in the role of team leader during residency. In order to gain more insight into leadership skills and behaviors, we classified leadership styles of pediatric residents during simulated emergencies. Methods We conducted a prospective quantitative study to investigate leadership styles used by pediatric residents during simulated emergencies with clinical deterioration of a child at a pediatric ward. Using videotaped scenarios of 48 simulated critical events among 12 residents, we were able to classify verbal and nonverbal communication into different leadership styles according to the situational leadership theory. Results The coaching style (mean 54.5%, SD 7.8) is the most frequently applied by residents, followed by the directing style (mean 35.6%, SD 4.1). This pattern conforms to the task- and role-related requirements in our scenarios and it also conforms to the concept of situational leadership. We did not find any significant differences in leadership style according to the postgraduate year or scenario content. Conclusion The model used in this pilot study helps us to gain a better understanding of the development of effective leadership behavior and supports the applicability of situational leadership theory in training leadership skills during residency. PMID:25610010

  5. [An emergency team working closely with the patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selma, Toufik; Chermak, Mustapha; Limani, Mohammed; Rochard, Jacques; Wendlandt, Jérôme; Hernandez, Angélique

    2015-01-01

    ERIC 77 is a rapid response team for emergency psychiatric situations. This cross-sector service based at Marne-la-Vallée general hospital represents a supplementary network in psychiatric patient care. The analysis of the professionals receiving calls as well as the link with the sector are critical in determining the success of patient care. Each risk is measured in order to provide adapted and personalised care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Nurses and social care workers in emergency teams in Norway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpüsch, Frank; Parschat, Petra; Fenes, Sissel; Aaraas, Ivar J; Gilbert, Mads

    2011-01-07

    The Norwegian counties Troms and Finnmark are dominated by large areas with widespread habitation and rather long response times for ambulances and doctors. We wished to investigate the extent to which the municipal preparedness in these counties use employees from the municipal nursing and social care services and if these are part of local emergency teams. In the autumn of 2008, we sent a questionnaire to the district medical officers and the leaders for municipal nursing and social care services in all 44 municipalities in Troms and Finnmark. The answers were analyzed manually. 41 municipalities responded. In 34 of these the municipal nurses and social care workers practice emergency medicine procedures. The content in these training sessions is much more comprehensive than that in a typical first aid course. In three of four municipalities ambulance personnel do not participate in this training. In 31 municipalities the inhabitants contact nurses and social care workers directly if they are acutely ill. In only 10 of the municipalities the nurses and social care workers are organized in local teams including a doctor and an ambulance. In the districts, nursing and social care services are a resource in an emergency medicine context. The potential within these professions can be exploited better and be an important supplement in emergencies. In emergencies, cooperation across disciplines requires a clear organizational and economical structure, local basis and leadership.

  7. Search for an Emergency Contraception Provider in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emergency contraception provider. Concerned about cost? Click here . ---------- Emergency contraceptive pills are stocked by all major pharmacy chains, ... daily birth control pills you can use as emergency contraceptive pills. You can search for a provider in ...

  8. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coolen EH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ester H Coolen,1 Jos M Draaisma,2 Sabien den Hamer,3 Jan L Loeffen2 1Department of Pediatric Surgery, Amalia Children’s Hospital, Radboud University Medical Center, 2Department of Pediatrics, Amalia Children’s Hospital, Radboud University Medical Center, 3Department of Communication Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Purpose: Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often report having little opportunity to perform in the role of team leader during residency. In order to gain more insight into leadership skills and behaviors, we classified leadership styles of pediatric residents during simulated emergencies. Methods: We conducted a prospective quantitative study to investigate leadership styles used by pediatric residents during simulated emergencies with clinical deterioration of a child at a pediatric ward. Using videotaped scenarios of 48 simulated critical events among 12 residents, we were able to classify verbal and nonverbal communication into different leadership styles according to the situational leadership theory. Results: The coaching style (mean 54.5%, SD 7.8 is the most frequently applied by residents, followed by the directing style (mean 35.6%, SD 4.1. This pattern conforms to the task- and role-related requirements in our scenarios and it also conforms to the concept of situational leadership. We did not find any significant differences in leadership style according to the postgraduate year or scenario content. Conclusion: The model used in this pilot study helps us to gain a better understanding of the development of effective leadership behavior and supports the applicability of situational leadership theory in training leadership skills during residency. Keywords

  9. Occupational emerging risks affecting international virtual project Team Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitraşcu-Băldău Iulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of internet access, high-speed connection services, collaborative work platforms and tools, allowed employees to interact virtually offering companies the possibility to develop projects around the world, reducing operational costs and gain competitive advantage. Realizing the advantages and disadvantages of developing a project team in an international virtual work environment, requires adopting specific strategies to construct an effective team and ensure the project success. One of the most important disadvantages that we identified is that the new work environment brings new risks for both team members and managers. So, it becomes mandatory to identify and analyze the occupational emerging risks and their impact on the productivity of virtual team members, in order to prevent them efficiently and to ensure the safety and health of employees in a virtual working environment. This paper aims to highlight the necessity for project managers and organizations, to include in their specific project strategies, an efficient occupational risks management in the virtual workplace, to obtain a continuously improved virtual working environment, so to achieve a high performance from virtual employees.

  10. The evolving story of medical emergency teams in quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, André Carlos Kajdacsy-Balla; Shojania, Kaveh G

    2009-01-01

    Adverse events affect approximately 3% to 12% of hospitalized patients. At least a third, but as many as half, of such events are considered preventable. Detection of these events requires investments of time and money. A report in a recent issue of Critical Care used the medical emergency team activation as a trigger to perform a prospective standardized evaluation of charts. The authors observed that roughly one fourth of calls were related to a preventable adverse event, which is comparable to the previous literature. However, while previous studies relied on retrospective chart reviews, this study introduced the novel element of real-time characterization of events by the team at the moment of consultation. This methodology captures important opportunities for improvements in local care at a rate far higher than routine incident-reporting systems, but without requiring substantial investments of additional resources. Academic centers are increasingly recognizing engagement in quality improvement as a distinct career pathway. Involving such physicians in medical emergency teams will likely facilitate the dual roles of these as a clinical outreach arm of the intensive care unit and in identifying problems in care and leading to strategies to reduce them.

  11. Operative team communication during simulated emergencies: Too busy to respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W Austin; Jones, Seth; Crowell-Kuhnberg, Adrianna M; O'Keeffe, Dara; Boyle, Kelly M; Klainer, Suzanne B; Smink, Douglas S; Yule, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Ineffective communication among members of a multidisciplinary team is associated with operative error and failure to rescue. We sought to measure operative team communication in a simulated emergency using an established communication framework called "closed loop communication." We hypothesized that communication directed at a specific recipient would be more likely to elicit a check back or closed loop response and that this relationship would vary with changes in patients' clinical status. We used the closed loop communication framework to code retrospectively the communication behavior of 7 operative teams (each comprising 2 surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses) during response to a simulated, postanesthesia care unit "code blue." We identified call outs, check backs, and closed loop episodes and applied descriptive statistics and a mixed-effects negative binomial regression to describe characteristics of communication in individuals and in different specialties. We coded a total of 662 call outs. The frequency and type of initiation and receipt of communication events varied between clinical specialties (P communication events than anesthesiologists. For the average participant, directed communication increased the likelihood of check back by at least 50% (P = .021) in periods preceding acute changes in the clinical setting, and exerted no significant effect in periods after acute changes in the clinical situation. Communication patterns vary by specialty during a simulated operative emergency, and the effect of directed communication in eliciting a response depends on the clinical status of the patient. Operative training programs should emphasize the importance of quality communication in the period immediately after an acute change in the clinical setting of a patient and recognize that communication patterns and needs vary between members of multidisciplinary operative teams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Team behaviors in emergency care: a qualitative study using behavior analysis of what makes team work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocato, Pamela; Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Schwarz, Ulrica von Thiele

    2011-11-15

    Teamwork has been suggested as a promising approach to improving care processes in emergency departments (ED). However, for teamwork to yield expected results, implementation must involve behavior changes. The aim of this study is to use behavior analysis to qualitatively examine how teamwork plays out in practice and to understand eventual discrepancies between planned and actual behaviors. The study was set in a Swedish university hospital ED during the initial phase of implementation of teamwork. The intervention focused on changing the environment and redesigning the work process to enable teamwork. Each team was responsible for entire care episodes, i.e. from patient arrival to discharge from the ED. Data was collected through 3 days of observations structured around an observation scheme. Behavior analysis was used to pinpoint key teamwork behaviors for consistent implementation of teamwork and to analyze the contingencies that decreased or increased the likelihood of these behaviors. We found a great discrepancy between the planned and the observed teamwork processes. 60% of the 44 team patients observed were handled solely by the appointed team members. Only 36% of the observed patient care processes started according to the description in the planned teamwork process, that is, with taking patient history together. Beside this behavior, meeting in a defined team room and communicating with team members were shown to be essential for the consistent implementation of teamwork. Factors that decreased the likelihood of these key behaviors included waiting for other team members or having trouble locating each other. Getting work done without delay and having an overview of the patient care process increased team behaviors. Moreover, explicit instructions on when team members should interact and communicate increased adherence to the planned process. This study illustrates how behavior analysis can be used to understand discrepancies between planned and observed

  13. Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) for the assessment of non-technical skills during resuscitation: Validation of the French version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maignan, Maxime; Koch, François-Xavier; Chaix, Jordane; Phellouzat, Pierre; Binauld, Gery; Collomb Muret, Roselyne; Cooper, Simon J; Labarère, José; Danel, Vincent; Viglino, Damien; Debaty, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of team performances during medical simulation must rely on validated and reproducible tools. Our aim was to build and validate a French version of the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) score, which was developed for the assessment of team performance and non-technical skills during resuscitation. A forward and backward translation of the initial TEAM score was made, with the agreement and the final validation by the original author. Ten medical teams were recruited and performed a standardized cardiac arrest simulation scenario. Teams were videotaped and nine raters evaluate non-technical skills for each team thanks to the French TEAM Score. Psychometric properties of the score were then evaluated. French TEAM score showed an excellent reliability with a Cronbach coefficient of 0.95. Mean correlation coefficient between each item and the global score range was 0.78. The inter-rater reliability measured by intraclass correlation coefficient of the global score was 0.93. Finally, expert teams had higher French TEAM score than intermediate and novice teams. The French TEAM score shows good psychometric properties to evaluate team performance during cardiac arrest simulation. Its utilization could help in the assessment of non-technical skills during simulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Emergency department team communication with the patient: the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Danielle M; Ellison, Emily P; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Engel, Kirsten G; Cameron, Kenzie A; Makoul, Gregory; Adams, James G

    2013-08-01

    Effective communication is important for the delivery of quality care. The Emergency Department (ED) environment poses significant challenges to effective communication. The objective of this study was to determine patients' perceptions of their ED team's communication skills. This was a cross-sectional study in an urban, academic ED. Patients completed the Communication Assessment Tool for Teams (CAT-T) survey upon ED exit. The CAT-T was adapted from the psychometrically validated Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) to measure patient perceptions of communication with a medical team. The 14 core CAT-T items are associated with a 5-point scale (5 = excellent); results are reported as the percent of participants who responded "excellent." Responses were analyzed for differences based on age, sex, race, and operational metrics (wait time, ED daily census). There were 346 patients identified; the final sample for analysis was 226 patients (53.5% female, 48.2% Caucasian), representing a response rate of 65.3%. The scores on CAT-T items (reported as % "excellent") ranged from 50.0% to 76.1%. The highest-scoring items were "let me talk without interruptions" (76.1%), "talked in terms I could understand" (75.2%), and "treated me with respect" (74.3%). The lowest-scoring item was "encouraged me to ask questions" (50.0%). No differences were noted based on patient sex, race, age, wait time, or daily census of the ED. The patients in this study perceived that the ED teams were respectful and allowed them to talk without interruptions; however, lower ratings were given for items related to actively engaging the patient in decision-making and asking questions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Search for Stability: Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wardle, Russel

    2004-01-01

    ... and international bodies as well as the military. Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs), as employed in Afghanistan, are used as a vehicle to examine the wide range of activities necessary for Nation Building...

  16. Searching for sponsors for four national rugby teams in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Ylönen, Niina

    2017-01-01

    How to get more sponsors to four national rugby teams in Finland? Finnish Rugby Federation and its four national teams are in the need of new long lasting sponsorship deals to fund the national teams’ tournaments in Finland and abroad. Since rugby is quite unknown sports in Finland it faces challenges in getting new sponsorship deals and also its visibility is currently very low. The purpose of this thesis is to analyse the current situation of rugby, sponsorship contracts Finnish rugby F...

  17. A hyperacute neurology team - transforming emergency neurological care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitkunan, Arani; MacDonald, Bridget K; Boodhoo, Ajay; Tomkins, Andrew; Smyth, Caitlin; Southam, Medina; Schon, Fred

    2017-07-01

    We present the results of an 18-month study of a new model of how to care for emergency neurological admissions. We have established a hyperacute neurology team at a single district general hospital. Key features are a senior acute neurology nurse coordinator, an exclusively consultant-delivered service, acute epilepsy nurses, an acute neurophysiology service supported by neuroradiology and acute physicians and based within the acute medical admissions unit. Key improvements are a major increase in the number of patients seen, the speed with which they are seen and the percentage seen on acute medical unit before going to the general wards. We have shown a reduced length of stay and readmission rates for patients with epilepsy. Epilepsy accounted for 30% of all referrals. The cost implications of running this service are modest. We feel that this model is worthy of widespread consideration. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  18. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team, an Institution for Nuclear Emergency Relief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldyreff, P.; Kiefer, H.; Krause, H.; Zuehlke, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH, Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1969-10-15

    The design of nuclear facilities is to exclude serious damage to the environment, even in case of the MCA (maximum credible accident). Although the likelihood of accidents exceeding the expected consequences of the MCA is extremely small, it is deemed reasonable to take general precautions against such accidents. Precautions of this type are customary also in the conventional field, and in this case they are to be implemented in part through the Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team. If the internal safety provisions of a nuclear facility are unable to prevent an impermissible leakage of radioactivity as the result of a major accident there is, at present, no possibility of decisively curbing the spread of activity throughout the environment in the first few hours after the accident. Hence the measures taken by the authorities as a result of the emission and immediately following upon it will have to be restricted to the protection of the population: analysis of intensity and pattern of distribution of activity, instructions.to seek closed shelters, or prohibition of the consumption of certain foodstuffs, distribution of blocking agents, etc. It is the purpose of the Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team to bring relief in the phase following the end of the emission. This may comprise the following steps: exact investigation of the external scope of the damage, in particular assessment of the contamination of ground, persons, and material; rapid personnel decontamination; securing and shielding radiation sources; fixing contamination and removing it immediately where this is deemed urgent for reasons of traffic or to keep the drinking water free from contamination; external containment of the source of danger; support in limiting the damage within the facility. In addition to these tasks of emergency protection, the Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team can take action also in disturbances within the facility which have no influence on the environment and where the operator

  19. Tethered Balloon Technology in Design Solutions for Rescue and Relief Team Emergency Communication Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsamhi, Saeed Hamood; Ansari, Mohd Samar; Ma, Ou; Almalki, Faris; Gupta, Sachin Kumar

    2018-05-23

    The actions taken at the initial times of a disaster are critical. Catastrophe occurs because of terrorist acts or natural hazards which have the potential to disrupt the infrastructure of wireless communication networks. Therefore, essential emergency functions such as search, rescue, and recovery operations during a catastrophic event will be disabled. We propose tethered balloon technology to provide efficient emergency communication services and reduce casualty mortality and morbidity for disaster recovery. The tethered balloon is an actively developed research area and a simple solution to support the performance, facilities, and services of emergency medical communication. The most critical requirement for rescue and relief teams is having a higher quality of communication services which enables them to save people's lives. Using our proposed technology, it has been reported that the performance of rescue and relief teams significantly improved. OPNET Modeler 14.5 is used for a network simulated with the help of ad hoc tools (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018;page 1 of 8).

  20. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, E.H.; Draaisma, J.M.T.; Hamer, S. den; Loeffen, J.L.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often

  1. Building Virtual Teams: Experiential Learning Using Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    Currently, virtual teams are being used exponentially in higher education and business because of the development of technologies and globalization. These teams have become an essential approach for collaborative learning as well as task completion. Team learning, especially in an online format, can be challenging due to lack of effective…

  2. Integration of radiation monitoring for nuclear emergency response teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, J T; Thompson, N Y [Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The Canadian Forces have established Nuclear Emergency Response Teams to cope with potential radiation accidents. Previously, only gamma and high-energy beta radiation could be detected. Recently, new radiation sampling, detecting, and analytical equipment has been bought, including air samplers, beta counters, high-purity germanium gamma detectors, and multi-channel analyzers together with Gamma Vision Software to analyze gamma spectra. The purpose of the present study is to propose a way to use the new equipment, to analyze the results from the gamma and beta detectors, and to integrate the results into a format for decision making. Integration is achieved through the creation of a computer program, Radiation Integration Program (RIP). This program analyzes gross beta counts, and uses them to estimate danger to the thyroid. As well the results from Gamma Vision are converted from Bq to dose rate for several parts of the body. Overall gamma results affecting the thyroid are compared to the beta results to verify the initial estimations.

  3. Quality of care using a multidisciplinary team in the emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthea; Maaløe, Rikke; Jensen, Nanna Martin

    2011-01-01

    Bispebjerg Hospital has implemented a multidisciplinary team reception of critically ill and severely injured patients at the Emergency Department (ED), termed emergency call (EC) and trauma call (TC). The aim of this study was to describe the course, medical treatment and outcome for patients re...... received by this multidisciplinary team and to evaluate the quality of acute medical treatment of these patients....

  4. The Emergence of Team Creativity: a social network perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y Yuan (Yingjie)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractTo overcome complex and dynamic economic challenges, organizations increasingly employ teams and build their competitive advantages on the inimitable capital of creativity. Naturally, when and how individual inputs combine to form team outcomes has therefore become one of the core

  5. Emergency team calls for critically ill non-trauma patients in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Marker; Do, Hien Quoc; Rasmussen, Søren W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Handling critically ill patients is a complex task for Emergency Department (ED) personnel. Initial treatment is of major importance and requires adequately experienced ED doctors to initiate and decide for the right medical or surgical treatment. Our aim was, with regard to clinical...... the study period. RESULTS: A total of 109 emergency team calls were triggered (79 orange and 30 red), comprising 66 (60.6 %) men and 43 women, with a median age of 64 years. Patients presented with: 4 Airway, 27 Breathing, 41 Circulation, 31 Disability, 2 Exposure and 4 Other problems. Overall, 58/109 (53.......2 %) patients were admitted to the ICU, while 20/109 (18.3 %) patients were deemed ineligible for ICU admission. 30-day mortality was 34/109 (31.2 %), and circulatory problems were the most frequent cause of death (61.8 %, p = 0.02). Patients who died were significantly older than those who survived (p = 0...

  6. Identifying and training non-technical skills of nuclear emergency response teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crichton, M.T.; Flin, R.

    2004-01-01

    Training of the non-technical (social and cognitive) skills that are crucial to safe and effective management by teams in emergency situations is an issue that is receiving increasing emphasis in many organisations, particularly in the nuclear power industry. As teams play a major role in emergency response organisations (ERO), effective functioning and interactions within, between and across teams is crucial, particularly as the management of an emergency situation often requires that teams are extended by members from various other sections and strategic groups throughout the company, as well as members of external agencies. A series of interviews was recently conducted with members of a UK nuclear emergency response organisation to identify the non-technical skills required by team members that would be required for managing an emergency. Critical skills have been identified as decision making and situation assessment, as well as communication, teamwork, and stress management. A number of training strategies are discussed which can be tailored to the roles and responsibilities of the team members and the team leader, based on the roles within the team being defined as either Decision Maker, Evaluator, or Implementor, according to Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) classifications. It is anticipated that enhanced learning of the necessary non-technical skills, through experience and directed practice, will improve the skills of members of emergency response teams

  7. Identifying and training non-technical skills of nuclear emergency response teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichton, M.T. E-mail: m.crichton@abdn.ac.uk; Flin, R

    2004-08-01

    Training of the non-technical (social and cognitive) skills that are crucial to safe and effective management by teams in emergency situations is an issue that is receiving increasing emphasis in many organisations, particularly in the nuclear power industry. As teams play a major role in emergency response organisations (ERO), effective functioning and interactions within, between and across teams is crucial, particularly as the management of an emergency situation often requires that teams are extended by members from various other sections and strategic groups throughout the company, as well as members of external agencies. A series of interviews was recently conducted with members of a UK nuclear emergency response organisation to identify the non-technical skills required by team members that would be required for managing an emergency. Critical skills have been identified as decision making and situation assessment, as well as communication, teamwork, and stress management. A number of training strategies are discussed which can be tailored to the roles and responsibilities of the team members and the team leader, based on the roles within the team being defined as either Decision Maker, Evaluator, or Implementor, according to Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) classifications. It is anticipated that enhanced learning of the necessary non-technical skills, through experience and directed practice, will improve the skills of members of emergency response teams.

  8. Challenges to effective crisis management: using information and communication technologies to coordinate emergency medical services and emergency department teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Madhu C; Paul, Sharoda A; Abraham, Joanna; McNeese, Michael; DeFlitch, Christopher; Yen, John

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the major challenges to coordination between emergency department (ED) teams and emergency medical services (EMS) teams. We conducted a series of focus groups involving both ED and EMS team members using a crisis scenario as the basis of the focus group discussion. We also collected organizational workflow data. We identified three major challenges to coordination between ED and EMS teams including ineffectiveness of current information and communication technologies, lack of common ground, and breakdowns in information flow. The three challenges highlight the importance of designing systems from socio-technical perspective. In particular, these inter-team coordination systems must support socio-technical issues such as awareness, context, and workflow between the two teams.

  9. Search route decision of environmental monitoring at emergency time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Isao

    1979-01-01

    The search route decision method is reviewed, especially the adequate arrangement of monitors in view of time in the information-gathering activity by transferring the monitors on the horizontal space after the confirmation of the abnormal release of radioactive material. As for the field of the theory of search, the developmental history is explained, namely the experiences of the naval anti submarine operation in WW-2, the salvage activities and the search problem on the sea. The kinematics for search, the probability theory for detection and the optimum distribution for search are the most important contents of the application of theory of search relating to the environmental monitoring at emergency condition. The combination of a search model consists of the peculiarity of targets, the peculiarity of observers and the standard of optimality. The peculiarity of targets is divided into the space of search, the number of targets, the way of appearance of targets and the motion of targets. The peculiarity of observers is divided into the number of observers, the divisibility of efforts for search, the credibility of search information and the search process. The standard of optimality is divided into the maximum probability of detection, the minimum risk expected and the others. Each item written above of search model is explained. Concerning the formulation of the search model, the theoretical equations for detection probability, discovery potential and instantaneous detection probability, density are derived, and these equations are evaluated and explained. The future plan is to advance the search technology so as to evaluate the detection potential to decide the route of running a monitoring car for a nuclear power plant at accidental condition. (Nakai, Y.)

  10. Searching for hidden radioactive sources in the Barents Rescue 2001 nuclear emergency exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smethurst, Mark A.; Mogaard, John O.; Mauring, Eirik; Koziel, Janusz; Kihle, Ola

    2001-11-01

    The international nuclear emergency exercise Barents Rescue took place in the vicinity of Boden in northern Sweden between the 12th and 20th of September 2001. The Gamma Search Cell part of the exercise was designed to test the abilities of car-borne and airborne measuring systems to quickly locate and characterise radioactive sources hidden in the countryside. The Geological Survey of Norway participated in the Gamma Search Cell with a car-borne gamma-ray spectrometer system, a field team of three persons and a remote support group of two persons situated in Trondheim. The Geological Survey of Norway team identified 16 sources and 2 small areas of Chernobyl fallout in real time. Two additional sources were identified during post processing of the data. Otherwise the team drove past 2 ''strong'' and 4 weak sources without detecting them. The remaining 9 sources were in locations not visited by the car-borne measuring system. All but two source identifications were reported to the base of operations within a few minutes of discovery. The Geological Survey of Norway's source search strategy worked well and comparatively few strong sources were overlooked in the short time allocated for searching. The measuring system proved to be extremely reliable, making approximately 140,000 measurements during 8 days of measuring in and around Boden. (author)

  11. Ontological Reasoning for Human-Robot Teaming in Search and Rescue Missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagosi, T.; Hindriks, k.V.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    In search and rescue missions robots are used to help rescue workers in exploring the disaster site. Our research focuses on how multiple robots and rescuers act as a team, and build up situation awareness. We propose a multi-agent system where each agent supports one member, either human or robot.

  12. Video conferencing versus telephone calls for team work across hospitals: a qualitative study on simulated emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Oddvar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teamwork is important for patient care and outcome in emergencies. In rural areas, efficient communication between rural hospitals and regional trauma centers optimise decisions and treatment of trauma patients. Little is known on potentials and effects of virtual team to team cooperation between rural and regional trauma teams. Methods We adapted a video conferencing (VC system to the work process between multidisciplinary teams responsible for trauma as well as medical emergencies between one rural and one regional (university hospital. We studied how the teams cooperated during simulated critical scenarios, and compared VC with standard telephone communication. We used qualitative observations and interviews to evaluate results. Results The team members found VC to be a useful tool during emergencies and for building "virtual emergency teams" across distant hospitals. Visual communication combined with visual patient information is superior to information gained during ordinary telephone calls, but VC may also cause interruptions in the local teamwork. Conclusion VC can improve clinical cooperation and decision processes in virtual teams during critical patient care. Such team interaction requires thoughtful organisation, training, and new rules for communication.

  13. Quantify uncertain emergency search techniques (QUEST) -- Theory and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.M.; Goldsby, M.E.; Plantenga, T.D.; Porter, T.L.; West, T.H.; Wilcox, W.B.; Hensley, W.K.

    1998-01-01

    As recent world events show, criminal and terrorist access to nuclear materials is a growing national concern. The national laboratories are taking the lead in developing technologies to counter these potential threats to the national security. Sandia National laboratories, with support from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Bechtel Nevada, Remote Sensing Laboratory, has developed QUEST (a model to Quantify Uncertain Emergency Search Techniques), to enhance the performance of organizations in the search for lost or stolen nuclear material. In addition, QUEST supports a wide range of other applications, such as environmental monitoring, nuclear facilities inspections, and searcher training. QUEST simulates the search for nuclear materials and calculates detector response for various source types and locations. The probability of detecting a radioactive source during a search is a function of many different variables, including source type, search location and structure geometry (including shielding), search dynamics (path and speed), and detector type and size. Through calculation of dynamic detector response, QUEST makes possible quantitative comparisons of various sensor technologies and search patterns. The QUEST model can be used as a tool to examine the impact of new detector technologies, explore alternative search concepts, and provide interactive search/inspector training

  14. Training and exercises of the Emergency Response Team at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yearwood, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility has an active Emergency Response Team. The Emergency Response Team is composed of members of the operating and support groups within the Plutonium Facility. In addition to their initial indoctrination, the members are trained and certified in first-aid, CPR, fire and rescue, and the use of self-contained-breathing-apparatus. Training exercises, drills, are conducted once a month. The drills consist of scenarios which require the Emergency Response Team to apply CPR and/or first aid. The drills are performed in the Plutonium Facility, they are video taped, then reviewed and critiqued by site personnel. Through training and effective drills and the Emergency Response Team can efficiently respond to any credible accident which may occur at the Plutonium Facility. 3 tabs

  15. TEAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents materials covering the television campaign against drunk driving called "TEAM" (Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management). It is noted that TEAM's purpose is to promote effective alcohol management in public facilities and other establishments that serve alcoholic beverages. TEAM sponsors are listed, including…

  16. A Model for Capturing Team Adaptation in Simulated Emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Musaeus, Peter

    2013-01-01

    and conceptualizes team processes through recursive cycles of updates. In the 29 simulation scenarios, 94 updates were recorded. There were between 0 and 8 updates per scenario (mean 3,2). Level five was achieved in 13 scenarios, level four in 8 scenarios and finally, level two and three were achieved in four...... is required to meaningfully account for communication exchanges in context. As such, this theoretical framework might provide a vocabulary for operationalizing the differences between "effective and ineffective" communication. Moving beyond counting communication events or the frequency of certain...

  17. Study on the action guidelines for medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang'an; Liu Ying; Geng Xiusheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the action guidelines for medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency. Methods: It is based on the experience and lessons learned in the course of meeting the emergencies preparedness and response of nuclear and radiological emergencies in China and abroad with the reference of the relevant reports of International Atomic Energy Agency. Results: Essential requirements and practical recommendations for the roles, responsibilities, emergency preparedness, principles and procedures of medical assistance at the scene, as well as the radiological protection of medical support team were provided. Conclusion: The document mentioned above can be applied to direct the establishment, effective medical preparedness and response of the medical support team for nuclear and radiological emergency. (authors)

  18. Team communication patterns in emergency resuscitation: a mixed methods qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Lisa Anne; Mastoras, George; Rahimpour, Mitra; Sohmer, Benjamin; Weitzman, Brian; Cwinn, A Adam; Hobin, Tara; Parush, Avi

    2017-12-01

    In order to enhance patient safety during resuscitation of critically ill patients, we need to optimize team communication and enhance team situational awareness but little is known about resuscitation team communication patterns. The objective of this study is to understand how teams communicate during resuscitation; specifically to assess for a shared mental model (organized understanding of a team's relationships) and information needs. We triangulated 3 methods to evaluate resuscitation team communication at a tertiary care academic trauma center: (1) interviews; (2) simulated resuscitation observations; (3) live resuscitation observations. We interviewed 18 resuscitation team members about shared mental models, roles and goals of team members and procedural expectations. We observed 30 simulated resuscitation video recordings and documented the timing, source and destination of communication and the information category. We observed 12 live resuscitations in the emergency department and recorded baseline characteristics of the type of resuscitations, nature of teams present and type and content of information exchanges. The data were analyzed using a qualitative communication analysis method. We found that resuscitation team members described a shared mental model. Respondents understood the roles and goals of each team member in order to provide rapid, efficient and life-saving care with an overall need for situational awareness. The information flow described in the interviews was reflected during the simulated and live resuscitations with the most responsible physician and charting nurse being central to team communication. We consolidated communicated information into six categories: (1) time; (2) patient status; (3) patient history; (4) interventions; (5) assistance and consultations; 6) team members present. Resuscitation team members expressed a shared mental model and prioritized situational awareness. Our findings support a need for cognitive aids to

  19. Analysis of manning options for Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure teams

    OpenAIRE

    Newbold, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This research explores the viability of qualifying and manning Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS) teams with Marine infantrymen from the Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) that are deployed with amphibious readiness groups. The VBSS element is an area that needs to be certified for surface combatants before deployment, and is required according to the Required Operational Capabilities, Projected Operational Environment, but it consu...

  20. Emergency team and action plan; Brigada de emergencia y plan de accion de emergencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Gorgerino, Ruben Dario [Central Hidroelectrica Itaipu, Hernandarias (Paraguay)]. E-mail: jimenez@itaipu.gov.br

    1998-07-01

    This work reports the various activities developed by a commission designated for the investigation of the fire occurred in the excitation panel of the generator unit 16, for the execution of two tasks: short term creation of plant emergency team, and a long term implementation of emergency action plan.

  1. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  2. Information spread of emergency events: path searching on social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Weihui; Hu, Hongzhi; Wu, Tunan; Dai, Yonghui

    2014-01-01

    Emergency has attracted global attentions of government and the public, and it will easily trigger a series of serious social problems if it is not supervised effectively in the dissemination process. In the Internet world, people communicate with each other and form various virtual communities based on social networks, which lead to a complex and fast information spread pattern of emergency events. This paper collects Internet data based on data acquisition and topic detection technology, analyzes the process of information spread on social networks, describes the diffusions and impacts of that information from the perspective of random graph, and finally seeks the key paths through an improved IBF algorithm. Application cases have shown that this algorithm can search the shortest spread paths efficiently, which may help us to guide and control the information dissemination of emergency events on early warning.

  3. Information Spread of Emergency Events: Path Searching on Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihui Dai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency has attracted global attentions of government and the public, and it will easily trigger a series of serious social problems if it is not supervised effectively in the dissemination process. In the Internet world, people communicate with each other and form various virtual communities based on social networks, which lead to a complex and fast information spread pattern of emergency events. This paper collects Internet data based on data acquisition and topic detection technology, analyzes the process of information spread on social networks, describes the diffusions and impacts of that information from the perspective of random graph, and finally seeks the key paths through an improved IBF algorithm. Application cases have shown that this algorithm can search the shortest spread paths efficiently, which may help us to guide and control the information dissemination of emergency events on early warning.

  4. A Simulation-based Approach to Measuring Team Situational Awareness in Emergency Medicine: A Multicenter, Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenman, Elizabeth D; Dixon, Aurora J; Webb, Jessica M; Brolliar, Sarah; Golden, Simon J; Jones, Kerin A; Shah, Sachita; Grand, James A; Kozlowski, Steve W J; Chao, Georgia T; Fernandez, Rosemarie

    2018-02-01

    Team situational awareness (TSA) is critical for effective teamwork and supports dynamic decision making in unpredictable, time-pressured situations. Simulation provides a platform for developing and assessing TSA, but these efforts are limited by suboptimal measurement approaches. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel approach to TSA measurement in interprofessional emergency medicine (EM) teams. We performed a multicenter, prospective, simulation-based observational study to evaluate an approach to TSA measurement. Interprofessional emergency medical teams, consisting of EM resident physicians, nurses, and medical students, were recruited from the University of Washington (Seattle, WA) and Wayne State University (Detroit, MI). Each team completed a simulated emergency resuscitation scenario. Immediately following the simulation, team members completed a TSA measure, a team perception of shared understanding measure, and a team leader effectiveness measure. Subject matter expert reviews and pilot testing of the TSA measure provided evidence of content and response process validity. Simulations were recorded and independently coded for team performance using a previously validated measure. The relationships between the TSA measure and other variables (team clinical performance, team perception of shared understanding, team leader effectiveness, and team experience) were explored. The TSA agreement metric was indexed by averaging the pairwise agreement for each dyad on a team and then averaging across dyads to yield agreement at the team level. For the team perception of shared understanding and team leadership effectiveness measures, individual team member scores were aggregated within a team to create a single team score. We computed descriptive statistics for all outcomes. We calculated Pearson's product-moment correlations to determine bivariate correlations between outcome variables with two-tailed significance testing (p teams (n = 41

  5. Resilience and Brittleness in a Nuclear Emergency Response Simulation: Focusing on Team Coordination Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Wagner Schenkel; Buarque, Lia; Voshell, Martin; Branlat, Matthieu; Woods, David D.; Gomes, Jose Orlando

    2008-01-01

    The current work presents results from a cognitive task analysis (CTA) of a nuclear disaster simulation. Audio-visual records were collected from an emergency room team composed of individuals from 26 different agencies as they responded to multiple scenarios in a simulated nuclear disaster. This simulation was part of a national emergency response training activity for a nuclear power plant located in a developing country. The objectives of this paper are to describe sources of resilience and brittleness in these activities, identify cues of potential improvements for future emergency simulations, and leveraging the resilience of the emergency response System in case of a real disaster. Multiple CTA techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the cognitive dimensions of the activity and to identify team coordination and crisis management patterns that emerged from the simulation training. (authors)

  6. Network analysis of team communication in a busy emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Emergency Department (ED) is consistently described as a high-risk environment for patients and clinicians that demands colleagues quickly work together as a cohesive group. Communication between nurses, physicians, and other ED clinicians is complex and difficult to track. A clear understanding of communications in the ED is lacking, which has a potentially negative impact on the design and effectiveness of interventions to improve communications. We sought to use Social Network Analysis (SNA) to characterize communication between clinicians in the ED. Methods Over three-months, we surveyed to solicit the communication relationships between clinicians at one urban academic ED across all shifts. We abstracted survey responses into matrices, calculated three standard SNA measures (network density, network centralization, and in-degree centrality), and presented findings stratified by night/day shift and over time. Results We received surveys from 82% of eligible participants and identified wide variation in the magnitude of communication cohesion (density) and concentration of communication between clinicians (centralization) by day/night shift and over time. We also identified variation in in-degree centrality (a measure of power/influence) by day/night shift and over time. Conclusions We show that SNA measurement techniques provide a comprehensive view of ED communication patterns. Our use of SNA revealed that frequency of communication as a measure of interdependencies between ED clinicians varies by day/night shift and over time. PMID:23521890

  7. Just allocation and team loyalty: a new virtue ethic for emergency medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, J; Beckman, A

    2005-01-01

    When traditional virtue ethics is applied to clinical medicine, it often claims as its goal the good of the individual patient, and focuses on the dyadic relationship between one physician and one patient. An alternative model of virtue ethics, more appropriate to the practice of emergency medicine, will be outlined by this paper. This alternative model is based on the assumption that the appropriate goal of the practice of emergency medicine is a team approach to the medical wellbeing of individual patients, constrained by the wellbeing of the patient population served by a particular emergency department. By defining boundaries and using the key virtues of justice and team loyalty, this model fits emergency practice well and gives care givers the conceptual clarity to apply this model to various conflicts both within the department and with those outside the department. PMID:16199595

  8. Smartphones let surgeons know WhatsApp: an analysis of communication in emergency surgical teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Maximilian J; King, Dominic; Arora, Sonal; Behar, Nebil; Athanasiou, Thanos; Sevdalis, Nick; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Outdated communication technologies in healthcare can place patient safety at risk. This study aimed to evaluate implementation of the WhatsApp messaging service within emergency surgical teams. A prospective mixed-methods study was conducted in a London hospital. All emergency surgery team members (n = 40) used WhatsApp for communication for 19 weeks. The initiator and receiver of communication were compared for response times and communication types. Safety events were reported using direct quotations. More than 1,100 hours of communication pertaining to 636 patients were recorded, generating 1,495 communication events. The attending initiated the most instruction-giving communication, whereas interns asked the most clinical questions (P WhatsApp helped flatten the hierarchy within the team. WhatsApp represents a safe, efficient communication technology. This study lays the foundations for quality improvement innovations delivered over smartphones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The emergence of new organization designs. Evidences from self-managed team-based organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annosi, Maria Carmela; Giustiniano, Luca; Brunetta, Federica; Magnusson, Mats

    2017-01-01

    New organization designs emerge continuously in highly dynamic innovation context to improve readiness to change. The adoption of self-managing teams operating cross-functionally on a bulk of products, together with the reduction of vertical layers in the organization, seems to be a common strategy

  10. Prehospital intraosseus access with the bone injection gun by a helicopter-transported emergency medical team.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritse, B.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the use of the bone injection gun to obtain vascular access in the prehospital setting by an Helicopter-Transported Emergency Medical Team. METHODS: Prospective descriptive study to assess the frequency and success rate of the use of the bone injection gun in prehospital care

  11. Defining Components of Team Leadership and Membership in Prehospital Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Remle P; Wagoner, Robert L; Rodriguez, Severo A; Bentley, Melissa A; Page, David

    2017-01-01

    Teamwork is critical for patient and provider safety in high-stakes environments, including the setting of prehospital emergency medical services (EMS). We sought to describe the components of team leadership and team membership on a single patient call where multiple EMS providers are present. We conducted a two-day focus group with nine subject matter experts in crew resource management (CRM) and EMS using a structured nominal group technique (NGT). The specific question posed to the group was, "What are the specific components of team leadership and team membership on a single patient call where multiple EMS providers are present?" After round-robin submission of ideas and in-depth discussion of the meaning of each component, participants voted on the most important components of team leadership and team membership. Through the NGT process, we identified eight components of team leadership: a) creates an action plan; b) communicates; c) receives, processes, verifies, and prioritizes information; d) reconciles incongruent information; e) demonstrates confidence, compassion, maturity, command presence, and trustworthiness; f) takes charge; g) is accountable for team actions and outcomes; and h) assesses the situation and resources and modifies the plan. The eight essential components of team membership identified included: a) demonstrates followership, b) maintains situational awareness, c) demonstrates appreciative inquiry, d) does not freelance, e) is an active listener, f) accurately performs tasks in a timely manner, g) is safety conscious and advocates for safety at all times, and h) leaves ego and rank at the door. This study used a highly structured qualitative technique and subject matter experts to identify components of teamwork essential for prehospital EMS providers. These findings and may be used to help inform the development of future EMS training and assessment initiatives.

  12. Communication between anesthesiologists, patients and the anesthesia team: a descriptive study of induction and emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew F; Pope, Catherine; Goodwin, Dawn; Mort, Maggie

    2005-11-01

    Although the importance of communication skills in anesthetic practice is increasingly recognized, formal communication skills training has hitherto dealt only with limited aspects of this professional activity. We aimed to document and analyze the informally-learned communication that takes place between anesthesia personnel and patients at induction of and emergence from general anesthesia. We adopted an ethnographic approach based principally on observation of anesthesia personnel at work in the operating theatres with subsequent analysis of observation transcripts. We noted three main styles of communication on induction, commonly combined in a single induction. In order of frequency, these were: (1) descriptive, where the anesthesiologists explained to the patient what he/she might expect to feel; (2) functional, which seemed designed to help anesthesiologists maintain physiological stability or assess the changing depth of anesthesia and (3) evocative, which referred to images or metaphors. Although the talk we have described is nominally directed at the patient, it also signifies to other members of the anesthetic team how induction is progressing. The team may also contribute to the communication behaviour depending on the context. Communication on emergence usually focused on establishing that the patient was awake. Communication at induction and emergence tends to fall into specific patterns with different emphases but similar functions. This communication work is shared across the anesthetic team. Further work could usefully explore the relationship between communication styles and team performance or indicators of patient safety or well-being.

  13. Team Resilience as a Second-Order Emergent State: A Theoretical Model and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint Bowers

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Resilience has been recognized as an important phenomenon for understanding how individuals overcome difficult situations. However, it is not only individuals who face difficulties; it is not uncommon for teams to experience adversity. When they do, they must be able to overcome these challenges without performance decrements.This manuscript represents a theoretical model that might be helpful in conceptualizing this important construct. Specifically, it describes team resilience as a second-order emergent state. We also include research propositions that follow from the model.

  14. Information delivery in team communication of MCR operators for an emergency task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwang Sub; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dae

    2005-01-01

    Team performance is a major measure to evaluate the ability of team when a lot of people perform a task of common purpose such as the main control room operators in the nuclear power plant. A team performance is affected the collaboration and communication among operators under dynamic situation as well as by the cognitive process of each team member. Specially, under the emergency situation, more clear and apparent communication in a team is a critical key for the appropriate response to emergency situation. As a general human factor analysis accesses the operator's behavior, it leads to a resulting action of planning, decision, problem-solving. In order to access the internal information and background information of his/her behavior, the verbal protocol analysis is applied. The impact factors on the team performance are derived from the state of the art for team performance, and it is found that the communication is a common key for all impact factors. And, in turn, the impact factors for the communication are accesses and the more detailed analysis is performed. The recorded data for the operator training for emergency situation of nuclear power plant training center are analyzed according to the verbal protocol analysis that are being generally utilized in cognitive psychology, educational psychology, and cognitive science. Two aspects, external (syntax) and internal (symantic) aspects of communication are reviewed. From the syntax analysis, it is found that the task of each step in EOP is separated according to each corresponding operator and the ordinary training is important, and the weak-points for a sentence presentation can be found team-by-team. And, from the symantic analysis for the diagnostic procedure of EOP is performed and the communication errors due to different situation awareness by operators could be found, and it lead to a diagnosis failure. The factors for different symantic cognition for a situation are analyzed and the affecting

  15. How the nuclear safety team conducts emergency exercises at the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Antonio C.A.; Silva, Davilson G.; Toyoda, Eduardo Y.; Santia, Paulo S.; Conti, Thadeu N.; Semmler, Renato; Carvalho, Ricardo N.

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination designed by the Nuclear Safety Team for better Emergency Exercise coordination. The Nuclear Safety Team was created with the mission of avoiding, preventing and mitigating the causes and effects of accidents at the IEA-R1. The facility where we conduct our work is located in an area of a huge population, what increases the responsibility of our mission: conducting exercises and training are part of our daily activities. During the Emergency Exercise, accidents ranked 0-4 on INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) are simulated and involve: Police Department, Fire Department, workers, people from the community, and others. In the last exercise held in June 2014, the scenario contemplated a terrorist organization action that infiltrated in a group of students who were visiting the IEA-R1, tried to steal fresh fuel element to fabricate a dirty bomb. Emergency procedures and plans, timeline and metrics of the actions were applied to the Emergency Exercise evaluation. The next exercise will be held in November, with the simulation of the piping of the primary cooling circuit rupture, causing the emptying of the pool and the lack of cooling of the fuel elements in the reactor core: this will be the scenario. The skills acquired and the systems improvement have been very important tools for the reactor operation safety and the Nuclear Safety Team is making technical efforts so that these Emergency Exercises may be applied to other nuclear and radiological facilities. Equally important for the process of improving nuclear safety is the emphasis placed on implementing quality improvements to the human factor in the nuclear safety area, a crucial element that is often not considered by those outside the nuclear sector. Surely, the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination application will improve and facilitate the organization, coordination and evaluation tasks. (author)

  16. How the nuclear safety team conducts emergency exercises at the IEA-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, Antonio C.A.; Silva, Davilson G.; Toyoda, Eduardo Y.; Santia, Paulo S.; Conti, Thadeu N.; Semmler, Renato; Carvalho, Ricardo N., E-mail: acavaz@ipen.br, E-mail: dgsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: eytoyoda@ipen.br, E-mail: psantia@ipen.br, E-mail: tnconti@ipen.br, E-mail: rsemmler@ipen.b, E-mail: rncarval@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work introduces the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination designed by the Nuclear Safety Team for better Emergency Exercise coordination. The Nuclear Safety Team was created with the mission of avoiding, preventing and mitigating the causes and effects of accidents at the IEA-R1. The facility where we conduct our work is located in an area of a huge population, what increases the responsibility of our mission: conducting exercises and training are part of our daily activities. During the Emergency Exercise, accidents ranked 0-4 on INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) are simulated and involve: Police Department, Fire Department, workers, people from the community, and others. In the last exercise held in June 2014, the scenario contemplated a terrorist organization action that infiltrated in a group of students who were visiting the IEA-R1, tried to steal fresh fuel element to fabricate a dirty bomb. Emergency procedures and plans, timeline and metrics of the actions were applied to the Emergency Exercise evaluation. The next exercise will be held in November, with the simulation of the piping of the primary cooling circuit rupture, causing the emptying of the pool and the lack of cooling of the fuel elements in the reactor core: this will be the scenario. The skills acquired and the systems improvement have been very important tools for the reactor operation safety and the Nuclear Safety Team is making technical efforts so that these Emergency Exercises may be applied to other nuclear and radiological facilities. Equally important for the process of improving nuclear safety is the emphasis placed on implementing quality improvements to the human factor in the nuclear safety area, a crucial element that is often not considered by those outside the nuclear sector. Surely, the Diagram of Emergency Exercise Coordination application will improve and facilitate the organization, coordination and evaluation tasks. (author)

  17. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team, a mobile intervention facility for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear emergency assistance team consisting of a vehicle pool and a stock of technical equipment was set up for operation in case of major reactor accidents. The equipment is kept in 6 containers which can be shipped on trucks, by rail or by helicopter or plane. Technical equipment and tasks of each container are briefly explained. Special transport vehicles for remote handling of contaminated material are described. (ORU) [de

  18. Retrospective on the construction and practice of a state-level emergency medical rescue team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhang; Haitao, Guo; Xin, Wang; Yundou, Wang

    2014-10-01

    For the past few years, disasters like earthquakes, landslides, mudslides, tsunamis, and traffic accidents have occurred with an ever-growing frequency, coverage, and intensity greatly beyond the expectation of the public. In order to respond effectively to disasters and to reduce casualties and property damage, countries around the world have invested more efforts in the theoretical study of emergency medicine and the construction of emergency medical rescue forces. Consequently, emergency medical rescue teams of all scales and types have come into being and have played significant roles in disaster response work. As the only state-level emergency medical rescue force from the Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, the force described here has developed, through continuous learning and practice, a characteristic mode in terms of grouping methods, equipment system construction, and training.

  19. Multidisciplinary team training in a simulation setting for acute abstetric emergencies : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merién, A.E.R.; Ven, van de J.; Mol, B.W.J.; Houterman, S.; Oei, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of multidisciplinary teamwork training in a simulation setting for the reduction of medical adverse outcomes in obstetric emergency situations. DATA SOURCES: We searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from

  20. Multidisciplinary Team Training in a Simulation Setting for Acute Obstetric Emergencies A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merién, A. E. R.; van de Ven, J.; Mol, B. W.; Houterman, S.; Oei, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of multidisciplinary teamwork training in a simulation setting for the reduction of medical adverse outcomes in obstetric emergency situations. DATA SOURCES: We searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from

  1. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  2. Difficult airway response team: a novel quality improvement program for managing hospital-wide airway emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J; Herzer, Kurt R; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I; Berkow, Lauren C; Haut, Elliott R; Hillel, Alexander T; Miller, Christina R; Feller-Kopman, David J; Schiavi, Adam J; Xie, Yanjun J; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W; Mirski, Marek A

    2015-07-01

    Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. We developed a quality improvement program-the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)-to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had 3 core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a Web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index >40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous or current tracheostomy. Twenty

  3. Interprofessional Collaboration between General Physicians and Emergency Department Teams in Belgium: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Karam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess interprofessional collaboration between general physicians and emergency departments in the French speaking regions of Belgium. Eight group interviews were conducted both in rural and urban areas, including in Brussels. Findings showed that the relational components of collaboration, which are highly valued by individuals involved, comprise mutual acquaintanceship and trust, shared power and objectives. The organizational components of collaboration included out-of-hours services, role clarification, leadership and overall environment. Communication and patient’s role were also found to be key elements in enhancing or hindering collaboration across these two levels of care. Relationships between general physicians and emergency departments’ teams were tightly linked to organizational factors and the general macro-environment. Health system regulation did not appear to play a significant role in promoting collaboration between actors. A better role clarification is needed in order to foster multidisciplinary team coordination for a more efficient patient management. Finally, economic power and private practice impeded interprofessional collaboration between the care teams. In conclusion, many challenges need to be addressed for achievement of a better collaboration and more efficient integration. Not only should integration policies aim at reinforcing the role of general physicians as gatekeepers, also they should target patients’ awareness and empowerment.

  4. Initial activities of a radiation emergency medical assistance team to Fukushima from Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Naoki; Yoshida, Kouji; Nakashima, Kanami; Iwatake, Satoshi; Morita, Naoko; Ohba, Takashi; Yusa, Takeshi; Kumagai, Atsushi; Ohtsuru, Akira

    2013-01-01

    As an urgent response to serious radiological accidents in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the radiation emergency medical assistance team (REMAT) from Nagasaki University landed at Fukushima on March 14, 2011, two days after the initiation of radiation crisis by the hydrogen explosion at Unit-1 reactor. During a succession of unexpected disasters, REMAT members were involved in various activities for six days, such as setting the base for radiological triage at the Fukushima Medical University, considerations for administration of stable iodine, and risk communication with health care workers. This report briefly describes what happened around REMAT members and radiation doses measured during their activities. -- Highlights: ► The radiation emergency medical assistance team from Nagasaki was sent to Fukushima. ► The practical action level for body surface contamination was 100 kcpm. ► The ambient radiation dose in Fukushima drastically elevated on March 15, 2011. ► Higher than 10 kBq of I-131, Cs-134, and Cs-137 were detected in soil samples. ► The effective dose of the team members ranged between 51.7 and 127.8 μSv in 6 days

  5. Behavioral Emergency Response Team: Implementation Improves Patient Safety, Staff Safety, and Staff Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicko, Cdr Jennifer M; Schroeder, Lcdr Rebecca A; Byers, Cdr William S; Taylor, Lt Adam M; Spence, Cdr Dennis L

    2017-10-01

    Staff members working on our nonmental health (non-MH) units (i.e., medical-surgical [MS] units) were not educated in recognizing or deescalating behavioral emergencies. Published evidence suggests a behavioral emergency response team (BERT) composed of MH experts who assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies may be beneficial in these situations. Therefore, we sought to implement a BERT on the inpatient non-MH units at our military treatment facility. The objectives of this evidence-based practice process improvement project were to determine how implementation of a BERT affects staff and patient safety and to examine nursing staffs' level of knowledge, confidence, and support in caring for psychiatric patients and patients exhibiting behavioral emergencies. A BERT was piloted on one MS unit for 5 months and expanded to two additional units for 3 months. Pre- and postimplementation staff surveys were conducted, and the number of staff assaults and injuries, restraint usage, and security intervention were compared. The BERT responded to 17 behavioral emergencies. The number of assaults decreased from 10 (pre) to 1 (post); security intervention decreased from 14 to 1; and restraint use decreased from 8 to 1. MS staffs' level of BERT knowledge and rating of support between MH staff and their staff significantly increased. Both MS and MH nurses rated the BERT as supportive and effective. A BERT can assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies, and improve staff collaboration and patient and staff safety. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Coordinating a Team Response to Behavioral Emergencies in the Emergency Department: A Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ambrose H; Wing, Lisa; Weiss, Brenda; Gang, Maureen

    2015-11-01

    While treating potentially violent patients in the emergency department (ED), both patients and staff may be subject to unintentional injury. Emergency healthcare providers are at the greatest risk of experiencing physical and verbal assault from patients. Preliminary studies have shown that a team-based approach with targeted staff training has significant positive outcomes in mitigating violence in healthcare settings. Staff attitudes toward patient aggression have also been linked to workplace safety, but current literature suggests that providers experience fear and anxiety while caring for potentially violent patients. The objectives of the study were (1) to develop an interprofessional curriculum focusing on improving teamwork and staff attitudes toward patient violence using simulation-enhanced education for ED staff, and (2) to assess attitudes towards patient aggression both at pre- and post-curriculum implementation stages using a survey-based study design. Formal roles and responsibilities for each member of the care team, including positioning during restraint placement, were predefined in conjunction with ED leadership. Emergency medicine residents, nurses and hospital police officers were assigned to interprofessional teams. The curriculum started with an introductory lecture discussing de-escalation techniques and restraint placement as well as core tenets of interprofessional collaboration. Next, we conducted two simulation scenarios using standardized participants (SPs) and structured debriefing. The study consisted of a survey-based design comparing pre- and post-intervention responses via a paired Student t-test to assess changes in staff attitudes. We used the validated Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale (MAVAS) consisting of 30 Likert-scale questions grouped into four themed constructs. One hundred sixty-two ED staff members completed the course with >95% staff participation, generating a total of 106 paired surveys

  7. UAVs Use for the Support of Emergency Response Teams Specific Missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin-Gabriel CONSTANTINESCU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents various methods of implementation for a new technology concerning the assessment and coordination of emergency situations, which is based upon the usage of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs. The UAV platform is equipped with optical electronic sensors and other types of sensors, being an aerial surveillance device as efficient as any other classically piloted platform. While currently being in service as military operations support for various operation theaters, they can also be used for assisting emergency response teams, providing full national coverage. For these special response teams, the ability to carry out overview, surveillance or information gathering activities and locating fixed or mobile targets are key components for the successful accomplishment of their missions, which have the purpose of saving lives and properties and of limiting the damage done to the surrounding environment. More concretely, the presented scenarios are: response in emergency situations, extinguishing of large-scale fires, testing of chemically, biologically or radioactively polluted areas and assessment of natural disasters.

  8. The culture of patient safety from the perspective of the pediatric emergency nursing team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taise Rocha Macedo

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the patient safety culture in pediatric emergencies from the perspective of the nursing team. METHOD A quantitative, cross-sectional survey research study with a sample composed of 75 professionals of the nursing team. Data was collected between September and November 2014 in three Pediatric Emergency units by applying the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument. Data were submitted to descriptive analysis. RESULTS Strong areas for patient safety were not found, with areas identified having potential being: Expectations and actions from supervisors/management to promote patient safety and teamwork. Areas identified as critical were: Non-punitive response to error and support from hospital management for patient safety. The study found a gap between the safety culture and pediatric emergencies, but it found possibilities of transformation that will contribute to the safety of pediatric patients. CONCLUSION Nursing professionals need to become protagonists in the process of replacing the current paradigm for a culture focused on safety. The replication of this study in other institutions is suggested in order to improve the current health care scenario.

  9. A 'mixed reality' simulator concept for future Medical Emergency Response Team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert J; Guest, R; Mahoney, P; Lamb, D; Gibson, C

    2017-08-01

    The UK Defence Medical Service's Pre-Hospital Emergency Care (PHEC) capability includes rapid-deployment Medical Emergency Response Teams (MERTs) comprising tri-service trauma consultants, paramedics and specialised nurses, all of whom are qualified to administer emergency care under extreme conditions to improve the survival prospects of combat casualties. The pre-deployment training of MERT personnel is designed to foster individual knowledge, skills and abilities in PHEC and in small team performance and cohesion in 'mission-specific' contexts. Until now, the provision of airborne pre-deployment MERT training had been dependent on either the availability of an operational aircraft (eg, the CH-47 Chinook helicopter) or access to one of only two ground-based facsimiles of the Chinook 's rear cargo/passenger cabin. Although MERT training has high priority, there will always be competition with other military taskings for access to helicopter assets (and for other platforms in other branches of the Armed Forces). This paper describes the development of an inexpensive, reconfigurable and transportable MERT training concept based on 'mixed reality' technologies-in effect the 'blending' of real-world objects of training relevance with virtual reality reconstructions of operational contexts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Collaboration between competitors’ NPD teams : in search of effective modes of management control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, L.P.M.; Langerak, F.; Tatikonda, M.V.

    Successful collaboration between new product development (NPD) teams maintained by competitors (so-called horizontal NPD collaboration) requires the use of formal modes of management control that simultaneously coordinate the teams' interdependent development activities and encourage their

  11. Training of medical teams on-site for individual and coordinated response in emergency management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    A system for training of coordination and cooperation of decision makers in emergency management has been under construction for some time. A first prototype of the system was developed in the MUSTER system. The system is being developed modularly with one module for each of the suborganisations...... involved in the complete preparedness: fire brigade, police, medical team, civil defence, etc. All these modules will in the end be integrated on a common integration platform, either to a fully-fledged system covering all aspects of training for the complete preparedness, or for creating a dedicated...

  12. The One Plan Project: A cooperative effort of the National Response Team and the Region 6 Regional Response Team to simplify facility emergency response planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staves, J.; McCormick, K.

    1997-01-01

    The National Response Team (NRT) in coordination with the Region 6 Response Team (RRT) have developed a facility contingency plan format which would integrate all existing regulatory requirements for contingency planning. This format was developed by a multi-agency team, chaired by the USEPA Region 6, in conjunction with various industry, labor, and public interest groups. The impetus for this project came through the USEPA Office of Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention (CEPPO). The current national oil and hazardous material emergency preparedness and response system is an amalgam of federal, state, local, and industrial programs which are often poorly coordinated. In a cooperative effort with the NRT, the CEPPO conducted a Presidential Review of federal agency authorities and coordination responsibilities regarding release prevention, mitigation, and response. Review recommendations led to a Pilot Project in USEPA Region 6. The Region 6 Pilot Project targeted end users in the intensely industrialized Houston Ship Channel (HSC) area, which is comprised of petroleum and petrochemical companies

  13. [Professional satisfaction for doctors of the Mobile Emergency Team and the Emergency Coordinator Office 061. Region of Murcia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-García, C; Martínez-Roche, M E; Vivo-Molina, M C; Quiñonero-Méndez, F; Gómez-Sánchez, R; Celdrán-Gil, F

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to analyze the phenomenon of work satisfaction of doctors of the Mobile Emergency Team and the Emergency Coordinator Office 061 of the Region of Murcia. A observational, analytical and cross-sectional study of development carried out with the medical staff of the Casualty and Emergency Operations Department 061 of the Region of Murcia. Data collection was carried out in December 2013 and January 2014. NTP 394 was used. Work satisfaction: general satisfaction scale. nonparametric tests for 2 samples or k samples depending on type of comparison. A participation rate of 88.2% was obtained, in relation to the general job satisfaction, the average of the participants was 69.55 (SD = 14.4). Of the 15 items that make up the questionnaire, « work colleagues » is the factor with which doctors are more satisfied with, indicating that up to an 87%, show a positive assessment on this point. Being the second aspect most respondents valued their « job stability » with a percentage of positive ratings of 76.7%. The main findings clearly demonstrate the importance of inter-professional relations and human potential as the cornerstone in the exercise of the activity of healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Emergency canine surgery in a deployed forward surgical team: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitler, Alan L; Jeanette, Joseph P; McGraw, Andrew L; Butera, Jennifer R; Vanfosson, Christopher A; Seery, Jason M

    2011-04-01

    Forward surgical teams (FSTs) perform a variety of non-doctrinal functions. During their deployment to Afghanistan, the 541st FST (Airborne) performed emergency surgery on a German shepherd military working dog (MWD). Retrospective examination of a case of veterinary surgery in a deployed FST. A 5 1/2-year-old German shepherd MWD presented with extreme lethargy, tachycardia, excessive drooling, and a firm, distended abdomen. These conditions resulted from gastric dilatation with volvulus. Since evacuation to a veterinarian was untenable, emergency laparotomy was performed in the FST. The gastric dilatation with volvulus was treated by detorsion and gastropexy, and the canine patient fully recovered. Canine surgery can be safely performed in an FST. Based on the number of MWDs deployed throughout the theater, FSTs may be called upon to care for them in the absence of available veterinary care.

  15. Trauma team activation criteria in managing trauma patients at an emergency room in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthisuthimethawee, P

    2017-02-01

    Trauma team activation (TTA) criteria were first implemented in the Emergency Department (ED) of Songklanagarind Hospital in 2009 to treat severe trauma patients. To determine the efficacy of the TTA criteria on the acute trauma care process in the ED and the 28-day mortality rate. A 1-year prospective cohort study was conducted at the ED. Trauma patients who were 18 years old and over who met the TTA criteria were enrolled. Demographic data, physiologic parameters, ED length of stay (EDLOS), and the injury severity score (ISS) were recorded. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the factors affecting 28-day mortality. Institutional review board approval was obtained from the Prince of Songkla University. A total of 80 patients (74 male and 6 female) were eligible with a mean age of 34.3 years old. Shock, penetrating torso injury, and pulse rate >120 beats per minute were the three most common criteria for trauma team consultation. At the ED, 9 patients (11.3 %) were non-survivors, 30 patients (37.5 %) needed immediate operation, and 41 patients (51.2 %) were admitted. All of the arrest patients died (p team activation criteria improved acute trauma care in the ED which was demonstrated by the decreased EDLOS and mortality rate. A high ISS is the sole parameter predicting mortality.

  16. Coordinating a Team Response to Behavioral Emergencies in the Emergency Department: A Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrose H. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While treating potentially violent patients in the emergency department (ED, both patients and staff may be subject to unintentional injury. Emergency healthcare providers are at the greatest risk of experiencing physical and verbal assault from patients. Preliminary studies have shown that a teambased approach with targeted staff training has significant positive outcomes in mitigating violence in healthcare settings. Staff attitudes toward patient aggression have also been linked to workplace safety, but current literature suggests that providers experience fear and anxiety while caring for potentially violent patients. The objectives of the study were (1 to develop an interprofessional curriculum focusing on improving teamwork and staff attitudes toward patient violence using simulation-enhanced education for ED staff, and (2 to assess attitudes towards patient aggression both at pre- and post-curriculum implementation stages using a survey-based study design. Methods: Formal roles and responsibilities for each member of the care team, including positioning during restraint placement, were predefined in conjunction with ED leadership. Emergency medicine residents, nurses and hospital police officers were assigned to interprofessional teams. The curriculum started with an introductory lecture discussing de-escalation techniques and restraint placement as well as core tenets of interprofessional collaboration. Next, we conducted two simulation scenarios using standardized participants (SPs and structured debriefing. The study consisted of a survey-based design comparing pre- and post-intervention responses via a paired Student t-test to assess changes in staff attitudes. We used the validated Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale (MAVAS consisting of 30 Likert-scale questions grouped into four themed constructs. Results: One hundred sixty-two ED staff members completed the course with >95% staff participation

  17. Are there any differences in medical emergency team interventions between rural and urban areas? A single-centre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftyka, Anna; Rybojad, Beata; Rudnicka-Drozak, Ewa

    2014-10-01

    To compare interventions of medical emergency teams in urban and rural areas with particular emphasis on response time and on-site medical rescue activities. A retrospective analysis of ambulance call reports from two emergency medical service substations: one in the city and the other in a rural area. Two emergency medical service substations: one in the city and the other in a rural area. Medical emergency teams. Interventions in the city were associated with a substantially shorter response time in comparison to rural areas. In the city, the distances were generally less than 10 km. In the rural area, however, such short distances accounted for only 7.2% of events, while 33.8% were over 30 km. Medical emergency teams more often acted exclusively on-site or ceased any interventions in rural areas. Compared with the city, actions in the rural setting were associated with significantly increased use of cervical collars and decreased use of intravenous access. The presence of a physician in the team raised the probability of pharmacotherapy. The relationship between medical emergency teams activities and the location of intervention shows the real diversity of the functioning of emergency medical service within a city and rural areas. Further research should aim to improve the generalisability of these findings. © 2014 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  18. Authentic leadership, group cohesion and group identification in security and emergency teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Guiu López, Carlos; Molero Alonso, Fernando; Moya Morales, Miguel; Moriano León, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Authentic leadership (AL) is a kind of leadership that inspires and promotes positive psychological capacities, underlining the moral and ethical component of behavior. The proposed investigation studies the relations among AL, cohesion, and group identification in security and emergency teams. A cross-sectional research design was conducted in which participated 221 members from 26 fire departments and operative teams from the local police of three Spanish provinces. The following questionnaires were administered: Authentic Leadership (ALQ), Group Cohesion (GEQ), and Mael and Ashford's Group Identification Questionnaire. A direct and positive relation was found between AL, cohesion, and group identification. An indirect relation was also found between AL and group cohesion through group identification, indicating the existence of partial mediation. The utility of the proposed model based on AL is considered; this model can be employed by those in charge of the fire departments and operative groups in organizations to improve workteams' cohesion. Both AL and group identification help to explain group cohesion in organizations committed to security and emergencies.

  19. Sustainable Effectiveness of Applying Trauma Team Activation in Managing Trauma Patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthisuthimethawee, Prasit; Molloy, Michael S; Ciottone, Gregory R

    2015-09-01

    To determine long term effectiveness of trauma team activation criteria by measuring emergency department length of stay (EDLOS) and 28-day mortality. A 3-year retrospective cohort study conducted in adult trauma patients who met one of the trauma team activation criteria (shock, penetrating torso injury, post traumatic arrest, respiratory rate of less than 12 or more than 30, and pulse rate of more than 120). Specific demographic data, physiologic parameters, EDLOS, injury severity score (ISS), and 28-day mortality were prospectively recorded into the Trauma Registry database. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors affecting mortality. The Institutional Review Board approval was obtained prior to undertaking the project. Two hundred eighty two patients with a mean age of35.1 years old were eligible. The median ISS was 25 (range, 13-30). The median EDLOS was 85 minutes (range, 50-135) and the 28-day mortality rate was 46.5%. The mean age was 31.7 years in the survival group and 38.7 years in the fatal group (p = 0.001). The median ISS was 17 in the survival group and 26 in the fatal group (p = 0.000) and the median EDLOS was 110 minutes in the survival group and 82 minutes in the fatal group (p = 0.034). When compared to data prior to the TTA application, the median time of EDLOS improvedsustainably from 184 to 85 minutes (p = 0.000) and the mortality rate decreased from 66.7% to 46.5% (p = 0.057). The parameters affecting patient mortality were older age, high ISS, and shorter EDLOS. Trauma team activation criteria significantly improved acute trauma care in the emergency department and decreased mortality.

  20. The culture of patient safety from the perspective of the pediatric emergency nursing team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Taise Rocha; Rocha, Patricia Kuerten; Tomazoni, Andreia; Souza, Sabrina de; Anders, Jane Cristina; Davis, Karri

    2016-01-01

    To identify the patient safety culture in pediatric emergencies from the perspective of the nursing team. A quantitative, cross-sectional survey research study with a sample composed of 75 professionals of the nursing team. Data was collected between September and November 2014 in three Pediatric Emergency units by applying the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument. Data were submitted to descriptive analysis. Strong areas for patient safety were not found, with areas identified having potential being: Expectations and actions from supervisors/management to promote patient safety and teamwork. Areas identified as critical were: Non-punitive response to error and support from hospital management for patient safety. The study found a gap between the safety culture and pediatric emergencies, but it found possibilities of transformation that will contribute to the safety of pediatric patients. Nursing professionals need to become protagonists in the process of replacing the current paradigm for a culture focused on safety. The replication of this study in other institutions is suggested in order to improve the current health care scenario. Identificar a cultura de segurança do paciente em emergências pediátricas, na perspectiva da equipe de enfermagem. Pesquisa quantitativa, tipo survey transversal. Amostra composta por 75 profissionais da equipe de enfermagem. Dados coletados entre setembro e novembro de 2014, em três Emergências Pediátricas, aplicando o instrumento Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Dados submetidos à análise descritiva. Não foram encontradas áreas de força para a segurança do paciente, sendo identificadas áreas com potencial de assim se tornarem: Expectativas e ações do supervisor/chefia para promoção da segurança do paciente e Trabalho em equipe. Como área crítica identificaram-se: Resposta não punitiva ao erro e Apoio da gestão hospitalar para segurança do paciente. O estudo apontou distanciamento

  1. Report on the emergency evacuation review team on emergency response plans for the Perry and Davis-Besse nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a report by Ohio's Emergency Evacuation Review Team, at the request of Governor Richard Celeste. The Team concludes that the current emergency response plan for Ohio's reactors is inadequate to protect the public and recommends changes in the current emergency plant requirements. The report also includes a summary of the litigation that has occurred since Celeste withdrew his support for the plans, a list of experts consulted, and sources used to prepare the report. An important document, and a study which every state should undertake

  2. Ethical issues associated with in-hospital emergency from the Medical Emergency Team's perspective: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, Luca; Giannini, Alberto; Pintaudi, Margherita; Semeraro, Federico; Radeschi, Giulio; Borga, Sara; Landoni, Giovanni; Troiano, Herbert; Luchetti, Marco; Pellis, Thomas; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Minoja, Giulio; Mazzon, Davide; Alampi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Medical Emergency Teams (METs) are frequently involved in ethical issues associated to in-hospital emergencies, like decisions about end-of-life care and intensive care unit (ICU) admission. MET involvement offers both advantages and disadvantages, especially when an immediate decision must be made. We performed a survey among Italian intensivists/anesthesiologists evaluating MET's perspective on the most relevant ethical aspects faced in daily practice. A questionnaire was developed on behalf of the Italian scientific society of anesthesia and intensive care (SIAARTI) and administered to its members. Decision making criteria applied by respondents when dealing with ethical aspects, the estimated incidence of conflicts due to ethical issues and the impact on the respondents' emotional and moral distress were explored. The questionnaire was completed by 327 intensivists/anesthesiologists. Patient life-expectancy, wishes, and the quality of life were the factors most considered for decisions. Conflicts with ward physicians were reported by most respondents; disagreement on appropriateness of ICU admission and family unpreparedness to the imminent patient death were the most frequent reasons. Half of respondents considered that in case of conflicts the final decision should be made by the MET. Conflicts were generally recognized as causing increased and moral distress within the MET members. Few respondents reported that dedicated protocols or training were locally available. Italian intensivists/anesthesiologists reported that ethical issues associated with in-hospital emergencies are occurring commonly and are having a significant negative impact on MET well-being. Conflicts with ward physicians happen frequently. They also conveyed that hospitals don't offer ethics training and have no protocols in place to address ethical issues.

  3. Measures against radiation disaster/terrorism and radiation emergency medical assistance team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Takako; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The probability of occurrence of radiological terrorism and disaster in Japan is not low. For this reason, preparations for coping with the occurrence of radiological terrorism should be an urgent issue. This paper describes the radiation medical system and the threat of radiological terrorism and disaster in Japan, and introduces the Radiation Emergency Medical Assistance Team (REMAT), one of the radiation accident/disaster response organizations at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Radiation exposure medical systems in Japan are constructed only in the location of nuclear facilities and adjacent prefectures. These medical systems have been developed only for the purpose of medical correspondence at the time of nuclear disaster, but preparations are not made by assuming measures against radiological terrorism. REMAT of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences is obligated to dispatch persons to the requesting prefecture to support radiation medical care in case of nuclear disaster or radiation accident. The designation of nuclear disaster orientated hospitals in each region, and the training of nuclear disaster medical staffing team were also started, but preparations are not enough. In addition to enhancing and strengthening experts, specialized agencies, and special forces dealing with radiological terrorism, it is essential to improve regional disaster management capacity and terrorism handling capacity. (A.O.)

  4. Organization of the French emergency teams in the event of a radiological accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumon, F. [Faculte de Pharmacie, 13 - Marseille (France); Pizzocaro, Y. [CSP, Risques Technologiques, 83 - Toulon (France)

    2001-07-01

    Nowadays, the intervention in ionizing environment is increasingly probable. It is still rare, but with the development of the nuclear programme of electricity production which was held in the french past and the significant rise in the use of the radioelements, as well in the medical field as industrial, the radioactive risk cannot be neglected. Technical and human resources, brought by mobile emergency teams called CMIR, were thus implemented to ensure either the safety of only hard-working exposed to the ionizing radiations, but also that of the population. In France, the organization of the public authorities in the event of nuclear accident, fixed by Directives of the Prime Minister which relate to nuclear safety, protection against radiation, the law and order and the civil safety, is described in Particular Plan for Intervention (PPI). (author)

  5. Organization of the French emergency teams in the event of a radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumon, F.; Pizzocaro, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays, the intervention in ionizing environment is increasingly probable. It is still rare, but with the development of the nuclear programme of electricity production which was held in the french past and the significant rise in the use of the radioelements, as well in the medical field as industrial, the radioactive risk cannot be neglected. Technical and human resources, brought by mobile emergency teams called CMIR, were thus implemented to ensure either the safety of only hard-working exposed to the ionizing radiations, but also that of the population. In France, the organization of the public authorities in the event of nuclear accident, fixed by Directives of the Prime Minister which relate to nuclear safety, protection against radiation, the law and order and the civil safety, is described in Particular Plan for Intervention (PPI). (author)

  6. Teammate Familiarity, Teamwork, and Risk of Workplace Injury in Emergency Medical Services Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ashley M; Patterson, P Daniel; Weaver, Matthew D; Gregory, Megan E; Sonesh, Shirley C; Landsittel, Douglas P; Krackhardt, David; Hostler, David; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Wang, Xiao; Vena, John E; Salas, Eduardo; Yealy, Donald M

    2017-07-01

    Increased teammate familiarity in emergency medical services (EMS) promotes development of positive teamwork and protects against workplace injury. Measures were collected using archival shift records, workplace injury data, and cross-sectional surveys from a nationally representative sample of 14 EMS agencies employing paramedics, prehospital nurses, and other EMS clinicians. One thousand EMS clinicians were selected at random to complete a teamwork survey for each of their recent partnerships and tested the hypothesized role of teamwork as a mediator in the relationship between teammate familiarity and injury with the PROCESS macro. We received 2566 completed surveys from 333 clinicians, of which 297 were retained. Mean participation was 40.5% (standard deviation [SD] = 20.5%) across EMS agencies. Survey respondents were primarily white (93.8%), male (67.3%), and ranged between 21-62 years of age (M = 37.4, SD = 9.7). Seventeen percent were prehospital nurses. Respondents worked a mean of 3 shifts with recent teammates in the 8 weeks preceding the survey (M = 3.06, SD = 4.4). We examined data at the team level, which suggest positive views of teamwork (M = 5.92, SD = 0.69). Our hypothesis that increased teammate familiarity protects against adverse safety outcomes through development of positive teamwork was not supported. Teamwork factor Partner Adaptability and Backup Behavior is a likely mediator (odds ratio = 1.03, P = .05). When dyad familiarity is high and there are high levels of backup behavior, the likelihood of injury is increased. The relationship between teammate familiarity and outcomes is complex. Teammate adaptation and backup behavior is a likely mediator of this relationship in EMS teams with greater familiarity. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Critical care clinician perceptions of factors leading to Medical Emergency Team review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currey, Judy; Allen, Josh; Jones, Daryl

    2018-03-01

    The introduction of rapid response systems has reduced the incidence of in-hospital cardiac arrest; however, many instances of clinical deterioration are unrecognised. Afferent limb failure is common and may be associated with unplanned intensive care admissions, heightened mortality and prolonged length of stay. Patients reviewed by a Medical Emergency Team are inherently vulnerable with a high in-hospital mortality. To explore perceptions of intensive care unit (ICU) staff who attend deteriorating acute care ward patients regarding current problems, barriers and potential solutions to recognising and responding to clinical deterioration that culminates in a Medical Emergency Team review. A descriptive exploratory design was used. Registered intensive care nurses and medical staff (N=207) were recruited during a professional conference using purposive sampling for experience in attending deteriorating patients. Written response surveys were used to address the study aim. Data were analysed using content analysis. Four major themes were identified: Governance, Teamwork, Clinical Care Delivery and End of Life Care. Participants perceived there was a lack of sufficient and senior staff with the required theoretical knowledge; and inadequate assessment and critical thinking skills for anticipating, recognising and responding to clinical deterioration. Senior doctors were perceived to inappropriately manage End of Life Care issues and displayed Teamwork behaviours rendering ward clinicians feeling fearful and intimidated. A lack of System and Clinical Governance hindered identification of clinical deterioration. To improve patient safety related to recognising and responding to clinical deterioration, suboptimal care due to professionals' knowledge, skills and behaviours need addressing, along with End of Life Care and Governance. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Composition of emergency medical services teams and the problem of specialisation of emergency medical services physicians in the opinions of occupationally active paramedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rębak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medicine includes prevention, prehospital care, specialised treatment, rehabilitation, and education. Aim of the research: The objective of the analysis was to determine the opinions of paramedics concerning the problem of the composition of emergency medical services (EMS teams and specialisation of EMS system physicians according to their education level and sense of coherence. Material and methods: The study was conducted among 336 occupationally active paramedics working in EMS teams delivering prehospital care in selected units in Poland. The study was conducted at Ambulance Stations and in Hospital Emergency Departments, which within their structure had an out-of-hospital EMS team. The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey, and the research instrument was the Orientation to Life Questionnaire SOC-29 and a questionnaire designed by the author. Results: The respondents who had licentiate education relatively more frequently indicated paramedics with licentiate education level as persons most suitable to undertake medical actions (26.32% rather than physicians (21.05%. Paramedics with 2-year post-secondary school education relatively more often mentioned physicians (33.07% than those with licentiate education (17.32%. As many as 89.58% of the paramedics reported the need for a physician in the composition of the EMS team delivering prehospital care, while only 10.42% of them expressed an opinion that there should be teams composed of paramedics only. According to 30.65% of respondents, EMS team delivering prehospital care should include a physician with the specialty in emergency medicine, whereas 8.04% of respondents reported the need for a physician, irrespective of specialisation. However, 42.56% of the paramedics expressed an opinion that a physician is needed only in a specialist team with a specialisation in emergency medicine. The opinions of the paramedics concerning the need for a

  9. The search for common ground: developing emergency medicine in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey P; Shokoohi, Hamid; Holliman, James C

    2007-05-01

    Academic ties between Iran and the United States were extensive before the 1979 revolution in Iran. After 20 years of negligible academic exchanges, there has been a growing trend of professional contacts between the two countries over the past few years. The genuine warmth of friendship and commitment to excellence in emergency medicine (EM) among Iranians has transcended the political barriers to allow international contribution of EM development in the country. Since 1999, there has been a successful academic collaboration between Iranian and U.S. universities to help develop EM in Iran. Today, remarkable progresses have been achieved through recognition of EM as a distinct profession, developing EM residency programs, improving emergency medical services, establishing qualified emergency departments, training faculty and staff, starting physician exchange programs, and building mutual contributions with professionals throughout the world. A supportive policy environment and a high-quality health care system have had incredible impacts on EM development in the country.

  10. Dedication increases productivity: an analysis of the implementation of a dedicated medical team in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pedro; Paiva, José Artur

    2017-12-01

    In several European countries, emergency departments (EDs) now employ a dedicated team of full-time emergency medicine (EM) physicians, with a distinct leadership and bed-side emergency training, in all similar to other hospital departments. In Portugal, however, there are still two very different models for staffing EDs: a classic model, where EDs are mostly staffed with young inexperienced physicians from different medical departments who take turns in the ED in 12-h shifts and a dedicated model, recently implemented in some hospitals, where the ED is staffed by a team of doctors with specific medical competencies in emergency medicine that work full-time in the ED. Our study assesses the effect of an intervention in a large academic hospital ED in Portugal in 2002, and it is the first to test the hypothesis that implementing a dedicated team of doctors with EM expertise increases the productivity and reduces costs in the ED, maintaining the quality of care provided to patients. A pre-post design was used for comparing the change on the organisational model of delivering care in our medical ED. All emergency medical admissions were tracked in 2002 (classic model with 12-h shift in the ED) and 2005/2006 (dedicated team with full-time EM physicians), and productivity, costs with medical human resources and quality of care measures were compared. We found that medical productivity (number of patients treated per hour of medical work) increased dramatically after the creation of the dedicated team (X 2 KW = 31.135; N = 36; p work reduced both in regular hours and overtime. Moreover, hospitalisation rates decreased and the length of stay in the ED increased significantly after the creation of the dedicated team. Implementing a dedicated team of doctors increased the medical productivity and reduced costs in our ED. Our findings have straightforward implication for Portuguese policymakers aiming at reducing hospital costs while coping with increased ED demand.

  11. Development of the assessment method for the idealized images of teams. Investigation on the teamwork in emergency response situation (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Since the occurrence of the Tohoku Pacific Earthquake and the nuclear disaster in 2011, the strengthening of emergency response training has been emphasized in Japanese electric industries. When disasters and accidents occur in a nuclear power plant, workers should collaborate with each other to mitigate possible hazards and to recovery from emergencies, as self-effort is not sufficient in these times. Effective teamwork is essential for the success of emergency response. However, the aspects of teamwork that are required in emergencies remain unclear. This study developed a questionnaire instrument to assess the idealized image of effective power plant operator teams in three different levels of emergencies. A pilot test of the instrument was conducted with 21 training instructors who are subject-matter experts in nuclear power plant operation. In the questionnaire, three hypothetical situations of differing emergency levels were presented: 'normal' (routine operation), 'abnormal' (trouble shooting and malfunction correction), 'emergency' (severe accident and disaster response). The idealized image of teams in each situation was also assessed in four aspects: 'decision-making', 'coordination', 'adaptation and adjustment', and 'command and control'. Questionnaire responses were summarized in a profile form to picture the idealized images, ant the profile scores in each situation were compared. Results suggested that, the idealized image of effective teams is different depending on the level of emergency. The Implications of results for training and future research directions are discussed. (author)

  12. Detecting the Norovirus Season in Sweden Using Search Engine Data – Meeting the Needs of Hospital Infection Control Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Michael; Wallensten, Anders; Zetterqvist, Inga; Hulth, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus outbreaks severely disrupt healthcare systems. We evaluated whether Websök, an internet-based surveillance system using search engine data, improved norovirus surveillance and response in Sweden. We compared Websök users' characteristics with the general population, cross-correlated weekly Websök searches with laboratory notifications between 2006 and 2013, compared the time Websök and laboratory data crossed the epidemic threshold and surveyed infection control teams about their perception and use of Websök. Users of Websök were not representative of the general population. Websök correlated with laboratory data (b = 0.88-0.89) and gave an earlier signal to the onset of the norovirus season compared with laboratory-based surveillance. 17/21 (81%) infection control teams answered the survey, of which 11 (65%) believed Websök could help with infection control plans. Websök is a low-resource, easily replicable system that detects the norovirus season as reliably as laboratory data, but earlier. Using Websök in routine surveillance can help infection control teams prepare for the yearly norovirus season. PMID:24955857

  13. Detecting the norovirus season in Sweden using search engine data--meeting the needs of hospital infection control teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Michael; Wallensten, Anders; Zetterqvist, Inga; Hulth, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus outbreaks severely disrupt healthcare systems. We evaluated whether Websök, an internet-based surveillance system using search engine data, improved norovirus surveillance and response in Sweden. We compared Websök users' characteristics with the general population, cross-correlated weekly Websök searches with laboratory notifications between 2006 and 2013, compared the time Websök and laboratory data crossed the epidemic threshold and surveyed infection control teams about their perception and use of Websök. Users of Websök were not representative of the general population. Websök correlated with laboratory data (b = 0.88-0.89) and gave an earlier signal to the onset of the norovirus season compared with laboratory-based surveillance. 17/21 (81%) infection control teams answered the survey, of which 11 (65%) believed Websök could help with infection control plans. Websök is a low-resource, easily replicable system that detects the norovirus season as reliably as laboratory data, but earlier. Using Websök in routine surveillance can help infection control teams prepare for the yearly norovirus season.

  14. Emergency and backup power supplies at Department of Energy facilities: Augmented Evaluation Team -- Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This report documents the results of the Defense Programs (DP) Augmented Evaluation Team (AET) review of emergency and backup power supplies (i.e., generator, uninterruptible power supply, and battery systems) at DP facilities. The review was conducted in response to concerns expressed by former Secretary of Energy James D. Watkins over the number of incidents where backup power sources failed to provide electrical power during tests or actual demands. The AET conducted a series of on-site reviews for the purpose of understanding the design, operation, maintenance, and safety significance of emergency and backup power (E&BP) supplies. The AET found that the quality of programs related to maintenance of backup power systems varies greatly among the sites visited, and often among facilities at the same site. No major safety issues were identified. However, there are areas where the AET believes the reliability of emergency and backup power systems can and should be improved. Recommendations for improving the performance of E&BP systems are provided in this report. The report also discusses progress made by Management and Operating (M&O) contractors to improve the reliability of backup sources used in safety significant applications. One area that requires further attention is the analysis and understanding of the safety implications of backup power equipment. This understanding is needed for proper graded-approach implementation of Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, and to help ensure that equipment important to the safety of DOE workers, the public, and the environment is identified, classified, recognized, and treated as such by designers, users, and maintainers. Another area considered important for improving E&BP system performance is the assignment of overall ownership responsibility and authority for ensuring that E&BP equipment performs adequately and that reliability and availability are maintained at acceptable levels.

  15. Emerging search regimes: measuring co-evolutions among research, science, and society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimeriks, G.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2012-01-01

    Scientometric data is used to investigate empirically the emergence of search regimes in biotechnology, genomics and nanotechnology. Complex regimes can emerge when three independent sources of variance interact. In our model, researchers can be considered as the nodes that carry the science system.

  16. Developing and evaluating the success of a family activated medical emergency team: a quality improvement report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Patrick W; Zix, Julie; Brilli, Richard; Wheeler, Derek S; Griffith, Kristie; Giaccone, Mary Jo; Dressman, Kathy; Kotagal, Uma; Muething, Stephen; Tegtmeyer, Ken

    2015-03-01

    Family-activated medical emergency teams (MET) have the potential to improve the timely recognition of clinical deterioration and reduce preventable adverse events. Adoption of family-activated METs is hindered by concerns that the calls may substantially increase MET workload. We aimed to develop a reliable process for family activated METs and to evaluate its effect on MET call rate and subsequent transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU). The setting was our free-standing children's hospital. We partnered with families to develop and test an educational intervention for clinicians and families, an informational poster in each patient room and a redesigned process with hospital operators who handle MET calls. We tracked our primary outcome of count of family-activated MET calls on a statistical process control chart. Additionally, we determined the association between family-activated versus clinician-activated MET and transfer to the ICU. Finally, we compared the reason for MET activation between family calls and a 2:1 matched sample of clinician calls. Over our 6-year study period, we had a total of 83 family-activated MET calls. Families made an average of 1.2 calls per month, which represented 2.9% of all MET calls. Children with family-activated METs were transferred to the ICU less commonly than those with clinician MET calls (24% vs 60%, pFamilies, like clinicians, most commonly called MET for concerns of clinical deterioration. Families also identified lack of response from clinicians and a dismissive interaction between team and family as reasons. Family MET activations were uncommon and not a burden on responders. These calls recognised clinical deterioration and communication failures. Family activated METs should be tested and implemented in hospitals that care for children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. The relationship between patients' perceptions of team effectiveness and their care experience in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipnis, Amira; Rhodes, Karin V; Burchill, Christian N; Datner, Elizabeth

    2013-11-01

    Effective teamwork is important in the fast-paced Emergency Department (ED) setting. Most of the teamwork literature addresses the provider's perspective of teamwork rather than the patient's perspective. Examine the relationship between patients' perceptions of teamwork and care experience in the ED. We conducted a cross-sectional survey study of adult patients seen at the University of Pennsylvania ED during the fall of 2011. Patients rated overall satisfaction, pain management, trust, and confidence in the team and likelihood of treatment compliance (outcomes) and four components of team effectiveness (role clarity, shared goals, relationships, and job satisfaction) on a Likert scale. We examined the relationship between patients' perception of teamwork and the outcomes using multivariate analysis, controlling for sociodemographic factors. We collected 1010 surveys. Patients rated the individual components of teamwork equally, with about 70% rating teamwork as "Very High." Most patients who rated teamwork highly also rated their confidence and trust in their providers highly (80-90%) compared to 20% of those who rated teamwork lower. The relative risk ratios between high and low teamwork were 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.8-5.9) for overall satisfaction, 3.9 (95% CI 2.7-5.8) for satisfaction with pain treatment, 5.3 (95% CI 3.6-7.8) for confidence in providers, and 1.9 (95% CI 1.5-2.5) for likelihood to follow-up treatment recommendations. Patient satisfaction and willingness to adhere to treatment recommendations are highly correlated with patients' perceptions of ED teamwork. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. FOAMSearch.net: A custom search engine for emergency medicine and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Todd; Thoma, Brent; Chan, Teresa M; Lin, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    The number of online resources read by and pertinent to clinicians has increased dramatically. However, most healthcare professionals still use mainstream search engines as their primary port of entry to the resources on the Internet. These search engines use algorithms that do not make it easy to find clinician-oriented resources. FOAMSearch, a custom search engine (CSE), was developed to find relevant, high-quality online resources for emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC) clinicians. Using Google™ algorithms, it searches a vetted list of >300 blogs, podcasts, wikis, knowledge translation tools, clinical decision support tools and medical journals. Utilisation has increased progressively to >3000 users/month since its launch in 2011. Further study of the role of CSEs to find medical resources is needed, and it might be possible to develop similar CSEs for other areas of medicine. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  19. Clinical efficiency in a simulated emergency and relationship to team behaviours: a multisite cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siassakos, D; Bristowe, K; Draycott, T J; Angouri, J; Hambly, H; Winter, C; Crofts, J F; Hunt, L P; Fox, R

    2011-04-01

    To identify specific aspects of teamworking associated with greater clinical efficiency in simulated obstetric emergencies. Cross-sectional secondary analysis of video recordings from the Simulation & Fire-drill Evaluation (SaFE) randomised controlled trial. Six secondary and tertiary maternity units. A total of 114 randomly selected healthcare professionals, in 19 teams of six members. Two independent assessors, a clinician and a language communication specialist identified specific teamwork behaviours using a grid derived from the safety literature. Relationship between teamwork behaviours and the time to administration of magnesium sulfate, a validated measure of clinical efficiency, was calculated. More efficient teams were likely to (1) have stated (recognised and verbally declared) the emergency (eclampsia) earlier (Kendall's rank correlation coefficient τ(b) = -0.53, 95% CI from -0.74 to -0.32, P=0.004); and (2) have managed the critical task using closed-loop communication (task clearly and loudly delegated, accepted, executed and completion acknowledged) (τ(b) = 0.46, 95% CI 0.17-0.74, P=0.022). Teams that administered magnesium sulfate within the allocated time (10 minutes) had significantly fewer exits from the labour room compared with teams who did not: a median of three (IQR 2-5) versus six exits (IQR 5-6) (P=0.03, Mann-Whitney U-test). Using administration of an essential drug as a valid surrogate of team efficiency and patient outcome after a simulated emergency, we found that more efficient teams were more likely to exhibit certain team behaviours relating to better handover and task allocation. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  20. Team Regulation in a Simulated Medical Emergency: An In-Depth Analysis of Cognitive, Metacognitive, and Affective Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Melissa C.; Azevedo, Roger; Sun, Ning-Zi; Griscom, Sophia E.; Stead, Victoria; Crelinsten, Linda; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Maniatis, Thomas; Lachapelle, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of cognitive, metacognitive, and affective processes among a medical team experiencing difficulty managing a challenging simulated medical emergency case by conducting in-depth analysis of process data. Medical residents participated in a simulation exercise designed to help trainees to develop medical expertise,…

  1. [Occupational accidents due to exposure to biological material in the multidisciplinary team of the emergency service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Adriana Cristina; Lopes, Aline Cristine Souza; Paiva, Maria Henriqueta Rocha Siqueira

    2009-09-01

    This transversal, survey-based research was carried out with a multiprofessional emergency care team in Belo Horizonte, between June and December 2006. The study aimed at estimating the incidence of occupational accidents by exposure to biological material, post-accidents conducts and demographic determinant factors. The study applied a structured questionnaire and descriptive analyses, as well as incidence calculations and logistic regression. The incidence of accidents with biological material reached 20.6%, being 40.8% by sharp materials and 49.0% by body fluids; 35.3% of the accidents took place among physicians and 24.0% among nurses. Post-accidents procedures: no medical assessment, 63.3%; under-notification, 81.6%; no conduct, 55.0%; and no serological follow-up, 61.2%. Factors associated with accidents: working time in the institution (Odds Ratio--OR, 2.84; Credible Interval--CI 95%-1.22-6.62); working in advanced support units (OR = 4.18; CI 95%--1.64-10.64); and interaction between working time in the institution and working in Basic Support Unit (OR 0.27; CI 95%--0.07-1.00). In order to reduce accidents, the implementation of post-accident protocols and follow-up, as well as under-notification norms, are suggested.

  2. Analysis of Manning Options for Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    the survey showed that 87.1% of the responses reported that manning had a negative impact on VBSS training opportunities, whereas only 45.2% said...requirements that must be assessed satisfactorily for a ship to pass the basic phase and be considered ready to deploy are shown in Table 2 ( Beaver ...members of the VBSS team to be present ( Beaver & Kitchener, 2012). Table 3. Required Respective VBSS Exercises (Thomas & Hunt, 2012) Number

  3. The Federal Oil Spill Team for Emergency Response Remote Sensing (FOSTERRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, T.; Jones, C. E.; Leifer, I.; Lindsay, F. E.; Murray, J. J.; Ramirez, E. M.; Salemi, A.; Streett, D.

    2014-12-01

    Oil spills can cause enormous ecological and economic devastation, necessitating application of the best science and technology available, for which remote sensing plays a critical role in detection and monitoring of oil spills. The FOSTERRS interagency working group seeks to ensure that during an oil spill, remote sensing assets (satellite/aircraft) and analysis techniques are quickly, effectively and seamlessly available to oil spills responders. FOSTERRS enables cooperation between agencies with core environmental remote sensing assets and capabilities and academic and industry experts to act as an oil spill remote sensing information clearinghouse. The US government and its collaborators have a broad variety of aircraft and satellite sensors, imagery interrogation techniques and other technology that can provide indispensable remote sensing information to agencies, emergency responders and the public during an oil spill. Specifically, FOSTERRS will work to ensure that (1) suitable aircraft and satellite imagery and radar observations are quickly made available in a manner that can be integrated into oil spill detection and mitigation efforts, (2) existing imagery interrogation techniques are in the hands of those who will provide the 24 x 7 operational support and (3) efforts are made to develop new technology where the existing techniques do not provide oil spills responders with important information they need. The FOSTERRS mission goal places it in an ideal place for identification of critical technological needs, and identifying bottlenecks in technology acceptance. The core FOSTERRS team incorporates representation for operations and science for agencies with relevant instrumental and platform assets (NASA, NOAA, USGS, NRL). FOSTERRS membership will open to a wide range of end-user agencies and planned observer status from industry and academic experts, and eventually international partners. Through these collaborations, FOSTERRS facilitates interagency

  4. Multidisciplinary Delphi Development of a Scale to Evaluate Team Function in Obstetric Emergencies: The PETRA Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Mrinalini; Hoppe, David; Monks, David; Cooke, Mary Ellen; Sharples, Lynn; Windrim, Rory

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new interdisciplinary teamwork scale, the Perinatal Emergency: Team Response Assessment (PETRA), for the management of obstetric crises, through consensus agreement of obstetric caregivers. This prospective study was performed using expert consensus, based on a Delphi method. The study investigators developed a new PETRA tool, specifically related to obstetric crisis management, based on the existing literature and discussions among themselves. The scale was distributed to a selected panel of experts in the field for the Delphi process. After each round of Delphi, every component of the scale was analyzed quantitatively by the percentage of agreement ratings and each comment reviewed by the blinded investigators. The assessment scale was then modified, with components of less than 80% agreement removed from the scale. The process was repeated on three occasions to reach a consensus and final PETRA scale. Fourteen of 24 invited experts participated in the Delphi process. The original PETRA scale included six categories and 48 items, one global scale item, and a 3-point rubric for rating. The overall percentage agreement by experts in the first, second, and third rounds was 95.0%, 93.2%, and 98.5%, respectively. The final scale after the third round of Delphi consisted of the following seven categories: shared mental model, communication, situational awareness, leadership, followership, workload management, and positive/effective behaviours and attitudes. There were 34 individual items within these categories, each with a 5-point rating rubric (1 = unacceptable to 5 = perfect). Using a structured Delphi method, we established the face and content validity of this assessment scale that focuses on important aspects of interdisciplinary teamwork in the management of obstetric crises. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada

  5. Emergent team roles in organizational meetings: Identifying communication patterns via cluster analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Beck, S.J.; Kauffeld, S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous team role taxonomies have largely relied on self-report data, have focused on functional roles and have described individual predispositions or personality traits. Instead, this study takes a communicative approach and proposes that team roles are produced, shaped and sustained in

  6. Members of the emergency medical team may have difficulty diagnosing rapid atrial fibrillation in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koźluk, Edward; Timler, Dariusz; Zyśko, Dorota; Piątkowska, Agnieszka; Grzebieniak, Tomasz; Gajek, Jacek; Gałązkowski, Robert; Fedorowski, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is potentially life-threatening as it may deteriorate into ventricular fibrillation. The aim of this study was to assess whether the emergency medical team members are able to diagnose AF with a rapid ventricular response due to the presence of atrioventricular bypass tract in WPW syndrome. The study group consisted of 316 participants attending a national congress of emergency medicine. A total of 196 questionnaires regarding recognition and management of cardiac arrhythmias were distributed. The assessed part presented a clinical scenario with a young hemodynamically stable man who had a 12-lead electrocardiogram performed in the past with signs of pre-excitation, and who presented to the emergency team with an irregular broad QRS-complex tachycardia. A total of 71 questionnaires were filled in. Only one responder recognized AF due to WPW syndrome, while 5 other responders recognized WPW syndrome and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia or broad QRS-complex tachycardia. About 20% of participants did not select any diagnosis, pointing out a method of treatment only. The most common diagnosis found in the survey was ventricular tachycardia/broad QRS-complex tachycardia marked by approximately a half of the participants. Nearly 18% of participants recognized WPW syndrome, whereas AF was recognized by less than 10% of participants. Members of emergency medical teams have limited skills for recognizing WPW syndrome with rapid AF, and ventricular tachycardia is the most frequent incorrect diagnosis.

  7. The Emerging Role of Social Work in Primary Health Care: A Survey of Social Workers in Ontario Family Health Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Rachelle; McMillan, Colleen; Ambrose-Miller, Wayne; McKee, Ryan; Brown, Judith Belle

    2018-05-01

    Primary health care systems are increasingly integrating interprofessional team-based approaches to care delivery. As members of these interprofessional primary health care teams, it is important for social workers to explore our experiences of integration into these newly emerging teams to help strengthen patient care. Despite the expansion of social work within primary health care settings, few studies have examined the integration of social work's role into this expanding area of the health care system. A survey was conducted with Canadian social work practitioners who were employed within Family Health Teams (FHTs), an interprofessional model of primary health care in Ontario emerging from a period of health care reform. One hundred and twenty-eight (N = 128) respondents completed the online survey. Key barriers to social work integration in FHTs included difficulties associated with a medical model environment, confusion about social work role, and organizational barriers. Facilitators for integration of social work in FHTs included adequate education and competencies, collaborative engagement, and organizational structures.

  8. Evaluation of Coordination of Emergency Response Team through the Social Network Analysis. Case Study: Oil and Gas Refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadfam, Iraj; Bastani, Susan; Esaghi, Mahbobeh; Golmohamadi, Rostam; Saee, Ali

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cohesions status of the coordination within response teams in the emergency response team (ERT) in a refinery. For this study, cohesion indicators of social network analysis (SNA; density, degree centrality, reciprocity, and transitivity) were utilized to examine the coordination of the response teams as a whole network. The ERT of this research, which was a case study, included seven teams consisting of 152 members. The required data were collected through structured interviews and were analyzed using the UCINET 6.0 Social Network Analysis Program. The results reported a relatively low number of triple connections, poor coordination with key members, and a high level of mutual relations in the network with low density, all implying that there were low cohesions of coordination in the ERT. The results showed that SNA provided a quantitative and logical approach for the examination of the coordination status among response teams and it also provided a main opportunity for managers and planners to have a clear understanding of the presented status. The research concluded that fundamental efforts were needed to improve the presented situations.

  9. Search for extraterrestrial intelligence/high resolution microwave survey team member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1993-01-01

    This semiannual status report describes activities conducted by the Principal Investigator during the first half of this third year of the NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey (HRMS) Investigator Working Group (IWG). As a (HRMS) Team Member with primary interest in the Sky Survey activity, this investigator attended IWG meetings at NASA/Ames and U.C.-Santa Cruz in Apr. and Aug. 1992, and has traveled independently to NRAO/Kitt Peak, Arizona (April 1993) and Woodbury, Georgia (July 1993). During the July 1993 visit to the Georgia Tech Research Corporation/Woodbury Research Facility, an experiment was conducted to study the effects of interference from C-band (3.7 - 4.2 GHz) geostationary spacecraft on the Sky Survey operation in that band. At the first IWG meeting in April of this year, results of a SETI observation conducted at the 203 GHz positronium hyperfine resonance using the NRAO facility at Kitt Peak, AZ, were presented, as well as updates on the development of the spaceborne RFI data bases developed for the project. At the second meeting, results of the study of interference from C-band geostationary spacecraft were presented. Likewise, a presentation was made at the accompanying 1993 Bioastronomy Symposium describing the SETI observation at the positronium hyperfine resonance.

  10. TOWARDS A FAST, LOW-COST INDOOR MAPPING AND POSITIONING SYSTEM FOR CIVIL PROTECTION AND EMERGENCY TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Angelats

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Civil protection and emergency teams work usually under very risky conditions that endanger their lives. One of the factors contributing to such risks is the lack of knowledge about their physical environment, especially when working indoors. Mapping and location indoor and outdoor technologies exist; for outdoors, very good levels of precision and accuracy may be obtained using offthe- shelf equipment; on the other side, and although good solutions for indoor environments are available, these require some extra pre-deployed infrastructure in the area to navigate, which is unacceptable in the case of emergency teams. It may be said, then, that no mature indoor + outdoor integrated solution providing the appropriate precision and accuracy for the purposes of emergency teams exist. In this paper, the assessment of a set of currently available sensors (IMUs, RGB-D cameras, GNSS receivers and algorithms is presented to show that it is already possible to build such a solution relying on them – providing that appropriate (indoor lightning and texture conditions exist.

  11. QUEST: A model to quantify uncertain emergency search techniques, theory and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.M.; Goldsby, M.E.; Plantenga, T.D.; Wilcox, W.B.; Hensley, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    As recent world events show, criminal and terrorist access to nuclear materials is a growing national concern. The national laboratories are taking the lead in developing technologies to counter these potential threats to our national security. Sandia National Laboratories, with support from Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the Remote Sensing Laboratory, has developed QUEST (a model to Quantify Uncertain Emergency Search Techniques), to enhance the performance of organizations in the search for lost or stolen nuclear material. In addition, QUEST supports a wide range of other applications, such as environmental monitoring, nuclear facilities inspections, and searcher training. QUEST simulates the search for nuclear materials and calculates detector response fro various source types and locations. The probability of detecting a radioactive source during a search is a function of many different variables. Through calculation of dynamic detector response, QUEST makes possible quantitative comparisons of various sensor technologies and search patterns. The QUEST model can be used to examine the impact of new detector technologies, explore alternative search concepts, and provide interactive search/inspector training

  12. An overview of the Environmental Response Team's air surveillance procedures at emergency response activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turpin, R.D.; Campagna, P.R. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (USA))

    The Safety and Air Surveillance Section of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Response Team responds to emergency air releases such as tire fires and explosions. The air surveillance equipment and procedures used by the organization are described, and case studies demonstrating the various emergency response activities are presented. Air response activities include emergency air responses, occupational and human health air responses and remedial air responses. Monitoring and sampling equipment includes photoionization detectors, combustible gas meters, real-time aerosol monitors, personal sampling pumps, and high flow pumps. Case histories presented include disposal of dioxane from a cotton plant, response to oil well fires in Kuwait, disposal of high pressure cylinders in American Samoa, and response to hurricane Hugo. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Vital Signs Predict Rapid-Response Team Activation within Twelve Hours of Emergency Department Admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Walston

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rapid-response teams (RRTs are interdisciplinary groups created to rapidly assess and treat patients with unexpected clinical deterioration marked by decline in vital signs. Traditionally emergency department (ED disposition is partially based on the patients’ vital signs (VS at the time of hospital admission. We aimed to identify which patients will have RRT activation within 12 hours of admission based on their ED VS, and if their outcomes differed. Methods: We conducted a case-control study of patients presenting from January 2009 to December 2012 to a tertiary ED who subsequently had RRT activations within 12 hours of admission (early RRT activations. The medical records of patients 18 years and older admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU setting were reviewed to obtain VS at the time of ED arrival and departure, age, gender and diagnoses. Controls were matched 1:1 on age, gender, and diagnosis. We evaluated VS using cut points (lowest 10%, middle 80% and highest 10% based on the distribution of VS for all patients. Our study adheres to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines for reporting observational studies. Results: A total of 948 patients were included (474 cases and 474 controls. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI [1.25-3.27], tachypneic (OR 2.92, 95% CI [1.73-4.92], and had lower oxygen saturations (OR 2.25, 95% CI [1.42-3.56] upon arrival to the ED. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic at the time of disposition from the ED (OR 2.76, 95% CI [1.65-4.60], more likely to have extremes of systolic blood pressure (BP (OR 1.72, 95% CI [1.08-2.72] for low BP and OR 1.82, 95% CI [1.19-2.80] for high BP, higher respiratory rate (OR 4.15, 95% CI [2.44-7.07] and lower oxygen saturation (OR 2.29, 95% CI [1.43-3.67]. Early RRT activation was associated with increased healthcare

  14. Vital Signs Predict Rapid-Response Team Activation Within Twelve Hours of Emergency Department Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, James M; Cabrera, Daniel; Bellew, Shawna D; Olive, Marc N; Lohse, Christine M; Bellolio, M Fernanda

    2016-05-01

    Rapid-response teams (RRTs) are interdisciplinary groups created to rapidly assess and treat patients with unexpected clinical deterioration marked by decline in vital signs. Traditionally emergency department (ED) disposition is partially based on the patients' vital signs (VS) at the time of hospital admission. We aimed to identify which patients will have RRT activation within 12 hours of admission based on their ED VS, and if their outcomes differed. We conducted a case-control study of patients presenting from January 2009 to December 2012 to a tertiary ED who subsequently had RRT activations within 12 hours of admission (early RRT activations). The medical records of patients 18 years and older admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU) setting were reviewed to obtain VS at the time of ED arrival and departure, age, gender and diagnoses. Controls were matched 1:1 on age, gender, and diagnosis. We evaluated VS using cut points (lowest 10%, middle 80% and highest 10%) based on the distribution of VS for all patients. Our study adheres to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines for reporting observational studies. A total of 948 patients were included (474 cases and 474 controls). Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI [1.25-3.27]), tachypneic (OR 2.92, 95% CI [1.73-4.92]), and had lower oxygen saturations (OR 2.25, 95% CI [1.42-3.56]) upon arrival to the ED. Patients who had RRT activations were more likely to be tachycardic at the time of disposition from the ED (OR 2.76, 95% CI [1.65-4.60]), more likely to have extremes of systolic blood pressure (BP) (OR 1.72, 95% CI [1.08-2.72] for low BP and OR 1.82, 95% CI [1.19-2.80] for high BP), higher respiratory rate (OR 4.15, 95% CI [2.44-7.07]) and lower oxygen saturation (OR 2.29, 95% CI [1.43-3.67]). Early RRT activation was associated with increased healthcare utilization and worse outcomes including

  15. Search for new particles decaying to a jet and an emerging jet

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A search for events consistent with the pair production of a heavy mediator particle that decays to a light quark and a new fermion, called a dark quark, is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $16.1~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2016. The dark quark is charged only under a new quantum chromodynamic-like force, and forms long-lived dark hadrons via a parton shower. The resulting emerging jet contains displaced vertices that are created by dark hadron decays to standard model hadrons. Mediator particles with masses between 400 and $1250~\\mathrm{GeV}$ are excluded for dark hadron decay lengths between 5 and $225~\\mathrm{mm}$. This analysis is the first dedicated search for new particles that decay to a jet and this kind of emerging jet.

  16. Reducing errors in health care: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary team training in obstetric emergencies (TOSTI study); a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, Joost; Houterman, Saskia; Steinweg, Rob A. J. Q.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; Wijers, Willy; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Oei, S. Guid; Group, The Tosti-Trial

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There are many avoidable deaths in hospitals because the care team is not well attuned. Training in emergency situations is generally followed on an individual basis. In practice, however, hospital patients are treated by a team composed of various disciplines. To prevent

  17. Factors predicting adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointments for patients assessed by the liaison psychiatric team in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O

    2010-01-01

    Several factors may predict adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointment for patients seen in the emergency department (ED) by liaison psychiatric teams. Awareness of these factors would allow for interventions targeted at vulnerable groups.

  18. Calming the campus: training school staff and crisis teams to manage student behavior during emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kendall

    2007-01-01

    Conversations with school and crisis personnel following large scale emergencies in and around schools, such as shootings, wildfires, and the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, indicated a need for pre-incident training in managing student behavior during emergencies. This article outlines a training program of this kind and offers suggestions regarding both content and process of this training. The suggestions follow discussion of the unique context and needs of the school setting.

  19. Systematic Reviews Published in Emergency Medicine Journals Do Not Routinely Search Clinical Trials Registries: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Lukas G; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-10-01

    Publication bias compromises the validity of systematic reviews. This problem can be addressed in part through searching clinical trials registries to identify unpublished studies. This study aims to determine how often systematic reviews published in emergency medicine journals include clinical trials registry searches. We identified all systematic reviews published in the 6 highest-impact emergency medicine journals between January 1 and December 31, 2013. Systematic reviews that assessed the effects of an intervention were further examined to determine whether the authors described searching a clinical trials registry and whether this search identified relevant unpublished studies. Of 191 articles identified through PubMed search, 80 were confirmed to be systematic reviews. Our sample consisted of 41 systematic reviews that assessed a specific intervention. Eight of these 41 (20%) searched a clinical trials registry. For 4 of these 8 reviews, the registry search identified at least 1 relevant unpublished study. Systematic reviews published in emergency medicine journals do not routinely include searches of clinical trials registries. By helping authors identify unpublished trial data, the addition of registry searches may improve the validity of systematic reviews. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multidisciplinary team training reduces the decision-to-delivery interval for emergency Caesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, Lone; Pedersen, T H; Atke, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency Caesarean section is performed when the life of the pregnant woman and/or the foetus is considered at risk. A 30-min standard for the decision-to-delivery interval (DDI) is a common practice and is supported by national organisations including The Danish Society of Obstetrics...

  1. Job task characteristics of Australian emergency services volunteers during search and rescue operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Aaron; Lenton, Gavin; Savage, Robbie; Aisbett, Brad

    2018-02-01

    Search and rescue operations are necessary in locating, assisting and recovering individuals lost or in distress. In Australia, land-based search and rescue roles require a range of physically demanding tasks undertaken in dynamic and challenging environments. The aim of the current research was to identify and characterise the physically demanding tasks inherent to search and rescue operation personnel within Australia. These aims were met through a subjective job task analysis approach. In total, 11 criterion tasks were identified by personnel. These tasks were the most physically demanding, frequently occurring and operationally important tasks to these specialist roles. Muscular strength was the dominant fitness component for 7 of the 11 tasks. In addition to the discrete criterion tasks, an operational scenario was established. With the tasks and operational scenario identified, objective task analysis procedures can be undertaken so that practitioners can implement evidence-based strategies, such as physical selection procedures and task-based physical training programs, commensurate with the physical demands of search and rescue job roles. Practitioner Summary: The identification of physically demanding tasks amongst specialist emergency service roles predicates health and safety strategies which can be incorporated into organisations. Knowledge of physical task parameters allows employers to mitigate injury risk through the implementation of strategies modelled on the precise physical demands of the role.

  2. Acute cardiac events and deployment of emergency medical teams and automated external defibrillators in large football stadiums in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sandt, Femke; Umans, Victor

    2009-10-01

    The incidence of acute cardiac events - including out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - may be increased in visitors of large sports stadiums when compared with the general population. This study sought to investigate the incidence of acute cardiac events inside large Dutch football stadiums, as well as the emergency response systems deployed in these stadiums and the success rate for in-stadium resuscitation. Retrospective cohort study using a questionnaire sent to the 20 Dutch stadiums that hosted professional matches during the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 football seasons. Stadium capacity ranged from 3600 to 51 600 spectators. Nearly 13 million spectators attended 686 'Eredivisie' (Honorary Division) and European football matches. All stadiums distribute multiple emergency medical teams among the spectators. Eighty-five percent of the stadiums have an ambulance standby during matches, 95% of the stadiums were equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) during the study period. On an average, one AED was available for every 7576 spectators (range 1800-29 600). Ninety-three cardiac events were reported (7.3 per 1 million spectators). An AED was used 22 times (1.7 per 1 million spectators). Resuscitation was successful in 18 cases (82%, 95% confidence interval: 61-93). The incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest inside large football stadiums in the Netherlands, albeit increased when compared with the general population, is low. The success rate for in-stadium resuscitation by medical teams equipped with AEDs is high. Dutch stadiums appear vigilant in regard to acute cardiac events. This report highlights the importance of adequate emergency medical response systems (including AEDs) in large sports venues.

  3. Medical Emergency Team: How do we play when we stay? Characterization of MET actions at the scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Raquel; Saraiva, Manuel; Cardoso, Teresa; Aragão, Irene C

    2016-03-22

    The creation, implementation and effectiveness of a medical emergency team (MET) in every hospital is encourage and supported by international bodies of quality certification. Issues such as what is the best composition of the team or the interventions performed by the MET at the scene and the immediate outcomes of the patients after MET intervention have not yet been sufficiently explored. The purpose of the study is to characterize MET actions at the scene and the immediate patient outcome. Retrospective cohort study, at a tertiary care, university-affiliated, 600-bed hospital, in the north of Portugal, over two years. There were 511 MET activations: 389 (76%) were for inpatients. MET activation rate was 8.6/1,000 inpatients. The main criteria for activation were airway threatening in 143 (36.8%), concern of medical staff in 121 (31.1%) and decrease in GCS > 2 in 98 (25.2%) patients; MET calls for cardiac arrest occurred in 68 patients (17.5%). The median (IQR) time the team stayed at the scene was 35 (20-50) minutes. At the scene, the most frequent actions were related to airway and ventilation, namely oxygen administration in 145 (37.3%); in circulation, fluid were administered in 158 (40.6%); overall medication was administered in 185 (47.5%) patients. End-of-life decisions were part of the MET actions in 94 (24.1%) patients. At the end of MET intervention, 73 (18.7%) patients died at the scene, 190 (60.7%) stayed on the ward and the remaining 123 patients were transferred to an increased level of care. Crude hospital mortality rate was 4.1% in the 3 years previously to MET implementation and 3.6% in the following 3 years (p residence. The team stayed on site for half an hour and during that time most of the actions were simple and nurse-driven, but in one third of all activations medical actions were taken, and in a forth (24%) end-of-life decisions made, reinforcing the inclusion of a doctor in the MET. A significant decrease in overall hospital

  4. Incidence, characteristics and management of pain in one operational area of medical emergency teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiński, Sylweriusz; Bryja, Magdalena; Wojtaszowicz, Rafał; Górka, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Experience of pain associated with both chronic as well as acute medical conditions is a main cause for call for ambulance. The aim of this study was to establish both frequency and characteristics of pain reported by patients treated in pre-hospital environment in a single operational area. The supplementary goal was an analysis of methods of pain alleviation applied by medical personnel in the above described scenario. The written documentation of 6 months of year 2009 provided by doctor-manned as well as paramedic-only ambulances operating in Tatra county, Małopolska, Poland was analyzed. Medical personnel inquired about pain experienced in 57.4% of cases, 10-point numerical rating scale was used in 22.3% of patients. Pain was reported by 43.8% of patients, the most frequent reasons of experienced pain were trauma and cardiovascular diseases. In almost half of the cases pain was referred to the areas of chest and abdomen. Non-traumatic pain was reported by 47.7% of patients, post-traumatic in 41.3% of cases, 11% of subjects reported ischemic chest pain. 42.3% of pain-reporting patients received some form of analgesia, yet only 3% of subjects in this group received opiates. Personnel of paramedic-only ambulances tended to use pain intensity scale more often (P < 0.01), yet administered pain alleviating drugs noticeably less often than the doctor-manned teams (P < 0.01). The use of pain alleviating drugs, opiates especially, was inadequate in proportion to frequency and intensity of pain reported by patients. General, nation-wide standards of pain measurement and treatment in pre-hospital rescue are suggested as a means to improve the efficacy of pain reduction treatment.

  5. Cannabis Hyperemesis Syndrome in the Emergency Department: How Can a Specialized Addiction Team Be Useful? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélissier, Fanny; Claudet, Isabelle; Gandia-Mailly, Peggy; Benyamina, Amine; Franchitto, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Chronic cannabis users may experience cyclical episodes of nausea and vomiting and learned behavior of hot bathing. This clinical condition, known as cannabis hyperemesis syndrome, was first reported in 2004. Our aim was to promote early recognition of this syndrome in emergency departments (EDs) and to increase referral to addiction specialists. Cannabis abusers were admitted to the ED for vomiting or abdominal pain from June 1, 2014 to January 1, 2015 and diagnosed with cannabis hyperemesis syndrome by a specialized addiction team. Then, medical records were examined retrospectively. Seven young adults were included. Their mean age was 24.7 years (range 17-39 years) and the majority were men (male-to-female ratio 1.2). Biological and toxicological blood samples were taken in all patients. Tetrahydrocannabinol blood level was measured in 4 patients, with a mean blood concentration of 11.6 ng/mL. Radiographic examination including abdominal computed tomography and brain imaging were negative, as was upper endoscopy. Five patients compulsively took hot baths in an attempt to decrease the symptoms. Treatment was symptomatic. Five patients have started follow-up with the specialized addiction team. Cannabis hyperemesis syndrome is still under-diagnosed 10 years after it was first described. Physicians should be aware of this syndrome to avoid repeated hospitalizations or esophageal complications. Greater awareness should lead to prompt treatment and prevention of future recurrence through cannabis cessation. Addiction specialists, as well as medical toxicologists, are experts in the management of cannabis abusers and can help re-establish the role of medical care in this population in collaboration with emergency physicians. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. CMSMAP : oil, chemical, search and rescue, and marine emergency response crisis management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.L.; Howlett, E.; Galagan, C.; Giguere, T.; Wee, F.; Chong, J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a newly developed Crisis Management System (CMS) which makes it possible to view oil and chemical spills on the seafloor. The CMS is designed to run in a network environment, so that multiple stations can be used cooperatively to respond to a spill incident. It was developed by the Maritime and Port Authority in Singapore and represents a singular integration of a ship's bridge simulator hardware and software. It incorporates numerical models and emergency response software. The CMS is installed in a specifically designed building at the Singapore Polytechnic University, and is integrated with two shipping bridge simulators. One user interface has access to models dealing with oil spills, chemical spills, search and rescues, marine emergencies, and nuclear disasters. The interface is linked to a response management system. The entire system is used to train response personnel to marine emergencies. The histories and costs of planned response activities are described and logged for reference purposes. Estimates of damages associated with spills can be obtained. Alternative response plans can also be determined. Further research in 2002 will focus on developing real time response. 3 refs., 6 figs

  7. Use of a Dedicated, Non-Physician-led Mental Health Team to Reduce Pediatric Emergency Department Lengths of Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspal, Neil G; Rutman, Lori E; Kodish, Ian; Moore, Ann; Migita, Russell T

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of emergency departments (EDs) for pediatric mental health (MH) complaints is increasing. These patients require more resources and have higher admission rates than those with nonpsychiatric complaints. A multistage, multidisciplinary process to reduce length of stay (LOS) and improve the quality of care for patients with psychiatric complaints was performed at a tertiary care children's hospital's ED using Lean methodology. This process resulted in the implementation of a dedicated MH team, led by either a social worker or a psychiatric nurse, to evaluate patients, facilitate admissions, and arrange discharge planning. We conducted a retrospective, before-and-after study analyzing data 1 year before through 1 year after new process implementation (March 28, 2011). Our primary outcome was mean ED LOS. After process implementation there was a statistically significant decrease in mean ED LOS (332 minutes vs. 244 minutes, p vs. 204 minutes, p = 0.001), security physical interventions (2.0% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.004), and restraint use (1.7% vs. 0.1%, p safety. Use of quality improvement methodology led to a redesign that was associated with a significant reduction in mean LOS of patients with psychiatric complaints and improved ED staff perception of care. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  8. TIA triage in emergency department using acute MRI (TIA-TEAM): a feasibility and safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Nirali; Tung, Christie E; Mlynash, Michael; Garcia, Madelleine; Kemp, Stephanie; Kleinman, Jonathan; Zaharchuk, Greg; Albers, Gregory; Olivot, Jean-Marc

    2015-04-01

    Positive diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) on MRI is associated with increased recurrent stroke risk in TIA patients. Acute MRI aids in TIA risk stratification and diagnosis. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of TIA triage directly from the emergency department (ED) with acute MRI and neurological consultation. Consecutive ED TIA patients assessed by a neurologist underwent acute MRI/MRA of head/neck per protocol and were hospitalized if positive DWI, symptomatic vessel stenosis, or per clinical judgment. Stroke neurologist adjudicated the final TIA diagnosis as definite, possible, or not a cerebrovascular event. Stroke recurrence rates were calculated at 7, 90, 365 days and compared with predicted stroke rates derived from historical DWI and ABCD(2) score data. One hundred twenty-nine enrolled patients had a mean age of 69 years (± 17) and median ABCD(2) score of 3 (interquartile range [IQR] 3-4). During triage, 112 (87%) patients underwent acute MRI after a median of 16 h (IQR 10-23) from symptom onset. No patients experienced a recurrent event before imaging. Twenty-four (21%) had positive DWI and 8 (7%) had symptomatic vessel stenosis. Of the total cohort, 83 (64%) were discharged and 46 (36%) were hospitalized. By one-year follow-up, one patient in each group had experienced a stroke. Of 92 patients with MRI and index cerebrovascular event, recurrent stroke rates were 1.1% at 7 and 90 days. These were similar to predicted recurrence rates. TIA triage in the ED using a protocol with neurological consultation and acute MRI is feasible and safe. The majority of patients were discharged without hospitalization and rates of recurrent stroke were not higher than predicted. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  9. Team-focused Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Prehospital Principles Adapted for Emergency Department Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Blake; Runyon, Michael; Weekes, Anthony; Pearson, David

    2018-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has high rates of morbidity and mortality, and a growing body of evidence is redefining our approach to the resuscitation of these high-risk patients. Team-focused cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TFCPR), most commonly deployed and described by prehospital care providers, is a focused approach to cardiac arrest care that emphasizes early defibrillation and high-quality, minimally interrupted chest compressions while de-emphasizing endotracheal intubation and intravenous drug administration. TFCPR is associated with statistically significant increases in survival to hospital admission, survival to hospital discharge, and survival with good neurologic outcome; however, the adoption of similar streamlined resuscitation approaches by emergency physicians has not been widely reported. In the absence of a deliberately streamlined approach, such as TFCPR, other advanced therapies and procedures that have not shown similar survival benefit may be prioritized at the expense of simpler evidence-based interventions. This review examines the current literature on cardiac arrest resuscitation. The recent prehospital success of TFCPR is highlighted, including the associated improvements in multiple patient-centered outcomes. The adaptability of TFCPR to the emergency department (ED) setting is also discussed in detail. Finally, we discuss advanced interventions frequently performed during ED cardiac arrest resuscitation that may interfere with early defibrillation and effective high-quality chest compressions. TFCPR has been associated with improved patient outcomes in the prehospital setting. The data are less compelling for other commonly used advanced resuscitation tools and procedures. Emergency physicians should consider incorporating the TFCPR approach into ED cardiac arrest resuscitation to optimize delivery of those interventions most associated with improved outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. UC3M Emergencies : health center search, first aid, defibrillators, emergency exits, last warnings and torch (iOS platform)

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Civiac, María

    2013-01-01

    This document contains Maria Martin’s bachelor thesis. The issues that this project wants to solve are emergencies-related: health centersand emergency exits location,emergency call, first aid instructions and information and latest emergency alerts at Carlos III University. It has been detected that members of Carlos III University currently have difficulties to find health centers, emergency exits and first aid information. Furthermore, the University itself did not have any mechanism to pu...

  11. Ireland's Preparedness for Nuclear Emergencies - Development of a Handbook for the Technical Assessment Team (TAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Organo, Catherine; Smith, Kilian; Smith, Veronica; O' Connor, Collette; McMahon, Ciara [Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiological Protection, 3 Clonskeagh Square, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland)

    2014-07-01

    In Ireland, the National Emergency Plan for Nuclear Accidents (NEPNA) provides a framework for the national response to a large scale nuclear incident with the potential to contaminate a wide area. Under this plan, the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) has been assigned a major role covering a range of responsibilities. One of these is to carry out a radiological assessment of the situation. The RPII Technical Assessment Team (TAT) is activated in such circumstances, and is tasked with delivering this radiological assessment. Broadly speaking, the role of the TAT is to gather together all of the available information relevant to the event and to use this information to assess the radiological consequences for Ireland so as to formulate advice regarding subsequent precautionary actions, particular regarding food controls and preventive measures for the agricultural sectors. The TAT could also be asked to assess the radiological consequences for Irish citizens abroad, living in any location potentially affected by radioactive contamination. The arrangements for the running of the TAT are set out in the TAT handbook. This document has been under developed for a number of years and is now undergoing a major revision. A large number of additional documents have been developed since the original draft version was produced and, in conjunction with RPII's experience in responding to real events and exercises these need to be integrated and taken into account to produce an updated version. This poster will explain the rationale behind the review; it will outline the planning process and describe the various implementation phases, from the inventory of the existing documents and procedures to the integration of the new information that need to be considered during the response to an emergency. An outline of some of the key procedures being developed will also be given. (authors)

  12. Behavioral emergency in the elderly: a descriptive study of patients referred to an Aggression Response Team in an acute hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpkins D

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Simpkins,1 Carmelle Peisah,2,3 Irene Boyatzis1 1Division of Rehabilitation and Aged Care, Hornsby Ku-ring-gai Hospital, 2School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, 3Discipline of Psychiatry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Aim: The management of severely agitated elderly patients is not easy, and limited guidelines are available to assist practitioners. At a Sydney hospital, an Aggression Response Team (ART comprising clinical and security staff can be alerted when a staff member has safety concerns. Our aims were to describe the patient population referred for ART calls, reasons for and interventions during ART calls, and complications following them.Methods: Patients 65 years and older referred for ART calls in the emergency department or wards during 2014 were identified using the Incident Information Management System database and medical records were reviewed. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Results: Of 43 elderly patients with ART calls, 30 had repeat ART calls. Thirty-one patients (72% had underlying dementia, and 22 (51% were agitated at the time of admission. The main reasons for ART calls were wandering and physical aggression. Pharmacological sedation was used in 88% of the ART calls, with a range of psychotropics, doses, and routes of administration, including intravenous (19% and, most commonly, midazolam (53%. Complications were documented in 14% of cases where sedation was used. Conclusion: We observed a high frequency of pharmacological sedation among the severely agitated elderly, with significant variance in the choice and dose of sedation and a high rate of complications arising from sedation, which may be an underestimate given the lack of post-sedation monitoring. We recommend the development of guidelines on the management of behavioral emergency in the elderly patients, including de-escalation strategies and standardized psychotropic guidelines. Keywords: aged, aggression

  13. Video registration of trauma team performance in the emergency department: the results of a 2-year analysis in a Level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbert, Pieter H W; Kaasschieter, Edgar G; Hoorntje, Lidewij E; Leenen, Loek P H

    2009-12-01

    Trauma teams responsible for the first response to patients with multiple injuries upon arrival in a hospital consist of medical specialists or resident physicians. We hypothesized that 24-hour video registration in the trauma room would allow for precise evaluation of team functioning and deviations from Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. We analyzed all video registrations of trauma patients who visited the emergency room of a Level I trauma center in the Netherlands between September 1, 2000, and September 1, 2002. Analysis was performed with a score list based on ATLS protocols. From a total of 1,256 trauma room presentations, we found a total of 387 video registrations suitable for analysis. The majority of patients had an injury severity score lower than 17 (264 patients), whereas 123 patients were classified as multiple injuries (injury severity score >or=17). Errors in team organization (omission of prehospital report, no evident leadership, unorganized resuscitation, not working according to protocol, and no continued supervision of the patient) lead to significantly more deviations in the treatment than when team organization was uncomplicated. Video registration of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures by a multidisciplinary trauma team facilitates an accurate analysis of possible deviations from protocol. In addition to identifying technical errors, the role of the team leader can clearly be analyzed and related to team actions. Registration strongly depends on availability of video tapes, timely started registration, and hardware functioning. The results from this study were used to develop a training program for trauma teams in our hospital that specifically focuses on the team leader's functioning.

  14. The New York City Urban Search and Rescue Team (NY-TF1): A Case Study of Interagency Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK vii TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION ... INTRODUCTION Inasmuch as modern terrorist objectives bring a form of warfare into the realm of the emergency services, it is imperative that those services...and collaborative response; in other words, a synergy of the fire service, law enforcement and emergency mangement . Command needs to be unified

  15. The emergence of shared leadership in newly-formed teams with an initial structure of vertical leadership: A longitudinal analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fransen, Katrien; Delvaux, Ellen; Mesquita, Batja; Van Puyenbroeck, Stef

    2018-01-01

    The importance of high-quality leadership for team effectiveness is widely recognized, with recent viewpoints arguing shared leadership to be a more powerful predictor than vertical leadership. To identify changes in leadership structures over time, we longitudinally tracked the leadership structure of 27 newly-formed teams (N = 195), all having an initial structure of vertical leadership. Our findings demonstrated that the average team leadership strengthened over the course of the 24-week p...

  16. Community-based assessment of human rights in a complex humanitarian emergency: the Emergency Assistance Teams-Burma and Cyclone Nargis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanvanichkij, Voravit; Murakami, Noriyuki; Lee, Catherine I; Leigh, Jen; Wirtz, Andrea L; Daniels, Brock; Mahn, Mahn; Maung, Cynthia; Beyrer, Chris

    2010-04-19

    Cyclone Nargis hit Burma on May 2, 2008, killing over 138,000 and affecting at least 2.4 million people. The Burmese military junta, the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), initially blocked international aid to storm victims, forcing community-based organizations such as the Emergency Assistance Teams-Burma (EAT) to fill the void, helping with cyclone relief and long-term reconstruction. Recognizing the need for independent monitoring of the human rights situation in cyclone-affected areas, particularly given censorship over storm relief coverage, EAT initiated such documentation efforts. A human rights investigation was conducted to document selected human rights abuses that had initially been reported to volunteers providing relief services in cyclone affected areas. Using participatory research methods and qualitative, semi-structured interviews, EAT volunteers collected 103 testimonies from August 2008 to June 2009; 42 from relief workers and 61 from storm survivors. One year after the storm, basic necessities such as food, potable water, and shelter remained insufficient for many, a situation exacerbated by lack of support to help rebuild livelihoods and worsening household debt. This precluded many survivors from being able to access healthcare services, which were inadequate even before Cyclone Nargis. Aid efforts continued to be met with government restrictions and harassment, and relief workers continued to face threats and fear of arrest. Abuses, including land confiscation and misappropriation of aid, were reported during reconstruction, and tight government control over communication and information exchange continued. Basic needs of many cyclone survivors in the Irrawaddy Delta remained unmet over a year following Cyclone Nargis. Official impediments to delivery of aid to storm survivors continued, including human rights abrogations experienced by civilians during reconstruction efforts. Such issues remain unaddressed in official assessments

  17. Community-based assessment of human rights in a complex humanitarian emergency: the Emergency Assistance Teams-Burma and Cyclone Nargis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahn Mahn

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cyclone Nargis hit Burma on May 2, 2008, killing over 138,000 and affecting at least 2.4 million people. The Burmese military junta, the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC, initially blocked international aid to storm victims, forcing community-based organizations such as the Emergency Assistance Teams-Burma (EAT to fill the void, helping with cyclone relief and long-term reconstruction. Recognizing the need for independent monitoring of the human rights situation in cyclone-affected areas, particularly given censorship over storm relief coverage, EAT initiated such documentation efforts. Methods A human rights investigation was conducted to document selected human rights abuses that had initially been reported to volunteers providing relief services in cyclone affected areas. Using participatory research methods and qualitative, semi-structured interviews, EAT volunteers collected 103 testimonies from August 2008 to June 2009; 42 from relief workers and 61 from storm survivors. Results One year after the storm, basic necessities such as food, potable water, and shelter remained insufficient for many, a situation exacerbated by lack of support to help rebuild livelihoods and worsening household debt. This precluded many survivors from being able to access healthcare services, which were inadequate even before Cyclone Nargis. Aid efforts continued to be met with government restrictions and harassment, and relief workers continued to face threats and fear of arrest. Abuses, including land confiscation and misappropriation of aid, were reported during reconstruction, and tight government control over communication and information exchange continued. Conclusions Basic needs of many cyclone survivors in the Irrawaddy Delta remained unmet over a year following Cyclone Nargis. Official impediments to delivery of aid to storm survivors continued, including human rights abrogations experienced by civilians during

  18. Cost-effectiveness of a physician-nurse supplementary triage assessment team at an academic tertiary care emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ivy; Castren, Maaret; Kiss, Alex; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Brommels, Mats; Mittmann, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of physician-nurse supplementary triage assistance team (MDRNSTAT) from a hospital and patient perspective. This was a cost-effectiveness evaluation of a cluster randomized control trial comparing the MDRNSTAT with nurse-only triage in the emergency department (ED) between the hours of 0800 and 1500. Cost was MDRNSTAT salary. Revenue was from Ontario's Pay-for-Results and patient volume-case mix payment programs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was based on MDRNSTAT cost and three consequence assessments: 1) per additional patient-seen; 2) per physician initial assessment (PIA) hour saved; and 3) per ED length of stay (EDLOS) hour saved. Patient opportunity cost was determined. Patient satisfaction was quantified by a cost-benefit ratio. A sensitivity analysis extrapolating MDRNSTAT to different working hours, salary, and willingness-to-pay data was performed. The added cost of the MDRNSTAT was $3,597.27 [$1,729.47 to ∞] per additional patient-seen, $75.37 [$67.99 to $105.30] per PIA hour saved, and $112.99 [$74.68 to $251.43] per EDLOS hour saved. From the hospital perspective, the cost-benefit ratio was 38.6 [19.0 to ∞] and net present value of -$447,996 [-$435,646 to -$459,900]. For patients, the cost-benefit ratio for satisfaction was 2.8 [2.3 to 4.6]. If MDRNSTAT performance were consistently implemented from noon to midnight, it would be more cost-effective. The MDRNSTAT is not a cost-effective daytime strategy but appears to be more feasible during time periods with higher patient volume, such as late morning to evening.

  19. Enhancing the emergency department approach to pediatric sexual assault care: implementation of a pediatric sexual assault response team program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Monika K; Mollen, Cynthia J; Hayes, Katie L; Molnar, Jennifer; Christian, Cindy W; Scribano, Philip V; Lavelle, Jane

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the experience of a novel pediatric sexual assault response team (SART) program in the first 3 years of implementation and compare patient characteristics, evaluation, and treatment among subpopulations of patients. This was a retrospective chart review of a consecutive sample of patients evaluated at a pediatric emergency department (ED) who met institutional criteria for a SART evaluation. Associations of evaluation and treatment with sex, menarchal status, and presence of injuries were measured using logistic regression. One hundred eighty-four patients met criteria for SART evaluation, of whom 87.5% were female; mean age was 10.1 (SD, 4.6) years. The majority of patients underwent forensic evidence collection (89.1%), which varied by menarchal status among girls (P < 0.01), but not by sex. Evidence of acute anogenital injury on physical examination was found in 20.6% of patients. As per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for acute sexual assault evaluations in pediatric patients, menarchal girls were more likely to undergo testing for sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy (P < 0.01) and to be offered pregnancy, sexually transmitted infection, and HIV prophylaxis (P < 0.01). In an effort to improve quality and consistency of acute sexual assault examinations in a pediatric ED, development of a SART program supported the majority of eligible patients undergoing forensic evidence collection. Furthermore, a substantial number of patients had evidence of injury on examination. These findings underscore the importance of having properly trained personnel to support ED care for pediatric victims of acute sexual assault.

  20. Addressing Dual Patient and Staff Safety Through A Team-Based Standardized Patient Simulation for Agitation Management in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ambrose H; Auerbach, Marc A; Ruppel, Halley; Crispino, Lauren J; Rosenberg, Alana; Iennaco, Joanne D; Vaca, Federico E

    2018-06-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) have seen harm rise for both patients and health workers from an increasing rate of agitation events. Team effectiveness during care of this population is particularly challenging because fear of physical harm leads to competing interests. Simulation is frequently employed to improve teamwork in medical resuscitations but has not yet been reported to address team-based behavioral emergency care. As part of a larger investigation of agitated patient care, we designed this secondary study to examine the impact of an interprofessional standardized patient simulation for ED agitation management. We used a mixed-methods approach with emergency medicine resident and attending physicians, Physician Assistants (PAs) and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs), ED nurses, technicians, and security officers at two hospital sites. After a simulated agitated patient encounter, we conducted uniprofessional and interprofessional focus groups. We undertook structured thematic analysis using a grounded theory approach. Quantitative data consisted of responses to the KidSIM Questionnaire addressing teamwork and simulation-based learning attitudes before and after each session. We reached data saturation with 57 participants. KidSIM scores revealed significant improvements in attitudes toward relevance of simulation, opportunities for interprofessional education, and situation awareness, as well as four of six questions for roles/responsibilities. Two broad themes emerged from the focus groups: (1) a team-based agitated patient simulation addressed dual safety of staff and patients simultaneously and (2) the experience fostered interprofessional discovery and cooperation in agitation management. A team-based simulated agitated patient encounter highlighted the need to consider the dual safety of staff and patients while facilitating interprofessional dialog and learning. Our findings suggest that simulation may be effective to enhance teamwork in

  1. Searching for the optimal renal prescription. Fresenius, Kaiser Permanente team up to offer new options in dialysis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, M E

    1999-01-01

    The goals are simple: Improve well-being of the dialysis patient and reduce hospitalizations. The tools are diverse: Ultrapure dialysate. On-line blood monitoring. Biocompatible membranes. No reuse. Daily, in-center dialysis and possibly nocturnal dialysis at home. Reimbursement: Full-risk capitation, With Medicare and commercial payor rates varying on a patient-by-patient basis. Create an incubator with approximately 1,000 end-stage renal disease patients, treated at both capitated payment-exclusive dialysis units and mingled in at traditional fee-for-service clinics. Establish a team of nurses and renal care staff to direct the care plan, and put the program in place. After the first year, analyze the data and see if the end--hopefully, improved outcomes and resulting reduced hospitalizations--justifies the means--the higher cost for "optimal technologies."

  2. Preparedness of Operation Teams' Non-technical Skills in a Main Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants to Manage Emergency Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Human reliability is one of the important determinants for the system safety. Nuclear Energy Agency reported that approximately half of events reported by foreign nuclear industry were related with inappropriate human actions. The human error problems can be viewed in two ways: the person approach and the system approach. Other terms to represent each approach are active failures and latent conditions. Active failures are unsafe acts committed by people who are in direct contact with systems whereas latent conditions are the inevitable 'resident pathogens' within the system. To identify what kinds of non-technical skills were needed to cope with emergency conditions, a method to evaluate preparedness of task management in emergency conditions based on monitoring patterns was presented. Five characteristics were suggested to evaluate emergency task management and communication: latent mistake resistibility, latent violation resistibility, thoroughness, communication, and assertiveness. Case study was done by analyzing emergency training of 9 different real operation teams in the reference plant. The result showed that the 9 teams had their own emergency task management skills which resulted in good and bad performances

  3. Preparedness of Operation Teams' Non-technical Skills in a Main Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants to Manage Emergency Situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Human reliability is one of the important determinants for the system safety. Nuclear Energy Agency reported that approximately half of events reported by foreign nuclear industry were related with inappropriate human actions. The human error problems can be viewed in two ways: the person approach and the system approach. Other terms to represent each approach are active failures and latent conditions. Active failures are unsafe acts committed by people who are in direct contact with systems whereas latent conditions are the inevitable 'resident pathogens' within the system. To identify what kinds of non-technical skills were needed to cope with emergency conditions, a method to evaluate preparedness of task management in emergency conditions based on monitoring patterns was presented. Five characteristics were suggested to evaluate emergency task management and communication: latent mistake resistibility, latent violation resistibility, thoroughness, communication, and assertiveness. Case study was done by analyzing emergency training of 9 different real operation teams in the reference plant. The result showed that the 9 teams had their own emergency task management skills which resulted in good and bad performances

  4. Development of a quantitative evaluation method for non-technical skills preparedness of operation teams in nuclear power plants to deal with emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We selected important non-technical skills for emergency conditions in NPPs. ► We proposed an evaluation method for the selected non-technical skills. ► We conducted two sets of training, 9 experiments each, with real plant operators. ► Teams showed consistent non-technical skills preparedness with changing scenarios. ► Non-technical skills preparedness gives plausible explanations why teams fail tasks. -- Abstract: Many statistical results from safety reports tell that human related errors are the dominant influencing factor on the safe operation of power plants. Fortunately, training operators for the technical and non-technical skills can prevent many types of human errors. In this study, four important non-technical skills in safety critical industries – medical, aviation, and nuclear – were selected to describe behaviors of operation teams in emergency conditions of nuclear power plants (NPPs): communication, leadership, situation awareness, and decision-making skills. Also, preparedness of the non-technical skills was defined, and a quantification method of those skills called NoT-SkiP (Non-Technical Skills Preparedness) was developed to represent ‘how well operation teams are prepared to deal with emergency conditions’ in the non-technical skills aspect by analyzing monitoring-control patterns and a verbal protocol. Two case studies were conducted to validate the method. The first case was applied to Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) training. Independent variables were scenario, training repetition, and members. Relative values of the NoT-SkiP showed a consistent trend with changing scenarios. However, when training was repeated with the same scenario, NoT-SkiP values of some team were changed. It was supposed that leaders of some teams exerted their knowledge acquired from the previous training and gave up thoroughness of using procedures. When members especially who play a dominant role

  5. Development of a quantitative evaluation method for non-technical skills preparedness of operation teams in nuclear power plants to deal with emergency conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Poong Hyun, E-mail: phseong@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► We selected important non-technical skills for emergency conditions in NPPs. ► We proposed an evaluation method for the selected non-technical skills. ► We conducted two sets of training, 9 experiments each, with real plant operators. ► Teams showed consistent non-technical skills preparedness with changing scenarios. ► Non-technical skills preparedness gives plausible explanations why teams fail tasks. -- Abstract: Many statistical results from safety reports tell that human related errors are the dominant influencing factor on the safe operation of power plants. Fortunately, training operators for the technical and non-technical skills can prevent many types of human errors. In this study, four important non-technical skills in safety critical industries – medical, aviation, and nuclear – were selected to describe behaviors of operation teams in emergency conditions of nuclear power plants (NPPs): communication, leadership, situation awareness, and decision-making skills. Also, preparedness of the non-technical skills was defined, and a quantification method of those skills called NoT-SkiP (Non-Technical Skills Preparedness) was developed to represent ‘how well operation teams are prepared to deal with emergency conditions’ in the non-technical skills aspect by analyzing monitoring-control patterns and a verbal protocol. Two case studies were conducted to validate the method. The first case was applied to Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) training. Independent variables were scenario, training repetition, and members. Relative values of the NoT-SkiP showed a consistent trend with changing scenarios. However, when training was repeated with the same scenario, NoT-SkiP values of some team were changed. It was supposed that leaders of some teams exerted their knowledge acquired from the previous training and gave up thoroughness of using procedures. When members especially who play a dominant role

  6. Team Leader Structuring for Team Effectiveness and Team Learning in Command-and-Control Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Haar, Selma; Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke; Euwe, Eline; Segers, Mien

    2017-01-01

    Due to their crucial and highly consequential task, it is of utmost importance to understand the levers leading to effectiveness of multidisciplinary emergency management command-and-control (EMCC) teams. We argue that the formal EMCC team leader needs to initiate structure in the team meetings to support organizing the work as well as facilitate team learning, especially the team learning process of constructive conflict. In a sample of 17 EMCC teams performing a realistic EMCC exercise, including one or two team meetings (28 in sum), we coded the team leader’s verbal structuring behaviors (1,704 events), rated constructive conflict by external experts, and rated team effectiveness by field experts. Results show that leaders of effective teams use structuring behaviors more often (except asking procedural questions) but decreasingly over time. They support constructive conflict by clarifying and by making summaries that conclude in a command or decision in a decreasing frequency over time. PMID:28490856

  7. Team Leader Structuring for Team Effectiveness and Team Learning in Command-and-Control Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Haar, Selma; Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke; Euwe, Eline; Segers, Mien

    2017-04-01

    Due to their crucial and highly consequential task, it is of utmost importance to understand the levers leading to effectiveness of multidisciplinary emergency management command-and-control (EMCC) teams. We argue that the formal EMCC team leader needs to initiate structure in the team meetings to support organizing the work as well as facilitate team learning, especially the team learning process of constructive conflict. In a sample of 17 EMCC teams performing a realistic EMCC exercise, including one or two team meetings (28 in sum), we coded the team leader's verbal structuring behaviors (1,704 events), rated constructive conflict by external experts, and rated team effectiveness by field experts. Results show that leaders of effective teams use structuring behaviors more often (except asking procedural questions) but decreasingly over time. They support constructive conflict by clarifying and by making summaries that conclude in a command or decision in a decreasing frequency over time.

  8. Emergency Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Calendar Search Contacts Resources » Emergency Communication Emergency Communication Stay informed of emergencies, weather delays, closures, other alerts. Find links to

  9. An Examination of Cultural Influences on Team Cognition and Information Sharing in Emergency Crisis Management Domains: A Mixed Methodological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, Tristan Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The consequence for better understanding and facilitating teamwork during crisis and disaster response in the coming years is significant. It becomes clear that environmental and situational complexity requires a reliance on teams to carry out response efforts. Crises, regardless of the type of event, require complex decision-making and planning…

  10. Prof. Samuel ting presents results from AMS experiment at CERN main auditorium. Geneva 3 April 2013. The international team running the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS1) today announced the first results in its search for dark matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    Geneva 3 April 2013. The international team running the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) today announced the first results in its search for dark matter. The results, presented by AMS spokesperson Professor Samuel Ting in a seminar at CERN, are to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters. They report the observation of an excess of positrons in the cosmic ray flux

  11. Surveillance Tools Emerging From Search Engines and Social Media Data for Determining Eye Disease Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiner, Michael S; Lietman, Thomas M; McLeod, Stephen D; Chodosh, James; Porco, Travis C

    2016-09-01

    Internet-based search engine and social media data may provide a novel complementary source for better understanding the epidemiologic factors of infectious eye diseases, which could better inform eye health care and disease prevention. To assess whether data from internet-based social media and search engines are associated with objective clinic-based diagnoses of conjunctivitis. Data from encounters of 4143 patients diagnosed with conjunctivitis from June 3, 2012, to April 26, 2014, at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center, were analyzed using Spearman rank correlation of each weekly observation to compare demographics and seasonality of nonallergic conjunctivitis with allergic conjunctivitis. Data for patient encounters with diagnoses for glaucoma and influenza were also obtained for the same period and compared with conjunctivitis. Temporal patterns of Twitter and Google web search data, geolocated to the United States and associated with these clinical diagnoses, were compared with the clinical encounters. The a priori hypothesis was that weekly internet-based searches and social media posts about conjunctivitis may reflect the true weekly clinical occurrence of conjunctivitis. Weekly total clinical diagnoses at UCSF of nonallergic conjunctivitis, allergic conjunctivitis, glaucoma, and influenza were compared using Spearman rank correlation with equivalent weekly data on Tweets related to disease or disease-related keyword searches obtained from Google Trends. Seasonality of clinical diagnoses of nonallergic conjunctivitis among the 4143 patients (2364 females [57.1%] and 1776 males [42.9%]) with 5816 conjunctivitis encounters at UCSF correlated strongly with results of Google searches in the United States for the term pink eye (ρ, 0.68 [95% CI, 0.52 to 0.78]; P < .001) and correlated moderately with Twitter results about pink eye (ρ, 0.38 [95% CI, 0.16 to 0.56]; P < .001) and with clinical diagnosis of influenza (ρ, 0

  12. High-reliability emergency response teams in the hospital: improving quality and safety using in situ simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Derek S; Geis, Gary; Mack, Elizabeth H; LeMaster, Tom; Patterson, Mary D

    2013-06-01

    In situ simulation training is a team-based training technique conducted on actual patient care units using equipment and resources from that unit, and involving actual members of the healthcare team. We describe our experience with in situ simulation training in a major children's medical centre. In situ simulations were conducted using standardised scenarios approximately twice per month on inpatient hospital units on a rotating basis. Simulations were scheduled so that each unit participated in at least two in situ simulations per year. Simulations were conducted on a revolving schedule alternating on the day and night shifts and were unannounced. Scenarios were preselected to maximise the educational experience, and frequently involved clinical deterioration to cardiopulmonary arrest. We performed 64 of the scheduled 112 (57%) in situ simulations on all shifts and all units over 21 months. We identified 134 latent safety threats and knowledge gaps during these in situ simulations, which we categorised as medication, equipment, and/or resource/system threats. Identification of these errors resulted in modification of systems to reduce the risk of error. In situ simulations also provided a method to reinforce teamwork behaviours, such as the use of assertive statements, role clarity, performance of frequent updating, development of a shared mental model, performance of independent double checks of high-risk medicines, and overcoming authority gradients between team members. Participants stated that the training programme was effective and did not disrupt patient care. In situ simulations can identify latent safety threats, identify knowledge gaps, and reinforce teamwork behaviours when used as part of an organisation-wide safety programme.

  13. Life-Cycle Assessment of Prototype Unit of Emergency Housing. The search for the zero impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Ros García

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Prototype Unit of Emergency Housing (PUEH is the result of the Applied Research Project VEM (Military Emergency Housing developed in collaboration with Escuela Politécnica Superior (Universidad CEU and the company Air-bus Defense & Space. It is designed as a modular and industrialized unit of basic habitability, with programmed and expandable growth, designed to provide shelter and protection in environments of humanitarian crises or contingencies of social vulnerability in order to ensure sustainable habitat for emergencies.The influence of the construction processes and materials involved in the manufacture of this PUEH have on the environment, analyzed using the methodology of life-cycle assessment (LCA, considered especially critical recycling the mate-rials used. Thus, in order to reduce the environmental impact environmental, each of the component parts of the developed prototype unit are quantified, evaluating the benefits resulting from the methodology DfMA (Design for Manufacturing and Assembly.

  14. Emergence of an optimal search strategy from a simple random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiyama, Tomoko; Gunji, Yukio-Pegio

    2013-09-06

    In reports addressing animal foraging strategies, it has been stated that Lévy-like algorithms represent an optimal search strategy in an unknown environment, because of their super-diffusion properties and power-law-distributed step lengths. Here, starting with a simple random walk algorithm, which offers the agent a randomly determined direction at each time step with a fixed move length, we investigated how flexible exploration is achieved if an agent alters its randomly determined next step forward and the rule that controls its random movement based on its own directional moving experiences. We showed that our algorithm led to an effective food-searching performance compared with a simple random walk algorithm and exhibited super-diffusion properties, despite the uniform step lengths. Moreover, our algorithm exhibited a power-law distribution independent of uniform step lengths.

  15. PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS INVOLVED IN THE SERVICE OF THE EMERGENCY PATIENT VICTIM OF VIOLENCE:REPRESENTATIONS OF NURSING TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mara Melo Tavares

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Este estudo visa analisar as representações da equipe de enfermagem sobre os aspectos psicossociais envolvidos no atendimento de emergência ao paciente vítima de violência. Método: Trata-se de uma pesquisa de campo realizada com a equipe de enfermagem de uma emergência de um hospital público do Rio de Janeiro, estando baseada no Discurso do Sujeito Coletivo. Resultados: Os aspectos psicossociais emergentes do discurso dos enfermeiros sobre o atendimento de emergência ao paciente vítima de violência foram: agilidade para manutenção da vida, incômodo pela forma como a equipe de enfermagem é tratada pelo paciente e/ou acompanhantes e preocupação com a própria segurança. Conclusão: As emoções presentes nas equipes de enfermagem que atuam com pacientes vítimas de violência são silenciadas, banalizadas e muitas vezes justificada pelo ritmo acelerado de trabalho próprio do setor de emergência. Inexistem políticas institucionais ou atitudes administrativas propiciadoras de um ambiente sócio-emocional seguro para o trabalho de enfermagem. Descritores: Enfermagem em emergência, Violência, Saúde ocupacional.

  16. Crisis Resource Management in the Delivery Room: Development of Behavioral Markers for Team Performance in Emergency Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracco, Fabrizio; de Tonetti, Gabriele; Masini, Michele; Passarelli, Marcello; Geretto, Francesca; Celleno, Danilo

    2018-03-03

    Human factors are the most relevant issues contributing to adverse events in obstetrics. Specific training of Crisis Resource Management (CRM) skills (i.e., problem solving and team management, resource allocation, awareness of environment, and dynamic decision-making) is now widespread and is often based on High Fidelity Simulation. In order to be used as a guideline in simulated scenarios, CRM skills need to be mapped to specific and observable behavioral markers. For this purpose, we developed a set of observable behaviors related to the main elements of CRM in the delivery room. The observational tool was then adopted in a two-days seminar on obstetric hemorrhage where teams working in obstetric wards of six Italian hospitals took part in simulations. The tool was used as a guide for the debriefing and as a peer-to-peer feedback. It was then rated for its usefulness in facilitating the reflection upon one's own behavior, its ease of use, and its usefulness for the peer-to-peer feedback. The ratings were positive, with a median of 4 on a 5-point scale. The CRM observational tool has therefore been well-received and presents a promising level of inter-rater agreement. We believe the tool could have value in facilitating debriefing and in the peer-to-peer feedback.

  17. Crisis Resource Management in the Delivery Room: Development of Behavioral Markers for Team Performance in Emergency Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Bracco

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Human factors are the most relevant issues contributing to adverse events in obstetrics. Specific training of Crisis Resource Management (CRM skills (i.e., problem solving and team management, resource allocation, awareness of environment, and dynamic decision-making is now widespread and is often based on High Fidelity Simulation. In order to be used as a guideline in simulated scenarios, CRM skills need to be mapped to specific and observable behavioral markers. For this purpose, we developed a set of observable behaviors related to the main elements of CRM in the delivery room. The observational tool was then adopted in a two-days seminar on obstetric hemorrhage where teams working in obstetric wards of six Italian hospitals took part in simulations. The tool was used as a guide for the debriefing and as a peer-to-peer feedback. It was then rated for its usefulness in facilitating the reflection upon one’s own behavior, its ease of use, and its usefulness for the peer-to-peer feedback. The ratings were positive, with a median of 4 on a 5-point scale. The CRM observational tool has therefore been well-received and presents a promising level of inter-rater agreement. We believe the tool could have value in facilitating debriefing and in the peer-to-peer feedback.

  18. Modeling and simulation for training and support of emergency management teams:the development of CrisisKit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafstal, A.M.; Post, W.

    2002-01-01

    Emergency management (EM), the decision making involved in directing the relief operation after a disaster or otherwise catastrophic accident is an issue of great public and private concern because of the high stakes involved. It is important to consider what can be done to optimize training and

  19. Physiological effects of stress related to helicopter travel in Federal Emergency Management Agency search-and-rescue canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, E; Gulson, N; Liu Cross, T-W; Swanson, K S

    2017-01-01

    Working canines are deployed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), as part of a National Disaster Response Plan. Stress associated with helicopter flight and the resulting physical effects on the dog are unknown. Our objective was to test the hypotheses that (1) helicopter travel affects the physiology and faecal microbiota of working canines, but that (2) physiological consequences of helicopter travel will not negatively affect their work performance. A total of nine FEMA canines were loaded onto helicopters and flown for 30 min in July 2015. Rectal temperature, behavioural stress indicators and saliva swabs (for cortisol) were collected at baseline, loading, mid-flight and post-flight. After flight, canines completed a standardised search exercise to monitor work performance. Faecal samples were collected for microbial DNA extraction and Illumina sequencing. All canines were on a standardised diet (CANIDAE ® Grain Free PURE Land ® ) for 3 weeks prior to the study. Visible indicators of stress were observed at loading and at mid-flight and corresponded with an increase ( P  travel did not affect search performance ( P  > 0·05). We found that α- and β-diversity measures of faecal microbiota were not affected ( P  > 0·05). Our data suggest that although helicopter travel may cause physiological changes that have been associated with stress in working dogs, it does not make an impact on their search performance or the stability of faecal microbiota.

  20. Analysis of Search Results for the Clarification and Identification of Technology Emergence (AR-CITE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    This work examines a scientometric model that clarifies and identifies the technology of emergence from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries(via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. The purpose of this study therefore, is to address the relationships among multiple disparate sources of information as a way to explain systematically the emergence of new technologies from innovation on through to commercial application. In one example, we investigate the combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) as they are assembled to become one collective network (a data set for analysis of relations). In another example, we investigate the combinations of five distinct sources (i.e., university R&D, industry R&D, product emergence, and two levels of annual market revenue [$1B and $10B]). These established networks and relationship become the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for multiple example subject domains we investigated.

  1. Are real teams healthy teams?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buljac, M.; van Woerkom, M.; van Wijngaarden, P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the impact of real-team--as opposed to a team in name only--characteristics (i.e., team boundaries, stability of membership, and task interdependence) on team processes (i.e., team learning and emotional support) and team effectiveness in the long-term care sector. We employed a

  2. Impact of an ABCDE team triage process combined with public guidance on the division of work in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantonen, Jarmo; Lloyd, Robert; Mattila, Juho; Kauppila, Timo; Menezes, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    To study the effects of applying an emergency department (ED) triage system, combined with extensive publicity in local media about the "right" use of emergency services, on the division of work between ED nurses and general practitioners (GPs). An observational and quasi-experimental study based on before-after comparisons. Implementation of the ABCDE triage system in a Finnish combined ED where secondary care is adjacent, and in a traditional primary care ED where secondary care is located elsewhere. GPs and nurses from two different primary care EDs. Numbers of monthly visits to different professional groups before and after intervention in the studied primary care EDs and numbers of monthly visits to doctors in the local secondary care ED. The beginning of the triage process increased temporarily the number of independent consultations and patient record entries by ED nurses in both types of studied primary care EDs and reduced the number of patient visits to a doctor compared with previous years but had no effect on doctor visits in the adjacent secondary care ED. No further decrease in the number of nurse or GP visits was observed by inhibiting the entrance of non-urgent patients. The ABCDE triage system combined with public guidance may reduce non-urgent patient visits to doctors in different kinds of primary care EDs without increasing visits in the secondary care ED. However, the additional work to implement the ABCDE system is mainly directed to nurses, which may pose a challenge for staffing.

  3. Measuring movement towards improved emergency obstetric care in rural Kenya with implementation of the PRONTO simulation and team training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, Julia C; Kamau, Stephen; Calkins, Kimberly; Cohen, Susanna R; Cranmer, John; Kibore, Minnie; Gachuno, Onesmus; Walker, Dilys

    2018-02-01

    As the proportion of facility-based births increases, so does the need to ensure that mothers and their newborns receive quality care. Developing facility-oriented obstetric and neonatal training programs grounded in principles of teamwork utilizing simulation-based training for emergency response is an important strategy for improving the quality care. This study uses 3 dimensions of the Kirkpatrick Model to measure the impact of PRONTO International (PRONTO) simulation-based training as part of the Linda Afya ya Mama na Mtoto (LAMMP, Protect the Health of mother and child) in Kenya. Changes in knowledge of obstetric and neonatal emergency response, self-efficacy, and teamwork were analyzed using longitudinal, fixed-effects, linear regression models. Participants from 26 facilities participated in the training between 2013 and 2014. The results demonstrate improvements in knowledge, self-efficacy, and teamwork self-assessment. When comparing pre-Module I scores with post-training scores, improvements range from 9 to 24 percentage points (p values strategic goals was high: 95.8% of the 192 strategic goals. Participants rated the PRONTO intervention as extremely useful, with an overall score of 1.4 out of 5 (1, extremely useful; 5, not at all useful). Evaluation of how these improvements affect maternal and perinatal clinical outcomes is forthcoming. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Analysis of search and rescue emergency evaluation in ship accidents in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arleiny

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives og this research is to describe the factors causing ship accident in Indonesia and know the effectiveness of SAR emergency in ship accident in Indonesia. The research method used in this research is qualitative research. Techniques Collection of literature study data and documents. Data validity method using triangulation. Data analysis uses interactive data analysis. The conclusions of this study are Factors that cause the occurrence of ship accidents in Indonesia, among others, the resources of the crew, the eligibility of ships, supporting facilities for shipping, operators, lack of supervision of apparatus, service users and other factors. The high number of ship accidents in Indonesia shows the ineffective implementation of SAR in ship accident in Indonesia.

  5. Improving the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation by training dedicated cardiac arrest teams incorporating a mechanical load-distributing device at the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Quah, Joy Li Juan; Annathurai, Annitha; Noor, Noorkiah Mohamed; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Tan, Kenneth Boon Kiat; Pothiawala, Sohil; Poh, Ah Ho; Loy, Chye Khiaw; Fook-Chong, Stephanie

    2013-04-01

    Determine if implementing cardiac arrest teams trained with a 'pit-crew' protocol incorporating a load-distributing band mechanical CPR device (Autopulse™ ZOLL) improves the quality of CPR, as determined by no-flow ratio (NFR) in the first 10min of resuscitation. A phased, prospective, non-randomized, before-after cohort evaluation. Data collection was from April 2008 to February 2011. There were 100 before and 148 after cases. Continuous video and chest compression data of all study subjects were analyzed. All non-traumatic, collapsed patients aged 18 years and above presenting to the emergency department were eligible. Primary outcome was NFR. Secondary outcomes were return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to hospital admission and neurological outcome at discharge. After implementation, mean total NFR for the first 5min decreased from 0.42 to 0.27 (decrease=0.15, 95% CI 0.10-0.19, pCPR ratio increased from 46.4% to 88.4% (increase=41.9%, 95% CI 36.9-46.9, pTraining cardiac arrest teams in a 'pit-crew' protocol may improve the quality of CPR at the ED. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Regular in-situ simulation training of paediatric Medical Emergency Team leads to sustained improvements in hospital response to deteriorating patients, improved outcomes in intensive care and financial savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilen, Ulf; Fraser, Laura; Jones, Patricia; Leonard, Paul; Simpson, Dave

    2017-06-01

    The introduction of a paediatric Medical Emergency Team (pMET) was accompanied by weekly in-situ simulation team training. Key ward staff participated in team training, focusing on recognition of the deteriorating child, teamwork and early involvement of senior staff. Following an earlier study [1], this investigation aimed to evaluate the long-term impact of ongoing regular team training on hospital response to deteriorating ward patients, patient outcome and financial implications. Prospective cohort study of all deteriorating in-patients in a tertiary paediatric hospital requiring admission to paediatric intensive care (PICU) the year before, 1year after and 3 years after the introduction of pMET and team training. Deteriorating patients were recognised more promptly (before/1year after/3years after pMET; median time 4/1.5/0.5h, pIntroduction of pMET coincided with significantly reduced hospital mortality (p<0.001). These results indicate that lessons learnt by ward staff during team training led to sustained improvements in the hospital response to critically deteriorating in-patients, significantly improved patient outcomes and substantial savings. Integration of regular in-situ simulation training of medical emergency teams, including key ward staff, in routine clinical care has potential application in all acute specialties. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Team dynamics within quality improvement teams: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Paula; Lising, Dean; Sinclair, Lynne; Baker, G Ross

    2018-03-31

    This scoping review examines what is known about the processes of quality improvement (QI) teams, particularly related to how teams impact outcomes. The aim is to provide research-informed guidance for QI leaders and to inform future research questions. Databases searched included: MedLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science and SCOPUS. Eligible publications were written in English, published between 1999 and 2016. Articles were included in the review if they examined processes of the QI team, were related to healthcare QI and were primary research studies. Studies were excluded if they had insufficient detail regarding QI team processes. Descriptive detail extracted included: authors, geographical region and health sector. The Integrated (Health Care) Team Effectiveness Model was used to synthesize findings of studies along domains of team effectiveness: task design, team process, psychosocial traits and organizational context. Over two stages of searching, 4813 citations were reviewed. Of those, 48 full-text articles are included in the synthesis. This review demonstrates that QI teams are not immune from dysfunction. Further, a dysfunctional QI team is not likely to influence practice. However, a functional QI team alone is unlikely to create change. A positive QI team dynamic may be a necessary but insufficient condition for implementing QI strategies. Areas for further research include: interactions between QI teams and clinical microsystems, understanding the role of interprofessional representation on QI teams and exploring interactions between QI team task, composition and process.

  8. Management Teams

    CERN Document Server

    Belbin, R Meredith Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Meredith Belbin's work on teams has become part of everyday language in organizations all over the world. All kinds of teams and team behaviours are covered. At the end of the book is a self-perception inventory so that readers can match their own personalities to particular team roles. Management Teams is required reading for managers concerned with achieving results by getting the best from their key personnel.

  9. Search and Tracking of an Unknown Number of Targets by a Team of Autonomous Agents Utilizing Time-evolving Partition Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Jared Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The advancement of computing technology has enabled the practical development of intelligent autonomous systems. Intelligent autonomous systems can be used to perform difficult sensing tasks. One such sensing task is to search for and track targets over large geographic areas. Searching for and tracking targets over geographic areas has important applications. These applications include search and rescue, boarder patrol, and reconnaissance. Inherent in applications such as these is the need ...

  10. Integrating community children’s nursing in urgent and emergency care: a qualitative comparison of two teams in North West England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Richard G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the policy principle that “children are best cared for at home whenever possible” children continue to have high rates of emergency department (ED attendance and emergency hospital admission. Community Children’s Nursing Teams (CCNTs can care for acutely ill children at home but their potential to provide an alternative to ED attendance and hospitalisation depends on effective integration with other services in the urgent care system, such as EDs and Observation and Assessment Units (OAUs. Although challenges of integrating CCNTs have been identified, there has been no comparative assessment of the factors that facilitate or hinder integration of care of acutely ill children by CCNTs with the urgent care system. The aim of this study was to identify enablers and barriers to integration of CCNTs with urgent and emergency care. Methods Comparative case studies were conducted of two CCNTs serving Primary Care Trusts in North West England. Twenty-two health professionals including CCNT managers and staff; paediatricians; nurses; children’s ward, ED and OAU staff; commissioners of children’s services; GPs and primary care staff were interviewed between June 2009 and February 2010. Qualitative data were analysed thematically using the Framework approach. Results Barriers to integration included paediatricians’ perceived lack of ownership of the CCNT, poor communication between consultants and community children’s nurses (CCNs, and weak personal relationships. This prevented early referral to the CCNT as an alternative to hospital care. Enablers of integration included co-location and rotation of CCNs through urgent care settings including OAUs and EDs. This enabled nurses to develop skills, make decisions about referral to home care and gain the confidence of referring clinicians. Conclusions Integration of CCNTs at multiple points in the urgent care system is required in order to provide an alternative to

  11. Team Learning Ditinjau dari Team Diversity dan Team Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Pohan, Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani; Ancok, Djamaludin

    2010-01-01

    This research attempted to observe team learning from the level of team diversity and team efficacy of work teams. This research used an individual level of analysis rather than the group level. The team members measured the level of team diversity, team efficacy and team learning of the teams through three scales, namely team learning scale, team diversity scale, and team efficacy scale. Respondents in this research were the active team members in a company, PT. Alkindo Mitraraya. The total ...

  12. Team Learning Ditinjau dari Team Diversity dan Team Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani Pohan; Djamaludin Ancok

    2015-01-01

    This research attempted to observe team learning from the level of team diversity and team efficacy of work teams. This research used an individual level of analysis rather than the group level. The team members measured the level of team diversity, team efficacy and team learning of the teams through three scales, namely team learning scale, team diversity scale, and team efficacy scale. Respondents in this research were the active team members in a company, PT. Alkindo Mitraraya. The total ...

  13. Does the effect of one-day simulation team training in obstetric emergencies decline within one year? A post-hoc analysis of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, J.; Fransen, A F; Schuit, E.; van Runnard Heimel, P.J.; Mol, Ben W.; Oei, Swan G.

    2017-01-01

    Does the effect of one-day simulation team training in obstetric emergencies decline within one year? A post-hoc analysis of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial. J van de Ven, AF Fransen, E Schuit, PJ van Runnard Heimel, BW Mol, SG Oei Objective To investigate whether the effect of a

  14. Team Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Games. USA Hockey offers additional information and resources. Softball It's not easy to field full teams of ... an annual tournament sponsored by the National Wheelchair Softball Association , where thirty or so teams show up ...

  15. Building Productivity in Virtual Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Hamersly

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The steady increase in project failure rates is leaving businesses searching for better integration techniques to virtualize their project environments. Through virtualization, organizations may have positive impacts on communities across geographical boundaries and resource constraints. The focus of this phenomenological study was to explore, via the experiences of successful project management practitioners, best practice strategies for integrating virtual project teams through data analysis. The conceptual framework included von Bertalanffy’s general systems theory, decomposition model of business process and project management frameworks, and the recomposition approach. Twenty-two senior project managers with more than 5 years of experience managing virtual project environments participated in semistructured telephone interviews. The van Kaam process employing normalization and bracketing approaches in data analysis resulted in the emergence of 34 thematic categories. The 10 most common themes culminated in the identification of strategies relevant for virtual project teams. The major themes pertained to 3 broad areas: (a structure that accommodates skills and technology for virtual team success, (b governance leading to efficient virtual project team management, and (c collaboration practices across diverse environments. This study involved the exploration of the experiences of the participants. Using the van Kaam method for normalization of the data and clustering like experiences into thematic statements, the study provided a plethora of new information concentrated on 10 themes that emerged.

  16. Teaming up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warhuus, Jan; Günzel-Jensen, Franziska; Robinson, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    types of team formation: random teacher pre-assigned, student selection, and teacher directed diversity. In each of these modules, ethnographic methods (interviews and observations) were employed. Additionally, we had access to students learning logs, formative and summative assessments, and final exams...... functioning entrepreneurial student teams as most teams lack personal chemistry which makes them anchor their work too much in a pre-defined project. In contrast, we find that students that can form their own teams aim for less diverse teams than what is achieved by random assignment. However, the homophily......Questions we care about (Objectives): When students have to work on challenging tasks, as it is often the case in entrepreneurship classrooms that leverage experiential learning, team success becomes central to the students learning. Yet, the formation of teams is often left up to the students...

  17. Injuries and illnesses among Federal Emergency Management Agency-certified search-and-recovery and search-and-rescue dogs deployed to Oso, Washington, following the March 22, 2014, State Route 530 landslide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lori E

    2015-10-15

    To establish types and rates of injuries and illnesses among search-and-recovery and search-and-rescue dogs deployed to Oso, Wash, following the March 22, 2014, State Route 530 landslide. Medical records review and cross-sectional survey. 25 Federal Emergency Management Agency-certified search dogs. On-site medical records and postdeployment laboratory test results were reviewed and an electronic survey was distributed to handlers within 8 days after demobilization. Dogs worked a total of 244 search shifts totaling 2,015 hours. Injuries and illnesses were reported in 21 (84%) dogs. Wounds (abrasions, pad wear, paw pad splits, and lacerations) were the most common injury, with an incidence rate of 28.3 wounds/1,000 hours worked. Dehydration was the most common illness, with an incidence rate of 10.4 cases of dehydration/1,000 hours worked. Total incidence rate for all health events was 66.5 events/1,000 hours worked. Two search dogs were removed from search operations for 2 days because of health issues. All others continued search operations while receiving treatment for their medical issues. All health issues were resolved during the deployment or within 2 weeks after demobilization. Results revealed that search dogs deployed to the Oso, Wash, landslide incurred injuries and illnesses similar to those reported following other disasters (dehydration, wounding, vomiting, and diarrhea) but also incurred medical issues not previously documented (acute caudal myopathy, cutaneous mass ruptures, and fever). The reported medical issues were minor; however, prompt veterinary care helped prevent them from developing into more serious conditions.

  18. The Benefits of Team Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, Deena J.; Buckalew, Flora C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of team teaching focuses on librarians team teaching a course on information search strategy at the Pennsylvania State Berks Campus Library. Course requirements are described, planning for the course is discussed, grading practices are reviewed, and course and instructor evaluations are described. (two references) (LRW)

  19. Does the effect of one-day simulation team training in obstetric emergencies decline within one year? A post-hoc analysis of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, J; Fransen, A F; Schuit, E; van Runnard Heimel, P J; Mol, B W; Oei, S G

    2017-09-01

    Does the effect of one-day simulation team training in obstetric emergencies decline within one year? A post-hoc analysis of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial. J van de Ven, AF Fransen, E Schuit, PJ van Runnard Heimel, BW Mol, SG Oei OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the effect of a one-day simulation-based obstetric team training on patient outcome changes over time. Post-hoc analysis of a multicentre, open, randomised controlled trial that evaluated team training in obstetrics (TOSTI study).We studied women with a singleton pregnancy beyond 24 weeks of gestation in 24 obstetric units. Included obstetric units were randomised to either a one-day, multi-professional simulation-based team training focusing on crew resource management in a medical simulation centre (12 units) or to no team training (12 units). We assessed whether outcomes differed between both groups in each of the first four quarters following the team training and compared the effect of team training over quarters. Primary outcome was a composite outcome of low Apgar score, severe postpartum haemorrhage, trauma due to shoulder dystocia, eclampsia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. During a one year period after the team training the rate of obstetric complications, both on the composite level and the individual component level, did not differ between any of the quarters. For trauma due to shoulder dystocia team training led to a significant decrease in the first quarter (0.06% versus 0.26%, OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.98) but in the subsequent quarters no significant reductions were observed. Similar results were found for invasive treatment for severe postpartum haemorrhage where a significant increase was only seen in the first quarter (0.4% versus 0.03%, OR 19, 95% CI 2.5-147), and not thereafter. The beneficial effect of a one-day, simulation-based, multiprofessional, obstetric team training seems to decline after three months. If team training is further evaluated or

  20. A systematic review of team-building interventions in non-acute healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher J; Kim, Bo; Silverman, Allie; Bauer, Mark S

    2018-03-01

    Healthcare is increasingly delivered in a team-based format emphasizing interdisciplinary coordination. While recent reviews have investigated team-building interventions primarily in acute healthcare settings (e.g. emergency or surgery departments), we aimed to systematically review the evidence base for team-building interventions in non-acute settings (e.g. primary care or rehabilitation clinics). We conducted a systematic review in PubMed and Embase to identify team-building interventions, and conducted follow-up literature searches to identify articles describing empirical studies of those interventions. This process identified 14 team-building interventions for non-acute healthcare settings, and 25 manuscripts describing empirical studies of these interventions. We evaluated outcomes in four domains: trainee evaluations, teamwork attitudes/knowledge, team functioning, and patient impact. Trainee evaluations for team-building interventions were generally positive, but only one study associated team-building with statistically significant improvement in teamwork attitudes/knowledge. Similarly mixed results emerged for team functioning and patient impact. The evidence base for healthcare team-building interventions in non-acute healthcare settings is much less developed than the parallel literature for short-term team function in acute care settings. Only one intervention we identified has been tested in multiple non-acute settings by distinct research teams. Positive findings regarding the utility of team-building interventions are tempered by a lack of control conditions, inconsistency in outcome measures, and high probability of bias. Considering these results alongside the well-recognized costs of poor healthcare teamwork suggests that additional research is sorely needed to develop the evidence base for team-building in non-acute settings.

  1. Team Building e a enfermagem Team Building e enfermería Team Building and nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Homem

    2012-07-01

    : profundizar los conocimientos sobre Team Building, contextualizar el Team Building y reflexionar sobre su utilidad del Team Building en su contexto dentro de las prestaciones de atención de enfermería. De este modo, se realizaron búsquedas en la base de datos electrónica EBSCO, y se consultó la literatura relacionada con la psicología organizacional. Con esta investigación se concluyó que la estrategia de dinamización de equipo es útil aplicada a la enfermería, puede incluso mejorar la comunicación y las relaciones interpersonales, identificar fortalezas y debilidades de los equipos, proporcionar una mayor satisfacción en el trabajo y así, mejorar la calidad la atención sanitaria prestada.In this environment of growing dissatisfaction and unpredictability in nursing, it is increasingly important to motivate teams, giving them personal, relational, and communicative competencies and, above all, to build team working and thus improve productivity. Team Building emerges as an effective strategy to achieve positive results within organizations. Because it is a strategy not yet widely used in Portugal, we decided to look into the issue and reflect on its relevance and potential in nursing teams with the following objectives: to deepen knowledge about Team Building, to frame Team Building within the context of organizational theories, to describe different models of Team Building and to reflect on the usefulness of Team Building for the quality of nursing care. Articles were searched in EBSCO electronic databases, and organizational psychology literature was consulted. With this research, we conclude that Team Building applied to nursing can improve communication and interpersonal relationships, identify strengths and weaknesses of teams, provide greater job satisfaction and thus enhance the quality of health care provided.

  2. Teaming up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warhuus, Jan; Günzel-Jensen, Franziska; Robinson, Sarah

    or pre-arranged at random. Therefore we investigate the importance of team formation in the entrepreneurial classroom and ask: (i) What are the underlying factors that influence outcomes of teamwork in student groups? (ii) How does team formation influence student perception of learning?, and (iii) Do...... different team formation strategies produce different teamwork and learning outcomes? Approach: We employed a multiple case study design comprising of 38 student teams to uncover potential links between team formation and student perception of learning. This research draws on data from three different....... A rigorous coding and inductive analysis process was undertaken. Pattern and relationship coding were used to reveal underlying factors, which helped to unveil important similarities and differences between student in different teams’ project progress and perception of learning. Results: When students...

  3. [Potential for the survey of quality indicators based on a national emergency department registry : A systematic literature search].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörster, A C; Kulla, M; Brammen, D; Lefering, R

    2018-06-01

    Emergency department processes are often key for successful treatment. Therefore, collection of quality indicators is demanded. A basis for the collection is systematic, electronic documentation. The development of paper-based documentation into an electronic and interoperable national emergency registry is-besides the establishment of quality management for emergency departments-a target of the AKTIN project. The objective of this research is identification of internationally applied quality indicators. For the investigation of the current status of quality management in emergency departments based on quality indicators, a systematic literature search of the database PubMed, the Cochrane Library and the internet was performed. Of the 170 internationally applied quality indicators, 25 with at least two references are identified. A total of 10 quality indicators are ascertainable by the data set. An enlargement of the data set will enable the collection of seven further quality indicators. The implementation of data of care behind the emergency processes will provide eight additional quality indicators. This work was able to show that the potential of a national emergency registry for the establishment of quality indicators corresponds with the international systems taken into consideration and could provide a comparable collection of quality indicators.

  4. Faceted Search

    CERN Document Server

    Tunkelang, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We live in an information age that requires us, more than ever, to represent, access, and use information. Over the last several decades, we have developed a modern science and technology for information retrieval, relentlessly pursuing the vision of a "memex" that Vannevar Bush proposed in his seminal article, "As We May Think." Faceted search plays a key role in this program. Faceted search addresses weaknesses of conventional search approaches and has emerged as a foundation for interactive information retrieval. User studies demonstrate that faceted search provides more

  5. Virtual Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    Virtual work teams scattered around the globe are becoming a feature of corporate workplaces. Although most people prefer face-to-face meetings and interactions, reality often requires telecommuting. (JOW)

  6. Multidisciplinary team approach for the management of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Searching the evidence to guide the decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, In Jae; Ahn, Sung Ja

    2017-01-01

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) is composed of heterogeneous subgroups that require a multidisciplinary team approach in order to ensure optimal therapy for each patient. Since 2010, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network has recommended chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for bulky mediastinal disease and surgical combination for those patients with single-station N2 involvement who respond to neoadjuvant therapy. According to lung cancer tumor boards, thoracic surgeons make a decision on the resectability of the tumor, if it is determined to be unresectable, concurrent CRT (CCRT) is considered the next choice. However, the survival benefit of CCRT over sequential CRT or radiotherapy alone carries the risk of additional toxicity. Considering severe adverse events that may lead to death, fit patients who are able to tolerate CCRT must be identified by multidisciplinary tumor board. Decelerated approaches, such as sequential CRT or high-dose radiation alone may be a valuable alternative for patients who are not eligible for CCRT. As a new treatment strategy, investigators are interested in the application of the innovative radiation techniques, trimodality therapy combining surgery after high-dose definitive CCRT, and the combination of radiation with targeted or immunotherapy agents. The updated results and on-going studies are thoroughly reviewed in this article

  7. Multidisciplinary team approach for the management of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Searching the evidence to guide the decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, In Jae; Ahn, Sung Ja [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) is composed of heterogeneous subgroups that require a multidisciplinary team approach in order to ensure optimal therapy for each patient. Since 2010, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network has recommended chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for bulky mediastinal disease and surgical combination for those patients with single-station N2 involvement who respond to neoadjuvant therapy. According to lung cancer tumor boards, thoracic surgeons make a decision on the resectability of the tumor, if it is determined to be unresectable, concurrent CRT (CCRT) is considered the next choice. However, the survival benefit of CCRT over sequential CRT or radiotherapy alone carries the risk of additional toxicity. Considering severe adverse events that may lead to death, fit patients who are able to tolerate CCRT must be identified by multidisciplinary tumor board. Decelerated approaches, such as sequential CRT or high-dose radiation alone may be a valuable alternative for patients who are not eligible for CCRT. As a new treatment strategy, investigators are interested in the application of the innovative radiation techniques, trimodality therapy combining surgery after high-dose definitive CCRT, and the combination of radiation with targeted or immunotherapy agents. The updated results and on-going studies are thoroughly reviewed in this article.

  8. Emergency department case management: the dyad team of nurse case manager and social worker improve discharge planning and patient and staff satisfaction while decreasing inappropriate admissions and costs: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Darlene P; Herrick, Charlotte A

    2002-01-01

    A model of emergency department (ED) case management consisting of a social worker and a nurse case manager can prevent inappropriate admissions, improve discharge planning, decrease cost, and enhance patient satisfaction. The individual and combined roles of the dyad team of social worker and nurse case manager are discussed. A literature review includes how a case management dyad team of social worker and nurse case manager in the ED can decrease utilization of the ED for nonemergent visits, promote the use of community resources, and improve discharge planning to avoid excessive costs. The importance of the dyad team working with the interdisciplinary team in the ED, the primary care physician (PCP), and other community health care providers in order to provide a holistic approach to care is addressed. A discussion about the improvement of both patient and staff satisfaction demonstrates the results of case management strategies that support and advocate for patients to receive quality, cost-effective care across the health care continuum, while decreasing the use of the ED for nonemergent care.

  9. The patient safety culture as perceived by staff at two different emergency departments before and after introducing a flow-oriented working model with team triage and lean principles: a repeated cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Lena; Letterstål, Anna; Engström, Marie-Louise; Berglund, Anders; Enlund, Mats

    2014-07-09

    Patient safety is of the utmost importance in health care. The patient safety culture in an institution has great impact on patient safety. To enhance patient safety and to design strategies to reduce medical injuries, there is a current focus on measuring the patient safety culture. The aim of the present study was to describe the patient safety culture in an ED at two different hospitals before and after a Quality improvement (QI) project that was aimed to enhance patient safety. A repeated cross-sectional design, using the Hospital Survey On Patient Safety Culture questionnaire before and after a quality improvement project in two emergency departments at a county hospital and a university hospital. The questionnaire was developed to obtain a better understanding of the patient safety culture of an entire hospital or of specific departments. The Swedish version has 51 questions and 15 dimensions. At the county hospital, a difference between baseline and follow-up was observed in three dimensions. For two of these dimensions, Team-work within hospital and Communication openness, a higher score was measured at the follow-up. At the university hospital, a higher score was measured at follow-up for the two dimensions Team-work across hospital units and Team-work within hospital. The result showed changes in the self-estimated patient safety culture, mainly regarding team-work and communication openness. Most of the improvements at follow-up were seen by physicians, and mainly at the county hospital.

  10. In search of the next memory inside the circuitry from the oldest to the emerging non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Campardo, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    This book provides students and practicing chip designers with an easy-to-follow yet thorough, introductory treatment of the most promising emerging memories under development in the industry. Focusing on the chip designer rather than the end user, this book offers expanded, up-to-date coverage of emerging memories circuit design. After an introduction on the old solid-state memories and the fundamental limitations soon to be encountered, the working principle and main technology issues of each of the considered technologies (PCRAM, MRAM, FeRAM, ReRAM) are reviewed and a range of topics related to design is explored: the array organization, sensing and writing circuitry, programming algorithms and error correction techniques are reviewed comparing the approach followed and the constraints for each of the technologies considered. Finally the issue of radiation effects on memory devices has been briefly treated. Additionally some considerations are entertained about how emerging memories can find a place in the...

  11. Geospatial Information Response Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Emitt C.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme emergency events of national significance that include manmade and natural disasters seem to have become more frequent during the past two decades. The Nation is becoming more resilient to these emergencies through better preparedness, reduced duplication, and establishing better communications so every response and recovery effort saves lives and mitigates the long-term social and economic impacts on the Nation. The National Response Framework (NRF) (http://www.fema.gov/NRF) was developed to provide the guiding principles that enable all response partners to prepare for and provide a unified national response to disasters and emergencies. The NRF provides five key principles for better preparation, coordination, and response: 1) engaged partnerships, 2) a tiered response, 3) scalable, flexible, and adaptable operations, 4) unity of effort, and 5) readiness to act. The NRF also describes how communities, tribes, States, Federal Government, privatesector, and non-governmental partners apply these principles for a coordinated, effective national response. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has adopted the NRF doctrine by establishing several earth-sciences, discipline-level teams to ensure that USGS science, data, and individual expertise are readily available during emergencies. The Geospatial Information Response Team (GIRT) is one of these teams. The USGS established the GIRT to facilitate the effective collection, storage, and dissemination of geospatial data information and products during an emergency. The GIRT ensures that timely geospatial data are available for use by emergency responders, land and resource managers, and for scientific analysis. In an emergency and response capacity, the GIRT is responsible for establishing procedures for geospatial data acquisition, processing, and archiving; discovery, access, and delivery of data; anticipating geospatial needs; and providing coordinated products and services utilizing the USGS' exceptional pool of

  12. Role Allocation and Team Structure in Command and Control Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    organizational psychology and management sciences literature show concepts such as empowered self-management and self-regulating work teams (see Cooney, 2004...tankers (FT), search units (S) and rescue units (R). Each unit is represented on the map by a numbered icon. Each type of unit is colour -coded and...Understanding team adaptation: A conceptual analysis and model. Journal of Applied Psychology , 91, 1189-1207. Cannon-Bowers, J. A., Tannenbaum

  13. Searching for dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Three teams of astronomers believe they have independently found evidence for dark matter in our galaxy. A brief history of the search for dark matter is presented. The use of microlensing-event observation for spotting dark matter is described. The equipment required to observe microlensing events and three groups working on dark matter detection are discussed. The three groups are the Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHO) Project team, the Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres (EROS) team, and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) team. The first apparent detections of microlensing events by the three teams are briefly reported.

  14. Formal modelling of processes and tasks to support use and search of geo-information in emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlatanova, S.

    2010-01-01

    Many Command& Control or Early warning systems have been developed providing access to large amounts of data (and metadata) via geo-portals, or by accessing predefined data sets relaying on Spatial Data Infrastructure. However, the users involved in emergency response are usually not geoinformation

  15. Emergency care in case of acute psychotic and/or manic symptoms: Lived experiences of patients and their families with the first interventions of a mobile crisis team. A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggenvoorde, Thea H; Gijsman, Harm J; Goossens, Peter J J

    2017-09-27

    To explore the lived experiences of patients with a psychotic or bipolar disorder and their families with emergency care during the first contact with a mobile crisis team. Open individual interviews were held with ten patients and ten family members. Content data-analysis was conducted. Communication and cooperation was difficult in several cases. Personal crisis plans were not always used. Stigma was felt, especially when police-assistance was needed. A calm, understanding attitude was appreciated. Focus explicitly on communication with the patient, despite the acute condition, enhances the chance of cooperation. Taking time for contact is important. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory…

  17. DIFFERENT DIMENSIONS OF TEAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Goparaju Purna SUDHAKAR

    2013-01-01

    Popularity of teams is growing in 21st Century. Organizations are getting their work done through different types of teams. Teams have proved that the collective performance is more than the sum of the individual performances. Thus, the teams have got different dimensions such as quantitative dimensions and qualitative dimensions. The Quantitative dimensions of teams such as team performance, team productivity, team innovation, team effectiveness, team efficiency, team decision making and tea...

  18. TEAM ORGANISERING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levisen, Vinie; Haugaard, Lena

    2004-01-01

    organisation som denne? Når teams i samtiden anses for at være en organisationsform, der fremmer organisatorisk læring, beror det på, at teamet antages at udgøre et ikke-hierarkisk arbejdsfællesskab, hvor erfaringer udveksles og problemer løses. Teamorganisering kan imidlertid udformes på mange forskellige...

  19. Multidisciplinary team care in rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, A.-M.; Nielsen, C.V.; Rasmussen, J.O.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically investigate current scientific evidence about the effectiveness of multidisciplinary team rehabilitation for different health problems. Data sources: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in Cochrane, Medline, DARE, Embase, and Cinahl databases, and research...... for adults, without restrictions in terms of study population or outcomes. The most recent reviews examining a study population were selected. Data extraction: Two reviewers independently extracted information about study populations, sample sizes, study designs, rehabilitation settings, the team...

  20. Career Concerns in Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Auriol, Emmanuelle; Friebel, Guido; Pechlivanos, Lambros

    2002-01-01

    We investigate how changes in the commitment power of a principal affect cooperation among agents who work in a team. When the principal and her agents are symmetrically uncertain about the agents' innate abilities, workers have career concerns. Then, unless the principal can commit herself to long-term wage contracts, an implicit sabotage incentive emerges. Agents become reluctant to help their teammates. Anticipating this risk, and in order to induce the desired level of cooperation, the pr...

  1. Searching for animal models and potential target species for emerging pathogens: Experience gained from Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Vergara-Alert

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emerging and re-emerging pathogens represent a substantial threat to public health, as demonstrated with numerous outbreaks over the past years, including the 2013–2016 outbreak of Ebola virus in western Africa. Coronaviruses are also a threat for humans, as evidenced in 2002/2003 with infection by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV, which caused more than 8000 human infections with 10% fatality rate in 37 countries. Ten years later, a novel human coronavirus (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, MERS-CoV, associated with severe pneumonia, arose in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Until December 2016, MERS has accounted for more than 1800 cases and 35% fatality rate. Finding an animal model of disease is key to develop vaccines or antivirals against such emerging pathogens and to understand its pathogenesis. Knowledge of the potential role of domestic livestock and other animal species in the transmission of pathogens is of importance to understand the epidemiology of the disease. Little is known about MERS-CoV animal host range. In this paper, experimental data on potential hosts for MERS-CoV is reviewed. Advantages and limitations of different animal models are evaluated in relation to viral pathogenesis and transmission studies. Finally, the relevance of potential new target species is discussed.

  2. Web Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Rajashekar, TB

    1998-01-01

    The World Wide Web is emerging as an all-in-one information source. Tools for searching Web-based information include search engines, subject directories and meta search tools. We take a look at key features of these tools and suggest practical hints for effective Web searching.

  3. [The analysis of a mobile mental health outreach team activity: from psychiatric emergencies on the street to practice of hospitalization at home for homeless people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Vincent; Sarradon-Eck, Aline; Payan, Noura; Bonin, Jean-Pierre; Perrot, Sylvain; Vialars, Vanessa; Boyer, Laurent; Tinland, Aurélie; Simeoni, Marie-Claude

    2012-05-01

    Since their creation in 2005 in France, mobile mental health outreach teams (EMPP) have been working to improve the health of the homeless who, for 30 to 50% of them, present severe mental disorders. Their missions are defined by ministerial circular's specifications. Few studies have been undertaken in France to analyze the practices of these teams' professionals, nor the characteristics of the populations with whom they are involved. The EMPP described in this paper had in 2010 a greater staff than other French EMPPs. It has 15 full-time staff, including four doctors (two psychiatrists, one GP, one house physician), two nurses, two educators, one social worker, three peer-workers, one secretary and two coordinators. The article analyzes the way of support developed within the range of EMPP's missions defined by the ministerial circular. Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out using standardized data from four different sources (round sheet, record of activity, record of hospitalization, housing information, interviews conducted by medical and social professionals with patients). Another source of data consists of records describing the operation of the team (reference framework) and annual activities (annual report). The method of care was developed based on a street working, involving a full medical and its relationship with the hospital and a place to live in a semi-community context. The Mobile Mental Health Outreach team documented 318 rounds in 2010, describing 666 contacts among whom 87.9% were followed regularly thereafter. It focuses to a target population. The team actively followed 198 people including 161 for whom a psychiatric diagnosis was done: 48.5% of the patients followed presented schizophrenic-type disorders, 21.8% bipolar disorders and other mood-linked problems, 13% behavioral disorders and 6.2% substance-use disorders. A percentage of 44.9 presented with a physical disease. Among the 89 hospitalizations, 86.5% were motivated by

  4. Is Googlizing polluting? The difficult emergence of stewards for low-carbon transition on the search engine market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastianutti, Julie; Chamaret, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    The value proposition of ecological search engines is based on conducting online research that is respectful of the environment. Our study highlights two contrasting models. On the one hand, some agents promise to reduce energy consumption or CO_2 emissions directly as a result of having to more effective technology. On the other hand, there are agents who propose to compensate CO_2 emissions due to online research by supporting reforestation associations or by buying Carbon Credits. We show that the multiplication of initiatives and legitimacy issues have led to difficulties. Generating networks effects and an ability to legitimate an ecological positioning in the eyes of partners and users appear to be key success factors for these initiatives

  5. [The importance of simulation in team training on obstetric emergencies: results of the first phase of the national plan for continuous medical training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio Matos, Francisco; Sousa Gomes, Andrea; Costa, Fernando Jorge; Santos Silva, Isabel; Carvalhas, Joana

    2012-01-01

    Obstetric emergencies are unexpected and random. The traditional model for medical training of these acute events has included lectures combined with sporadic clinical experiences, but this educational method has inherent limitations. Given the variety of manual skills that must be learned and high-risk environment, Obstetrics is uniquely suited for simulation. New technological educational tools provide an opportunity to learn and master technical skills needed in emergent situations as well as the opportunity to rehearse and learn from mistakes without risks to patients. The goals of this study are to assess which are the factors that trainees associate to human fallibility before and after clinical simulation based training; to compare the confidence level to solve emergent obstetric situations between interns and experts with up to 5 years of experience before and after training, and to determine the value that trainees give to simulation as a teaching tool on emergent events. 31 physicians participated at this course sessions. After the course, we verified changes in the factores that trainees associate to human fallibility, an increase in confidence level to solve emergent obstetric and an increase in the value that trainees give to simulation as a teaching tool.

  6. The main trends of interaction of sanitary-epidemiological teams in the system of the Russian service of disaster medicine in emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichenko, A.I.; Zhuravleva, V.E.; Varenikov, I.I.; Komarova, V.V.; Borisov, B.K.; Pozhidaev, A.E.; Pozhidaeva, N.V.

    1995-01-01

    For improvement of the system of prevention of emergency situations (ES) and for rendering emergency therapeutic-prophylactic and sanitary-epidemiological aid to population in case of ES the paper has determined and proved the first and foremost tasks which are to be settled by joint efforts of the Russian Centre on Disaster Medicine Zashchita and Scientific-practical Center of hygienic expert survey for practical perfection of the efficient forms of interaction of medical-sanitary forces engaged in work in ES. 4 refs

  7. Quality charters or quality members? A control theory perspective on team charters and team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Stephen H; McCormick, Brian W; Mistry, Sal; Wang, Jiexin

    2017-10-01

    Though prevalent in practice, team charters have only recently received scholarly attention. However, most of this work has been relatively devoid of theory, and consequently, key questions about why and under what conditions team charter quality affects team performance remain unanswered. To address these gaps, we draw on macro organizational control theory to propose that team charter quality serves as a team-level "behavior" control mechanism that builds task cohesion through a structured exercise. We then juxtapose team charter quality with an "input" team control mechanism that influences the emergence of task cohesion more organically: team conscientiousness. Given their redundant effects on task cohesion, we propose that the effects of team charter quality and team conscientiousness on team performance (through task cohesion) are substitutive such that team charter quality primarily impacts team performance for teams that are low (vs. high) on conscientiousness. We test and find support for our hypotheses in a sample of 239 undergraduate self-managing project teams. Our study contributes to the groups and teams literature in the following ways: first, relative to previous studies, we take a more theory-driven approach toward understanding team charters, and in doing so, uncover when and why team charter quality impacts team performance; second, we integrate two normally disparate perspectives on team effectiveness (team development and team selection) to offer a broader perspective on how teams are "built"; and third, we introduce team charter quality as a performance-enhancing mechanism for teams lower on conscientiousness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Obstetric Emergencies: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwochei, Desire N; Halpern, Stephen; Balki, Mrinalini

    2017-06-01

    Team-based training and simulation can improve patient safety, by improving communication, decision making, and performance of team members. Currently, there is no general consensus on whether or not a specific assessment tool is better adapted to evaluate teamwork in obstetric emergencies. The purpose of this qualitative systematic review was to find the tools available to assess team effectiveness in obstetric emergencies. We searched Embase, Medline, PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar for prospective studies that evaluated nontechnical skills in multidisciplinary teams involving obstetric emergencies. The search included studies from 1944 until January 11, 2016. Data on reliability and validity measures were collected and used for interpretation. A descriptive analysis was performed on the data. Thirteen studies were included in the final qualitative synthesis. All the studies assessed teams in the context of obstetric simulation scenarios, but only six included anesthetists in the simulations. One study evaluated their teamwork tool using just validity measures, five using just reliability measures, and one used both. The most reliable tools identified were the Clinical Teamwork Scale, the Global Assessment of Obstetric Team Performance, and the Global Rating Scale of performance. However, they were still lacking in terms of quality and validity. More work needs to be conducted to establish the validity of teamwork tools for nontechnical skills, and the development of an ideal tool is warranted. Further studies are required to assess how outcomes, such as performance and patient safety, are influenced when using these tools.

  9. Asteroid team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matson, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to support asteroid research and the operation of an Asteroid Team within the Earth and Space Sciences Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Asteroid Team carries out original research on asteroids in order to discover, better characterize and define asteroid properties. This information is needed for the planning and design of NASA asteroid flyby and rendezvous missions. The asteroid Team also provides scientific and technical advice to NASA and JPL on asteroid related programs. Work on asteroid classification continued and the discovery of two Earth-approaching M asteroids was published. In the asteroid photometry program researchers obtained N or Q photometry for more than 50 asteroids, including the two M-earth-crossers. Compositional analysis of infrared spectra (0.8 to 2.6 micrometer) of asteroids is continuing. Over the next year the work on asteroid classification and composition will continue with the analysis of the 60 reduced infrared spectra which we now have at hand. The radiometry program will continue with the reduction of the N and Q bandpass data for the 57 asteroids in order to obtain albedos and diameters. This year the emphasis will shift to IRAS follow-up observations; which includes objects not observed by IRAS and objects with poor or peculiar IRAS data. As in previous year, we plan to give top priority to any opportunities for observing near-Earth asteroids and the support (through radiometric lightcurve observations from the IRTF) of any stellar occultations by asteroids for which occultation observation expeditions are fielded. Support of preparing of IRAS data for publication and of D. Matson for his participation in the NASA Planetary Astronomy Management and Operations Working Group will continue

  10. Asteroid team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to support asteroid research and the operation of an Asteroid Team within the Earth and Space Sciences Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Asteroid Team carries out original research on asteroids in order to discover, better characterize and define asteroid properties. This information is needed for the planning and design of NASA asteroid flyby and rendezvous missions. The asteroid Team also provides scientific and technical advice to NASA and JPL on asteroid related programs. Work on asteroid classification continued and the discovery of two Earth-approaching M asteroids was published. In the asteroid photometry program researchers obtained N or Q photometry for more than 50 asteroids, including the two M-earth-crossers. Compositional analysis of infrared spectra (0.8 to 2.6 micrometer) of asteroids is continuing. Over the next year the work on asteroid classification and composition will continue with the analysis of the 60 reduced infrared spectra which we now have at hand. The radiometry program will continue with the reduction of the N and Q bandpass data for the 57 asteroids in order to obtain albedos and diameters. This year the emphasis will shift to IRAS follow-up observations; which includes objects not observed by IRAS and objects with poor or peculiar IRAS data. As in previous year, we plan to give top priority to any opportunities for observing near-Earth asteroids and the support (through radiometric lightcurve observations from the IRTF) of any stellar occultations by asteroids for which occultation observation expeditions are fielded. Support of preparing of IRAS data for publication and of D. Matson for his participation in the NASA Planetary Astronomy Management and Operations Working Group will continue.

  11. Structuring Successful Global Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    e.g., email) to a lot (e.g., video conferencing ). Finally, global teams can vary in their level of synchronicity, or the degree to which a team’s... electronic communication. Thus, we view these types of teams as analogous enough that they can be discussed together under the overarching term of “global...emergence. Balthazard, Waldman, and Warren (2009) found that communication media that mim- ics face-to-face interactions (e.g., video conferencing

  12. Infodemiology and infoveillance: framework for an emerging set of public health informatics methods to analyze search, communication and publication behavior on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2009-03-27

    Infodemiology can be defined as the science of distribution and determinants of information in an electronic medium, specifically the Internet, or in a population, with the ultimate aim to inform public health and public policy. Infodemiology data can be collected and analyzed in near real time. Examples for infodemiology applications include the analysis of queries from Internet search engines to predict disease outbreaks (eg. influenza), monitoring peoples' status updates on microblogs such as Twitter for syndromic surveillance, detecting and quantifying disparities in health information availability, identifying and monitoring of public health relevant publications on the Internet (eg. anti-vaccination sites, but also news articles or expert-curated outbreak reports), automated tools to measure information diffusion and knowledge translation, and tracking the effectiveness of health marketing campaigns. Moreover, analyzing how people search and navigate the Internet for health-related information, as well as how they communicate and share this information, can provide valuable insights into health-related behavior of populations. Seven years after the infodemiology concept was first introduced, this paper revisits the emerging fields of infodemiology and infoveillance and proposes an expanded framework, introducing some basic metrics such as information prevalence, concept occurrence ratios, and information incidence. The framework distinguishes supply-based applications (analyzing what is being published on the Internet, eg. on Web sites, newsgroups, blogs, microblogs and social media) from demand-based methods (search and navigation behavior), and further distinguishes passive from active infoveillance methods. Infodemiology metrics follow population health relevant events or predict them. Thus, these metrics and methods are potentially useful for public health practice and research, and should be further developed and standardized.

  13. Team designing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denise J. Stokholm, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Future wellbeing is depending on human competences in order to strengthen a sustainable development. This requires system thinking and ability to deal with complexity, dynamic and a vast of information. `We need to move away from present principles of breaking down problems into components and gi...... thinking and communication in design. Trying to answer the question: How can visual system models facilitate learning in design thinking and team designing?......Future wellbeing is depending on human competences in order to strengthen a sustainable development. This requires system thinking and ability to deal with complexity, dynamic and a vast of information. `We need to move away from present principles of breaking down problems into components and give...... in relation to a design-engineering education at Aalborg University. It will exemplify how the model has been used in workshops on team designing, challenged design learning and affected design competence. In specific it will investigate the influence of visual models of the perception of design, design...

  14. Interprofessional Learning - Development and Implementation of Joint Medical Emergency Team Trainings for Medical and Nursing Students at Universitätsmedizin Greifswald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partecke, Maud; Balzer, Claudius; Finkenzeller, Ingmar; Reppenhagen, Christiane; Hess, Ulrike; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Meissner, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is of great importance in clinical practice, particularly in the field of emergency medicine. The professions involved in providing emergency care must work hand in hand, and tasks and routines must be coordinated effectively. However, medical and nursing students have only few opportunities to experience interprofessional cooperation during their formal training. Addressing this situation, the Department of Anesthesiology and the Vocational School of Greifswald University Medical School initiated a project to increase patient safety by integrating interprofessional human factor training into the curriculum of both health professions. This manuscript addresses how an interprofessional course module focusing on clinical emergency medicine can be taught with an emphasis on competency and problem-solving. In addition, it was important to identify suitable instruments for systematic quality development and assurance of this teaching and learning format. The aim of the project, which took place from October 2013 to September 2015, was the development, implementation and evaluation of a simulation-based, interprofessional course module on clinical emergency medicine. Target groups were medical and nursing students. Modern pedagogical models and methods were applied to the design and teaching of the course content. The project was carried out in separate phases: definition, planning, practical implementation, evaluation and documentation. The project was accompanied by systematic quality development. Established guidelines for quality-centered school development were applied to quality development, assurance and evaluation. Over two years, a 16 credit-hour course module was developed and then taught and evaluated during the 2014 and 2015 summer semesters. A total of 120 medical students and 120 nursing students participated in the course module. Eighteen teachers from medicine and nursing were trained as instructors and assisted by 12

  15. Interprofessional Learning – Development and Implementation of Joint Medical Emergency Team Trainings for Medical and Nursing Students at Universitätsmedizin Greifswald

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partecke, Maud; Balzer, Claudius; Finkenzeller, Ingmar; Reppenhagen, Christiane; Hess, Ulrike; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Meissner, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Interprofessional collaboration is of great importance in clinical practice, particularly in the field of emergency medicine. The professions involved in providing emergency care must work hand in hand, and tasks and routines must be coordinated effectively. However, medical and nursing students have only few opportunities to experience interprofessional cooperation during their formal training. Addressing this situation, the Department of Anesthesiology and the Vocational School of Greifswald University Medical School initiated a project to increase patient safety by integrating interprofessional human factor training into the curriculum of both health professions. This manuscript addresses how an interprofessional course module focusing on clinical emergency medicine can be taught with an emphasis on competency and problem-solving. In addition, it was important to identify suitable instruments for systematic quality development and assurance of this teaching and learning format. Project description: The aim of the project, which took place from October 2013 to September 2015, was the development, implementation and evaluation of a simulation-based, interprofessional course module on clinical emergency medicine. Target groups were medical and nursing students. Modern pedagogical models and methods were applied to the design and teaching of the course content. The project was carried out in separate phases: definition, planning, practical implementation, evaluation and documentation. The project was accompanied by systematic quality development. Established guidelines for quality-centered school development were applied to quality development, assurance and evaluation. Results: Over two years, a 16 credit-hour course module was developed and then taught and evaluated during the 2014 and 2015 summer semesters. A total of 120 medical students and 120 nursing students participated in the course module. Eighteen teachers from medicine and nursing were

  16. Interprofessional Learning – Development and Implementation of Joint Medical Emergency Team Trainings for Medical and Nursing Students at Universitätsmedizin Greifswald

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partecke, Maud

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Interprofessional collaboration is of great importance in clinical practice, particularly in the field of emergency medicine. The professions involved in providing emergency care must work hand in hand, and tasks and routines must be coordinated effectively. However, medical and nursing students have only few opportunities to experience interprofessional cooperation during their formal training. Addressing this situation, the Department of Anesthesiology and the Vocational School of Greifswald University Medical School initiated a project to increase patient safety by integrating interprofessional human factor training into the curriculum of both health professions. This manuscript addresses how an interprofessional course module focusing on clinical emergency medicine can be taught with an emphasis on competency and problem-solving. In addition, it was important to identify suitable instruments for systematic quality development and assurance of this teaching and learning format.Project description: The aim of the project, which took place from October 2013 to September 2015, was the development, implementation and evaluation of a simulation-based, interprofessional course module on clinical emergency medicine. Target groups were medical and nursing students. Modern pedagogical models and methods were applied to the design and teaching of the course content. The project was carried out in separate phases: definition, planning, practical implementation, evaluation and documentation. The project was accompanied by systematic quality development. Established guidelines for quality-centered school development were applied to quality development, assurance and evaluation.Results: Over two years, a 16 credit-hour course module was developed and then taught and evaluated during the 2014 and 2015 summer semesters. A total of 120 medical students and 120 nursing students participated in the course module. Eighteen teachers from medicine

  17. Team-training in healthcare: a narrative synthesis of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Sallie J; Dy, Sydney M; Rosen, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients are safer and receive higher quality care when providers work as a highly effective team. Investment in optimising healthcare teamwork has swelled in the last 10 years. Consequently, evidence regarding the effectiveness for these interventions has also grown rapidly. We provide an updated review concerning the current state of team-training science and practice in acute care settings. Methods A PubMed search for review articles examining team-training interventions in acute care settings published between 2000 and 2012 was conducted. Following identification of relevant reviews with searches terminating in 2008 and 2010, PubMed and PSNet were searched for additional primary studies published in 2011 and 2012. Primary outcomes included patient outcomes and quality indices. Secondary outcomes included teamwork behaviours, knowledge and attitudes. Results Both simulation and classroom-based team-training interventions can improve teamwork processes (eg, communication, coordination and cooperation), and implementation has been associated with improvements in patient safety outcomes. Thirteen studies published between 2011 and 2012 reported statistically significant changes in teamwork behaviours, processes or emergent states and 10 reported significant improvement in clinical care processes or patient outcomes, including mortality and morbidity. Effects were reported across a range of clinical contexts. Larger effect sizes were reported for bundled team-training interventions that included tools and organisational changes to support sustainment and transfer of teamwork competencies into daily practice. Conclusions Overall, moderate-to-high-quality evidence suggests team-training can positively impact healthcare team processes and patient outcomes. Additionally, toolkits are available to support intervention development and implementation. Evidence suggests bundled team-training interventions and implementation strategies that embed effective

  18. Valuing gender diversity in teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Villeseche, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Team gender diversity has been much debated in many different contexts – not least since the search for a main effect of diversity on performance was launched. However, results have so far been inconclusive, and a number of scholars suggest that more attention should be directed at contextual...... factors which could influence the effect of gender diversity on team performance. In this study, we explore the effect of positive diversity attitudes and assess the degree of gender diversity where such group attitudes have greater impact. This is done by using a sample of 1085 leaders of academic...... research teams. Findings show that positive diversity attitude in the form of group openness to diversity is strongly associated with team performance. We also find a moderating effect of gender diversity meaning that the effect of openness to diversity is stronger when gender groups are more balanced...

  19. Food banking for improved nutrition of HIV infected orphans and vulnerable children; emerging evidence from quality improvement teams in high food insecure regions of Kiambu, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akulima, Muhamed; Ikamati, Rudia; Mungai, Margaret; Samuel, Muhula; Ndirangu, Meshack; Muga, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Estimated 236,548 People Living with HIV (PLHIV) were in Central-Eastern Kenya in 2013. Kiambu County had 46,656 PLHIV with 42,400 (91%) adults and 4,200(9%) children (1-14yrs). Amref Health Africa in Kenya, supported through USAID-APHIAplus KAMILI project, initiated two food banks to respond to poor nutritional status of the HIV infected children. Quality Improvement Teams were used to facilitate food-banking initiatives. The study aimed at assessing and demonstrating roles of community food-banking in improving nutrition status of HIV-infected children in food insecure regions. A pre and post-test study lasting 12 months (Oct 2013 to September 2014) conducted in Kiambu County, Kenya covering 103 HIV infected children. Two assessments were conducted before and after the food banking initiative and results compared. Child Status Index (CSI) and the Middle Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) tools were used in data collection at households. Paired T-test and Wilcoxon test were applied for analysing MUAC and CSI scores respectively using the SPSS. There was a significant improvement in the children's nutrition status from a rating of 'bad' in CSI Median (IQR) score 2(2-1) before food banking to a rating of 'fair' in CSI Median (IQR) score 3(4-3) after food banking intervention (p=banking (p=banking is a community-based nutritional intervention that can address factors of food access, affordability and availability. Food banking is a sustainable way to contribute to quality nutrition and reduced related deaths among HIV infected children.

  20. Travelling with football teams

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ultimately on the performance of the teams on the playing field and not so much ... However, travelling with a football team presents the team physician .... physician to determine the nutritional ..... diarrhoea in elite athletes: an audit of one team.

  1. Study on team evaluation. Team process model for team evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasou Kunihide; Ebisu, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Ayako

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have been done to evaluate or improve team performance in nuclear and aviation industries. Crew resource management is the typical example. In addition, team evaluation recently gathers interests in other teams of lawyers, medical staff, accountants, psychiatrics, executive, etc. However, the most evaluation methods focus on the results of team behavior that can be observed through training or actual business situations. What is expected team is not only resolving problems but also training younger members being destined to lead the next generation. Therefore, the authors set the final goal of this study establishing a series of methods to evaluate and improve teams inclusively such as decision making, motivation, staffing, etc. As the first step, this study develops team process model describing viewpoints for the evaluation. The team process is defined as some kinds of power that activate or inactivate competency of individuals that is the components of team's competency. To find the team process, the authors discussed the merits of team behavior with the experienced training instructors and shift supervisors of nuclear/thermal power plants. The discussion finds four team merits and many components to realize those team merits. Classifying those components into eight groups of team processes such as 'Orientation', 'Decision Making', 'Power and Responsibility', 'Workload Management', 'Professional Trust', 'Motivation', 'Training' and 'staffing', the authors propose Team Process Model with two to four sub processes in each team process. In the future, the authors will develop methods to evaluate some of the team processes for nuclear/thermal power plant operation teams. (author)

  2. Team responsibility structure and team performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.; Hootegem, G. van; Huys, R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose is to analyse the impact of team responsibility (the division of job regulation tasks between team leader and team members) on team performance. It bases an analysis on 36 case studies in The Netherlands which are known to have implemented team‐based work. The case studies were executed

  3. Search 3.0: Present, Personal, Precise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivack, Nova

    The next generation of Web search is already beginning to emerge. With it we will see several shifts in the way people search, and the way major search engines provide search functionality to consumers.

  4. Computerized Tests of Team Performance and Crew Coordination Suitable for Military/Aviation Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Ben D; Britt, Thomas W; Kelley, Amanda M; Athy, Jeremy R; Legan, Shauna M

    2017-08-01

    The coordination of team effort on shared tasks is an area of inquiry. A number of tests of team performance in challenging environments have been developed without comparison or standardization. This article provides a systematic review of the most accessible and usable low-to-medium fidelity computerized tests of team performance and determines which are most applicable to military- and aviation-relevant research, such as studies of group command, control, communication, and crew coordination. A search was conducted to identify computerized measures of team performance. In addition to extensive literature searches (DTIC, Psychinfo, PubMed), the authors reached out to team performance researchers at conferences and through electronic communication. Identified were 57 potential tests according to 6 specific selection criteria (e.g., the requirement for automated collection of team performance and coordination processes, the use of military-relevant scenarios). The following seven tests (listed alphabetically) were considered most suitable for military needs: Agent Enabled Decision Group Environment (AEDGE), C3Conflict, the C3 (Command, Control, & Communications) Interactive Task for Identifying Emerging Situations (NeoCITIES), Distributed Dynamic Decision Making (DDD), Duo Wondrous Original Method Basic Awareness/Airmanship Test (DuoWOMBAT), the Leader Development Simulator (LDS), and the Planning Task for Teams (PLATT). Strengths and weaknesses of these tests are described and recommendations offered to help researchers identify the test most suitable for their particular needs. Adoption of a few standard computerized test batteries to study team performance would facilitate the evaluation of interventions intended to enhance group performance in multiple challenging military and aerospace operational environments.Lawson BD, Britt TW, Kelley AM, Athy JR, Legan SM. Computerized tests of team performance and crew coordination suitable for military/aviation settings

  5. A review of salient elements defining team collaboration in paediatric rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, B. J. G.; Reinders-Messelink, H. A.; de Blecourt, A. C. E.; Olijve, W. G.; Groothoff, J. W.; Nakken, H.; Postema, K.; Postuma, K.

    Objective: To explicate the complex process of team collaboration and identify salient elements of team collaboration in paediatric rehabilitation. Data sources: After an initial search to define key features of team collaboration a systematic search on team collaboration and the key features was

  6. Implementing wait-time reductions under Ontario government benchmarks (Pay-for-Results): a Cluster Randomized Trial of the Effect of a Physician-Nurse Supplementary Triage Assistance team (MDRNSTAT) on emergency department patient wait times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ivy; Lee, Jacques; Mittmann, Nicole; Tyberg, Jeffrey; Ramagnano, Sharon; Kiss, Alex; Schull, Michael; Kerr, Fergus; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2013-11-11

    Internationally, emergency departments are struggling with crowding and its associated morbidity, mortality, and decreased patient and health-care worker satisfaction. The objective was to evaluate the addition of a MDRNSTAT (Physician (MD)-Nurse (RN) Supplementary Team At Triage) on emergency department patient flow and quality of care. Pragmatic cluster randomized trial. From 131 weekday shifts (8:00-14:30) during a 26-week period, we randomized 65 days (3173 visits) to the intervention cluster with a MDRNSTAT presence, and 66 days (3163 visits) to the nurse-only triage control cluster. The primary outcome was emergency department length-of-stay (EDLOS) for patients managed and discharged only by the emergency department. Secondary outcomes included EDLOS for patients initially seen by the emergency department, and subsequently consulted and admitted, patients reaching government-mandated thresholds, time to initial physician assessment, left-without being seen rate, time to investigation, and measurement of harm. The intervention's median EDLOS for discharged, non-consulted, high acuity patients was 4:05 [95th% CI: 3:58 to 4:15] versus 4:29 [95th% CI: 4:19-4:38] during comparator shifts. The intervention's median EDLOS for discharged, non-consulted, low acuity patients was 1:55 [95th% CI: 1:48 to 2:05] versus 2:08 [95th% CI: 2:02-2:14]. The intervention's median physician initial assessment time was 0:55 [95th% CI: 0:53 to 0:58] versus 1:21 [95th% CI: 1:18 to 1:25]. The intervention's left-without-being-seen rate was 1.5% versus 2.2% for the control (p = 0.06). The MDRNSTAT subgroup analysis resulted in significant decreases in median EDLOS for discharged, non-consulted high (4:01 [95th% CI: 3:43-4:16]) and low acuity patients (1:10 95th% CI: 0:58-1:19]), as well as physician initial assessment time (0:25 [95th% CI: 0:23-0:26]). No patients returned to the emergency department after being discharged by the MDRNSTAT at triage. The intervention reduced delays

  7. Enhancing Brigade Combat Team Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Developing Learning Infrastructures (Training, Education , Practice, Research, Doctrine) -Create a shared vision -Build the business case (assess/Buy...To effectively respond to the characteristics of the operational environment, Brigade Combat Teams must be able to learn constantly from experience...behavior. Organizational adaptive behavior consists of three supporting emergent behaviors which are: self-organization, learning , and organizational

  8. Better team management--better team care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, P; Powney, B

    1994-01-01

    Team building should not be a 'bolt-on' extra, it should be a well planned, integrated part of developing teams and assisting their leaders. When asked to facilitate team building by a group of NHS managers we developed a framework which enabled individual members of staff to become more effective in the way they communicated with each other, their teams and in turn within the organization. Facing the challenge posed by complex organizational changes, staff were able to use 3 training days to increase and develop their awareness of the principles of teamwork, better team management, and how a process of leadership and team building could help yield better patient care.

  9. The impact of team characteristics and context on team communication: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiferes, Judith; Bisantz, Ann M

    2018-04-01

    Many studies on teams report measures of team communication; however, these studies vary widely in terms of the team characteristics, situations, and tasks studied making it difficult to understand impacts on team communication more generally. The objective of this review is systematically summarize relationships between measures of team communication and team characteristics and situational contexts. A literature review was conducted searching in four electronic databases (PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Ergonomics Abstracts, and SocINDEX). Additional studies were identified by cross-referencing. Articles included for final review had reported at least one team communication measure associated with some team and/or context dimension. Ninety-nine of 727 articles met the inclusion criteria. Data extracted from articles included characteristics of the studies and teams and the nature of each of the reported team and/or context dimensions-team communication properties relationships. Some dimensions (job role, situational stressors, training strategies, cognitive artifacts, and communication media) were found to be consistently linked to changes in team communication. A synthesized diagram that describes the possible associations between eleven team and context dimensions and nine team communication measures is provided along with research needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of the Facilitator on Total Quality Management Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, William L.

    1993-01-01

    As Total Quality Management teams work to improve organizational processes, several types of facilitators emerge: the director, the workhorse, and the cheerleader. Experience at the University of Kansas illustrates how different facilitator styles can affect team learning. (MSE)

  11. The impact of brief team communication, leadership and team behavior training on ad hoc team performance in trauma care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nicole K; Williams, Reed G; Schwind, Cathy J; Sutyak, John A; McDowell, Christopher; Griffen, David; Wall, Jarrod; Sanfey, Hilary; Chestnut, Audra; Meier, Andreas H; Wohltmann, Christopher; Clark, Ted R; Wetter, Nathan

    2014-02-01

    Communication breakdowns and care coordination problems often cause preventable adverse patient care events, which can be especially acute in the trauma setting, in which ad hoc teams have little time for advanced planning. Existing teamwork curricula do not address the particular issues associated with ad hoc emergency teams providing trauma care. Ad hoc trauma teams completed a preinstruction simulated trauma encounter and were provided with instruction on appropriate team behaviors and team communication. Teams completed a postinstruction simulated trauma encounter immediately afterward and 3 weeks later, then completed a questionnaire. Blinded raters rated videotapes of the simulations. Participants expressed high levels of satisfaction and intent to change practice after the intervention. Participants changed teamwork and communication behavior on the posttest, and changes were sustained after a 3-week interval, though there was some loss of retention. Brief training exercises can change teamwork and communication behaviors on ad hoc trauma teams. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Work team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RBE Editorial

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Work Team 2016 (Jan-Jul1. Editorial TeamChief-editorsBayardo Bapstista Torres, Instituto de Química (USP, BrasilEduardo Galembeck, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade de Campinas (Unicamp, Brasil Co-editorsGabriel Gerber Hornink, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade - Federal de Alfenas (Unifal-MG, BrasilVera Maria Treis Trindade, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS, Brasil Editorial BoardAdriana Cassina, Department of Biochemistry, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, UruguayAngel Herráez, Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología molecular, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, SpainAndré Amaral Gonçalves Bianco, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp, BrasilDenise Vaz de Macedo, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, BrasilEneida de Paula, Depto. Bioquímica, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, BrasilJose Antonio Martinez Oyanedel, Universidad de Concepción, ChileJosep Maria Fernández Novell, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry, Universitat de Barcelona, SpainLeila Maria Beltramini, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo (USP, BrasilManuel João da Costa, Escola de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade do Minho, PortugalMaria Lucia Bianconi, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, BrasilMaría Noel Alvarez, Department of Biochemistry, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, UruguayMiguel Ángel Medina Torres, Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry Faculty of Sciences University of Málaga, SpainNelma Regina Segnini Bossolan, Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (USP, BrasilPaulo De Avila Junior, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas (CCNH Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC

  13. Team Orientations, Interpersonal Relations, and Team Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Howard L.

    1976-01-01

    Contradictions in post research on the concepts of "cohesiveness" and team success seem to arise from the ways in which cohesiveness is measured and the nature of the teams investigated in each study. (MB)

  14. Team cohesion and team success in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Albert V; Bray, Steven R; Eys, Mark A

    2002-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the relationship between task cohesiveness and team success in elite teams using composite team estimates of cohesion. A secondary aim was to determine statistically the consistency (i.e. 'groupness') present in team members' perceptions of cohesion. Elite university basketball teams (n = 18) and club soccer teams (n = 9) were assessed for cohesiveness and winning percentages. Measures were recorded towards the end of each team's competitive season. Our results indicate that cohesiveness is a shared perception, thereby providing statistical support for the use of composite team scores. Further analyses indicated a strong relationship between cohesion and success (r = 0.55-0.67). Further research using multi-level statistical techniques is recommended.

  15. Virtual worlds and team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Parvati; Youngblood, Patricia; Heinrichs, W Leroy; Kusumoto, Laura

    2007-06-01

    An important component of all emergency medicine residency programs is managing trauma effectively as a member of an emergency medicine team, but practice on live patients is often impractical and mannequin-based simulators are expensive and require all trainees to be physically present at the same location. This article describes a project to develop and evaluate a computer-based simulator (the Virtual Emergency Department) for distance training in teamwork and leadership in trauma management. The virtual environment provides repeated practice opportunities with life-threatening trauma cases in a safe and reproducible setting.

  16. Moving Forward with Computational Red Teaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Red Teaming is used across both public and private sectors and is not the sole domain of the military. Red Team Consulting (2011) notes that “the use...open for review. Consider also the context of application. Oh (2009) explains how globalisation , the rise of emerging powers, environmental

  17. Studying Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Selin, Cynthia; Rodegher, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The Emerge event, held in Tempe, AZ in March 2012, brought together a range of scientists, artists, futurists, engineers and students in order to experiment with innovative methods for thinking about the future. These methodological techniques were tested through nine workshops, each of which made...... use of a different format; Emerge as a whole, then, offered an opportunity to study a diverse set of future-oriented engagement practices. We conducted an event ethnography, in which a team of 11 researchers collaboratively developed accounts of the practices at play within Emerge and its workshops...

  18. Rapid response teams: qualitative analysis of their effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Linda Searle; Mayo, Ann M

    2013-05-01

    Multidisciplinary rapid response teams focus on patients' emergent needs and manage critical situations to prevent avoidable deaths. Although research has focused primarily on outcomes, studies of the actual team effectiveness within the teams from multiple perspectives have been limited. To describe effectiveness of rapid response teams in a large teaching hospital in California that had been using such teams for 5 years. The grounded-theory method was used to discover if substantive theory might emerge from interview and/or observational data. Purposeful sampling was used to conduct in-person semistructured interviews with 17 key informants. Convenience sampling was used for the 9 observed events that involved a rapid response team. Analysis involved use of a concept or indicator model to generate empirical results from the data. Data were coded, compared, and contrasted, and, when appropriate, relationships between concepts were formed. Results Dimensions of effective team performance included the concepts of organizational culture, team structure, expertise, communication, and teamwork. Professionals involved reported that rapid response teams functioned well in managing patients at risk or in crisis; however, unique challenges were identified. Teams were loosely coupled because of the inconsistency of team members from day to day. Team members had little opportunity to develop relationships or team skills. The need for team training may be greater than that among teams that work together regularly under less time pressure to perform. Communication between team members and managing a crisis were critical aspects of an effective response team.

  19. Your cancer care team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000929.htm Your cancer care team To use the sharing features on this page, ... help your body heal. Working with Your Care Team Each member of your care team plays an ...

  20. The nutritional intake of elderly patients with dysphagia admitted to the internal medical department of the emergency hospital was analyzed. The Fujishima dysphagia scale after care and treatment by the Nutrition Support Team was assessed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwano, Mototaka

    2016-01-01

    The Nutrition Support Team (NST) assessed the severity of dysphagia in elderly patients admitted to the internal medical department, and the appropriate nutritional treatment was determined. Patients were treated with either oral nutrition (enteral nutrition, EN) or artificial alimentation (parenteral nutrition, PN). The goal of this study was to analyze whether or not the route of nutrition affected the patient discharge rates. We divided 290 elderly inpatients with dysphagia into 2 groups, the pneumonia group (200 patients) and the non-pneumonia group (90 patients). The NST estimated the swallowing function using the Fujishima dysphagia scale. Monitoring was continued until the NST care and treatment had been finalized. We further divided the pneumonia patients into two subgroups: those with a Fujishima dysphagia scale score ≤3 or ≥4 at the beginning of NST intervention. The changes in the swallowing function were analyzed.The swallowing function in the patients with a score ≥4 was significantly improved compared with that in the patients with a score ≤3. This difference, however, was not observed in the non-pneumonia group. In both the pneumonia and non-pneumonia groups, the ratio of patients discharged on oral nutrition was one-third, and the ratio of death in hospital was one-quarter, the remaining patients required artificial alimentation. Among elderly patients admitted to the internal medical department of the emergency hospital with dysphagia, one-third left the hospital with oral nutritional intake, one-quarter died in hospital, and the remaining required artificial alimentation.

  1. Collaborative and Competitive Strategies in Virtual Teams of e-Entrepreneurs: A pan-European Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Matlay

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs and the advent of the Internet have facilitated the emergence and growth of collaborative strategies amongst small e-Businesses (Matlay & Westhead, 2005. In addition, during the last decade or so, team-led entrepreneurship has been identified as a highly profitable alternative to single founder entrepreneurship. Recent research suggests that growth oriented, small e-Businesses operating in international e-Markets are more likely to be founded and managed by teams of e-Entrepreneurs (Matlay & Westhead, 2007. In increasingly globalised and hyper-competitive markets, "virtual teams" of e-Entrepreneurs search, discover and exploit new entrepreneurial opportunities. This type of entrepreneurial team consists of geographically dispersed entrepreneurs who are led by common entrepreneurial interests and interact electronically in order to promote interdependent strategies and fulfil entrepreneurial goals. In this article, an illustrative longitudinal case study of a pan-European virtual team of 24 e-Entrepreneur members is used to evaluate emergent collaborative and competitive strategies in small e-Businesses that are lead and managed by members. Collaborative and competitive strategies of e-Businesses are identified and related outcomes are analysed. Future research opportunities are suggested and pertinent policy recommendations are offered.

  2. Team Learning in Teacher Teams: Team Entitativity as a Bridge between Teams-in-Theory and Teams-in-Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangrieken, Katrien; Dochy, Filip; Raes, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate team learning in the context of teacher teams in higher vocational education. As teacher teams often do not meet all criteria included in theoretical team definitions, the construct "team entitativity" was introduced. Defined as the degree to which a group of individuals possesses the quality of being a…

  3. Who Gets to Lead the Multinational Team?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paunova, Minna

    2017-01-01

    of their core self-evaluations. A study of over 230 individuals from 46 nationalities working in 36 self-managing teams generally supports the expected main and moderation effects. Individual core self-evaluations enhance an otherwise weak effect of English proficiency, but compensate for low levels of national......This article examines the emergence of informal leadership in multinational teams. Building on and extending status characteristics theory, the article proposes and tests a model that describes how global inequalities reproduce in multinational teams, and accounts for who gets to lead these teams...

  4. Simulation-based education for building clinical teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure to work as an effective team is commonly cited as a cause of adverse events and errors in emergency medicine. Until recently, individual knowledge and skills in managing emergencies were taught, without reference to the additional skills required to work as part of a team. Team training courses are now becoming commonplace, however their strategies and modes of delivery are varied. Just as different delivery methods of traditional education can result in different levels of retention and transfer to the real world, the same is true in team training of the material in different ways in traditional forms of education may lead to different levels of retention and transfer to the real world, the same is true in team training. As team training becomes more widespread, the effectiveness of different modes of delivery including the role of simulation-based education needs to be clearly understood. This review examines the basis of team working in emergency medicine, and the components of an effective emergency medical team. Lessons from other domains with more experience in team training are discussed, as well as the variations from these settings that can be observed in medical contexts. Methods and strategies for team training are listed, and experiences in other health care settings as well as emergency medicine are assessed. Finally, best practice guidelines for the development of team training programs in emergency medicine are presented.

  5. Speeding Up Team Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Amy; Bohmer, Richard; Pisano, Gary

    2001-01-01

    A study of 16 cardiac surgery teams looked at how the teams adapted to new ways of working. The challenge of team management is to implement new processes as quickly as possible. Steps for creating a learning team include selecting a mix of skills and expertise, framing the challenge, and creating an environment of psychological safety. (JOW)

  6. Trust in Diverse Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    , maintaining team cohesiveness in multicultural teams to collaborate effectively presents a number of challenges. The present study employs the concept of trust to explore influences on team collaboration in high performing teams. The study is based on observation of teams in seven multinational corporations...... and interviews with managers from the US, Europe, China and Japan. The study presents a conceptual framework - a ‘trust buffer’ – which enables analysis and exemplification of the dynamics and challenges of teams as drivers of change. Each team has strategically important tasks, unique capacities and deal...... with change in particular ways: Each team is analyzed in relation to its global (HQ) mandate, local (national) stakeholders and organizational context. It is found that communication energy, resources and team mandate underscore the sense of trust in high performing teams. Diversity is understood...

  7. Issues for the Traveling Team Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeding, Christopher C; Borchers, James

    2016-07-01

    This article outlines the value of having the team physician traveling with athletes to away venues for competitions or training sessions. At present, this travel presents several issues for the team physician who crosses state lines for taking care of the athletes. In this article, these issues and their possible remedies are discussed. A concern for the travelling team physician is practicing medicine while caring for the team in a state where the physician is not licensed. Another issue can be the transportation of controlled substances in the course of providing optimal care for the team athletes. These two issues are regulatory and legislative issues at both the state and federal levels. On the practical side of being a team physician, the issues of emergency action plans, supplies, and when to transport injured or ill patients are also reviewed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Developing Your Dream Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, Kenda

    2005-01-01

    Almost anyone has held various roles on a team, be it a family unit, sports team, or a project-oriented team. As an educator, one must make a conscious decision to build and invest in a team. Gathering the best team possible will help one achieve one's goals. This article explores some of the key reasons why it is important to focus on the team…

  9. 11.361 sports injuries in a 15-year survey of a Level I emergency trauma department reveal different severe injury types in the 6 most common team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutsch, Werner; Krutsch, Volker; Hilber, Franz; Pfeifer, Christian; Baumann, Florian; Weber, Johannes; Schmitz, Paul; Kerschbaum, Maximilian; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2018-06-01

     Severe sports-related injuries are a common affliction treated in Level I trauma departments. Detailed knowledge on injury characteristics from different medical settings is essential to improve the development of injury prevention strategies in different team sports.  Team sport injuries were retrospectively analysed in a Level I trauma department registry over 15 years. Injury and treatment data were compared with regard to competition and training exposure. Injury data such as "time of visitation", "type of injury", "multiple injured body regions" and "immediate hospitalisation" helped to define the severity level of each team sports injury.  At the Level I trauma department, 11.361 sports-related injuries were seen over 15 years, of which 34.0 % were sustained during team sports. Soccer injuries were the most common injuries of all team sports (71.4 %). The lower extremity was the most affected body region overall, followed by the upper extremity. Head injuries were mainly seen in Ice hockey and American football and concussion additionally frequently in team handball. Slight injuries like sprains or contusions occurred most frequently in all team sports. In soccer and team handball, injuries sustained in competition were significantly more severe (p team sports, injury prevention strategies should address competitive as well as training situations, whichmay need different strategies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Complex Problem Solving in Teams: The Impact of Collective Orientation on Team Process Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Vera; Kluge, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Complex problem solving is challenging and a high-level cognitive process for individuals. When analyzing complex problem solving in teams, an additional, new dimension has to be considered, as teamwork processes increase the requirements already put on individual team members. After introducing an idealized teamwork process model, that complex problem solving teams pass through, and integrating the relevant teamwork skills for interdependently working teams into the model and combining it with the four kinds of team processes (transition, action, interpersonal, and learning processes), the paper demonstrates the importance of fulfilling team process demands for successful complex problem solving within teams. Therefore, results from a controlled team study within complex situations are presented. The study focused on factors that influence action processes, like coordination, such as emergent states like collective orientation, cohesion, and trust and that dynamically enable effective teamwork in complex situations. Before conducting the experiments, participants were divided by median split into two-person teams with either high (n = 58) or low (n = 58) collective orientation values. The study was conducted with the microworld C3Fire, simulating dynamic decision making, and acting in complex situations within a teamwork context. The microworld includes interdependent tasks such as extinguishing forest fires or protecting houses. Two firefighting scenarios had been developed, which takes a maximum of 15 min each. All teams worked on these two scenarios. Coordination within the team and the resulting team performance were calculated based on a log-file analysis. The results show that no relationships between trust and action processes and team performance exist. Likewise, no relationships were found for cohesion. Only collective orientation of team members positively influences team performance in complex environments mediated by action processes such as

  11. Complex Problem Solving in Teams: The Impact of Collective Orientation on Team Process Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Vera; Kluge, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Complex problem solving is challenging and a high-level cognitive process for individuals. When analyzing complex problem solving in teams, an additional, new dimension has to be considered, as teamwork processes increase the requirements already put on individual team members. After introducing an idealized teamwork process model, that complex problem solving teams pass through, and integrating the relevant teamwork skills for interdependently working teams into the model and combining it with the four kinds of team processes (transition, action, interpersonal, and learning processes), the paper demonstrates the importance of fulfilling team process demands for successful complex problem solving within teams. Therefore, results from a controlled team study within complex situations are presented. The study focused on factors that influence action processes, like coordination, such as emergent states like collective orientation, cohesion, and trust and that dynamically enable effective teamwork in complex situations. Before conducting the experiments, participants were divided by median split into two-person teams with either high ( n = 58) or low ( n = 58) collective orientation values. The study was conducted with the microworld C3Fire, simulating dynamic decision making, and acting in complex situations within a teamwork context. The microworld includes interdependent tasks such as extinguishing forest fires or protecting houses. Two firefighting scenarios had been developed, which takes a maximum of 15 min each. All teams worked on these two scenarios. Coordination within the team and the resulting team performance were calculated based on a log-file analysis. The results show that no relationships between trust and action processes and team performance exist. Likewise, no relationships were found for cohesion. Only collective orientation of team members positively influences team performance in complex environments mediated by action processes such as

  12. Complex Problem Solving in Teams: The Impact of Collective Orientation on Team Process Demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Hagemann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Complex problem solving is challenging and a high-level cognitive process for individuals. When analyzing complex problem solving in teams, an additional, new dimension has to be considered, as teamwork processes increase the requirements already put on individual team members. After introducing an idealized teamwork process model, that complex problem solving teams pass through, and integrating the relevant teamwork skills for interdependently working teams into the model and combining it with the four kinds of team processes (transition, action, interpersonal, and learning processes, the paper demonstrates the importance of fulfilling team process demands for successful complex problem solving within teams. Therefore, results from a controlled team study within complex situations are presented. The study focused on factors that influence action processes, like coordination, such as emergent states like collective orientation, cohesion, and trust and that dynamically enable effective teamwork in complex situations. Before conducting the experiments, participants were divided by median split into two-person teams with either high (n = 58 or low (n = 58 collective orientation values. The study was conducted with the microworld C3Fire, simulating dynamic decision making, and acting in complex situations within a teamwork context. The microworld includes interdependent tasks such as extinguishing forest fires or protecting houses. Two firefighting scenarios had been developed, which takes a maximum of 15 min each. All teams worked on these two scenarios. Coordination within the team and the resulting team performance were calculated based on a log-file analysis. The results show that no relationships between trust and action processes and team performance exist. Likewise, no relationships were found for cohesion. Only collective orientation of team members positively influences team performance in complex environments mediated by action processes

  13. Distributed Cognition in Sports Teams: Explaining Successful and Expert Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kellie; Cox, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    In this article we use a hybrid methodology to better understand the skilful performance of sports teams as an exemplar of distributed cognition. We highlight key differences between a team of individual experts (an aggregate system) and an expert team (an emergent system), and outline the kinds of shared characteristics likely to be found in an…

  14. Search Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance and search help resource listing examples of common queries that can be used in the Google Search Appliance search request, including examples of special characters, or query term seperators that Google Search Appliance recognizes.

  15. Team-Based Care: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Dawon

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this concept analysis is to clarify and analyze the concept of team-based care in clinical practice. Team-based care has garnered attention as a way to enhance healthcare delivery and patient care related to quality and safety. However, there is no consensus on the concept of team-based care; as a result, the lack of common definition impedes further studies on team-based care. This analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's strategy. Literature searches were conducted using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and PsycINFO, with a timeline from January 1985 to December 2015. The analysis demonstrates that the concept of team-based care has three core attributes: (a) interprofessional collaboration, (b) patient-centered approach, and (c) integrated care process. This is accomplished through understanding other team members' roles and responsibilities, a climate of mutual respect, and organizational support. Consequences of team-based care are identified with three aspects: (a) patient, (b) healthcare professional, and (c) healthcare organization. This concept analysis helps better understand the characteristics of team-based care in the clinical practice as well as promote the development of a theoretical definition of team-based care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

  17. MANAGING MULTICULTURAL PROJECT TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar SCARLAT

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on literature review and authors’ own recent experience in managing multicultural project teams, in international environment. This comparative study considers two groups of projects: technical assistance (TA projects versus information technology (IT projects. The aim is to explore the size and structure of the project teams – according to the team formation and its lifecycle, and to identify some distinctive attributes of the project teams – both similarities and differences between the above mentioned types of projects. Distinct focus of the research is on the multiculturalism of the project teams: how the cultural background of the team members influences the team performance and team management. Besides the results of the study are the managerial implications: how the team managers could soften the cultural clash, and avoid inter-cultural misunderstandings and even conflicts – in order to get a better performance. Some practical examples are provided as well.

  18. What's the Right Answer? Team Problem-Solving in Environments of Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Daphne A.

    2009-01-01

    Whether in the workplace or the classroom, many teams approach problem-solving as a search for certainty--even though certainty rarely exists in business. This search for the one right answer to a problem creates unrealistic expectations and often undermines teams' effectiveness. To help teams manage their problem-solving process and communication…

  19. Implicit Coordination Strategies for Effective Team Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchibabu, Abhizna; Sparano-Huiban, Christopher; Sonenberg, Liz; Shah, Julie

    2016-06-01

    We investigated implicit communication strategies for anticipatory information sharing during team performance of tasks with varying degrees of complexity. We compared the strategies used by teams with the highest level of performance to those used by the lowest-performing teams to evaluate the frequency and methods of communications used as a function of task structure. High-performing teams share information by anticipating the needs of their teammates rather than explicitly requesting the exchange of information. As the complexity of a task increases to involve more interdependence among teammates, the impact of coordination on team performance also increases. This observation motivated us to conduct a study of anticipatory information sharing as a function of task complexity. We conducted an experiment in which 13 teams of four people performed collaborative search-and-deliver tasks with varying degrees of complexity in a simulation environment. We elaborated upon prior characterizations of communication as implicit versus explicit by dividing implicit communication into two subtypes: (a) deliberative/goal information and (b) reactive status updates. We then characterized relationships between task structure, implicit communication, and team performance. We found that the five teams with the fastest task completion times and lowest idle times exhibited higher rates of deliberative communication versus reactive communication during high-complexity tasks compared with the five teams with the slowest completion times and longest idle times (p = .039). Teams in which members proactively communicated information about their next goal to teammates exhibited improved team performance. The findings from our work can inform the design of communication strategies for team training to improve performance of complex tasks. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  20. Hematologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Vallisa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the surprising progress made in other areas of hematology (advances in the understanding of leukemogenesis, improved transplant techniques has been conspicuously absent in the management of hematologic emergencies. And yet, every step toward greater knowledge, every new treatment option will be of little value unless we are able to manage the acute complications of hematologic diseases. These complications are better defined as hematologic emergencies, and they are characterized by a high rate of mortality. This review is based on a search of the literature that was initially confined to articles published in the journal Hematology from 2000 to 2009. The search was then extended to the Cochrane Library and to Pub Med in February 2010 with the following Keywords emergencies; urgencies; hematology. The same key words were employed in a search of the archives of Blood and the New England Journal of Medicine from 2000 to 2010. The results confirm that hematologic emergencies can be caused by hematologic malignancies as well as by non-neoplastic hematologic diseases. Within the former category; this review examines the causes; manifestations; treatment and prevention of disseminated intravascular coagulation; superior vena caval syndrome; spinal cord compression; tumor lysis syndrome; hyperleukocytosis; and hypercalcemia. We also review emergency situations associated with non-neoplatic haematological diseases; such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; drug-induced hemolytic anemia; and acute sickle-cell crisis.

  1. United States Department of Energy radiological emergency response programme - a national capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon-Hagerty, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    In order to respond to a radiological emergency, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) maintains seven emergency response assets and capabilities in support of a radiological emergency of any proportion within the continental United States and abroad. The seven emergency response assets and capabilities include: Accident Response Group; Aerial Measuring Systems; Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability; Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center; Nuclear Emergency Search Team; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiological Assistance Program. Presently, USDOE maintains the most comprehensive national radiological emergency response assets in the United States, capable of dealing with any type of emergency involving nuclear materials. In all, the Department's assets are available to support any type of accident/incident involving radioactive materials in coordination with other United States Federal agencies, as well as state and local governments, as required. (author)

  2. Confluence and convergence: team effectiveness in complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter-OʼGrady, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Complex adaptive systems require nursing leadership to rethink organizational work and the viability and effectiveness of teams. Much of emergent thinking about complexity and systems and organizations alter the understanding of the nature and function of teamwork and the configuration and leadership of team effort. Reflecting on basic concepts of complexity and their application to team formation, dynamics, and outcomes lays an important foundation for effectively guiding the strategic activity of systems through the focused tactical action of teams. Basic principles of complexity, their impact on teams, and the fundamental elements of team effectiveness are explored.

  3. Targeted On-Demand Team Performance App Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    management protocols and set up file management using encryption and a secure server. Complete 10 Customize Data Collection App Modify CareAssess App to...greater team morale. An App that serves to build relationships around the management of emergency medicine cases over time, could stimulate the... Management 4. Casualty Care 5. Trauma Care 6. Critical Care 7. Trauma Management 8. High Performing Teams 9. Team Characteristics 10. Team Composition

  4. Tiger Team audits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheney, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will address the purpose, scope, and approach of the Department of Energy Tiger Team Assessments. It will use the Tiger Team Assessment experience of Sandia National Laboratories at Albuquerque, New Mexico, as illustration

  5. Transforming Virtual Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille

    2005-01-01

    Investigating virtual team collaboration in industry using grounded theory this paper presents the in-dept analysis of empirical work conducted in a global organization of 100.000 employees where a global virtual team with participants from Sweden, United Kingdom, Canada, and North America were...... studied. The research question investigated is how collaboration is negotiated within virtual teams? This paper presents findings concerning how collaboration is negotiated within a virtual team and elaborate the difficulties due to invisible articulation work and managing multiple communities...... in transforming the virtual team into a community. It is argued that translucence in communication structures within the virtual team and between team and management is essential for engaging in a positive transformation process of trustworthiness supporting the team becoming a community, managing the immanent...

  6. Leadership Team | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadership Team Leadership Team Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the wind Initiative and provides leadership in the focus areas of high-fidelity modeling, wind power plant controls

  7. Teaming up for learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Fransen, J. (2012). Teaming up for learning: Team effectiveness in collaborative learning in higher education (Doctoral dissertation). November, 16, 2012, Open University in the Netherlands (CELSTEC), Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  8. Culture and teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Bradley L; Shapiro, Debra L; Lu, Shuye; McGurrin, Daniel P

    2016-04-01

    We first review research on culture effects in teams, illustrating that mean levels of team cultural values have main (i.e. direct) effects, indirect effects (i.e. mediated by intervening variables), and moderating influences on team processes and outcomes. Variance in team cultural values or on country of origin (i.e. nationality diversity) also has main effects on team functioning, and we highlight contextual variables that strengthen or weaken these main effects. We next review research examining the effect of variance in team cultural values on global virtual teams, specifically. Finally, we review research on how cultural values shape employees' receptivity to empowering leadership behavior in teams. We conclude by discussing critical areas for future research. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Your Dialysis Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z Health Guide Your Dialysis Care Team Tweet Share Print Email Good health care is ... dialyzers (artificial kidneys) for reuse. Vascular Access Care Team If you are a hemodialysis patient, another group ...

  10. Relatos da equipe de saúde quanto às práticas educativas ao vitimado no trânsito durante a hospitalização/reabilitação num hospital de emergência Health care team's reports on educational practices for road traffic victims during hospitalization/rehabilitation in an emergency hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Jane Eyre de Souza Vieira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar os relatos da equipe de saúde quanto às práticas educativas ao vitimado no trânsito durante a hospitalização/reabilitação, visando à minimização da instalação de sequelas traumato-ortopédicas. Este estudo foi realizado com 10 profissionais da equipe de saúde que trabalham em um hospital público de emergência em Fortaleza, Ceará, Brasil, em 2006. A entrevista semiestruturada foi a técnica utilizada para a coleta de dados, os quais foram submetidos à análise temática e discutidos à luz da Educação em Saúde e Promoção da Saúde. Para os participantes, a concepção sobre a prática educativa convergiu para o caráter preventivo, informacional e normativo; a equipe de saúde, apesar de não exercer o processo de assistência terapêutica integral e humanizada, alguns profissionais da equipe de saúde desenvolvem de forma tímida a prática educativa, desmitificando a Promoção da Saúde como foco da atenção primária. Desse modo, a reorientação da prática da equipe de saúde, com enfoque interdisciplinar à vítima de acidente de trânsito, pode ser um diferencial para minimizar a instalação de sequelas.The paper aims at analyzing the health care team's reports on educational practices to road traffic victims during the period of hospitalization and rehabilitation, trying to reduce traumatic orthopedic sequelae. The study was carried out with 10 professionals from the health care team who work in a public emergency hospital in the city of Fortaleza, State of Ceará, Brazil, in 2006. The semi-structured interview was the technique for collecting data and these were submitted to thematic analysis and then discussed in the light of Health Education and Health Promotion. To the participants, the conception of educational practice converged to a preventive, informational, and normative approach; although the health care team did not accomplish with integrality and humanization the

  11. Building multidisciplinary business teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyson, C.J.; Winte, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is a description of an approach to managing Exploration and Production assets through the operation of multidisciplinary business teams. The business team approach can assist in improved asset performance in terms of efficiency, motivation and business results, compared with more traditional matrix style hierarchies. Within this paper certain critical success factors for the long term success of multidiscipline teams are outlined, together with some of the risk of business team operation

  12. Toward Learning Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoda, Rashina; Babb, Jeff; Nørbjerg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    to sacrifice learning-focused practices. Effective learning under pressure involves conscious efforts to implement original agile practices such as retrospectives and adapted strategies such as learning spikes. Teams, their management, and customers must all recognize the importance of creating learning teams......Today's software development challenges require learning teams that can continuously apply new engineering and management practices, new and complex technical skills, cross-functional skills, and experiential lessons learned. The pressure of delivering working software often forces software teams...

  13. Formalization of Team Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Cerman, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    This paper is divided to practical and theoretical part. Theoretical part defines essential background of personality and work psychology which are pillars for using the personality and roles typology in practical part. I also define conceptions such as group, team, procedures of making the team. Practical part is focused at making the repertoary grid which outlines proximity of team roles, anchored in the repertoary grids upon personal atributes basis and picked team positions.

  14. The search of the best mode of the reserve power supply consumption during the nuclear reactor’s emergency shutdown procedures in case of force majeure circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrebaev, A. M.; Trifonenkov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the problem of the control mode choice for a power supply system in case of force majeure circumstances. It is not known precisely, when a force majeure incident occurs, but the threatened period is given, when the incident is expected. It is supposed, that force majeure circumstances force nuclear reactor shutdown at the moment of threat coming. In this article the power supply system is considered, which consists of a nuclear reactor and a reserve power supply, for example, a hydroelectric pumped storage power station. The reserve power supply has limited capacity and it doesn’t undergo the threatened incident. The problem of the search of the best reserve supply time-distribution in case of force majeure circumstances is stated. The search is performed according to minimization of power loss and damage to the infrastructure. The software has been developed, which performs automatic numerical search of the approximate optimal control modes for the reserve power supply.

  15. Structuring Effective Student Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Ellen L.

    1997-01-01

    Experience with student teams working on policy analysis projects indicates the need for faculty supervision of teams in the process of addressing complex issues. The problem-solving approach adopted in one policy analysis course is described, including assignments and tasks, issues and sponsors, team dynamics, conflict management, and the…

  16. Fostering teachers' team learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmans, Machiel; Runhaar, Piety; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of educational innovations by teachers seems to benefit from a team approach and team learning. The study's goal is to examine to what extent transformational leadership is associated with team learning, and to investigate the mediating roles of participative decision-making,

  17. Leadership for Distributed Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rooij, J.P.G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation was to study the little examined, yet important issue of leadership for distributed teams. Distributed teams are defined as: “teams of which members are geographically distributed and are therefore working predominantly via mediated communication means on an

  18. Study on dynamic team performance evaluation methodology based on team situation awareness model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk Chul

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to provide a theoretical framework and its evaluation methodology of team dynamic task performance of operating team at nuclear power plant under the dynamic and tactical environment such as radiological accident. This thesis suggested a team dynamic task performance evaluation model so called team crystallization model stemmed from Endsely's situation awareness model being comprised of four elements: state, information, organization, and orientation and its quantification methods using system dynamics approach and a communication process model based on a receding horizon control approach. The team crystallization model is a holistic approach for evaluating the team dynamic task performance in conjunction with team situation awareness considering physical system dynamics and team behavioral dynamics for a tactical and dynamic task at nuclear power plant. This model provides a systematic measure to evaluate time-dependent team effectiveness or performance affected by multi-agents such as plant states, communication quality in terms of transferring situation-specific information and strategies for achieving the team task goal at given time, and organizational factors. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model and its quantification method, the case study was carried out using the data obtained from a full-scope power plant simulator for 1,000MWe pressurized water reactors with four on-the-job operating groups and one expert group who knows accident sequences. Simulated results team dynamic task performance with reference key plant parameters behavior and team-specific organizational center of gravity and cue-and-response matrix illustrated good symmetry with observed value. The team crystallization model will be useful and effective tool for evaluating team effectiveness in terms of recruiting new operating team for new plant as cost-benefit manner. Also, this model can be utilized as a systematic analysis tool for

  19. Study on dynamic team performance evaluation methodology based on team situation awareness model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk Chul

    2005-02-15

    The purpose of this thesis is to provide a theoretical framework and its evaluation methodology of team dynamic task performance of operating team at nuclear power plant under the dynamic and tactical environment such as radiological accident. This thesis suggested a team dynamic task performance evaluation model so called team crystallization model stemmed from Endsely's situation awareness model being comprised of four elements: state, information, organization, and orientation and its quantification methods using system dynamics approach and a communication process model based on a receding horizon control approach. The team crystallization model is a holistic approach for evaluating the team dynamic task performance in conjunction with team situation awareness considering physical system dynamics and team behavioral dynamics for a tactical and dynamic task at nuclear power plant. This model provides a systematic measure to evaluate time-dependent team effectiveness or performance affected by multi-agents such as plant states, communication quality in terms of transferring situation-specific information and strategies for achieving the team task goal at given time, and organizational factors. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model and its quantification method, the case study was carried out using the data obtained from a full-scope power plant simulator for 1,000MWe pressurized water reactors with four on-the-job operating groups and one expert group who knows accident sequences. Simulated results team dynamic task performance with reference key plant parameters behavior and team-specific organizational center of gravity and cue-and-response matrix illustrated good symmetry with observed value. The team crystallization model will be useful and effective tool for evaluating team effectiveness in terms of recruiting new operating team for new plant as cost-benefit manner. Also, this model can be utilized as a systematic analysis tool for

  20. Emergency preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J. [Key Safety and Blowout Control Corp., Sylvan Lake, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This presentation included several slides depicting well control and emergency preparedness. It provided information to help in pre-emergency planning for potential well control situations. Key Safety and Blowout Control Corp has gained experience in the Canadian and International well control industry as well as from the fires of Kuwait. The president of the company lectures on the complications and concerns of managers, wellsite supervisors, service companies, the public sector, land owners, government agencies and the media. The slides presented scenarios based on actual blowout recovery assignments and described what types of resources are needed by a well control team. The presentation addressed issues such as the responsibility of a well control team and what they can be expected to do. The issue of how government agencies become involved was also discussed. The presentation combines important information and descriptive images of personal experiences in fire fighting and well control. The emergency situations presented here demonstrate the need for a thorough understanding of preplanning for emergencies and what to expect when a typical day in the oil patch turns into a high stress, volatile situation. tabs., figs.

  1. The impact of team familiarity and team leader experience on team coordination errors: A panel analysis of professional basketball teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieweke, Jost; Zhao, B.

    2015-01-01

    To explore the dynamics involved in team coordination, we examine the impact of team familiarity and team leader experience on team coordination errors (TCEs). We argue that team familiarity has a U-shaped effect on TCEs. We study the moderating effects of team leader prior experience and team

  2. Search Engines for Tomorrow's Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2011-01-01

    Today's scholars face an outstanding array of choices when choosing search tools: Google Scholar, discipline-specific abstracts and index databases, library discovery tools, and more recently, Microsoft's re-launch of their academic search tool, now dubbed Microsoft Academic Search. What are these tools' strengths for the emerging needs of…

  3. Criteria for successful multiprofessional cooperation in palliative care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünger, S; Pestinger, M; Elsner, F; Krumm, N; Radbruch, L

    2007-06-01

    Team work is considered a central component of palliative care. Within this comparatively young field of medicine, the emergence of new institutions (eg, palliative care units) highlights the challenge of establishing a completely new team. This study focuses on the factors, which enhance both the success and outcome criteria of good team work from the perception of team members in a palliative care unit. The palliative care team at the University Hospital of Aachen (n = 19) was interviewed 1 year after the unit's startup by the means of semistructured interviews. Interview texts were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Factors crucial to cooperation in the team members' views were close communication, team philosophy, good interpersonal relationships, high team commitment, autonomy and the ability to deal with death and dying. Moreover, close communication was by far the most frequently mentioned criteria for cooperation. Team performance, good coordination of workflow and mutual trust underpin the evaluation of efficient team work. Inefficient team work is associated with the absence of clear goals, tasks and role delegation, as well as a lack of team commitment. In a new team, close communication is particularly important for staff as they reorientate themselves to the dynamics of a new peer group. The results confirm the overwhelming importance of clarity, commitment and close, positive exchange among team members for successful team work.

  4. Searching for Effective Training Solutions for Firefighting: The Analysis of Emergency Responses and Line of Duty Death Reports for Low Frequency, High Risk Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    From the more common problems of pre-existing hazardous structures to the rare events of temperature inversion creating a dangerous environment...the Academy’s burn building. These training scenarios allow firefighters to practice search methods while simultaneously dealing with the heat, smoke...fire behavior (RFB), 32 • secondary collapse (SC), • standard op procedures training (SOP), • temperature inversion (TI), • unrestricted flow

  5. The Performance of Gender Diverse Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Villeseche, Florence

    Team gender diversity has been much debated in many different contexts – not least since the search for a main effect of diversity on performance was launched. However, results have so far been inconclusive, and a number of scholars suggest that more attention should be directed at contextual...... factors which could influence the effect of gender diversity on team performance. In this study, we explore the effect of positive diversity attitudes and assess the degree of gender diversity where such group attitudes have greater impact. This is done by using a sample of 1085 leaders of academic...... research teams. Findings show that positive diversity attitude in the form of group openness to diversity is strongly associated with team performance. We also find a moderating effect of gender diversity meaning that the effect of openness to diversity is stronger when gender groups are more balanced...

  6. Network-aware support for mobile distributed teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, R. van der; Jong, A. de; Brake, G.M. te; Greefe, T.E.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment evaluated network-aware support to increase understanding of the factors that are important for successful teamwork in mobile geographically dispersed teams of first responders. Participants performed a simulated search and rescue team task and were equipped with a digitized map and

  7. When Teams Fail to Self-Regulate: Predictors and Outcomes of Team Procrastination Among Debating Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooft, Edwin A J; Van Mierlo, Heleen

    2018-01-01

    Models of team development have indicated that teams typically engage in task delay during the first stages of the team's life cycle. An important question is to what extent this equally applies to all teams, or whether there is variation across teams in the amount of task delay. The present study introduces the concept of team procrastination as a lens through which we can examine whether teams collectively engage in unplanned, voluntary, and irrational delay of team tasks. Based on theory and research on self-regulation, team processes, and team motivation we developed a conceptual multilevel model of predictors and outcomes of team procrastination. In a sample of 209 student debating teams, we investigated whether and why teams engage in collective procrastination as a team, and what consequences team procrastination has in terms of team member well-being and team performance. The results supported the existence of team procrastination as a team-level construct that has some stability over time. The teams' composition in terms of individual-level trait procrastination, as well as the teams' motivational states (i.e., team learning goal orientation, team performance-approach goal orientation in interaction with team efficacy) predicted team procrastination. Team procrastination related positively to team members' stress levels, especially for those low on trait procrastination. Furthermore, team procrastination had an indirect negative relationship with team performance, through teams' collective stress levels. These findings add to the theoretical understanding of self-regulatory processes of teams, and highlight the practical importance of paying attention to team-level states and processes such as team goal orientation and team procrastination.

  8. Interpersonal team leadership skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M

    1995-05-01

    To say that a team leader's job is a tough one is certainly not saying enough. It is up to the team leader to manage a group of people to be individuals but yet work as a team. The team leader must keep the peace and yet create a revolution with this group all at the same time. The good leader will require a lot of education, training, and tons of practical application to be a success. The good news, however, is that the team leader's job is a rewarding one, one that they'll always feel good about if they do it right. How many of us get the opportunity to take a group of wonderful, thinking individual minds and pull from them ideas that a whole team can take to success? Yes, the job is indeed tough, but the paybacks are many.

  9. Managing multicultural teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Jeanne; Behfar, Kristin; Kern, Mary C

    2006-11-01

    Multicultural teams offer a number of advantages to international firms, including deep knowledge of different product markets, culturally sensitive customer service, and 24-hour work rotations. But those advantages may be outweighed by problems stemming from cultural differences, which can seriously impair the effectiveness of a team or even bring itto a stalemate. How can managers best cope with culture-based challenges? The authors conducted in-depth interviews with managers and members of multicultural teams from all over the world. Drawing on their extensive research on dispute resolution and teamwork and those interviews, they identify four problem categories that can create barriers to a team's success: direct versus indirect communication, trouble with accents and fluency, differing attitudes toward hierarchy and authority, and conflicting norms for decision making. If a manager--or a team member--can pinpoint the root cause of the problem, he or she is likelier to select an appropriate strategy for solving it. The most successful teams and managers, the authors found, dealt with multicultural challenges in one of four ways: adaptation (acknowledging cultural gaps openly and working around them), structural intervention (changing the shape or makeup of the team), managerial intervention (setting norms early or bringing in a higher-level manager), and exit (removing a team member when other options have failed). Which strategy is best depends on the particular circumstances--and each has potential complications. In general, though, managers who intervene early and set norms; teams and managers who try to engage everyone on the team; and teams that can see challenges as stemming from culture, not personality, succeed in solving culture-based problems with good humor and creativity. They are the likeliest to harvest the benefits inherent in multicultural teams.

  10. Random searching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlesinger, Michael F

    2009-01-01

    There are a wide variety of searching problems from molecules seeking receptor sites to predators seeking prey. The optimal search strategy can depend on constraints on time, energy, supplies or other variables. We discuss a number of cases and especially remark on the usefulness of Levy walk search patterns when the targets of the search are scarce.

  11. The NPD team conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zheng; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Tanev, Stoyan

    2012-01-01

    elaborates on the role of culture diversity and geographical dispersion in NPD team conflict. A simulation is conducted where organizations may be regarded as complex systems to affect the team conflict with a variety of influences. The results firstly indicate that there are two dimensions of NPD team...... conflict: stable and unstable dimensions with four elements: task characteristics, group members’ relationship, cultural diversity and geographical dispersion; secondly, there are two phenomena whereby the geographical dispersion influences the NPD team interaction, and the influence between cultural...

  12. Search Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Morville, Peter

    2010-01-01

    What people are saying about Search Patterns "Search Patterns is a delight to read -- very thoughtful and thought provoking. It's the most comprehensive survey of designing effective search experiences I've seen." --Irene Au, Director of User Experience, Google "I love this book! Thanks to Peter and Jeffery, I now know that search (yes, boring old yucky who cares search) is one of the coolest ways around of looking at the world." --Dan Roam, author, The Back of the Napkin (Portfolio Hardcover) "Search Patterns is a playful guide to the practical concerns of search interface design. It cont

  13. Path to 'Stardom' in Globally Distributed Hybrid Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarker, Suprateek; Hove-Kirkeby, Sarah; Sarker, Saonee

    2011-01-01

    recognition that specific individuals within such teams are often critical to the team's performance. Consequently, existing knowledge about such teams may be enhanced by examining the factors that affect the performance of individual team members. This study attempts to address this need by identifying...... individuals who emerge as “stars” in globally distributed teams involved in knowledge work such as information systems development (ISD). Specifically, the study takes a knowledge-centered view in explaining which factors lead to “stardom” in such teams. Further, it adopts a social network approach consistent......Although distributed teams have been researched extensively in information systems and decision science disciplines, a review of the literature suggests that the dominant focus has been on understanding the factors affecting performance at the team level. There has however been an increasing...

  14. Thick as Thieves: The Effects of Ethical Orientation and Psychological Safety on Unethical Team Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall, Matthew J.; Ellis, Aleksander P. J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to uncover compositional and emergent influences on unethical behavior by teams. Results from 126 teams indicated that the presence of a formalistic orientation within the team was negatively related to collective unethical decisions. Conversely, the presence of a utilitarian orientation within the team was positively…

  15. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  16. Emerging jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Weiler, Andreas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  17. Emerging jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  18. Trauma teams and time to early management during in situ trauma team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härgestam, Maria; Lindkvist, Marie; Jacobsson, Maritha; Brulin, Christine; Hultin, Magnus

    2016-01-29

    To investigate the association between the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery and gender, ethnicity, years in profession, experience of trauma team training, experience of structured trauma courses and trauma in the trauma team, as well as use of closed-loop communication and leadership styles during trauma team training. In situ trauma team training. The patient simulator was preprogrammed to represent a severely injured patient (injury severity score: 25) suffering from hypovolemia due to external trauma. An emergency room in an urban Scandinavian level one trauma centre. A total of 96 participants were divided into 16 trauma teams. Each team consisted of six team members: one surgeon/emergency physician (designated team leader), one anaesthesiologist, one registered nurse anaesthetist, one registered nurse from the emergency department, one enrolled nurse from the emergency department and one enrolled nurse from the operating theatre. HRs with CIs (95% CI) for the time taken to make a decision to go to surgery was computed from a Cox proportional hazards model. Three variables remained significant in the final model. Closed-loop communication initiated by the team leader increased the chance of a decision to go to surgery (HR: 3.88; CI 1.02 to 14.69). Only 8 of the 16 teams made the decision to go to surgery within the timeframe of the trauma team training. Conversely, call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by the team members significantly decreased the chance of a decision to go to surgery, (HR: 0.82; CI 0.71 to 0.96, and HR: 0.23; CI 0.08 to 0.71, respectively). Closed-loop communication initiated by the leader appears to be beneficial for teamwork. In contrast, a high number of call-outs and closed-loop communication initiated by team members might lead to a communication overload. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Expanding the Advising Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennen, Robert E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The process and results of team building by Emporia State University's centralized advising center are examined from the perspectives of president, enrollment management, centralized advising, and faculty. The effort demonstrates that administrative, state, and team commitment can produce positive results in freshman retention, higher graduation…

  20. Cooperative Team Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    team processes, such as identifying motifs of dynamic communication exchanges which goes well beyond simple dyadic and triadic configurations; as well...new metrics and ways to formulate team processes, such as identifying motifs of dynamic communication exchanges which goes well beyond simple dyadic ...sensing, communication , information, and decision networks - Darryl Ahner (AFIT: Air Force Inst Tech) Panel Session: Mathematical Models of

  1. Interactive Team Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team…

  2. Climate Action Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Partnerships Contact Us Climate Action Team & Climate Action Initiative The Climate Action programs and the state's Climate Adaptation Strategy. The CAT members are state agency secretaries and the . See CAT reports Climate Action Team Pages CAT Home Members Working Groups Reports Back to Top

  3. Team Leadership in Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neck, Christopher; Manz, Charles C.; Manz, Karen P.

    1998-01-01

    Although educational teams can help reduce teachers' feelings of isolation and enhance instruction, ineffective leadership often dooms their efforts. This article describes four team leadership approaches: "strong-man,""transactor,""visionary hero," and "SuperLeadership." The last is superior, since it…

  4. Gender diversity in teams

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazala Azmat

    2014-01-01

    Women’s representation on corporate boards, political committees, and other teams is increasing, in part because of legal mandates. Data on team dynamics and gender differences in preferences (risk-taking behavior, taste for competition, prosocial behavior) show how gender composition influences group decision-making and subsequent performance through channels such as investment decisions, internal management, corporate governance, and social responsibility.

  5. Trust in agile teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Gitte; Fransgård, Mette; Skalkam, Signe

    2012-01-01

    actions influenced this. We see two important lessons from the analysis. First the agile practices of daily Scrum and self organizing team can empower DSD teams to manage their own development of trust and thereby alleviate the obstacles of DSD. Second if management fails to support the development...

  6. Creating collaboration opportunities for marine research across the Arctic: The SEARCH-ACCESS partnership and an emerging sea ice prediction research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicken, H.; Bitz, C. M.; Gascard, J.; Kaminski, T.; Karcher, M. J.; Kauker, F.; Overland, J. E.; Stroeve, J. C.; Wiggins, H. V.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid Arctic environmental and socio-economic change presents major challenges and opportunities to Arctic residents, government agencies and the private sector. The Arctic Ocean and its ice cover, in particular, are in the midst of transformative change, ranging from declines in sea-ice thickness and summer ice extent to threats to coastal communities and increases in maritime traffic and offshore resource development. The US interagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) and the European Arctic Climate Change, Economy and Society (ACCESS) project are addressing both scientific research needs and stakeholder information priorities to improve understanding and responses to Arctic change. Capacity building, coordination and integration of activities at the international level and across sectors and stakeholder groups are major challenges that have to be met. ACCESS and SEARCH build on long-standing collaborations with a focus on environmental change in the Arctic ocean-ice-atmosphere system and the most pressing research needs to inform marine policy, resource management and threats to Arctic coastal communities. To illustrate the approach, key results and major conclusions from this international coordination and collaboration effort, we focus on a nascent sea-ice prediction research network. This activity builds on the Arctic Sea Ice Outlook that was initiated by SEARCH and the European DAMOCLES project (a precursor to ACCESS) and has now grown into an international community of practice that synthesizes, evaluates and discusses sea-ice predictions on seasonal to interannual scales. Key goals of the effort which is now entering into a new phase include the comparative evaluation of different prediction approaches, including the combination of different techniques, the compilation of reference datasets and model output, guidance on the design and implementation of observing system efforts to improve predictions and information transfer into private

  7. Return of IAEA assistance team from Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document informs about the return from Thailand of the IAEA team sent (upon the request of the Thai Government under the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency) to Bangkok to help Thai counterparts in the wake of an accident involving a discarded radioactive cobalt 60 source used in hospitals

  8. When Teams Fail to Self-Regulate: Predictors and Outcomes of Team Procrastination Among Debating Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooft, Edwin A. J.; Van Mierlo, Heleen

    2018-01-01

    Models of team development have indicated that teams typically engage in task delay during the first stages of the team’s life cycle. An important question is to what extent this equally applies to all teams, or whether there is variation across teams in the amount of task delay. The present study introduces the concept of team procrastination as a lens through which we can examine whether teams collectively engage in unplanned, voluntary, and irrational delay of team tasks. Based on theory and research on self-regulation, team processes, and team motivation we developed a conceptual multilevel model of predictors and outcomes of team procrastination. In a sample of 209 student debating teams, we investigated whether and why teams engage in collective procrastination as a team, and what consequences team procrastination has in terms of team member well-being and team performance. The results supported the existence of team procrastination as a team-level construct that has some stability over time. The teams’ composition in terms of individual-level trait procrastination, as well as the teams’ motivational states (i.e., team learning goal orientation, team performance-approach goal orientation in interaction with team efficacy) predicted team procrastination. Team procrastination related positively to team members’ stress levels, especially for those low on trait procrastination. Furthermore, team procrastination had an indirect negative relationship with team performance, through teams’ collective stress levels. These findings add to the theoretical understanding of self-regulatory processes of teams, and highlight the practical importance of paying attention to team-level states and processes such as team goal orientation and team procrastination. PMID:29674991

  9. When Teams Fail to Self-Regulate: Predictors and Outcomes of Team Procrastination Among Debating Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin A. J. Van Hooft

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Models of team development have indicated that teams typically engage in task delay during the first stages of the team’s life cycle. An important question is to what extent this equally applies to all teams, or whether there is variation across teams in the amount of task delay. The present study introduces the concept of team procrastination as a lens through which we can examine whether teams collectively engage in unplanned, voluntary, and irrational delay of team tasks. Based on theory and research on self-regulation, team processes, and team motivation we developed a conceptual multilevel model of predictors and outcomes of team procrastination. In a sample of 209 student debating teams, we investigated whether and why teams engage in collective procrastination as a team, and what consequences team procrastination has in terms of team member well-being and team performance. The results supported the existence of team procrastination as a team-level construct that has some stability over time. The teams’ composition in terms of individual-level trait procrastination, as well as the teams’ motivational states (i.e., team learning goal orientation, team performance-approach goal orientation in interaction with team efficacy predicted team procrastination. Team procrastination related positively to team members’ stress levels, especially for those low on trait procrastination. Furthermore, team procrastination had an indirect negative relationship with team performance, through teams’ collective stress levels. These findings add to the theoretical understanding of self-regulatory processes of teams, and highlight the practical importance of paying attention to team-level states and processes such as team goal orientation and team procrastination.

  10. Managing Geographically Dispersed Teams: From Temporary to Permanent Global Virtual Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane Hansen, Tine; Hope, Alexander John; Moehler, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    for organisations to move towards establishing permanent Global Virtual Teams in order to leverage knowledge sharing and cooperation across distance. To close this gap, this paper will set the scene for a research project investigating the changed preconditions for organisations. As daily face-to-face communication......The rise and spread of information communication technologies (ICT) has enabled increasing use of geographically dispersed work teams (Global Virtual Teams). Originally, Global Virtual Teams were mainly organised into temporary projects. Little research has focused on the emergent challenge...... generation of self-lead digital natives, who are already practising virtual relationships and a new approach to work, and currently joining the global workforce; and improved communication technologies. Keywords: Global Virtual teams, ICT, leadership, motivation, self-management, millenials....

  11. 'In situ simulation' versus 'off site simulation' in obstetric emergencies and their effect on knowledge, safety attitudes, team performance, stress, and motivation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorensen, J.L.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Lindschou, J.; Gluud, C.; Ostergaard, D.; Leblanc, V.; Johansen, M.; Ekelund, K.; Albrechtsen, C.K.; Pedersen, B.W.; Kjaergaard, H.; Weikop, P.; Ottesen, B.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unexpected obstetric emergencies threaten the safety of pregnant women. As emergencies are rare, they are difficult to learn. Therefore, simulation-based medical education (SBME) seems relevant. In non-systematic reviews on SBME, medical simulation has been suggested to be associated

  12. Leading Teams of Leaders: What Helps Team Member Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Monica; Young, Lissa; Weiner, Jennie; Wlodarczyk, Steven

    2010-01-01

    School districts are moving toward a new form of management in which superintendents need to form and nurture leadership teams. A study of 25 such teams in Connecticut suggests that a team's effectiveness is maximized when the team members are coached by other team members, not the superintendent, and when they are coached on task-related…

  13. Team Psychological Safety and Team Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauwelier, Peter; Ribière, Vincent M.; Bennet, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if the concept of team psychological safety, a key driver of team learning and originally studied in the West, can be applied in teams from different national cultures. The model originally validated for teams in the West is applied to teams in Thailand to evaluate its validity, and the views team…

  14. Measuring Team Learning Behaviours through Observing Verbal Team Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Elisabeth; Boon, Anne; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore, as an answer to the observed lack of knowledge about actual team learning behaviours, the characteristics of the actual observed basic team learning behaviours and facilitating team learning behaviours more in-depth of three project teams. Over time, team learning in an organisational context has been…

  15. Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours in Response Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Anne; Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Teams, teamwork and team learning have been the subject of many research studies over the last decades. This article aims at investigating and confirming the Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours (TLB&B) model within a very specific population, i.e. police and firemen teams. Within this context, the paper asks whether the team's…

  16. Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

  17. Exploring the importance of team psychological safety in the development of two interprofessional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Denise Fiona

    2016-01-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that interactions within interprofessional teams are characterised by effective communication, shared decision-making, and knowledge sharing. This article outlines aspects of an action research study examining the emergence of these characteristics within change management teams made up of nurses, general practitioners, physiotherapists, care assistants, a health and safety officer, and a client at two residential care facilities for older people in Ireland. The theoretical concept of team psychological safety (TPS) is utilised in presenting these characteristics. TPS has been defined as an atmosphere within a team where individuals feel comfortable engaging in discussion and reflection without fear of censure. Study results suggest that TPS was an important catalyst in enhancing understanding and power sharing across professional boundaries and thus in the development of interprofessional teamwork. There were differences between the teams. In one facility, the team developed many characteristics of interprofessional teamwork while at the other there was only a limited shift. Stability in team membership and organisational norms relating to shared decision-making emerged as particularly important in accounting for differences in the development of TPS and interprofessional teamwork.

  18. Building the team for team science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Emily K.; O'Rourke, M.; Hong, G. S.; Hanson, P. C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Crowley, S.; Brewer, C. A.; Weathers, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to effectively exchange information and develop trusting, collaborative relationships across disciplinary boundaries is essential for 21st century scientists charged with solving complex and large-scale societal and environmental challenges, yet these communication skills are rarely taught. Here, we describe an adaptable training program designed to increase the capacity of scientists to engage in information exchange and relationship development in team science settings. A pilot of the program, developed by a leader in ecological network science, the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), indicates that the training program resulted in improvement in early career scientists’ confidence in team-based network science collaborations within and outside of the program. Fellows in the program navigated human-network challenges, expanded communication skills, and improved their ability to build professional relationships, all in the context of producing collaborative scientific outcomes. Here, we describe the rationale for key communication training elements and provide evidence that such training is effective in building essential team science skills.

  19. Personalized Search

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)749939

    2015-01-01

    As the volume of electronically available information grows, relevant items become harder to find. This work presents an approach to personalizing search results in scientific publication databases. This work focuses on re-ranking search results from existing search engines like Solr or ElasticSearch. This work also includes the development of Obelix, a new recommendation system used to re-rank search results. The project was proposed and performed at CERN, using the scientific publications available on the CERN Document Server (CDS). This work experiments with re-ranking using offline and online evaluation of users and documents in CDS. The experiments conclude that the personalized search result outperform both latest first and word similarity in terms of click position in the search result for global search in CDS.

  20. Next generation red teaming

    CERN Document Server

    Dalziel, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Red Teaming is can be described as a type of wargaming.In private business, penetration testers audit and test organization security, often in a secretive setting. The entire point of the Red Team is to see how weak or otherwise the organization's security posture is. This course is particularly suited to CISO's and CTO's that need to learn how to build a successful Red Team, as well as budding cyber security professionals who would like to learn more about the world of information security. Teaches readers how to dentify systemic security issues based on the analysis of vulnerability and con

  1. Project team motyvation

    OpenAIRE

    Jasionis, Dominykas

    2016-01-01

    The term paper is to analyze the formation of the team and its - motyvation, and interviews from four different companies and find out the leaders in terms of your team, and what principle he tries to motivate her. The Tasks of this paper is to review the organization formed by a team; investigate the promotion of employees in enterprises; The four firms interviewed; Assess how you can work in different organizations. Methods used To analyze the topic, I decided to interview four different co...

  2. Conflict in medical teams: opportunity or danger?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lindred L; Saygi, Ozum; Aaldering, Hillie; de Dreu, Carsten K W

    2012-10-01

      Intragroup conflicts often occur when people are called upon to collaborate in the accomplishment of a task. For example, when surgeons and nurses work together during an operation, conflicts may emerge because of differences in functional understanding. Whether these conflicts are beneficial or detrimental to team outcomes has been the source of much debate. From one perspective, a conflict that stems from differences in members' functional understanding may enhance team members' understanding and performance of the task at hand. By contrast, such a conflict may cause hostility, emotionality and distraction from actual task accomplishment.   This study reviews findings on the relationships between intragroup conflict and team outcomes, discusses potential conflict resolution strategies for intragroup conflicts and explores how these link to the field of medical education.   Three primary types of conflict have been distinguished, involving, respectively, task-, process- and relationship-associated conflict. Both process conflict, or conflict about the logistics of task accomplishment, and relationship conflict, or conflict about interpersonal incompatibilities, have been shown to detract from effective team functioning. Task conflict, or conflict about the content of the task itself, is also generally negative for team functioning, but under certain conditions its negative effects may be minimised. For example, when teams can clearly separate task issues from relationship issues, task conflicts are less destructive for team outcomes. However, achieving such a separation in practice, and thereby realising the benefits of task conflict, is quite difficult to achieve.   Intragroup conflicts pose a challenge to effective team functioning. In the education of medical professionals, effective training in conflict management skills and their application to specific team conflict dynamics, such as with reference to how to resolve task as opposed to relationship

  3. Research teams as complex systems: implications for knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasileiadou, E.

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase in research collaboration creates the need to better understand the interaction between individual researchers and the collaborative team. The paper elaborates the conceptualisation of research teams as complex systems which emerge out of the local interactions of individual

  4. 78 FR 79010 - Criteria to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... coal requires more heat to combust; (3) anthracite dust does not propagate an explosion; and (4) there... to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION... updated the coal mine rescue team certification criteria. The Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response...

  5. One Team, One Fight, One Future, Total Army Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    ...; and, most important, our vision for maintaining a trained and ready force. As the ideas in One Team, One Fight, One Future unfold, you will find the key themes of Total Army integration emerging again and again...

  6. Hearing Conservation Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hearing Conservation Team focuses on ways to identify the early stages of noise-induced damage to the human ear.Our current research involves the evaluation of...

  7. Forging Provincial Reconstruction Teams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Honore, Russel L; Boslego, David V

    2007-01-01

    The Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) training mission completed by First U.S. Army in April 2006 was a joint Service effort to meet a requirement from the combatant commander to support goals in Afghanistan...

  8. Critical Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often uphold the patient's wishes. The critical care nurse becomes an important part of decision-making with the patient, the family and the care team. A registered nurse (RN) who is certified in critical care is ...

  9. Integrated Transdisciplinary Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivan-Fenlon, Amanda

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews the use of transdisciplinary teaming and integrated therapy for young children with multiple disabilities. It presents examples and suggestions for implementation, in the areas of flexibility, Individualized Education Program development, and parent participation. (JDD)

  10. Submarine Medicine Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Submarine Medicine Team conducts basic and applied research on biomedical aspects of submarine and diving environments. It focuses on ways to optimize the health...

  11. Virtual Project Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille

    technology in six real-life virtual teams, two in industry and four in education, applying interpretative research and action research methods. Two main lines of investigation are pursued: the first involves an examination of the organisational issues related to groupware adaptation in virtual project teams......, professional disciplines, time differences and technology. This thesis comprises a general introduction, referred to as the summary report, and seven research papers, which deal in detail with the results and findings of the empirical cases. The summary report provides a general introduction to the research......, while the second looks at the social context and practices of virtual project teams. Two of the key findings are 1) that the process of groupware adaptation by virtual project teams can be viewed as a process of expanding and aligning the technological frames of the participants, which includes mutual...

  12. Virtual team collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Ngwenyama, Ojelanki

    2009-01-01

    Managing international teams with geographically distributed participants is a complex task. The risk of communication breakdowns increases due to cultural and organizational differences grounded in the geographical distribution of the participants. Such breakdowns indicate general misunderstandi...

  13. Media and Security Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Media And Security Team led by Prof. Min Wu was established in Fall 2001 at University of Maryland, College Park. A number of research and education activities...

  14. PPB | Study Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pleuropulmonary Blastoma (PPB) DICER1 Syndrome Study team is made up of researchers from the National Cancer Institute, Children¹s National Medical Center, the International Pleuropulmonary Blastoma Registry, and Washington University in St. Louis.

  15. Leading Strategic Leader Teams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burleson, Willard M

    2008-01-01

    .... Although only 1 to 2 percent of the Army's senior leaders will attain a command position of strategic leadership, they are assisted by others, not only by teams specifically designed and structured...

  16. Making Teamwork Work: Team Knowledge for Team Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchait, Priyanko; Lei, Puiwa; Tews, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two types of team knowledge on team effectiveness. The study assessed the impact of taskwork knowledge and teamwork knowledge on team satisfaction and performance. A longitudinal study was conducted with 27 service-management teams involving 178 students in a real-life restaurant setting. Teamwork knowledge was found to impact both team outcomes. Furthermore, team learning behavior was found to mediate the relationships between teamwork knowledge and team outcomes. Educators and managers should therefore ensure these types of knowledge are developed in teams along with learning behavior for maximum effectiveness.

  17. Teams make it work: how team work engagement mediates between social resources and performance in teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Pedro; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2012-02-01

    In this study we analyze the mediating role of team work engagement between team social resources (i.e., supportive team climate, coordination, teamwork), and team performance (i.e., in-role and extra-role performance) as predicted by the Job Demands-Resources Model. Aggregated data of 533 employees nested within 62 teams and 13 organizations were used, whereas team performance was assessed by supervisor ratings. Structural equation modeling revealed that, as expected, team work engagement plays a mediating role between social resources perceived at the team level and team performance as assessed by the supervisor.

  18. When teams fail to self-regulate: Predictors and outcomes of team procrastination among debating teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.J. van Hooft (Edwin); H. van Mierlo (Heleen)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractModels of team development have indicated that teams typically engage in task delay during the first stages of the team's life cycle. An important question is to what extent this equally applies to all teams, or whether there is variation across teams in the amount of task delay. The

  19. Team Training and Institutional Protocols to Prevent Shoulder Dystocia Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetrical emergency that may result in significant neonatal complications. It requires rapid recognition and a coordinated response. Standardization of care, teamwork and communication, and clinical simulation are the key components of patient safety programs in obstetrics. Simulation-based team training and institutional protocols for the management of shoulder dystocia are emerging as integral components of many labor and delivery safety initiatives because of their impact on technical skills and team performance.

  20. Trauma team leaders' non-verbal communication: video registration during trauma team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härgestam, Maria; Hultin, Magnus; Brulin, Christine; Jacobsson, Maritha

    2016-03-25

    There is widespread consensus on the importance of safe and secure communication in healthcare, especially in trauma care where time is a limiting factor. Although non-verbal communication has an impact on communication between individuals, there is only limited knowledge of how trauma team leaders communicate. The purpose of this study was to investigate how trauma team members are positioned in the emergency room, and how leaders communicate in terms of gaze direction, vocal nuances, and gestures during trauma team training. Eighteen trauma teams were audio and video recorded during trauma team training in the emergency department of a hospital in northern Sweden. Quantitative content analysis was used to categorize the team members' positions and the leaders' non-verbal communication: gaze direction, vocal nuances, and gestures. The quantitative data were interpreted in relation to the specific context. Time sequences of the leaders' gaze direction, speech time, and gestures were identified separately and registered as time (seconds) and proportions (%) of the total training time. The team leaders who gained control over the most important area in the emergency room, the "inner circle", positioned themselves as heads over the team, using gaze direction, gestures, vocal nuances, and verbal commands that solidified their verbal message. Changes in position required both attention and collaboration. Leaders who spoke in a hesitant voice, or were silent, expressed ambiguity in their non-verbal communication: and other team members took over the leader's tasks. In teams where the leader had control over the inner circle, the members seemed to have an awareness of each other's roles and tasks, knowing when in time and where in space these tasks needed to be executed. Deviations in the leaders' communication increased the ambiguity in the communication, which had consequences for the teamwork. Communication cannot be taken for granted; it needs to be practiced

  1. Relationships among Team Trust, Team Cohesion, Team Satisfaction and Project Team Effectiveness as Perceived by Project Managers in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Han-Ping Fung

    2014-01-01

    Today, more and more project teams are formed to achieve organizational objectives as organizations generally recognized the importance and benefits of project teams. There is a compelling reason to study what are the team outcome factors that can predict project team effectiveness as it is unclear whether these team outcome factors can yield the same result in project setting whereby there is resource and time constraint compare to normal work teams which are ongoing and operational in natur...

  2. The Research of Self-Management Team and Superior-Direction Team in Team Learning Influential Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Team learning is a cure for bureaucracy; it facilitates team innovation and team performance. But team learning occurs only when necessary conditions were met. This research focused on differences of team learning influential factors between self-management team and superior-direction team. Four variables were chosen as predictors of team learning though literature review and pilot interview. The 4 variables are team motivation, team trust, team conflict and team leadership. Selected 54 self ...

  3. Emergency procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed - Emergency Procedures: emergency equipment, emergency procedures; emergency procedure involving X-Ray equipment; emergency procedure involving radioactive sources

  4. Bomb Threats and Bomb Search Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet explains how to be prepared and plan for bomb threats and describes procedures to follow once a call has been received. The content covers (1) preparation for bomb threats, (2) evacuation procedures, (3) room search methods, (4) procedures to follow once a bomb has been located, and (5) typical problems that search teams will…

  5. Search Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Cornière (de), Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Search engines enable advertisers to target consumers based on the query they have entered. In a framework with horizontal product differentiation, imperfect product information and in which consumers incur search costs, I study a game in which advertisers have to choose a price and a set of relevant keywords. The targeting mechanism brings about three kinds of efficiency gains, namely lower search costs, better matching, and more intense product market price-competition. A monopolistic searc...

  6. The Relationship between Management Team Size and Team Performance: The Mediating Effect of Team Psychological Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Midthaug, Mari Bratterud

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore the relationship between team size (number of team members) and team performance in management teams. There is a lack of empirical research exploring the potential links between these two elements within management teams. Further, little attention has been paid to potential mechanisms affecting this relationship. In this study, team psychological safety has been examined as a potential mediator in the size-performance relationship, hypothesizing that t...

  7. Team skills training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, R.P.; Carl, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous reports and articles have been written recently on the importance of team skills training for nuclear reactor operators, but little has appeared on the practical application of this theoretical guidance. This paper describes the activities of the Training and Education Department at GPU Nuclear (GPUN). In 1987, GPUN undertook a significant initiative in its licensed operator training programs to design and develop initial and requalification team skills training. Prior to that time, human interaction skills training (communication, stress management, supervisory skills, etc.) focused more on the individual rather than a group. Today, GPU Nuclear conducts team training at both its Three Mile Island (YMI), PA and Oyster Creek (OC), NJ generating stations. Videotaped feedback is sued extensively to critique and reinforce targeted behaviors. In fact, the TMI simulator trainer has a built-in, four camera system specifically designed for team training. Evaluations conducted on this training indicated these newly acquired skills are being carried over to the work environment. Team training is now an important and on-going part of GPUN operator training

  8. Science and Team Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Cole

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a new idea about the future development of science and teams, and predicts its possible applications in science, education, workforce development and research. The inter-relatedness of science and teamwork developments suggests a growing importance of team facilitators’ quality, as well as the criticality of detailed studies of teamwork processes and team consortiums to address the increasing complexity of exponential knowledge growth and work interdependency. In the future, it will become much easier to produce a highly specialised workforce, such as brain surgeons or genome engineers, than to identify, educate and develop individuals capable of the delicate and complex work of multi-team facilitation. Such individuals will become the new scientists of the millennium, having extraordinary knowledge in variety of scientific fields, unusual mix of abilities, possessing highly developed interpersonal and teamwork skills, and visionary ideas in illuminating bold strategies for new scientific discoveries. The new scientists of the millennium, through team consortium facilitation, will be able to build bridges between the multitude of diverse and extremely specialised knowledge and interdependent functions to improve systems for the further benefit of mankind.

  9. Increasing Student-Learning Team Effectiveness with Team Charters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Phillip; Pavett, Cynthia; Hunsaker, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Because teams are a ubiquitous part of most organizations today, it is common for business educators to use team assignments to help students experientially learn about course concepts and team process. Unfortunately, students frequently experience a number of problems during team assignments. The authors describe the results of their research and…

  10. Measuring cognition in teams: a cross-domain review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, Jessica L; Salas, Eduardo; Scott, Charles P R

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold: to provide a critical cross-domain evaluation of team cognition measurement options and to provide novice researchers with practical guidance when selecting a measurement method. A vast selection of measurement approaches exist for measuring team cognition constructs including team mental models, transactive memory systems, team situation awareness, strategic consensus, and cognitive processes. Empirical studies and theoretical articles were reviewed to identify all of the existing approaches for measuring team cognition. These approaches were evaluated based on theoretical perspective assumed, constructs studied, resources required, level of obtrusiveness, internal consistency reliability, and predictive validity. The evaluations suggest that all existing methods are viable options from the point of view of reliability and validity, and that there are potential opportunities for cross-domain use. For example, methods traditionally used only to measure mental models may be useful for examining transactive memory and situation awareness. The selection of team cognition measures requires researchers to answer several key questions regarding the theoretical nature of team cognition and the practical feasibility of each method. We provide novice researchers with guidance regarding how to begin the search for a team cognition measure and suggest several new ideas regarding future measurement research. We provide (1) a broad overview and evaluation of existing team cognition measurement methods, (2) suggestions for new uses of those methods across research domains, and (3) critical guidance for novice researchers looking to measure team cognition.

  11. When Teams Go Crazy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Münch, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Software development consists to a large extend of human-based processes with continuously increasing demands regarding interdisciplinary team work. Understanding the dynamics of software teams can be seen as highly important to successful project execution. Hence, for future project managers......, knowledge about non-technical processes in teams is significant. In this paper, we present a course unit that provides an environment in which students can learn and experience the impact of group dynamics on project performance and quality. The course unit uses the Tuckman model as theoretical framework......, and borrows from controlled experiments to organize and implement its practical parts in which students then experience the effects of, e.g., time pressure, resource bottlenecks, staff turnover, loss of key personnel, and other stress factors. We provide a detailed design of the course unit to allow...

  12. Creativity and Creative Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

  13. Team Leadership: Leadership Role Achievement in Supervision Teams in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Sabanci; Izzet Ozdemir

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the views of team leaders and team members of supervision teams about the extent that team leaders achieve their team leadership roles in Turkey. This research was conducted as a survey. The population of the study consisted of approximately 2650 supervisors (inspectors) working in 81 provinces distributed to seven geographical regions in Turkey. The sample consisted of 563 supervisors which were selected out by random sampling. The data were gathered b...

  14. Beautiful Teams Inspiring and Cautionary Tales from Veteran Team Leaders

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    What's it like to work on a great software development team facing an impossible problem? How do you build an effective team? Beautiful Teams takes you behind the scenes with some of the most interesting teams in software engineering history. You'll learn from veteran team leaders' successes and failures, told through a series of engaging personal stories -- and interviews -- by leading programmers, architects, project managers, and thought leaders.

  15. Payment Mechanisms for Integrated Teams in Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Motawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The overwhelming consensus for process andteam integration has emerged as an enabler tomanage construction projects. Theperformance of integrated teams is highlyaffected by the adopted payment mechanism.However, the payment mechanisms availablefor a project may need the team tocompromise in order to agree on a fairmechanism for as many members as possible.This paper introduces a methodology tosimulate the profiles of alternative paymentmechanisms. The methodology aims to helpproject teams define the most appropriatemechanism for each member. The proposedmethodology is therefore novel and superior toexisting cash flow models where the focus hasbeen limited to main contractors only. Topromote its use as a performance enablingmechanism, the methodology utilizes “theproject process map”, “the stakeholders &supply chain”, “the pricing method” and “thepayment mechanism”. This will act as an aid todesign or “fine-tune” payment mechanisms toindividual projects characteristics consideringpayment for off-site materials andcomponents, which always concerns projectfabricators and supply chain.

  16. Assessing the facilitators and barriers of interdisciplinary team working in primary care using normalisation process theory: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Pauline; Lee, Siew Hwa; O'Sullivan, Madeleine; Cullen, Walter; Kennedy, Catriona; MacFarlane, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinary team working is of paramount importance in the reform of primary care in order to provide cost-effective and comprehensive care. However, international research shows that it is not routine practice in many healthcare jurisdictions. It is imperative to understand levers and barriers to the implementation process. This review examines interdisciplinary team working in practice, in primary care, from the perspective of service providers and analyses 1 barriers and facilitators to implementation of interdisciplinary teams in primary care and 2 the main research gaps. An integrative review following the PRISMA guidelines was conducted. Following a search of 10 international databases, 8,827 titles were screened for relevance and 49 met the criteria. Quality of evidence was appraised using predetermined criteria. Data were analysed following the principles of framework analysis using Normalisation Process Theory (NPT), which has four constructs: sense making, enrolment, enactment, and appraisal. The literature is dominated by a focus on interdisciplinary working between physicians and nurses. There is a dearth of evidence about all NPT constructs apart from enactment. Physicians play a key role in encouraging the enrolment of others in primary care team working and in enabling effective divisions of labour in the team. The experience of interdisciplinary working emerged as a lever for its implementation, particularly where communication and respect were strong between professionals. A key lever for interdisciplinary team working in primary care is to get professionals working together and to learn from each other in practice. However, the evidence base is limited as it does not reflect the experiences of all primary care professionals and it is primarily about the enactment of team working. We need to know much more about the experiences of the full network of primary care professionals regarding all aspects of implementation work. International

  17. Assessing the facilitators and barriers of interdisciplinary team working in primary care using normalisation process theory: An integrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Reilly, Pauline; Lee, Siew Hwa; O’Sullivan, Madeleine; Cullen, Walter; Kennedy, Catriona; MacFarlane, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background Interdisciplinary team working is of paramount importance in the reform of primary care in order to provide cost-effective and comprehensive care. However, international research shows that it is not routine practice in many healthcare jurisdictions. It is imperative to understand levers and barriers to the implementation process. This review examines interdisciplinary team working in practice, in primary care, from the perspective of service providers and analyses 1 barriers and facilitators to implementation of interdisciplinary teams in primary care and 2 the main research gaps. Methods and findings An integrative review following the PRISMA guidelines was conducted. Following a search of 10 international databases, 8,827 titles were screened for relevance and 49 met the criteria. Quality of evidence was appraised using predetermined criteria. Data were analysed following the principles of framework analysis using Normalisation Process Theory (NPT), which has four constructs: sense making, enrolment, enactment, and appraisal. The literature is dominated by a focus on interdisciplinary working between physicians and nurses. There is a dearth of evidence about all NPT constructs apart from enactment. Physicians play a key role in encouraging the enrolment of others in primary care team working and in enabling effective divisions of labour in the team. The experience of interdisciplinary working emerged as a lever for its implementation, particularly where communication and respect were strong between professionals. Conclusion A key lever for interdisciplinary team working in primary care is to get professionals working together and to learn from each other in practice. However, the evidence base is limited as it does not reflect the experiences of all primary care professionals and it is primarily about the enactment of team working. We need to know much more about the experiences of the full network of primary care professionals regarding all aspects

  18. SPQR Team Description Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Cherubini , Andrea; Leonetti , M; Marchetti , L; De Luca , A; Iocchi , L; Nardi , D; Oriolo , G; Vendittelli , M

    2008-01-01

    International audience; SPQR is the group of the Faculty of Engineering at Sapienza University of Rome in Italy, that is involved in RoboCup competitions since 1998 in different leagues (Middle-size 1998-2002, Four-legged since 2000, Real-rescue-robots 2003-2006, Virtual-rescue since 2006 and @Home in 2006). In RoboCup 2008, SPQR team will participate in the Standard Platform League with Nao humanoid robots and in the Virtual Rescue League.The team for 2008 is composed by two groups from the C...

  19. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  20. Predictors of Team Work Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlyn-Harris, James H.; Hurst, Barbara J.; von Baggo, Karola; Bayley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to work in teams is an attribute highly valued by employers of information technology (IT) graduates. For IT students to effectively engage in team work tasks, the process of working in teams should be satisfying for the students. This work explored whether university students who were involved in compulsory team work were satisfied…

  1. Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  2. Teamwork education improves trauma team performance in undergraduate health professional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Valerie O'Toole; Cuzzola, Ronald; Knox, Carolyn; Liotta, Cynthia; Cornfield, Charles S; Tarkowski, Robert D; Masters, Carolynn; McCarthy, Michael; Sturdivant, Suzanne; Carlson, Jestin N

    2015-01-01

    Effective trauma resuscitation requires efficient and coordinated care from a team of providers; however, providers are rarely instructed on how to be effective members of trauma teams. Team-based learning using Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) has been shown to improve team dynamics among practicing professionals, including physicians and nurses. The impact of TeamSTEPPS on students being trained in trauma management in an undergraduate health professional program is currently unknown. We sought to determine the impact of TeamSTEPPS on team dynamics among undergraduate students being trained in trauma resuscitation. We enrolled teams of undergraduate health professional students from four programs: nursing, physician assistant, radiologic science, and respiratory care. After completing an online training on trauma resuscitation principles, the participants completed a trauma resuscitation scenario. The participants then received teamwork training using TeamSTEPPS and completed a second trauma resuscitation scenario identical to the first. All resuscitations were recorded and scored offline by two blinded research assistants using both the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) and Trauma Team Performance Observation Tool (TPOT) scoring systems. Pre-test and post-test TEAM and TPOT scores were compared. We enrolled a total of 48 students in 12 teams. Team leadership, situational monitoring, and overall communication improved with TeamSTEPPS training (P=0.04, P=0.02, and P=0.03, respectively), as assessed by the TPOT scoring system. TeamSTEPPS also improved the team's ability to prioritize tasks and work together to complete tasks in a rapid manner (P<0.01 and P=0.02, respectively) as measured by TEAM. Incorporating TeamSTEPPS into trauma team education leads to improved TEAM and TPOT scores among undergraduate health professionals.

  3. What makes maternity teams effective and safe? Lessons from a series of research on teamwork, leadership and team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siassakos, Dimitrios; Fox, Robert; Bristowe, Katherine; Angouri, Jo; Hambly, Helen; Robson, Lauren; Draycott, Timothy J

    2013-11-01

    We describe lessons for safety from a synthesis of seven studies of teamwork, leadership and team training across a healthcare region. Two studies identified successes and challenges in a unit with embedded team training: a staff survey demonstrated a positive culture but a perceived need for greater senior presence; training improved actual emergency care, but wide variation in team performance remained. Analysis of multicenter simulation records showed that variation in patient safety and team efficiency correlated with their teamwork but not individual knowledge, skills or attitudes. Safe teams tended to declare the emergency earlier, hand over in a more structured way, and use closed-loop communication. Focused and directed communication was also associated with better patient-actor perception of care. Focus groups corroborated these findings, proposed that the capability and experience of the leader is more important than seniority, and identified teamwork and leadership issues that require further research. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Report on the research through the U.S.DOE. 'The international search and consequence management workshop (ISCM-WS)'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Takeshi; Tasaki, Takashi

    2011-12-01

    The International Search and Consequence Management Workshop (ISCM-WS) that was organized by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) took place from May 17th to May 20th, 2010. The aim of this Workshop was to build and enhance the global capacity to prevent and respond to nuclear and radiological emergencies, and it directly supports the aims of global initiative to combat nuclear terrorism. The U.S.DOE brought together 92 officials from 26 countries and 3 officials from IAEA in this workshop. DOE introduced two matters in the USA, first was response against nuclear and radiological terrorisms and second was technology, systems, activity for consequence management. This Review Report summarized the observation of the ISCM-WS including activity of DOE/NNSA's Search Response Team and activity of consequence management. Important knowledge from the ISCM-WS is as follows: Development and Equipment of remote radiation measurement system for searching Improvised Nuclear devises, Radiological Dispersal Device, etc. Using GPS data for mapping and checking of radiation measurement, Using GIS system for supporting planning and mapping of radiation measurement. Follow up system for checking first responder's radiation measurement data by radiological specialist in the radiological institute at distance place. Deployment system and logistics system for radiation monitoring team and radiation management team including national agency's team who are deployed on the spot. Aerial Measuring System and mobile laboratory for environmental samples analysis. Information sharing system for consequence management. (author)

  5. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 (student) teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances for one year. We...... ensured exogenous variation in otherwise random team composition by assigning students to teams based on their measured cognitive abilities. Each team performs a variety of tasks, often involving complex decision making. The key result of the experiment is that the performance of business teams first...... increases and then decreases with ability dispersion. We seek to understand this finding by developing a model in which team members of different ability levels form sub- teams with other team members with similar ability levels to specialize in different productive tasks. Diversity spreads production over...

  6. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The rescue crews have been searching for the woman for nearly a week. Hurricane Katrina devastated Hancock County, the southernmost point in Mississippi, and the woman had stayed through the storm in her beach house. There is little hope of finding her alive; the search teams know she is gone because the house is gone. Late at night in the art classroom of the school that is serving as the county s emergency operations center, Craig Harvey is discussing the search with the center s commander. Harvey is the Chief Operating Officer of a unique company called NVision Solutions Inc., based at NASA s Stennis Space Center in Bay St. Louis, only a couple of miles away. He and his entire staff have set up a volunteer operation in the art room, supporting the emergency management efforts using technology and capabilities the company developed through its NASA partnerships. As he talks to the commander, Harvey feels an idea taking shape that might lead them to the woman s location. Working with surface elevation data and hydrological principles, Harvey creates a map showing how the floodwaters from the storm would have flowed along the topography of the region around the woman s former home. Using the map, search crews find the woman s body in 15 minutes. Recovering individuals who have been lost is a sad reality of emergency management in the wake of a disaster like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. But the sooner answers can be provided, the sooner a community s overall recovery can take place. When damage is extensive, resources are scattered, and people are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical assistance, the speed and efficiency of emergency operations can be the key to limiting the impact of a disaster and speeding the process of recovery. And a key to quick and effective emergency planning and response is geographic information. With a host of Earth-observing satellites orbiting the globe at all times, NASA generates an unmatched wealth of data about our ever

  7. Factors influencing mine rescue team behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansky, Jacqueline H; Kowalski-Trakofler, K M; Brnich, M J; Vaught, C

    2016-01-01

    A focus group study of the first moments in an underground mine emergency response was conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Office for Mine Safety and Health Research. Participants in the study included mine rescue team members, team trainers, mine officials, state mining personnel, and individual mine managers. A subset of the data consists of responses from participants with mine rescue backgrounds. These responses were noticeably different from those given by on-site emergency personnel who were at the mine and involved with decisions made during the first moments of an event. As a result, mine rescue team behavior data were separated in the analysis and are reported in this article. By considering the responses from mine rescue team members and trainers, it was possible to sort the data and identify seven key areas of importance to them. On the basis of the responses from the focus group participants with a mine rescue background, the authors concluded that accurate and complete information and a unity of purpose among all command center personnel are two of the key conditions needed for an effective mine rescue operation.

  8. Affirmative action and team performance

    OpenAIRE

    Kölle, Felix

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate spillover effects of affirmative action policies in tournaments on subsequent team performance and the willingness to work in teams. In three different team environments, we find that such policies in form of gender quotas do not harm performance and cooperation within teams, and do not weaken people's willingness to work in teams. Our results, thus, provide further evidence that gender quotas can have the desired effect of promoting women without harming efficie...

  9. Academic characteristics of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with high school, collegiate, and professional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Buza, John A; Byram, Ian; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a study to determine the academic involvement and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians at high school, college, and professional levels of sport. Through Internet and telephone queries, we identified 1054 team physicians from 362 institutions, including 120 randomly selected high schools and colleges and 122 professional teams (baseball, basketball, football, hockey). For all physicians included in the study, we performed a comprehensive search of the Internet and of a citation database to determine academic affiliations, number of publications, and h-index values. Of the 1054 physicians, 678 (64%) were orthopedic surgeons. Percentage of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with an academic medical center was highest in professional sports (64%; 173/270) followed by collegiate sports (36%; 98/275) and high school sports (20%; 27/133). Median number of publications per orthopedic team physician was significantly higher in professional sports (30.6) than in collegiate sports (10.7) or high school sports (6). Median number of publications by orthopedic physicians also varied by sport, with the highest number in Major League Baseball (37.9; range, 0-225) followed by the National Basketball Association (32.0; range, 0-227) and the National Football League (30.4; range, 0-460), with the lowest number within the National Hockey League (20.7; range, 0-144). Academic affiliation and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians vary by competition level and professional sporting league.

  10. AA magnet measurement team

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    Quickly improvised measurement equipment for the AA (Antiproton Accumulator) was all the tight schedule permitted, but the high motivation of the team made up for the lack of convenience. From left to right: Roy Billinge (Joint AA Project Leader, the other one was Simon van der Meer); Bruno Autin, Brian Pincott, Colin Johnson.

  11. Materials Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-08-01

    Roadmap identifying the efforts of the Materials Technical Team (MTT) to focus primarily on reducing the mass of structural systems such as the body and chassis in light-duty vehicles (including passenger cars and light trucks) which enables improved vehicle efficiency regardless of the vehicle size or propulsion system employed.

  12. Aircrew team management program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerison, Charles; Mccann, Dick; Davies, Rod

    1987-01-01

    The key features of the Aircrew Team Management Workshop which was designed for and in consultation with Trans Australia Airlines are outlined. Five major sections are presented dealing with: (1) A profile of the airline and the designers; (2) Aircrew consultation and involvement; (3) Educational design and development; (4) Implementation and instruction; and (5) Evaluation and assessment. These areas are detailed.

  13. The Team We Got.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soos, Frank

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the importance of high school basketball in rural West Virginia and what it felt like to win and to lose. Reflects on how playing team sports builds character, and suggests that, although life goes on regardless of game outcomes, it is still difficult to think of high school basketball as just a game. (LP)

  14. Web Team Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jennifer; Felker, Kyle

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic world of the Web has provided libraries with a wealth of opportunities, including new approaches to the provision of information and varied internal staffing structures. The development of self-managed Web teams, endowed with authority and resources, can create an adaptable and responsive culture within libraries. This new working team…

  15. National Response Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Response planning and coordination (not direct response itself) is accomplished at the federal level through the U.S. National Response Team (NRT), an interagency group co-chaired by EPA and U.S. Coast Guard. NRT distributes information, plans, and trains.

  16. Multidisciplinary team functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovitz, K E; Dougan, P; Riese, R; Brummitt, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper advocates the need to move beyond interdisciplinary team composition as a minimum criterion for multidisciplinary functioning in child abuse treatment. Recent developments within the field reflect the practice of shared professional responsibility for detection, case management and treatment. Adherence to this particular model for intervention requires cooperative service planning and implementation as task related functions. Implicitly, this model also carries the potential to incorporate the supportive functioning essential to effective group process. However, explicit attention to the dynamics and process of small groups has been neglected in prescriptive accounts of multidisciplinary child abuse team organization. The present paper therefore focuses upon the maintenance and enhancement aspects of multidisciplinary group functioning. First, the development and philosophy of service for the Alberta Children's Hospital Child Abuse Program are reviewed. Second, composition of the team, it's mandate for service, and the population it serves are briefly described. Third, the conceptual framework within which the program functions is outlined. Strategies for effective group functioning are presented and the difficulties encountered with this model are highlighted. Finally, recommendations are offered for planning and implementing a multidisciplinary child abuse team and for maintaining its effective group functioning.

  17. The CHIK Team

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The CHIK Team. Arankalle VA, Mishra AC. Tandale BV Clinical. Yergolkar P, Sudeep Balan Virus Isolations. Cherian S, Walimbe A Bioinformatics. Sathe PS, Supriya Serology. Swati, Shubham, Supriya Sequence analysis. Tripathy AS Immunological. Parashar D Real time PCR. Gokhale M, Jacob George Entomological ...

  18. Interdisciplinarity and Team Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, William M.; LeBold, William K.

    1975-01-01

    Describes eight experimental courses in a series called the Man Series, instituted at Purdue University to improve the social dimensions of engineering education. Each course is team taught by engineering, humanities, and social science faculty members and is interdisciplinary in nature. (MLH)

  19. A Project Team: a Team or Just a Group?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues related to work in either teams or groups. The theoretical part discusses a team and a group with regards to its definition, classification and basic distinction, brings in more on the typology of team roles, personality assessment and sociometric methods. The analytical part tests the project (work team of a medical center represented in terms of personality and motivational types, team roles and interpersonal team relations concerning the willingness of cooperation and communication. The main objective of this work is to verify the validity of the assumptions that the analyzed team represents a very disparate group as for its composition from the perspective of personality types, types of motivation, team roles and interpersonal relations in terms of the willingness of cooperation and communication. A separate output shall focus on sociometric investigation of those team members where willingness to work together and communicate is based on the authors’ assumption of tight interdependence.

  20. Effects of team emotional authenticity on virtual team performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Connelly

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of virtual teams lack many of the visual or auditory cues that are usually used as the basis for impressions about fellow team members. We focus on the effects of the impressions formed in this context, and use social exchange theory to understand how these impressions affect team performance. Our pilot study, using content analysis (n = 191 students, suggested that most individuals believe that they can assess others’ emotional authenticity in online settings by focusing on the content and tone of the messages. Our quantitative study examined the effects of these assessments. Structural equation modeling (SEM analysis (n = 81 student teams suggested that team-level trust and teamwork behaviors mediate the relationship between team emotional authenticity and team performance, and illuminate the importance of team emotional authenticity for team processes and outcomes.

  1. Imagery Integration Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Tracy; Melendrez, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The Human Exploration Science Office (KX) provides leadership for NASA's Imagery Integration (Integration 2) Team, an affiliation of experts in the use of engineering-class imagery intended to monitor the performance of launch vehicles and crewed spacecraft in flight. Typical engineering imagery assessments include studying and characterizing the liftoff and ascent debris environments; launch vehicle and propulsion element performance; in-flight activities; and entry, landing, and recovery operations. Integration 2 support has been provided not only for U.S. Government spaceflight (e.g., Space Shuttle, Ares I-X) but also for commercial launch providers, such as Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corporation, servicing the International Space Station. The NASA Integration 2 Team is composed of imagery integration specialists from JSC, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), who have access to a vast pool of experience and capabilities related to program integration, deployment and management of imagery assets, imagery data management, and photogrammetric analysis. The Integration 2 team is currently providing integration services to commercial demonstration flights, Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), and the Space Launch System (SLS)-based Exploration Missions (EM)-1 and EM-2. EM-2 will be the first attempt to fly a piloted mission with the Orion spacecraft. The Integration 2 Team provides the customer (both commercial and Government) with access to a wide array of imagery options - ground-based, airborne, seaborne, or vehicle-based - that are available through the Government and commercial vendors. The team guides the customer in assembling the appropriate complement of imagery acquisition assets at the customer's facilities, minimizing costs associated with market research and the risk of purchasing inadequate assets. The NASA Integration 2 capability simplifies the process of securing one

  2. Putting the "Team" in the Fine Arts Team: An Application of Business Management Team Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses current challenges to the idea of teamwork in fine arts teams, redefines the terms team and collaboration using a business management perspective, discusses the success of effective teams in the business world and the characteristics of those teams, and proposes the implementation of the business model of…

  3. [The mobile geriatrics team, global patient management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Fréderiue; Bloch, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The mobile geriatric team of Cochin hospital in Paris is responsible for the management and orientation of fragile elderly patients over the age of 75 admitted to emergency departments. It carries out a multi-disciplinary assessment, contributes to the creation of the care project and life project of geriatric patients and is involved in organising the patient's return home. This article focuses on the role of the social assistant through two clinical cases.

  4. Improving Care Teams' Functioning: Recommendations from Team Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Mauksch, Larry; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Salas, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    Team science has been applied to many sectors including health care. Yet there has been relatively little attention paid to the application of team science to developing and sustaining primary care teams. Application of team science to primary care requires adaptation of core team elements to different types of primary care teams. Six elements of teams are particularly relevant to primary care: practice conditions that support or hinder effective teamwork; team cognition, including shared understanding of team goals, roles, and how members will work together as a team; leadership and coaching, including mutual feedback among members that promotes teamwork and moves the team closer to achieving its goals; cooperation supported by an emotionally safe climate that supports expression and resolution of conflict and builds team trust and cohesion; coordination, including adoption of processes that optimize efficient performance of interdependent activities among team members; and communication, particularly regular, recursive team cycles involving planning, action, and debriefing. These six core elements are adapted to three prototypical primary care teams: teamlets, health coaching, and complex care coordination. Implementation of effective team-based models in primary care requires adaptation of core team science elements coupled with relevant, practical training and organizational support, including adequate time to train, plan, and debrief. Training should be based on assessment of needs and tasks and the use of simulations and feedback, and it should extend to live action. Teamlets represent a potential launch point for team development and diffusion of teamwork principles within primary care practices. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparative study of job satisfaction among nurses, psychologists/psychotherapists and social workers working in Quebec mental health teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Grenier, Guy; Bamvita, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    This study identified multiple socio-professional and team effectiveness variables, based on the Input-Mediator-Output-Input (IMOI) model, and tested their associations with job satisfaction for three categories of mental health professionals (nurses, psychologists/psychotherapists, and social workers). Job satisfaction was assessed with the Job Satisfaction Survey. Independent variables were classified into four categories: 1) Socio-professional Characteristics; 2) Team Attributes; 3) Team Processes; and 4) Team Emergent States. Variables were entered successively, by category, into a hierarchical regression model. Team Processes contributed the greatest number of variables to job satisfaction among all professional groups, including team support which was the only significant variable common to all three types of professionals. Greater involvement in the decision-making process, and lower levels of team conflict (Team Processes) were associated with job satisfaction among nurses and social workers. Lower seniority on team (Socio-professional Characteristics), and team collaboration (Team Processes) were associated with job satisfaction among nurses, as was belief in the advantages of interdisciplinary collaboration (Team Emergent States) among psychologists. Knowledge sharing (Team Processes) and affective commitment to the team (Team Emergent States) were associated with job satisfaction among social workers. Results suggest the need for mental health decision-makers and team managers to offer adequate support to mental health professionals, to involve nurses and social workers in the decision-making process, and implement procedures and mechanisms favourable to the prevention or resolution of team conflict with a view toward increasing job satisfaction among mental health professionals.

  6. Personality and community prevention teams: Dimensions of team leader and member personality predicting team functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Mark E; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Greenberg, Mark T

    2008-11-01

    The predictors and correlates of positive functioning among community prevention teams have been examined in a number of research studies; however, the role of personality has been neglected. In this study, we examined whether team member and leader personality dimensions assessed at the time of team formation predicted local prevention team functioning 2.5-3.5 years later. Participants were 159 prevention team members in 14 communities participating in the PROSPER study of prevention program dissemination. Three aspects of personality, aggregated at the team level, were examined as predictors: Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, and Agreeableness. A series of multivariate regression analyses were performed that accounted for the interdependency of five categories of team functioning. Results showed that average team member Openness was negatively, and Conscientiousness was positively linked to team functioning. The findings have implications for decisions about the level and nature of technical assistance support provided to community prevention teams.

  7. Teamwork education improves trauma team performance in undergraduate health professional students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie O’Toole Baker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Effective trauma resuscitation requires efficient and coordinated care from a team of providers; however, providers are rarely instructed on how to be effective members of trauma teams. Team-based learning using Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS has been shown to improve team dynamics among practicing professionals, including physicians and nurses. The impact of TeamSTEPPS on students being trained in trauma management in an undergraduate health professional program is currently unknown. We sought to determine the impact of TeamSTEPPS on team dynamics among undergraduate students being trained in trauma resuscitation. Methods: We enrolled teams of undergraduate health professional students from four programs: nursing, physician assistant, radiologic science, and respiratory care. After completing an online training on trauma resuscitation principles, the participants completed a trauma resuscitation scenario. The participants then received teamwork training using TeamSTEPPS and completed a second trauma resuscitation scenario identical to the first. All resuscitations were recorded and scored offline by two blinded research assistants using both the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM and Trauma Team Performance Observation Tool (TPOT scoring systems. Pre-test and post-test TEAM and TPOT scores were compared. Results: We enrolled a total of 48 students in 12 teams. Team leadership, situational monitoring, and overall communication improved with TeamSTEPPS training (P=0.04, P=0.02, and P=0.03, respectively, as assessed by the TPOT scoring system. TeamSTEPPS also improved the team’s ability to prioritize tasks and work together to complete tasks in a rapid manner (P<0.01 and P=0.02, respectively as measured by TEAM. Conclusions: Incorporating TeamSTEPPS into trauma team education leads to improved TEAM and TPOT scores among undergraduate health professionals.

  8. 76 FR 61371 - All-Hazard Position Task Books for Type 3 Incident Management Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ...-Hazard Position Task Books for Type 3 Incident Management Teams AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management... Books for Type 3 Incident Management Teams were developed to assist personnel achieve qualifications in... Management Teams were developed to assist personnel achieve qualifications in the All-Hazard ICS positions...

  9. [Concepts of a multidisciplinar team on runaway patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sílvio Antônio; Dall'agnol, Clarice Maria

    2009-01-01

    A qualitative study that aimed at learning the way an emergency care multidisciplinary team at a public university hospital conceives and deals with the problem of patients who run away from hospital was carried out. Data were collected using the focus groups technique, whose sample was constituted by ten individuals, approached by non-directive group dynamics. Three thematic classes resulted from content analysis: a certain ambivalence; emergency, a place of (lack of) control; fears and insecurities. The study indicates the chaotic situation encountered by emergency services and, in this context, when patients run away, the health care team is imminently subject to a triple judgment: social, legal and institutional.

  10. Inter-Professional Team Objective Structured Clinical Examination (ITOSCE: Teaching and Assessment Strategies of the Inter Professional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Keshmiri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the recent decades, Inter-Professional Team Objective Structured Clinical Examination (ITOSCE has been considered as an efficient tool in evaluating the teamwork and the Inter-professional competences. The aim of this study was to review the literature related ITOSCE as educational tool. Method: This narrative review study was conducted in 2015. Relevant literature was found by searching the databases such as: PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, Google Scholar, Science Direct, EBSCO, ProQuest. Title searching was performed in full English texts without time limitation using keywords including; Team, Inter professional Team, Group, Inter-disciplinary, Objective Structured Clinical Examination (TOSCE, ITOSCE, GOSCE. Results: 19 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analyses. In 13 studies, ITOSCE was used as an assessment tool, and in 6 studies as a learning tool. ITOSCE had been used in several fields such as: obstetrics, gynecology, emergency, palliative care with participating of a variety of disciplines, including: medicine, pharmacy, several trends of nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and Social working. Conclusion: Eventually, it can be noted that ITOSCE plays significant role as an educational and evaluation tool to improve inter-professional teamwork competences among the students. Further studies are needed to develop to examine the psychometric criteria of ITOSCE.

  11. Sounds like Team Spirit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  12. Evaluating trauma team performance in a Level I trauma center: Validation of the trauma team communication assessment (TTCA-24).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMoor, Stephanie; Abdel-Rehim, Shady; Olmsted, Richard; Myers, John G; Parker-Raley, Jessica

    2017-07-01

    Nontechnical skills (NTS), such as team communication, are well-recognized determinants of trauma team performance and good patient care. Measuring these competencies during trauma resuscitations is essential, yet few valid and reliable tools are available. We aimed to demonstrate that the Trauma Team Communication Assessment (TTCA-24) is a valid and reliable instrument that measures communication effectiveness during activations. Two tools with adequate psychometric strength (Trauma Nontechnical Skills Scale [T-NOTECHS], Team Emergency Assessment Measure [TEAM]) were identified during a systematic review of medical literature and compared with TTCA-24. Three coders used each tool to evaluate 35 stable and 35 unstable patient activations (defined according to Advanced Trauma Life Support criteria). Interrater reliability was calculated between coders using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to establish concurrent validity between TTCA-24 and the other two validated tools. Coders achieved an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.87 for stable patient activations and 0.78 for unstable activations scoring excellent on the interrater agreement guidelines. The median score for each assessment showed good team communication for all 70 videos (TEAM, 39.8 of 54; T-NOTECHS, 17.4 of 25; and TTCA-24, 87.4 of 96). A significant correlation between TTTC-24 and T-NOTECHS was revealed (p = 0.029), but no significant correlation between TTCA-24 and TEAM (p = 0.77). Team communication was rated slightly better across all assessments for stable versus unstable patient activations, but not statistically significant. TTCA-24 correlated with T-NOTECHS, an instrument measuring nontechnical skills for trauma teams, but not TEAM, a tool that assesses communication in generic emergency settings. TTCA-24 is a reliable and valid assessment that can be a useful adjunct when evaluating interpersonal and team communication during trauma

  13. Physiological monitoring of team and task stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orasanu, Judith; Tada, Yuri; Kraft, Norbert; Fischer, Ute

    2005-05-01

    Sending astronauts into space, especially on long-durations missions (e.g. three-year missions to Mars), entails enormous risk. Threats include both physical dangers of radiation, bone loss and other consequences of weightlessness, and also those arising from interpersonal problems associated with extended life in a high-risk isolated and confined environment. Before undertaking long-duration missions, NASA seeks to develop technologies to monitor indicators of potentially debilitating stress at both the individual and team level so that countermeasures can be introduced to prevent further deterioration. Doing so requires a better understanding of indicators of team health and performance. To that end, a study of team problem solving in a simulation environment was undertaken to explore effects of team and task stress. Groups of four males (25-45 yrs) engaged in six dynamic computer-based Antarctic search and rescue missions over four days. Both task and team stressors were manipulated. Physiological responses (ECG, respiration rate and amplitude, SCL, EMG, and PPG); communication (voice and email); individual personality and subjective team dynamics responses were collected and related to task performance. Initial analyses found that physiological measures can be used to identify transient stress, predict performance, and reflect subjective workload. Muscle tension and respiration were the most robust predictors. Not only the level of arousal but its variability during engagement in the task is important to consider. In general, less variability was found to be associated with higher levels of performance. Individuals scoring high on specific personality characteristics responded differently to task stress.

  14. The Search for Stability: Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-07

    forces was incomplete. These were examples of how a technologically superior force can succeed in Decisive Operations with lower numbers of troops than...never been matched by firm troop contributions, and even recent agreement to widen the ISAF mandate (now under NATO command) to all Afghanistan is more...international support for operations, thus legitimising them. As part of the internationalising of this effort, it is probable that non- military agencies

  15. On teams, teamwork, and team performance: discoveries and developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Eduardo; Cooke, Nancy J; Rosen, Michael A

    2008-06-01

    We highlight some of the key discoveries and developments in the area of team performance over the past 50 years, especially as reflected in the pages of Human Factors. Teams increasingly have become a way of life in many organizations, and research has kept up with the pace. We have characterized progress in the field in terms of eight discoveries and five challenges. Discoveries pertain to the importance of shared cognition, the measurement of shared cognition, advances in team training, the use of synthetic task environments for research, factors influencing team effectiveness, models of team effectiveness, a multidisciplinary perspective, and training and technological interventions designed to improve team effectiveness. Challenges that are faced in the coming decades include an increased emphasis on team cognition; reconfigurable, adaptive teams; multicultural influences; and the need for naturalistic study and better measurement. Work in human factors has contributed significantly to the science and practice of teams, teamwork, and team performance. Future work must keep pace with the increasing use of teams in organizations. The science of teams contributes to team effectiveness in the same way that the science of individual performance contributes to individual effectiveness.

  16. Autonomous search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous combinatorial search (AS) represents a new field in combinatorial problem solving. Its major standpoint and originality is that it considers that problem solvers must be capable of self-improvement operations. This is the first book dedicated to AS.

  17. A dynamical approach toward understanding mechanisms of team science: change, kinship, tension, and heritage in a transdisciplinary team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R

    2013-08-01

    Since the concept of team science gained recognition among biomedical researchers, social scientists have been challenged with investigating evidence of team mechanisms and functional dynamics within transdisciplinary teams. Identification of these mechanisms has lacked substantial research using grounded theory models to adequately describe their dynamical qualities. Research trends continue to favor the measurement of teams by isolating occurrences of production over relational mechanistic team tendencies. This study uses a social constructionist-grounded multilevel mixed methods approach to identify social dynamics and mechanisms within a transdisciplinary team. A National Institutes of Health-funded research team served as a sample. Data from observations, interviews, and focus groups were qualitatively coded to generate micro/meso level analyses. Social mechanisms operative within this biomedical scientific team were identified. Dynamics that support such mechanisms were documented and explored. Through theoretical and emergent coding, four social mechanisms dominated in the analysis-change, kinship, tension, and heritage. Each contains relational social dynamics. This micro/meso level study suggests such mechanisms and dynamics are key features of team science and as such can inform problems of integration, praxis, and engagement in teams. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Flexible knowledge repertoires: communication by leaders in trauma teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsson Maritha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In emergency situations, it is important for the trauma team to efficiently communicate their observations and assessments. One common communication strategy is “closed-loop communication”, which can be described as a transmission model in which feedback is of great importance. The role of the leader is to create a shared goal in order to achieve consensus in the work for the safety of the patient. The purpose of this study was to analyze how formal leaders communicate knowledge, create consensus, and position themselves in relation to others in the team. Methods Sixteen trauma teams were audio- and video-recorded during high fidelity training in an emergency department. Each team consisted of six members: one surgeon or emergency physician (the designated team leader, one anaesthesiologist, one nurse anaesthetist, one enrolled nurse from the theatre ward, one registered nurse and one enrolled nurse from the emergency department (ED. The communication was transcribed and analyzed, inspired by discourse psychology and Strauss’ concept of “negotiated order”. The data were organized and coded in NVivo 9. Results The findings suggest that leaders use coercive, educational, discussing and negotiating strategies to work things through. The leaders in this study used different repertoires to convey their knowledge to the team, in order to create a common goal of the priorities of the work. Changes in repertoires were dependent on the urgency of the situation and the interaction between team members. When using these repertoires, the leaders positioned themselves in different ways, either on an authoritarian or a more egalitarian level. Conclusion This study indicates that communication in trauma teams is complex and consists of more than just transferring messages quickly. It also concerns what the leaders express, and even more importantly, how they speak to and involve other team members.

  19. Flexible knowledge repertoires: communication by leaders in trauma teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In emergency situations, it is important for the trauma team to efficiently communicate their observations and assessments. One common communication strategy is “closed-loop communication”, which can be described as a transmission model in which feedback is of great importance. The role of the leader is to create a shared goal in order to achieve consensus in the work for the safety of the patient. The purpose of this study was to analyze how formal leaders communicate knowledge, create consensus, and position themselves in relation to others in the team. Methods Sixteen trauma teams were audio- and video-recorded during high fidelity training in an emergency department. Each team consisted of six members: one surgeon or emergency physician (the designated team leader), one anaesthesiologist, one nurse anaesthetist, one enrolled nurse from the theatre ward, one registered nurse and one enrolled nurse from the emergency department (ED). The communication was transcribed and analyzed, inspired by discourse psychology and Strauss’ concept of “negotiated order”. The data were organized and coded in NVivo 9. Results The findings suggest that leaders use coercive, educational, discussing and negotiating strategies to work things through. The leaders in this study used different repertoires to convey their knowledge to the team, in order to create a common goal of the priorities of the work. Changes in repertoires were dependent on the urgency of the situation and the interaction between team members. When using these repertoires, the leaders positioned themselves in different ways, either on an authoritarian or a more egalitarian level. Conclusion This study indicates that communication in trauma teams is complex and consists of more than just transferring messages quickly. It also concerns what the leaders express, and even more importantly, how they speak to and involve other team members. PMID:22747848

  20. Flexible knowledge repertoires: communication by leaders in trauma teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Maritha; Hargestam, Maria; Hultin, Magnus; Brulin, Christine

    2012-07-02

    In emergency situations, it is important for the trauma team to efficiently communicate their observations and assessments. One common communication strategy is "closed-loop communication", which can be described as a transmission model in which feedback is of great importance. The role of the leader is to create a shared goal in order to achieve consensus in the work for the safety of the patient. The purpose of this study was to analyze how formal leaders communicate knowledge, create consensus, and position themselves in relation to others in the team. Sixteen trauma teams were audio- and video-recorded during high fidelity training in an emergency department. Each team consisted of six members: one surgeon or emergency physician (the designated team leader), one anaesthesiologist, one nurse anaesthetist, one enrolled nurse from the theatre ward, one registered nurse and one enrolled nurse from the emergency department (ED). The communication was transcribed and analyzed, inspired by discourse psychology and Strauss' concept of "negotiated order". The data were organized and coded in NVivo 9. The findings suggest that leaders use coercive, educational, discussing and negotiating strategies to work things through. The leaders in this study used different repertoires to convey their knowledge to the team, in order to create a common goal of the priorities of the work. Changes in repertoires were dependent on the urgency of the situation and the interaction between team members. When using these repertoires, the leaders positioned themselves in different ways, either on an authoritarian or a more egalitarian level. This study indicates that communication in trauma teams is complex and consists of more than just transferring messages quickly. It also concerns what the leaders express, and even more importantly, how they speak to and involve other team members.

  1. Successes emerge in search for cleaner processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Faced with mounting public and regulatory pressures, many chemical producers have long adopted pollution reduction efforts. But increasingly, firms are eyeing fundamental process changes to achieve cleaner technologies. In addition to environmental benefits, the promised economic payoffs are clear: higher yields and an escape from soaring waste treatment and disposal costs. Having such technologies, says Paolo Galli, Montecatini's (Milan) director/corporate research, is a tremendous tool. It's becoming an increasingly important competitive element. Indeed, suggests David Hyde, ICI's (London) manager/environmental technology, everyone is looking to use cleaner technologies for a competitive advantage. A number of leading technology groups, including UOP (Des Plaines, IL), are working on replacing hydrofluoric acid (HF) with solid catalysts in alkylation processes. Although it is technologically tough to replace HF or alternative sulfuric acid technology, the rewards could be huge in producing high-octane fuel additives. Catalytica (Mountain View, CA), for one, is building a pilot plant with partners Neste (Helsinki) and Du Pont's Conoco. The company has developed a process to manufacture high-purity DMC by direct synthesis from carbom monoxide, methanol, and oxygen. The medium-pressure process uses a copper salts catalyst system; EniChem says the only significant by-product is carbon dioxide, and there are no chlorinated impurities

  2. Marine Search, Rescue and Emergency Preparedness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-09-01

    most points made by these men is that from the Manager of J. Percy Priest Reservoir, William Redmon, who is also a member of the Board of Directors of...Alamo Lake: COE - Lowell C. Flannery Curacanti: National Park Svc. - J. C. Riggs, Chief Park RangerI Jackson : Mancos Water Conservance District...Safety ! J. Percy Priest Reservoir: COE - William G. Redmon, Reservoir Mgr. John Sevier Steam Plant: TA - Walter C. Vance, Lt. Public Safety Kentucky Lake

  3. Professional Team Sports Clubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Rasmus K.

    Professional football in Europe is characterized by persistent deficits, growing debts and additional financial problems among the majority of the top league clubs. Despite these problems, these clubs have an abnormally high survival rate. This paper focuses on this apparent paradox and poses the...... in Europe, this paper argues that professional team sports clubs (PTSCs) are cases of an economic phenomenon normally found in socialist or post-socialist economies....

  4. The Motivated Project Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Financial incentives that match level of achievement • Regular, constructive feedback. Hierarchy of Needs ( Abraham H. Maslow ) Team members can be...Much has been written regarding motivational Defense AT&L: November-December 2009 58 theory . To further complicate mat- ters, some motivational... theories clearly contradict others, and a manager’s ability to motivate is, to no small degree, related to his or her leadership approach and inter

  5. Rapid improvement teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, F; Moore, S; Headrick, L; Neuhauser, D; Hekelman, F; Kizys, N

    1998-03-01

    Suggestions, most of which are supported by empirical studies, are provided on how total quality management (TQM) teams can be used to bring about faster organizationwide improvements. Ideas are offered on how to identify the right problem, have rapid meetings, plan rapidly, collect data rapidly, and make rapid whole-system changes. Suggestions for identifying the right problem include (1) postpone benchmarking when problems are obvious, (2) define the problem in terms of customer experience so as not to blame employees nor embed a solution in the problem statement, (3) communicate with the rest of the organization from the start, (4) state the problem from different perspectives, and (5) break large problems into smaller units. Suggestions for having rapid meetings include (1) choose a nonparticipating facilitator to expedite meetings, (2) meet with each team member before the team meeting, (3) postpone evaluation of ideas, and (4) rethink conclusions of a meeting before acting on them. Suggestions for rapid planning include reducing time spent on flowcharting by focusing on the future, not the present. Suggestions for rapid data collection include (1) sample patients for surveys, (2) rely on numerical estimates by process owners, and (3) plan for rapid data collection. Suggestions for rapid organizationwide implementation include (1) change membership on cross-functional teams, (2) get outside perspectives, (3) use unfolding storyboards, and (4) go beyond self-interest to motivate lasting change in the organization. Additional empirical investigations of time saved as a consequence of the strategies provided are needed. If organizations solve their problems rapidly, fewer unresolved problems may remain.

  6. Building multidisciplinary business teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyson, C.J.; Winter, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to managing oil and gas industry E and P assets through the operation of multidisciplinary business teams (MBT's). This approach can result in improved asset performance in terms of efficiency, motivation, and business results compared with more traditional matrix-style hierarchies. This paper also outlines certain critical success factors for the long-term success of MBT's and discusses some of the risks of MBT operation

  7. Nutrition in team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Iñigo; Burke, Louise M

    2010-01-01

    Team sports are based on intermittent high-intensity activity patterns, but the exact characteristics vary between and within codes, and from one game to the next. Despite the challenge of predicting exact game demands, performance in team sports is often dependent on nutritional factors. Chronic issues include achieving ideal levels of muscle mass and body fat, and supporting the nutrient needs of the training program. Acute issues, both for training and in games, include strategies that allow the player to be well fuelled and hydrated over the duration of exercise. Each player should develop a plan of consuming fluid and carbohydrate according to the needs of their activity patterns, within the breaks that are provided in their sport. In seasonal fixtures, competition varies from a weekly game in some codes to 2-3 games over a weekend road trip in others, and a tournament fixture usually involves 1-3 days between matches. Recovery between events is a major priority, involving rehydration, refuelling and repair/adaptation activities. Some sports supplements may be of value to the team athlete. Sports drinks, gels and liquid meals may be valuable in allowing nutritional goals to be met, while caffeine, creatine and buffering agents may directly enhance performance. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Team sponsors in community-based health leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tracy Enright; Dinkin, Donna R; Champion, Heather

    2017-05-02

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned about the role of team sponsors in action-learning teams as part of community-based health leadership development programs. Design/methodology/approach This case study uses program survey results from fellow participants, action learning coaches and team sponsors to understand the value of sponsors to the teams, the roles they most often filled and the challenges they faced as team sponsors. Findings The extent to which the sponsors were perceived as having contributed to the work of the action learning teams varied greatly from team to team. Most sponsors agreed that they were well informed about their role. The roles sponsors most frequently played were to provide the teams with input and support, serve as a liaison to the community and serve as a sounding board, motivator and cheerleader. The most common challenges or barriers team sponsors faced in this role were keeping engaged in the process, adjusting to the role and feeling disconnected from the program. Practical implications This work provides insights for program developers and community foundations who are interested in building the capacity for health leadership by linking community sponsors with emerging leaders engaged in an action learning experience. Originality/value This work begins to fill a gap in the literature. The role of team sponsors has been studied for single organization work teams but there is a void of understanding about the role of sponsors with multi-organizational teams working to improve health while also learning about leadership.

  9. Acute oncological emergencies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gabriel, J

    2012-01-01

    The number of people receiving systemic anti-cancer treatment and presenting at emergency departments with treatment-related problems is rising. Nurses will be the first point of contact for most patients and need to be able to recognise oncological emergencies to initiate urgent assessment of patients and referral to the acute oncology team so that the most appropriate care can be delivered promptly. This article discusses the role of acute oncology services, and provides an overview of the most common acute oncological emergencies.

  10. Collocation Impact on Team Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eccles

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The collocation of software development teams is common, specially in agile software development environments. However little is known about the impact of collocation on the team’s effectiveness. This paper explores the impact of collocating agile software development teams on a number of team effectiveness factors. The study focused on South African software development teams and gathered data through the use of questionnaires and interviews. The key finding was that collocation has a positive impact on a number of team effectiveness factors which can be categorised under team composition, team support, team management and structure and team communication. Some of the negative impact collocation had on team effectiveness relate to the fact that team members perceived that less emphasis was placed on roles, that morale of the group was influenced by individuals, and that collocation was invasive, reduced level of privacy and increased frequency of interruptions. Overall through it is proposed that companies should consider collocating their agile software development teams, as collocation might leverage overall team effectiveness.

  11. Cohesion in Online Student Teams versus Traditional Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have found that the electronic methods in use for online team communication today increase communication quality in project-based work situations. Because communication quality is known to influence group cohesion, the present research examined whether online student project teams are more cohesive than traditional teams. We tested…

  12. Using artificial team members for team training in virtual environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diggelen, J. van; Muller, T.; Bosch, K. van den

    2010-01-01

    In a good team, members do not only perform their individual task, they also coordinate their actions with other members of the team. Developing such team skills usually involves exercises with all members playing their role. This approach is costly and has organizational and educational drawbacks.

  13. Hoe teams deadlines halen : een aanzet tot team-timemanagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, J.M.P.; Rutte, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Dit artikel geeft een overzicht van de stand van zaken in de wetenschappelijk literatuur ten aanzien van de vraag hoe teams hun deadlines halen. Het beschikbare materiaal wijst erop dat teams beter in staat zijn om deadlines te halen als teamleden, naast een gemeenschappelijke visie op het team en

  14. Teams, Team Motivation, and the Theory of the Firm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Lindenberg, Siegwart

    A concern with teams was central to early attempts to grasp the nature of the firm, but fell out of favor in later work. We encourage a return to the emphasis on teams, but argue that the idea of teams as central to the nature of the firm needs to be grounded in an appreciation of the importance...

  15. Emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    According the conception of the Emergency Response Centre (ERC) of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA), and the obtained experience from exercises, and as well as on the basis of recommendations of international missions, the NRA SR started, in 1997 the ERC extension. The new room enable the work for radiation protection group, reactor safety and logistic group separately. At the same time special room was build for work of the NECRA Technical Support Group of the Emergency Commission for Radiation Accidents of the SR.This group co-operates closely with ERC while evaluation the situation, and by using the information system of the NRA and database of ERC to generate the conditions of nuclear facilities in once of emergency. Extension of the mentioned rooms was carried out. The financing by the European Union helped to build the project RAMG. In this way the NRA gained a working site which, with its equipment and parameters belongs to the top working sites of regulatory bodies of developed European countries. The NRA preparation of exercise and special staff education was carried out in 1997, for employees of the NRA and members of Emergency Headquarters (EH) for work in ERC in case of nuclear installation accident. The task of education of member of EH was their preparation for carrying out three exercises. These exercises are described. In the area of emergency preparedness, in accordance with inspection plan of the Office, 7 team inspections were carried out in individual localities; in NPP Bohunice, two in NPP Mochovce and one in Bohunice Conditioning Centre for radioactive wastes. Solution of the task of development of science and technology in the area of 'Development of technical and programme means for analyses of accidents and solutions of crisis situations'continued in 1997. Another regulations were elaborated for activity of members of EH of the NRA. The following was was carried out: selection of data for transfer and the

  16. Team climate and quality of care in primary health care: a review of studies using the Team Climate Inventory in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Teik T; Eccles, Martin P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Attributes of teams could affect the quality of care delivered in primary care. The aim of this study was to systematically review studies conducted within the UK NHS primary care that have measured team climate using the Team Climate Inventory (TCI), and to describe, if reported, the relationship between the TCI and measures of quality of care. Findings The databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched. The reference lists of included article were checked and one re...

  17. Leadership Team | Water Power | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadership Team Leadership Team Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the water Initiative and provides leadership in the focus areas of high-fidelity modeling, wind power plant controls

  18. Diverse Teams Drive Leadership Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Lotte; Hjortlund Andersen, Lotte

    New research from ISS Denmark shows that leading diverse teams strengthens leaders’ competencies within communication, relationship building and talent development and ensures inclusion. This has a reinforcing effect as the better the leadership, the better the heterogeneous team will function....

  19. Team Dynamics. Implications for Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freishlag, Jerry

    1985-01-01

    A recent survey of coaches ranks team cohesion as the most critical problem coaches face. Optimal interpersonal relationships among athletes and their coaches can maximize collective performance. Team dynamics are discussed and coaching tips are provided. (MT)

  20. Cultural Diversity and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Van Praag, Mirjam

    One of the most salient and relevant dimensions of team heterogeneity is cultural background. We measure the impact of cultural diversity on the performance of business teams using a field experiment. Companies are set up by teams of undergraduate students in business studies in realistic though...... similar circumstances. We vary the cultural composition of otherwise randomly composed teams in a multi-cultural student population. Our data indicate that a moderate level of cultural diversity has no effect on team performance in terms of business outcomes (sales, profits and profits per share). However......, if at least the majority of team members is culturally diverse then more cultural diversity seems to affect the performance of teams positively. Our data suggest that this might be related to the more diverse pool of relevant knowledge facilitating (mutual) learning within culturally diverse teams....

  1. Diabetic Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaigns Share this! EmergencyCareForYou » Emergency 101 » Diabetic Emergencies Diabetic Emergencies It is estimated that more than 20 ... they have it. The best way to prevent diabetic emergencies is to effectively manage the disease through ...

  2. Team synergies in sport: Theory and measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Araújo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Individual players act as a coherent unit during team sports performance, forming a team synergy. A synergy is a collective property of a task-specific organization of individuals, such that the degrees of freedom of each individual in the system are coupled, enabling the degrees of freedom of different individuals to co-regulate each other. Here, we present an explanation for the emergence of such collective behaviors, indicating how these can be assessed and understood through the measurement of key system properties that exist, considering the contribution of each individual and beyond These include: to (i dimensional compression, a process resulting in independent degree of freedom being coupled so that the synergy has fewer degrees of freedom than the set of components from which it arises; (ii reciprocal compensation, if one element do not produce its function, other elements should display changes in their contributions so that task goals are still attained; (iii interpersonal linkages, the specific contribution of each element to a group task; and (iv, degeneracy, structurally different components performing a similar, but not necessarily identical, function with respect to context. A primary goal of our analysis is to highlight the principles and tools required to understand coherent and dynamic team behaviors, as well as the performance conditions that make such team synergies possible, through perceptual attunement to shared affordances in individual performers. A key conclusion is that teams can be trained to perceive how to use and share specific affordances, explaining how individual’s behaviours self-organize into a group synergy.Ecological dynamics explanations of team behaviors can transit beyond mere ratification of sport performance, providing a comprehensive conceptual framework to guide the implementation of diagnostic measures by sport scientists, sport psychologists and performance analysts.

  3. It's a team game: exploring factors that influence team experience

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Many multiplayer games feature teams, and whether they are pitted against each other or against the game itself it seems likely that the way these teams bond will affect the players' experience. What are the factors that influence the experience of being a team member in a game? To what extent can the game designer manipulate the cohesion of the teams by changing the game design? How does the satisfaction of the player with their team relate to their feeling of cohesion? How does cohesion dif...

  4. A meta-analysis of shared leadership and team effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danni; Waldman, David A; Zhang, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    A growing number of studies have examined the "sharedness" of leadership processes in teams (i.e., shared leadership, collective leadership, and distributed leadership). We meta-analytically cumulated 42 independent samples of shared leadership and examined its relationship to team effectiveness. Our findings reveal an overall positive relationship (ρ = .34). But perhaps more important, what is actually shared among members appears to matter with regard to team effectiveness. That is, shared traditional forms of leadership (e.g., initiating structure and consideration) show a lower relationship (ρ = .18) than either shared new-genre leadership (e.g., charismatic and transformational leadership; ρ = .34) or cumulative, overall shared leadership (ρ = .35). In addition, shared leadership tends to be more strongly related to team attitudinal outcomes and behavioral processes and emergent team states, compared with team performance. Moreover, the effects of shared leadership are stronger when the work of team members is more complex. Our findings further suggest that the referent used in measuring shared leadership does not influence its relationship with team effectiveness and that compared with vertical leadership, shared leadership shows unique effects in relation to team performance. In total, our study not only cumulates extant research on shared leadership but also provides directions for future research to move forward in the study of plural forms of leadership.

  5. Search strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, B. M.

    Attention is given to the approaches which would provide the greatest chance of success in attempts related to the discovery of extraterrestrial advanced cultures in the Galaxy, taking into account the principle of least energy expenditure. The energetics of interstellar contact are explored, giving attention to the use of manned spacecraft, automatic probes, and beacons. The least expensive approach to a search for other civilizations involves a listening program which attempts to detect signals emitted by such civilizations. The optimum part of the spectrum for the considered search is found to be in the range from 1 to 2 GHz. Antenna and transmission formulas are discussed along with the employment of matched gates and filters, the probable characteristics of the signals to be detected, the filter-signal mismatch loss, surveys of the radio sky, the conduction of targeted searches.

  6. The cohesiveness of sourcing teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Sourcing teams are introduced as an approach to achieving the interdepartmental integration necessary for companies to address the complexity of strategic sourcing. Companies aim at facilitating teams capable of balancing the goals and tasks of the team with departmental expectations; however...

  7. Entrepreneurial team cognition: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, E.; Khapova, S.N.; Elfring, T.

    2015-01-01

    Entrepreneurial team scholars highlight the importance of studying entrepreneurial team cognition in gaining a better understanding of why some entrepreneurial teams are capable of developing teamwork leading to successful entrepreneurial outcomes while others are not. However, in the absence of a

  8. Ability Dispersion and Team Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogendoorn, Sander; Parker, Simon C.; Van Praag, Mirjam

    What is the effect of dispersed levels of cognitive ability of members of a (business) team on their team's performance? This paper reports the results of a field experiment in which 573 students in 49 teams start up and manage real companies under identical circumstances. We ensured exogenous va...

  9. Team Based Engineering Design Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to explore design thinking among teams of high school students. This objective was encompassed in the research question driving the inquiry: How do teams of high school students allocate time across stages of design? Design thinking on the professional level typically occurs in a team environment. Many…

  10. Enabling Team Learning in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, George

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a study of learning processes within 35 healthcare therapy teams that took action to improve their services. The published research on team learning is introduced, and the paper suggests it is an activity that has similarities with action research and with those forms of action learning where teams address collective…

  11. Automated Cyber Red Teaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    affect one’s cyber system by searching for viable attack plans1, and examining its effect on the system. It is a labour - intensive exercise as it...Both Satisfaction and Optimization Problems,” AI Magazine, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 85-87, 2001. [183] S. Milton, Machine Learning methods for

  12. A Project Team: A Team or Just a Group?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Hrazdilova Bockova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues related to work in either teams or groups. The theoretical part which discusses a team and a group with regards to its definition, classification and basic distinction brings in more on the typology of team roles, personality assessment and sociometric methods. The analytical part tests the project (work team of a medical center represented in terms of personality and motivational types, team roles and interpersonal team relations concerning the willingness of cooperation and communication. The main objective of this work was to determine whether the existing team is not by its nature rather a working group that contributes to the generally perceived stagnation of that field.

  13. Conceptualizing Interprofessional Teams as Multi-Team Systems-Implications for Assessment and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Courtney; Landry, Karen; Graham, Anna; Graham, Lori; Cianciolo, Anna T; Kalet, Adina; Rosen, Michael; Sherman, Deborah Witt

    2015-01-01

    SGEA 2015 CONFERENCE ABSTRACT (EDITED). Evaluating Interprofessional Teamwork During a Large-Scale Simulation. Courtney West, Karen Landry, Anna Graham, and Lori Graham. CONSTRUCT: This study investigated the multidimensional measurement of interprofessional (IPE) teamwork as part of large-scale simulation training. Healthcare team function has a direct impact on patient safety and quality of care. However, IPE team training has not been the norm. Recognizing the importance of developing team-based collaborative care, our College of Nursing implemented an IPE simulation activity called Disaster Day and invited other professions to participate. The exercise consists of two sessions: one in the morning and another in the afternoon. The disaster scenario is announced just prior to each session, which consists of team building, a 90-minute simulation, and debriefing. Approximately 300 Nursing, Medicine, Pharmacy, Emergency Medical Technicians, and Radiology students and over 500 standardized and volunteer patients participated in the Disaster Day event. To improve student learning outcomes, we created 3 competency-based instruments to evaluate collaborative practice in multidimensional fashion during this exercise. A 20-item IPE Team Observation Instrument designed to assess interprofessional team's attainment of Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competencies was completed by 20 faculty and staff observing the Disaster Day simulation. One hundred sixty-six standardized patients completed a 10-item Standardized Patient IPE Team Evaluation Instrument developed from the IPEC competencies and adapted items from the 2014 Henry et al. PIVOT Questionnaire. This instrument assessed the standardized or volunteer patient's perception of the team's collaborative performance. A 29-item IPE Team's Perception of Collaborative Care Questionnaire, also created from the IPEC competencies and divided into 5 categories of Values/Ethics, Roles and Responsibilities

  14. Ready to rumble: how team personality composition and task conflict interact to improve performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Bret H; Klotz, Anthony C; Postlethwaite, Bennett E; Brown, Kenneth G

    2013-03-01

    Although prior work has proposed a number of conditions under which task conflict in teams may improve performance, composition variables have been left unexplored. Given the effects of personality traits on team processes and outcomes demonstrated in prior work, investigating whether specific personality compositions influence the effect of task conflict on team performance is critical to researchers' understanding of conflict in teams. Our results indicate that team-level averages of both openness to experience and emotional stability function as moderators of the relationship between task conflict and team performance. Specifically, task conflict had a positive impact on performance in teams with high levels of openness or emotional stability; in contrast, task conflict had a negative impact on performance in teams with low levels of openness or emotional stability. Thus, when task conflict emerges, teams composed of members who are open minded or emotionally stable are best able to leverage conflict to improve performance. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  15. Survey team on

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Mogens Allan; Bruder, Regina; Planas, Núria

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of the work of the ICME 13 Survey Team on ‘Conceptualisation and the role of competencies, knowing and knowledge in mathematics education research’. It surveys a variety of historical and contemporary views and conceptualisations of what it means to master...... mathematics, focusing on notions such as mathematical competence and competencies, mathematical proficiency, and mathematical practices, amongst others. The paper provides theoretical analyses of these notions—under the generic heading of mathematical competencies—and gives an overview of selected research...

  16. Volunteer Team Management

    OpenAIRE

    Monych, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looked into volunteer team management in a project in AIESEC in Finland through the action research method. AIESEC in Finland is a non-profit non-government organization with a purpose of “peace and fulfilment of humankinds potential” through development of the youth’s future leadership. AIESEC was not a commissioning party; the project was the basis for the thesis without the supervision of the company. The thesis is based on a project that the author was in charge of, in ...

  17. Launch team training system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to the training, certification, recertification, and proficiency maintenance of the Shuttle launch team is proposed. Previous training approaches are first reviewed. Short term program goals include expanding current training methods, improving the existing simulation capability, and scheduling training exercises with the same priority as hardware tests. Long-term goals include developing user requirements which would take advantage of state-of-the-art tools and techniques. Training requirements for the different groups of people to be trained are identified, and future goals are outlined.

  18. Komi oil spill - An assessment by a multinational team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenis, P.

    1995-12-31

    The mission objectives, findings of an on-site visit, and recommendations of a multinational United Nations team who assessed the Komi oil spill in Russia were discussed, combined with a discussion of the findings and field work of Russian investigators, whose work preceded that of the UN team. Concern was expressed over spring flooding as a unique problem that might well complicate the cleanup. Areas of serious concern were identified by the group and recommendations for remediation were made, and described in detail. It was found that the multinational team approach was a successful answer in this particular situation in that the diverse backgrounds and experiences of the team members resulted in better solutions and recommendations for remediation than would have been possible otherwise. Access to information provided by EMERCOM (the Russian Ministry for Emergency Response to Natural Disasters) and the Russian consulting firm, helped the UN team in overcoming time constraints and other obstructions affecting their work. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Should they stay or should they go now? Exploring the impact of team familiarity on interprofessional team training outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kavita; Hernandez, Jessica; Martinez, Joseph; AbdelFattah, Kareem; Gardner, Aimee K

    2018-02-01

    Although simulation is an effective method for enhancing team competencies, it is unclear how team familiarity impacts this process. We examined how team familiarity impacted team competencies. Trainees were assigned to stable or dynamic teams to participate in three simulated cases. Situation awareness (SA) data was collected through in-scenario freezes. The recorded performances were assessed for clinical effectiveness (ClinEff) and teamwork. All data are reported on a 1-100% (100% = perfect performance) scale. Forty-six trainees (23 General Surgery; 23 Emergency Medicine) were randomized by specialty into stable (N = 8) or dynamic (N = 7) groups. Overall changes from Sim 1 to Sim3 were 12.2% (p teams reflecting improvements in ClinEff (15.2%; p team ClinEff improvement (8.7%) was not significant. Both groups demonstrated improvements in teamwork (stable = 9%, p Teams who continued to work together demonstrated increased improvements in clinical effectiveness and teamwork, while dynamic teams only demonstrated improvements in teamwork. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Team player styles, team design variables and team work effectiveness in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    El-Kot, Ghada Awed Hassan

    2001-01-01

    The literature has revealed few studies of management in Arab countries in general and particularly in Egypt. Many Egyptian organisations implemented the team concept a number of years ago, however, there do not appear to be any studies investicitaýt inc",D team work effectiveness in Egypt. The literature review and the findings of a pilot study emphasised the need for empirical research in team work in Egypt. Team effectiveness models are examined in order to identify the fact...

  1. Cooperative mobile agents search using beehive partitioned structure and Tabu Random search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazani, Saba; Jackson, Delvin L.; Selmic, Rastko R.

    2013-05-01

    In search and surveillance operations, deploying a team of mobile agents provides a robust solution that has multiple advantages over using a single agent in efficiency and minimizing exploration time. This paper addresses the challenge of identifying a target in a given environment when using a team of mobile agents by proposing a novel method of mapping and movement of agent teams in a cooperative manner. The approach consists of two parts. First, the region is partitioned into a hexagonal beehive structure in order to provide equidistant movements in every direction and to allow for more natural and flexible environment mapping. Additionally, in search environments that are partitioned into hexagons, mobile agents have an efficient travel path while performing searches due to this partitioning approach. Second, we use a team of mobile agents that move in a cooperative manner and utilize the Tabu Random algorithm to search for the target. Due to the ever-increasing use of robotics and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) platforms, the field of cooperative multi-agent search has developed many applications recently that would benefit from the use of the approach presented in this work, including: search and rescue operations, surveillance, data collection, and border patrol. In this paper, the increased efficiency of the Tabu Random Search algorithm method in combination with hexagonal partitioning is simulated, analyzed, and advantages of this approach are presented and discussed.

  2. Approach to team skills training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, J.L.; Roe, M.L.; Gaddy, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    The US commercial nuclear power industry has recognized the importance of team skills in control room operation. The desire to combine training of team interaction skills, like communications, with technical knowledge of reactor operations requires a unique approach to training. An NRC-sponsored study identified a five-phase approach to team skills training designed to be consistent with the systems approach to training currently endorsed by the NRC Policy Statement on Training and Qualification. This paper describes an approach to team skills training with emphasis on the nuclear power plant control room crew. An approach to team skills training

  3. Leadership by Confidence in Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Hajime; Suehiro, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    We study endogenous signaling by analyzing a team production problem with endogenous timing. Each agent of the team is privately endowed with some level of confidence about team productivity. Each of them must then commit a level of effort in one of two periods. At the end of each period, each agent observes his partner' s move in this period. Both agents are rewarded by a team output determined by team productivity and total invested effort. Each agent must personally incur the cost of effor...

  4. Professional Team Foundation Server 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Blankenship, Ed; Holliday, Grant; Keller, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Authoritative guide to TFS 2010 from a dream team of Microsoft insiders and MVPs!Microsoft Visual Studio Team Foundation Server (TFS) has evolved until it is now an essential tool for Microsoft?s Application Lifestyle Management suite of productivity tools, enabling collaboration within and among software development teams. By 2011, TFS will replace Microsoft?s leading source control system, VisualSourceSafe, resulting in an even greater demand for information about it. Professional Team Foundation Server 2010, written by an accomplished team of Microsoft insiders and Microsoft MVPs, provides

  5. Use of Airborne Gamma-Ray Spectrometry in case of emergency. Example of HELGA exercise - collaboration between France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, L.

    2004-01-01

    Since Chernobyl accident, airborne gamma-ray spectrometry has been recognised as a useful tool to evaluate consequences of an accident over large areas. Nine European countries have capabilities to perform such measurements. Between 1996 and 2003, a collaboration between these teams was supported by European community. In 2002, an exercise involving airborne and ground-based measurements was organised in Scotland. This exercise demonstrated the ability of European countries to provide assistance to one of them in case of emergency. Since this project has been completed, the French and German team decided to continue a collaboration. The CEA team (France) went in Germany in 2003 to participate to a survey with the German team. In September 2004, an exercise including mapping of contaminated areas and orphan sources search is planned in France. Such actions are good opportunities to exchange technical information about the acquisition systems and operating procedures. It is also essential to improve the availability of teams to obtain comparable and compatible results. The AGRS (airborne gamma ray spectrometry) systems involved in this exercise will be described and compared in this paper. The capacity of teams to work in collaboration in various situation (orphan source search, contamination mapping) will be then evaluated. In particular, a European Radiometric and Spectrometry format defined during Eccomags project will be used to create a database of raw and processed data. The aim is to produce quickly composite maps with data recorded by different teams. A choice of results will be presented and an assessment of capability of teams to work in collaboration will be done. (author)

  6. Leading Teams of Higher Education Administrators: Integrating Goal Setting, Team Role, and Team Life Cycle Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthuma, Richard; Al-Riyami, Said

    2012-01-01

    Leaders of higher education institutions can create top management teams of academic administrators to guide and improve their organizations. This study illustrates how the leadership of top management teams can be accomplished successfully through a combination of goal setting (Doran, 1981; Locke & Latham, 1990), understanding of team roles…

  7. Oncologic multidisciplinary team meetings: evaluation of quality criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottevanger, N.; Hilbink, M.; Weenk, M.; Janssen, R.; Vrijmoeth, T.; Vries, A. de; Hermens, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To develop a guideline with quality criteria for an optimal structure and functioning of a multidisciplinary team meeting (MTM), and to assess to what extent the Dutch MTMs complied with these criteria. METHOD: A literature search and expert opinions were used to

  8. Team-based global organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Lena; Butler, Christina; Mockaitis, Audra

    2015-01-01

    diversity in enhancing team creativity and performance, and 2) the sharing of knowledge in team-based organizations, while the other two themes address global team leadership: 3) the unprecedented significance of social capital for the success of global team leader roles; and 4) the link between shared......This chapter draws on a panel discussion of the future of global organizing as a team-based organization at EIBA 2014 in Uppsala, Sweden. We began by discussing contemporary developments of hybrid forms of hierarchy and teams-based organizing, but we venture to propose that as organizations become...... characterized by decreased importance of hierarchal structures, more fluidity across borders, even a possible dissolution of firm boundaries, we move towards team-based organizing as an alternative to more traditional forms of hierarchical-based organizing in global firms. To provide input for a discussion...

  9. Team errors: definition and taxonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasou, Kunihide; Reason, James

    1999-01-01

    In error analysis or error management, the focus is usually upon individuals who have made errors. In large complex systems, however, most people work in teams or groups. Considering this working environment, insufficient emphasis has been given to 'team errors'. This paper discusses the definition of team errors and its taxonomy. These notions are also applied to events that have occurred in the nuclear power industry, aviation industry and shipping industry. The paper also discusses the relations between team errors and Performance Shaping Factors (PSFs). As a result, the proposed definition and taxonomy are found to be useful in categorizing team errors. The analysis also reveals that deficiencies in communication, resource/task management, excessive authority gradient, excessive professional courtesy will cause team errors. Handling human errors as team errors provides an opportunity to reduce human errors

  10. Possibilities and limits of multiprofessional attention in the care of psychiatric emergencies: analytical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Lima de Paula

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Goal: to analyze the possibilities and limits of multiprofessional care in the attention to psychiatric emergencies. Method: it is an analytical study of the type integrative review of the comprehensive literature. Searches were conducted in the Latin American and Caribbean Literature (LILACS and Nursing Database (BDENF databases and in the ScieLo Virtual Library, with the use of Descriptors in Health Sciences (DECs: “Emergency Services, Psychiatric”, “Forensic Psychiatry”, “Psychiatric Rehabilitation”, in the period from 2007 to 2017. Results: after data analysis, two thematic categories emerged: “Possibilities and limits in multiprofessional care for patients in crisis” and “The continuity of care to the patient in crisis by the multiprofessional team”. The studies point out fragility in the management of the multiprofessional team of care to the patients in psychiatric crisis. Therefore, in the substitutive services to the psychiatric hospital, it is necessary to strengthen the care and bonding tools for continuity of treatment after the cases of psychiatric emergency of these patients. Conclusion: this research provided a deepening of the knowledge regarding the challenges of the multiprofessional team in the care of analytical psychiatric emergencies and in relation to the patient in crisis, considering the main multiprofessional actions, understanding how this approach is done and patient follow-up. Descriptors: Emergency Services, Psychiatric. Forensic Psychiatry. Psychiatric Rehabilitation.

  11. The systematic review team: contributions of the health sciences librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudden, Rosalind F; Protzko, Shandra L

    2011-01-01

    While the role of the librarian as an expert searcher in the systematic review process is widely recognized, librarians also can be enlisted to help systematic review teams with other challenges. This article reviews the contributions of librarians to systematic reviews, including communicating methods of the review process, collaboratively formulating the research question and exclusion criteria, formulating the search strategy on a variety of databases, documenting the searches, record keeping, and writing the search methodology. It also discusses challenges encountered such as irregular timelines, providing education, communication, and learning new technologies for record keeping. Rewards include building relationships with researchers, expanding professional expertise, and receiving recognition for contributions to health care outcomes.

  12. Cheap Talk: “Team Factors and Management Practices Influence on Team Trust”

    OpenAIRE

    Doris Padmini Selvaratnam; Aini Aman; Muhamad Maziz Mahyuddin Bin Kamaludin; Gary Lynn; Richard Reilly

    2016-01-01

    Team trust has been cited as a contributing factor towards team performance. This paper looks at the antecedents of team trust and to what extent they influence team trust. The antecedents of team trust are team factors like team autonomy, team stability and team member experience; and the management practices are top management involvement and management support. The results demonstrated that team factors and management practices influence team trust individually. The key find...

  13. GUEST EDITORIAL TEAM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jacob Mufunda received his MBChB and. MBA degrees from the. University of Zimbabwe and PhD in Physiology from Michigan State. University, Postgraduate. Certificates in. Emergency Medicine from Auckland and. Global Health Diplomacy from Geneva. He then spent. 14 years in the Department of Physiology later.

  14. Building Team Belay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    framework to the architecture of radicalization, recruitment, and targeting by terrorist organizations. In Multiculturalism and Intergroup... Multiculturalism and Intergroup Relations: Psychological Implications for Democracy in Global Context (Washington, DC: American Psychological Association...Management Agency, Emergency Support Function #8: Public Health and Medical Services Annex, 2013, http://www.fema.gov/media- library /assets/documents/32198

  15. Internet Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Fatmaa El Zahraa Mohamed Abdou

    2004-01-01

    A general study about the internet search engines, the study deals main 7 points; the differance between search engines and search directories, components of search engines, the percentage of sites covered by search engines, cataloging of sites, the needed time for sites appearance in search engines, search capabilities, and types of search engines.

  16. Individual and team performance in team-handball: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Herbert; Finkenzeller, Thomas; Würth, Sabine; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2014-12-01

    Team handball is a complex sport game that is determined by the individual performance of each player as well as tactical components and interaction of the team. The aim of this review was to specify the elements of team-handball performance based on scientific studies and practical experience, and to convey perspectives for practical implication. Scientific studies were identified via data bases of PubMed, Web of Knowledge, SPORT Discus, Google Scholar, and Hercules. A total of 56 articles met the inclusion criteria. In addition, we supplemented the review with 13 additional articles, proceedings and book sections. It was found that the specific characteristics of team-handball with frequent intensity changes, team-handball techniques, hard body confrontations, mental skills and social factors specify the determinants of coordination, endurance, strength and cognition. Although we found comprehensive studies examining individual performance in team-handball players of different experience level, sex or age, there is a lack of studies, particularly for team-handball specific training, as well as cognition and social factors. Key PointsThe specific characteristics of team-handball with frequent intensity changes, specific skills, hard body confrontations, mental skills and social factors define the determinants of coordination, endurance, strength and cognition.To increase individual and team performance in team-handball specific training based on these determinants have been suggested.Although there are comprehensive studies examining individual performance in team-handball players of different experience level, sex, or age are published, there is a lack of training studies, particularly for team-handball specific techniques and endurance, as well as cognition and social factors.

  17. A social-cognitive framework of multidisciplinary team innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletz, Susannah B F; Schunn, Christian D

    2010-01-01

    The psychology of science typically lacks integration between cognitive and social variables. We present a new framework of team innovation in multidisciplinary science and engineering groups that ties factors from both literatures together. We focus on the effects of a particularly challenging social factor, knowledge diversity, which has a history of mixed effects on creativity, most likely because those effects are mediated and moderated by cognitive and additional social variables. In addition, we highlight the distinction between team innovative processes that are primarily divergent versus convergent; we propose that the social and cognitive implications are different for each, providing a possible explanation for knowledge diversity's mixed results on team outcomes. Social variables mapped out include formal roles, communication norms, sufficient participation and information sharing, and task conflict; cognitive variables include analogy, information search, and evaluation. This framework provides a roadmap for research that aims to harness the power of multidisciplinary teams. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  18. Improving the Interdisciplinary Team Work in the Operating Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Birgitte

    In surgical teams, where health professionals are highly interdependent and work under time pressure, it is of particular importance that the team work is well-functioning to secure treatment quality and patient safety. Using the theory of relational coordination (RC) may be the key to unlocking...... the black box of teamwork in search for relational elements critical to successful collaboration and communication. Few single studies exists which explore how RC could be observed and improved in this context. The present study examines surgical teams in selected operating rooms (OR) focusing on RC...... period in 2014 in two orthopedic surgical wards in a university hospital. A directed content analysis on the basis of theory of RC is used to transform the data to show different typologies of interdisciplinary team work. RC was subsequently measured using the RC Survey. Data describe very complex...

  19. A Data Scheduling and Management Infrastructure for the TEAM Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelman, S.; Baru, C.; Chandra, S.; Fegraus, E.; Lin, K.; Unwin, R.

    2009-04-01

    TEAM protocols with the logistical scheduling needs of each TEAM Site. For example, each TEAM protocol defines when data must be collected (e.g. time of day, number of times per year, during which seasons, etc) as well as where data must be collected (from which sampling units, which trees, etc). Each TEAM Site has a limited number of resources and must create plans that will both satisfy the requirements of the protocols as well as be logistically feasible for their TEAM Site. With 15 TEAM Sites (and many more coming soon) the schedules of each TEAM Site must be communicated to the Network Office to ensure data are being collected as scheduled and to address the many problems when working in difficult environments like Tropical Forests. The Sampling Schedule provides built-in proposal and approval functionality to ensure that the TEAM Sites are and the Network office are in sync as well as provides the capability to modify schedules when needed. The Data Management Framework The Data Management framework is a three-tier data ingestion, edit and review application for protocols defined in the TEAM network. The data ingestion framework provides online web forms for field personnel to submit and edit data collected at TEAM Sites. These web forms will be accessible from the TEAM content management site. Once the data is securely uploaded, cured, processed and approved, it will be made publicly available for consumption by the scientific community. The Data Management framework, when combined with the Sampling Scheduler provides a closed loop Data Scheduling and Management infrastructure. All information starting from data collection plan, tools to input, modify and curate data, review and run QA/QC tests, as well as verify data are collected as planed are included. Finally, TEAM Network data are available for download via the Data Query and Download Application. This application utilizes a Google Maps custom interface to search, visualize, and download TEAM Network data

  20. Childhood Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SUBSCRIBE Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Childhood Emergencies Keeping children healthy and safe is every ... and tools to prevent, recognize and address a childhood emergency is the first step in keeping your ...

  1. Eye Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of retinal detachment, a ...

  2. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... IUD placed inside the uterus CHOICES FOR EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION Two emergency contraceptive pills may be bought without a prescription. ...

  3. Do trainees feel that they belong to a team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sophie; Lusznat, Rosie

    2017-05-18

    Postgraduate medical education has undergone significant reorganisation in recent years, with changes to the traditional apprenticeship model and an increasing reliance on shift working. The importance of teamwork in clinical care is well established; however, there is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team in the context of current working patterns. This is a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of medical and surgical trainees. Data were analysed thematically using an inductive qualitative approach. Fifteen trainees who had worked in a range of hospitals across the UK participated. Emerging themes fell into several categories: what constitutes the team; the effect of shift patterns on the team; the role of the team in education, support and well-being; and influences on team rapport. Whilst in general interviewees felt part of a team, this was not true for all posts. The nature of the team was also highly variable, and had evolved from the traditional 'Firm' structure to a more nebulous concept. Shift-working patterns could result in the fragmentation of the team, which had implications for patient care as well as for training. The team played an important role in both education and well-being for trainees, and several factors were identified that could engender a more supportive team. With an ageing population and with increasing demands on limited resources, the requirement for shift work is likely to increase, and there is a fundamental need to maintain support for the next generation of doctors. There is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  4. Effect of CRM team leader training on team performance and leadership behavior in simulated cardiac arrest scenarios: a prospective, randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Castelao, Ezequiel; Boos, Margarete; Ringer, Christiane; Eich, Christoph; Russo, Sebastian G

    2015-07-24

    Effective team leadership in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is well recognized as a crucial factor influencing performance. Generally, leadership training focuses on task requirements for leading as well as non-leading team members. We provided crisis resource management (CRM) training only for designated team leaders of advanced life support (ALS) trained teams. This study assessed the impact of the CRM team leader training on CPR performance and team leader verbalization. Forty-five teams of four members each were randomly assigned to one of two study groups: CRM team leader training (CRM-TL) and additional ALS-training (ALS add-on). After an initial lecture and three ALS skill training tutorials (basic life support, airway management and rhythm recognition/defibrillation) of 90-min each, one member of each team was randomly assigned to act as the team leader in the upcoming CPR simulation. Team leaders of the CRM-TL groups attended a 90-min CRM-TL training. All other participants received an additional 90-min ALS skill training. A simulated CPR scenario was videotaped and analyzed regarding no-flow time (NFT) percentage, adherence to the European Resuscitation Council 2010 ALS algorithm (ADH), and type and rate of team leader verbalizations (TLV). CRM-TL teams showed shorter, albeit statistically insignificant, NFT rates compared to ALS-Add teams (mean difference 1.34 (95% CI -2.5, 5.2), p = 0.48). ADH scores in the CRM-TL group were significantly higher (difference -6.4 (95% CI -10.3, -2.4), p = 0.002). Significantly higher TLV proportions were found for the CRM-TL group: direct orders (difference -1.82 (95% CI -2.4, -1.2), p CRM improves performance of the entire team, in particular guideline adherence and team leader behavior. Emphasis on training of team leader behavior appears to be beneficial in resuscitation and emergency medical course performance.

  5. Virtual Teams and Knowledge Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtonen, Miikka; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    How does culture affect virtual teams and the knowledge communication processes in which they engage? As virtual spaces are increasingly used to support teams and establish collaboration in cross-cultural projects, the notion of cross-cultural communication can be understood as shifting from...... contextual perspective to a semiotic perspective. That is to say, although the team members are using the same vocabulary they might attach different meanings to and have different knowledge about them thus highlighting the importance of approaching virtual teams and collaboration from a semiotic perspective....... To look at how knowledge about virtual work is established in a multinational context, we interviewed members of a team that connects Finland and India. Results reveal five objects shared between the team members with varying knowledge about them. By making these differences in knowledge visible through...

  6. Roles in Innovative Software Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    With inspiration from role-play and improvisational theater, we are developing a framework for innovation in software teams called Essence. Based on agile principles, Essence is designed for teams of developers and an onsite customer. This paper reports from teaching experiments inspired by design...... science, where we tried to assign differentiated roles to team members. The experiments provided valuable insights into the design of roles in Essence. These insights are used for redesigning how roles are described and conveyed in Essence....

  7. New lenses on team learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    Team læring er sjældent blevet studeret fra et sociokulturelt perspektiv (vygotskiansk). Denne poster er et teoretisk bidrag til team læring, der fokuserer på dialog, tegn-mediering og kulturel historisk praksis for at udvikle en forståelse af team læring som mere end forøgelse i adfærd, viden og...

  8. Team Training through Communications Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    training * operational environment * team training research issues * training approach * team communications * models of operator beharior e...on the market soon, it certainly would be investigated carefully for its applicability to the team training problem. ce A text-to-speech voice...generation system. Votrax has recently marketed such a device, and others may soon follow suit. ’ d. A speech replay system designed to produce speech from

  9. Swift Trust in Distributed Ad Hoc Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-04

    individus sont perçus. Et les abus de confiance commis pendant la mission ont nui temporairement à la réputation de leurs auteurs , mais ils n’ont...of theory and research argue that trust may emerge in teams even when the development of conventional person-based trust is challenged. 1.3.1 Swift...good deal of theory (and some research) espouses the importance of “swift trust” in environments where conventional trust would otherwise be

  10. Team performance: Pitfalls and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.R.; Eckert, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Team building is often used as a focal point and process for improving performance. In many cases these efforts are successful in achieving the desired goals and the team building is confirmed as an effective approach. The authors have been involved in a number of successful, and some unsuccessful, efforts. This paper is concerned primarily with those cases where a team approach did not achieve the desired improvement. These experiences offer an opportunity to better understand the conditions under which team building works and to identify how a complete assessment of the prevailing conditions can provide corrections to improve the probability of success

  11. Commodity team motivation and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englyst, Linda; Jørgensen, Frances; Johansen, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article, an in-depth single case study is presented in order to explore and discuss the functioning of commodity teams in a global sourcing context. Specifically, the study aimed at identifying factors that may influence team members' motivation to participate in activities that create...... opportunities for synergy and coordination of purchasing. In the teams studied, motivation appeared to be influenced to some degree by a number of factors, including rewards, leadership behaviours, goal setting, and the career goals of the commodity team members. In some cases, inconsistencies between...

  12. Commodity Team Motivation and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englyst, Linda; Jørgensen, Frances; Johansen, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article, an in-depth single case study is presented in order to explore and discuss the functioning of commodity teams in a global sourcing context. Specifically, the study aimed at identifying factors that may influence team members' motivation to participate in activities that create...... opportunities for synergy and coordination of purchasing. In the teams studied, motivation appeared to be influenced to some degree by a number of factors, including rewards, leadership behaviours, goal setting, and the career goals of the commodity team members. In some cases, inconsistencies between...

  13. Red Teaming: Past and Present

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Longbine, David F

    2008-01-01

    .... Key aspects of the Army red teaming definition are its emphasis on independent thinking, challenging organizational thinking, incorporating alternative perspectives, and incorporating alternative analysis...

  14. Investigating Team Learning in a Military Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veestraeten, Marlies; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2014-01-01

    As teams have become fundamental parts of today's organisations, the need for these teams to function and learn efficiently and effectively is widely emphasised. Also in military contexts team learning is vital. The current article examines team learning behaviour in military teams as it aims to cross-validate a team learning model that was…

  15. Leadership for Team Learning: The Case of University Teacher Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeslag-Kreunen, Mieke G. M.; Van der Klink, Marcel R.; Van den Bossche, Piet; Gijselaers, Wim H.

    2018-01-01

    Teacher team involvement is considered a key factor in achieving sustainable innovation in higher education. This requires engaging in team learning behaviors that should result in new knowledge and solutions. However, university teachers are not used to discussing their work practices with one another and tend to neglect any innovation in their…

  16. Practice effects on intra-team synergies in football teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pedro; Chung, Dante; Carvalho, Thiago; Cardoso, Tiago; Davids, Keith; Araújo, Duarte; Garganta, Júlio

    2016-04-01

    Developing synchronised player movements for fluent competitive match play is a common goal for coaches of team games. An ecological dynamics approach advocates that intra-team synchronization is governed by locally created information, which specifies shared affordances responsible for synergy formation. To verify this claim we evaluated coordination tendencies in two newly-formed teams of recreational players during association football practice games, weekly, for fifteen weeks (thirteen matches). We investigated practice effects on two central features of synergies in sports teams - dimensional compression and reciprocal compensation here captured through near in-phase modes of coordination and time delays between coupled players during forward and backwards movements on field while attacking and defending. Results verified that synergies were formed and dissolved rapidly as a result of the dynamic creation of informational properties, perceived as shared affordances among performers. Practising once a week led to small improvements in the readjustment delays between co-positioning team members, enabling faster regulation of coordinated team actions. Mean values of the number of player and team synergies displayed only limited improvements, possibly due to the timescales of practice. No relationship between improvements in dimensional compression and reciprocal compensation were found for number of shots, amount of ball possession and number of ball recoveries made. Findings open up new perspectives for monitoring team coordination processes in sport. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of team and work characteristics on team functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, E.; Slomp, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors seek to strengthen the theoretical foundation of team and cell formation through the inclusion of human factors. They distinguish three types of team characteristics: global, shared, and compositional attributes. In this last category, they also deal with diversity in

  18. Facilitating Team Cognition : How designers mirror what NPD teams do

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stompff, G.

    2012-01-01

    Products are developed by large multi-disciplinary teams. The teams deal with many topics requiring the expertise of several specialists simultaneously. They have to decide together if something is a problem; propose multi-disciplinary solutions; and align their activities into a seamless whole.

  19. Stimulating teachers’ team performance through team-oriented HR practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmans, Machiel; Runhaar, Piety; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Teams of teachers are increasingly held accountable for the quality of education and educational reforms in vocational education and training institutions. However, historically teachers have not been required to engage in deep-level collaboration, thus team-oriented HR practices are being used

  20. Diversity in goal orientation, team reflexivity, and team performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, Anne Nederveen; van Knippenberg, Daan; van Ginkel, Wendy P.

    Although recent research highlights the role of team member goal orientation in team functioning, research has neglected the effects of diversity in goal orientation. In a laboratory study with groups working on a problem-solving task, we show that diversity in learning and performance orientation