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Sample records for emergency response training

  1. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site

  2. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-04-08

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site.

  3. Short radiological emergency response training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.D.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of a radiological emergency response training program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the health physics and safety training staff. This course is given to groups from local, county, state, and federal agencies and industrial organizations. It is normally three days in length, although the structure is flexible to accommodate individual needs and prior training. An important feature of the course is an emergency exercise utilizing a short lived radionuclide to better simulate real accident conditions. Groups are encouraged to use their own instruments to gain better familiarity with their operating characteristics under field conditions. Immediately following the exercise, a critical review of the students' performance is conducted

  4. Emergency response training with the BNL plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Guppy, J.G.; Mallen, A.N.; Wulff, W.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the experience in the use of the BNL Plant Analyzer for NRC emergency response training to simulated accidents in a BWR. The unique features of the BNL Plant Analyzer that are important for the emergency response training are summarized. A closed-loop simulation of all the key systems of a power plant in question was found essential to the realism of the emergency drills conducted at NRC. The faster than real-time simulation speeds afforded by the BNL Plant Analyzer have demonstrated its usefulness for the timely conduct of the emergency response training

  5. Training programs for emergency response personnel at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Three Mile Island reactor accident has focused attention on emergency planning and preparedness including selection and training of personnel. At Hanford, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is in the unique position of providing emergency response personnel, planning, training and equipment not only for its own organization and facilities but also for the Hanford Site in general, as well as the Interagency Radiological Assistance Plan (IRAP) Region 8 Team. Team members are chosen for one or more of the emergency teams based upon professional education and/or experience as well as interest, aptitude and specialized knowledge. Consequently, the initial training orientation of each new team member is not directed toward general professional ability, but rather toward specialized knowledge required to carry out their assigned emergency tasks. Continual training and practice is necessary to maintain the interest and skills for effectively coping with major emergencies. The types of training which are conducted include: tests of emergency systems and/or procedures; drills involving plant employees and/or emergency team members (e.g., activation of emergency notification systems); short training sessions on special topics; and realistic emergency exercises involving the simulation of major accidents wherein the emergency team must solve specific problems on a real time basis

  6. Application and evaluation of training for response to emergency situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidwell, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    At Washington Gas Light Co., a magnetic situation-simulation board has become an effective tool for training field personnel in emergency procedures and decisionmaking. Class participants use magnetic disks - symbolizing physical features and components of the distribution system and service equipment - to visually describe the step-by-step procedures applied to specific emergency scenarios. A manually operated clock keeps a running account of the time estimated for each step, emphasizing the need for quick response. Situation-board programs of typical problems, complete with script and drawings, are available to all training foremen to ensure uniform training throughout the department.

  7. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center

  8. A simulator-based nuclear reactor emergency response training exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Edward; Bereznai, George; Shaw, John; Chaput, Joseph; Lafortune, Jean-Francois

    Training offsite emergency response personnel basic awareness of onsite control room operations during nuclear power plant emergency conditions was the primary objective of a week-long workshop conducted on a CANDU® virtual nuclear reactor simulator available at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Canada. The workshop was designed to examine both normal and abnormal reactor operating conditions, and to observe the conditions in the control room that may have impact on the subsequent offsite emergency response. The workshop was attended by participants from a number of countries encompassing diverse job functions related to nuclear emergency response. Objectives of the workshop were to provide opportunities for participants to act in the roles of control room personnel under different reactor operating scenarios, providing a unique experience for participants to interact with the simulator in real-time, and providing increased awareness of control room operations during accident conditions. The ability to "pause" the simulator during exercises allowed the instructors to evaluate and critique the performance of participants, and to provide context with respect to potential offsite emergency actions. Feedback from the participants highlighted (i) advantages of observing and participating "hands-on" with operational exercises, (ii) their general unfamiliarity with control room operational procedures and arrangements prior to the workshop, (iii) awareness of the vast quantity of detailed control room procedures for both normal and transient conditions, and (iv) appreciation of the increased workload for the operators in the control room during a transient from normal operations. Based upon participant feedback, it was determined that the objectives of the training had been met, and that future workshops should be conducted.

  9. Regional training course on medical response on radiological emergencies. Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This short information is an annex of the documentation distributed to the participants to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Regional Training Course on Medical Response on Radiological Emergencies, organised by the IAEA in co-operation with the Government of Argentina thought the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 16-20 October 2000. The course was intended to people from IAEA Member State in the Latin American and Caribbean region, and to professionals and workers on medicine related with the radiation protection. This annex present information about: Radioactive materials transport; Internal and external contamination; Radiation accidents; Physical dosimetry

  10. Southern State Radiological Transportation Emergency Response Training Course Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is an interstate compact organization that serves 16 states and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico with information and analysis in energy and environmental matters. Nuclear waste management is a topic that has garnered considerable attention in the SSEB region in the last several years. Since 1985, SSEB has received support from the US Department of Energy for the regional analysis of high-level radioactive waste transportation issues. In the performance of its work in this area, SSEB formed the Advisory Committee on High-Level Radioactive Materials Transportation, which comprises representatives from impacted states and tribes. SSEB meets with the committee semi-annually to provide issue updates to members and to solicit their views on activities impacting their respective states. Among the waste transportation issues considered by SSEB and the committee are shipment routing, the impacts of monitored retrievable storage, state liability in the event of an accident and emergency preparedness and response. This document addresses the latter by describing the radiological emergency response training courses and programs of the southern states, as well as federal courses available outside the southern region

  11. A knowledge based system for training radiation emergency response personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriakose, K.K.; Peter, T.U.; Natarajan, A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the important aspects of radiation emergency preparedness is to impart training to emergency handling staff. Mock exercises are generally used for this purpose. But practical considerations limit the frequency of such exercises. A suitably designed computer software can be effectively used to impart training. With the advent of low cost personal computers, the frequency with which the training programme can be conducted is unlimited. A computer software with monotonic behaviour is inadequate for such training. It is necessary to provide human like tutoring capabilities. With the advances in knowledge based computer systems, it is possible to develop such a system. These systems have the capability of providing individualized training. This paper describes the development of such a system for training and evaluation of agencies associated with the management of radiation emergency. It also discusses the utility of the software as a general purpose tutor. The details required for the preparation of data files and knowledge base files are included. It uses a student model based on performance measures. The software is developed in C under MS-DOS. It uses a rule based expert system shell developed in C. The features of this shell are briefly described. (author). 5 refs

  12. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  13. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, K.E.

    1994-01-01

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel

  14. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations

  15. Functional design criteria for the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Within the United States, there are few hands-on training centers capable of providing integrated technical training within a practical application environment. Currently, there are no training facilities that offer both radioactive and chemical hazardous response training. There are no hands-on training centers that provide training for both hazardous material operations and emergency response that also operate as a partnership between organized labor, state agencies, tribes, and local emergency responders within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Available facilities appear grossly inadequate for training the thousands of people at Hanford, and throughout the Pacific Northwest, who are required to qualify under nationally-mandated requirements. It is estimated that 4,000 workers at the Hanford Site alone need hands-on training. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, the potential target audience would be over 30,000 public sector emergency response personnel, as well as another 10,000 clean-up workers represented by organized labor. The HAMMER Training Center will be an interagency-sponsored training center. It will be designed, built, and operated to ensure that clean-up workers, fire fighters, and public sector management and emergency response personnel are trained to handle accidental spills of hazardous materials. Training will cover wastes at clean-up sites, and in jurisdictions along the transportation corridors, to effectively protect human life, property, and the environment

  16. Advanced simulation and management software for nuclear emergency training and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.W.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of training of safety personnel to deal with real world scenarios is prevalent amongst nuclear emergency preparedness and response organizations. For the development of training tools we have committed to ensure that field procedures, data collection software and decision making tools be identical during training sessions as they would be during a real emergency. By identifying the importance of a fully integrated tool, we have developed a safety support system capable of both functioning in training mode and real mode, enabling emergency response organizations to train more efficiently and effectively. This new fully integrated emergency management tool is called S3-FAST also known as Safety Support Systems - Field Assessment Survey Tool. (orig.)

  17. Training and exercises of the Emergency Response Team at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yearwood, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility has an active Emergency Response Team. The Emergency Response Team is composed of members of the operating and support groups within the Plutonium Facility. In addition to their initial indoctrination, the members are trained and certified in first-aid, CPR, fire and rescue, and the use of self-contained-breathing-apparatus. Training exercises, drills, are conducted once a month. The drills consist of scenarios which require the Emergency Response Team to apply CPR and/or first aid. The drills are performed in the Plutonium Facility, they are video taped, then reviewed and critiqued by site personnel. Through training and effective drills and the Emergency Response Team can efficiently respond to any credible accident which may occur at the Plutonium Facility. 3 tabs

  18. Project management plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the Hanford Site will involve the handling and cleanup of toxic substances. Thousands of workers involved in these new activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and associated risks. This project is an important part of the Hanford Site mission and will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to meet high standards for safety. The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center (HAMMER) project will construct a centralized regional training center dedicated to training hazardous materials workers and emergency responders in classrooms and with hands-on, realistic training aids representing actual field conditions. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a cost-effective, high-quality way to meet the Hanford Site training needs. The training center creates a partnership among DOE; government contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and selected institutions of higher education

  19. Cooperative approach to training for radiological emergency preparedness and response in Southeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bus, John; Popp, Andrew; Holland, Brian; Murray, Allan

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the collaborative and systematic approach to training for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response and the outcomes of this work with ANSTO's Southeast Asian counterparts, particularly in the Philippines. The standards and criteria being applied are discussed, along with the methods, design and conduct of workshops, table-top and field exercises. The following elements of this training will be presented: (a) identifying the priority areas for training through needs analysis;(b) strengthening individual profesional expertise through a structured approach to training; and (c) enhancing individual Agency and National nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response arrangements and capabilities. Whilst the work is motivated by nuclear security concerns, the implications for effective and sustainable emergency response to any nuclear or radiological incidents are noted. (author)

  20. Hybrid Decision-making Method for Emergency Response System of Unattended Train Operation Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suitable selection of the emergency alternatives is a critical issue in emergency response system of Unattended Train Operation (UTO metro system of China. However, there is no available method for dispatcher group in Operating Control Center (OCC to evaluate the decision under emergency situation. It was found that the emergency decision making in UTO metro system is relative with the preferences and the importance of multi-dispatcher in emergency. Regarding these factors, this paper presents a hybrid method to determinate the priority weights of emergency alternatives, which aggregates the preference matrix by constructing the emergency response task model based on the Weighted Ordered Weighted Averaging (WOWA operator. This calculation approach derives the importance weights depending on the dispatcher emergency tasks and integrates it into the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA operator weights based on a fuzzy membership relation. A case from train fire is given to demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of the proposed methods for Group Multi-Criteria Decision Making (GMCDM in emergency management of UTO metro system. The innovation of this research is paving the way for a systematic emergency decision-making solution which connects the automatic metro emergency response system with the GMCDM theory.

  1. Development of a virtual reality training system. An application to emergency response in radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Naohito

    2003-01-01

    A virtual reality (VR) training system was developed for the purpose of confirming the applicability of virtual reality on training systems for emergency response of radioactive materials transport. This system has following features; 1) Accident scenarios were derived from an event tree analysis. 2) Instructors can edit the training scenario. 3) Three VR scenes were prepared: vehicle and equipment checks, vehicle travel on an expressway, and emergency response in a tunnel fire accident. 4) every action by users is recorded automatically. 5) Instructors and users hold briefing session after the training, and they can review and confirm the results with VR animation. 6) A support database is provided for the convenience of users. The applicability of the system was validated through some trial applications and demonstrations. (author)

  2. Radiological transportation emergency response training course funding and timing in the southern states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The following is a review of the enabling statutes of 16 southern states regarding training for personnel preparing for or responding to a transportation-related emergency involving highway route-controlled quantities of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This report outlines the funding sources and procedures for administering funds for programs attended by state and local officials. Additionally, the report outlines the views of emergency response officials in the southem states concerning the timing and administration of future federal assistance to be provided under section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act. Under section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is required to provide technical assistance and funds to states for training public safety officials of appropriate units of local government and Indian tribes when spent nuclear fuel or high-level radioactive waste is transported through their jurisdictions. The Comprehensive Cooperative Agreement (CCA) is the primary funding mechanism for federal assistance to states for the development of their overall emergency management capabilities. FEMA supports 12 separate emergency management programs including the Emergency Management Training program (EMT). This program provides funds for emergency management training and technical assistance to states for unique state training needs. Funds may be used for instructors, students and other related costs

  3. Medical Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    In almost all nuclear and radiological emergencies, local emergency services (e.g. local medical, law enforcement, and fire brigades) will have the most important role in the early response. Within hours, hospitals may also have an important role to play in the response at the local level. Since nuclear and radiological emergencies are rare, medical responders often have little or no experience in dealing with this type of emergency and inexperience may lead to an inadequate response. For this reason, training in medical preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency is an important aspect of preparedness and response activities. These materials are designed for use at a training course on medical preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency. They contain a wide range of lectures and supporting materials, which cover the basic topics and more specific areas of medical preparedness and response. Therefore, in planning their specific courses, organizers are encouraged to choose those lectures and supportive materials from the CD-ROM that best match their training priorities. Materials on the CD-ROM address the following areas: • Terrorism in Perspective; • Malicious Act Scenarios; • Providing Information to the Medical Community and the Public; • Medical Response to a Radiation Mass Casualty Event; • Handling of Contaminated Persons in Malicious Events; • Planning and Preparedness for Medical Response to Malicious Events with Radioactive Material; • Handling the Bodies of Decedents Contaminated with Radioactive Material; • Radiation Emergencies: Scope of the Problem; • Common Sources of Radiation; • Basic Concepts of Ionizing Radiation; • Basic Concepts of Radiation Protection; • Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation – Basic Notions; • Basics of Radiopathology; • External Radioactive Contamination; • Internal Radioactive Contamination; • Acute Radiation Syndrome; • Cutaneous Radiation

  4. Identifying and training non-technical skills of nuclear emergency response teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crichton, M.T.; Flin, R.

    2004-01-01

    Training of the non-technical (social and cognitive) skills that are crucial to safe and effective management by teams in emergency situations is an issue that is receiving increasing emphasis in many organisations, particularly in the nuclear power industry. As teams play a major role in emergency response organisations (ERO), effective functioning and interactions within, between and across teams is crucial, particularly as the management of an emergency situation often requires that teams are extended by members from various other sections and strategic groups throughout the company, as well as members of external agencies. A series of interviews was recently conducted with members of a UK nuclear emergency response organisation to identify the non-technical skills required by team members that would be required for managing an emergency. Critical skills have been identified as decision making and situation assessment, as well as communication, teamwork, and stress management. A number of training strategies are discussed which can be tailored to the roles and responsibilities of the team members and the team leader, based on the roles within the team being defined as either Decision Maker, Evaluator, or Implementor, according to Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) classifications. It is anticipated that enhanced learning of the necessary non-technical skills, through experience and directed practice, will improve the skills of members of emergency response teams

  5. Identifying and training non-technical skills of nuclear emergency response teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichton, M.T. E-mail: m.crichton@abdn.ac.uk; Flin, R

    2004-08-01

    Training of the non-technical (social and cognitive) skills that are crucial to safe and effective management by teams in emergency situations is an issue that is receiving increasing emphasis in many organisations, particularly in the nuclear power industry. As teams play a major role in emergency response organisations (ERO), effective functioning and interactions within, between and across teams is crucial, particularly as the management of an emergency situation often requires that teams are extended by members from various other sections and strategic groups throughout the company, as well as members of external agencies. A series of interviews was recently conducted with members of a UK nuclear emergency response organisation to identify the non-technical skills required by team members that would be required for managing an emergency. Critical skills have been identified as decision making and situation assessment, as well as communication, teamwork, and stress management. A number of training strategies are discussed which can be tailored to the roles and responsibilities of the team members and the team leader, based on the roles within the team being defined as either Decision Maker, Evaluator, or Implementor, according to Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) classifications. It is anticipated that enhanced learning of the necessary non-technical skills, through experience and directed practice, will improve the skills of members of emergency response teams.

  6. Training for the medical response in radiological emergency experiences and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The use of the nuclear techniques int he social practice confers a special imporatnce to the relative aspects to the safety of the practices and radiationsources, for what the implementation of efficient programs of radiation protection constitutes a priority. However in spite of the will before expressed, regrettably radiological situations happen accidental assocaited to multiple causes taht suggest the creation of response capacities to intervention before these fortuitous facts. The experiences accumulated in the last decades related with accidental exposures have evidenced the convenience of having properly qualified human resources for the Medical Response in Radiological Emergencies. The training in the medical aspects of the radiological emergencies acquires a singular character. In such a sense when valuing the national situation put onof manifest deficiences as for the training in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies that advised the development of training programs in such aspects for the different response groups linked to the topic. After identified the training necessities and the scope of the same ones, the contents of the training program were elaborated. The program has as general purpose the invigoration of the capacity of the medical response in front of accidental radiological situations, by means of actions that they bear to prepare groups of medical response in the handling of people accident victims and to the identification of potentials,accidental scenarios, as well as of the necessary resources to confront them. The program content approaches theoretical and paractical aspects to the medical aspect to radiological emergencies. The program include the different topics about fundamental of physical biological to radiation protection, radiation protection during exposure of radiological accidents, medical care for overexposed or contaminated persons, drill, exercises and concludes with designation of a strategy as preparation and

  7. Development of emergency response training program for on-site commanders (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikono, Masaru; Matsui, Yuko; Kanayama, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Since the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, there have been increasing calls for developing the leadership capabilities of managers who are in charge of command and control of the on-site emergency response center at nuclear power plants. Training programs to improve non-technical skills are being developed and introduced. The authors developed an active learning exercise that can be repeatedly performed on-site, targeting on-site commander teams in charge of the initial response in an emergency situation. The exercise forms the core element of a non-technical skills training curriculum. This paper outlines the developed exercise, evaluates the stress on the participants caused by the exercise, and identifies any issues before actually introducing it to a site. (author)

  8. A 'mixed reality' simulator concept for future Medical Emergency Response Team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert J; Guest, R; Mahoney, P; Lamb, D; Gibson, C

    2017-08-01

    The UK Defence Medical Service's Pre-Hospital Emergency Care (PHEC) capability includes rapid-deployment Medical Emergency Response Teams (MERTs) comprising tri-service trauma consultants, paramedics and specialised nurses, all of whom are qualified to administer emergency care under extreme conditions to improve the survival prospects of combat casualties. The pre-deployment training of MERT personnel is designed to foster individual knowledge, skills and abilities in PHEC and in small team performance and cohesion in 'mission-specific' contexts. Until now, the provision of airborne pre-deployment MERT training had been dependent on either the availability of an operational aircraft (eg, the CH-47 Chinook helicopter) or access to one of only two ground-based facsimiles of the Chinook 's rear cargo/passenger cabin. Although MERT training has high priority, there will always be competition with other military taskings for access to helicopter assets (and for other platforms in other branches of the Armed Forces). This paper describes the development of an inexpensive, reconfigurable and transportable MERT training concept based on 'mixed reality' technologies-in effect the 'blending' of real-world objects of training relevance with virtual reality reconstructions of operational contexts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Development and evaluation of a leadership training program for public health emergency response: results from a Chinese study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yihua

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the 9/11 attack and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, the development of qualified and able public health leaders has become a new urgency in building the infrastructure needed to address public health emergencies. Although previous studies have reported that the training of individual leaders is an important approach, the systemic and scientific training model need further improvement and development. The purpose of this study was to develop, deliver, and evaluate a participatory leadership training program for emergency response. Methods Forty-one public health leaders (N = 41 from five provinces completed the entire emergency preparedness training program in China. The program was evaluated by anonymous questionnaires and semi-structured interviews held prior to training, immediately post-training and 12-month after training (Follow-up. Results The emergency preparedness training resulted in positive shifts in knowledge, self-assessment of skills for public health leaders. More than ninety-five percent of participants reported that the training model was scientific and feasible. Moreover, the response of participants in the program to the avian influenza outbreak, as well as the planned evaluations for this leadership training program, further demonstrated both the successful approaches and methods and the positive impact of this integrated leadership training initiative. Conclusion The emergency preparedness training program met its aims and objectives satisfactorily, and improved the emergency capability of public health leaders. This suggests that the leadership training model was effective and feasible in improving the emergency preparedness capability.

  10. Hazardous materials emergency response training program at Texas A ampersand M University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) as the engineering vocational training arm of the Texas A ampersand M University system has conducted oil-spill, hazardous-material, and related safety training for industry since 1976 and fire suppression training since 1931. In 1987 TEEX conducted training for some 66,000 persons, of which some 6000 were in hazardous-materials safety training and 22,000 in fire suppression or related fields. Various laws and regulations exist relative to employee training at an industrial facility, such as the Hazard Communication Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or more commonly Superfund), the Community Right to Know Law, and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), Titles I and III. The TEEX programs developed on the foundation emphasize the hands-on approach (60% field exercises) to provide a comprehensive training curriculum resulting in regulatory compliance, an effective emergency response capability, a prepared community, and a safe work environment

  11. Training center and response to emergencies; Centro de treinamento e resposta a emergencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Paulo Manuel da; Endo, Nelson Yukio [PMS Consultoria em Engenharia de Seguranca e Ambiental S/C Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Accidents with installations and products have troubled companies and governmental authorities too, who are actuating so much by inspecting, and prevention of these events must be intensified. It is clear that all persons involved have to qualify for risks management of his activities and to response satisfactorily when accidents occur. For attending this necessity, a partnership with Petroleo Brasileiro S/A - PETROBRAS and PMS Consultoria em Engenharia de Seguranca e Ambiental S/C Ltda, was established to build and operate a Training Centre and Emergency Response. The philosophy of this project is that the major parts of accidents happen many times at the same conditions, and if the accidents representation will be in real conditions for training, in practice it is faster to control the events, and what is more important to avoid repeated accidents. Another purpose of the Centre is to integrate universities and industries, developing research and news technologies, for attending companies needs in this millennium. (author)

  12. Project T100 -- Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center (HAMMER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) is to provide a system of Quality Assurance reviews and verifications on the design and construction of the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center, project 95L-EWT-100 at Hanford. The reviews and verifications will be on activities associated with design, procurement, and construction of the HAMMER project which includes, but is not limited to earthwork, placement of concrete, laying of rail, drilling of wells, water and sewer line fabrication and installation, communications systems, fire protection/detection systems, line tie-ins, building and mock-up (prop) construction, electrical, instrumentation, pump and valves and special coatings

  13. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  14. Emergency response workers workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapeev, S.A.; Glukhikh, E.N.; Tyurin, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A training workshop entitled Current issues and potential improvements in Rosatom Corporation emergency prevention and response system was held in May-June, 2012. The workshop combined theoretical training with full-scale practical exercise that demonstrated the existing innovative capabilities for radiation reconnaissance, diving equipment and robotics, aircraft, emergency response and rescue hardware and machinery. This paper describes the activities carried out during the workshop [ru

  15. Cytogenetic Dosimetry: Applications in Preparedness for and Response to Radiation Emergencies - Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    These materials are designed for use at a four day training course on the application of cytogenetic dosimetry in preparedness for and response to radiation emergencies. They contain information on: (1) Basics of biological effects of ionizing radiation: Parts 1+2; (2) Basics of dosimetry; (3) dicentric assay; (4) Retrospective dosimetry by translocation analysis; (5) Premature chromosome condensation analysis; (6) Cytokinesis block micronucleus assay; (7) Applied statistics for biodosimetry; (8) Automatic analysis of chromosomal assays; (9) Biodosimetry in mass casualty events; (10) Safety of laboratory staff and quality programmes; (11) Examples of accident investigations; (12) Cytogenetic dose estimation in the criticality accident in Tokaimura; (13) Radiological accidents in Latin America; (14) Radiological accidents in Georgia. Additionally, the CD contains two working sessions with the reference materials for use and a standard training programme. This training course consists of lectures and work sessions that can easily be utilized by a State to build a basic capability in biodosimetry application in a nuclear or radiological emergency

  16. Contingency planning and emergency response in construction activities: Training the construction worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.

    1987-01-01

    Construction activities have the potential for environmental and/or health impacts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) particularly as site cleanup and restoration plans are initiated. ORNL has instituted special training for all construction workers and related contractors. Individuals learn how construction activities at ORNL can potentially have adverse effects on the environment and their health, and to learn how to respond to potential chemical and radiation hazards. Workers are given a review of basic information on radiation and chemicals in a framework that emphasizes the situations in which workers or the environment may be exposed to potential risk. Specific instructions are presented on what to do when contamination is suspected, with identification of emergency procedures and response personnel. 5 refs., 1 fig

  17. Development of Educational and Training Simulator for Emergency Response to Chinese Nuclear Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Juyub; Kim, Juyoul; Kim, Sukhoon; Lee, Seunghee; Yoon, Taebin; Cliff, Li-Chi

    2015-01-01

    One of the lessons in the emergency response category is that information on the nuclear power plants of neighboring countries should be organized and the consequence can be assessed. In addition, many reactors have been constructed and are under construction on the eastern coast of China recently. Korea might be directly affected by an accident of Chinese nuclear power plant since Korea is located in the westerly belt. performed with the PCTRAN/CPR-1000 module. The result showed that normal operation and DBA conditions were simulated swiftly with the speed of 16 times faster than real time. Thus, it would be a good source term estimation module for the educational and training simulator

  18. Train operation in emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on train operation theories and methods in the context of emergencies. It examines and assesses a range of aspects—including the definition of a railway emergency, transport organization modes in emergencies, calculating railway transport capacity in emergencies, line planning in emergencies, train re-pathing in emergencies and train re-scheduling in emergencies—that are urgently needed in the railway transportation field, which faces the serious challenge of dealing with emergencies worldwide. The book highlights the latest research results in an integrated and systematic way, and the methodology presented is oriented on real-world problems, allowing it to be used not only directly in railway operational management, but also as the point of departure for further applications or theoretical research. As such, the book will be of considerable interest to graduate students and researchers in the field of traffic and transportation engineering.>.

  19. Training for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauf, E.

    1993-01-01

    There are specific boundary conditions where preparedness for in-plant emergency management is as necessary and useful as is the training for the management of design-based accidents. The shift personnel has to be trained to cope particularly with the difficult and demanding initial phase of an emergency, and care must be taken to be very close to reality. Only thus can weak points be discovered and removed by pinpointed measures such as organisational changes, optimization of emergency management procedures, or hardware conditions. (orig.) [de

  20. Training of medical teams on-site for individual and coordinated response in emergency management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    A system for training of coordination and cooperation of decision makers in emergency management has been under construction for some time. A first prototype of the system was developed in the MUSTER system. The system is being developed modularly with one module for each of the suborganisations...... involved in the complete preparedness: fire brigade, police, medical team, civil defence, etc. All these modules will in the end be integrated on a common integration platform, either to a fully-fledged system covering all aspects of training for the complete preparedness, or for creating a dedicated...

  1. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme, Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of these training materials is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for a State embarking on a nuclear power programme, and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the Assistance Convention). Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. One of the concerns associated with nuclear power is the possibility that a State embarking on a nuclear power programme might not have sufficient capabilities and therefore would not be adequately prepared to respond to a radiation emergency caused by severe accident conditions. Protecting the public, the environment and property in the event of a failure of any level of defence in depth is the most important safety objective. A robust framework for emergency preparedness and response to a radiation emergency forms the last level of defence in depth and, as such, must be developed and implemented by any State embarking on a nuclear power programme, using best international practices. The establishment of capabilities and arrangements for emergency preparedness and response to severe accident conditions is one of the principal tasks in the development of a national infrastructure for nuclear power. State of the art emergency preparedness and response is a key element in achieving overall plant safety. This training course complements the IAEA publication 'Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme' (EPR-Embarking 2012). These materials are designed to help States apply the guidance in EPR-Embarking 2012, in order to develop the capability to adequately prepare for and respond to a radiation emergency after the commissioning and start of

  2. Workload differences across command levels and emergency response organizations during a major joint training exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytz, Erik G; Rybing, Jonas; Jonson, Carl-Oscar

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on an initial test using a validated workload measurement method, the NASA Task Load Index (TLX), as an indicator of joint emergency exercise effectiveness. Prior research on emergency exercises indicates that exercises must be challenging, ie, result in high workload, to be effective. However, this is often problematic with some participants being underloaded and some overloaded. The NASA TLX was used to test for differences in workload between commanders and subordinates and among three different emergency response organizations during a joint emergency exercise. Questionnaire-based evaluation with professional emergency responders. The study was performed in conjunction with a large-scale interorganizational joint emergency exercise in Sweden. A total of 20 participants from the rescue services, 12 from the emergency medical services, and 12 from the police participated in the study (N=44). Ten participants had a command-level role during the exercise and the remaining 34 were subordinates. The main outcome measures were the workload subscales of the NASA TLX: mental demands, physical demands, temporal demands, performance, effort, and frustration. The results showed that the organizations experienced different levels of workload, that the commanders experienced a higher workload than the subordinates, and that two out of three organizations fell below the twenty-fifth percentile of average workload scores compiled from 237 prior studies. The results support the notion that the NASA TLX could be a useful complementary tool to evaluate exercise designs and outcomes. This should be further explored and verified in additional studies.

  3. Development of emergency response training focusing on non-technical skills. (1) Development and Trial of 'TAIKAN Training'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikono, Masaru; Matsui, Yuko; Kanayama, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Since the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, there have been increasing calls for developing the leadership capabilities of managers who are in charge of command and control of the on-site emergency response center at nuclear power plants. Training programs to improve non-technical skills are being developed and introduced. The authors developed an active learning exercise 'TAIKAN Training' that can be repeatedly performed on-site, targeting on-site commander teams in charge of the initial response in an emergency situation. The exercise forms the core element of a non-technical skills training curriculum. This paper outlines the developed exercise, evaluates the stress on the participants caused by the exercise, and identifies any issues before actually introducing it to a site. (author)

  4. Development of emergency response training focusing on non-technical skills. (2) Extraction of non-technical skills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yuko; Hikono, Masaru; Iwasaki, Mari; Morita, Mizuho

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at characterizing a non-technical skill exercise for on-site managers in charge of initial response at an emergency response center by extracting and clarifying the behavior examples of non-technical skills shown in the exercise scenario. From video observations, the non-technical skill examples were identified from seven of the eight nontechnical skill categories which had been defined when the training program was developed. Especially, they included many skills of 'Communication', 'Situation Understanding' and 'Organizational management'. At the same time, the limitation when extracting the cases by observations was identified. The extracted non-technical skill cases are expected to be used for characterizing exercise scenarios, as well as provide knowledge to raise the awareness of exercise participants. (author)

  5. Development of emergency response training program for on-site commanders (2). Extraction of non-technical skills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yuko; Hikono, Masaru; Iwasaki, Mari; Morita, Miduho

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at characterizing a non-technical skill exercise for on-site managers in charge of initial response at an emergency response center by extracting and clarifying the behavior examples of non-technical skills shown in the exercise scenario. From video observations, the non-technical skill examples were identified from seven of the eight non-technical skill categories which had been defined when the training program was developed. At the same time, the limitation when extracting the cases by observations was identified. The extracted non-technical skill cases are expected to be used for characterizing exercise scenarios, as well as provide knowledge to raise the awareness of exercise participants. (author)

  6. Planning and training in emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    Link Simulation Systems Division of the Singer Company is combining its tactical simulation and display system with state-of-the-art decision and control technology to provide a combined operations, planning, and training (COPAT) system. This system provides for the total integration of the three primary responsibilities of emergency managers: planning and training for and decision and control of an emergency. The system is intended to be a complete operations center for emergency management personnel. In the event of a natural disaster or man-made emergency, the national, state, county, and city emergency managers require a secure and reliable operations center. The COPAT system combines the decision and control capabilities with proven simulation techniques allowing for integrated planning and training. The hardware system, software, data bases, and maps used during planning and training are the same as those used during actual emergencies

  7. Volcanic risk and tourism in southern Iceland: Implications for hazard, risk and emergency response education and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Deanne K.; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Dominey-Howes, Dale

    2010-01-01

    should focus on: (a) increasing tourists' knowledge of Katla, jökulhlaup and other volcanic hazards and (b) increasing tourist and employee awareness of the early warning and information system and appropriate behavioural response if a warning is issued. Further, tourism employees should be required to participate in emergency training and evacuation exercises annually. These efforts are timely given that Katla is expected to erupt in the near future and international tourism is an expanding industry in Þórsmörk.

  8. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  9. Psychological first-aid training for paraprofessionals: a systems-based model for enhancing capacity of rural emergency responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, O Lee; Perry, Charlene; Azur, Melissa; Taylor, Henry G; Bailey, Mark; Links, Jonathan M

    2011-08-01

    consider LHDs, FBOs, and AHCs as partners to work effectively within the span of a six-month period to design, promote, conduct, and evaluate a model of capacity/capability building for public mental health emergency response based on a professional "extender" rationale. Moreover, consistently high levels of perceived self-efficacy as PFA responders can be achieved with lay members of the community who receive a specially-designed, one-day training program in crisis intervention and referral strategies for disaster survivors.

  10. First Response to Medical Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manisah Saedon; Sarimah Mahat; Muhamad Nurfalah Karoji; Hasnul Nizam Osman

    2015-01-01

    Accident or medical emergencies, both minor and critical, occurs each day and can happen in any workplace. In any medical emergencies, time is a critical factor because the first person to arrive at the scene of an accident has a key role in the rescue of a victim. With the knowledge of some common medical procedures and emergency actions, this first responder can make a positive contribution to the welfare of the accident victim. In some cases, this contribution can make difference between life and death. Improper response to medical emergencies by an untrained person can result in worsen injuries or death. Therefore, first aids training are necessary to provide the information. (author)

  11. Towards accurate emergency response behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reactor operator emergency response behavior has persisted as a training problem through lack of information. The industry needs an accurate definition of operator behavior in adverse stress conditions, and training methods which will produce the desired behavior. Newly assembled information from fifty years of research into human behavior in both high and low stress provides a more accurate definition of appropriate operator response, and supports training methods which will produce the needed control room behavior. The research indicates that operator response in emergencies is divided into two modes, conditioned behavior and knowledge based behavior. Methods which assure accurate conditioned behavior, and provide for the recovery of knowledge based behavior, are described in detail

  12. Emergency Medical Care Training and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Charles S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 11-week emergency medical care training program for adolescents focusing on: pretest results; factual emergency instruction and first aid; practical experience training; and assessment. (RC)

  13. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  14. OEM Emergency Response Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management retains records of all incident responses in which it participates. This data asset includes three major sources of information:...

  15. Training for the medical response in radiological emergency experiences and results; Capacitacion para la respuesta medica en emergencias radiologicas experiencias y resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2003-07-01

    The use of the nuclear techniques in the social practice confers a special imporatnce to the relative aspects to the safety of the practices and radiationsources, for what the implementation of efficient programs of radiation protection constitutes a priority. However in spite of the will before expressed, regrettably radiological situations happen accidental assocaited to multiple causes taht suggest the creation of response capacities to intervention before these fortuitous facts. The experiences accumulated in the last decades related with accidental exposures have evidenced the convenience of having properly qualified human resources for the Medical Response in Radiological Emergencies. The training in the medical aspects of the radiological emergencies acquires a singular character. In such a sense when valuing the national situation put onof manifest deficiences as for the training in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies that advised the development of training programs in such aspects for the different response groups linked to the topic. After identified the training necessities and the scope of the same ones, the contents of the training program were elaborated. The program has as general purpose the invigoration of the capacity of the medical response in front of accidental radiological situations, by means of actions that they bear to prepare groups of medical response in the handling of people accident victims and to the identification of potentials,accidental scenarios, as well as of the necessary resources to confront them. The program content approaches theoretical and paractical aspects to the medical aspect to radiological emergencies. The program include the different topics about fundamental of physical biological to radiation protection, radiation protection during exposure of radiological accidents, medical care for overexposed or contaminated persons, drill, exercises and concludes with designation of a strategy as preparation and

  16. Adaptive workflow simulation of emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Guido Wybe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Recent incidents and major training exercises in and outside the Netherlands have persistently shown that not having or not sharing information during emergency response are major sources of emergency response inefficiency and error, and affect incident mitigation outcomes through workflow planning

  17. Development of emergency response training program based on human factors; Developpement d'un programme de formation pour la reaction aux situations d'urgences base sur les facteurs humains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Y. [Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    A training program has been developed at Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. to improve personal response to emergency situations by enabling plant shift chiefs to understand the unique human behavioral patterns that appear during emergencies. The program provides comprehensive and systematic training consisting of lectures and seminars based on a Human Factor Handbook, simulation training, and feedback training. The program can also be applied to all areas of the process industry. (author)

  18. Emergency response strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrilo, D.; Dias de la Cruz, F.

    1984-01-01

    In the present study is estimated, on the basis of a release category (PWR4) and several accident scenarios previously set up, the emergency response efficacy obtained in the application of different response strategies on each of the above mentioned scenarios. The studied strategies contemplate the following protective measures: evacuation, shelter and relocation. The radiological response has been obtained by means of CRAC2 (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) code, and calculated in terms of absorbed dose equivalent (Whole body and thyroid), as well as early and latent biological effects. (author)

  19. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures

  20. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

  1. Nonclinical core competencies and effects of interprofessional teamwork in disaster and emergency response training and practice: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Jennifer; Schwartz, Brian; Kitto, Simon

    2013-08-01

    To define and delineate the nontechnical core competencies required for disaster response, Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) members were interviewed regarding their perspectives and experiences in disaster management. Also explored was the relationship between nontechnical competencies and interprofessional collaboration. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 Canadian DMAT members to explore how they viewed nontechnical core competencies and how their experiences influenced their perceptions toward interprofessonalism in disaster response. Data were examined using thematic analysis. Nontechnical core competencies were categorized under austere skills, interpersonal skills, and cognitive skills. Research participants defined interprofessionalism and discussed the importance of specific nontechnical core competencies to interprofessional collaboration. The findings of this study established a connection between nontechnical core competencies and interprofessional collaboration in DMAT activities. It also provided preliminary insights into the importance of context in developing an evidence base for competency training in disaster response and management. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2013;0:1-8).

  2. Wind emergency response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, A.J.; Buckner, M.R.; Mueller, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The WIND system is an automated emergency response system for real-time predictions of the consequences of liquid and airborne releases from SRP. The system consists of a minicomputer and associated peripherals necessary for acquisition and handling of large amounts of meteorological data from a local tower network and the National Weather Service. The minicomputer uses these data and several predictive models to assess the impact of accidental releases. The system is fast and easy to use, and output is displayed both in tabular form and as trajectory map plots for quick interpretation. The rapid response capabilities of the WIND system have been demonstrated in support of SRP operations

  3. Emergency response planning in Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In the decade since the accident at Three Mile Island, emergency planning for response to these events has undergone a significant change in Pennsylvania, as elsewhere. Changes respond to federal guidance and to state agency initiatives. The most singular change is the practice of implementing a protective action throughout the entire emergency planning zone (EPZ). Due to Pennsylvania agency experiences during the accident, the decision was made soon after to develop a staff of nuclear engineers, each giving special day-to-day attention to a specific nuclear power station in the state. Changes in communications capabilities are significant, these being dedicated phone lines between the Commonwealth and each power station, and the reorientation of the Department of Environmental Resources radio network to accommodate direction of field monitoring teams from Harrisburg. Changes that are being or will be implemented in the near future include assessing the emergency response data system for electronic delivery of plant parameter data form facilities during accidents, increased participation in exercises, emergency medical planning, and training, the inclusion of all 67 counties in Pennsylvania in an ingestion EPZ, and the gradual severance of dependence on land-line emergency communication systems

  4. Experience with Emergency Ultrasound Training by Canadian Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Starting in 2008, emergency ultrasound (EUS was introduced as a core competency to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (Royal College emergency medicine (EM training standards. The Royal College accredits postgraduate EM specialty training in Canada through 5-year residency programs. The objective of this study is to describe both the current experience with and the perceptions of EUS by Canadian Royal College EM senior residents. Methods: This was a web-based survey conducted from January to March 2011 of all 39 Canadian Royal College postgraduate fifth-year (PGY-5 EM residents. Main outcome measures were characteristics of EUS training and perceptions of EUS. Results: Survey response rate was 95% (37/39. EUS was part of the formal residency curriculum for 86% of respondents (32/37. Residents most commonly received training in focused assessment with sonography for trauma, intrauterine pregnancy, abdominal aortic aneurysm, cardiac, and procedural guidance. Although the most commonly provided instructional material (86% [32/37] was an ultrasound course, 73% (27/37 of residents used educational resources outside of residency training to supplement their ultrasound knowledge. Most residents (95% [35/37] made clinical decisions and patient dispositions based on their EUS interpretation without a consultative study by radiology. Residents had very favorable perceptions and opinions of EUS. Conclusion: EUS training in Royal College EM programs was prevalent and perceived favorably by residents, but there was heterogeneity in resident training and practice of EUS. This suggests variability in both the level and quality of EUS training in Canadian Royal College EM residency programs.

  5. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.

    1996-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, it became painfully obvious to the international community that there was an urgent need to establish a system for the coordination of international disaster assistance. It became the task of the United Nations Office for Disaster Relief (UNDRO) to develop such a system. The former UNDRO was subsumed into the Department of Humanitarian Affairs (DHA), established in January 1992 on the basis of UN General Assembly Resolution 46/182 adopted in December 1991, and the disaster relief system presently found in DHA is a further evolution of the system established by UNDRO. One particular importance in relation to nuclear accidents is the fact that UNDRO and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) signed a Memorandum of Understanding defining their respective responsibilities and the need for cooperation in case of accidents involving the unintentional release of nuclear radiation. In essence, the MOU makes it clear that the responsibilities of the IAEA, in connection with accidents at Nuclear Power Plants, related to the technical and radiological aspects, in particular to accident prevention, to the on-site preparedness, and to remedial measures within the 30-km zone outside the NPP. DHA's responsibilities, on the other hand, relate to the general preparedness and the rescue efforts outside the 30 km zone. In this respect, the preparedness and emergency response system is no different from the system employed in any other type of sudden-onset emergency

  6. A multi-method approach to curriculum development for in-service training in China's newly established health emergency response offices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Wang

    Full Text Available To describe an innovative approach for developing and implementing an in-service curriculum in China for staff of the newly established health emergency response offices (HEROs, and that is generalisable to other settings.The multi-method training needs assessment included reviews of the competency domains needed to implement the International Health Regulations (2005 as well as China's policies and emergency regulations. The review, iterative interviews and workshops with experts in government, academia, the military, and with HERO staff were reviewed critically by an expert technical advisory panel.Over 1600 participants contributed to curriculum development. Of the 18 competency domains identified as essential for HERO staff, nine were developed into priority in-service training modules to be conducted over 2.5 weeks. Experts from academia and experienced practitioners prepared and delivered each module through lectures followed by interactive problem-solving exercises and desktop simulations to help trainees apply, experiment with, and consolidate newly acquired knowledge and skills.This study adds to the emerging literature on China's enduring efforts to strengthen its emergency response capabilities since the outbreak of SARS in 2003. The multi-method approach to curriculum development in partnership with senior policy-makers, researchers, and experienced practitioners can be applied in other settings to ensure training is responsive and customized to local needs, resources and priorities. Ongoing curriculum development should reflect international standards and be coupled with the development of appropriate performance support systems at the workplace for motivating staff to apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills effectively and creatively.

  7. A multi-method approach to curriculum development for in-service training in China's newly established health emergency response offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yadong; Li, Xiangrui; Yuan, Yiwen; Patel, Mahomed S

    2014-01-01

    To describe an innovative approach for developing and implementing an in-service curriculum in China for staff of the newly established health emergency response offices (HEROs), and that is generalisable to other settings. The multi-method training needs assessment included reviews of the competency domains needed to implement the International Health Regulations (2005) as well as China's policies and emergency regulations. The review, iterative interviews and workshops with experts in government, academia, the military, and with HERO staff were reviewed critically by an expert technical advisory panel. Over 1600 participants contributed to curriculum development. Of the 18 competency domains identified as essential for HERO staff, nine were developed into priority in-service training modules to be conducted over 2.5 weeks. Experts from academia and experienced practitioners prepared and delivered each module through lectures followed by interactive problem-solving exercises and desktop simulations to help trainees apply, experiment with, and consolidate newly acquired knowledge and skills. This study adds to the emerging literature on China's enduring efforts to strengthen its emergency response capabilities since the outbreak of SARS in 2003. The multi-method approach to curriculum development in partnership with senior policy-makers, researchers, and experienced practitioners can be applied in other settings to ensure training is responsive and customized to local needs, resources and priorities. Ongoing curriculum development should reflect international standards and be coupled with the development of appropriate performance support systems at the workplace for motivating staff to apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills effectively and creatively.

  8. Tactical training of emergency management - the MUSTER concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Verner.

    1996-08-01

    The efficiency with which complex, large-scale organisations respon d to emergencies and critical situations depends crucially on the co-ordination of actions and communication among decision makers. However, decision makers have typically few opportunities to train distributed crisis management under artificial, yet realistic conditions; and at the same time, real emergencies occur fortunately so relatively infrequently that few decision makers have a chance of establishing a useful real-life experience of crisis management. There is therefore a need for having available realistic and flexible multi-user training environments in which co-ordinated response to crises or emergencies may be trained. The objective of the MUSTER project (Multi-User System for Training and Evaluating Environmental Emergency Response) is to produce specifications for a training system supporting collaborative training and evaluation directed to the special needs of environmental emergency management. The MUSTER project was partially funced by CEC

  9. Dangerous goods emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a general overview of the State of Western Australia including: the legal framework of the Dangerous Goods and Emergency response management scenarios (which consist mainly of fuel products such as LP gas); particular problems unique to the Western Australian environment; what has been done to overcome those problems. Western Australia has an area of about two and a half million square kilometers. The demography of the State is such that the population is concentrated in the south-west corner of the State with isolated pockets, mainly associated with mineral development but also associated with agriculture, scattered throughout the State

  10. Emergency Response Guideline Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary D Storrick

    2007-01-01

    Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled 'Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor' focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design--specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design--precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I and C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions

  11. Once upon a time (training for emergency situations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    Taking the pretend out of the emergency is discussed in this manual on emergency response training. The following suggestions are made: (1) plan credible emergency situations, (2) select plausible locations, (3) write scenarios, (4) tailor situations to locations, (5) involve other organizations, (6) make injuries look realistic, and (7) let employees take part

  12. Transport accident emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallette-Fontaine, M.; Frantz, P.

    1998-01-01

    To comply with the IAEA recommendations for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan as described in Safety Series 87, Transnucleaire, a company deeply involved in the road and rail transports of the fuel cycle, masters means of Emergency Response in the event of a transport accident. This paper aims at analyzing the solutions adopted for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan and the development of a technical support and adapted means for the recovery of heavy packagings. (authors)

  13. Astronaut Stephen Oswald during emergency bailout training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Suited in a training version of the Shuttle partial-pressure launch and entry garment, astronaut Stephen S. Oswald, STS-67 commander, gets help with a piece of gear from Boeing's David Brandt. The scene was photographed prior to a session of emergency bailout training in the 25-feet deep pool at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF).

  14. Training teams for emergency management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafstal, A.M.; Johnston, J.H.; Oser, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Emergency management (EM), the decision making involved in directing the relief operation after a disaster or otherwise catastrophic accident is an issue of great public and private concern because of the high stakes involved. Due to the nature of emergencies, and especially mass emergencies, EM

  15. Report on the emergency response training and equipment activities through 1991 for the transportation of transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility with the mission of demonstrating the safe shipment, emplacement and retrieval of radioactive transuranic (TRU) wastes resulting from the defense activities and programs of the United States. It is the only long-term storage facility constructed for TRU waste. This report provides the status on the Department of Energy (DOE) efforts as of December 31, 1991, regarding emergency response training and equipment funding provided to local, state, and tribal governments for waste shipments to the WIPP. Because of a growing public awareness of transportation activities involving nuclear materials, this report has been prepared to provide a status of the DOE's activities in this regard, as well as the cooperative efforts between the DOE and state and tribal governments

  16. The Brazilian emergency response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Raul dos

    1997-01-01

    With the objective of improving the response actions to potential or real emergency situations generated by radiological or nuclear accidents, the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) installed an integrated response system on a 24 hours basis. All the natiowide notifications on events that may start an emergency situation are converged to this system. Established since July 1990, this system has received around 300 notifications in which 5% were classified as potential emergency situation. (author)

  17. High-reliability emergency response teams in the hospital: improving quality and safety using in situ simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Derek S; Geis, Gary; Mack, Elizabeth H; LeMaster, Tom; Patterson, Mary D

    2013-06-01

    In situ simulation training is a team-based training technique conducted on actual patient care units using equipment and resources from that unit, and involving actual members of the healthcare team. We describe our experience with in situ simulation training in a major children's medical centre. In situ simulations were conducted using standardised scenarios approximately twice per month on inpatient hospital units on a rotating basis. Simulations were scheduled so that each unit participated in at least two in situ simulations per year. Simulations were conducted on a revolving schedule alternating on the day and night shifts and were unannounced. Scenarios were preselected to maximise the educational experience, and frequently involved clinical deterioration to cardiopulmonary arrest. We performed 64 of the scheduled 112 (57%) in situ simulations on all shifts and all units over 21 months. We identified 134 latent safety threats and knowledge gaps during these in situ simulations, which we categorised as medication, equipment, and/or resource/system threats. Identification of these errors resulted in modification of systems to reduce the risk of error. In situ simulations also provided a method to reinforce teamwork behaviours, such as the use of assertive statements, role clarity, performance of frequent updating, development of a shared mental model, performance of independent double checks of high-risk medicines, and overcoming authority gradients between team members. Participants stated that the training programme was effective and did not disrupt patient care. In situ simulations can identify latent safety threats, identify knowledge gaps, and reinforce teamwork behaviours when used as part of an organisation-wide safety programme.

  18. Fire Department Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.; Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services

  19. Emergency medical technician education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, Joseph; Sullivan, Francis; Williams, Kenneth A

    2013-12-03

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) training and education are vital and vibrant aspects of a young and evolving profession. This article provides a perspective on this effort in the United States and reviews current activity in Rhode Island.

  20. NOAA Emergency Response Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is in response to natural disasters. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The majority...

  1. Radiological emergency response - a functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, P.

    1998-01-01

    The state of Louisiana's radiological emergency response programme is based on the federal guidance 'Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants' (NUREG-0654, FEMA-REP-1 Rev. 1). Over the past 14 years, the planning and implementation of response capabilities became more organized and efficient; the training programme has strengthened considerably; co-ordination with all participating agencies has assumed a more co-operative role, and as a result, a fairly well integrated response planning has evolved. Recently, a more 'functional' approach is being adopted to maximize the programme's efficiency not only for nuclear power plant emergency response, but radiological emergency response as a whole. First, several broad-based 'components' are identified; clusters of 'nodes' are generated for each component; these 'nodes' may be divided into 'sub-nodes' which will contain some 'attributes'; 'relational bonds' among the 'attributes' will exist. When executed, the process begins and continues with the 'nodes' assuming a functional and dynamic role based on the nature and characteristics of the 'attributes'. The typical response based on stand-alone elements is thus eliminated, the overlapping of functions is avoided, and a well structured and efficient organization is produced, that is essential for today's complex nature of emergency response. (author)

  2. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  3. A multi disciplinary obstetric emergency training programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, Mary

    2012-09-01

    The Rotunda Hospital (Dublin) obstetric emergency training programme (RHOET) was designed, in 2008, to meet the ongoing education and training needs of the local multidisciplinary team. Prior to its implementation, senior midwives attended the advanced life support in obstetrics (ALSO) course, and many of the obstetricians attended the Management of obstetric emergencies and trauma (MOET) and\\/or ALSO courses. Attendance at these off site courses meant that the only opportunity for team training was the informal and ad hoc \\'drills and skills\\' that took place in the birthing suite. This paper documents our journey since RHOET was implemented.

  4. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L.

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig

  5. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L. (UNESA, Madrid (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig.

  6. Emergency preparedness training for local communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, M.J.; Thompson, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detroit Edison, in cooperation with Monroe County, has developed a comprehensive training program for local emergency workers in the area surrounding the Fermi 2 Nuclear Power Plant. Using expertise from both organizations, a program consisting of two videotapes, two slide-tapes and nine narrated slide series was produced to address the worker-specific training needs of county emergency workers. In June of 185, the program was approved by Detroit Edison and the Monroe County Board of Commissioners. To date, Monroe County has trained more than 1000 emergency workers. This program has been so well received that the county staff has developed and presented a modified version of this program to the general public. The result of this cooperative effort is increased public confidence in emergency preparedness at the state, local and utility level and a renewed spirit of cooperation and trust between the utility and local units of government

  7. Mobile emergency response unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadi, W.J.; Trolan, R.T.; Becker, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The Hotspot quick-response unit was the solution to a requirement to find, identify, and control areas of radioactive contamination at the scene of a nuclear weapons accident. The unit consists of two trucks and two trailers, and is designed to be transported by one U.S. Air Force C-141. One truck (generator truck) carries a 40 kW generator-heater-air conditioner combination, spare tires, and accessories. The other (water truck) carries supplies and a 250-gal water tank. One trailer (counting trailer) contains detecting, counting, and recording equipment. The other (decontaminating trailer) contains a shower, sink, 30-gal hot water tank, and supplies

  8. An emergency response plan for transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, M.V.; Guerel, E.

    2000-01-01

    Transnucleaire is involved in road and rail transport of nuclear fuel cycle materials. To comply with IAEA recommendations, Transnucleaire has to master methods of emergency response in the event of a transport accident. Considering the utmost severe situations, Transnucleaire has studied several cases and focused especially on an accident involving a heavy cask. In France, the sub-prefect of each department is in charge of the organisation of the emergency teams. The sub-prefect may request Transnucleaire to supply experts, organisation, equipment and technical support. The Transnucleaire Emergency Response Plan covers all possible scenarios of land transport accidents and relies on: (i) an organisation ready for emergency situations, (ii) equipment dedicated to intervention, and (iii) training of its own experts and specialised companies. (author)

  9. Emergency Preparedness and Response: A Safety Net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, H., E-mail: hannele.aaltonen@stuk.fi [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Full text: The objective of nuclear regulatory work is to prevent accidents. Nevertheless, possibility of a severe accident cannot be totally excluded, which makes a safety net, efficient emergency preparedness and response, necessary. Should the possibility of accidents be rejected, the result would be in the worst case inadequate protection of population, functions of society, and environment from harmful effects of radiation. Adequate resources for maintenance and development of emergency arrangement are crucial. However, they need to be balanced taking into account risks assessments, justified expectations of society, and international requirements. To successfully respond to an emergency, effective emergency preparedness, such as up-to-date plans and procedures, robust arrangements and knowledgeable and regularly trained staff are required. These, however, are not enough without willingness and proactive attitude to • communicate in a timely manner; • co-operate and coordinate actions; • provide and receive assistance; and • evaluate and improve emergency arrangements. In the establishment and development of emergency arrangements, redundant and diverse means or tools used are needed in, for example, communication and assessment of hazard. Any severe nuclear emergency would affect all countries either directly or indirectly. Thus, national emergency arrangements have to be compatible to the extent practicable with international emergency arrangements. It is important to all countries that the safety nets of emergency arrangements are reliable - and operate efficiently in a coordinated manner when needed - on national, regional and international level. (author)

  10. Report on the emergency response training and equipment activities through fiscal year 1992 for the transportation of transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility with the mission of demonstrating the safe shipment, emplacement, and retrieval of radioactive transuranic (TRU) wastes resulting from the defense activities and programs of the United States. It is the only long-term storage facility constructed for TRU waste. This report provides the status on the Department of Energy (DOE) efforts as of September 30, 1992, regarding emergency response training provided to local, state, and tribal governments for waste shipments to the WIPP, as required by section 16(c)(1)(A) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (Public Law 102-579). This is an update to the April 1992 report (DOE/WIPP 92003) which provided status through 1991. This report will be updated and issued annually. Because of a growing public awareness of transportation-activities involving nuclear materials, this report was prepared to provide a status of the DOE's activities in this regard, as well as the cooperative efforts between the DOE and state and tribal governments

  11. Medical response to radiation emergencies in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo A.; Perez, Maria del R.; Dubner, Diana L.; Michelin, Severino C.; Vazquez, M.; Demayo, O.

    2006-01-01

    Although radiation accidents are not frequent, the increasing use of radioisotopes in medicine and industry increases the likelihood of such accidental situations. Additionally, risks posed by the malevolent use of radiation sources have been highlighted during the last few years. In this context, the enhancement of national capabilities for medical assistance of victims in radiation emergencies becomes relevant. This communication describes the organization of medical response to radiation emergencies existing in Argentina. A three-level system for medical response has been developed: pre-hospital response given on-site by local emergency services, assistance provided by emergency departments of local general hospitals and central reference hospitals for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination. An education and training program is regularly executed at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been elaborated and implemented. Research and development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of radiation injuries are promoted by ARN in close collaboration with physicians belonging to reference hospitals. (author)

  12. Emergency response planning in Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Release reporting and spill clean-up requirements by Saskatchewan Energy and Mines were reviewed. Wascana's experience in response planning was discussed. It was suggested that the key to prevention was up-front due diligence, including facility and oil well analysis. Details of Wascana's emergency plan, and details of Saskatchewan Energy and Mines release reporting procedures were also provided

  13. Emergency response in the Newfoundland offshore industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, J.

    2006-01-01

    equipped with fast rescue craft with crews trained in marine rescue. It was concluded that the emergency response process should assess and prioritize all concerns, with people being the highest priority. figs

  14. Regular in-situ simulation training of paediatric Medical Emergency Team leads to sustained improvements in hospital response to deteriorating patients, improved outcomes in intensive care and financial savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilen, Ulf; Fraser, Laura; Jones, Patricia; Leonard, Paul; Simpson, Dave

    2017-06-01

    The introduction of a paediatric Medical Emergency Team (pMET) was accompanied by weekly in-situ simulation team training. Key ward staff participated in team training, focusing on recognition of the deteriorating child, teamwork and early involvement of senior staff. Following an earlier study [1], this investigation aimed to evaluate the long-term impact of ongoing regular team training on hospital response to deteriorating ward patients, patient outcome and financial implications. Prospective cohort study of all deteriorating in-patients in a tertiary paediatric hospital requiring admission to paediatric intensive care (PICU) the year before, 1year after and 3 years after the introduction of pMET and team training. Deteriorating patients were recognised more promptly (before/1year after/3years after pMET; median time 4/1.5/0.5h, pIntroduction of pMET coincided with significantly reduced hospital mortality (p<0.001). These results indicate that lessons learnt by ward staff during team training led to sustained improvements in the hospital response to critically deteriorating in-patients, significantly improved patient outcomes and substantial savings. Integration of regular in-situ simulation training of medical emergency teams, including key ward staff, in routine clinical care has potential application in all acute specialties. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Experience with simulator training for emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The training of operators by the use of simulators is common to most countries with nuclear power plants. Simulator training programmes are generally well developed, but their value can be limited by the age, type, size and capability of the simulator. Within these limits, most full scope simulators have a capability of training operators for a range of design basis accidents. It is recognized that human performance under accident conditions is difficult to predict or analyse, particularly in the area of severe accidents. These are rare events and by their very nature, unpredictable. Of importance, therefore, is to investigate the training of operators for severe accident conditions, and to examine ways in which simulators may be used in this task. The International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) has reviewed this field and the associated elements of human behaviour. It has recommended that activities are concentrated on this area. Initially it is encouraging the following objectives: i) To train operators for accident conditions including severe accidents and to strongly encourage the development and use of simulators for this purpose; ii) To improve the man-machine interface by the use of computer aids to the operator; iii) To develop human performance requirements for plant operating staff. As part of this work, the IAEA convened a technical committee on 15-19 September 1986 to review the experience with simulator training for emergency conditions, to review simulator modelling for severe accident training, to examine the role of human cognitive behaviour modelling, and to review guidance on accident scenarios. A substantial deviation may be a major fuel failure, a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), etc. Examples of engineered safety features are: an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), and Containment Systems. This report was prepared by the participants during the meeting and reviewed further in a Consultant's Meeting. It also includes papers which were

  16. Radioactive materials transportation emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmali, N.

    1987-05-01

    Ontario Hydro transports radioactive material between its nuclear facilities, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at Chalk River Laboratories and Radiochemical Company in Kanata, on a regular basis. Ontario Hydro also occasionally transports to Whiteshell Laboratories, Hydro-Quebec and New Brunswick Electric Power Commission. Although there are stringent packaging and procedural requirements for these shipments, Ontario Hydro has developed a Radioactive Materials Transportation Emergency Response Plan in the event that there is an accident. The Transportation Emergency Response plan is based on six concepts: 1) the Province id divided into three response areas with each station (Pickering, Darlington, Bruce) having identified response areas; 2) response is activated via a toll-free number. A shift supervisor at Pickering will answer the call, determine the hazards involved from the central shipment log and provide on-line advice to the emergency worker. At the same time he will notify the nearest Ontario Hydro area office to provide initial corporate response, and will request the nearest nuclear station to provide response assistance; 3) all stations have capability in terms of trained personnel and equipment to respond to an accident; 4) all Ontario Hydro shipments are logged with Pickering NGS. Present capability is based on computerized logging with the computer located in the shift office at Pickering to allow quick access to information on the shipment; 5) there is a three tier structure for emergency public information. The local Area Manager is the first Ontario Hydro person at the scene of the accident. The responding facility technical spokesperson is the second line of Corporate presence and the Ontario Hydro Corporate spokesperson is notified in case the accident is a media event; and 6) Ontario Hydro will respond to non-Hydro shipments of radioactive materials in terms of providing assistance, guidance and capability. However, the shipper is responsible

  17. Emergency department operations and management education in emergency medicine training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bret A Nicks; Darrell Nelson

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:This study was undertaken to examine the current level of operations and management education within US-based Emergency Medicine Residency programs.METHODS:Residency program directors at all US-based Emergency Medicine Residency programs were anonymously surveyed via a web-based instrument.Participants indicated their levels of residency education dedicated to documentation,billing/coding,core measure/quality indicator compliance,and operations management.Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics for the ordinal data/Likert scales.RESULTS:One hundred and six(106)program directors completed the study instrument of one hundred and fifty-six(156)programs(70%).Of these,82.6%indicated emergency department(ED)operations and management education within the training curriculum.Dedicated documentation training was noted in all but 1 program(99%).Program educational offerings also included billing/coding(83%),core measure/quality indicators(78%)and operations management training(71%).In all areas,the most common means of educating came through didactic sessions and direct attending feedback or 69%-94%and 72%-98%respectively.Residency leadership was most confident with resident understanding of quality documentation(80%)and less so with core measures(72%),billing/coding/RVUs(58%),and operations management tools(23%).CONCLUSIONS:While most EM residency programs integrate basic operational education related to documentation and billing/coding,a smaller number provide focused education on the dayto-day management and operations of the ED.Residency leadership perceives graduating resident understanding of operational management tools to be limited.All respondents value further resident curriculum development of ED operations and management.

  18. Evaluation criteria for emergency response plans in radiological transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, M.K.; Perry, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper identifies a set of general criteria which can be used as guides for evaluating emergency response plans prepared in connection with the transportation of radiological materials. The development of criteria takes the form of examining the meaning and role of emergency plans in general, reviewing the process as it is used in connection with natural disasters and other nonnuclear disasters, and explicitly considering unique aspects of the radiological transportation setting. Eight areas of critical importance for such response plans are isolated: notification procedures; accident assessment; public information; protection of the public at risk; other protective responses; radiological exposure control; responsibility for planning and operations; and emergency response training and exercises. (Auth.)

  19. Automated emergency meteorological response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    A sophisticated emergency response system was developed to aid in the evaluation of accidental releases of hazardous materials from the Savannah River Plant to the environment. A minicomputer system collects and archives data from both onsite meteorological towers and the National Weather Service. In the event of an accidental release, the computer rapidly calculates the trajectory and dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere. Computer codes have been developed which provide a graphic display of predicted concentration profiles downwind from the source, as functions of time and distance

  20. Planning and implementing nuclear emergency response facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    After Three Mile Island, Arkansas Nuclear One produced a planning document called TMI-2 Response Program. Phase I of the program defined action plans in nine areas: safety assessment, training, organization, public information, communication, security, fiscal-governmental, technical and logistical support. Under safety assessment, the staff was made even better prepared to handle radioactive material. Under training, on site simulators for each unit at ANO were installed. The other seven topics interface closely with each other. An emergency control center is diagrammed. A habitable technical support system was created. A media center, with a large media area, and an auditorium, was built. Electric door strike systems increased security. Phone networks independently run via microwave were installed. Until Three Mile Island, logistical problems were guesswork. That incident afforded an opportunity to better identify and prepare for these problems

  1. Human Response to Emergency Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J.

    2009-12-01

    Almost every day people evacuate from their homes, businesses or other sites, even ships, in response to actual or predicted threats or hazards. Evacuation is the primary protective action utilized in large-scale emergencies such as hurricanes, floods, tornados, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, or wildfires. Although often precautionary, protecting human lives by temporally relocating populations before or during times of threat remains a major emergency management strategy. One of the most formidable challenges facing emergency officials is evacuating residents for a fast-moving and largely unpredictable event such as a wildfire or a local tsunami. How to issue effective warnings to those at risk in time for residents to take appropriate action is an on-going problem. To do so, some communities have instituted advanced communications systems that include reverse telephone call-down systems or other alerting systems to notify at-risk residents of imminent threats. This presentation examines the effectiveness of using reverse telephone call-down systems for warning San Diego residents of wildfires in the October of 2007. This is the first systematic study conducted on this topic and is based on interviews with 1200 households in the evacuation areas.

  2. A Tactical Emergency Response Management System (Terms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... information is a result of collaboration between accident response personnel. ... Tactical Emergency Response Management System (TERMS) which unifies all these different ... purpose of handling crisis and emergency.

  3. Emergency response in the Newfoundland offshore industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dempsey, J. [Cormorant Ltd., St. John' s, NL (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    . Supply vessels are also equipped with fast rescue craft with crews trained in marine rescue. It was concluded that the emergency response process should assess and prioritize all concerns, with people being the highest priority. figs.

  4. Emergency response packaging: A conceptual outline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, R.E.; McClure, J.D.; Bennett, P.C.; Wheeler, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Packaging and Transportation Needs in the 1990's (PATN) component of the Transportation Assessment and Integration (TRAIN) program (DOE Nov. 1991) was designed to survey United States Department of Energy programs, both ongoing and planned, to identify needs for packaging and transportation services over the next decade. PATN also identified transportation elements that should be developed by the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (DOE EM) Transportation Management Program (TMP). As a result of the predominant involvement of the TMP in radioactive material shipment issues and DOE EM's involvement with waste management issues, the primary focus of PATN was on waste packaging issues. Pending DOE regulations will formalize federal guidelines and regulations for transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials within the boundaries of DOE reservations and facilities and reflect a growing awareness of concern regarding safety environmental responsibility activities on DOE reservations. Future practices involving the transportation of radioactive material within DOE reservations will closely parallel those used for commercial and governmental transportation across the United States. This has added to the perceived need for emergency recovery packaging and emergency response features on primary packaging, for both on-site shipments and shipments between DOE facilities (off-site). Historically, emergency response and recovery functions of packaging have not been adequately considered in packaging design and construction concepts. This paper develops the rationale for emergency response packaging, including both overpack concepts for repackaging compromised packaging and primary packaging redesign to facilitate the recovery of packages via mobile remote handling equipment. The rationale will examine concepts for determination of likely use patterns to identify types of shipments where recovery packaging may have the most favorable payoff

  5. Training Librarians for 21st Century Repository Services: Emerging Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Emasealu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviewed the emerging roles of the 21st century librarians, charged with the responsibility to manage repository services across libraries in present-day information technology environment. Librarians need to be trained and empowered with requisite skills and knowledge needed for successful management of the ICT driven repository initiatives that the 21st century demands. Literature was reviewed on the roles and responsibilities of librarians, training needs and opportunities, career path and recruitment of librarians, and community support necessary for effective and efficient implementation and management of repository initiatives. This entails the ability to comprehend trends and change patterns which are essential for providing research focused and user-friendly models in open repository services that are based on thorough analytical understanding of the challenges of emerging trends. To achieve this requires the training and retraining of librarians to reposition them as information specialists in their career path. The role of the library as an integral part of its social environment is to educate the community about the existence of an open repository by building partnership with community-oriented research centres through seminars, workshops, symposium, training, and awareness programmes. The study recommends that librarians should strategize and collaborate with researchers to make open repository an essential research tool.

  6. Coordinating International Response to Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bice, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    Pandemic disease, natural disasters and terrorism can affect thousands of people in a relatively short period of time anywhere in the world. Our recent international experience with hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis and infectious diseases (AIDS, TB and highly pathogenic avian influenza) show us that we must respond with a coordinated approach or we will fail the very people we intend to help. Nations from around the world are often eager to send assistance to the site of a disaster, but coordinating the incoming aid is more often flawed and imprecise than it must be in order to save lives and mitigate suffering. How can any one country, suffering from a horrendous calamity coordinate the incoming aid from around the world? Can any one agency hope to coordinate the myriad nation's response let alone that of the hundreds of non-governmental organizations? Currently, the answer is sadly, no. The purpose of this presentation is not to recommend one over the many international bodies which claim to oversee humanitarian assistance; the purpose of this presentation is to discuss the elements of only one aspect of the overall response effort: public health and medical response coordination. Public health response is of course different than a purely medical response. Traditionally, in a natural disaster, immediate public health concerns center around water, sewerage/waste disposal, potential for disease outbreaks, etc, whereas medical response concentrates on triage, saving those who can be saved, patching up the injured, and to a lesser extent, primary care to the survivors. In order to avoid political controversy, this presentation will use the example of Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii, September 1992, to illustrate key concepts. The State of Hawaii is no stranger to natural disasters. Their emergency response mechanisms are well honed, exercised and quite capable. However, the local community leaders on Kauai Island went thru each of the following phases before they

  7. The Student Volunteer Army: a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Sally; Mills, Colleen E

    2017-10-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to understanding of the factors associated with an effective emergent emergency response organisation and to provide new insights into this understudied area. It examines, through an analysis of a range of textual resources, the emergence and re-emergence of the Student Volunteer Army (SVA) during the devastating earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, in 2010-11. This evaluation is conducted in relation to the four key features of an effective emergency response organisation: adaptability; direction; leadership; and communication. In addition, the paper aims to further understanding of 'emergency entrepreneurship' and thus of the values and strategies that underpin social entrepreneur organisations in times of normalcy. The paper concludes that the unique position of the SVA as a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation enabled it to innovate continually and to improve repeatedly its systems, relationships, and image, such that it exhibited features common to emergent and established emergency response organisations. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  8. Emergency planning and response preparedness in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.; Frlin-Lubi, A.; Usenicnik, B.

    2000-01-01

    Disasters do occur and so do nuclear or radiological accidents. Experience has shown that advance emergency response preparedness is essential in order to mitigate the consequences of an accident. In Slovenia, the Civil Protection Organization is the responsible authority for emergency preparedness and response to any kind of disasters. The Krko Nuclear Power Plant is the only nuclear power plant in Slovenia. To date the plant has operated safely and no serious incidents have been recorded. Slovenia nevertheless, maintains a high level of emergency preparedness, which is reflected in the area of prevention and safety and in the area of emergency response preparedness. The emergency management system for nuclear emergencies is incorporated into an overall preparedness and response system. The paper presents an overview of nuclear or radiological emergency response preparedness in Slovenia and its harmonization with the international guidelines. (author)

  9. Cold weather oil spill response training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solsberg, L.B.; Owens, E.H.

    2001-01-01

    In April 2000, a three-day oil spill response training program was conducted on Alaska's North Slope. The unique hands-on program was specifically developed for Chevron Corporation's world-wide response team. It featured a combination of classroom and outdoor sessions that helped participants to learn and apply emergency measures in a series of field exercises performed in very cold weather conditions. Temperatures remained below minus 20 degrees C and sometimes reached minus 40 degrees C throughout the training. The classroom instructions introduced participants to the Emergency Prevention Preparedness and Response (EPPR) Working Group's Field Guide for Spill Response in Arctic Waters. This guide provides response strategies specific to the Arctic, including open water, ice and snow conditions. The sessions also reviewed the Alaska Clean Seas Tactics Manual which addresses spill containment and recovery, storage, tracking, burning and disposal. The issues that were emphasized throughout the training program were cold weather safety and survival. During the training sessions, participants were required to set up weather ports and drive snowmobiles and all terrain vehicles. Their mission was to detect oil with infra-red and hand-held devices. They were required to contain the oil by piling snow into snow banks, and by augering, trenching and slotting ice. Oil was removed by trimming operations on solid ice, snow melting, snow blowing, skimming and pumping. In-situ burning was also performed. Other sessions were also conducted develop skills in site characterization and treating oiled shorelines. The successfully conducted field sessions spanned all phases of a cleanup operation in cold weather. 5 refs., 7 figs

  10. Training to the Nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Navascues, I.

    2003-01-01

    In 1994 the Civil Protection Directorate outlined a formation plan related to the Nuclear emergency plans with the purpose of guaranteeing for the communities involved in this material a basic and homogeneous formation. In the preparation of this Plan the following phases had been developed: 1. Study of formative needs of the different participant communities involved in nuclear plans. This has been done throw the information collected by: nuclear emergency plans and procedures that develop them, questionnaires, observation list, exercise, drills, etc. 2. With all the needs detected and in function of them was designed the objectives to teach in relation with the knowledge and the abilities that the formation can give to the participants. 3. Definition of thematic areas related with the different matters to teach, derived from the different objectives. 4. Organization: The development of the formative activities through a specific material with orientations for the professors (content of material to impart, didactic resources, etc.) and a short summary of the Didactic Units imparted to the students. The methodology is based in short theoretical classes and in the active implication through practice activities exercises and drills to train its functions and the coordination of the different implied organizations. 5. Evaluation: the implantation of the formation plan contributes new formative needs. (Author)

  11. Evaluating emergency ultrasound training in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Amit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In countries with fully developed emergency medicine systems, emergency ultrasound (EUS plays an important role in the assessment and treatment of critically ill patients. Methods : The authors sought to introduce EUS to a group of doctors working in the emergency departments (EDs in India through an intensive 4-day adult and pediatric ultrasound course held at the Apex Trauma Center and EM division of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi. The workshop was evaluated with a survey questionnaire and a hands-on practical test. The questionnaire was designed to assess the current state of EUS in India′s EDs, and to identify potential barriers to the incorporation of EUS into current EM practice. The EUS course consisted of a general introductory didactic session followed by pediatric, abdominal and trauma, cardiothoracic, obstetrical and gynecologic, and vascular modules. Each module had a didactic session followed by hands-on applications with live models and/or simulators. A post-course survey questionnaire was given to the participants, and there was a practical test on the final day of the course. The ultrasound images taken by the participants were digitally recorded, and were subsequently graded for their accuracy by independent observers, residency, and/or fellowship trained in EUS. Results : There were a total of 42 participants who completed the workshop and took the practical examination; 32 participants filled in the course evaluation survey. Twenty-four (75% participants had no prior experience with EUS, 5 (16% had some experience, and 3 (9% had significant experience. During the practical examination, 38 of 42 participants (90% were able to identify Morison′s pouch on the focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST examination, and 32 (76% were able to obtain a parasternal long axis cardiac view and identify the left ventricle. The inferior vena cava was identified as it crosses the diaphragm into

  12. Audit of Childbirth Emergency Referrals by Trained Traditional Birth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicine, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, 5Department of Obstetrics and ... Aim: The aim was to audit childbirth emergency referrals by trained TBAs to a ..... training of TBAs has been documented by previous African.

  13. Astronauts and cosmonauts during emergency bailout training session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Using small life rafts, several cosmonauts and astronauts participating in joint Russia - United States space missions take part in an emergency bailout training session in the JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) 25-feet-deep pool. In the

  14. Integrated surgical emergency training plan in the internship: A step toward improving the quality of training and emergency center management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Mohammad Reza; Vafamehr, Vajiheh; Dadgostarnia, Mohammad; Dehghani, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    In this study, by using a problem-oriented approach in the needs assessment, identifying the defects and deficiencies in emergency health training centers has been determined as the basis for the requirements. The main objective of the study was the implementation of surgical emergencies integration of the five surgical groups (general surgery, urology, orthopedics, neurosurgery, and ENT) to meet the needs and determining its efficacy. THIS INTERVENTIONAL STUDY WAS CONDUCTED IN THREE PHASES: (1) Phase I (design and planning): Needs assessment, recognition of implementation barriers and providing the objectives and training program for integrated emergencies. (2) Phase II (implementation): Justification of the main stakeholders of the project, preparation of students' duties in the emergency department, preparation of on-duty plans, supervising the implementation of the program, and reviewing the plan in parallel with the implementation based on the problems. (3) Phase III (evaluation): Reviewing the evidences based on the amount of efficiency of the plan and justification for its continuation. In the first and the second phase, the data were collected through holding focus group meetings and interviews. In the third phase, the opened-reply and closed-reply researcher-made questionnaires were used. The questionnaire face and content validity were confirmed by experts and the reliability was assessed by calculating the Cronbach's alpha. ACCORDING TO THE VIEWS OF THE INTERNS, ASSISTANTS, TEACHERS, AND EMERGENCY PERSONNEL, THE POSITIVE FEATURES OF THE PLAN INCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: Increasing the patients' satisfaction, reducing the patients' stay in the Emergency Department, increasing the speed of handling the patients, balancing the workloads of the interns, direct training of interns by young teachers of emergency medicine, giving the direct responsibility of the patient to the intern, practical and operational training of emergency issues, increasing the teamwork

  15. Medical Response in Radiation Emergency in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, M.A.; Tadic, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    According to the Nuclear Federal Law No. 24804, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. ARN has a system for intervention in radiological -and nuclear emergencies with a primary intervention group, which is on duty in weekly shifts all year round. This paper aims at describing the system as implemented at present. The Emergency Medical System has been developed into three levels: Level I: local emergency services. This level includes triage (conventional and radiological), first-aid care, and first management of contaminated victims Level II: emergency departments of local general hospitals that are in charge of performing a second triage by a biomedical approach, the treatment of conventional and/or radiocombined injuries and completing decontamination as necessary. In this way the initial triage is completed by a physical examination, timing and severity of prodromal signs and symptoms, sequential blood counts and serum enzymatic levels that allow a first-stage dosimetric approach at this level. Victims requiring higher complexity assistance shall be transferred to third-level hospitals. Level III: three central reference hospitals (Hospital Naval 'Pedro Mallo', Hospital de Quemados from Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires and Hospital Britanico de Ciudad de Buenos Aires) capable of providing healthcare for diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination constitute this level. An educational program for medical and paramedical responders is regularly carried out at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been drawn up. Research and development of new strategies for first medical response, diagnosis and treatment of radiation

  16. Medical response in radiation emergency in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Marina A.; Tadic, Maria M.

    2008-01-01

    According to the Nuclear Federal Law Nr. 24804, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. ARN has a system for intervention in radiological -and nuclear emergencies with a primary intervention group, which is on duty in weekly shifts all year round. This paper aims at describing the system as implemented at present. The Emergency Medical System has been developed into three levels: Level I: local emergency services. This level includes triage (conventional and radiological), first-aid care, and first management of contaminated victims. Level II: Emergency departments of local general hospitals that are in charge of performing a second triage by a biomedical approach, the treatment of conventional and/or radio-combined injuries and completing decontamination as necessary. In this way the initial triage is completed by a physical examination, timing and severity of prodromal signs and symptoms, sequential blood counts and serum enzymatic levels that allow a first-stage dosimetric approach at this level. Victims requiring higher complexity assistance shall be transferred to third-level hospitals. Level III: three central reference hospitals (Hospital Naval 'Pedro Mallo', Hospital de Quemados from Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires and Hospital Britanico de Ciudad de Buenos Aires) capable of providing health care for diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination constitute this level. An educational program for medical and paramedical responders is regularly carried out at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been drawn up. Research and development of new strategies for first medical response, diagnosis and treatment of radiation

  17. Dehydration treatment practices among pediatrics-trained and non-pediatrics trained emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Jeranil; Liu, Deborah R; Nager, Alan L

    2012-04-01

    We sought to survey emergency physicians in the United States regarding the management of pediatric dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis. We hypothesized that responses from physicians with dedicated pediatric training (PT), that is, board certification in pediatrics or pediatric emergency medicine, would differ from responses of physicians with no dedicated pediatric training (non-PT). An anonymous survey was mailed to randomly selected members of the American College of Emergency Physicians and sent electronically to enrollees of Brown University pediatric emergency medicine listserv. The survey consisted of 17 multiple-choice questions based on a clinical scenario depicting a 2-year-old with acute gastroenteritis and moderate dehydration. Questions asked related to treatment preferences, practice setting, and training information. One thousand sixty-nine surveys were received: 997 surveys were used for data analysis, including 269 PT physicians and 721 non-PT physicians. Seventy-nine percent of PT physicians correctly classified the scenario patient as moderately dehydrated versus 71% of non-PT physicians (P = 0.063). Among those who correctly classified the patient, 121 PT physicians (58%) and 350 non-PT physicians (68%) would initially hydrate the patient with intravenous fluids. Pediatrics-trained physicians were more likely to initially choose oral or nasogastric hydration compared with non-PT physicians (P = 0.0127). Pediatrics-trained physicians were less likely to perform laboratory testing compared with the non-PT group (n = 92, 45%, vs n = 337, 66%; P dehydrated children, significantly more PT physicians, compared with non-PT physicians, follow established guidelines.

  18. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, M. A. W.; Ali, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency. (authors)

  19. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  20. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  1. Chinese experience on medical response to radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying; Qin, Bin; Lei, Cuiping; Chen, Huifang; Han, Yuhong

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Chinese Center for Medical Response to Radiation Emergency (CCMRRE) was established in 1992, based on the National Institute for Radiological Protection, China CDC (NIRP, China CDC). CCMRRE is a liaison of WHO/REMPAN and functions as a national and professional institute for medical preparedness and response to emergencies involving radioactive material. CCMRRE participates in drafting National Medical Assistant Program for Radiation Emergency and relevant technical documents, develops preventive measures and technique means of medical preparedness and response to radiation emergency. CCMRRE is responsible for medical response to radiological or nuclear accident on national level. CCMRRE holds training courses, organizes drills and provides technical support to local medical organizations in practicing medical preparedness and response to radiation emergency. CCMRRE collects, analyzes and exchanges information on medical response to radiological and nuclear emergency and establishes relevant database. CCMRRE also guides and participates in radiation pollution monitoring on accident sites. In the past ten years, we accumulate much knowledge and experience on medical response to radiation emergencies. In this context, we will discuss Xinzhou Accident, which took place in 1992 and involved in three deaths, and Ha'erbin Accident that took place in 2005 and involved one death. A father and two brothers in Xinzhou Accident died of over-exposed to 60 Co source and misdiagnosis and improper treatment, which indicates that most general practitioners are uncertain about the health consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation and the medical management of exposed patients. When Ha'erbin Accident happened in 2005, the local hospital gave the right diagnosis and treatment based on the clinic symptoms and signs, which prevent more people suffering from over-expose to 192 Ir source. The distinct changes comes from the education and training to primary doctors related

  2. Searching for Effective Training Solutions for Firefighting: The Analysis of Emergency Responses and Line of Duty Death Reports for Low Frequency, High Risk Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    From the more common problems of pre-existing hazardous structures to the rare events of temperature inversion creating a dangerous environment...the Academy’s burn building. These training scenarios allow firefighters to practice search methods while simultaneously dealing with the heat, smoke...fire behavior (RFB), 32 • secondary collapse (SC), • standard op procedures training (SOP), • temperature inversion (TI), • unrestricted flow

  3. Basic data of emergency response centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenieek, O.

    1995-01-01

    Emergency Response Centre (ERC) of Czech Republic is a highly specialized institution belonging to Nuclear Safety State Administration (SONS), which assures its activities both organizationally and technically. Main function of the ERC in the case of nuclear emergency is to fulfil the needs of SONS, Governmental Committee for Nuclear Emergencies in ER (GCNE ER) and the regional organs of State Authorities concerning the emergency planning and preparedness, evaluation of nuclear emergency consequences, including the emergency management and response. In the case of major failure or accident on NPP, the ERC carries out the performance analysis and review of a given NPP. It also monitors the dosimetric situation and transfers the recommendation to GCNE ER, Regional Emergency Management Committees and to NPP

  4. Spill exercise 1980: an LLNL emergency training exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, J.L.; Gibson, T.A.; Vance, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    An emergency training exercise at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) demonstrated that off-hours emergency personnel can respond promptly and effecively to an emergency situation involving radiation, hazardous chemicals, and injured persons. The exercise simulated an explosion in a chemistry laboratory and a subsequent toxic-gas release

  5. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  6. Emergence of tacts following mand training in young children with autism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, Claire E

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to examine the effects of training mands on the emergence of tacts with the same response forms. Results indicated that training adjective sets as mands resulted in the emergence of adjective sets as tacts under modified, but not standard, antecedent conditions. The findings suggested that the apparent functional independence of mands and tacts may be explained by a lack of appropriate antecedent control over responding.

  7. Training of Ambulance Personnel and Others Responsible for Emergency Care of the Sick and Injured at the Scene and During Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Div. of Medical Sciences.

    Ambulance personnel must be able to (1) appraise the extent of first aid rendered by others, (2) carry out additional measures at the scene and en route, (3) operate vehicles safely, (4) maintain communication with traffic authorities, dispatchers, and emergency departments, and (5) keep records for medical and other authorities. Guidelines for…

  8. ANS-8.23: Criticality accident emergency planning and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruvost, N.L.

    1991-01-01

    A study group has been formed under the auspices of ANS-8 to examine the need for a standard on nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response. This standard would be ANS-8.23. ANSI/ANS-8.19-1984, Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety, provides some guidance on the subject in Section 10 titled -- Planned Response to Nuclear Criticality Accidents. However, the study group has formed a consensus that Section 10 is inadequate in that technical guidance in addition to administrative guidance is needed. The group believes that a new standard which specifically addresses emergency planning and response to a perceived criticality accident is needed. Plans for underway to request the study group be designated a writing group to create a draft of such a new standard. The proposed standard will divide responsibility between management and technical staff. Generally, management will be charged with providing the necessary elements of emergency planning such as a criticality detection and alarm system, training, safe evacuation routes and assembly areas, a system for timely accountability of personnel, and an effective emergency response organization. The technical staff, on the other hand, will be made responsible for establishing specific items such as safe and clearly posted evacuation evacuation routes and dose criteria for personnel assembly areas. The key to the question of responsibilities is that management must provide the resources for the technical staff to establish the elements of an emergency response effort

  9. Emergency response preparedness: the French experience of large scale exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanson, D.; Desnoyers, B.; Chabane, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In compliance with the IAEA regulations for the transport of radioactive material in the event of accidents during transport of radioactive material, emergency provisions to protect persons, property and environment have to be established and developed by the relevant national organisations. In France, the prefect of the department where the accident occurs is responsible for decisions and measures required to ensure the protection of both population and property at risk owing to the accident. During an accident, the ministers concerned provide the prefect with recommendations and information, in order to help him take the requisite decisions. On their side, the nuclear industry and transport companies also have to be prepared to intervene and to support the authorities at their request, depending on their capacities and their specialities. To prepare the emergency teams properly and acquire effective emergency plans, training exercises have to be conducted regularly with every ministerial department involved, the nuclear industry and transport companies, members of the public and the media. Then, the feedback from such exercises shall be taken into account to improve the emergency procedures. This paper will introduce: - emergency response preparedness: what is required by the relevant regulations? - emergency response preparedness: how is France organised? - the French experience of conducting large training exercises simulating accidents involving the transport of radioactive material; - the main difficulties and lessons learned; - the perspectives

  10. Emergency response technical centre of the IPSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallendre, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN), the technical support of the French nuclear safety authority, provides the technical support needed for protect the surrounding population from the consequences of radioactive releases. In the event of an accident arising at a nuclear facility, the IPSN would set up an Emergency Response Technical Centre (CTC) at Fontenay-aux-Roses. The IPSN's objectives are: (a) to diagnose the state of the nuclear facility and monitor its development, (b) to prepare prognosis for the evolution of the accident and to give an estimation of the associated consequences according to the situation evolution, (c) to estimate the risk of radioactive releases and the consequences on man and on the environment, mainly on the basis of weather forecasts and on the prognosis. This diagnosis-prognosis approach is build-up with the information on the state of the installation given by: the concerned site via audio-conference system and telescope, the security panels of the nuclear plant via networks. To perform its missions, the CTC, which has to be both safe and secure, uses multiple telecommunication resources to dialogue with partners and also mapping computer systems, data bases and software tools: (a) the SESAME system, which gives, during an accident of a PWR, a calculation method for the diagnosis-prognosis aforesaid, (b) the CONRAD system, which calculates the atmospheric dispersal of radioactive substances and consequences in the environment in the early phase of an accident, (c) the ASTRAL code, which allows to cope with long lasting situations. In order to be operational, the IPSN expert regularly undergo training in emergency situation management and participate in exercises organised by the government authorities. (author)

  11. Understanding Public Responses to Emerging Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macnaghten, Philip; Davies, S.R.; Kearnes, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies aimed at understanding public responses to emerging technologies have given limited attention to the social and cultural processes through which public concerns emerge. When probed, these have tended to be explained either in cognitive social psychological terms, typically in the

  12. Training and training simulators for emergency situations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present principles and means set up by Electricite de France (E.D.F.) to provide the required tailor-made training. Today, recent advantages in computing capacities and software engineering along with the completion of Research and Development Training Division programs in the reactor safety (R+D) field (CATHARE, BETHSY..) give E.D.F. the opportunity to conceive and operate new tools for training which are described in the paper: RTGV-SEPIA: a simulator devoted to self training in SGTR field, thanks to a powerful expert system. SIPA: a 'generator of simulators' aiming at control and engineering studies and training, provided with a software able to give in real time a relevant description of complex topologies with diphasic flow patterns (up to a 12'' break in the primary coolant system of a reactor). (orig./DG) [de

  13. Land Transport Emergency Response Technology Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOTSON, LORI J.; PIERCE, JIM D.

    2003-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was tasked by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) to provide assistance in developing an emergency response plan for radioactive material transportation activities. Those tasks included compiling radioactive materials (RAM) transportation accident data FR-om the open literature and databases, investigating emergency response plans for radioactive materials transport in the United States, and developing specific recommendations for the JNC' nuclear material transport emergency response plan, based on information gathered during the first two tasks. These recommendations include developing a RAM database, a public transparency Internet website, an emergency response inFR-astructure designed specifically for transportation needs, and a clear set of directives to provide authority in the case of transportation accidents or incidents involving RAM

  14. Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY)

  15. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas H, J.

    2006-01-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  16. Nuclear accident/radiological emergency assistance plan. NAREAP - edition 2000. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Nuclear Accident/Radiological Emergency Assistance Plan (NAREAP) is to describe the framework for systematic, integrated, co-ordinated, and effective preparedness and response for a nuclear accident or radiological emergency involving facilities or practices that may give rise to a threat to health, the environment or property. The purpose of the NAREAP is: to define the emergency response objectives of the Agency's staff in a nuclear accident or a radiological emergency; to assign responsibilities for performing the tasks and authorities for making the decisions that comprise the Agency staff's response to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency; to guide the Agency managers who must ensure that all necessary tasks are given the necessary support in discharging the Agency staff responsibilities and fulfilling its obligations in response to an emergency; to ensure that the development and maintenance of detailed and coherent response procedures are well founded; to act as a point of reference for individual Agency staff members on their responsibilities (as an individual or a team member) throughout a response; to identify interrelationships with other international intergovernmental Organizations; and to serve as a training aid to maintain readiness of personnel. The NAREAP refers to the arrangements of the International Atomic Energy Agency and of the United Nations Security and Safety Section at the Vienna International Centre (UNSSS-VIC) that may be necessary for the IAEA to respond to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, as defined in the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions. It covers response arrangements for any situation that may have actual, potential or perceived radiological consequences and that could require a response from the IAEA, as well as the arrangements for developing, maintaining and exercising preparedness. The implementing procedures themselves are not included in the NAREAP, but they are required

  17. Emergency Response Resources guide for nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience was this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly from those organizations within the Federal Government. This first revision of that guide broadens the focus of the original document. Also, new information defines the major Federal response facilities. This guide should assist State and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when their resources have been exhausted

  18. Off-site response for radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, J.S.; Oakes, T.W.; Hubbard, H.M.; Hibbitts, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Environmental radiological surveillance under emergency conditions at off-site locations is one of the advisory functions provided by DOE within the ORO jurisdiction. The Department of Environmental Management of ORNL has been requested to provide sampling and analytical assistance at such emergency response activities. We have assembled and identified specific individuals and equipment to provide a rapid response force to perform field measurements for environmental radioactivity releases as a consequence of nuclear accidents. Survey teams for sample collection and field measurements are provided along with analytical assistance to operate the radioactivity measuring equipment in the DOE emergency van

  19. Evaluating an australian emergency nurse practitioner candidate training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plath, Sharyn J; Wright, Mary; Hocking, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Nurse Practitioners (NPs) receive core clinical training at master's level, with their employer providing the opportunity to upskill in clinical and procedural competencies. It is increasingly recognised that this generic education requires supplementary training for operating effectively within a specific clinical environment. In this paper we describe a pilot program designed to train Australian NP Candidates to work effectively within the Emergency Department Fast Track model of care. The training program consisted of a 12-month period: four hours in-house training per week over two semesters, running concurrently with the NP candidate's University semesters, and 3 months' clinical practice to consolidate. The training team defined milestones for Semesters one and two, and developed a case review form to assess application of the candidate's knowledge in new clinical situations, as well as check for gaps in understanding. A clinical skills guide was developed for the candidate to work toward, and a comprehensive assessment was carried out at two time points in the training program. Feedback was obtained from the mentors and the candidate at the end point of the training program, and has been used to refine the program for 2017. This in-house training program provided specialised, evidence-based training for the emergency department environment, resulting in development of the nurse practitioner candidate as a high functioning team member. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. All rights reserved.

  20. Emergency Response to Radioactive Material Transport Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-shinawy, R.M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Although transport regulations issued by IAEA is providing a high degree of safety during transport opertions,transport accidents involving packages containing radioactive material have occurred and will occur at any time. Whenever a transport accident involving radioactive material accurs, and many will pose no radiation safety problems, emergency respnose actioms are meeded to ensure that radiation safety is maintained. In case of transport accident that result in a significant relesae of radioactive material , loss of shielding or loss of criticality control , that consequences should be controlled or mitigated by proper emergency response actions safety guide, Emergency Response Plamming and Prepardness for transport accidents involving radioactive material, was published by IAEA. This guide reflected all requirememts of IAEA, regulations for safe transport of radioactive material this guide provide guidance to the publicauthorites and other interested organziation who are responsible for establishing such emergency arrangements

  1. Using risk based tools in emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, B.W.; Ferns, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques are used by the nuclear industry to model the potential response of a reactor subjected to unusual conditions. The knowledge contained in these models can aid in emergency response decision making. This paper presents requirements for a PRA based emergency response support system to date. A brief discussion of published work provides background for a detailed description of recent developments. A rapid deep assessment capability for specific portions of full plant models is presented. The program uses a screening rule base to control search space expansion in a combinational algorithm

  2. Effect of simulated emergency skills training and assessments on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of emergency skills in simulation was highly effective in enhancing the competence and confidence of medical students when managing a clinical emergency. However, students appeared to be overconfident, which could be ascribed to ignorance, and possibly indicates that feedback during training should be improved.

  3. Preparing a laboratory for radioanalytical emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.; Webb, C.J.; Isch, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the state of the nation's ability to respond to a radiological event is examined, it has become apparent that both capacity and capability are lacking. Department of Homeland Security National Planning Scenario 11 is designed to address the planning activities for the response to an attack using radiological dispersal devices. The scenario details show that the cleanup activity will take several years, and that there will be between 360 000 and 1 000 000 environmental samples in the first year. Based on existing capacity and capabilities it would take four to six years to analyze the samples generated at the lower end of the sample range. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been given responsibility for the remediation activities following a radiological event, and has awarded cooperative agreements to several laboratories to start the process of developing capacity and capabilities. The Connecticut Department of Public Health Laboratory (DPHL) was awarded one of the cooperative agreements. The DPHL has started activities to further those goals by investigating and implementing procedures to ensure that samples with activity higher than normal background can be processed safely, as well as implementing more rapid methods for radiochemical analysis. The DPHL already served as the primacy radiochemistry laboratory for several New England states and thus had a solid foundation to build upon. The DPHL has taken a process flow approach in preparing for radiological emergency response and recommends that radioanalytical laboratories that are reviewing their roles in such a response: - Ensure that their Nuclear Regulatory Commission licenses allow for appropriate radioisotope types and activities; - Develop procedures and processes to ensure that samples with higher activities can be processed safely, with due regard for sample screening and aliquanting samples; - Provide for enhanced radioanalytical contamination control, with careful consideration of sample

  4. Radiological emergency response planning in Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The most important aspect of emergency preparedness is to recognize and accept the fact that there exists a potential for a problem or a condition and that it requires some attention. Emergency plans should be sufficiently flexible so as to accommodate the emergency situation as it unfolds. Of the several emergency responses that may be taken following a nuclear power plant accident evacuation evokes the greatest attention and discussion as to whether it is truly a feasible option. Movements of people confined to mass care facilities or on life support systems involve special requirements. The Three Mile Island accident has been the most studied nuclear incident in the history of the nuclear power reactor industry. The findings of these reports will have a major influence on nuclear power issues as they are addressed in the future. The question remains as to whether the political leadership will be willing to provide the resources required by the emergency plan. Future safety and emergency response to nuclear accidents depend upon Government and industry acting responsibly and not merely responding to regulations. The Three Mile Island accident has had some beneficial side effects for the emergency management community. It has: increased the level of awareness and importance of emergency planning; served as a catalyst for the sharing of experiences and information; encouraged standardization of procedures; and emphasized the need for identifying and assigning responsibilities. The Emergency Management Organization in responding to a disaster situation does not enjoy the luxury of time. It needs to act decisively and correctly. It does not often get a second chance. Governments, at all levels, and the nuclear power industry have been put on notice as a result of Three Mile Island. The future of nuclear energy may well hang in the balance, based upon the public's perception of the adequacy of preparedness and safety measures being taken. (author)

  5. Emergency Preparedness and Response at Nuclear Power Plants in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, L. A.; Qamar, M. A.; Liaquat, M.R., E-mail: samasl@yahoo.com [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-10-15

    Emergency preparedness and response arrangements at Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in Pakistan have been reevaluated in the light of Fukushima Daiichi accident. Appropriate measures have been taken to strengthen and effectively implement the on-site and off-site emergency plans. Verification of these plans is conducted through regulatory review and by witnessing periodic emergency drills and exercises conducted by the NPPs in the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements. Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) have been revised at NPPs. A multi discipline reserve force has been formed for assistance during severe accidents. Nuclear Emergency Management System (NEMS) has been established at the national level in order to make necessary arrangements for responding to nuclear and radiological emergencies. Training programs for first responders and medical professionals have been launched. Emergencies coordination centres have been established at national and corporate levels. Public awareness program has been initiated to ensure that the surrounding population is provided with appropriate information on emergency planning and response. To share national and international operational experience, Pakistan has arranged various workshops and developed a strong link with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  6. The TransPetro emergency response system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, A.T.F.; Cardoso, V.F.; Carbone, R.; Berardinelli, R.P. [Petrobras-TransPetro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Carvalho, M.T.M.; Casanova, M.A. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Informatica, TeCGraf

    2004-07-01

    Petrobras-TransPetro developed the TransPetro Emergency Response System in response to emergency situations at large oil pipelines or at terminal facilities located in sea or river harbour areas. The standard of excellence includes full compliance with environmental regulations set by the federal government. A distributed workflow management software called InfoPAE forms the basis of the system in which actions are defined, along with geographic and conventional data. The first prototype of InfoPAE was installed in 1999. Currently it is operational in nearly 80 installations. The basic concepts and functionality of the TransPetro Emergency Response System were outlined in this paper with reference to the mitigative actions that are based on an evaluation of the organization of the emergency teams; the communication procedures; characterization of the installations; definition of accidental scenarios; environmental sensitivity maps; simulation of oil spill trajectories and dispersion behaviour; geographical data of the area surrounding the installations; and, other conventional data related to the installations, including available equipment. The emergency response team can take action as soon as an accident is detected. The action plan involves characterizing several scenarios and delegating mitigative actions to specific sub-teams, each with access to geographic data on the region where the emergency occurred. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Role of first responder's training in the management of nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagarajan, V.; Sankhla, Rajesh; Verma, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    Consequent to the terrorist attacks on WTC in USA and other similar terrorist attacks worldwide, there has been increasing public concern regarding the use of radioactive materials in a malevolent act. As the radioactive sources are widely used in the industries, terrorists may have access to these facilities and obtain the radioactive material suitable for making Radioactive Dispersal Device (RDD) often called as dirty bomb. Response to nuclear or radiological emergency may involve highly specialized agencies or technical experts. Hence well-coordinated arrangements must be integrated with those required for any other conventional emergencies. During radiological emergencies, emergency service personnel are expected to play a major role in the early response. Though these personnel are well equipped and trained in tackling the normal emergencies it is essential to train them to deal with the radiological emergencies due to inherent characteristics of radioactivity. For the effective management of radiological emergencies, these first responders are required to be trained in such a way that they understand the concept of radiation protection. This objective can be achieved by using a typical training module consisting of interactive class room lectures, practical sessions to use the instruments and handling of radioactive sources, demonstration of radiation protection practices, exhibition of all radiation survey instruments and protective equipment etc., display of various posters and RDD Emergency Exercise. (author)

  8. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head, James Colson. This document is the second of a two-part analysis on Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2016 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2016 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. The 2013 BNA was approved by NNSA’s Livermore Field Office on January 22, 2014.

  9. Post-emergency response resources guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience is this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly those organizations within the federal government. This guide should assist state and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when theirs have been exhausted

  10. The Evolution of On-Board Emergency Training for the International Space Station Crew

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBuff, Skyler

    2015-01-01

    The crew of the International Space Station (ISS) receives extensive ground-training in order to safely and effectively respond to any potential emergency event while on-orbit, but few people realize that their training is not concluded when they launch into space. The evolution of the emergency On- Board Training events (OBTs) has recently moved from paper "scripts" to an intranet-based software simulation that allows for the crew, as well as the flight control teams in Mission Control Centers across the world, to share in an improved and more realistic training event. This emergency OBT simulator ensures that the participants experience the training event as it unfolds, completely unaware of the type, location, or severity of the simulated emergency until the scenario begins. The crew interfaces with the simulation software via iPads that they keep with them as they translate through the ISS modules, receiving prompts and information as they proceed through the response. Personnel in the control centers bring up the simulation via an intranet browser at their console workstations, and can view additional telemetry signatures in simulated ground displays in order to assist the crew and communicate vital information to them as applicable. The Chief Training Officers and emergency instructors set the simulation in motion, choosing the type of emergency (rapid depressurization, fire, or toxic atmosphere) and specific initial conditions to emphasize the desired training objectives. Project development, testing, and implementation was a collaborative effort between ISS emergency instructors, Chief Training Officers, Flight Directors, and the Crew Office using commercial off the shelf (COTS) hardware along with simulation software created in-house. Due to the success of the Emergency OBT simulator, the already-developed software has been leveraged and repurposed to develop a new emulator used during fire response ground-training to deliver data that the crew receives

  11. Emergency medical personnel training: I. An historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytkowski, P A; Jacobs, L M; Meany, M

    1983-01-01

    The status of Emergency Medical Technicians has evolved from an undefined role with few rules, regulations, or standards to an established health care profession and a nationally administered program. The evolution of this profession received major impetus from the 1966 report by the National Academy of Science/National Research Council that provided recommended training standards. Development of a training course curriculum for basic life support (BLS) followed. The need for coordinated training of Emergency Medical Technical Technicians was recognized, and funds became available to aid in the national standardization of education, examination, certification, and recertification procedures for EMTs. Concomitant with the attempt to standardize BLS training, advanced life support (ALS) programs grew in number. By 1977 the National Standard Training Curriculum became available and was soon followed by a national certification exam. As states have the option to accept or reject the federal standards embodied in the national training course, there remains variation among programs offered by each state. Because of the difference in need for specific emergency services among the states at a time of increased professional mobility, arguments still exist regarding the desirability of federally mandated training and certification programs.

  12. Simulation in Canadian postgraduate emergency medicine training - a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Evan; Hall, Andrew Koch; Hagel, Carly; Petrosoniak, Andrew; Dagnone, Jeffrey Damon; Howes, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Simulation-based education (SBE) is an important training strategy in emergency medicine (EM) postgraduate programs. This study sought to characterize the use of simulation in FRCPC-EM residency programs across Canada. A national survey was administered to residents and knowledgeable program representatives (PRs) at all Canadian FRCPC-EM programs. Survey question themes included simulation program characteristics, the frequency of resident participation, the location and administration of SBE, institutional barriers, interprofessional involvement, content, assessment strategies, and attitudes about SBE. Resident and PR response rates were 63% (203/321) and 100% (16/16), respectively. Residents reported a median of 20 (range 0-150) hours of annual simulation training, with 52% of residents indicating that the time dedicated to simulation training met their needs. PRs reported the frequency of SBE sessions ranging from weekly to every 6 months, with 15 (94%) programs having an established simulation curriculum. Two (13%) of the programs used simulation for resident assessment, although 15 (94%) of PRs indicated that they would be comfortable with simulation-based assessment. The most common PR-identified barriers to administering simulation were a lack of protected faculty time (75%) and a lack of faculty experience with simulation (56%). Interprofessional involvement in simulation was strongly valued by both residents and PRs. SBE is frequently used by Canadian FRCPC-EM residency programs. However, there exists considerable variability in the structure, frequency, and timing of simulation-based activities. As programs transition to competency-based medical education, national organizations and collaborations should consider the variability in how SBE is administered.

  13. Integrated simulation of emergency response in disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Taro; Furuta, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    An integrated simulation system of emergency response in disasters is under development that can consider various factors of disasters, such as disaster phenomena, activities of response organizations, resident behavior, and their environment. The aim of this system is to provide support for design and assessment of disaster management systems. This paper introduces the conceptual design of the entire system and presents simulators of organizational behavior in nuclear and earthquake disasters. (author)

  14. Collaborative situational mapping during emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunawan, L.T.; Oomes, A.H.J.; Neerincx, M.; Brinkman, W.-P.; Alers, H.

    2009-01-01

    During emergency response, individuals observe only part of the picture, sharing of information is needed to get the required complete picture. The aim of our study is to get insight in the collaborative mapping process in order to derive requirements for a map-sharing tool. First, we analyzed the

  15. L-007: Objectives preparation and Emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This lecture explains the preparation and response in a nuclear and radiological emergency. Must be taken into consideration a program of preparedness, the public health and environment protection, propagation of contamination limit, first aid and treatment radiation damage, the stochastic, psychological and physical effects reduction

  16. Requirement of trained first responders and national level preparedness for prevention and response to radiological terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we have identified the educational needs for response to radiological emergency in India with major thrust on training. The paper has also enumerated the available educational and training infrastructure, the human resources, as well as the important stake holders for development of sustainable education and training programme. The training of emergency response personnel will help in quick decision making, planning and effective response during such emergencies. Medical Emergency management requires planning by hospitals which includes up-gradation of earmarked hospitals, development of mobile hospitals and mobile medical teams supported by communication backups and adequate medical logistics for radiological emergency. Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is a nodal agency for advising authorities for any nuclear/radiological emergency in public domain. DAE through the various ERCs have already developed technical expertise, systems, software and methodology for quick impact assessment which may be required for the implementation of countermeasures if required following any nuclear disaster/radiological emergency

  17. Theory, training and timing: psychosocial interventions in complex emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, William

    2006-06-01

    The Asian tsunami of December 2004 galvanised mental health and emergency agencies in a way that no other recent disaster has done. The loss of life and forced migration focused national and international agencies on the need to provide appropriate psychosocial care from the very beginning. The prior academic arguments surrounding early intervention paled into insignificance against the urgent need to reduce distress and prevent chronic mental health problems. This chapter notes that there was a major, planned and early intervention following the earthquake in Bam, exactly one year earlier. The lessons from that are only now beginning to filter through and help shape better responses to disasters. It is argued that too many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and even IGOs are following theoretical positions that have little empirical justification. There is an urgent need for training for mental health and NGO personnel alike to deliver evidence-based psychological first aid. There is no justification for mental health responses to be delayed until weeks after a disaster happens.

  18. Radiological emergency response - a functional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Prosanta [Louisiana Radiation Protection Div., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The radiological emergency response program in the State of Louisiana is discussed. The improved approach intends to maximize the efficiency for both nuclear power plant and radiological emergency response as a whole. Several broad-based components are identified: cluster of `nodes` are generated for each component; these `nodes` may be divided into `sub-nodes` which will contain some `attributes`; `relational bonds` among the `attributes` will exist. When executed, the process begins and continues with the `nodes` assuming a functional and dynamic role based on the nature and characteristics of the `attributes`. The typical response based on stand-alone elements is eliminated; overlapping of functions is avoided, and is produced a well-structure and efficient organization 1 ref., 6 figs.; e-mail: prosanta at deq.state.la.us

  19. Radiological emergency response - a functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Prosanta

    1997-01-01

    The radiological emergency response program in the State of Louisiana is discussed. The improved approach intends to maximize the efficiency for both nuclear power plant and radiological emergency response as a whole. Several broad-based components are identified: cluster of 'nodes' are generated for each component; these 'nodes' may be divided into 'sub-nodes' which will contain some 'attributes'; 'relational bonds' among the 'attributes' will exist. When executed, the process begins and continues with the 'nodes' assuming a functional and dynamic role based on the nature and characteristics of the 'attributes'. The typical response based on stand-alone elements is eliminated; overlapping of functions is avoided, and is produced a well-structure and efficient organization

  20. Exercising the federal radiological emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gant, K.S.; Adler, M.V.; Wolff, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Multiagency exercises were an important part of the development of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This paper concentrates on two of these exercises, the Federal Field Exercise in March 1984 and the Relocation Tabletop Exercise in December 1985. The Federal Field Exercise demonstrated the viability and usefulness of the draft plan; lessons learned from the exercise were incorporated into the published plan. The Relocation Tabletop Exercise examined the federal response in the postemergency phase. This exercise highlighted the change over time in the roles of some agencies and suggested response procedures that should be developed or revised. 8 refs

  1. Nuclear emergency preparedness and response in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miska, H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-site nuclear emergency response in Germany is divided into disaster response under the responsibility of the Laender and measures for precautionary radiation protection pursuant to the Precautionary Radiation Protection Act under the lead of federal authorities. Early countermeasures at the regional level require a different management than long-term and comprehensive actions of precautionary radiation protection. As situations may arise in which measures of both approaches overlap with regard to place and time, it is essential to make thorough preparations in order to avoid problems with implementation. (orig.)

  2. Simulation analysis of the use of emergency resources during the emergency response to a major fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Reniers, G.L.L.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    During an emergency response to an accident or disaster, emergency response actions often need to use various emergency resources. The use of resources plays an important role in the successful implementation of emergency response, but there may be conflicts in the use of resources for emergency

  3. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhaus C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Neuhaus,1,2 Jochen Hinkelbein2,31Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue Working Group, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots.Keywords: cognitive response, aviation training, pilot, hypoxia, oxygen, loss of consciousness

  4. Interprofessional Emergency Training Leads to Changes in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Dorothea; Stroben, Fabian; Gerken, Jan D; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K; Machner, Mareen; Hautz, Wolf E

    2018-01-01

    Preventable mistakes occur frequently and can lead to patient harm and death. The emergency department (ED) is notoriously prone to such errors, and evidence suggests that improving teamwork is a key aspect to reduce the rate of error in acute care settings. Only a few strategies are in place to train team skills and communication in interprofessional situations. Our goal was to conceptualize, implement, and evaluate a training module for students of three professions involved in emergency care. The objective was to sensitize participants to barriers for their team skills and communication across professional borders. We developed a longitudinal simulation-enhanced training format for interprofessional teams, consisting of final-year medical students, advanced trainees of emergency nursing and student paramedics. The training format consisted of several one-day training modules, which took place twice in 2016 and 2017. Each training module started with an introduction to share one's roles, professional self-concepts, common misconceptions, and communication barriers. Next, we conducted different simulated cases. Each case consisted of a prehospital section (for paramedics and medical students), a handover (everyone), and an ED section (medical students and emergency nurses). After each training module, we assessed participants' "Commitment to Change." In this questionnaire, students were anonymously asked to state up to three changes that they wished to implement as a result of the course, as well as the strength of their commitment to these changes. In total, 64 of 80 participants (80.0%) made at least one commitment to change after participating in the training modules. The total of 123 commitments was evenly distributed over four emerging categories: communication , behavior , knowledge and attitude . Roughly one third of behavior- and attitude-related commitments were directly related to interprofessional topics (e.g., "acknowledge other professions' work

  5. Interprofessional Emergency Training Leads to Changes in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Eisenmann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Preventable mistakes occur frequently and can lead to patient harm and death. The emergency department (ED is notoriously prone to such errors, and evidence suggests that improving teamwork is a key aspect to reduce the rate of error in acute care settings. Only a few strategies are in place to train team skills and communication in interprofessional situations. Our goal was to conceptualize, implement, and evaluate a training module for students of three professions involved in emergency care. The objective was to sensitize participants to barriers for their team skills and communication across professional borders. Methods We developed a longitudinal simulation-enhanced training format for interprofessional teams, consisting of final-year medical students, advanced trainees of emergency nursing and student paramedics. The training format consisted of several one-day training modules, which took place twice in 2016 and 2017. Each training module started with an introduction to share one’s roles, professional self-concepts, common misconceptions, and communication barriers. Next, we conducted different simulated cases. Each case consisted of a prehospital section (for paramedics and medical students, a handover (everyone, and an ED section (medical students and emergency nurses. After each training module, we assessed participants’ “Commitment to Change.” In this questionnaire, students were anonymously asked to state up to three changes that they wished to implement as a result of the course, as well as the strength of their commitment to these changes. Results In total, 64 of 80 participants (80.0% made at least one commitment to change after participating in the training modules. The total of 123 commitments was evenly distributed over four emerging categories: communication, behavior, knowledge and attitude. Roughly one third of behavior- and attitude-related commitments were directly related to interprofessional topics

  6. The impact of emergency obstetric care training in Somaliland, Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Charles; Adegoke, Adetoro; Hofman, Jan; Ismail, Fouzia M; Ahmed, Fatuma M; van den Broek, Nynke

    2012-06-01

    To provide and evaluate in-service training in "Life Saving Skills - Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care" in order to improve the availability of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in Somaliland. In total, 222 healthcare providers (HCPs) were trained between January 2007 and December 2009. A before-after study was conducted using quantitative and qualitative methods to evaluate trainee reaction and change in knowledge, skills, and behavior, in addition to functionality of healthcare facilities, during and immediately after training, and at 3 and 6 months post-training. The HCPs reacted positively to the training, with a significant improvement in 50% of knowledge and 100% of skills modules assessed. The HCPs reported improved confidence in providing EmOC. Basic and comprehensive EmOC healthcare facilities provided 100% of expected signal functions-compared with 43% and 56%, respectively, at baseline-with trained midwives performing skills usually performed by medical doctors. Lack of drugs, supplies, medical equipment, and supportive policy were identified as barriers that could contribute to nonuse of new skills and knowledge acquired. The training impacted positively on the availability and quality of EmOC and resulted in "up-skilling" of midwives. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Train Repathing in Emergencies Based on Fuzzy Linear Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelei Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Train pathing is a typical problem which is to assign the train trips on the sets of rail segments, such as rail tracks and links. This paper focuses on the train pathing problem, determining the paths of the train trips in emergencies. We analyze the influencing factors of train pathing, such as transferring cost, running cost, and social adverse effect cost. With the overall consideration of the segment and station capability constraints, we build the fuzzy linear programming model to solve the train pathing problem. We design the fuzzy membership function to describe the fuzzy coefficients. Furthermore, the contraction-expansion factors are introduced to contract or expand the value ranges of the fuzzy coefficients, coping with the uncertainty of the value range of the fuzzy coefficients. We propose a method based on triangular fuzzy coefficient and transfer the train pathing (fuzzy linear programming model to a determinate linear model to solve the fuzzy linear programming problem. An emergency is supposed based on the real data of the Beijing-Shanghai Railway. The model in this paper was solved and the computation results prove the availability of the model and efficiency of the algorithm.

  8. Train repathing in emergencies based on fuzzy linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xuelei; Cui, Bingmou

    2014-01-01

    Train pathing is a typical problem which is to assign the train trips on the sets of rail segments, such as rail tracks and links. This paper focuses on the train pathing problem, determining the paths of the train trips in emergencies. We analyze the influencing factors of train pathing, such as transferring cost, running cost, and social adverse effect cost. With the overall consideration of the segment and station capability constraints, we build the fuzzy linear programming model to solve the train pathing problem. We design the fuzzy membership function to describe the fuzzy coefficients. Furthermore, the contraction-expansion factors are introduced to contract or expand the value ranges of the fuzzy coefficients, coping with the uncertainty of the value range of the fuzzy coefficients. We propose a method based on triangular fuzzy coefficient and transfer the train pathing (fuzzy linear programming model) to a determinate linear model to solve the fuzzy linear programming problem. An emergency is supposed based on the real data of the Beijing-Shanghai Railway. The model in this paper was solved and the computation results prove the availability of the model and efficiency of the algorithm.

  9. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical resource for planning the medical response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. Effective medical response is a necessary component of the overall response to nuclear or radiological (radiation) emergencies. In general, the medical response may represent a difficult challenge for the authorities due to the complexity of the situation, often requiring specialized expertise, and special organizational arrangements and materials. To be effective, adequate planning and preparedness are needed. This manual, if implemented, should help to contribute to coherent international response. The manual provides the practical tools and generic procedures for use by emergency medical personnel during an emergency situation. It also provides guidance to be used at the stage of preparedness for development of medical response capabilities. The manual also addresses mass casualty emergencies resulting from malicious acts involving radioactive material. This part was supported by the Nuclear Security Fund. The manual was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, it must be reviewed and revised as part of the planning process to match the potential accidents, threats, local conditions and other unique characteristics of the facility where it may be used

  10. Manual for first responders to a radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: June 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, 'first responders shall take all practicable and appropriate actions to minimize the consequences of a nuclear or radiological emergency'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(49)/RES/9, continues to encourage Member States 'to adopt the relevant Agency standards, procedures and practical tools' and underlines 'the need for first responders to have appropriate training for dealing with ionizing radiation during nuclear and radiological emergencies'. This publication is intended to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. Its aim is to provide practical guidance for those who will respond during the first few hours to a radiological emergency (referred to here as 'first responders') and for national officials who would support this early response. It provides guidance in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This report, published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, replaces and builds on IAEA-TECDOC-1162 in the area of early response and first responders' actions. It takes account of the

  11. Manual for first responders to a radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: October 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, 'first responders shall take all practicable and appropriate actions to minimize the consequences of a nuclear or radiological emergency'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(49)/RES/9, continues to encourage Member States 'to adopt the relevant Agency standards, procedures and practical tools' and underlines 'the need for first responders to have appropriate training for dealing with ionizing radiation during nuclear and radiological emergencies'. This publication is intended to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. Its aim is to provide practical guidance for those who will respond during the first few hours to a radiological emergency (referred to here as 'first responders') and for national officials who would support this early response. It provides guidance in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This report, published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, replaces and builds on IAEA-TECDOC-1162 in the area of early response and first responders' actions. It takes account of the

  12. Manual for first responders to a radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, 'first responders shall take all practicable and appropriate actions to minimize the consequences of a nuclear or radiological emergency'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(49)/RES/9, continues to encourage Member States 'to adopt the relevant Agency standards, procedures and practical tools' and underlines 'the need for first responders to have appropriate training for dealing with ionizing radiation during nuclear and radiological emergencies'. This publication is intended to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. Its aim is to provide practical guidance for those who will respond during the first few hours to a radiological emergency (referred to here as 'first responders') and for national officials who would support this early response. It provides guidance in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This report, published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, replaces and builds on IAEA-TECDOC-1162 in the area of early response and first responders' actions. It takes account of the

  13. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2013 - March 31, 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Muto, Shigeo; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Aoki, Kazufumi; Okamoto, Akiko; Kawakami, Takeshi; Kume, Nobuhide; Nakanishi, Chika; Koie, Masahiro; Kawamata, Hiroyuki; Nemotouchi, Toshimasa; Saito, Toru; Kato, Tadashi; Sumiya, Akio; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Sato, Sohei; Sumiya, Akihiro; Okuno, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Matsusaka, Masaru

    2015-02-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which will be abbreviated as JAEA hereafter, was assigned as a designated public institution under the Disaster Countermeasures Basic Act and under the Armed Attack Situations Response Act. Based on these Acts, the JAEA has the responsibility of providing technical support to the national government and/or local governments in case of disaster responses or response in the event of a military attack, etc. In order to fulfill the tasks, the JAEA has established the Emergency Action Plan and the Civil Protection Action Plan. In case of a nuclear emergency, the Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) dispatches specialists of JAEA, supplies the national government and local governments with emergency equipment and materials, and gives technical advice and information. In normal time, NEAT provides various exercises and training courses concerning nuclear disaster prevention to those personnel taking an active part in emergency response institutions of the national and local governments, police, fire fighters, self-defense forces, etc. in addition to the JAEA itself. The NEAT also researches nuclear disaster preparedness and response, and cooperates with international organizations. In the FY2013, the NEAT accomplished the following tasks: (1) Technical support activities as a designated public institution in cooperation with the national and local governments, etc. (2) Human resource development, exercise and training of nuclear emergency response personnel for the national and local governments, etc. (3) Researches on nuclear disaster preparedness and response, and sending useful information. (4) International contributions to Asian countries on nuclear disaster preparedness and response in collaboration with the international organizations. (author)

  14. STIR: Assessing and Training Response Inhibition Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Learning to stop responding to alcohol cues reduces alcohol intake via reduced affective associations rather than increased response inhibition. Addiction ...requires an abstract application of the core learning principle1,2, and viable examples are often hard to find and/or assess. If exposure to non...inhibition training that expands upon previous successful “near transfer” response inhibition training efforts—such as treating alcohol addictions by

  15. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) emergency response system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998)

  16. Responsibility modelling for civil emergency planning

    OpenAIRE

    Sommerville, Ian; Storer, Timothy; Lock, Russell

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to analysing and understanding civil emergency planning based on the notion of responsibility modelling combined with HAZOPS-style analysis of information requirements. Our goal is to represent complex contingency plans so that they can be more readily understood, so that inconsistencies can be highlighted and vulnerabilities discovered. In this paper, we outline the framework for contingency planning in the United Kingdom and introduce the notion of respons...

  17. New Learning Methods for Marine Oil Spill Response Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justiina Halonen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Finland the Regional Fire and Rescue Services (RFRS are responsible for near shore oil spill response and shoreline cleanup operations. In addition, they assist in other types of maritime incidents, such as search and rescue operations and fire-fighting on board. These statutory assignments require the RFRS to have capability to act both on land and at sea. As maritime incidents occur infrequently, little routine has been established. In order to improve their performance in maritime operations, the RFRS are participating in a new oil spill training programme to be launched by South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences. This training programme aims to utilize new educational methods; e-learning and simulator based training. In addition to fully exploiting the existing navigational bridge simulator, radio communication simulator and crisis management simulator, an entirely new simulator is developed. This simulator is designed to model the oil recovery process; recovery method, rate and volume in various conditions with different oil types. New simulator enables creation of a comprehensive training programme covering training tasks from a distress call to the completion of an oil spill response operation. Structure of the training programme, as well as the training objectives, are based on the findings from competence and education surveys conducted in spring 2016. In these results, a need for vessel maneuvering and navigation exercises together with actual response measures training were emphasized. Also additional training for maritime radio communication, GMDSS-emergency protocols and collaboration with maritime authorities were seemed important. This paper describes new approach to the maritime operations training designed for rescue authorities, a way of learning by doing, without mobilising the vessels at sea.

  18. United States Department of Energy radiological emergency response programme - a national capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon-Hagerty, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    In order to respond to a radiological emergency, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) maintains seven emergency response assets and capabilities in support of a radiological emergency of any proportion within the continental United States and abroad. The seven emergency response assets and capabilities include: Accident Response Group; Aerial Measuring Systems; Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability; Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center; Nuclear Emergency Search Team; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiological Assistance Program. Presently, USDOE maintains the most comprehensive national radiological emergency response assets in the United States, capable of dealing with any type of emergency involving nuclear materials. In all, the Department's assets are available to support any type of accident/incident involving radioactive materials in coordination with other United States Federal agencies, as well as state and local governments, as required. (author)

  19. Education and training of physicians for radiation emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Rita

    2012-01-01

    The project orders implied the development, testing, and evaluation of a curriculum for educating and training physicians in prehospital radiation accident management and the development of a master curriculum. Objectives were to develop, preserve, and enlarge medical competence concerning prehospital care of radiation accident patients. The project is expected to contribute to qualify emergency physicians challenged by scenarios related to radiological and nuclear hazards. The development and the content of the curriculum for educating and training physicians in prehospital radiation accident management are being described. The conduction and evaluation of two pilot training courses with a total of 40 participating physicians are being presented. Successful testing of the pilot courses proves the value of the curriculum developed. Self-contained courses can be performed according to the master curriculum and the respective master presentations. Moreover, single modules can be integrated in existing education and training programmes. Suggestions for the implementation and accreditation of the curriculum are being made. (orig.)

  20. Preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical tool for the preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part the functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning the methodologies, techniques and available results of research on such emergencies. To ensure effective response to radiation emergencies when needed, provisions should be made for regular training of emergency response personnel. As stated in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Safety Requirements, Safety Standard Series No. GS-R-2), 'The operator and the response organizations shall make arrangements for the selection of personnel and training to ensure that the personnel have the requisite knowledge, skills, abilities, equipment, procedures and other arrangements to perform their assigned response functions'. A further requirement is that 'Exercise programmes shall be conducted to ensure that all specified functions required to be performed for emergency response and all organizational interfaces for facilities in threat category I, II or III and the national level programmes for threat category IV or V are tested at suitable intervals'. In 2004 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(48)/RES/10 encouraged Member States to 'implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency'. This document is published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. It was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, the exercise structure, terms and scenarios must be

  1. An emergency response centre (ERC) for the preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Abani, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the requirement for a state of the art Emergency Response Centre (ERC) to be developed and kept in readiness for the quick response to any nuclear or radiological emergencies. For an effective response to any major nuclear emergency an ERC having the facilities of i) environmental dose rate monitoring network established using both mobile and fixed units ii) on-line meteorological data collection and information station iii) on-line computation and prediction of isodose curves in real time and iv) properly developed and tested monitoring methodologies are essential. Vehicles with on-line data transfer facility to the ERC and equipped with different type of monitoring systems can function as Mobile Monitoring Laboratories (MMLs) and can help in quick decision making even during a radiological emergency far away from the ERC. (author)

  2. Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, J.

    1990-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has begun implementation of the Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) to upgrade its ability to acquire data from nuclear power plants in the event of an emergency at the plant. ERDS provides a direct real-time transfer of data from licensee plant computers to the NRC Operations Center. The system has been designed to be activated by the licensee during an emergency which has been classified at an ALERT or higher level. The NRC portion of ERDS will receive the data stream, sort and file the data. The users will include the NRC Operations Center, the NRC Regional Office of the affected plant, and if requested the States which are within the ten mile EPZ of the site. The currently installed Emergency Notification System will be used to supplement ERDS data. This report provides the minimum guidance for implementation of ERDS at licensee sites. It is intended to be used for planning implementation under the current voluntary program as well as for providing the minimum standards for implementing the proposed ERDS rule

  3. Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, J.

    1991-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has begun implementation of the Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) to upgrade its ability to acquire data from nuclear power plants in the event of an emergency at the plant. ERDS provides a direct real-time transfer of data from licensee plant computers to the NRC Operations Center. The system has been designed to be activated by the licensee during an emergency which has been classified at an ALERT or higher level. The NRC portion of ERDS will receive the data stream, sort and file the data. The users will include the NRC Operations Center, the NRC Regional Office of the affected plant, and if requested the States which are within the ten mile EPZ of the site. The currently installed Emergency Notification System will be used to supplement ERDS data. This report provides the minimum guidance for implementation of ERDS at licensee sites. It is intended to be used for planning implementation under the current voluntary program as well as for providing the minimum standards for implementing the proposed ERDS rule. 4 refs., 3 figs

  4. Chemical toxicity approach for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the event of an airborne release of chemical agent or toxic industrial chemical by accidental or intentional means, emergency responders must have a reasonable estimate of the location and size of the resulting hazard area. Emergency responders are responsible for warning persons downwind of the hazard to evacuate or shelter-in-place and must know where to look for casualties after the hazard has passed or dissipated. Given the same source characterization, modern hazard assessment models provide comparable concentration versus location and time estimates. Even urban hazard assessment models often provide similar predictions. There is a major shortcoming, though, in applying model output to estimating human toxicity effects. There exist a variety of toxicity values for non-lethal effects ranging from short-term to occupational to lifetime exposures. For health and safety purposes, these estimates are all safe-sided in converting animal data to human effects and in addressing the most sensitive subset of the population. In addition, these values are usually based on an assumed 1 hour exposure duration at constant concentration and do not reflect either a passing clouds concentration profile or duration. Emergency responders need expected value toxicity parameters rather than the existing safe-sided ones. This presentation will specify the types of toxicity values needed to provide appropriate chemical hazard estimates to emergency responders and will demonstrate how dramatically their use changes the hazard area.(author)

  5. Global approach of emergency response, reflection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco Garcia, E.; Garcia Ahumada, F.; Albaladejo Vidal, S.

    1998-01-01

    The emergency response management approach must be dealt with adequately within company strategy, since a badly managed emergency situation can adversely affect a company, not only in terms of asset, but also in terms of the negative impact on its credibility, profitability and image. Thereby, it can be said that there are three main supports to manage the response in an emergency situation. a) Diagnosis b) Prognosis. c) Communications. To reach these capabilities it is necessary a co-ordination of different actions at the following levels. i. Facility Operation implies Local level. ii. Facility Property implies National level iii. Local Authority implies Local level iv. National Authority implies National level Taking into account all the last, these following functions must be covered: a) Management: incorporating communication, diagnosis and prognosis areas. b) Decision: incorporating communication and information means. c) Services: in order to facilitate the decision, as well as the execution of this decision. d) Analysis: in order to facilitate the situations that make easier to decide. e) Documentation: to seek the information for the analysts and decision makers. (Author)

  6. International IAEA Emergency Response Workshop in Fukushima Concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA workshop aimed at further strengthening nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response capabilities concluded today in Fukushima, Japan. More than 40 participants from 18 countries took part in the four-day Response and Assistance Network (RANET) workshop, which included a field exercise in areas affected following the March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. During the exercise, participants conducted radiation monitoring and environmental sampling and analysis. They measured the contamination level of the ground surface and conducted gamma spectrum analysis and vehicle-based monitoring - activities that are conducted following any nuclear or radiological incident or emergency. Results were then compared amongst participants. RANET is a network currently comprising 22 countries through which the IAEA can facilitate the provision of expert support and equipment on request under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. Pat Kenny, IAEA RANET Officer, said the workshop provided an opportunity to practice cooperation between international teams that would be deployed through RANET following an emergency. 'By bringing together so many experts from different countries in one place, the workshop helped us learn how international teams can work together to provide assistance in a nuclear or radiological emergency situation,' he said. 'It also enabled us to improve the coordination of such assistance, and it gave participants the opportunity to learn from each other.' The workshop was the first activity conducted from the IAEA RANET Capacity Building Centre, a new training centre based in the city of Fukushima that was designated earlier this week with the support of the Japanese Foreign Ministry and Fukushima Prefecture. The Centre will host RANET and other training courses, workshops and exercises aimed at enhancing nuclear emergency preparedness and response

  7. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability

  8. Global teaching and training initiatives for emerging cohort studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K. Paulus

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A striking disparity exists across the globe, with essentially no large-scale longitudinal studies ongoing in regions that will be significantly affected by the oncoming non-communicable disease epidemic. The successful implementation of cohort studies in most low-resource research environments presents unique challenges that may be aided by coordinated training programs. Leaders of emerging cohort studies attending the First World Cohort Integration Workshop were surveyed about training priorities, unmet needs and potential cross-cohort solutions to these barriers through an electronic pre-workshop questionnaire and focus groups. Cohort studies representing India, Mexico, Nigeria, South Africa, Sweden, Tanzania and Uganda described similar training needs, including on-the-job training, data analysis software instruction, and database and bio-bank management. A lack of funding and protected time for training activities were commonly identified constraints. Proposed solutions include a collaborative cross-cohort teaching platform with web-based content and interactive teaching methods for a range of research personnel. An international network for research mentorship and idea exchange, and modifying the graduate thesis structure were also identified as key initiatives. Cross-cohort integrated educational initiatives will efficiently meet shared needs, catalyze the development of emerging cohorts, speed closure of the global disparity in cohort research, and may fortify scientific capacity development in low-resource settings.

  9. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-04-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  10. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  11. Virtual reality and simulation: training the future emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznek, Martin; Harter, Phillip; Krummel, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The traditional system of clinical education in emergency medicine relies on practicing diagnostic, therapeutic, and procedural skills on live patients. The ethical, financial, and practical weaknesses of this system are well recognized, but the alternatives that have been explored to date have shown even greater flaws. However, ongoing progress in the area of virtual reality and computer-enhanced simulation is now providing educational applications that show tremendous promise in overcoming most of the deficiencies associated with live-patient training. It will be important for academic emergency physicians to become more involved with this technology to ensure that our educational system benefits optimally.

  12. Lessons learned from the second Federal Radiology Emergency Response Plan Field Exercise (FFE-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.; Weiss, B.H.; Wolff, W.F.; Adler, V.

    1988-01-01

    The FFE-2, held in 1987 at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, provided a large-scale, multiagency, field test of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). The FRERP provided workable guidance for coordinating the federal response efforts and effectively supplementing the states' resources. Needs for more training for responders and clarification in portions of the response were identified

  13. Response to Commentaries on Bystander Training as Leadership Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jackson

    2018-03-01

    In this article, the author responds to three commentaries about his article "Bystander Training as Leadership Training: Notes on the Origins, Philosophy, and Pedagogy of the Mentors in Violence Prevention Model," published in this volume. Topics covered in the commentaries and response include questions about evaluation and evidence for program effectiveness; the necessity for gender violence prevention education to be gender transformative and part of a comprehensive, multilevel prevention approach, especially for adolescents; and the degree to which Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP), as a "social justice"-oriented program, incorporates intersectional and anti-oppression frameworks and perspectives.

  14. Training induces cognitive bias: the case of a simulation-based emergency airway curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Christine S; Stojiljkovic, Ljuba; Milicic, Biljana; Lin, Brian F; Dror, Itiel E

    2014-04-01

    Training-induced cognitive bias may affect performance. Using a simulation-based emergency airway curriculum, we tested the hypothesis that curriculum design would induce bias and affect decision making. Twenty-three novice anesthesiology residents were randomized into 2 groups. The primary outcome measure was the initiation of supraglottic airway and cricothyroidotomy techniques in a simulated cannot-ventilate, cannot-intubate scenario during 3 evaluation sessions. Secondary outcomes were response times for device initiation. After a baseline evaluation and didactic lecture, residents received an initial practical training in either surgical cricothyroidotomy (CRIC group) or supraglottic airway (SGA group). After the midtest, the groups switched to receive the alternate training. From baseline to midtest, the SGA group increased initiation of supraglottic airway but not cricothyroidotomy. The CRIC group increased initiation of cricothyroidotomy but not supraglottic airway. After completion of training in both techniques, the SGA group increased initiation of both supraglottic airway and cricothyroidotomy. In contrast, the CRIC group increased initiation of cricothyroidotomy but failed to change practice in supraglottic airway. Final test response times showed that the CRIC group was slower to initiate supraglottic airway and faster to initiate cricothyroidotomy. Practical training in only 1 technique caused bias in both groups despite a preceding didactic lecture. The chief finding was an asymmetrical effect of training sequence even after training in both techniques. Initial training in cricothyroidotomy caused bias that did not correct despite subsequent supraglottic airway training. Educators must be alert to the risk of inducing cognitive bias when designing curricula.

  15. Advanced information technology for training and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.

    1989-01-01

    Modern information technology provides many possibilities for improving both the safety and the availability of nuclear installations. A Nordic research programme was started in 1977, in which several organizations in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden has been participating. The work has on a general level been addressing control rooms, human reliability and information technology for nuclear power plants. The research has had impact on the development of the control room solutions and the training simulators in Finland and also in the other Nordic countries. The present phase of the Nordic cooperation is investigating the use of advanced information technology in emergency management. The paper gives a brief introduction to the use of advance information technology for training and emergency management, which is based on the experience from the Nordic projects and other similar application projects in Finland. The paper includes also references to results from several of the projects. (author)

  16. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 5. CPR, Oxygen Therapy. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the fifth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains two sections covering the following course content; cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (including artificial ventilation, foreign body obstructions, adjunctive equipment and special techniques, artificial…

  17. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 3--Anatomy and Physiology. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the third in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains one section covering the following topics: general anatomical terms, the body cavities and contents, the integumentary system, the skeletal system, the muscular system, the nervous system, the respiratory…

  18. Management and training aspects of the emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The main objectives of an emergency management system are to prevent or reduce the likelihood of consequential loss in the event of an emergency occurring. In the event of a nuclear accident the effectiveness of measures for the protection of the public will depend on the advance preparation especially in education and training. This paper reviews two recent initiatives and concludes with comments on the future development of this subject. There is an increasing requirement in legal and moral terms for industry to inform the population of health hazards to which they are exposed. In a report published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA/OECD) radiation protection was described as a subject which is impenetrable to the layman and as wide as it is complex. For this and other reasons radiation hazards are perceived to exceed all others and the public appear to have a poor image of the radiation protection specialists. Communication with the public and the media is widely recognized as a key pan of an emergency plan. This view is supported in the European Union which has sponsored the book on 'Radiation and Radiation Protection - a course for primary and secondary schools' which is described in this paper. The training of emergency teams includes the use of drills and exercises to maintain skills and can also be used to test the adequacy of plans. Every effort should be made to simulate the pressure on time and resources which would occur in a real event. Radiation emergencies are fortunately rare and so there is little practical experience of these events. The emergency worker must gain some radiation protection skills and must be able to use some technical language when communicating with specialist advisors. For this reason the European Union has sponsored the book 'Radiation Protection for Emergency Workers' which is also described in this paper. (author)

  19. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2012 - March 31, 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Muto, Shigeo; Okuno, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Hiromi; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Okamoto, Akiko; Koie, Masahiro; Ikeda, Takeshi; Nemotouchi, Toshimasa; Saito, Toru; Sumiya, Akio; Kawamata, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Chika; Hirayama, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Sato, Sohei; Sumiya, Akihiro; Kawakami, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Aoki, Kazufumi; Matsusaka, Masaru; Nagakura, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Koichi

    2014-02-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which will be abbreviated as JAEA hereafter, was assigned as a designated public institution under the Disaster Countermeasures Basic Act and under the Armed Attack Situations Response Act. Based on these Acts, the JAEA has the responsibility of providing technical support to the National government and/or local governments in case of disaster responses or response in the event of a military attack, etc. In order to fulfill the tasks, the JAEA has established the Emergency Action Plan and the Civil Protection Action Plan. In case of a nuclear emergency, the Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides technical support activities to an Off-Site Center in any prefecture. Specifically, NEAT dispatches specialists, supplies the National Government and local governments with emergency equipment and materials, and gives technical advice and information. In normal time, NEAT provides various exercises and training courses concerning nuclear disaster prevention to those personnel taking an active part in emergency response institutions of the national and local governments, police, fire fighters, self-defense forces, etc. in addition to the JAEA itself. The NEAT also researches nuclear disaster preparedness and response, and cooperates with international organizations. In the FY2012, the NEAT accomplished the following tasks: (1) Technical support activities as a designated public institution in cooperation with the national and local governments, etc. (2) Human resource development, exercise and training of nuclear emergency response personnel for the national and local governments, etc. (3) Researches on nuclear disaster preparedness and response, and sending useful information. (4) International contributions to Asian countries on nuclear disaster preparedness and response in collaboration with the international organizations. The responses of the JAEA to the accident of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power

  20. Radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response. How well are we prepared?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, Gunther H.G.; Herrmann, Andre R.; Koch, Doris; Meisenberg, Oliver; Rauber, Dominique; Stuerm, Rolf P.; Weiss, Wolfgang; Miska, Horst; Schoenhacker, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The contributions to this topic are dealing, in a broad overview, with important aspects of Nuclear Emergency Preparedness and Response, like the influence of the new ICRP recommendations number 103 and number 109 on emergency preparedness and on planning for response, possible problems in installing and operating emergency care centres, experience from exercises as well as the training of response personnel in Austria and Germany. Finally, measures in emergency preparedness with regard to a dirty bomb attack are reported by means of an INEX-4-exercise in Switzerland. (orig.)

  1. Distinguishing human responses to radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.H. Jr.; Ziegler, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Inherent in the revised emergency planning regulations recently issued by the federal government is the assumption that people will follow official protective action advisories during a nuclear reactor accident. In this paper the authors argue that this is an unrealistic assumption and present empirical evidence which supports the proposition that a radiological emergency in likely to give rise to a high degree of extreme public behavior. Their analyses indicate that less than one-third of the households on Long Island are likely to follow instructions in the event of an accident at the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station. Among the families who would not follow instructions, some would underreact but most would overreact. Perceived distance from the plant and age of household head appear to be the strongest discriminators among those who are most likely to follow orders, those most likely to underreact, and those most likely to overreact. Implications for radiological emergency preparedness and response planning are discussed. 71 references, 3 figures, 8 tables

  2. Emergency response capabilities developed in the United States to deal with nuclear materials transportation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandevender, S.G.; Reese, R.T.; Schilling, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    The non-existence of emergency response programs is frequently stated as a reason for restricting the movement of radioactive materials through states or local jurisdictions. Yet, studies discussed here indicate that emergency response capability, while not in the best condition, is getting more money, interest and attention, and in most states response networks exist which could be effective in responding to radiological emergencies. Awareness of such capabilities by the public is an important feature in increasing the public's confidence in the ability of federal, state and local officials in controlling hazards. One aspect of this awareness program could be in broader availability of radioactive emergency techniques for possible first responders to emergencies. This training, public awareness and more emphasis on workable emergency plans will help to assure reliable and workable emergency response plans

  3. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2011 - March 31, 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Hiromi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Akiko; Ikeda, Takeshi; Tamura, Kenichi; Nagakura, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Chika; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Abe, Minako; Sato, Sohei; Kawakami, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Sumiya, Akihiro; Matsusaka, Masaru

    2012-08-01

    When a nuclear emergency occurs in Japan, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has the responsibility of providing technical support to the National government, local governments, police, fire stations and nuclear operators etc., because the JAEA has been designated as the Designated Public Institution under the Basic Act on Disaster Control Measures and the Act on Response to Armed Attack Situations, etc.. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides a comprehensive range of technical support activities to an Off-Site Center in case of a nuclear emergency. Specifically, NEAT gives technical advice and information, dispatches specialists as required, and supplies the National Government and local governments with emergency equipments and materials. NEAT provides various exercise and training courses concerning nuclear disaster prevention to those personnel taking an active part in emergency response organizations at normal times. NEAT also researches on nuclear disaster prevention and cooperates with international organizations. Concerning the assistance to the Accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March, 2011, JAEA has assisted activities including environmental radiation monitoring, environmental radioactivity analyses, and response to telephone inquiries from residents etc., with utmost effort. NEAT has served as the center of these supporting activities of JAEA. This annual report summarized these activities of JAEA/NEAT in the fiscal year 2011. (author)

  4. State-level emergency preparedness and response capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Sharon M; Perrotta, Dennis M; Stanbury, Martha; Heumann, Michael; Anderson, Henry; Simms, Erin; Huang, Monica

    2011-03-01

    Prior assessments of public health readiness had identified gaps in radiation preparedness. In recent years, preparedness planning has involved an "all-hazards" approach. Current assessment of the national status related to radiation public health emergency preparedness capabilities at the state and local health department levels was needed. A survey of state health departments related to radiation readiness was undertaken in 2010 by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE). States with nuclear power plants were instructed to consider their responses exclusive of capabilities and resources related to the plants given that the emergency response plans for nuclear power plants are specific and unique. Thirty-eight (76%) state health departments responded to the survey, including 26 of the 31 states with nuclear power plants. Specific strengths noted at the state level included that the majority of states had a written radiation response plan and most plans include a detailed section for communications issues during a radiation emergency. In addition, more than half of the states indicated that their relationship with federal partners is sufficient to provide resources for radiation emergencies, indicating the importance states placed on federal resources and expertise. Specific weaknesses are discussed and include that most states had completed little to no planning for public health surveillance to assess potential human health impacts of a radiation event; less than half had written plans to address exposure assessment, environmental sampling, human specimen collection and analysis, and human health assessment. Few reported having sufficient resources to do public health surveillance, radiation exposure assessment, laboratory functions and other capabilities. Levels of planning, resources and partnerships varied among states, those with nuclear power plants were better prepared. Gaps were evident in all states; however and additional training and

  5. Economic evaluation of emergency obstetric care training: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi; Wilson-Jones, Megan; Madaj, Barbara; van den Broek, Nynke

    2017-12-04

    Training healthcare providers in Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) has been shown to be effective in improving their capacity to provide this critical care package for mothers and babies. However, little is known about the costs and cost-effectiveness of such training. Understanding costs and cost-effectiveness is essential in guaranteeing value-for-money in healthcare spending. This study systematically reviewed the available literature on cost and cost-effectiveness of EmOC trainings. Peer-reviewed and grey literature was searched for relevant papers published after 1990. Studies were included if they described an economic evaluation of EmOC training and the training cost data were available. Two reviewers independently searched, screened, and selected studies that met the inclusion criteria, with disagreements resolved by a third reviewer. Quality of studies was assessed using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards statement. For comparability, all costs in local currency were converted to International dollar (I$) equivalents using purchasing power parity conversion factors. The cost per training per participant was calculated. Narrative synthesis was used to summarise the available evidence on cost effectiveness. Fourteen studies (five full and nine partial economic evaluations) met the inclusion criteria. All five and two of the nine partial economic evaluations were of high quality. The majority of studies (13/14) were from low- and middle-income countries. Training equipment, per diems and resource person allowance were the most expensive components. Cost of training per person per day ranged from I$33 to I$90 when accommodation was required and from I$5 to I$21 when training was facility-based. Cost-effectiveness of training was assessed in 5 studies with differing measures of effectiveness (knowledge, skills, procedure cost and lives saved) making comparison difficult. Economic evaluations of EmOC training are limited. There is a

  6. Contraceptive availability during an emergency response in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Sascha R; Kourtis, Athena P; Curtis, Kathryn M; Tepper, Naomi; Gorman, Susan; Jamieson, Denise J; Zotti, Marianne; Barfield, Wanda

    2013-03-01

    This article provides the evidence for contraceptive need to prevent unintended pregnancy during an emergency response, discusses the most appropriate types of contraceptives for disaster situations, and details the current provisions in place to provide contraceptives during an emergency response.

  7. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the emergency response laws and regulations in place in the various states within the southern region for use by legislators, emergency response planners, the general public and all persons concerned about the existing legal framework for emergency response. SSEB expects to periodically update the report as necessary. Radiation protection regulations without emergency response provisions are not included in the summary

  8. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.K.; Chester, R.O.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response

  9. 48 CFR 452.236-77 - Emergency Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contracts: Emergency Response (NOV 1996) (a) Contractor's Responsibility for Fire Fighting. (1) The... emergency work (anticipated to be restricted to fire fighting). An equitable adjustment for the temporary... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency Response. 452...

  10. Some Qualitative Requirements for Testing of Nuclear Emergency Response Robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Heungseop; Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Youngsoo; Jeong, Kyungmin

    2014-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is carrying out the project 'Development of Core Technology for Remote Response in Nuclear Emergency Situation', and as a part of the project, we are studying the reliability and performance requirements of nuclear emergency response robots. In this paper, we described some qualitative requirements for testing of nuclear emergency response robots which are different to general emergency response robots. We briefly introduced test requirements of general emergency response robots and described some qualitative aspects of test requirements for nuclear emergency response robots. When considering an immature field-robot technology and variety of nuclear emergency situations, it seems hard to establish quantitative test requirements of these robots at this time. However, based on studies of nuclear severe accidents and the experience of Fukushima NPP accident, we can expect some test requirements including quantitative ones for nuclear emergency response robots

  11. Experience report: a training center for health response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurmo, Alexandre M.; Leite, Teresa C.S.B.

    2009-01-01

    The Professor Nelson Valverde Training Center was created within FEAM (The ELETRONUCLEAR Medical Assistance Foundation) with the objective of capacitating Radio Nuclear Accident Responders for the Health Area in the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Central (Angra dos Reis - RJ - Brazil). The first step was structuring the contents for this training using IAEA's Manuals as base (EPR Medical - 2005, EPR First Responders - 2006 and TMT - Handbook - 2009) and data from REAC/TS. The second step was to capacitate instructors. The third step was the integration with the Company's Radiological Protection Division, giving radiological assessment. Finally, the development of training applications, ending with Drills, Tests and Assessment, gathering data and suggestions, objectifying the constant improvement. Training Programs with pre and post evaluations have been started. Since 2004 training internal courses were ministered for 125 professionals with annual re-training and were ministered to 130 professionals from several external institutions. During the same period training courses were ministered to 140 trainees from the Radiological Protection Division of The Nuclear Power Plant of Angra dos Reis, as First Lay Responders, objectifying the improvement of the quality of the emergency response. (author)

  12. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2010 - March 31, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Hiromi; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sawahata, Masayoshi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Sato, Sohei; Terakado, Naoya; Nagakura, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Chika; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Abe, Minako; Kawakami, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Sumiya, Akihiro; Matsusaka, Masaru

    2011-12-01

    When a nuclear emergency occurs in Japan, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has the responsibility of providing technical support to the National government, local governments, police, fire station and license holders etc., because the JAEA is designated a Public Organization conforming to the Basic Law on Emergency Preparedness and the Basic Plan for Disaster Countermeasures. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides a comprehensive range of technical support activities to an Off-Site Center in case of a nuclear emergency. Specifically, NEAT gives technical advice and information, dispatch specialists as required, supplies emergency equipment and materials to the National Government and local governments. NEAT provides various lectures and training courses concerning nuclear disaster prevention for those personnel taking an active part in emergency response organizations at normal time. NEAT also researches on nuclear disaster prevention and cooperates with international organizations. Concerning about the assistance to the Accident of Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake at 11 March, 2011, JAEA assisted activities including environmental radiation monitoring, environmental radioactivity analyses, resident public consulting etc., with its full scale effort. NEAT served as the center of these supporting activities of JAEA. This annual report summarized these activities of JAEA/NEAT in the fiscal year 2010. (author)

  13. Automated data system for emergency meteorological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, C.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant (SRP) releases small amounts of radioactive nuclides to the atmosphere as a consequence of the production of radioisotopes. The potential for larger accidental releases to the atmosphere also exists, although the probability for most accidents is low. To provide for emergency meteorological response to accidental releases and to conduct research on the transport and diffusion of radioactive nuclides in the routine releases, a series of high-quality meteorological sensors have been located on towers in and about SRP. These towers are equipped with instrumentation to detect and record temperature and wind turbulence. Signals from the meterological sensors are brought by land-line to the SRL Weather Center-Analysis Laboratory (WC-AL). At the WC-AL, a Weather Information and Display (WIND) system has been installed. The WIND system consists of a minicomputer with graphical displays in the WC-AL and also in the emergency operating center (EOC) of SRP. In addition, data are available to the system from standard weat []er teletype services, which provide both routine surface weather observations and routine upper air wind and temperature observations for the southeastern United States. Should there be an accidental release to the atmosphere, available recorded data and computer codes would allow the calculation and display of the location, time, and downwind concentration of the atmospheric release. These data are made available to decision makers in near real-time to permit rapid decisive action to limit the consequences of such accidental releases. (auth)

  14. Technical information management in an emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.; Greve, C.; Best, R.G.; Phillipson, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Through many experiences in responding to real radiation accidents and emergency response exercises, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a technical information management system that will be used in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in the event of a major radiological accident. The core of the system is the Data Center in the FRMAC, utilizing a computerized database of all off-site environmental radiological data. The information contained and managed by the Data Center will be comprehensive, accountable, and traceable, providing information to the assessors for immediate health and safety needs as well as for long-term documentation requirements. A DOE task force has been formed to develop compatibility guidelines for video, automated data processing, and communication systems. An electronic mail, information status, and bulletin board system is also being developed to assist in the dissemination of information. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offer a giant step forward in displaying and analyzing information in a geographically referenced system

  15. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  16. PRONTO training for obstetric and neonatal emergencies in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dilys M; Cohen, Susanna R; Estrada, Fatima; Monterroso, Marcia E; Jenny, Alisa; Fritz, Jimena; Fahey, Jenifer O

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the acceptability, feasibility, rating, and potential impact of PRONTO, a low-tech and high-fidelity simulation-based training for obstetric and neonatal emergencies and teamwork using the PartoPants low-cost birth simulator. A pilot project was conducted from September 21, 2009, to April 9, 2010, to train interprofessional teams from 5 community hospitals in the states of Mexico and Chiapas. Module I (teamwork, neonatal resuscitation, and obstetric hemorrhage) was followed 3 months later by module II (dystocia and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia) and an evaluation. Four elements were assessed: acceptability; feasibility and rating; institutional goal achievement; teamwork improvement; and knowledge and self-efficacy. The program was rated highly both by trainees and by non-trainees who completed a survey and interview. Hospital goals identified by participants in the module I strategic-planning sessions were achieved for 65% of goals in 3 months. Teamwork, knowledge, and self-efficacy scores improved. PRONTO brings simulation training to low-resource settings and can empower interprofessional teams to respond more effectively within their institutional limitations to emergencies involving women and newborns. Further study is warranted to evaluate the potential impact of the program on obstetric and neonatal outcome. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Emergency response to mass casualty incidents in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen J

    2013-08-01

    The emergency response to mass casualty incidents in Lebanon lacks uniformity. Three recent large-scale incidents have challenged the existing emergency response process and have raised the need to improve and develop incident management for better resilience in times of crisis. We describe some simple emergency management principles that are currently applied in the United States. These principles can be easily adopted by Lebanon and other developing countries to standardize and improve their emergency response systems using existing infrastructure.

  18. Training in Emergency Obstetrics: A Needs Assessment of U.S. Emergency Medicine Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Robinson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Obstetrical emergencies are a high-risk yet infrequent occurrence in the emergency department. While U.S. emergency medicine (EM residency graduates are required to perform 10 low-risk normal spontaneous vaginal deliveries, little is known about how residencies prepare residents to manage obstetrical emergencies. We sought to profile the current obstetrical training curricula through a survey of U.S. training programs. Methods We sent a web-based survey covering the four most common obstetrical emergencies (pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH, shoulder dystocia, and breech presentation through email invitations to all program directors (PD of U.S. EM residency programs. The survey focused on curricular details as well as the comfort level of the PDs in the preparation of their graduating residents to treat obstetrical emergencies and normal vaginal deliveries. Results Our survey had a 55% return rate (n=105/191. Of the residencies responding, 75% were in the academic setting, 20.2% community, 65% urban, and 29.8% suburban, and the obstetrical curricula were 2–4 weeks long occurring in post-graduate year one. The most common teaching method was didactics (84.1–98.1%, followed by oral cases for pre-eclampsia (48% and PPH (37.2%, and homemade simulation for shoulder dystocia (37.5% and breech delivery (33.3%. The PDs’ comfort about residency graduate skills was highest for normal spontaneous vaginal delivery, pre-eclampsia, and PPH. PDs were not as comfortable about their graduates’ skill in handling shoulder dystocia or breech delivery. Conclusion Our survey found that PDs are less comfortable in their graduates’ ability to perform non-routine emergency obstetrical procedures.

  19. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the emergency response laws and regulations in place in the various states within the southern region for use by legislators, emergency response planners, the general public and all persons concerned about the existing legal framework for emergency response. SSEB expects to periodically update the report as necessary. Radiation protection regulations without emergency response provisions are not included in the summary. The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ''natural disasters.'' Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic, others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms. State-by-state breakdowns are given for specific states

  20. Medical response guide for the initial phase of a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Marina A.; Perez, Maria del R.

    2007-01-01

    In case of a sanitary emergency, the local community and its health care system are the first aid providers. Therefore, preparedness through education and training programs would allow emergency systems to provide an appropriate first medical response. The main objective of this guide is to give basic guidelines for the medical response management after situations involving radioactive materials, in an easy and simple way. The information contained in this guide is addressed to health care personnel of any local assistance center. (author) [es

  1. Development of knowledge tests for multi-disciplinary emergency training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, J. L.; Thellesen, L.; Strandbygaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    and evaluating a multiple-choice question(MCQ) test for use in a multi-disciplinary training program inobstetric-anesthesia emergencies. Methods: A multi-disciplinary working committee with 12members representing six professional healthcare groups andanother 28 participants were involved. Recurrent revisions......, 40 out of originally50 items were included in the final MCQ test. The MCQ test wasable to distinguish between levels of competence, and good con-struct validity was indicated by a significant difference in the meanscore between consultants and first-year trainees, as well as betweenfirst...

  2. Status and developing of nuclear emergency response techniques in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiangang, Zhang; Bing, Zhao; Rongyao, Tang; Xiaoxiao, Xu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Emergency preparedness and response in China is consistent with international basic principle of nuclear safety and emergency response. Nuclear emergency response techniques in China developed with nuclear power from 1980s. The status of nuclear emergency techniques in China are: 1) China have plentiful experiences and abilities in the fields of nuclear facility emergency planning and preparedness, nuclear accident consequence assessment, emergency monitoring, and emergency advisory; 2) Emergency assistance ability in China has a foundation, however it cannot satisfy national requirement; 3) Emergency planning and preparedness is not based on hazard assessment; 4) Remote monitoring and robot techniques in not adaptable to the requirements of nuclear emergency response; 5) A consistent emergency assessment system is lack in China. In this paper, it is analyzed what is the developing focal points of nuclear emergency response techniques in China, and it is proposed that the main points are: a) To develop the research of emergency preparedness on the base of hazard analysis; b) To improve remote monitoring and robot ability during nuclear emergency; c) To develop the response technique research with anti-terrorism. (author)

  3. Building a year 2000 emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riopel, P.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation emphasized the importance of developing an emergency plan to minimize any impacts in the event that something may go wrong when the clock changes over at midnight on December 31, 1999. It is usually impossible to anticipate what kinds of emergencies will happen. Planning for emergencies does not have to be an intimidating task. Hazard analysis is a subjective way to investigate what can go wrong, the likelihood of it happening relative to some other potential emergency, and the seriousness of the event. In general, emergency planning for Y2K should not be significantly different from planning for any other type of emergency. Y2K is not the emergency. The events that occur as a consequence of Y2K are. It is these events that should be the focus of a Year 2000 emergency plan

  4. Oil supply security: the emergency response potential of IEA countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This work deals with the oil supply security and more particularly with the emergency response potential of International Energy Agency (IEA) countries. The first part describes the changing pattern of IEA emergency response requirements. It begins with the experience from the past, then gives the energy outlook to 2010 and ends with the emergency response policy issues for the future. The second part is an overview on the IEA emergency response potential which includes the organisation, the emergency reserves, the demand restraint and the other response mechanisms. The third part gives the response potential of individual IEA countries. The last part deals with IEA emergency response in practice and more particularly with the gulf crisis of 1990-1991. It includes the initial problems raised by the gulf crisis, the adjustment and preparation and the onset of military action with the IEA response.(O.L.). 7 figs., 85 tabs

  5. Using principles from emergency management to improve emergency response plans for research animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelweid, Catherine M

    2013-10-01

    Animal research regulatory agencies have issued updated requirements for emergency response planning by regulated research institutions. A thorough emergency response plan is an essential component of an institution's animal care and use program, but developing an effective plan can be a daunting task. The author provides basic information drawn from the field of emergency management about best practices for developing emergency response plans. Planners should use the basic principles of emergency management to develop a common-sense approach to managing emergencies in their facilities.

  6. EDA-EMERGE : An FP7 initial training network to equip the next generation of young scientists with the skills to address the complexity of environmental contamination with emerging pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brack, Werner; Govender, Selvan; Schulze, Tobias; Krauss, Martin; Hu, Meng; Muz, Melis; Hollender, Juliane; Schirmer, Kristin; Schollee, Jennifer; Hidasi, Anita; Slobodnik, Jaroslav; Rabova, Zuzana; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Sonavane, Manoj; Carere, Mario; Lamoree, Marja; Leonards, Pim; Tufi, Sara; Ouyang, Xiyu; Schriks, Merijn; Thomas, Kevin; De Almeida, Ana Catarina; Froment, Jean; Hammers-Wirtz, Monika; Ahel, Marijan; Koprivica, Sanja; Hollert, Henner; Seiler, Thomas Benjamin; Di Paolo, Carolina; Tindall, Andrew; Spirhanzlova, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The initial training network consortium novel tools in effect-directed analysis to support the identification and monitoring of emerging toxicants on a European scale (EDA-EMERGE) was formed in response to the seventh EU framework program call to train a new generation of young scientists (13 PhD

  7. Resilience and Brittleness in a Nuclear Emergency Response Simulation: Focusing on Team Coordination Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Wagner Schenkel; Buarque, Lia; Voshell, Martin; Branlat, Matthieu; Woods, David D.; Gomes, Jose Orlando

    2008-01-01

    The current work presents results from a cognitive task analysis (CTA) of a nuclear disaster simulation. Audio-visual records were collected from an emergency room team composed of individuals from 26 different agencies as they responded to multiple scenarios in a simulated nuclear disaster. This simulation was part of a national emergency response training activity for a nuclear power plant located in a developing country. The objectives of this paper are to describe sources of resilience and brittleness in these activities, identify cues of potential improvements for future emergency simulations, and leveraging the resilience of the emergency response System in case of a real disaster. Multiple CTA techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the cognitive dimensions of the activity and to identify team coordination and crisis management patterns that emerged from the simulation training. (authors)

  8. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Masashi; Hashimoto, Kazuichiro; Terunuma, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Ohmura, Akiko; Terakado, Naoya; Nagakura, Tomohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Watanabe, Fumitaka; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Abe, Minako; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Sumiya, Akihiro; Matsusaka, Masaru

    2009-09-01

    When a nuclear emergency occurs in Japan, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) provides technical support to the National government, local governments, police, fire station and license holder etc. They are Designated Public Organizations conforming to the Basic Law on Emergency Preparedness and the Basic Plan for Disaster Countermeasures. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides a comprehensive range of technical support activities to an Off-Site Center in case of a nuclear emergency. Specifically, NEAT gives technical advice and information, provides for the dispatch of specialist as required, supplies emergency equipments and materials to the Joint Council of Nuclear Disaster Countermeasures, which meets at the Off-Site Center. NEAT provide various lectures and training course concerning nuclear disaster prevention for those personnel taking an active part in emergency response organizations at normal time. And NEAT researches on nuclear disaster prevention and also cooperate with international organizations. This annual report summarized the activities of JAEA/NEAT in the fiscal year 2008. (author)

  9. Annual report of Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center. April 1, 2006 - March 31, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    When a nuclear emergency occurs in Japan, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) provides technical support to the National government, local governments, police, fire station and license holder etc. They are Designated Public Organizations conforming to the Basic Law on Emergency Preparedness and the Basic Plan for Disaster Countermeasures. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) of JAEA provides a comprehensive range of technical support activities to an off-site center in case of a nuclear emergency. Specifically, NEAT gives technical advice and information, provides for the dispatch of specialist as required, supplies emergency equipments and materials to the Joint Council of Nuclear Disaster Countermeasures, which meets at the off-site center. NEAT provide various lectures and training course concerning nuclear disaster prevention for those personnel taking an active part in emergency response organizations at normal time. And NEAT researches on nuclear disaster prevention and also cooperate with international organizations. This annual report summarized the activities of JAEA/NEAT in the fiscal year 2006 and 2007. (author)

  10. Numerical models and their role in emergency response: a perspective on dispersion modeling for emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenly, G.D.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1983-03-01

    Numerical models on several levels of complexity should be available to the emergency response planner. They are a basic tool but must be used in conjunction with both measurements and experience. When these tools are used in a complimentary fashion they greatly enhance the capability of the consequence manager to respond in an emergency situation. Because each accident or incident develops it's own characteristics and requirements the system must be capable of a flexible response. Interaction and feedback between model results from a suite of models and measurements (including airborne measurements) serve the emergency response planner's spectrum of needs, ranging from planning exercises and emergency precalculations to a real-time emergency response

  11. Sexual Assault Training in Emergency Medicine Residencies: A Survey of Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret K Sande

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is currently no standard forensic medicine training program for emergency medicine residents. In the advent of sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE programs aimed at improving the quality of care for sexual assault victims, it is also unclear how these programs impact emergency medicine (EM resident forensic medicine training. The purpose of this study was togather information on EM residency programs’ training in the care of sexual assault patients and determine what impact SANE programs may have on the experience of EM resident training from the perspective of residency program directors (PDs.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey. The study cohort was all residency PDs from approved EM residency training programs who completed a closed-response self-administered survey electronically.Results: We sent surveys to 152 PDs, and 71 responded for an overall response rate of 47%. Twenty-two PDs (31% reported that their residency does not require procedural competency for the sexual assault exam, and 29 (41% reported their residents are required only to observe sexual assault exam completion to demonstrate competency. Residency PDs were asked how their programs established resident requirements for sexual assault exams. Thirty-seven PDs (52% did not know how their sexual assault exam requirement was established.Conclusion: More than half of residency PDs did not know how their sexual assault guidelines were established, and few were based upon recommendations from the literature. There is no clear consensus as to how PDs view the effect of SANE programs on resident competency with the sexual assault exam. This study highlights both a need for increased awareness of EM resident sexual assault education nationally and also a possible need for a training curriculum defining guidelines forEM residents performing sexual assault exams. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:461–466.

  12. Implementation of a Sustainable Training System for Emergency in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sunjoo; Seo, Hyejin; Ho, Binh Duy; Nguyen, Phuong Thi Anh

    2018-01-01

    This study analyzed the project outcomes to share lessons regarding the development of an emergency medicine education system in Vietnam. Retrospective evaluation was implemented using project outcome indicators. A total of 13 training courses were administered, with the collaboration of international experts in Korea and Vietnam. A total of 23 kinds of emergency medicine education equipment were purchased, and a basic life support (BLS) and two advanced cardiac life support labs were remodeled to provide appropriate simulation training. Throughout the 2 years of the project, nine Vietnamese BLS instructors were approved by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation under American Heart Association. Results of evaluation by Korean international development experts were based on five criteria, provided by the Development Assistance Committee of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, were excellent. Success factors were identified as partnership, ownership, commitment, government support, and global networking. Project indicators were all accomplished and received an excellent evaluation by external experts. For sustainable success, healthcare policy and legal regulation to promote high quality and safe service to the Vietnamese people are recommended.

  13. Implementation of a Sustainable Training System for Emergency in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunjoo Kang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThis study analyzed the project outcomes to share lessons regarding the development of an emergency medicine education system in Vietnam.MethodsRetrospective evaluation was implemented using project outcome indicators.ResultsA total of 13 training courses were administered, with the collaboration of international experts in Korea and Vietnam. A total of 23 kinds of emergency medicine education equipment were purchased, and a basic life support (BLS and two advanced cardiac life support labs were remodeled to provide appropriate simulation training. Throughout the 2 years of the project, nine Vietnamese BLS instructors were approved by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation under American Heart Association. Results of evaluation by Korean international development experts were based on five criteria, provided by the Development Assistance Committee of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, were excellent. Success factors were identified as partnership, ownership, commitment, government support, and global networking.ConclusionProject indicators were all accomplished and received an excellent evaluation by external experts. For sustainable success, healthcare policy and legal regulation to promote high quality and safe service to the Vietnamese people are recommended.

  14. Emergency response plan for accidents in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Solaiman, K.M.; Al-Arfaj, A.M.; Farouk, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the general emergency plan for accidents involving radioactive materials in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Uses of radioactive materials and radiation sources and their associated potential accident are specified. Most general accident scenarios of various levels have been determined. Protective measures have been specified to reduce individual and collective doses arising during accident situations. Intervention levels for temporary exposure situations, as established in the IAEA's basic safety standards for protection against ionising radiation and for the safety of radiation sources, are adopted as national intervention levels. General procedures for implementation of the response plan, including notification and radiological monitoring instrumentation and equipment, are described and radiation monitoring teams are nominated. Training programs for the different parties which may be called upon to respond are studied and will be started. (author)

  15. Responsibilities and tasks of the Emergency planning organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, B.

    1983-10-01

    In order to strengthen the emergency preparedness of the most essential agencies so that all types of nuclear accidents can be mastered, the following measures will be taken: - special training for decision-makers and other personnel - introduction of continuously operating staff emergency organization - introduction of a prompt radiation measurement organization - introduction of reliable telecommunications links. (author)

  16. [Experience in training in emergencies, Division of Special Projects in Health, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Vega, Felipe; Loría-Castellanos, Jorge; Hernández-Olivas, Irma Patricia; Franco-Bey, Rubén; Ochoa-Avila, César; Sánchez-Badillo, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    There has been interest in the Division of Special Projects in Health to offer the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social personnel resources for training and quality thereby respond to potential contingencies. Presented here is their experience in this field. To describe and analyse the productivity in different training programs in emergencies and disasters developed by the Division of Special Projects in Health, Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). Observational study in which different training activities conducted by the Division of Special Projects in Health between 1989 and 2014 are described. Descriptive statistics were used. In these 25 years have trained 20,674 participants; 19.451 IMSS and 1,223 other health institutions. The most productive courses were life support (BLS/ACLS) (47.17%), distance courses "Hospital medical evacuation plans and units" (14.17%), the workshop-run "Evacuation of hospital units with an emphasis on critical areas" (5.93%) and course "Programme Evaluators of Hospital Insurance" (8.43%). Although the Special Projects Division Health has primarily operational functions, it nevertheless has neglected its responsibility to maintain constantly trained and updated institute staff that every day is in a position to face any type of emergency and disaster. This increases the chance that the answer to any contingency is more organised and of higher quality, always to the benefit of the population. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ''natural disasters.'' Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic; others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms

  18. A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a results, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request. 2 tabs

  19. A prototype nuclear emergency response decision making expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Shih, C.; Hong, M.; Yu, W.; Su, M.; Wang, S.

    1990-01-01

    A prototype of emergency response expert system developed for nuclear power plants, has been fulfilled by Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. Key elements that have been implemented for emergency response include radioactive material dispersion assessment, dynamic transportation evacuation assessment, and meteorological parametric forecasting. A network system consists of five 80386 Personal Computers (PCs) has been installed to perform the system functions above. A further project is still continuing to achieve a more complicated and fanciful computer aid integral emergency response expert system

  20. Meteorological considerations in emergency response capability at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairobent, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Meteorological considerations in emergency response at nuclear power plants are discussed through examination of current regulations and guidance documents, including discussion of the rationale for current regulatory requirements related to meteorological information for emergency response. Areas discussed include: major meteorological features important to emergency response; onsite meteorological measurements programs, including redundant and backup measurements; access to offsite sources of meteorological information; consideration of real-time and forecast conditions and atmospheric dispersion modeling

  1. Aquatic emergency response model at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant emergency response plans include a stream/river emergency response model to predict travel times, maximum concentrations, and concentration distributions as a function of time at selected downstream/river locations from each of the major SRP installations. The menu driven model can be operated from any of the terminals that are linked to the real-time computer monitoring system for emergency response

  2. Developing a highway emergency response plan for incidents involving hazardous materials, second edition, March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This provides minimum guidelines for developing an emergency response plan for incidents involving hazardous liquid hydrocarbons, such as gasoline and crude oil, transported in MC 306/DOT 406 and MC 307/DOT 407 aluminum cargo tanks and for coordinating and cooperating with local, state, and federal officials. This publication covers response plan priorities, personnel training, special equipment, media relations, environmental relations, and post-response activities. The apprendixes to this recommended practice outline a highway emergency response plan and suggest a procedure for removing liquid hydrocarbons from overturned cargo tanks and righting the tank vehicles

  3. Emergency response facility technical data system of Taiwan Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, E.; Liang, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company (Taipower) has developed its emergency response facility program since 1981. This program is integrated with the following activities to enhance the emergency response capability of nuclear power plants: (1) survey of the plant instrumentation based on the requirements of R.G. 1.97; (2) improvement of plant specific emergency operating procedures based on the emergency response guidelines developed by the Owners group; (3) implementation of the detailed control room design review with the consideration of human engineering and task analysis; and (4) organization, staff and communication of emergency planning of nuclear power plant. The emergency response facility programs of Taipower are implemented in Chinshan (GE BWR4/MARK I), Kuosheng (GE BWR6/MARK III) and Maanshan (W PWR). The major items included in each program are: (1) to establish new buildings for On-Site Technical Support Center, Near-Site Emergency Operation Facility; (2) to establish an Emergency Executive Center at Taipower headquarters; (3) to establish the communication network between control room and emergency response facilities; and (4) to install a dedicated Emergency Response Facility Technical Data System (ERFTDS) for each plant. The ERFTDS provides the functions of data acquisition, data processing, data storage and display in meeting with the requirements of NUREG 0696. The ERFTDS is designed with plant specific requirements. These specific requirements are expected to be useful not only for the emergency condition but also for normal operation conditions

  4. Surgeons’ and Emergency Physicians’ Perceptions of Trauma Management and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemphill, Robin R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study objective was to determine whether surgeons and emergency medicine physicians (EMPs have differing opinions on trauma residency training and trauma management in clinical practice.Methods: A survey was mailed to 250 EMPs and 250 surgeons randomly selected.Results: Fifty percent of surgeons perceived that surgery exclusively managed trauma compared to 27% of EMPs. Surgeons were more likely to feel that only surgeons should manage trauma on presentation to the ED. However, only 60% of surgeons currently felt comfortable with caring for the trauma patient, compared to 84% of EMPs. Compared to EMPs, surgeons are less likely to feel that EMPs can initially manage the trauma patient (71% of surgeons vs. 92% of EMPs.Conclusion: EMPs are comfortable managing trauma while many surgeons do not feel comfortable with the complex trauma patient although the majority of surgeons responded that surgeons should manage the trauma.[WestJEM. 2009;10:144-149.

  5. Survey of Emergency Department staff on disaster preparedness and training for Ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, Jennica; Tolleson-Rinehart, Sue; Brice, Jane

    2016-01-01

    In the domestic response to the outbreak of Ebola virus disease from 2013 to 2015, many US hospitals developed and implemented specialized training programs to care for patients with Ebola. This research reports on the effects of targeted training on Emergency Department (ED) staff's Ebola-related perceptions and attitudes. One hundred fifty-nine members of the UNC Health Care System ED staff participated in a voluntary cross-sectional, anonymous Web survey administered using a one-time "post then pre" design. Participants responded to questions about risk, roles, willingness to provide care, preparedness, and the contributions of media, training, or time to opinion change using a Likert agree-disagree scale. The authors conducted t test comparisons of Likert responses to pretraining and post-training attitudes about Ebola preparedness. The authors conducted multinomial logistic regression analyses of index scores of change and positivity of responses, controlling for the effects of independent variables. ED staff's opinions supported training; 73 percent felt all workers should receive Ebola education, 60 percent agreed all hospitals should prepare for Ebola, 66 percent felt UNC was better prepared, and 66 percent felt it had done enough to be ready for an Ebola case. Most staff (79 percent) said they had gotten more training for Ebola than for other disease outbreaks; 58 percent had experienced prior epidemics. After training, workers' attitudes were more positive about Ebola preparation including perceived risk of transmission, readiness and ability to manage a patient case, understanding team roles, and trust in both personal protective equipment and the hospital system's preparations (13 measures, p training period (Mean Difference [MD] = 17.45, SD = 9.89) and in the intended positive direction (MD = 15.80, SD = 0.91, p training (p = 0.003). Despite different occupations, mean scores were similar. Staff rated training most important and media least important

  6. AECB emergency response plan - in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The AECB's mission is to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment. The mission applies before, during and after emergencies

  7. CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: "How to make research succeed in your emergency department: How to develop and train career researchers in emergency medicine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jeffrey J; Snider, Carolyn E; Artz, Jennifer D; Stiell, Ian G; Shaeri, Sedigheh; McLeod, Shelley; Le Sage, Natalie; Hohl, Corinne; Calder, Lisa A; Vaillancourt, Christian; Holroyd, Brian; Hollander, Judd E; Morrison, Laurie J

    2015-05-01

    We sought to 1) identify best practices for training and mentoring clinician researchers, 2) characterize facilitators and barriers for Canadian emergency medicine researchers, and 3) develop pragmatic recommendations to improve and standardize emergency medicine postgraduate research training programs to build research capacity. We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE and Embase using search terms relevant to emergency medicine research fellowship/graduate training. We conducted an email survey of all Canadian emergency physician researchers. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) research fellowship program was analysed, and other similar international programs were sought. An expert panel reviewed these data and presented recommendations at the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) 2014 Academic Symposium. We refined our recommendations based on feedback received. Of 1,246 potentially relevant citations, we included 10 articles. We identified five key themes: 1) creating training opportunities; 2) ensuring adequate protected time; 3) salary support; 4) infrastructure; and 5) mentorship. Our survey achieved a 72% (67/93) response rate. From these responses, 42 (63%) consider themselves clinical researchers (i.e., spend a significant proportion of their career conducting research). The single largest constraint to conducting research was funding. Factors felt to be positive contributors to a clinical research career included salary support, research training (including an advanced graduate degree), mentorship, and infrastructure. The SAEM research fellowship was the only emergency medicine research fellowship program identified. This 2-year program requires approval of both the teaching centre and each applying fellow. This program requires training in 15 core competencies, manuscript preparation, and submission of a large grant to a national peer-review funding organization. We recommend that the CAEP Academic Section create a

  8. More efficient response to nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    Three documents related to the first volume of this report are presented here. These are a description of the emergency provisions organisation, an analysis of the weaknesses in the present organisation and proposed improvements (with appendices on the information problem in excercises with the emergency provisions at Ringhals and attitudes to tasks connected with evacuation following a power reactor accident) and agreements with Denmark, Finland, Norway and the IAEA for mutual assistance. (JIW)

  9. Addressing the gap between public health emergency planning and incident response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Ariela M; Mindlin, Michele; Morley, Christopher; Griffin, Meghan; Wooten, Wilma; Miner, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Since 9/11, Incident Command System (ICS) and Emergency Operations Center (EOC) are relatively new concepts to public health, which typically operates using less hierarchical and more collaborative approaches to organizing staff. This paper describes the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak in San Diego County to explore the use of ICS and EOC in public health emergency response. Methods: This study was conducted using critical case study methodology consisting of document review and 18 key-informant interviews with individuals who played key roles in planning and response. Thematic analysis was used to analyze data. Results: Several broad elements emerged as key to ensuring effective and efficient public health response: 1) developing a plan for emergency response; 2) establishing the framework for an ICS; 3) creating the infrastructure to support response; 4) supporting a workforce trained on emergency response roles, responsibilities, and equipment; and 5) conducting regular preparedness exercises. Conclusions: This research demonstrates the value of investments made and that effective emergency preparedness requires sustained efforts to maintain personnel and material resources. By having the infrastructure and experience based on ICS and EOC, the public health system had the capability to surge-up: to expand its day-to-day operation in a systematic and prolonged manner. None of these critical actions are possible without sustained funding for the public health infrastructure. Ultimately, this case study illustrates the importance of public health as a key leader in emergency response. PMID:28228983

  10. A Simulation Learning Approach to Training First Responders for Radiological Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, Robert Lon; Rhodes, Graham S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the application of simulation learning technology, popularized by the emerging serious games industry, for training first responders to properly act in the event of a radiological emergency. Using state-of-the-art video game production tools and runtime engines as an enabling technology, simulation learning combines interactive virtual worlds based on validated engineering models with engaging storylines and scenarios that invoke the emotional response-and the corresponding human stress level-that first responders would encounter during a real-world emergency. For the application discussed here, in addition to providing engaging instruction about the fundamentals of radiological environments and the proper usage of radiological equipment, simulation learning prepares first responders to perform effectively under high stress and enables them to practice in teams

  11. The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the eThekwini district of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. PR Newton, R Naidoo, P Brysiewicz. Abstract. Introduction. Emergency medical services (EMS) are sometimes required to respond to cases that are later found not to be emergencies, resulting in high ...

  12. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All water services systems, irrespective of size, location etc., should have emergency response plans (ERPs) to guide officials, stakeholders and consumers through emergencies, as part of managing risks in the water supply system. Emergencies in the water supply system may result from, among other causes, natural ...

  13. Pilot program: NRC severe reactor accident incident response training manual: US Nuclear Regulatory Commission response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakenas, C.A.; McKenna, T.J.; Perkins, K.; Miller, C.W.; Hively, L.M.; Sharpe, R.W.; Giitter, J.G.; Watkins, R.M.

    1987-02-01

    This pilot training manual has been written to fill the need for a general text on NRC response to reactor accidents. The manual is intended to be the foundation for a course for all NRC response personnel. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Response is the fifth in a series of volumes that collectively summarize the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) emergency response during severe power reactor accidents and provide necessary background information. This volume describes NRC response modes, organizations, and official positions; roles of other federal agencies are also described briefly. Each volume serves, respectively, as the text for a course of instruction in a series of courses for NRC response personnel. These materials do not provide guidance or license requirements for NRC licensees. Each volume is accompanied by an appendix of slides that can be used to present this material. The slides are called out in the text

  14. [Simulation as possible training for palliative emergencies: prospective initial data analysis of participants from two simulation training sessions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, C H R; Bosse, G; Schröder, T; Lassen, C L; Bundscherer, A C; Graf, B M; Zausig, Y A

    2015-01-01

    Palliative emergencies describe an acute situation in patients with a life-limiting illness. At present defined curricula for prehospital emergency physician training for palliative emergencies are limited. Simulation-based training (SBT) for such palliative emergency situations is an exception both nationally and internationally. This article presents the preparation of recommendations in the training and development of palliative care emergency situations. A selected literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, Medline and the Cochrane database (1990-2013). Reference lists of included articles were checked by two reviewers. Data of the included articles were extracted, evaluated und summarized. In the second phase the participants of two simulated scenarios of palliative emergencies were asked to complete an anonymous 15-item questionnaire. The results of the literature search and the questionnaire-based investigation were compared and recommendations were formulated based on the results. Altogether 30 eligible national and international articles were included. Overall, training curricula in palliative emergencies are currently being developed nationally and internationally but are not yet widely integrated into emergency medical training and education. In the second part of the investigation, 25 participants (9 male, 16 female, 20 physicians and 5 nurses) were included in 4 multiprofessional emergency medical simulation training sessions. The most important interests of the participants were the problems for training and further education concerning palliative emergencies described in the national and international literature. The literature review and the expectations of the participants underlined that the development and characteristics of palliative emergencies will become increasingly more important in outpatient emergency medicine. All participants considered palliative care to be very important concerning the competency for end-of-life decisions

  15. Study on IAEA international emergency response exercise convEx-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2007-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) carried out a large-scale international emergency response exercise in 2005 under the designated name of ConvEx-3(2005), at Romania. This review report summarizes a study about ConvEx-3(2005) based on several related open literature. The ConvEx-3 was conducted in accordance with Agency's safety standard series and requirements in the field of Emergency Preparedness and Response. The study on the preparation, conduct and evaluation of ConvEx-3(2005) exercise is expected to provide very useful knowledge for development of drills and educational programs conducted by Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT). Especially, study on the exercise evaluations is instrumental in improving evaluations of drills planned by the national government and local governments. As international cooperation among Asian countries in the field of nuclear emergency preparedness and response is going to realize, it is very useful to survey and consider scheme and methodology about international emergency preparedness, response and exercise referring the knowledge of this ConvEx-3 study. The lessons learned from this study of ConvEx-3(2005) are summarized in four chapters; methodology of exercises and educational programs, exercise evaluation process, amendments/verification of the emergency response plan of NEAT, and technical issues of systems for emergency response and assistance of NEAT relevant to interface for international emergency communication. (author)

  16. Functional criteria for emergency response facilities. Technical report (final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This report describes the facilities and systems to be used by nuclear power plant licensees to improve responses to emergency situations. The facilities include the Technical Support Center (TSC), Onsite Operational Support Center (OSC), and Nearsite Emergency Operations Facility (EOF), as well as a brief discussion of the emergency response function of the control room. The data systems described are the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) and Nuclear Data Link (NDL). Together, these facilities and systems make up the total Emergency Response Facilities (ERFs). Licensees should follow the guidance provided both in this report and in NUREG-0654 (FEMA-REP-1), Revision 1, for design and implementation of the ERFs

  17. Indian Point Nuclear Power Station: verification analysis of County Radiological Emergency-Response Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, J.; Whitfield, R.

    1983-05-01

    This report was developed as a management tool for use by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region II staff. The analysis summarized in this report was undertaken to verify the extent to which procedures, training programs, and resources set forth in the County Radiological Emergency Response Plans (CRERPs) for Orange, Putnam, and Westchester counties in New York had been realized prior to the March 9, 1983, exercise of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Station near Buchanan, New York. To this end, a telephone survey of county emergency response organizations was conducted between January 19 and February 22, 1983. This report presents the results of responses obtained from this survey of county emergency response organizations

  18. Occupational Safety and Health System for Workers Engaged in Emergency Response Operations in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Hiroyuki; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Mori, Koji

    2016-12-03

    To study the occupational safety and health systems used for emergency response workers in the USA, we performed interviews with related federal agencies and conducted research on related studies. We visited the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in the USA and performed interviews with their managers on the agencies' roles in the national emergency response system. We also obtained information prepared for our visit from the USA's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). In addition, we conducted research on related studies and information on the website of the agencies. We found that the USA had an established emergency response system based on their National Incident Management System (NIMS). This enabled several organizations to respond to emergencies cooperatively using a National Response Framework (NRF) that clarifies the roles and cooperative functions of each federal agency. The core system in NIMS was the Incident Command System (ICS), within which a Safety Officer was positioned as one of the command staff supporting the commander. All ICS staff were required to complete a training program specific to their position; in addition, the Safety Officer was required to have experience. The All-Hazards model was commonly used in the emergency response system. We found that FEMA coordinated support functions, and OSHA and NIOSH, which had specific functions to protect workers, worked cooperatively under NRF. These agencies employed certified industrial hygienists that play a professional role in safety and health. NIOSH recently executed support activities during disasters and other emergencies. The USA's emergency response system is characterized by functions that protect the lives and health of emergency response workers. Trained and experienced human resources support system effectiveness. The findings provided valuable information that could be used to improve the

  19. Evaluating the effect of emergency residency training on productivity in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Daniel J; McGillicuddy, Daniel C; Sanchez, Leon D

    2013-09-01

    Resident productivity, defined as patients seen per unit time, is one measure that is used to assess the performance and educational progress of residents in the emergency department (ED). One published study suggested that emergency residency training (EM) does not improve productivity compared with that in other specialties, including internal medicine (IM). This study assesses how EM and IM trainees perform in the ED and illustrates how resident productivity changes through the academic year. A retrospective review of attending physicians and residents working 8-h shifts in the higher acuity zone of a large-volume, tertiary, academic health care center was performed for July 2009, October 2009, January 2010, and April 2010. The total number of patients seen primarily and admitted during each shift was recorded. ED volume was approximated by the number of patients seen by the attending physician, and acuity was approximated by admission rate. A mixed model regression assessed the impact of year and type of residency training (e.g., EM1, EM2, IM1, and IM2), ED volume, and acuity on resident productivity (number of patients per shift). The study was granted waiver of informed consent by our institutional review board. We reviewed 936 shifts. After adjusting for acuity and ED volume, the EM1 group had a significant increase in patients per shift over the year, from 6.11 in July to 10.3 in April (p increased productivity significantly. The first EM training year leads to a significant change in productivity that separates EM from IM residents. This contradicts the previous assertion that non-EM residents have the same productivity as EM residents in the ED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Scaling-up Support for Emergency Response Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomes, A.H.J.; Neef, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the design of an information system that supports the process of scaling-up of emergency response organizations. This process is vital for effective emergency response but tends to go awry in practice. Our proposed system consists of multiple distributed agents that are capable of

  1. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies (2012 update)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  2. Ebola Virus Disease: Ethics and Emergency Medical Response Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jecker, Nancy S; Dudzinski, Denise M; Diekema, Douglas S; Tonelli, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Caring for patients affected with Ebola virus disease (EVD) while simultaneously preventing EVD transmission represents a central ethical challenge of the EVD epidemic. To address this challenge, we propose a model policy for resuscitation and emergent procedure policy of patients with EVD and set forth ethical principles that lend support to this policy. The policy and principles we propose bear relevance beyond the EVD epidemic, offering guidance for the care of patients with other highly contagious, virulent, and lethal diseases. The policy establishes (1) a limited code status for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD. Limited code status means that a code blue will not be called for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD at any stage of the disease; however, properly protected providers (those already in full protective equipment) may initiate resuscitative efforts if, in their clinical assessment, these efforts are likely to benefit the patient. The policy also requires that (2) resuscitation not be attempted for patients with advanced EVD, as resuscitation would be medically futile; (3) providers caring for or having contact with patients with confirmed or suspected EVD be properly protected and trained; (4) the treating team identify and treat in advance likely causes of cardiac and respiratory arrest to minimize the need for emergency response; (5) patients with EVD and their proxies be involved in care discussions; and (6) care team and provider discretion guide the care of patients with EVD. We discuss ethical issues involving medical futility and the duty to avoid harm and propose a utilitarian-based principle of triage to address resource scarcity in the emergency setting.

  3. Managing emergencies in primary care: does real-world simulation-based training have any lasting impact?

    OpenAIRE

    Forde, Emer; Bromilow, J.; Jackson, S.; Wedderburn, Clare

    2017-01-01

    General Practitioners (GPs) have a responsibility to provide prompt and effective care when attending to life threatening emergencies in their GP surgeries. Primary care staff undertake mandatory, annual basic life support training. However, most emergencies are peri-arrest situations, and this is an area where GPs lack confidence and competence [1, 2]. The importance of effective, early intervention in peri-arrest scenarios was highlighted by the NCEPOD report “Time to Intervene (2012)” [3]....

  4. Development of effective emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    It has been discussed that there were many differences to international standards and the delay for prior planning implementation of unclear emergency preparedness. Therefore, it was necessary to promote the study to take the concept of the international standard to the Guide 'Emergency Preparedness for Nuclear Facilities', and to apply the Precautionary Action Zone (PAZ) etc. as the protective actions procedure. This study was started since the fiscal year 2010 to enhance the effectiveness of the protective actions, which are corresponding to these requirements based on international aspects in the nuclear disaster occurrence. And the study was conducted to introduce the emergency action level (EAL) as decision criteria and to apply urgent protective action considering PAZ, and the results from this study will be used as the basic data necessary to modify and improve the Guide. In order to fulfill the purposes described above, in fiscal year 2011, followings are executed, (1) analysis and verification for basic evacuation area such as the PAZ, (2) analysis with regard to the EAL and prototype of protective actions for public, and (3) analysis with regard to prototype of protective actions for public including evacuation plan. However, taking account of the significance of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, Japanese emergency preparedness strategy should be studied and reconstructed in logically, systematically, and with international standard, but also being based on the reflection of individual lessons from this accident. (author)

  5. An ergonomics study of computerized emergency operating procedures: Presentation style, task complexity, and training level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Song; Song Fei; Li Zhizhong; Zhao Qianyi; Luo Wei; He Xuhong; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2008-01-01

    Emergency operating procedures (EOPs) are widely used in nuclear power plants (NPPs). With the development of information technology, computerized EOPs are taking the place of paper-based ones. Unlike paper-based EOPs, the industrial practice of computerized EOPs is still quite limited. Ergonomics issues of computerized EOPs have not been studied adequately. This study focuses on the effects of EOP presentation style, task complexity, and training level on the performance of the operators in the execution of computerized EOPs. One simulated computerized EOP system was developed to present two EOPs, each with different task complexity levels, by two presentation styles (Style A: one- and two-dimensional flowcharts combination; Style B: two-dimensional flowchart and success logic tree combination). Forty subjects participated in the experiment of EOP execution using the simulated system. Statistical analysis of the experimental results indicates that: (1) complexity, presentation style, and training level all can significantly influence the error rate. High-complexity tasks and lack of sufficient training may lead to a higher error rate. Style B caused a significantly higher error rate than style A did in the skilled phase. So the designers of computerized procedures should take the presentation styles of EOPs into account. (2) Task complexity and training level can significantly influence operation time. No significant difference was found in operation time between the two presentation styles. (3) Training level can also significantly influence the subjective workload of EOPs operations. This implies that adequate training is very important for the performance of computerized EOPs even if emergency responses with computerized EOPs are much more simple and easy than that with paper-based EOPs

  6. An ergonomics study of computerized emergency operating procedures: Presentation style, task complexity, and training level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Song; Song Fei [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Zhizhong [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: zzli@tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhao Qianyi; Luo Wei [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He Xuhong [Scanpower Risk Management China Inc., Towercrest International Plaza, No. 3 Maizidian West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100016 (China); Salvendy, Gavriel [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-10-15

    Emergency operating procedures (EOPs) are widely used in nuclear power plants (NPPs). With the development of information technology, computerized EOPs are taking the place of paper-based ones. Unlike paper-based EOPs, the industrial practice of computerized EOPs is still quite limited. Ergonomics issues of computerized EOPs have not been studied adequately. This study focuses on the effects of EOP presentation style, task complexity, and training level on the performance of the operators in the execution of computerized EOPs. One simulated computerized EOP system was developed to present two EOPs, each with different task complexity levels, by two presentation styles (Style A: one- and two-dimensional flowcharts combination; Style B: two-dimensional flowchart and success logic tree combination). Forty subjects participated in the experiment of EOP execution using the simulated system. Statistical analysis of the experimental results indicates that: (1) complexity, presentation style, and training level all can significantly influence the error rate. High-complexity tasks and lack of sufficient training may lead to a higher error rate. Style B caused a significantly higher error rate than style A did in the skilled phase. So the designers of computerized procedures should take the presentation styles of EOPs into account. (2) Task complexity and training level can significantly influence operation time. No significant difference was found in operation time between the two presentation styles. (3) Training level can also significantly influence the subjective workload of EOPs operations. This implies that adequate training is very important for the performance of computerized EOPs even if emergency responses with computerized EOPs are much more simple and easy than that with paper-based EOPs.

  7. Value Chain Responsibility in Emerging Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Colette; van Lente, Harro

    2014-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) and value chain responsibility (VCR) have gained increasing importance for firms. The literature on these topics reports on CSR practices for established firms with existing technologies and stable value chains. This raises questions about the viability of CSR

  8. Generic procedures for assessment and response during a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. Radiological accident assessment must take account of all critical information available at any time and must be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at reviewing the response as more detailed and complete information becomes available. This manual provides the tools, generic procedures and data needed for an initial response to a non-reactor radiological accident. This manual is one out of a set of IAEA publications on emergency preparedness and response, including Method for the Development of Emergency Response Preparedness for Nuclear or Radiological Accidents (IAEA-TECDOC-953), Generic Assessment Procedures for Determining Protective Actions During a Reactor Accident (IAEA-TECDOC-955) and Intervention Criteria in a Nuclear or Radiation Emergency (Safety Series No. 109)

  9. Emergency response and radiation monitoring systems in Russian regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, R.; Osipiyants, I.; Kiselev, V.; Ogar, K; Gavrilov, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Preparedness of the emergency response system to elimination of radiation incidents and accidents is one of the most important elements of ensuring safe operation of nuclear power facilities. Routine activities on prevention of emergency situations along with adequate, efficient and opportune response actions are the key factors reducing the risks of adverse effects on population and environment. Both high engineering level and multiformity of the nuclear branch facilities make special demands on establishment of response system activities to eventual emergency situations. First and foremost, while resolving sophisticated engineering and scientific problems emerging during the emergency response process, one needs a powerful scientific and technical support system.The emergency response system established in the past decade in Russian nuclear branch provides a high efficiency of response activities due to the use of scientific and engineering potential and experience of the involved institutions. In Russia the responsibility for population protection is imposed on regional authority. So regional emergence response system should include up-to-date tools of radiation monitoring and infrastructure. That's why new activities on development of radiation monitoring and emergency response system were started in the regions of Russia. The main directions of these activities are: 1) Modernization of the existing and setting-up new facility and territorial automatic radiation monitoring systems, including mobile radiation surveillance kits; 2) Establishment of the Regional Crisis Centres and Crisis Centres of nuclear and radiation hazardous facilities; 3) Setting up communication systems for transfer, acquisition, processing, storage and presentation of data for participants of emergency response at the facility, regional and federal levels; 4) Development of software and hardware systems for expert support of decision-making on protection of personnel, population

  10. A national survey of terrorism preparedness training among pediatric, family practice, and emergency medicine programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shelly D; Bush, Anneke C; Lynch, Julia A

    2006-09-01

    Domestic terrorism is a real threat focusing on a need to engage in effective emergency preparedness planning and training. Front-line physicians are an important component of any emergency preparedness plan. Potential victims of an attack include children who have unique physiologic and psychological vulnerabilities in disasters. Front-line providers need to have adequate training to effectively participate in local planning initiatives and to recognize and treat casualties including children. The goal of the survey was to assess the current state of terrorism preparedness training, including child victims, by emergency medicine, family practice, and pediatric residency programs in the United States and to assess methods of training and barriers to establishing effective training. A survey was e-mailed to a comprehensive list of all US pediatric, family practice, and emergency medicine residency programs 3 times between September 2003 and January 2004. The survey measured the perceived risk of terrorist attack, level of training by type of attack, level of training regarding children, method of training, and barriers to training. Overall, 21% of programs responded (46 of 182 pediatric, 75 of 400 family practice, and 29 of 125 emergency medicine programs). Across all of the event types, emergency medicine programs were more likely to report adequate/comprehensive training. However, terrorism preparedness funding, these data suggest that we are failing to provide adequate training to front-line providers who may care for children in a catastrophic domestic terrorist event.

  11. Science in Emergency Response at CDC: Structure and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, John; Rose, Dale A; Ghiya, Neelam D

    2017-09-01

    Recent high-profile activations of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) include responses to the West African Ebola and Zika virus epidemics. Within the EOC, emergency responses are organized according to the Incident Management System, which provides a standardized structure and chain of command, regardless of whether the EOC activation occurs in response to an outbreak, natural disaster, or other type of public health emergency. By embedding key scientific roles, such as the associate director for science, and functions within a Scientific Response Section, the current CDC emergency response structure ensures that both urgent and important science issues receive needed attention. Key functions during emergency responses include internal coordination of scientific work, data management, information dissemination, and scientific publication. We describe a case example involving the ongoing Zika virus response that demonstrates how the scientific response structure can be used to rapidly produce high-quality science needed to answer urgent public health questions and guide policy. Within the context of emergency response, longer-term priorities at CDC include both streamlining administrative requirements and funding mechanisms for scientific research.

  12. Emergency response facilities including primary and secondary prevention strategies across 79 professional football clubs in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Aneil; Dhutia, Harshil; Gati, Sabiha; Yeo, Tee-Joo; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Keteepe-Arachi, Tracey; Richards, Thomas; Walker, Mike; Birt, Robin; Stuckey, David; Robinson, Laurence; Tome, Maite; Beasley, Ian; Papadakis, Michael; Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-06-14

    To assess the emergency response planning and prevention strategies for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) across a wide range of professional football clubs in England. A written survey was sent to all professional clubs in the English football league, namely the Premiership, Championship, League 1 and League 2. Outcomes included: (1) number of clubs performing cardiac screening and frequency of screening; (2) emergency planning and documentation; (3) automated external defibrillator (AED) training and availability; and (4) provision of emergency services at sporting venues. 79 clubs (86%) responded to the survey. 100% clubs participated in cardiac screening. All clubs had AEDs available on match days and during training sessions. 100% Premiership clubs provided AED training to designated staff. In contrast, 30% of lower division clubs with AEDs available did not provide formal training. Most clubs (n=66; 83%) reported the existence of an emergency action plan for SCA but formal documentation was variable. All clubs in the Premiership and League 1 provided an ambulance equipped for medical emergencies on match days compared with 75% of clubs in the Championship and 66% in League 2. The majority of football clubs in England have satisfactory prevention strategies and emergency response planning in line with European recommendations. Additional improvements such as increasing awareness of European guidelines for emergency planning, AED training and mentorship with financial support to lower division clubs are necessary to further enhance cardiovascular safety of athletes and spectators and close the gap between the highest and lower divisions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  14. Updating Dosimetry for Emergency Response Dose Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCair, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an update to the 1992 Protective Action Guides (PAG) Manual. The PAG Manual provides guidance to state and local officials planning for radiological emergencies. EPA requested public comment on the proposed revisions, while making them available for interim use by officials faced with an emergency situation. Developed with interagency partners, EPA's proposal incorporates newer dosimetric methods, identifies tools and guidelines developed since the current document was issued, and extends the scope of the PAGs to all significant radiological incidents, including radiological dispersal devices or improvised nuclear devices. In order to best serve the emergency management community, scientific policy direction had to be set on how to use International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60 age groups in dose assessment when implementing emergency guidelines. Certain guidelines that lend themselves to different PAGs for different subpopulations are the PAGs for potassium iodide (KI), food, and water. These guidelines provide age-specific recommendations because of the radiosensitivity of the thyroid and young children with respect to ingestion and inhalation doses in particular. Taking protective actions like using KI, avoiding certain foods or using alternative sources of drinking water can be relatively simple to implement by the parents of young children. Clear public messages can convey which age groups should take which action, unlike how an evacuation or relocation order should apply to entire households or neighborhoods. New in the PAG Manual is planning guidance for the late phase of an incident, after the situation is stabilized and efforts turn toward recovery. Because the late phase can take years to complete, decision makers are faced with managing public exposures in areas not fully remediated. The proposal includes quick-reference operational guidelines to inform re-entry to

  15. More efficient response to nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    A working group was appointed in 1978 to consider the problems which would face the local authorities in the unlikely event of a reactor accident considerably more severe than that foreseen as the basis of the emergency provisions as defined in the parliamentary bill of 1960. The group's report is here presented, together with appendices containing population and meteorological data. This report has been used by the Radiation protection Institute in its evaluations, which are presented in vol. 2 of this report. The views expressed in this report are those of the working group. (JIW)

  16. Emergency Preparedness and Response. Working to Protect People, Society and the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The IEC develops safety standards and guidelines relating to preparedness for, and response to, nuclear or radiological incidents and emergencies, independently of the cause, and technical documents and training materials for the application of those standards. The IEC also provides training and services to assist Member States in strengthening and maintaining their regional, national, local and on-site response capabilities. An extra resource to the IAEA's response system is foreseen through the Response and Assistance Network (RANET), which represents a network of registered national capabilities in different EPR areas. Its objectives are the provision of requested international assistance, the harmonization of emergency assistance capabilities and the relevant exchange of information and feedback of experience. Important components of the global emergency response system are the notification and reporting arrangements and secure and reliable communication systems operated around the clock by the IEC. States and international organizations report events and submit requests for assistance to the IAEA through the Unified System for Information Exchange on Incidents and Emergencies (USIE) web site, by phone or by fax. Member States (and a few non-Member States) have nominated competent authorities and National Warning Points who are able to receive, convey and quickly provide authoritative information on incidents and emergencies

  17. The development of nuclear power and emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear power is a safe, clean energy, which has been evidenced by the history of nuclear power development. Nuclear power is associated with very low risk but not equal to zero. Accident emergency response and preparedness is a final barrier necessary to reduce potential risks that may arise from nuclear power plants, which must be enhanced. In the course of accident emergency response and preparedness, it is highly necessary to draw domestic and foreign experiences and lessons. Lastly, the paper presents the discussions of some issues which merit attention with respect to emergency response and preparedness in China. (authors)

  18. An advanced system for environmental emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, James S.; Sullivan, Thomas J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability, better known as ARAC, is a hybrid system of models, computers, databases, communications and highly skilled staff dedicated to emergency consequence analysis and prediction of atmospheric hazardous material releases. The ARAC system is located at and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (in Livermore, California, USA). It's development and operational support for the U.S. government have been funded by the U.S. Departments of Energy and Defense for the purpose of providing real-time, down-wind consequence assessments for emergency responders and managers for radiological and other hazardous releases. This service is available for both fixed facilities and any location in the world whenever and wherever the U.S. government has interest or concern. Over the past 26 years ARAC has provided consequence assessments for more than 160 potential and actual hazardous releases. This capability has been applied to diverse real-world releases such as the 1978 reentry of the COSMOS 954 nuclear powered satellite over Canada, the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear powerplant accidents, the Tomsk nuclear facility accident in Russia, two radiological accidents at Tokai (Japan) the Algeciras (Spain) melt of a radiotherapy source, and several non-radiological events such as chemical releases, toxic fires including the Kuwait oil fires, and even volcanic ash emissions. (author)

  19. Emergency Response and the International Charter Space and Major Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.; Lamb, R.

    2011-12-01

    thus is helping to mitigate the effects of disasters on human life and property. The International Charter has been in formal operation since November 1, 2000. An Authorized User can call a single number to request the mobilization of satellite imagery and associated ground station support of the Charter's member agencies to obtain data and information on a disaster occurrence. The International Charter is supported by Argentinean, Canadian, European, Indian, Japanese, Chinese, Brazilian, Korean, Russian and U.S. satellite operators, as well as through U.S. and foreign commercial satellite firms and consortia. These operators can provide a wide variety of imagery and information under various environmental conditions (including, in some instances, through cloud cover and darkness). The Charter works in close cooperation with the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO), and with United Nations bodies such as the UN Office of Outer Space Affairs (UN OOSA) and the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) Operational Satellite Applications Programe (UNOSAT). Both UN OOSA and UNOSAT are authorized to request data from Charter members in response to a UN emergency. Sentinel Asia is also allowed to request activations on behalf of its member states. These organizations play an important role in maximizing the Charter's use.

  20. The role of musical training in emergent and event-based timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence eBaer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Musical performance is thought to rely predominantly on event-based timing involving a clock-like neural process and an explicit internal representation of the time interval. Some aspects of musical performance may rely on emergent timing, which is established through the optimization of movement kinematics, and can be maintained without reference to any explicit representation of the time interval. We predicted that musical training would have its largest effect on event-based timing, supporting the dissociability of these timing processes and the dominance of event-based timing in musical performance. We compared 22 musicians and 17 non-musicians on the prototypical event-based timing task of finger tapping and on the typically emergently timed task of circle drawing. For each task, participants first responded in synchrony with a metronome (Paced and then responded at the same rate without the metronome (Unpaced. Analyses of the Unpaced phase revealed that non-musicians were more variable in their inter-response intervals for finger tapping compared to circle drawing. Musicians did not differ between the two tasks. Between groups, non-musicians were more variable than musicians for tapping but not for drawing. We were able to show that the differences were due to less timer variability in musicians on the tapping task. Correlational analyses of movement jerk and inter-response interval variability revealed a negative association for tapping and a positive association for drawing in non-musicians only. These results suggest that musical training affects temporal variability in tapping but not drawing. Additionally, musicians and non-musicians may be employing different movement strategies to maintain accurate timing in the two tasks. These findings add to our understanding of how musical training affects timing and support the dissociability of event-based and emergent timing modes.

  1. Sibling rivalry: training effects, emergence of dominance and incomplete control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaiem, Sarah; Hofer, Heribert; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Brunner, Edgar; East, Marion L

    2012-09-22

    Within-brood or -litter dominance provides fitness-related benefits if dominant siblings selfishly skew access to food provided by parents in their favour. Models of facultative siblicide assume that dominants exert complete control over their subordinate sibling's access to food and that control is maintained, irrespective of the subordinate's hunger level. By contrast, a recent functional hypothesis suggests that subordinates should contest access to food when the cost of not doing so is high. Here, we show that within spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) twin litters, dominants most effectively skew access to maternal milk in their favour when their aggression prompts a highly submissive response. When hungry, subordinates were less submissive in response to aggression, thereby decreasing lost suckling time and increasing suckling time lost by dominants. In a species where adult females socially dominate adult males, juvenile females were more often dominant than males in mixed-sex litters, and subordinate sisters used more effective counter-tactics against dominant brothers than subordinate brothers against dominant sisters. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence in a mammal that dominant offspring in twin litters do not exert complete control over their sibling's access to resources (milk), and that sibling dominance relationships are influenced by sibling sex and training effects.

  2. Exploring mHealth Participation for Emergency Response Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Schwartz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the challenges of participation by members of emergency response communities who share a similar condition and treatment, and are called upon to participate in emergency events experienced by fellow members. Smartphones and location-based social networking technologies present an opportunity to re-engineer certain aspects of emergency medical response. Life-saving prescription medication extended in an emergency by one individual to another occurs on a micro level, anecdotally documented. We illustrate the issues and our approach through the example of an app to support patients prone to anaphylaxis and prescribed to carry epinephrine auto-injectors. We address unique participation challenges in an mHealth environment in which interventions are primarily short-term interactions which require clear and precise decision-making and constant tracking of potential participants in responding to an emergency medical event. The conflicting effects of diffused responsibility and shared identity are identified as key factors in modeling participation.

  3. First response to transportation emergencies involving radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This FEMA/DOE/DOT videocourse describes the basis for procedures to be used by emergency first responders for transportation accidents which involve radioactive materials. Various commercial and government sector radioactive materials shipment programs will be described and will include information about hazards and the elements of safety, proper first response actions, notification procedures, and state or federal assistance during emergencies. Primary audience: fire service and emergency management personnel

  4. Emergency response planning for transport accidents involving radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The document presents a basic discussion of the various aspects and philosophies of emergency planning and preparedness along with a consideration of the problems which might be encountered in a transportation accident involving a release of radioactive materials. Readers who are responsible for preparing emergency plans and procedures will have to decide on how best to apply this guidance to their own organizational structures and will also have to decide on an emergency planning and preparedness philosophy suitable to their own situations

  5. 77 FR 23161 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... Operating Procedures B. Severe Accident Management Guidelines C. Extensive Damage Mitigation Guidelines D... the EOPs. B. Severe Accident Management Guidelines During the 1990s, the nuclear industry developed Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) as a voluntary industry initiative in response to Generic...

  6. Emerging Organisational Trends in Training & Development in India

    OpenAIRE

    Khosla, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Training and Development is a continuous process for improving the caliber and competence of the employees to meet the current and future performances. Training and development is vital to any business. Training presents a prime opportunity to expand the knowledge base of all employees, but many employers find the development opportunities expensive. A structured training and development program ensures that employees have a consistent experience and background knowledge. All employees need ...

  7. 45 CFR 673.5 - Emergency response plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ensure that: (a) The vessel owner's or operator's shipboard oil pollution emergency plan, prepared and... Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto (MARPOL 73/78), has provisions for prompt and effective response action to such emergencies as might arise in the performance of...

  8. Report of the emergency preparedness and response task force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynes, R.R.; Purcell, A.H.; Wenger, D.E.; Stern, P.S.; Stallings, R.A.; Johnson, Q.T.

    1979-10-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) marked the first time in the US when traditional planning for emergencies was applied to a possible radiological emergency. This report examines the planning that existed in the counties surrounding the plant and at the state and federal levels. It also examines the responses of the various governmental units following the initial accident

  9. Report of the Emergency Preparedness and Response Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynes, R.R.; Purcell, A.H.; Wenger, D.E.; Stern, P.S.; Stallings, R.A.; Johnson, Q.T.

    1979-10-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) marked the first time in the US when traditional planning for emergencies was applied to a possible radiological emergency. This report examines the planning that existed in the counties surrounding the plant and at the state and federal levels. It also examines the responses of the various governmental units following the initial accident

  10. Caire - A real-time feedback system for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Brenk, H.D.; de Witt, H.

    1991-01-01

    In cases of nuclear emergencies it is the primary task of emergency response forces and decision making authorities to act properly. Whatever the specific reason for the contingency may be, a quick and most accurate estimate of the radiation exposure in consequence of the emergency must be made. This is a necessary prerequisite for decisions on protective measures and off-site emergency management. With respect to this fact ant the recent experience of the Chernobyl accident, remote monitoring systems have increased their importance as an inherent part of environmental surveillance installations in the FRG and in other countries. The existing systems in Germany are designed to cover both, routine operation and emergency situations. They provide site specific meteorological data, gross effluent dose rates, and dose rate measurements at on-site and approximately 30 off-site locations in the vicinity of a plant. Based on such telemetric surveillance networks an advanced automatic on-line system named CAIRE (Computer Aided Response to Emergencies) has been developed as a real time emergency response tool for nuclear facilities. this tool is designed to provide decision makers with most relevant radiation exposure data of the population at risk. The development phase of CAIRE has already been finished. CAIRE is now in an operational status and available for applications in emergency planning and response

  11. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2016-10-04

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head James Colson. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only addresses emergency response.

  12. General RMP Guidance - Chapter 8: Emergency Response Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have a Program 2 or 3 process at your facility, 40 CFR Part 68 (risk management program) requires an emergency response program in place if employees respond to some releases involving regulated toxic or flammable substances.

  13. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  14. Calming the campus: training school staff and crisis teams to manage student behavior during emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kendall

    2007-01-01

    Conversations with school and crisis personnel following large scale emergencies in and around schools, such as shootings, wildfires, and the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, indicated a need for pre-incident training in managing student behavior during emergencies. This article outlines a training program of this kind and offers suggestions regarding both content and process of this training. The suggestions follow discussion of the unique context and needs of the school setting.

  15. Just-In-Time eTraining Applied To Emergency Medical Services

    OpenAIRE

    Vico Vela, Francisco José; Sánchez Canteli, Vicente; Lobo Fernández, Daniel; Fernández Rodríguez, Jose David; Bandera, César; Rivas, Ramón; Rosen, M.; Schlegel, M.

    2013-01-01

    While the applications of just-in-time training are more and more spread, the ubiquitous mobile technology has not found practical uses of this training strategy. As an original example of services for healthcare, we present in this work an application of eTraining that makes use of mobile telephones to transmit medical and on-site information content to emergency medical personnel that attend and emergency. The state-of-the-art in related technologies, overall architectu...

  16. Simulation of operators' response in emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.

    1986-09-01

    For the simulation of the accidential course of events in industrial process plants, a model is needed of operators' response to the cues presented by the system. A model is proposed, based on the simplifications which can be made when restricting attention to the operator functions having significants for a probabilistic risk analysis, and to anly skill and rule based performance, i.e., to responses in the early phase of an accident. The model is based on Brunswik's lens model, a model of the normal task repertoire, and on a taxonomy of human errors. To bring the model in perspective, a review of the state of the art of cognitive models of human behaviour is included. (author)

  17. Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, works with his life raft during emergency bailout training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, works with his life raft during emergency bailout training for crew members in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Brown will join five other astronauts for nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  18. Simulation of Operators' Response in Emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    significants for a probabilistic risk analysis, and to only skill and rule based performance, i.e., to responses in the early phase of an accident. The model is based on Brunswik's lens model, a model of the normal task repertoire, and on a taxonomy of human errors. To bring the model in perspective, a review...... of the state of the art of cognitive models of human behaviour is included....

  19. Identification of training and emergency-planning needs through job-safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltrie, J.

    1987-01-01

    Training and emergency-planning needs within the photovoltaic industry may be more accurately determined through the performance of detailed job-safety analysis. This paper outlines the four major components of such an analysis, namely operational review, hazards evaluation, personnel review and resources evaluation. It then shows how these may be developed into coherent training and planning recommendations, for both emergency and non-emergency situations.

  20. An expert system for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.

    1989-01-01

    An expert system, the Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS), is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the NRC Operations Center. The RSAS is intended to aid the reactor safety team (RST) at the operations center in monitoring and projecting core and containment status during an emergency at a licensed nuclear power plant. The RSAS system development has two major aspects. The first is the compilation and storage of knowledge required for RST assessment tasks. The knowledge structure used by RSAS is a goal tree-success tree (GTST) model. The upper level structure of the GTST model is generic in nature. This allows development of models for generic plant-specific GTST models. The second aspect of the RSAS is the development of inferencing techniques for the access, display, and manipulation of the knowledge to meet RST requirements in a real-time manner during the activation of the operations center. This objective is achieved by critical safety function and success path monitoring. This basic strategy is used to determine the current status and estimate future challenges to the status of the reactor, identify procedures and equipment required to maintain or regain the critical safety functions, identify critical equipment, determine information requirements, and display pertinent information concerning current reactor status

  1. Emergency response preparedness analysis for radioactive materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parentela, E.M.; Burli, S.S.; Sathisan, S.K.; Vodrazka, W.C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper evaluates the emergency response capabilities of first responders, specifically fire services, within the state of Nevada. It addresses issues relating to the available emergency responders such as general capabilities, jurisdictions, and response times. Graphical displays of the response units and attribute tables were created using GIS ARC/INFO. These coverages, plus the existing Census Bureau TIGER Files and highway network for the state of Nevada, were utilized to determine approximate service areas of each response unit, population density served by each response unit, population density served by each response unit and the areas that can be served by a response unit for 3, 5, 10, and 30 minutes response times. Results of the analysis enabled identification of the critical areas along the proposed highway route corridor

  2. Implementation and assessment of a training course for residents in neonatology and pediatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, D; Bellot, A; Villedieu, F; Fazilleau, L; Brouard, J; Guillois, B

    2017-05-01

    Residents must balance patient care and the ongoing acquisition of medical knowledge. With increasing clinical responsibilities and patient overload, medical training is often left aside. In 2010, we designed and implemented a training course in neonatology and pediatric emergency medicine for residents in pediatrics, in order to improve their medical education. The course was made of didactic sessions and several simulation-based seminars for each year of residency. We conducted this study to assess the impact of our program on residents' satisfaction and self-assessed clinical skills. A survey was conducted at the end of each seminar. The students were asked to complete a form on a five-point rating scale to evaluate the courses and their impact on their satisfaction and self-assessed clinical skills, following the French National Health Institute's adapted Kirkpatrick model. Sixty-four (84%) of the 76 residents who attended the courses completed the form. The mean satisfaction score for the entire course was 4.78±0.42. Over 80% of the students felt that their clinical skills had improved. Medical education is an important part of residency training. Our training course responded to the perceived needs of the students with consistently satisfactory evaluations. Before the evaluation of the impact of the course on patient care, further studies are needed to assess the acquisition of knowledge and skills through objective evaluations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Challenges in designing interactive systems for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten; Nielsen, Esben Toftdahl

    2007-01-01

    and visions as ways to bridge between fieldwork and literature studies on the one hand and the emerging computer based prototypes on the other. Our case concerns design of innovative interactive systems for support in emergency response, including patient identification and monitoring as well as construction......This paper presents research on participatory design of interactive systems for emergency response. We present the work by going through the design method with a focus on the new elements that we developed for the participatory design toolkit, in particular we emphasize the use of challenges...

  4. Requirement of trained first responders and national level preparedness for prevention and response to radiological terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    The increase in the usage of radioactive sources in various fields and the present scenario of adopting various means of terrorism indicates a possible environment for malicious usage of radioactive sources. Many nations, India inclusive, have to strengthen further it's capability to deal with Nuclear/Radiological Emergencies. The probable radiological emergency scenario in public domain involves inadvertent melting of radioactive material, transport accident involving radioactive material/sources and presence of orphan sources as reported elsewhere. Explosion of Radiological Dispersal Device (RDDs) or Improvised Nuclear Devices (IND) leading to spread of radioactive contamination in public places have been identified by IAEA as probable radiological threats. The IAEA documents put lot of emphasis, at national level, on training and educational issues related with Radiological Emergencies. The agencies and institutions dealing with radioactive sources have few personnel trained in radiation protection. Experience so far indicates that public awareness is also not adequate in the field of radiological safety which may create difficulties during emergency response in public domain. The major challenges are associated with mitigation, monitoring methodology, contaminated and overexposed casualties, decontamination and media briefing. In this paper, we have identified the educational needs for response to radiological emergency in India with major thrust on training. The paper has also enumerated the available educational and training infrastructure, the human resources, as well as the important stake holders for development of sustainable education and training programme. (author)

  5. Emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Rahmah Hidayati; Pande Made Udiyani

    2009-01-01

    All nuclear facilities in Indonesia are owned and operated by the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). The programs and activities of emergency planning and preparedness in Indonesia are based on the existing nuclear facilities, i.e. research reactors, research reactor fuel fabrication plant, radioactive waste treatment installation and radioisotopes production installation. The assessment is conducted to learn of status of emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia and to support the preparation of future Nuclear Power Plant. The assessment is conducted by comparing the emergency preparedness and response system in Indonesia to the system in other countries such as Japan and Republic of Korea, since the countries have many Nuclear Power Plants and other nuclear facilities. As a result, emergency preparedness response plan for existing nuclear facility in Indonesia has been implemented in many activities such as environmental monitoring program, facility monitoring equipment, and the continuous exercise of emergency preparedness and response. However, the implementation need law enforcement for imposing the responsibility of the coordinators in National Emergency Preparedness Plan. It also needs some additional technical support systems which refer to the system in Japan or Republic of Korea. The systems must be completed with some real time monitors which will support the emergency preparedness and response organization. The system should be built in NPP site before the first NPP will be operated. The system should be connected to an Off Site Emergency Center under coordination of BAPETEN as the regulatory body which has responsibility to control of nuclear energy in Indonesia. (Author)

  6. Method for developing arrangements for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. Updating IAEA-TECDOC-953. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: October 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    In 1997 the IAEA compiled, consolidated and organized existing information, and published the TECDOC-953 'Method for Development of Emergency Response Preparedness for Nuclear or Radiological Accidents'. Subsequently this publication was used extensively by the IAEA for training and for evaluation of emergency response programmes. In November 1999 a technical committee meeting (TCM) with representatives of over 20 States reviewed and provided feedback on IAEA-TECDOC-953. In March 2002, the IAEA's Board of Governors approved a Safety Requirements publication, 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', jointly sponsored by seven international organizations, which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. The IAEA General Conference in resolution GC(46)/RES/9 encouraged Member States to implement, if necessary, instruments for improving their own preparedness and response capabilities for nuclear and radiological incidents and accidents, including their arrangements for responding to acts involving the malicious use of nuclear or radioactive material and to threats of such acts, and has further encouraged them to implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. The obligations, responsibilities and requirements for preparedness and response for radiation emergencies are set out in the safety standards, in particular the 1996 'International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources'. Consensus information on relevant radiation protection criteria was established in 1994 and published in 'Intervention Criteria in a Nuclear or Radiation Emergency'. Several other guides and publications in the area of emergency preparedness and response had previously been issued. The present publication now being issued in the Emergency Preparedness and

  7. Emergency Response Damage Assessment using Satellite Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clandillon, Stephen; Yésou, Hervé; Schneiderhan, Tobias; de Boissezon, Hélène; de Fraipont, Paul

    2013-04-01

    During disasters rescue and relief organisations need quick access to reliable and accurate information to be better equipped to do their job. It is increasingly felt that satellites offer a unique near real time (NRT) tool to aid disaster management. A short introduction to the International Charter 'Space and Major Disasters', in operation since 2000 promoting worldwide cooperation among member space agencies, will be given as it is the foundation on which satellite-based, emergency response, damage assessment has been built. Other complementary mechanisms will also be discussed. The user access, triggering mechanism, an essential component for this user-driven service, will be highlighted with its 24/7 single access point. Then, a clear distinction will be made between data provision and geo-information delivery mechanisms to underline the user need for geo-information that is easily integrated into their working environments. Briefly, the path to assured emergency response product quality will be presented beginning with user requirements, expressed early-on, for emergency response value-adding services. Initiatives were then established, supported by national and European institutions, to develop the sector, with SERTIT and DLR being key players, providing support to decision makers in headquarters and relief teams in the field. To consistently meet the high quality levels demanded by users, rapid mapping has been transformed via workflow and quality control standardisation to improve both speed and quality. As such, SERTIT located in Alsace, France, and DLR/ZKI from Bavaria, Germany, join their knowledge in this presentation to report about recent standards as both have ISO certified their rapid mapping services based on experienced, well-trained, 24/7 on-call teams and established systems providing the first crisis analysis product in 6 hours after satellite data reception. The three main product types provided are then outlined: up-to-date pre

  8. Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Services in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Han, X.; Zhou, Y.; Yue, P.; Wang, X.; Lu, J.; Jiang, W.; Li, J.; Tang, H.; Wang, F.; Li, X.; Fan, J.

    2018-04-01

    The Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service(DIMERS) project was kicked off in 2017 in China, with the purpose to improve timely responsive service of the institutions involved in the management of natural disasters and man-made emergency situations with the timely and high-quality products derived from Space-based, Air-based and the in-situ Earth observation. The project team brought together a group of top universities and research institutions in the field of Earth observations as well as the operational institute in typical disaster services at national level. The project will bridge the scientific research and the response services of massive catastrophe in order to improve the emergency response capability of China and provide scientific and technological support for the implementation of the national emergency response strategy. In response to the call for proposal of "Earth Observation and Navigation" of 2017 National Key R&D Program of China, Professor Wu Jianjun, the deputy chairman of Faculty of Geographical Science of Beijing Normal University, submitted the Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service (DIMERS) project, jointly with the experts and scholars from Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan University, China Institute of Earthquake Forecasting of China Earthquake Administration and China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Science. After two round evaluations, the proposal was funded by Ministry of Science and Technology of China.

  9. Mobile Phone Training Platform for the Nursing Staff in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqing; Cheng, Jing; Huang, Sufang

    2018-05-09

    Continuous education is required for nursing staff, but continuous education can be complicated for nurses working shifts, such as those in the emergency department (ED). To explore the effectiveness of the ED Training Platform of Tongji Hospital for conventional continuing education of emergency nurses. The training completion rate and training outcomes were validated. This was a retrospective study of all in-service emergency nurses working at the Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology between August 2016 and August 2017. The training results of the previous year of the same group were used as controls. The platform used was an online system called JikeXuetang ( www.jkxuetang.com/ ), using the WeChat application as a carrier. The training completion rate and pass rate were compared with the control data. Among 124 nurses, the training completion rate increased from training course; 89.7% believed it as an effective tool of learning, and intended to join public courses after completion; and 63.4% nurses expressed the wish to receive push services once or twice weekly for training course. The outcome of emergency nurse training was improved using the mobile training platform. This approach was more feasible and easier for training.

  10. Evaluating nuclear power plant crew performance during emergency response drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is responsible for the regulation of the health, safety and environmental consequences of nuclear activities in Canada. Recently, the Human Factors Specialists of the AECB have become involved in the assessment of emergency preparedness and emergency response at nuclear facilities. One key contribution to existing AECB methodology is the introduction of Behaviourally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS) to measure crew interaction skills during emergency response drills. This report presents results of an on-going pilot study to determine if the BARS provide a reliable and valid means of rating the key dimensions of communications, openness, task coordination and adaptability under simulated emergency circumstances. To date, the objectivity of the BARS is supported by good inter-rater reliability while the validity of the BARS is supported by the agreement between ratings of crew interaction and qualitative and quantitative observations of crew performance. (author)

  11. Child abuse training and knowledge: a national survey of emergency medicine, family medicine, and pediatric residents and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Suzanne P; Heisler, Kurt W; Paulson, James F; Youmans, Eren

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the level of knowledge, comfort, and training related to the medical management of child abuse among pediatrics, emergency medicine, and family medicine residents. Surveys were administered to program directors and third-year residents at 67 residency programs. The resident survey included a 24-item quiz to assess knowledge regarding the medical management of physical and sexual child abuse. Sites were solicited from members of a network of child abuse physicians practicing at institutions with residency programs. Analyzable surveys were received from 53 program directors and 462 residents. Compared with emergency medicine and family medicine programs, pediatric programs were significantly larger and more likely to have a medical provider specializing in child abuse pediatrics, have faculty primarily responsible for child abuse training, use a written curriculum for child abuse training, and offer an elective rotation in child abuse. Exposure to child abuse training and abused patients was highest for pediatric residents and lowest for family medicine residents. Comfort with managing child abuse cases was lowest among family medicine residents. On the knowledge quiz, pediatric residents significantly outperformed emergency medicine and family medicine residents. Residents with high knowledge scores were significantly more likely to come from larger programs and programs that had a center, provider, or interdisciplinary team that specialized in child abuse pediatrics; had a physician on faculty responsible for child abuse training; used a written curriculum for child abuse training; and had a required rotation in child abuse pediatrics. By analyzing the relationship between program characteristics and residents' child abuse knowledge, we found that pediatric programs provide far more training and resources for child abuse education than emergency medicine and family medicine programs. As leaders, pediatricians must

  12. Experiences from exercises associated with nuclear emergency response in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Responsibilities Regarding Emergency Response in Germany - In the Federal Republic of Germany, the 16 federal state Ministries of the Interior are responsible for emergency response (threat through weapons, explosives, etc.). In the case of threats due to radioactive material experts of the competent federal state radiological protection authorities are consulted. The Federal Office for Radiation Protection assists in serious cases of defence against nuclear hazards (nuclear fuels, criticality, risk of dispersion). Currently, exercises are being performed in all 16 federal states to co-ordinate the ways of behaviour, action and thinking of the various necessary organisational units, like police, deactivators, prosecution officials, radiological protection experts and fire brigade. The joint exercises serve the purpose to practice the total chain of necessary measures like: notification chain, organisation at the place of action, co-ordination of appropriate search strategy, investigation of who was responsible, analysis (X-ray pictures, radiological analysis), activity determination, assessment of possible effects due to deactivation measures, determination of dispersion conditions, recommendation of measures for the protection of responders and the general population and measures to limit the consequences. Given Exercise Scenario - Via the emergency emergency call a situation is transmitted that urgently demands joint and co-ordinated action of prosecution authority, emergency response and radiation protection authority, to be able to master the situation successfully. As a rule this means that one deals with an IED (Improvised Explosive Device) secured by a booby trap with added radioactive substances. Organisation at the Place of Action - Experience shows that as a rule the patrol police and the local fire brigade will be the first to arrive at the place of action, already after a few minutes. Gradually, the other experts arrive. Depending on distance

  13. Spatial data requirements for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time assessments of the consequences resulting from an atmospheric radioactive material. In support of this operation, a system has been created which integrates numerical models, data acquisition systems, data analysis techniques, and professional staff. Components of this system rely to large degree on spatial data of various kinds. Of particular importance is the rapid generation of digital terrain models for any area in the continental U.S. The digital terrain models are used as input to atmospheric models and serve to familiarize assessors to new areas by presenting the terrain surface as a graphical image. In addition, base map data (roads, rivers, political boundaries) must also be supplied as an overlay to ARAC graphical products. A terrain data base and an associated acquisition system have been developed that provide the required terrain data within ten minutes. This terrain data base was derived from the Defense Mapping Ageny's planar data. A digital base map data base is currently being developed from the U.S. Geographical Survey's 1:2,000,000 Digital Line Graph data as well as their Geographic Names Information System. This base map data base improves ARAC's response to its mapping needs anywhere in the continental U.S

  14. Emergency response planning in hospitals, United States: 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niska, Richard W; Burt, Catharine W

    2007-08-20

    This study presents baseline data to determine which hospital characteristics are associated with preparedness for terrorism and natural disaster in the areas of emergency response planning and availability of equipment and specialized care units. Information from the Bioterrorism and Mass Casualty Preparedness Supplements to the 2003 and 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys was used to provide national estimates of variations in hospital emergency response plans and resources by residency and medical school affiliation, hospital size, ownership, metropolitan statistical area status, and Joint Commission accreditation. Of 874 sampled hospitals with emergency or outpatient departments, 739 responded for an 84.6 percent response rate. Estimates are presented with 95 percent confidence intervals. About 92 percent of hospitals had revised their emergency response plans since September 11, 2001, but only about 63 percent had addressed natural disasters and biological, chemical, radiological, and explosive terrorism in those plans. Only about 9 percent of hospitals had provided for all 10 of the response plan components studied. Hospitals had a mean of about 14 personal protective suits, 21 critical care beds, 12 mechanical ventilators, 7 negative pressure isolation rooms, and 2 decontamination showers each. Hospital bed capacity was the factor most consistently associated with emergency response planning and availability of resources.

  15. Analysis of emergency response procedures and air traffic accidents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incessant air transport accidents have been a source of concern to stakeholders and aviation experts in Nigeria, yet the response and process has not been adequately appraised. This study attempts an evaluation of the emergency response procedures in the aviation industry with particular focus on Murtala Muhammed ...

  16. An expert system for improving nuclear emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salame-Alfie, A.; Goldbogen, G.C.; Ryan, R.M.; Wallace, W.A.; Yeater, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The accidents at TMI-2 and Chernobyl have produced initiatives aimed at improving nuclear plant emergency response capabilities. Among them are the development of emergency response facilities with capabilities for the acquisition, processing, and diagnosis of data which are needed to help coordinate plant operations, engineering support and management under emergency conditions. An effort in this direction prompted the development of an expert system. EP (EMERGENCY PLANNER) is a prototype expert system that is intended to help coordinate the overall management during emergency conditions. The EP system was built using the GEN-X expert system shell. GEN-X has a variety of knowledge representation mechanisms including AND/OR trees, Decision trees, and IF/THEN tables, and runs on an IBM PC-XT or AT computer or compatible. Among the main features, EP is portable, modular, user friendly, can interact with external programs and interrogate data bases. The knowledge base is made of New York State (NYS) Procedures for Emergency Classification, NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Plan (REPP) and knowledge from experts of the NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Group and the Office of Radiological Health and Chemistry of the New York Power Authority (NYPA)

  17. Ontario Power Generation Fukushima emergency response drill strengthens and lessons learned - Ontario Power Generation Fukushima Emergency Response Drill Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Japan's Fukushima Daiichi severe nuclear accident in March 2011 has resulted in a reassessment of nuclear emergency response and preparedness in Canada. On May 26, 27 and 28, 2014 Ontario Power Generation (OPG) conducted the first North American full scale nuclear emergency response exercise designed to include regional, provincial and federal bodies as well as the utility. This paper describes the radiological aspects of the OPG Exercise Unified Response (ExUR) with emphasis on deployment of new Fukushima equipment on the Darlington site, management of emergency workers deplored in the vicinity of Darlington to collect environmental samples and radiation measurements, performance of dose calculations, communication of dose projections and protective actions to local, provincial and federal agencies and conduct of vehicle, truck and personnel monitoring and decontamination facilities. The ExUR involved more than 1000 personnel from local, provincial and federal bodies. Also, 200 OPG employees participated in the off-site emergency response duties. The objective of the ExUR was to test and enhance the preparedness of the utility (OPG), government and non-government agencies and communities to respond to a nuclear emergency. The types of radiological instrumentation and mobile facilities employed are highlighted in the presentation. The establishment of temporary emergency rooms with 8 beds and treatment facilities to manage potentially contaminated injuries from the nuclear emergency is also described. (author)

  18. Employer Requirements to Work during Emergency Responses: Key Ethics Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Lainie; Taylor, Holly A; Powell, Tia

    2017-03-01

    Local health departments and their employees are at the forefront of emergency preparedness and response. Yet, recent studies have found that some local public health workers are unwilling to report to work in a variety of disaster scenarios. This can greatly compromise a response, as many local health departments need "all hands on deck" to effectively meet increased demands. To address these concerns, local health departments have employed varied policy strategies to ensure that employees do report to work. After describing different approaches taken by local health departments throughout the United States, we briefly identify and explore key ethics considerations that arise for local health departments when employees are required to report to work for emergency responses. We then discuss how these ethics considerations may inform local health department practices intended to promote a robust emergency response.

  19. Development of the assessment method for the idealized images of teams. Investigation on the teamwork in emergency response situation (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Since the occurrence of the Tohoku Pacific Earthquake and the nuclear disaster in 2011, the strengthening of emergency response training has been emphasized in Japanese electric industries. When disasters and accidents occur in a nuclear power plant, workers should collaborate with each other to mitigate possible hazards and to recovery from emergencies, as self-effort is not sufficient in these times. Effective teamwork is essential for the success of emergency response. However, the aspects of teamwork that are required in emergencies remain unclear. This study developed a questionnaire instrument to assess the idealized image of effective power plant operator teams in three different levels of emergencies. A pilot test of the instrument was conducted with 21 training instructors who are subject-matter experts in nuclear power plant operation. In the questionnaire, three hypothetical situations of differing emergency levels were presented: 'normal' (routine operation), 'abnormal' (trouble shooting and malfunction correction), 'emergency' (severe accident and disaster response). The idealized image of teams in each situation was also assessed in four aspects: 'decision-making', 'coordination', 'adaptation and adjustment', and 'command and control'. Questionnaire responses were summarized in a profile form to picture the idealized images, ant the profile scores in each situation were compared. Results suggested that, the idealized image of effective teams is different depending on the level of emergency. The Implications of results for training and future research directions are discussed. (author)

  20. Modeling operators' emergency response time for chemical processing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Susan L; Harputlu, Emrah; Mentzer, Ray A; Mannan, M Sam

    2014-01-01

    Operators have a crucial role during emergencies at a variety of facilities such as chemical processing plants. When an abnormality occurs in the production process, the operator often has limited time to either take corrective actions or evacuate before the situation becomes deadly. It is crucial that system designers and safety professionals can estimate the time required for a response before procedures and facilities are designed and operations are initiated. There are existing industrial engineering techniques to establish time standards for tasks performed at a normal working pace. However, it is reasonable to expect the time required to take action in emergency situations will be different than working at a normal production pace. It is possible that in an emergency, operators will act faster compared to a normal pace. It would be useful for system designers to be able to establish a time range for operators' response times for emergency situations. This article develops a modeling approach to estimate the time standard range for operators taking corrective actions or following evacuation procedures in emergency situations. This will aid engineers and managers in establishing time requirements for operators in emergency situations. The methodology used for this study combines a well-established industrial engineering technique for determining time requirements (predetermined time standard system) and adjustment coefficients for emergency situations developed by the authors. Numerous videos of workers performing well-established tasks at a maximum pace were studied. As an example, one of the tasks analyzed was pit crew workers changing tires as quickly as they could during a race. The operations in these videos were decomposed into basic, fundamental motions (such as walking, reaching for a tool, and bending over) by studying the videos frame by frame. A comparison analysis was then performed between the emergency pace and the normal working pace operations

  1. Elements of a national emergency response system for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest elements for a general emergency response system, employed at a national level, to detect, evaluate and assess the consequences of a radiological atmospheric release occurring within or outside of national boundaries. These elements are focused on the total aspect of emergency response ranging from providing an initial alarm to a total assessment of the environmental and health effects. Elements of the emergency response system are described in such a way that existing resources can be directly applied if appropriate; if not, newly developed or an expansion of existing resources can be employed. The major thrust of this paper is toward a philosophical discussion and general description of resources that would be required to implementation. If the major features of this proposal system are judged desirable for implementation, then the next level of detail can be added. The philosophy underlying this paper is preparedness - preparedness through planning, awareness and the application of technology. More specifically, it is establishment of reasonable guidelines including the definition of reference and protective action levels for public exposure to accidents involving nuclear material; education of the public, government officials and the news media; and the application of models and measurements coupled to computer systems to address a series of questions related to emergency planning, response and assessment. It is the role of a proven national emergency response system to provide reliable, quality-controlled information to decision makers for the management of environmental crises

  2. Responses to emergencies in Mexico and Central America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation emergencies have two main aspects: radiation safety, which concerns control of the radiation source, and, more importantly, health effects, which entail diagnoses, treatment, and rehabilitation. The physician participates directly in a radiation emergency because he or she is the professional who knows best the human body and the methodology to re-establish health. However, because these types of incidents are infrequent, many physicians are poorly prepared to deal with such emergencies. Two main aspects of emergency response plans are: (1) prevention, including public education for behavior and planning for appropriate response; and (2) application, including prophylactic measures, assessing the extent of exposure and contamination, controlling public anxiety, and managing and treating the victims

  3. Veterans Health Administration's Disaster Emergency Medical Personnel System (DEMPS) Training Evaluation: Potential Implications for Disaster Health Care Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Susan; Radcliff, Tiffany A; Chu, Karen; Smith, Robert E; Dobalian, Aram

    2018-02-20

    The US Veterans Health Administration's Disaster Emergency Medical Personnel System (DEMPS) is a team of employee disaster response volunteers who provide clinical and non-clinical staffing assistance when local systems are overwhelmed. This study evaluated attitudes and recommendations of the DEMPS program to understand the impact of multi-modal training on volunteer perceptions. DEMPS volunteers completed an electronic survey in 2012 (n=2120). Three training modes were evaluated: online, field exercise, and face-to-face. Measures included: "Training Satisfaction," "Attitudes about Training," "Continued Engagement in DEMPS." Data were analyzed using χ2 and logistic regression. Open-ended questions were evaluated in a manner consistent with grounded theory methodology. Most respondents participated in DEMPS training (80%). Volunteers with multi-modal training who completed all 3 modes (14%) were significantly more likely to have positive attitudes about training, plan to continue as volunteers, and would recommend DEMPS to others (P-valuevolunteer engagement. A blended learning environment using multi-modal training methods, could enhance satisfaction and attitudes and possibly encourage continued engagement in DEMPS or similar programs. DEMPS training program modifications in 2015 expanded this blended learning approach through new interactive online learning opportunities. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018; page 1 of 8).

  4. Real-time information support for managing plant emergency responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.; Lord, R.J.; Wilkinson, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident highlighted the need to develop a systematic approach to managing plant emergency responses, to identify a better decision-making process, and to implement real-time information support for decision-making. The overall process management function is described and general information requirements for management of plant emergencies are identified. Basic information systems are being incorporated and future extensions and problem areas are discussed. (U.K.)

  5. SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

    2006-01-01

    Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release

  6. Enhancing the benefits of written emotional disclosure through response training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konig, Andrea; Eonta, Alison; Dyal, Stephanie R; Vrana, Scott R

    2014-05-01

    Writing about a personal stressful event has been found to have psychological and physical health benefits, especially when physiological response increases during writing. Response training was developed to amplify appropriate physiological reactivity in imagery exposure. The present study examined whether response training enhances the benefits of written emotional disclosure. Participants were assigned to either a written emotional disclosure condition (n=113) or a neutral writing condition (n=133). Participants in each condition wrote for 20 minutes on 3 occasions and received response training (n=79), stimulus training (n=84) or no training (n=83). Heart rate and skin conductance were recorded throughout a 10-minute baseline, 20-minute writing, and a 10-minute recovery period. Self-reported emotion was assessed in each session. One month after completing the sessions, participants completed follow-up assessments of psychological and physical health outcomes. Emotional disclosure elicited greater physiological reactivity and self-reported emotion than neutral writing. Response training amplified physiological reactivity to emotional disclosure. Greater heart rate during emotional disclosure was associated with the greatest reductions in event-related distress, depression, and physical illness symptoms at follow-up, especially among response trained participants. Results support an exposure explanation of emotional disclosure effects and are the first to demonstrate that response training facilitates emotional processing and may be a beneficial adjunct to written emotional disclosure. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Enhancing the Benefits of Written Emotional Disclosure through Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konig, Andrea; Eonta, Alison; Dyal, Stephanie R.; Vrana, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Writing about a personal stressful event has been found to have psychological and physical health benefits, especially when physiological response increases during writing. Response training was developed to amplify appropriate physiological reactivity in imagery exposure. The present study examined whether response training enhances the benefits of written emotional disclosure. Participants were assigned to either a written emotional disclosure condition (n = 113) or a neutral writing condition (n = 133). Participants in each condition wrote for 20 minutes on three occasions and received response training (n = 79), stimulus training (n = 84) or no training (n = 83). Heart rate and skin conductance were recorded throughout a 10-minute baseline, 20-minute writing, and a 10-minute recovery period. Self-reported emotion was assessed in each session. One month after completing the sessions, participants completed follow-up assessments of psychological and physical health outcomes. Emotional disclosure elicited greater physiological reactivity and self-reported emotion than neutral writing. Response training amplified physiological reactivity to emotional disclosure. Greater heart rate during emotional disclosure was associated with the greatest reductions in event-related distress, depression, and physical illness symptoms at follow-up, especially among response trained participants. Results support an exposure explanation of emotional disclosure effects and are the first to demonstrate that response training facilitates emotional processing and may be a beneficial adjunct to written emotional disclosure. PMID:24680230

  8. Assessing Emergency Preparedness and Response Capacity Using Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response Methodology: Portsmouth, Virginia, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkjian, Katie M; Winz, Michelle; Yang, Jun; Corvese, Kate; Colón, Ana; Levine, Seth J; Mullen, Jessica; Ruth, Donna; Anson-Dwamena, Rexford; Bayleyegn, Tesfaye; Chang, David S

    2016-04-01

    For the past decade, emergency preparedness campaigns have encouraged households to meet preparedness metrics, such as having a household evacuation plan and emergency supplies of food, water, and medication. To estimate current household preparedness levels and to enhance disaster response planning, the Virginia Department of Health with remote technical assistance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a community health assessment in 2013 in Portsmouth, Virginia. Using the Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) methodology with 2-stage cluster sampling, we randomly selected 210 households for in-person interviews. Households were questioned about emergency planning and supplies, information sources during emergencies, and chronic health conditions. Interview teams completed 180 interviews (86%). Interviews revealed that 70% of households had an emergency evacuation plan, 67% had a 3-day supply of water for each member, and 77% had a first aid kit. Most households (65%) reported that the television was the primary source of information during an emergency. Heart disease (54%) and obesity (40%) were the most frequently reported chronic conditions. The Virginia Department of Health identified important gaps in local household preparedness. Data from the assessment have been used to inform community health partners, enhance disaster response planning, set community health priorities, and influence Portsmouth's Community Health Improvement Plan.

  9. Emergency preparedness and response in transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takani, Michio

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power has been providing clean, affordable electricity in many parts of the world for nearly half a century. The national and international transport of nuclear fuel cycle materials is essential to support this activity. To sustain the nuclear power industry, fuel cycle materials have to be transported safely and efficiently. The nature of the industry is such that most countries with large-scale nuclear power industries cannot provide all the necessary fuel services themselves and consequently nuclear fuel cycle transport activities are international. The radioactive material transport industry has an outstanding safety record spanning over 45 years; however the transport of radioactive materials cannot and most not be taken for granted. Efficient emergency preparedness and response in the transport of radioactive material is an important element to ensure the maximum safety in accident conditions. The World Nuclear Transport Institute (WNTI), founded by International Nuclear Services (INS) of the United Kingdom, AREVA of France an the Federation of Electric Power Companies (FEPC) of Japan, represents the collective interest of the radioactive material transport sector, and those who rely on safe, effective and reliable transport. As part of its activities, WNTI has conducted two surveys through its members on emergency preparedness and response in the transport of radioactive material and emergency exercises. After recalling the International Atomic Energy Agency approach on emergency response, this paper will be discussing the main conclusion of surveys, in particular the national variations in emergency response and preparedness on the national and local levels of regulations, the emergency preparedness in place, the emergency response organisation (who and how), communication and exercises. (author)

  10. Virtual reality: emerging role of simulation training in vascular access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ingemar J A; Lok, Charmaine; Dolmatch, Bart; Gallieni, Maurizio; Nolen, Billy; Pittiruti, Mauro; Ross, John; Slakey, Douglas

    2012-11-01

    Evolving new technologies in vascular access mandate increased attention to patient safety; an often overlooked yet valuable training tool is simulation. For the end-stage renal disease patient, simulation tools are effective for all aspects of creating access for peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. Based on aviation principles, known as crew resource management, we place equal emphasis on team training as individual training to improve interactions between team members and systems, cumulating in improved safety. Simulation allows for environmental control and standardized procedures, letting the trainee practice and correct mistakes without harm to patients, compared with traditional patient-based training. Vascular access simulators range from suture devices, to pressurized tunneled conduits for needle cannulation, to computer-based interventional simulators. Simulation training includes simulated case learning, root cause analysis of adverse outcomes, and continual update and refinement of concepts. Implementation of effective human to complex systems interaction in end-stage renal disease patients involves a change in institutional culture. Three concepts discussed in this article are as follows: (1) the need for user-friendly systems and technology to enhance performance, (2) the necessity for members to both train and work together as a team, and (3) the team assigned to use the system must test and practice it to a proficient level before safely using the system on patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrating Social Media Monitoring Into Public Health Emergency Response Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Tamer A; Fleshler, Keren

    2016-10-01

    Social media monitoring for public health emergency response and recovery is an essential response capability for any health department. The value of social media for emergency response lies not only in the capacity to rapidly communicate official and critical incident information, but as a rich source of incoming data that can be gathered to inform leadership decision-making. Social media monitoring is a function that can be formally integrated into the Incident Command System of any response agency. The approach to planning and required resources, such as staffing, logistics, and technology, is flexible and adaptable based on the needs of the agency and size and scope of the emergency. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has successfully used its Social Media Monitoring Team during public health emergency responses and planned events including major Ebola and Legionnaires' disease responses. The concepts and implementations described can be applied by any agency, large or small, interested in building a social media monitoring capacity. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  12. Applications of complex terrain meteorological models to emergency response management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Tetsuji; Leone, J.M. Jr.; Rao, K.S.; Dickerson, M.H.; Bader, D.C.; Williams, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), US Department of Energy (DOE), has supported the development of mesoscale transport and diffusion and meteorological models for several decades. The model development activities are closely tied to the OHER field measurement program which has generated a large amount of meteorological and tracer gas data that have been used extensively to test and improve both meteorological and dispersion models. This paper briefly discusses the history of the model development activities associated with the OHER atmospheric science program. The discussion will then focus on how results from this program have made their way into the emergency response community in the past, and what activities are presently being pursued to improve real-time emergency response capabilities. Finally, fruitful areas of research for improving real-time emergency response modeling capabilities are suggested. 35 refs., 5 figs

  13. Autogenic-feedback training improves pilot performance during emergency flying conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellar, Michael A.; Folen, Raymond A.; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Hisert, Glen L.

    1994-01-01

    Studies have shown that autonomous mode behavior is one cause of aircraft fatalities due to pilot error. In such cases, the pilot is in a high state of psychological and physiological arousal and tends to focus on one problem, while ignoring more critical information. This study examined the effect of training in physiological self-recognition and regulation, as a means of improving crew cockpit performance. Seventeen pilots were assigned to the treatment and control groups matched for accumulated flight hours. The treatment group comprised three pilots of HC-130 Hercules aircraft and four HH-65 Dolphin helicopter pilots; the control group comprised three pilots of HC-130's and six Dolphin helicopter pilots. During an initial flight, physiological data were recorded for each crew member and individual crew performance was rated by an instructor pilot. Eight crewmembers were then taught to regulate their own physiological response levels using Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT). The remaining subjects received no training. During a second flight, treatment subjects showed significant improvement in performance, while controls did not improve. The results indicate that AFT management of high states of physiological arousal may improve pilot performance during emergency flying conditions.

  14. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training; Intervencion medica en emergencias radiologicas, formacion y adiestramiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas H, J. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113, e/41 y 47 Playa, CP 11300, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: cardenas@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  15. Multi-objective evolutionary emergency response optimization for major accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiadou, Paraskevi S.; Papazoglou, Ioannis A.; Kiranoudis, Chris T.; Markatos, Nikolaos C.

    2010-01-01

    Emergency response planning in case of a major accident (hazardous material event, nuclear accident) is very important for the protection of the public and workers' safety and health. In this context, several protective actions can be performed, such as, evacuation of an area; protection of the population in buildings; and use of personal protective equipment. The best solution is not unique when multiple criteria are taken into consideration (e.g. health consequences, social disruption, economic cost). This paper presents a methodology for multi-objective optimization of emergency response planning in case of a major accident. The emergency policy with regards to protective actions to be implemented is optimized. An evolutionary algorithm has been used as the optimization tool. Case studies demonstrating the methodology and its application in emergency response decision-making in case of accidents related to hazardous materials installations are presented. However, the methodology with appropriate modification is suitable for supporting decisions in assessing emergency response procedures in other cases (nuclear accidents, transportation of hazardous materials) or for land-use planning issues.

  16. On-the-job training and practical emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuhl, R.

    1996-01-01

    It is described in detail how OJT during initial and retraining of licensed shift personnel is performed. Furthermore it is explained how an emergency exercise, which is OJT of highest value, is prepared, conducted and evaluated. 9 figs

  17. Training programmes and experiences of medical emergency preparedness for radiation accident in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Yasumoto, M

    1982-01-01

    Our policy of training programmes for medical radiation emergency preparedness is described. We found it is necessary to have two approaches to the training of relevant personnel. The first approach was to conduct adequate basic training of nurses and health physics personnel in large nuclear installations for medical radiation emergency preparedness. We found it was necessary to have courses for basic knowledge of nuclear radiation and industrial activities, radiation monitoring procedures, radiation injuries, human counters and wound monitors, first aid practices, and radiation medical emergency procedures including practices. The second approach was to make a simple and introductory training program on the subject using lectures and visual presentations in the vicinity of big nuclear installations for personnel relating to the nuclear industrial activities and for concerned local personnel, including medical doctors and nurses. These two training courses and approaches were planned and have been conducted. 2 refs. (DT)

  18. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  19. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Chinese Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  20. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  1. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  2. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  3. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  4. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  5. Emergency planning and response - role nad responsibilities of the regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizamska, M.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a emergency plan and organisation of adequate emergency preparedness in case of radiological accident in NPP cannot be effective without the appropriate preparatory work. In most countries, also in Republic of Bulgaria, several organisations are identified to have a potential role to play in a radiological emergency. For these reason is very important to have a national organisation, with a mandate to organise, inspect and co-ordinate the possibility of ministries and institution to react in case of radiological emergency, i.e. to quarantine the possibility for implementation of adequate counter measure for protection of the population and environment in case of radiological emergency in NPP. For the purposes of the emergency planning and response the NPP operator, ministries and the institutions developed an Emergency plan - NPP Emergency Plan and National Emergency Plan. The development of the emergency plans will be impossible without the good co-operation of the organisations which have a responsibilities in a radiological emergency. Once emergency plans are adopted, each individual organisation, also the NPP operator, must ensure that in can carry out its role effectively in accordance with the emergency plan and can develop the appropriate organisation for action and implementation of protection counter measures. For testing the emergency plans a regular exercise must be organised. Periodic reviews of the plan and modifications, based on actual events and exercise experience must be performed. The main aim of these report is to present the Bulgarian emergency planning organisation and response by explaining the national emergency panning and response legislation, implementation of IAEA recommendations and exercise experience

  6. Nuclear emergency planning and response in the Netherlands after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, L.J.W.M.; Kerkhoven, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    After Chernobyl an extensive project on nuclear emergency planning and response was started in the Netherlands. The objective of this project was to develop a (governmental) structure to cope with accidents with radioactive materials, that can threaten the Dutch community and neighbouring countries. The project has resulted in a new organizational structure for nuclear emergency response, that differs on major points from the existing plans and procedures. In this paper an outline of the new structure is given. Emphasis is placed on accidents with nuclear power plants

  7. Enhancing the Benefits of Written Emotional Disclosure through Response Training

    OpenAIRE

    Konig, Andrea; Eonta, Alison; Dyal, Stephanie R.; Vrana, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Writing about a personal stressful event has been found to have psychological and physical health benefits, especially when physiological response increases during writing. Response training was developed to amplify appropriate physiological reactivity in imagery exposure. The present study examined whether response training enhances the benefits of written emotional disclosure. Participants were assigned to either a written emotional disclosure condition (n = 113) or a neutral writing condit...

  8. Emergency response information within the National LLW Information Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paukert, J.G.; Fuchs, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, with operational assistance from EG and G Idaho, Inc., maintains the National Low-Level Waste Information Management System, a relational data base management system with extensive information collection and reporting capabilities. The system operates on an IBM 4341 main-frame computer in Idaho Falls, Idaho and is accessible through terminals in 46 states. One of the many programs available on the system is an emergency response data network, which was developed jointly by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. As a prototype, the program comprises emergency response team contacts, policies, activities and decisions; federal, state and local government contacts; facility and support center locations; and news releases for nine reactor sites in the southeast. The emergency response program provides a method for consolidating currently fragmented information into a central and user-friendly system. When the program is implemented, immediate answers to response questions will be available through a remote terminal or telephone on a 24-hour basis. In view of current hazardous and low-level waste shipment rates and future movements of high-level waste, the program can offer needed and timely information for transportation as well as site incident response

  9. Can first aid training encourage individuals' propensity to act in an emergency situation? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Emily; Cooper, Jane; McKinney, David

    2014-06-01

    To explore the effect that different activities included in first aid training can have on an individual's propensity to act in a medical emergency. Additional pilot-developed activities were added to a core first aid training session to create six unique groups, including a control group where no activities were added. Participants rated their agreement to pre-identified fears following the course and scored their self-efficacy and willingness to act before, immediately after and 2 months after the course. Change values were compared between groups. Three locations in the UK (community halls, schools). 554 members of the public were recruited using advertising and community groups. A deliberately broad demographic was sought and achieved using targeted approaches where a particular demographic was deficient. Each participant attended one British Red Cross first aid course lasting 2 h. The same questionnaire was completed by all participants before and after each course. Two months later all participants were asked a series of follow-up questions. All courses showed an increase in self-efficacy and willingness to act immediately following the course. The course, which included both factual information relevant to helping in an emergency and 'helper' identity activities, produced significantly more positive responses to pre-identified fears. Activities which allow the learner to explore and discuss behaviour in an emergency situation can effectively increase the learner's propensity to act. First aid education should be expanded to support the learner to develop both the skill and the will to help. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Measuring movement towards improved emergency obstetric care in rural Kenya with implementation of the PRONTO simulation and team training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, Julia C; Kamau, Stephen; Calkins, Kimberly; Cohen, Susanna R; Cranmer, John; Kibore, Minnie; Gachuno, Onesmus; Walker, Dilys

    2018-02-01

    As the proportion of facility-based births increases, so does the need to ensure that mothers and their newborns receive quality care. Developing facility-oriented obstetric and neonatal training programs grounded in principles of teamwork utilizing simulation-based training for emergency response is an important strategy for improving the quality care. This study uses 3 dimensions of the Kirkpatrick Model to measure the impact of PRONTO International (PRONTO) simulation-based training as part of the Linda Afya ya Mama na Mtoto (LAMMP, Protect the Health of mother and child) in Kenya. Changes in knowledge of obstetric and neonatal emergency response, self-efficacy, and teamwork were analyzed using longitudinal, fixed-effects, linear regression models. Participants from 26 facilities participated in the training between 2013 and 2014. The results demonstrate improvements in knowledge, self-efficacy, and teamwork self-assessment. When comparing pre-Module I scores with post-training scores, improvements range from 9 to 24 percentage points (p values strategic goals was high: 95.8% of the 192 strategic goals. Participants rated the PRONTO intervention as extremely useful, with an overall score of 1.4 out of 5 (1, extremely useful; 5, not at all useful). Evaluation of how these improvements affect maternal and perinatal clinical outcomes is forthcoming. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Survey of state and tribal emergency response capabilities for radiological transportation incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilardo, F J; Mitter, E L; Palmer, J A; Briggs, H C; Fesenmaier, J [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (USA). School of Public and Environmental Affairs

    1990-05-01

    This publication is the final report of a project to survey the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and selected Indian Tribal jurisdictions to ascertain their emergency-preparedness planning and capabilities for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. The survey was conducted to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other federal agencies with information concerning the current level of emergency-response preparedness of the states and selected tribes and an assessment of the changes that have occurred since 1980. There have been no major changes in the states' emergency-response planning strategies and field tactics. The changes noted included an increased availability of dedicated emergency-response vehicles, wider availability of specialized radiation-detection instruments, and higher proportions of police and fire personnel with training in the handling of suspected radiation threats. Most Indian tribes have no capability to evaluate suspected radiation threats and have no formal relations with emergency-response personnel in adjacent states. For the nation as a whole, the incidence of suspected radiation threats declined substantially from 1980 to 1988. 58 tabs.

  12. The IAEAs incident and emergency centre: the global focal point for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buglova, E.

    2016-08-01

    The continuous use of nuclear power to generate electricity and the continued threat of radioactive materials being used for nefarious reasons reminds us of the importance to stay prepared to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies. Stringent nuclear safety and nuclear security requirements, the training of personnel, operational checks and legal frameworks cannot always prevent radiation-related emergencies. Though these events can range in severity, each has the potential to cause harm to the public, employees, patients, property and the environment. Until the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, there was no international information exchange system. Immediately following that accident, the international community negotiated the so-called Emergency Conventions to ensure that the country suffering an accident with an international transboundary release of radioactive material would issue timely, authenticated information, while the States that could field technical support, would do so in a coordinated fashion. The Conventions also place specific legal obligations on the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) with regard to emergency preparedness and response. (Author)

  13. Oil supply security -- Emergency response of IEA countries 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-29

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf of Mexico in 2005, the region's oil production and refining infrastructure was devastated and world energy markets were disrupted. The International Energy Agency decided in a matter of days to bring 60 million barrels of additional oil to the market. The emergency response system worked - the collective action helped to stabilise global markets. Since its founding in 1974, oil supply security has been a core mission of the IEA and the Agency has improved its mechanisms to respond to short-term oil supply disruptions. Nevertheless, numerous factors will continue to test the delicate balance of supply and demand. Oil demand growth will continue to accelerate in Asia; oil will be increasingly produced by a shrinking number of countries; and capacities in the supply chain will need to expand. These are just a few of the challenges facing an already tight market. What are the emergency response systems of IEA countries? How are their emergency structures organised? How prepared is the IEA to deal with an oil supply disruption? This publication addresses these questions. It presents another cycle of rigorous reviews of the emergency response mechanisms of IEA member countries. The goal of these reviews is to ensure that the IEA stays ready to respond effectively to oil supply disruptions. This publication also includes overviews of how China, India and countries of Southeast Asia are progressing with domestic policies to improve oil supply security, based on emergency stocks.

  14. Oil supply security -- Emergency response of IEA countries 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-29

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf of Mexico in 2005, the region's oil production and refining infrastructure was devastated and world energy markets were disrupted. The International Energy Agency decided in a matter of days to bring 60 million barrels of additional oil to the market. The emergency response system worked - the collective action helped to stabilise global markets. Since its founding in 1974, oil supply security has been a core mission of the IEA and the Agency has improved its mechanisms to respond to short-term oil supply disruptions. Nevertheless, numerous factors will continue to test the delicate balance of supply and demand. Oil demand growth will continue to accelerate in Asia; oil will be increasingly produced by a shrinking number of countries; and capacities in the supply chain will need to expand. These are just a few of the challenges facing an already tight market. What are the emergency response systems of IEA countries? How are their emergency structures organised? How prepared is the IEA to deal with an oil supply disruption? This publication addresses these questions. It presents another cycle of rigorous reviews of the emergency response mechanisms of IEA member countries. The goal of these reviews is to ensure that the IEA stays ready to respond effectively to oil supply disruptions. This publication also includes overviews of how China, India and countries of Southeast Asia are progressing with domestic policies to improve oil supply security, based on emergency stocks.

  15. Radiological response training for law enforcement personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maixner, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    A specialized training course for Nevada's law enforcement personnel has been conducted by Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc. for the US Department of Energy since February 1981. This course is designed for those persons who are first to arrive at a transportation accident scene. The course provides a basic understanding of radiation protection, the prevention of contamination spread from the accident site, use of radiation detection equipment, and decontamination procedures. The Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office provides the training at no cost to Nevada agencies. Each agency selects its attendees. Details of the course are given

  16. 14 CFR 135.331 - Crewmember emergency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Training... of crew and passenger oxygen. (6) Removal of life rafts from the aircraft, inflation of the life rafts, use of life lines, and boarding of passengers and crew, if applicable. (7) Donning and inflation...

  17. Self-directed simulation-based training of emergency cricothyroidotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiors, Jacob; Todsen, Tobias; Mørkeberg Nilsson, Philip

    2016-01-01

    training session. One month later, an EC on a cadaver was performed. All EC's were video recorded. An assessment tool was used to rate performance. Performance was compared with a pass/fail level for the EC. We found a high reliability, based on Pearson's r (0.88), and a significant progression of skill...

  18. 46 CFR 109.213 - Emergency training and drills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to each person on board the unit. If audiovisual training aids are used, they must be incorporated... month. (3) Drills must be held before the unit enters service for the first time after modification of a... communication system, and ensuring that all on board are made aware of the order to abandon ship. (ii) Each...

  19. Emergency response capability for pollutant releases to streams and rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, M.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Watts, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Stream-river models have been developed which provide an accurate prediction of normal and accidental pollutant releases to streams and rivers. Stream parameters are being developed for the Savannah River Plant streams and the Savannah River to allow quick response in case of an accidental release of radioactive material. These data are stored on permanent disk storage for quick access via the JOSHUA operating system. This system provides an efficient and flexible emergency response capability for pollutant releases to streams and rivers

  20. Training student pharmacists to administer emergency pediatric influenza vaccine: A comparison of traditional vs. just-in-time training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriff, Colleen M; McKeirnan, Kimberly

    2017-07-01

    This study compared traditional training (TT) and just-in-time training (JITT) of P3 student pharmacists regarding interest, confidence, and comfort pre- and post-training (primary objective); and assessment and administration competency (secondary objective) during a simulated influenza vaccination clinic. Student pharmacists were randomized 1:1 to receive either TT or JITT, completed pre- and post-training surveys assessing interest, confidence and comfort; and evaluated on performance during a simulated emergency infant vaccination. An infant manikin simulated a child <1 year of age, and an actor role-played the mother. All students received a briefing about the simulated mass vaccination prior to their performance assessment. Survey differences between groups were analyzed by ANOVA. The competency assessment was analyzed by a Chi-square or Fisher's exact test for individual steps and Student t-test for mean scores. Pre-training interest was high and maintained post-training. Pre-training confidence and comfort levels were low and improved in both groups. Mean competency scores were comparable between the TT and JITT groups. Comparing groups, TT students more commonly missed proper injection site selection and care; while JITT missed distracting the infant and administration documentation. JITT for student pharmacists to learn skills required to immunize infants elicits similar outcomes (interest, confidence, comfort, and administration competency) as TT for emergency pediatric influenza vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of geographic information system for radiologic emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.G.; Doyle, J.F.; Mueller, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Comprehensive and timely radiological, cultural, and environmental data are required in order to make informed decisions during a radiological emergency. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. The most recent addition to this essential function has been the development of the Field Analysis System for Emergency Response (FASER). It is an integrated system with compatible digital image processing and Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities. FASER is configured with commercially available off-the-shelf hardware and software components. To demonstrate the potential of the FASER system for radiological emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. (R.P.)

  2. Gamification for data gathering in emergency response exercises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Kenny; Ruhe, Aaron; Soetanto, Marvin; Munkvold, R.; Kolås, L.

    2015-01-01

    Our paper describes how gamification can be implemented in an emergency response exercise. In particular, we focus on the potential of gamification to support self-evaluation processes through the automated gathering of data about the participants' performance. Disaster-exercises are typically

  3. Correlates of emergency response interval and mortality from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study to determine the influence of blood transfusion emergency response interval on Mortality from childhood severe anemia was carried out. An admission record of all children with severe anemia over a 5-year period was reviewed. Those who either died before transfusion or got discharged against ...

  4. RMP Guidance for Warehouses - Chapter 8: Emergency Response Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implementing an emergency response program along with your risk management plan may be required if you have at least one Program 2 or 3 process in place, and if your employees will respond to some releases involving regulated toxic or flammable substances.

  5. MMS: An electronic message management system for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.B.; Garde, H.; Andersen, V.

    1998-01-01

    among messages can be viewed in a graphic tree-like display. By employing the extensive filtration facilities offered by the MMS. users are able to monitor the current status of messages. And, in general, filtration provides users with means of surveying a possibly large number of responses to messages...... contingency plan and procedures to be applied during predefined stages of an emergency....

  6. 47 CFR 0.192 - Emergency Response Interoperability Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency Response Interoperability Center. 0.192 Section 0.192 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION..., industry representatives, and service providers. [75 FR 28207, May 20, 2010] ...

  7. 49 CFR 239.103 - Passenger train emergency simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... effectiveness of its plan during that major emergency and, as appropriate, modify the rescheduled simulation. (d... greater than the current reporting threshold of part 225 of this chapter to railroad on-track equipment, signals, tracks, track structures, or roadbeds, including labor costs and the costs for acquiring new...

  8. Application of Robotic System for Emergency Response in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Ho Chul; Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Seung Ho

    2010-01-01

    Increasing energy demand and concerns over climate change make increasing use of nuclear power plant in worldwide. Even though the probability of accident is greatly reduced, safety is the highest priority issue in the nuclear energy industry. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts with the design and construction of NPP, there are very little possibilities with which accidents are occur and radioactive materials are released to environments in NPP. But NPP have prepared with the emergency response procedures and conduct exercises for post-accident circumstance according to the procedures. The application of robots for emergency response task for post-accident in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots have been sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could receive a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI-2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. The first robot was lowered into the basement through a hatch and human operators monitoring in a control room drove it through mud, water and debris, capturing the initial post-accident images of the reactor's basement. It was used for several years equipped with various tools allowing it to scour surfaces, scoop samples and vacuum sludge. A second version carried a core sampler to determine the intensity and depth of the radiation that had permeated into the walls. To perform cleanup tasks, they built Workhorse that featured system redundancy and had a boom extendable to reach high places, but it was never used because it had too many complexities and to clean and fix. While remote robotics technology has proven to remove the human from the radioactive environment, it is also difficult to make it useful because it may requires skill about remote control and obtaining remote

  9. Application of Robotic System for Emergency Response in NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Ho Chul; Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Seung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Increasing energy demand and concerns over climate change make increasing use of nuclear power plant in worldwide. Even though the probability of accident is greatly reduced, safety is the highest priority issue in the nuclear energy industry. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts with the design and construction of NPP, there are very little possibilities with which accidents are occur and radioactive materials are released to environments in NPP. But NPP have prepared with the emergency response procedures and conduct exercises for post-accident circumstance according to the procedures. The application of robots for emergency response task for post-accident in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots have been sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could receive a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI-2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. The first robot was lowered into the basement through a hatch and human operators monitoring in a control room drove it through mud, water and debris, capturing the initial post-accident images of the reactor's basement. It was used for several years equipped with various tools allowing it to scour surfaces, scoop samples and vacuum sludge. A second version carried a core sampler to determine the intensity and depth of the radiation that had permeated into the walls. To perform cleanup tasks, they built Workhorse that featured system redundancy and had a boom extendable to reach high places, but it was never used because it had too many complexities and to clean and fix. While remote robotics technology has proven to remove the human from the radioactive environment, it is also difficult to make it useful because it may requires skill about remote control and

  10. To enhance effectiveness of response to emergency situations following earthquakes, tsunamis, and nuclear disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Jiro; Tase, Choichiro; Tsukada, Yasuhiko; Hasegawa, Arifumi; Ikegami, Yukihiro; Iida, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    From the immediate aftermath of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami and the ensuing Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Fukushima Medical University Hospital urgently needed to operate as both a core disaster hospital and a secondary radiation emergency hospital. The disaster drills and emergency simulation training that had been undertaken to prepare for such a scenario proved to be immensely helpful. However, due to the fact that the disaster caused much more damage than expected putting that preparation perfectly into practice was impossible. In any disaster, it is important to collect human intelligence. Therefore, simulating the collection of human intelligence is necessary in order to supplement drills and training and improve rapid response following a disaster. (author)

  11. Emergency response arrangements for the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan-Warren, E.

    2004-01-01

    Response arrangements are required for the transport of radioactive materials, under both transport and health and safety legislation, to safeguard persons, property and the environment in the event of incidents and emergencies. Responsibilities fall on both government and industry: government is responsible for ensuring public safety and providing information and reassurance. This responsibility is discharged for each type of incident by a nominated ''lead department'', supported as appropriate by other government departments and agencies; for their part, operators are obliged to have arrangements in place for dealing with the practicalities of any reasonably foreseeable incident, including recovery and onward transport of a package, and any required clean-up or restoration of the environment. This paper outlines both the government and industry arrangements in Great Britain. The principles of response and intervention are discussed, together with the lead department concept, regulatory requirements, and the plans developed by the transport industry to ensure a nation-wide response capability

  12. Moments of disaster response in the emergency department (ED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Karen S; Arbon, Paul; Gebbie, Kristine; Hutton, Alison

    2017-11-01

    We experience our lives as a series of memorable moments, some good and some bad. Undoubtedly, the experience of participating in disaster response, is likely to stand out as a memorable moment in a nurses' career. This presentation will describe five distinct moments of nursing in the emergency department (ED) during a disaster response. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological approach informed by van Manen underpins the research process. Thirteen nurses from different countries around the world participated in interviews about their experience of working in the ED during a disaster. Thematic analysis resulted in five moments of disaster response which are common to the collective participant experience. The 5 themes emerge as Notification (as a nurse finds out that the ED will be receiving casualties), Waiting (waiting for the patients to arrive to the ED), Patient Arrival (the arrival of the first patients to the ED), Caring for patients (caring for people affected by the disaster) and Reflection (the moment the disaster response comes to an end). This paper provides an in-depth insight into the experience of nursing in the ED during a disaster response which can help generate awareness and inform future disaster preparedness of emergency nurses. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    CERN Document Server

    Simpkins, A A

    2002-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response models estimate dose for inhalation and ground shine pathways. A methodology has been developed to incorporate ingestion doses into the emergency response models. The methodology follows a two-phase approach. The first phase estimates site-specific derived response levels (DRLs) which can be compared with predicted ground-level concentrations to determine if intervention is needed to protect the public. This phase uses accepted methods with little deviation from recommended guidance. The second phase uses site-specific data to estimate a 'best estimate' dose to offsite individuals from ingestion of foodstuffs. While this method deviates from recommended guidance, it is technically defensibly and more realistic. As guidance is updated, these methods also will need to be updated.

  14. An environmental scan of emergency response systems and services in remote First Nations communities in Northern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mew, E J; Ritchie, S D; VanderBurgh, D; Beardy, J L; Gordon, J; Fortune, M; Mamakwa, S; Orkin, A M

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 24,000 Ontarians live in remote Indigenous communities with no road access. These communities are a subset of Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN), a political grouping of 49 First Nations communities in Northern Ontario, Canada. Limited information is available regarding the status of emergency care in these communities. We aimed to understand emergency response systems, services, and training in remote NAN communities. We used an environmental scan approach to compile information from multiple sources including community-based participatory research. This included the analysis of data collected from key informant interviews (n=10) with First Nations community health leaders and a multi-stakeholder roundtable meeting (n=33) in October 2013. Qualitative analysis of the interview data revealed four issues related to emergency response systems and training: (1) inequity in response capacity and services, (2) lack of formalised dispatch systems, (3) turnover and burnout in volunteer emergency services, and (4) challenges related to first aid training. Roundtable stakeholders supported the development of a community-based emergency care system to address gaps. Existing first response, paramedical, and ambulance service models do not meet the unique geographical, epidemiological and cultural needs in most NAN communities. Sustainable, context-appropriate, and culturally relevant emergency care systems are needed.

  15. [The importance of teamwork in emergency medicine training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, B; Carron, P-N

    2007-08-15

    The study of dynamics in relation to performing in small groups has increased pedagogic knowledge about teamwork. The successful management of patients with life-threatening pathologies depends highly from a succession of teams with a specific mission as: the call centre 144, Paramedics, the ED, the Operating Theatre and the Intensive care. To enable each team to operate successfully, it is essential to coordinate their qualifications and synergism. This can be efficiently attained by simulating real situations and by following protocols dedicated to teamwork. Emergency Medicine, which is on the brink of acquiring its proper curriculum, must adopt this concept to integrate knowledge and know-how, and the art of being and doing. At this stage, the Emergency Physician will have the competence which will enable him to be a real "team leader".

  16. Current level of training, experience and perceptions of emergency physicians as expert witnesses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Nicola Y; Weiland, Tracey J

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine emergency physicians' training, experience and perceptions as expert witnesses. Emergency physicians of an adult tertiary referral and teaching hospital participated in a pilot survey regarding their experiences in report writing and in court as expert witnesses. The 28-item survey also examined the amount of formalized forensic medical teaching that emergency physicians had received during their training. Of the participants, 41% (95% CI 21.6-64.1; 7/17) had never received any undergraduate or postgraduate training in forensic medicine, 11/17 (65%, 95% CI 41.2-82.8) had provided a written expert opinion for court, and 12/17 (71%, 95% CI 46.6-87.0) had attended court as an expert witness. All participants considered themselves 'skilled in attending an emergency resuscitation', whereas 3/13 (23%, 95% CI 7.5-50.9) considered themselves 'skilled in attending a courtroom trial'. Nearly 90% (95% CI 64.7-98.0; 15/17) thought that medical evidence training should be a requirement of emergency speciality training. The most commonly preferred forms of medical evidence training were mock court sessions (76%, 95% CI 52.2-91.0; 13/17) and forensic workshops (76%, 95% CI 52.2-91.0; 13/17). From 10 non-technical skills required of an EP, 'appearing in court as an expert witness' was perceived to be the second most difficult skill by most respondents. Emergency physicians in this pilot study have limited training for the role of expert witness and see it as one of the most difficult non-technical skills they have to perform. Further research is required regarding the current and future scope of forensic training.

  17. Psychological first aid training for Lebanese field workers in the emergency context of the Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoury-Dirani, Leyla; Sahakian, Tina S; Hassan, Fahed Y; Hajjar, Ranya V; El Asmar, Khalil

    2015-11-01

    The Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon required a fast and efficient comprehensive rescue strategy. Professionals working in emergency response were neither prepared to provide psychological first aid nor prepared to screen for mental health disorders in child refugees. This article examines the efficacy of a national training program in psychological first aid (PFA) to enhance the readiness of mental health field workers in the Syrian refugee response. Participant (N = 109) were recruited from Lebanese ministries and nongovernmental organizations. They received a 2.5-day training on PFA and on screening for mental health disorders in children. Their knowledge and perceived readiness were assessed before the training, immediately after the training, and 1 month after the training using 2 evaluation forms. Evaluation Form A was a multiple choice questionnaire composed of 20 questions and created on the basis of the content of the training, and Evaluation Form B was a Likert-type scale of 20 items created based on the core components of PFA. The data of 60 participants were analyzed. The results showed a significant increase in knowledge and readiness, specifically on the components related to the principles and techniques of PFA. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Implementation of the Service for Radiological Emergency Response of CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE, Recife, PE, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Claudio J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In 1998, it was created in the Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE) - the Brazilian regional center of nuclear sciences -, Recife, PE, Brazil, the Service for Radiological Emergency Response with the objective of providing the population of Pernambuco and neighboring States a team of professionals specialized in emergency situations and radiological protection. This action has the purpose of decentralization of actions of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), an agency responsible for licensing and safety of radioactive sources in Brazil. With this study we can conclude that the settlement of SAER/CRCN came to meet initial expectations, having in the last years provided assistance in situations with suspected radioactive material and participated actively: with radioactive load simulation; of the Exercicio de Emergencia Aeronautica Completo (EXEAC) - an emergency simulated training in airports- from the Guararapes-Gilberto Freire Airport; trained, every two years, the services of emergency for accidents and participated in events of the area

  19. Trasax '90: An integrated transportation emergency response exercise program involving transuranic waste shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouba, S.; Everitt, J.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last five years, the US Department of Energy (DOE), and several states and numerous local governments have been preparing for the transportation of transuranic (TRU) waste to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico, near Carlsbad. Seven western states, represented by the Western Governors' Association (WGA), submitted a report to the US Congress that discussed the concerns of their constituents related to the transportation of TRU waste through their communities. One of the three major concerns identified was emergency preparedness. Initial funding to resolve concerns identified in the WGA report to Congress was provided by the US Department of Transportation. Upon receiving funding, lead states were assigned responsibilities to devise programs aimed at increasing public confidence in the areas of most concern. The responsibility for emergency response readiness, as demonstrated through a program of training and responding to simulated accident scenarios, was accepted by the state of Colorado. The state of Colorado laid out an exercise program which expanded upon the DOE training programs already offered to emergency responders along Colorado's designated TRU-waste transportation corridor. The ongoing program included a full-scale field exercise staged in Colorado Springs and dubbed, ''TRANSAX '90.''

  20. CMSMAP : oil, chemical, search and rescue, and marine emergency response crisis management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.L.; Howlett, E.; Galagan, C.; Giguere, T.; Wee, F.; Chong, J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a newly developed Crisis Management System (CMS) which makes it possible to view oil and chemical spills on the seafloor. The CMS is designed to run in a network environment, so that multiple stations can be used cooperatively to respond to a spill incident. It was developed by the Maritime and Port Authority in Singapore and represents a singular integration of a ship's bridge simulator hardware and software. It incorporates numerical models and emergency response software. The CMS is installed in a specifically designed building at the Singapore Polytechnic University, and is integrated with two shipping bridge simulators. One user interface has access to models dealing with oil spills, chemical spills, search and rescues, marine emergencies, and nuclear disasters. The interface is linked to a response management system. The entire system is used to train response personnel to marine emergencies. The histories and costs of planned response activities are described and logged for reference purposes. Estimates of damages associated with spills can be obtained. Alternative response plans can also be determined. Further research in 2002 will focus on developing real time response. 3 refs., 6 figs

  1. Combined residency training in emergency medicine and internal medicine: an update on career outcomes and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Chad S; Stallings, Leonard A; Gonzalez, Andrew A; Templeman, Todd A

    2009-09-01

    This study was designed to provide an update on the career outcomes and experiences of graduates of combined emergency medicine-internal medicine (EM-IM) residency programs. The graduates of the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) and American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM)-accredited EM-IM residencies from 1998 to 2008 were contacted and asked to complete a survey concerning demographics, board certification, fellowships completed, practice setting, academic affiliation, and perceptions about EM-IM training and careers. There were 127 respondents of a possible 163 total graduates for a response rate of 78%. Seventy graduates (55%) practice EM only, 47 graduates (37%) practice both EM and IM, and nine graduates (7%) practice IM or an IM subspecialty only. Thirty-one graduates (24%) pursued formal fellowship training in either EM or IM. Graduates spend the majority of their time practicing clinical EM in an urban (72%) and academic (60%) environment. Eighty-seven graduates (69%) spend at least 10% of their time in an academic setting. Most graduates (64%) believe it practical to practice both EM and IM. A total of 112 graduates (88%) would complete EM-IM training again. Dual training in EM-IM affords a great deal of career opportunities, particularly in academics and clinical practice, in a number of environments. Graduates hold their training in high esteem and would do it again if given the opportunity.

  2. Training and Transfer Effects of Response Inhibition Training in Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Chen, Ling; Maes, Joseph H. R.

    2018-01-01

    Response inhibition is crucial for mental and physical health but studies assessing the trainability of this type of inhibition are rare. Thirty-nine children aged 10-12 years and 46 adults aged 18-24 years were assigned to an adaptive go/no-go inhibition training condition or an active control condition. Transfer of training effects to…

  3. Real-Time Surveillance in Emergencies Using the Early Warning Alert and Response Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Kristina M; Cookson, Susan T; Boyd, Andrew T; Hardy, Colleen; Malik, Mamunur Rahman; Mala, Peter; El Tahir, Khalid; Everard, Marthe; Jasiem, Mohamad; Husain, Farah

    2017-11-01

    Humanitarian emergencies often result in population displacement and increase the risk for transmission of communicable diseases. To address the increased risk for outbreaks during humanitarian emergencies, the World Health Organization developed the Early Warning Alert and Response Network (EWARN) for early detection of epidemic-prone diseases. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has worked with the World Health Organization, ministries of health, and other partners to support EWARN through the implementation and evaluation of these systems and the development of standardized guidance. Although protocols have been developed for the implementation and evaluation of EWARN, a need persists for standardized training and additional guidance on supporting these systems remotely when access to affected areas is restricted. Continued collaboration between partners and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for surveillance during emergencies is necessary to strengthen capacity and support global health security.

  4. Coordinating a Team Response to Behavioral Emergencies in the Emergency Department: A Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ambrose H; Wing, Lisa; Weiss, Brenda; Gang, Maureen

    2015-11-01

    While treating potentially violent patients in the emergency department (ED), both patients and staff may be subject to unintentional injury. Emergency healthcare providers are at the greatest risk of experiencing physical and verbal assault from patients. Preliminary studies have shown that a team-based approach with targeted staff training has significant positive outcomes in mitigating violence in healthcare settings. Staff attitudes toward patient aggression have also been linked to workplace safety, but current literature suggests that providers experience fear and anxiety while caring for potentially violent patients. The objectives of the study were (1) to develop an interprofessional curriculum focusing on improving teamwork and staff attitudes toward patient violence using simulation-enhanced education for ED staff, and (2) to assess attitudes towards patient aggression both at pre- and post-curriculum implementation stages using a survey-based study design. Formal roles and responsibilities for each member of the care team, including positioning during restraint placement, were predefined in conjunction with ED leadership. Emergency medicine residents, nurses and hospital police officers were assigned to interprofessional teams. The curriculum started with an introductory lecture discussing de-escalation techniques and restraint placement as well as core tenets of interprofessional collaboration. Next, we conducted two simulation scenarios using standardized participants (SPs) and structured debriefing. The study consisted of a survey-based design comparing pre- and post-intervention responses via a paired Student t-test to assess changes in staff attitudes. We used the validated Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale (MAVAS) consisting of 30 Likert-scale questions grouped into four themed constructs. One hundred sixty-two ED staff members completed the course with >95% staff participation, generating a total of 106 paired surveys

  5. Coordinating a Team Response to Behavioral Emergencies in the Emergency Department: A Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrose H. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While treating potentially violent patients in the emergency department (ED, both patients and staff may be subject to unintentional injury. Emergency healthcare providers are at the greatest risk of experiencing physical and verbal assault from patients. Preliminary studies have shown that a teambased approach with targeted staff training has significant positive outcomes in mitigating violence in healthcare settings. Staff attitudes toward patient aggression have also been linked to workplace safety, but current literature suggests that providers experience fear and anxiety while caring for potentially violent patients. The objectives of the study were (1 to develop an interprofessional curriculum focusing on improving teamwork and staff attitudes toward patient violence using simulation-enhanced education for ED staff, and (2 to assess attitudes towards patient aggression both at pre- and post-curriculum implementation stages using a survey-based study design. Methods: Formal roles and responsibilities for each member of the care team, including positioning during restraint placement, were predefined in conjunction with ED leadership. Emergency medicine residents, nurses and hospital police officers were assigned to interprofessional teams. The curriculum started with an introductory lecture discussing de-escalation techniques and restraint placement as well as core tenets of interprofessional collaboration. Next, we conducted two simulation scenarios using standardized participants (SPs and structured debriefing. The study consisted of a survey-based design comparing pre- and post-intervention responses via a paired Student t-test to assess changes in staff attitudes. We used the validated Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale (MAVAS consisting of 30 Likert-scale questions grouped into four themed constructs. Results: One hundred sixty-two ED staff members completed the course with >95% staff participation

  6. Training, Drills Pivotal in Mounting Response to Orlando Shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Eric; Bullard, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Emergency providers at Orlando Regional Medical Center in Orlando. FL, faced multiple challenges in responding to the worst mass shooting in U.S. history. As the scene of the shooting was only three blocks away from the hospital, there was little time to prepare when notified that victims would begin arriving shortly after 2 a.m. on June 12. Also, fears of a gunman near the hospital briefly put the ED on lock down. However, using the incident command system, the hospital was able to mobilize quickly, receiving 44 patients, nine of whom died shortly after arrival. Administrators note that recent training exercises geared toward a mass shooting event facilitated the response and probably saved lives. Patients arrived at the hospital in two waves, with the initial surge occurring right after the hooting took place around 2 a.m., and the second surge occurring about three hours later. At one point, more than 90 patients were in the ED, more than half for reasons unrelated to the shooting. Clinicians contended with a much higher than usual noise level while treating patients, making it hard to hear reports from EMS personnel. Also, treatment had to commence prior to identification for some patients who arrived unconscious or unable to speak. While surgeons and other key specialists were called into the hospital to address identified needs, administrators actually called hospital personnel to tell them not to come in unless they were notified. This prevented added management hurdles.

  7. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    nuclear accident or radiological emergency even if there is no direct transboundary impact, primarily for the purposes of minimizing the consequences of the accident or emergency e.g. for trade and tourism and providing advice to their nationals living, working and travelling in the Accident State. The provision of such information would also help to avoid unnecessary international rumours and concerns. In order to be able to provide such information in an emergency, States need to be prepared in advance. Moreover, States are encouraged to provide warning messages and other relevant information within the ENATOM framework even in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency that does not trigger the Early Notification Convention but is of international concern. Recent work on clarifying emergency classification schemes for nuclear facilities and on identifying the key information to be transmitted for technical assessment purposes, the development of emergency preparedness and response standards and improvements in communications technology (e-mail and Web servers) have been reflected in the arrangements described in this new edition of ENATOM. ENATOM addresses the issue of requesting and providing assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. For the provision of assistance, the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. ENATOM states the Secretariat's expectations rather than prescribing arrangements. Nevertheless, all States, including States which are neither Member States of the IAEA nor party to either Convention, and the relevant International Intergovernmental Organisations are invited to adopt the arrangements described in it for providing and receiving information about nuclear accidents and radiological emergencies. In the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, the

  8. Student tutors for hands-on training in focused emergency echocardiography – a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühl Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focused emergency echocardiography performed by non-cardiologists has been shown to be feasible and effective in emergency situations. During resuscitation a short focused emergency echocardiography has been shown to narrow down potential differential diagnoses and to improve patient survival. Quite a large proportion of physicians are eligible to learn focused emergency echocardiography. Training in focused emergency echocardiography usually comprises a lecture, hands-on trainings in very small groups, and a practice phase. There is a shortage of experienced echocardiographers who can supervise the second step, the hands-on training. We thus investigated whether student tutors can perform the hands-on training for focused emergency echocardiography. Methods A total of 30 volunteer 4th and 5th year students were randomly assigned to a twelve-hour basic echocardiography course comprising a lecture followed by a hands-on training in small groups taught either by an expert cardiographer (EC or by a student tutor (ST. Using a pre-post-design, the students were evaluated by an OSCE. The students had to generate two still frames with the apical five-chamber view and the parasternal long axis in five minutes and to correctly mark twelve anatomical cardiac structures. Two blinded expert cardiographers rated the students’ performance using a standardized checklist. Students could achieve a maximum of 25 points. Results Both groups showed significant improvement after the training (p Conclusions Hands-on training by student tutors led to a significant gain in echocardiography skills, although inferior to teaching by an expert cardiographer.

  9. A national assessment of the roles and responsibilities of training officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Melissa A; Eggerichs-Purcell, Jennifer J; Brown, William E; Wagoner, Robert; Gibson, Gregory C; Sahni, Ritu

    2013-01-01

    Since the inception of emergency medical services (EMS), individuals have assumed the role of "training officer" without a clear and concise description of the responsibilities inherent in this position. Furthermore, EMS system leaders rely heavily on these individuals to implement changes within an EMS system and to ensure the competency of practicing out-of-hospital professionals. The limited understanding of and research in training officer roles highlight the need for study in this area. Specific objectives of our study were to describe demographic and work-life characteristics of training officers, estimate the number of hours spent on specific training officer tasks in a typical week, and determine methods of training officer appointment and education received after appointment. This was a questionnaire-based cross-sectional census analysis of all training officers in the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) database. This questionnaire contained items related to demographics, work-life characteristics, and specific roles and responsibilities of training officers. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and Mann-Whitney U tests were utilized to assess specific differences among training officers. Over 2,500 individuals responded to this questionnaire (2,528/4,956). The majority of the respondents were male (79.0%), held a full-time salaried position (64.9%), and were of nonminority status (93.4%). Individuals reported an overall median number of years worked in EMS of 19.0 (standard deviation [SD] = 8.7, range = 0-45) and a median of 4.0 years of serving as a training officer (SD = 5.1, range = 0-33), and planned to serve as a training officer for a median of 10.0 years (SD = 7.6, range = 0-50). The highest median numbers of hours spent on specific training officer tasks in a typical week were for providing patient care (median = 8.0, SD = 18.1); developing, delivering, and accounting for continuing education (median = 5.0, SD = 9

  10. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.; Aaltonen, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A large number of different national plans and procedures have been established and substantial resources allocated world wide with varying comprehensiveness and quality depending an the national requirements and the possible threat scenarios considered. These national plans are only to a small degree harmonized. It is clear that it is the responsibility of the authorities in the respective countries or utilities under their jurisdiction, to decide upon and implement appropriate response actions to a nuclear emergency. The basic needs for responding properly are: infrastructure in terms of plans, procedures etc.; information regarding the accident, its development and consequences; resources in terms of expertise, man power and tools for acquiring and processing information, making assessments and decisions and carry out the actions. When a large number of countries are making assessments and decisions for their own country and providing the public with information, it is important that assessments, decisions and public information become correct, complete and consistent across boarders. In order to achieve this, they should all have access to the same information as basis for their actions. Lack of information or wrong information could easily lead to wrong assessments, wrong decisions and misleading information to the public. If there is a serious nuclear emergency somewhere that could potentially affect several or many States in one way or another, 'everyone' would like to know 'everything' that happens 'everywhere'. In this case, all States should have the obligation to share with the international community the relevant information they have available themselves and that could be of interest for other States responding to the situation. During a serious nuclear or radiological emergency, the demand for different kinds of resources is huge and could, in many countries, probably exceed national capabilities. Looking at the situation in a global

  11. Roles that numerical models can play in emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Four points are presented with regard to a perspective on modeling for emergency preparedness. First, and probably foremost, modeling should be considered a tool, along with measurements and experience when used for emergency preparedness. The second point is that the potential for large errors associated with knowing the source term during an accident should not be used as a guide for determining the level of the model development and application. There are many other uses for models than estimating consequences, given the source term. These uses range from estimating the source term to bracketing the problem at hand. The third point is that several levels of model complexity should be considered when addressing emergency response. These levels can vary from the simple Gaussian calculation to the more complex three-dimensional transport and diffusion calculations where terrain and vertical and horizontal shears in the wind fields can be modeled. Lastly, proper interaction and feedback between model results and measurements enhances the capabilities of each if they were applied independently for emergency response purposes

  12. Does Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Training Affect Attitudes of Emergency Department Nurses Toward Sexual Assault Survivors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Mary Hugo; Strong, Linda; Stewart, Julie G

    2015-01-01

    There are over 243,800 female sexual assaults in the United States annually. Of those who seek healthcare services after being sexually assaulted, 90% present to hospitals. Unfortunately, care and services for women who have been sexually assaulted are inconsistent. Increased burnout, frustration, and feelings of inadequacy can lead healthcare providers to exhibit personal biases or negative attitudes toward their patients. The Joint Commission, responsible for accreditation of healthcare organizations, has stated that nurses must provide competent care to all patients. Therefore, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) training needs to be available for emergency department (ED) nurses who care for patients who have been sexually assaulted. A survey using the Attitude Toward Rape Victims Scale was sent to 1503 ED nurses throughout the United States, from the Emergency Nursing Association's mailing list. The results of the survey showed that there was a significant difference in attitudes toward the patients between SANE-trained emergency nurses and those without training. This study also showed that 35.5% of hospitals represented by the respondents did not have SANE services available for adult patients who had been sexually assaulted, and furthermore, 85.5% of the respondents who cared for adult patients who had been sexually assaulted were not SANE trained. The negative attitudes held toward such patients as found in this study, coupled with a lack of training provides evidence that ED nurses may benefit from education related to appropriate treatment for patients who have been sexually assaulted. As evidence-based practice becomes the gold standard of care, ensuring that nurses are properly trained to care for all patients must be the goal.

  13. Ontario Hydro's transportation of radioactive material and emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmali, N.

    1993-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has been transporting radioactive material for almost 30 years without any exposure to the public or release to the environment. However, there have been three accidents involving Hydro's shipments of radioactive material. In addition to the quality packaging and shipping program, Ontario Hydro has an Emergency Response Plan and capability to deal with an accident involving a shipment of radioactive material. The Corporation's ability to respond, to effectively control and contain the situation, site remediation, and to provide emergency public information in the event of a road accident minimizes the risk to the public and the environment. This emphasizes their commitment to worker safety, public safety and impact to the environment. Response capability is mandated under various legislation and regulations in Canada

  14. Use of the Emergency First Response Program as a Tool for Teaching English as a Foreign Language: A Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordice, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    This paper discussed both the theoretical and practical implications of using a first aid training course, specifically the Emergency First Response (EFR) program, as a tool for the teaching and practice of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). The conceptual origins of the idea are discusses through comparisons with theories of learning found in…

  15. A collaborative virtual environment for training of security agents in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Sara I.; Passos, Cláudio A.; Silva, Marcio H.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R.; Legey, Ana Paula; Mol, Antonio Carlos; Machado, Daniel M.; Cotelli, André; Rocha, Tiago L.

    2017-01-01

    In face the recently observed security menaces related to terrorist actions and natural disasters, there is a need for a major qualification and training of the agents responsible for avoid any problems regarding to abnormal conditions. In the conventional training procedures, however, field simulations are associated to logistical and operational constraints regarded to the execution of the tests which can expose the user to risk. On the other hand, the use of virtual simulations provides an alternative to such limitations besides of promote the qualifying of professionals with a great reliability. For this reason, this paper proposes the development of a collaborative virtual environment that will be used to prepare the security agents on identifying individuals suspected of carrying radioactive materials. The development of the virtual environment consisted on modeling using Autodesk 3ds Max, where the scene itself and the scene objects were modeled besides the terrain creation and basic features programming using the Game Engine Unity 3D. In the Engine Game were included radiation detectors and avatars. The security agents were able to communicate to each other by means of auxiliary external tools like a headset software that makes possible the communication, coordination and cooperation required for an effective collaboration. Experimental tests of the virtual simulations were performed with the participation of CNEN radiological protection agents and collaborators. The tests have shown that the proposed method can contribute to improve the training results of the basic collaborative skills required for a CNEN agent in an emergency situation without the need to expose him to any kind of risk. In face of that, we hope that it can contribute to minimize the demand for qualified security professionals. (author)

  16. A collaborative virtual environment for training of security agents in nuclear emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Sara I.; Passos, Cláudio A.; Silva, Marcio H.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R.; Legey, Ana Paula; Mol, Antonio Carlos; Machado, Daniel M.; Cotelli, André; Rocha, Tiago L., E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Realidade Virtual

    2017-07-01

    In face the recently observed security menaces related to terrorist actions and natural disasters, there is a need for a major qualification and training of the agents responsible for avoid any problems regarding to abnormal conditions. In the conventional training procedures, however, field simulations are associated to logistical and operational constraints regarded to the execution of the tests which can expose the user to risk. On the other hand, the use of virtual simulations provides an alternative to such limitations besides of promote the qualifying of professionals with a great reliability. For this reason, this paper proposes the development of a collaborative virtual environment that will be used to prepare the security agents on identifying individuals suspected of carrying radioactive materials. The development of the virtual environment consisted on modeling using Autodesk 3ds Max, where the scene itself and the scene objects were modeled besides the terrain creation and basic features programming using the Game Engine Unity 3D. In the Engine Game were included radiation detectors and avatars. The security agents were able to communicate to each other by means of auxiliary external tools like a headset software that makes possible the communication, coordination and cooperation required for an effective collaboration. Experimental tests of the virtual simulations were performed with the participation of CNEN radiological protection agents and collaborators. The tests have shown that the proposed method can contribute to improve the training results of the basic collaborative skills required for a CNEN agent in an emergency situation without the need to expose him to any kind of risk. In face of that, we hope that it can contribute to minimize the demand for qualified security professionals. (author)

  17. Retrospective evaluation of urological admissions to emergency service of a training and research hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaktaş, Ramazan; Altın, Selçuk; Aydın, Cemil; Akkoç, Ali; Yılmaz, Yakup

    2014-12-01

    Many patients consult emergency services with urological complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatments of urological emergency cases in a training and research hospital. We retrospectively evaluated urological emergency patients referred to the emergency unit between July 2012 and July 2013 according to age, gender, affected organ, radiological imaging techniques and treatment. Among 141.844 emergency cases, 3.113 (2.19%) were urological emergencies and 53.2% of the patients were male (mean age: 49.1), and 46.8% of them were female (median age: 42.8). The most frequent illness was genitourinary infection constituting 41.2% of the cases followed by renal colic (36.9%). Among the urological emergencies 483 (15.5%) patients were hospitalized and 152 surgical operations were performed. The mostly performed procedure was the placement of a suprapubic catheter in 34 patients constituting (22.3%) of the cases. Totally eight patients were referred to another experienced health center due to different reasons. Most of the urological emergency patients do not require emergency surgical interventions however, timely identification and management of urological emergencies with in-depth clinical evaluation are important to prevent late complications. Therefore the doctors working in emergency services must be heedful of urological emergencies.

  18. Exercises for radiological and nuclear emergency response. Planing - performance - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, A.; Faleschini, J.; Goelling, K.; Stapel, R.; Strobl, C.

    2010-01-01

    The report of the study group emergency response seminar covers the following topics: (A) purpose of exercises and exercise culture: fundamentals and appliances for planning, performance and evaluation; (B) exercises in nuclear facilities; (C) exercises of national authorities and aid organizations on nuclear scenarios; exercises of national authorities and aid organizations on other radiological scenarios; (D) exercises in industrial plants, universities, medical facilities and medical services, and research institutes; (E) transnational exercises, international exercises; (F): exercises on public information.

  19. EPPM and willingness to respond: the role of risk and efficacy communication in strengthening public health emergency response systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Daniel J; Thompson, Carol B; Semon, Natalie L; Errett, Nicole A; Harrison, Krista L; Anderson, Marilyn K; Ferrell, Justin L; Freiheit, Jennifer M; Hudson, Robert; McKee, Mary; Mejia-Echeverry, Alvaro; Spitzer, James; Balicer, Ran D; Links, Jonathan M; Storey, J Douglas

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the attitudinal impact of an Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM)-based training curriculum on local public health department (LHD) workers' willingness to respond to representative public health emergency scenarios. Data are from 71 U.S. LHDs in urban and rural settings across nine states. The study explores changes in response willingness and EPPM threat and efficacy appraisals between randomly assigned control versus intervention health departments, at baseline and 1 week post curriculum, through an EPPM-based survey/resurvey design. Levels of response willingness and emergency response-related attitudes/beliefs are measured. Analyses focus on two scenario categories that have appeared on a U.S. government list of scenarios of significant concern: a weather-related emergency and a radiological "dirty" bomb event (U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 2007). The greatest impact from the training intervention on response willingness was observed among LHD workers who had low levels of EPPM-related threat and efficacy perceptions at baseline. Self-efficacy and response efficacy and response willingness increased in intervention LHDs for both scenarios, with greater response willingness increases observed for the radiological "dirty" bomb terrorism scenario. Findings indicate the importance of building efficacy versus enhancing threat perceptions as a path toward greater response willingness, and suggest the potential applicability of such curricular interventions for boosting emergency response willingness among other cadres of health providers.

  20. Emergency preparedness: a responsibility of the medical profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammons, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    There are a series of things that we might do with regard to emergency planning. Some are clearly obvious, some perhaps are less so. Obviously, we should try to prevent a disaster from occurring. But we know that disasters are going to happen. Second, we should attempt to minimize the number of casualties in the event of an emergency. A part of planning is traffic control, with the traffic control designed to prevent that particular difficulty. Clearly we need to prevent additional casualties once the natural or man-made disaster has occurred. Without question, we have to rescue the injured, we have to be able to provide first aid, and we have to make value judgments instantly on who needs aid and who does not. Obviously, the medical community has to supply the leaders in terms of the care of the injured. Equally obvious is that other people in the community, such as the governor, the mayor, the city manager, the chief of police, and the fire chief, have to be involved. When you become involved in emergency planning, remember that there are other people in the health care family. It is not just physicians who are important; the Red Cross, nurses, public health agencies, those in state radiation control programs, and many others also are important. And let us not forget the people with specialized training in nuclear medicine, as well as radiologists and radiation oncologists

  1. Emergency preparedness and response for the non-reactor countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buglova, E.

    2000-01-01

    Preparedness and response for nuclear and radiological accidents in the countries without nuclear power plants (NPP) have some peculiarities. Accident at the Chernobyl NPP clearly showed the necessity of effective response for non-reactor countries in the case of transboundary release. Experience obtained in Belarus is providing evidence for the necessity of changing some aspects of emergency preparedness. The results of analysis made of some protective actions taken during the early stage of the accident form the basis for recommendations provided this paper. Real experience is supported by model predictions of the consequences for the hypothetical accident at a NPP close to the Belarus. (author)

  2. Combining internet technology and mobile phones for emergency response management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsson, S.E.

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended for persons involved in radiological emergency response management. An introduction is given to the technical basis of the mobile Internet and ongoing development summarised. Examples are given describing how mobile Internet technology has been used to improve monitoring media coverage of incidents and events, and a test is described where web based information was selectively processed and made available to WAP enabled mobile phones. The report concludes with recommendations stressing the need for following mobile Internet developments and taking them into account when designing web applications for radiological response management. Doing so can make web based material accessible to mobile devices at minimal additional cost. (au)

  3. Preparing for the worst : Calgary startup brings emergency response into the digital age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.

    2009-01-01

    The potential danger of blowouts and oil spills is present in areas with high concentration of energy facilities and infrastructure. Ensuring that all possible measures have been taken to alert residents as early as possible is one way to alleviate fears of well blowouts, gas processing plant leaks, pipeline failures, or refinery or upgrader explosions. This article presented the GeoAlert, a high technology solution developed by Cell Bridge Communications Corporation to bring emergency response into the modern communications era. The features, benefits, and applications of GeoAlert were described. The program is a web-based emergency notification geographic information system application, that created a digital audit trail, and served as an internal communications and training platform, and had the potential to eliminate duplication among oil companies with overlapping jurisdictions. The system enabled companies to program emergency zones based on precise geographical co-ordinates and to use the system to proactively manage emergency response. It was concluded that the most visually striking feature of GeoAlert is its three-dimensional satellite mapping technology, which could display plumes as a purple-coloured initial isolation zone laid over designated emergency planning zones, moving in real-time while automatically identifying who should be notified and when. 1 fig.

  4. Conference attendance does not correlate with emergency medicine residency in-training examination scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene Hern, H; Wills, Charlotte; Alter, Harrison; Bowman, Steven H; Katz, Eric; Shayne, Philip; Vahidnia, Farnaz

    2009-12-01

    The residency review committee for emergency medicine (EM) requires residents to have greater than 70% attendance of educational conferences during residency training, but it is unknown whether attendance improves clinical competence or scores on the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) in-training examination (ITE). This study examined the relationship between conference attendance and ITE scores. The hypothesis was that greater attendance would correlate to a higher examination score. This was a multi-center retrospective cohort study using conference attendance data and examination results from residents in four large county EM residency training programs. Longitudinal multi-level models, adjusting for training site, U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 score, and sex were used to explore the relationship between conference attendance and in-training examination scores according to year of training. Each year of training was studied, as well as the overall effect of mean attendance as it related to examination score. Four training sites reported data on 405 residents during 2002 to 2008; 386 residents had sufficient data to analyze. In the multi-level longitudinal models, attendance at conference was not a significant predictor of in-training percentile score (coefficient = 0.005, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.053 to 0.063, p = 0.87). Score on the USMLE Step 1 examination was a strong predictor of ITE score (coefficient = 0.186, 95% CI = 0.155 to 0.217; p ITE scores. Conference attendance may represent an important part of EM residency training but perhaps not of ITE performance. (c) 2009 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  5. Development of national level preparedness for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    In India, DAE being the nodal agency for technical support for response to any radiation emergency nuclear disaster and various nuclear and radiological emergency scenarios and their impacts are identified. To reduce their consequences development of methodologies for detection and quick impact assessment, trained First Responders and Quick Response Teams (QRTs), twenty two DAE Emergency Response Centers, mobile and aerial radiation monitoring systems, aerial and ground based validation trials etc. are carried out. Study related to radiological threats and simulated RDD experiments conducted using stable isotopes indicates that radiation levels for distances more than 50 m will not be very high as hotspots may be restricted to nearby area. The biggest challenge from an RDD explosion will be handling of the radioactive contamination and 'fear factor' compared to radiation exposure to public or First Responders. Level and pattern of radioactive contamination on ground following releases during nuclear accidents and minimum strength of orphan radioactive sources to be detected are taken into account for optimizing systems and monitoring methodology required for emergency preparedness

  6. REPRODUCTIVE HORMONES AND CORTISOL RESPONSES TO PLYOMETRIC TRAINING IN MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serife Vatansever Ozen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plyometric training activities are commonly used by a wide range of athletes to increase jump performance and improve explosive power and muscular activation patterns. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of plyometric training on male reproductive hormones. Nineteen recreationally active males volunteered to participate in this study and were randomly assigned to plyometrically trained (n=10, 21.2 ±2.3 years and control groups (n=9, 21.4± 2.1. The plyometric training group performed in a six-week plyometric training programme and the control group did not perform any plyometric training techniques. Resting serum levels of testosterone, prolactin, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinising hormone (LH, and cortisol were measured in each subject at t0 (before the training, t1 (end of third week and t2 (end of training. Two-way ANOVA revealed significant (P<0.05 interaction effects for testosterone, prolactin, FSH and cortisol. Six-week plyometric training decreased serum levels of testosterone, cortisol and FSH and increased serum levels of prolactin. These results suggest the presence of alterations in anabolic and catabolic hormonal responses to resistance exercise in men.

  7. Changing the paradigm of emergency response: The need for first-care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobko, Joshua P; Kamin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    There is a major gap in the security of the critical infrastructure - civilian medical response to atypical emergencies. Clear evidence demonstrates that, despite ongoing improvements to the first-responder system, there exists an inherent delay in the immediate medical care at the scene of an emergency. This delay can only be reduced through a societal shift in reliance on police and fire response and by extending the medical system into all communities. Additionally, through analysis of military data, it is known that immediately addressing the common injury patterns following a traumatic event will save lives. The predictable nature of these injuries, coupled with an unavoidable delay in the arrival of first responders, necessitates the need for immediate care on scene. Initial care is often rendered by bystanders, typically armed only with basic first-aid training based on medical emergencies and does not adequately address the traumatic injury patterns seen in disasters. Implementing an approach similar to the American Cardiac Arrest Act can improve outcomes to traumatic events. This paper analyses the latest data on active shooter incidents and proposes that the creation of a network of trauma-trained medic extenders would improve all communities' resilience to catastrophic disaster.

  8. Analyzing Track Responses to Train Braking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bose, Tulika; Levenberg, Eyal; Zania, Varvara

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to suggest a response analysis framework for railway tracks that are subjected to braking. An analytical formulation was developed, in which the rail–track system was modeled as an infinite beam supported by an orthogonal Winkler foundation consisting of linear...... a response analysis framework for railway tracks that are subjected to braking. An analytical formulation was developed, in which the rail–track system was modeled as an infinite beam supported by an orthogonal Winkler foundation consisting of linear springs in perpendicular directions. The spring constants...... springs in perpendicular directions. The spring constants were varied over a wide range in order to represent different track types. Braking loads were simulated as representative sets of vertical and longitudinal forces, either concentrated or distributed. Considering a realistic set of model parameters...

  9. MBRRACE in simulation: an evaluation of a multi-disciplinary simulation training for medical emergencies in obstetrics (MEmO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Mary; Abthorpe, Jennifer; Simpson, Thomas; Reedy, Gabriel; Little, Fiona; Banerjee, Anita

    2018-03-21

    The majority of maternal deaths in the UK are due to pre-existing or new-onset medical conditions, known as 'indirect deaths'. The MBRRACE report identified serious gaps in clinicians' human factors skills, including communication, leadership and teamwork, which contributed to maternal death. In response, we developed the first multi-disciplinary simulation-based training programme designed to address Medical Emergencies in Obstetrics (MEmO). Employing a mixed methods design, this study evaluated the educational impact of this training programme on the healthcare staff (n = 140), including the medical doctors (n = 91) and the midwives (n = 49). The training improved participants' clinical management of medical deterioration in pregnancy (p=.003) alongside improving their human factors skills (p=.004). Furthermore, participants reported the translation of these skills to their routine clinical practice. This flexible training is responsive to the changing national needs and contextualises the MBRRACE findings for healthcare staff. It is a promising avenue for reducing the rates of in-direct death in pregnancy. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? The majority of maternal deaths in the UK are due to pre-existing or new-onset medical conditions. The management of medical conditions in pregnancy relies on a multi-professional approach. However, serious gaps in clinicians' human factors skills, highlighted by the MBRRACE report, may contribute to maternal death. What do the results of this study add? This study evaluated the first multi-disciplinary, simulation-based training programme designed to address Medical Emergencies in Obstetrics (MEmO). Training significantly improved participants' management of medical deterioration in pregnancy and human factors skills, particularly in the areas of leadership, communication and teamwork. Moreover, the participants learning translated into their clinical practice. What are the implications of

  10. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 February 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a large number of States, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full parties. The arrangements provided between the IAEA, States that are IAEA Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations, and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions - specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). ENATOM was first issued on 18 January 1989. Member States, Parties to the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, relevant international organizations and other States have since then regularly received updates to the manual. In 2000, a complete revision of ENATOM was reissued as EPR-ENATOM (2000) to reflect technological developments, changes in operational concepts, views on standards in the area of emergency preparedness and response, and Member States' expectations. Since then ENATOM has been reviewed and reissued biennially in line with the review cycle of the Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (the 'Joint Plan'). Since the last edition of ENATOM in 2004, several factors have warranted some modifications to

  11. Health effects of training laypeople to deliver emergency care in underserviced populations: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Orkin, Aaron M; Curran, Jeffrey D; Fortune, Melanie K; McArthur, Allison; Mew, Emma J; Ritchie, Stephen D; Van de Velde, Stijn; VanderBurgh, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Disease Control Priorities Project recommends emergency care training for laypersons in low-resource settings, but evidence for these interventions has not yet been systematically reviewed. This review will identify the individual and community health effects of educating laypeople to deliver prehospital emergency care interventions in low-resource settings. Methods and analysis This systematic review addresses the following question: in underserviced populations and low-reso...

  12. Innovations in emergency response plans : making the useful application of the 2007 CDA guidelines for emergency response plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, A.J. [Columbia Power Corp., Castlegar, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Columbia Power Corporation (CPC) changed its perspective and approach to emergency response plans (ERP) between 2002 and 2007 from one of administrative necessity to one of important functional reference. The new 2007 Canadian Dam Association Guidelines helped facilitate that transition for both CPC and all dam owners. As part of the licensing requirements for its new facility, CPC had an ERP commissioned and developed in 2002. A potential dam safety event occurred in 2004, which necessitated the need for the ERP to be put to use. However, at the time, it was found to be lacking in functionality for field personnel. As a result, CPC recognized the significance of having a functional ERP for field staff and undertook a substantial redraft between 2005 and 2007. This paper discussed the development of the ERP with particular reference to assessing the top potential emergency scenarios for the facility; development of response plans for the identified scenarios; a flow chart to guide personnel through the required actions; response checklist; detailed inspection checklists and any required forms, photos or specific information. It was concluded that the new ERP has been well received and has improved facility awareness and emergency preparedness. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  13. Optimization of emergency response to major nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, I.A.; Christou, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for the optimization of the short-term emergency response in the event of a nuclear accident has been developed. The method aims at an optimum combination of protective actions in the presence of a multitude of conflicting objectives and under uncertainty. Conflicting objectives arise when the minimization of the potential adverse effects of an accident and the simultaneous minimization of the associated socioeconomic impacts is attempted. Additional conflicting objectives appear whenever an emergency plan tends to decrease a particular health effect (e.g. acute deaths) while at the same time it increases another (e.g. latent deaths). The uncertainty is due to the multitude of the possible accident scenarios and their respective probability of occurrence, the stochastic variability in the weather conditions and in the variability and/or lack of knowledge in the parameters of the risk assessment models. A multiobjective optimization approach is adopted in a dynamic programming scheme. An emergency protective plan consists of defining a protective action (e.g. evacuation, sheltering) at each spatial cell around the plant. Three criteria (evaluators) are used as the objective functions of the problem, namely, acute fatalities, latent effects and socioeconomic cost. The optimization procedure defines the efficient frontier, i.e. all emergency plans that are not dominated by another in all three criteria. No value trade-offs are necessary up to this point

  14. Emergency response guide for Point Lepreau area residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The design, construction and operating procedures of CANDU nuclear generating stations ensure that an accident causing a significant risk to people living near these stations is extremely unlikely. However, despite the excellent safety record of nuclear stations, it is common practice to prepare an emergency plan for such facilities. In this regard, The New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization is responsible for developing and implementing the Off-Site Emergency Plan for the Point Lepreau Generating Station. Work for the Off-Site Emergency Plan began in 1976 and, under the leadership of N.B.E.M.O., a number of government agencies co-operated in this project. The completed plan thus represents agreement among a number of Province of New Brunswick departments, various community groups, NB Power, and representatives of the Government of Canada. Also, information gathered in the annual door-to-door survey of the Lepreau area enabled government planners to make specialized arrangements such as an extensive warden service, a siren system, and evacuation assistance for the disabled

  15. Examining the importance of incorporating emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into allied health curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Preparation for responding to emergency events that does not warrant outside help beyond the local community resources or responding to disaster events that is beyond the capabilities of the local community both require first responders and healthcare professionals to have interdisciplinary skills needed to function as a team for saving lives. To date, there is no core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies that have been standardized at all levels across the various allied health curricula disciplines. To identify if emergency preparedness and disaster training content are currently being taught in allied health program courses, to identify possible gaps within allied health curricula, and to explore the perceptions of allied health college educators for implementing emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into their existing curricula, if not already included. A quantitative Internet-based survey was conducted in 2013. Convenient sample. Fifty-one allied health college educators completed the survey. Descriptive statistics indicated that the majority of allied health college instructors do not currently teach emergency preparedness and disaster training core competency content within their current allied health discipline; however, their perceived level of importance for inclusion of the competencies was high. The results of this study supported the need for developing and establishing a basic national set of standardized core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies at all levels across various allied health curricula disciplines to ensure victims receive the best patient care and have the best possible chance of survival.

  16. Study of developing nuclear fabrication facility's integrated emergency response manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taeh Yeong; Cho, Nam Chan; Han, Seung Hoon; Moon, Jong Han; Lee, Jin Hang; Min, Guem Young; Han, Ji Ah

    2016-01-01

    Public begin to pay attention to emergency management. Thus, public's consensus on having high level of emergency management system up to advanced country's is reached. In this social atmosphere, manual is considered as key factor to prevent accident or secure business continuity. Therefore, we first define possible crisis at KEPCO Nuclear Fuel (hereinafter KNF) and also make a 'Reaction List' for each crisis situation at the view of information-design. To achieve it, we analyze several country's crisis response manual and then derive component, indicate duties and roles at the information-design point of view. From this, we suggested guideline to make 'Integrated emergency response manual(IERM)'. The manual we used before have following few problems; difficult to applicate at the site, difficult to deliver information. To complement these problems, we searched manual elements from the view of information-design. As a result, we develop administrative manual. Although, this manual could be thought as fragmentary manual because it confined specific several agency/organization and disaster type

  17. Emergency Response Imagery Related to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthem, A. V.; Madore, B.; Imahori, G.; Woolard, J.; Sellars, J.; Halbach, A.; Helmricks, D.; Quarrick, J.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Remote Sensing Division acquired and rapidly disseminated emergency response imagery related to the three recent hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. Aerial imagery was collected using a Trimble Digital Sensor System, a high-resolution digital camera, by means of NOAA's King Air 350ER and DeHavilland Twin Otter (DHC-6) Aircraft. The emergency response images are used to assess the before and after effects of the hurricanes' damage. The imagery aids emergency responders, such as FEMA, Coast Guard, and other state and local governments, in developing recovery strategies and efforts by prioritizing areas most affected and distributing appropriate resources. Collected imagery is also used to provide damage assessment for use in long-term recovery and rebuilding efforts. Additionally, the imagery allows for those evacuated persons to see images of their homes and neighborhoods remotely. Each of the individual images are processed through ortho-rectification and merged into a uniform mosaic image. These remotely sensed datasets are publically available, and often used by web-based map servers as well as, federal, state, and local government agencies. This poster will show the imagery collected for these three hurricanes and the processes involved in getting data quickly into the hands of those that need it most.

  18. How the Nuclear Applications Laboratories Help in Strengthening Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Safety is one of the most important considerations when engaging in highly advanced scientific and technological activities. In this respect, utilizing the potential of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes also involves risks, and nuclear techniques themselves can be useful in strengthening emergency response measures related to the use of nuclear technology. In the case of a nuclear incident, the rapid measurement and subsequent monitoring of radiation levels are top priorities as they help to determine the degree of risk faced by emergency responders and the general public. Instruments for the remote measurement of radioactivity are particularly important when there are potential health risks associated with entering areas with elevated radiation levels. The Nuclear Science and Instrumentation Laboratory (NSIL) — one of the eight laboratories of the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications (NA) in Seibersdorf, Austria — focuses on developing a variety of specialized analytical and diagnostic instruments and methods, and transferring knowledge to IAEA Member States. These include instruments capable of carrying out remote measurements. This emergency response work carried out by the NA laboratories supports health and safety in Member States and supports the IAEA’s mandate to promote the safe and peaceful use of nuclear energy

  19. Reflections on the emergency preparations and responses of China to Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoqiu; Li Bing; Yu Shaoqing

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviewed the emergency response of Japan in Fukushima nuclear accident, provided and discussed the issues should be of concern on emergency preparedness and response in future: (1) modifying the existing emergency preparedness and response system; (2) consolidating the concept of emergency preparedness as the ultimate level of defense-in-depth; (3) promoting the emergency response decision-making support capabilities; (4) valuing the information opening of involving nuclear news and radiation environmental information. (authors)

  20. Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response: There's An App for That.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Daniel J; Jamison, Nathan K; Martin, Andrew; Delgado, Jose; Kman, Nicholas E

    2015-10-01

    Smartphone applications (or apps) are becoming increasingly popular with emergency responders and health care providers, as well as the public as a whole. There are thousands of medical apps available for Smartphones and tablet computers, with more added each day. These include apps to view textbooks, guidelines, medication databases, medical calculators, and radiology images. Hypothesis/Problem With an ever expanding catalog of apps that relate to disaster medicine, it is hard for both the lay public and responders to know where to turn for effective Smartphone apps. A systematic review of these apps was conducted. A search of the Apple iTunes store (Version 12; Apple Inc.; Cupertino, California USA) was performed using the following terms obtained from the PubMed Medical Subject Headings Database: Emergency Preparedness, Emergency Responders, Disaster, Disaster Planning, Disaster Medicine, Bioterrorism, Chemical Terrorism, Hazardous Materials (HazMat), and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). After excluding any unrelated apps, a working list of apps was formed and categorized based on topics. Apps were grouped based on applicability to responders, the lay public, or regional preparedness, and were then ranked based on iTunes user reviews, value, relevance to audience, and user interface. This search revealed 683 applications and was narrowed to 219 based on relevance to the field. After grouping the apps as described above, and subsequently ranking them, the highest quality apps were determined from each group. The Community Emergency Response Teams and FEMA had the best apps for National Disaster Medical System responders. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had high-quality apps for emergency responders in a variety of fields. The National Library of Medicine's Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER) app was an excellent app for HazMat responders. The American Red Cross had the most useful apps for natural

  1. Improving the emergency response by education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The issue of communication between professionals and the wide public is discussed. It is concluded that we should encourage education about the understanding of risks and hazards. We must support education about our own subject and we should contribute to the development of the national curriculum. Above all we should try to help individual school teachers. We should try to provide a radiological protection input to courses on hazards and safety culture for undergraduates. We should try to improve the status of the profession and to ensure awareness of the profession in universities. We should see ourselves as partners with the media but we must learn interview technique. (P.A.)

  2. Physiological responses of astronaut candidates to simulated +Gx orbital emergency re-entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Xue, Yueying; Wu, Ping; Gu, Zhiming; Wang, Yue; Jing, Xiaolu

    2012-08-01

    We investigated astronaut candidates' physiological and pathological responses to +Gx exposure during simulated emergency return from a running orbit to advance astronaut +Gx tolerance training and medical support in manned spaceflight. There were 13 male astronaut candidates who were exposed to a simulated high +Gx acceleration profile in a spacecraft during an emergency return lasting for 230 s. The peak value was 8.5 G. Subjective feelings and symptoms, cardiovascular and respiratory responses, and changes in urine component before, during, and after +Gx exposure were investigated. Under high +Gx exposure, 15.4% of subjects exhibited arrhythmia. Heart rate (HR) increased significantly and four different types of HR response curves were distinguished. The ratio of QT to RR interval on the electrocardiograms was significantly increased. Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) declined with increasing G value and then returned gradually. SaO2 reached a minimum (87.7%) at 3 G during the decline phase of the +Gx curve. Respiratory rate increased significantly with increasing G value, while the amplitude and area of the respiratory waves were significantly reduced. The overshoot appeared immediately after +Gx exposure. A few subjects suffered from slight injuries, including positive urine protein (1/13), positive urinary occult blood (1/13), and a large area of petechiae on the back (1/13). Astronaut candidates have relatively good tolerance to the +Gx profile during a simulation of spacecraft emergent ballistic re-entry. However, a few subjects exhibited adverse physiological responses and slight reversible pathological injuries.

  3. Timing criteria for supplemental BWR emergency response equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickel, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The Great Tohuku Earthquake and subsequent Tsunami represented a double failure event which destroyed offsite power connections to Fukushima-Daiichi site and then destroyed on-site electrical systems needed to run decay heat removal systems. The accident could have been mitigated had there been supplemental portable battery chargers, supplemental pumps, and in-place piping connections to provide alternate decay heat removal. In response to this event in the USA, two national response centers, one in Memphis, Tennessee, and another in Phoenix, Arizona, will begin operation. They will be able to dispatch supplemental emergency response equipment to any nuclear plant in the U.S. within 24 hours. In order to define requirements for supplemental nuclear power plant emergency response equipment maintained onsite vs. in a regional support center it is necessary to confirm: (a) the earliest time such equipment might be needed depending on the specific scenario, (b) the nominal time to move the equipment from a storage location either on-site or within the region of a nuclear power plant, and (c) the time required to connect in the supplemental equipment to use it. This paper describes an evaluation process for a BWR-4 with a Mark I Containment starting with: (a) severe accident simulation to define best estimate times available for recovery based on the specific scenario, (b) identify the key supplemental response equipment needed at specific times to accomplish recovery of key safety functions, and (c) evaluate what types of equipment should be warehoused on-site vs. in regional response centers. (authors)

  4. The Emergence of Marketing and Communications Strategy in South African Further Education and Training Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Simon; Akoojee, Salim

    2007-01-01

    South African further education and training (FET) colleges have been enjoined to become more responsive to their external environment, in keeping with international trends in public vocational education and training (VET) reform. One mechanism for achieving this goal is to market colleges and communicate more effectively to future students,…

  5. Arctic shipping and risks: Emergency categories and response capacities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchenko, Nataly A.; Andreassen, Natalia; Borch, Odd Jarl

    2018-01-01

    The sea ice in the Arctic has shrunk significantly in the last decades. The transport pattern has as a result partly changed with more traffic in remote areas. This change may influence the risk pattern. The critical factors are harsh weather, ice conditions, remoteness and vulnerability of natur...... are rare, there are limited statistics available for Arctic maritime accidents. Hence, this study offers a qualitative analysis and an expert-based risk assessment. Implications for the emergency preparedness system of the Arctic region are discussed........ In this paper, we look into the risk of accidents in Atlantic Arctic based on previous ship accidents and the changes in maritime activity. The risk has to be assessed to ensure a proper level of emergency response. The consequences of incidents depend on the incident type, scale and location. As accidents...

  6. Response of human populations to large-scale emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrow, James; Wang, Dashun; Barabási, Albert-László

    2010-03-01

    Until recently, little quantitative data regarding collective human behavior during dangerous events such as bombings and riots have been available, despite its importance for emergency management, safety and urban planning. Understanding how populations react to danger is critical for prediction, detection and intervention strategies. Using a large telecommunications dataset, we study for the first time the spatiotemporal, social and demographic response properties of people during several disasters, including a bombing, a city-wide power outage, and an earthquake. Call activity rapidly increases after an event and we find that, when faced with a truly life-threatening emergency, information rapidly propagates through a population's social network. Other events, such as sports games, do not exhibit this propagation.

  7. Two-Graph Building Interior Representation for Emergency Response Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslawski, P.; Mahdjoubi, L.; Zverovich, V.; Fadli, F.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, in a rapidly developing urban environment with bigger and higher public buildings, disasters causing emergency situations and casualties are unavoidable. Preparedness and quick response are crucial issues saving human lives. Available information about an emergency scene, such as a building structure, helps for decision making and organizing rescue operations. Models supporting decision-making should be available in real, or near-real, time. Thus, good quality models that allow implementation of automated methods are highly desirable. This paper presents details of the recently developed method for automated generation of variable density navigable networks in a 3D indoor environment, including a full 3D topological model, which may be used not only for standard navigation but also for finding safe routes and simulating hazard and phenomena associated with disasters such as fire spread and heat transfer.

  8. TWO-GRAPH BUILDING INTERIOR REPRESENTATION FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Boguslawski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, in a rapidly developing urban environment with bigger and higher public buildings, disasters causing emergency situations and casualties are unavoidable. Preparedness and quick response are crucial issues saving human lives. Available information about an emergency scene, such as a building structure, helps for decision making and organizing rescue operations. Models supporting decision-making should be available in real, or near-real, time. Thus, good quality models that allow implementation of automated methods are highly desirable. This paper presents details of the recently developed method for automated generation of variable density navigable networks in a 3D indoor environment, including a full 3D topological model, which may be used not only for standard navigation but also for finding safe routes and simulating hazard and phenomena associated with disasters such as fire spread and heat transfer.

  9. On-site and off-site emergency planning at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyberk, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    An emergency plan was prepared for minimizing the consequences of any unforeseen radiation accident in Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre (CNAEM) in Istanbul, Turkey. CNAEM is situated near Kucukcekmece Lake, which is about 30 km to the west of Istanbul. It includes two pool-type research reactors of 1 MW(th) and 5 MW(th). The population in the nearest inhabited areas varies from 1000 to 50,000. Accidents are classified, according to their severity, into three categories at CNAEM: (a) local emergency, (b) on-site emergency, (c) off-site emergency. During local emergency situations evacuation is not necessary. An on-site emergency situation requires the evacuation of personnel from the plant. Personnel hearing the emergency alarm should move directly to the preselected place as soon as possible. An off-site emergency is any accident that leads to widespread contamination outside the boundary. In this situation the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority and governmental authorities are notified immediately. The emergency organization group consists of: (a) Plant Superintendent, (b) Emergency Director, (c) Reactor Supervisor, (d) Senior Health Physicist, (e) Reactor Shift Operator, (f) Health Physicists. The administration building will be used as the Emergency Control Centre. The emergency teams working under the direction of the Emergency Director consist of: (a) Health Physics, (b) Fire and Rescue, (c) First Aid and Decontamination, (d) Transportation, (e) Security and Patrol. The emergency situation is evaluated in three phases at CNAEM. The first phase is the first few hours after the beginning of the accident. The second phase is between 8-10 hours or more following the first phase. The third phase is the recovery phase. The integrated doses over periods of two hours and two days are calculated according to the situation of the core, i.e. total or partial melting, and weather conditions. The results of the calculated parameters can be adapted to possible

  10. The training needs of Turkish emergency department personnel regarding intimate partner violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksan, H Asli Davas; Aksu, Feride

    2007-01-01

    Background Violence against females is a widespread public health problem in Turkey and the lifetime prevalence of IPV ranges between 34 and 58.7%. Health care workers (HCW) sometimes have the unique opportunity and obligation to identify, treat, and educate females who are abused. The objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of the emergency department (ED) staff regarding intimate partner violence (IPV) at a large university hospital in Turkey. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a large university hospital via questionnaire. The study population consisted of all the nurses and physicians who worked in the ED during a two month period (n = 215). The questionnaire response rate was 80.5% (41 nurses and 132 physicians). The main domains of the questionnaire were knowledge regarding the definition of IPV, clinical findings in victims of IPV, legal aspects of IPV, attitudes towards IPV, knowledge about the characteristics of IPV victims and abusers, and professional and personal experiences and training with respect to IPV. Results One-half of the study group were females, 76.3% were physicians, and 89.8% had no training on IPV. The majority of the nurses (89.5%) and physicians (71.1%) declared that they were aware of the clinical appearance of IPV. The mean of the knowledge scores on clinical knowledge were 8.84 ± 1.73 (range, 0–10) for acute conditions, and 4.51 ± 3.32 for chronic conditions. The mean of the knowledge score on legal procedures and the legal rights of the victims was 4.33 ± 1.66 (range, 0–7). At least one reason to justify physical violence was accepted by 69.0% of females and 84.7% of males, but more males than females tended to justify violence (chi square = 5.96; p = 0.015). However, both genders accepted that females who experienced physical violence should seek professional medical help. Conclusion The study participants' knowledge about IPV was rather low and a training program is

  11. The emergence of mirror-like response properties from domain-general principles in vision and audition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, Ayse P; Dick, Frederic

    2014-04-01

    Like Cook et al., we suggest that mirror neurons are a fascinating product of cross-modal learning. As predicted by an associative account, responses in motor regions are observed for novel and/or abstract visual stimuli such as point-light and android movements. Domain-specific mirror responses also emerge as a function of audiomotor expertise that is slowly acquired over years of intensive training.

  12. Emergency response arrangements for the transport of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan-Warren, E. [Radioactive Materials Transport Div., Dept. for Transport, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Response arrangements are required for the transport of radioactive materials, under both transport and health and safety legislation, to safeguard persons, property and the environment in the event of incidents and emergencies. Responsibilities fall on both government and industry: government is responsible for ensuring public safety and providing information and reassurance. This responsibility is discharged for each type of incident by a nominated ''lead department'', supported as appropriate by other government departments and agencies; for their part, operators are obliged to have arrangements in place for dealing with the practicalities of any reasonably foreseeable incident, including recovery and onward transport of a package, and any required clean-up or restoration of the environment. This paper outlines both the government and industry arrangements in Great Britain. The principles of response and intervention are discussed, together with the lead department concept, regulatory requirements, and the plans developed by the transport industry to ensure a nation-wide response capability.

  13. Oil Notifications: Emergency Response Notification System (ERNS) fact sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The Emergency Response Notification System (ERNS) is a national computer database which provides the only centralized mechanism for documenting and verifying incident notification information as initially reported to the National Response Center (NRC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and to a limited extent, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). The initial notification data may be followed up with updated information from various Federal, State and local response authorities, as appropriate. ERNS contains data that can be used to analyze release notifications, support emergency planning efforts, and assist decision makers in developing spill prevention programs. The fact sheet provides summary information on notifications of releases of oil reported in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA). Under Section 311 of the CWA, discharges of oil which: (1) cause a sheen to appear on the surface of the water; (2) violate applicable water quality standards; or (3) cause sludge or emulsion to be deposited beneath the surface of the water or adjoining shoreline, must be reported to the NRC

  14. Endurance exercise training increases peripheral vascular response in human fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, K; Shimoda, M; Maeda, J; Takemiya, T

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether peripheral vascular response to alteration of transmural pressure is changed by endurance exercise training. The healthy male subjects (training group; n = 6) performed endurance exercise training that consisted of cycle ergometer exercise 5 d.week-1 and 30 min.d-1 for a period of 8 weeks. Changes in the peripheral vascular response to alteration of transmural pressure in the human finger were measured by a differential digital photoplethysmogram (DeltaDPG) and blood pressure during passive movement of the arm to different vertical hand positions relative to heart level. Following 8 weeks of endurance training, percent changes in DeltaDPG from heart level in the training group increased significantly (mean +/- SD, -48.1 +/- 7. 3 to -58.7 +/- 9.3% at the lowered position, 46.1 +/- 13.4 to 84.6 +/- 8.8% at the elevated position, ppressure, also significantly changed in the training group over the 8 weeks (5.6 +/- 1.3 to 2.7 +/- 1.6 mV. V-1.s-1.mmHg-1 at the lowered position, 30.0 +/- 12.4 to 54.4 +/- 18. 9 mV.V-1.s-1.mmHg-1 at the elevated position ). Maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2 max) was significantly increased in the training group. On the other hand, the control group (n = 6) showed no significant changes in all parameters for 8 weeks. Therefore these results suggest that endurance exercise training induces an increase in peripheral vascular response to alteration of transmural pressure in the human finger.

  15. Commercial Airline In-Flight Emergency: Medical Student Response and Review of Medicolegal Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Josh H; Richards, John R

    2016-01-01

    As the prevalence of air travel increases, in-flight medical emergencies occur more frequently. A significant percentage of these emergencies occur when there is no certified physician, nurse, or paramedic onboard. During these situations, flight crews might enlist the help of noncertified passengers, such as medical students, dentists, or emergency medical technicians in training. Although Good Samaritan laws exist, many health care providers are unfamiliar with the limited legal protections and resources provided to them after responding to an in-flight emergency. A 78-year-old woman lost consciousness and became pulseless onboard a commercial aircraft. No physician was available. A medical student responded and coordinated care with the flight crew, ground support physician, and other passengers. After receiving a packet (4 g) of sublingual sucrose and 1 L i.v. crystalloid, the patient regained pulses and consciousness. The medical student made the decision not to divert the aircraft based on the patient's initial response to therapy and, 45 min later, the patient had normal vital signs. Upon landing, she was met and taken by paramedics to the nearest emergency department for evaluation of her collapse. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians are the most qualified to assist in-flight emergencies, but they might not be aware of the medicolegal risks involved with in-flight care, the resources available, and the role of the flight crew in liability and decision making. This case, which involved a medical student who was not given explicit protection under Good Samaritan laws, illustrates the authority of the flight crew during these events and highlights areas of uncertainty in the legislation for volunteer medical professionals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Developing Training Programs to Save Lives: Serving Students with Complex or Emergency Healthcare Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Annmarie; Rozalski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The number of students with special health care needs (SHCN; McPherson, Arango & Fox, 1998) and the frequency of life-threatening health emergencies in schools (e.g., asthma, diabetes, severe allergic reactions, cardiac arrest, seizure disorders), continues to increase. It has become increasingly important for teachers to be trained in…

  17. Multidisciplinary team training in a simulation setting for acute abstetric emergencies : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merién, A.E.R.; Ven, van de J.; Mol, B.W.J.; Houterman, S.; Oei, S.G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of multidisciplinary teamwork training in a simulation setting for the reduction of medical adverse outcomes in obstetric emergency situations. DATA SOURCES: We searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from

  18. Multidisciplinary Team Training in a Simulation Setting for Acute Obstetric Emergencies A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merién, A. E. R.; van de Ven, J.; Mol, B. W.; Houterman, S.; Oei, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of multidisciplinary teamwork training in a simulation setting for the reduction of medical adverse outcomes in obstetric emergency situations. DATA SOURCES: We searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from

  19. STS-54 Astronaut Crew Emergency Egress Training, Press Q&A, TCDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The crew of STS-54, Commander John H. Casper, Pilot Donald R. McMonagle, and Mission Specialists Mario Runco, Jr., Gregory J. Harbaugh, and Susan J. Helms, is seen during a question and answer session with the press and during the Terminal Countdown and Demonstration Test (TCDT), including Emergency Egress Training.

  20. Simulation training for medical emergencies in the dental setting using an inexpensive software application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, N; Mukai, N; Honda, Y; Hirata, Y; Tanaka, M; Momota, Y

    2017-11-09

    Every dental provider needs to be educated about medical emergencies to provide safe dental care. Simulation training is available with simulators such as advanced life support manikins and robot patients. However, the purchase and development costs of these simulators are high. We have developed a simulation training course on medical emergencies using an inexpensive software application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the educational effectiveness of this course. Fifty-one dental providers participated in this study from December 2014 to March 2015. Medical simulation software was used to simulate a patient's vital signs. We evaluated participants' ability to diagnose and treat vasovagal syncope or anaphylaxis with an evaluation sheet and conducted a questionnaire before and after the scenario-based simulation training. The median evaluation sheet score for vasovagal syncope increased significantly from 7/9 before to 9/9 after simulation training. The median score for anaphylaxis also increased significantly from 8/12 to 12/12 (P simulation training. This simulation course improved participants' ability to diagnose and treat medical emergencies and improved their confidence. This course can be offered inexpensively using a software application. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Use of fiber optics in an emergency response data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaffey, J.A.; Wahab, E.Z.

    1988-01-01

    An optical fiber communications medium has been installed in the Emergency Response Data Systems (ERDS) in the E. I. Hatch Nuclear Power Plant. These high-speed, digital communications systems are used to link together two data-collection nodes in each of two computer networks, so that the plant operating data may be shared on a real-time basis. The use of a glass-and-plastic fiber for data communications may have several advantages over a metallic medium in this special application, and it has proven to be a very reliable means of data linkage over several unit-years of operation

  2. Oil spill emergency response: Fulfilling regulatory requirements on the Grand Banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    Offshore well licensing under Canadian regulations requires the operator to conduct a practice exercise of oil spill countermeasures and emergency response procedures at least yearly, once the drilling program starts. The relevant parts of the Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Drilling Regulations are summarized and the objectives and benefits of the practice exercises are reviewed. In addition to ensuring regulatory compliance, the exercises also provide the opportunity to test operational procedures, to provide in-house training, and improve response efficiency by regular repetition of the exercise. Exercises in communications during a spill incident in the offshore and in deployment of offshore spill response equipment conducted by Petro-Canada in Newfoundland are described. Problems identified during the exercises are noted

  3. Skeletal Muscle Response to Endurance Training in IL-6-/- Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojewoda, M; Kmiecik, K; Majerczak, J; Ventura-Clapier, R; Fortin, D; Onopiuk, M; Rog, J; Kaminski, K; Chlopicki, S; Zoladz, J A

    2015-12-01

    We examined effects of moderate-intensity endurance training on muscle COX/CS activities and V'O2max in control WT and IL-6(-/-) mice. Animals were exercised for 10 weeks on treadmill for 1 h, 5 days a week at velocity of 6 m·min(-1) which was increased by 0.5 m·min(-1) every 2 weeks up to 8 m·min(-1) . Training triggered an increase of enzyme activities in soleus muscle of WT mice (COX: 480.3±8.9 U·g(-1) in sedentary group vs. 773.3±62.6 U·g(-1) in trained group, P<0.05 and CS: 374.0±6.0 U·g(-1) in sedentary group vs. 534.2±20.5 U·g(-1) in trained group, P<0.01, respectively) whereas no changes were observed in soleus of IL6(-/-) mice. Moreover, in mixed gastrocnemius muscle of trained IL-6(-/-) mice enzyme activities tended to be lower (COX: 410.7±48.4 U·g(-1) for sedentary vs. 277.0±36.5 U·g(-1) for trained group and CS: 343.8±24.6 U·g(-1) for sedentary vs. 251.7±27.1 U·g(-1) for trained group). No changes in V'O2max were observed in WT and IL-6(-/-) mice after training. Concluding, moderate-velocity endurance training-induced increase in COX and CS activities in muscles of WT mice only which suggests that IL-6 regulates training-induced skeletal muscle responses to exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. EM Talk: communication skills training for emergency medicine patients with serious illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzen, Corita R; Emlet, Lillian L; Kuntz, Joanne; Shreves, Ashley; Zimny, Erin; Gang, Maureen; Schaulis, Monique; Schmidt, Scott; Isaacs, Eric; Arnold, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The emergency department visit for a patient with serious illness represents a sentinel event, signalling a change in the illness trajectory. By better understanding patient and family wishes, emergency physicians can reinforce advance care plans and ensure the hospital care provided matches the patient's values. Despite their importance in care at the end of life, emergency physicians have received little training on how to talk to seriously ill patients and their families about goals of care. To expand communication skills training to emergency medicine, we developed a programme to give emergency medicine physicians the ability to empathically deliver serious news and to talk about goals of care. We have built on lessons from prior studies to design an intervention employing the most effective pedagogical techniques, including the use of simulated patients/families, role-playing and small group learning with constructive feedback from master clinicians. Here, we describe our evidence-based communication skills training course EM Talk using simulation, reflective feedback and deliberate practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Dose-response relationship of autonomic nervous system responses to individualized training impulse in marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Castagna, Carlo; Padua, Elvira; Lombardo, Mauro; D'Ottavio, Stefano; Massaro, Michele; Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2009-06-01

    In athletes, exercise training induces autonomic nervous system (ANS) adaptations that could be used to monitor training status. However, the relationship between training and ANS in athletes has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in long-distance athletes, changes in ANS parameters are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load and could predict athletic performance. A spectral analysis of heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity by the sequences technique was investigated in eight recreational athletes during a 6-mo training period culminating with a marathon. Individualized training load responses were monitored by a modified training impulse (TRIMP(i)) method, which was determined in each athlete using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test. Monthly TRIMP(i) steadily increased during the training period. All the ANS parameters were significantly and very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.90 to 0.99; P marathon. These results suggest that in recreational athletes, ANS adaptations to exercise training are dose related on an individual basis, showing a progressive shift toward a sympathetic predominance, and that LF oscillations in HRV at peak training load could predict athletic achievement in this athlete population.

  6. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing their consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a large number of States (Section 1.7), the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full parties. The arrangements between the IAEA, States that are IAEA Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations, and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). In 2000, a complete revision of ENATOM, with all relevant sections updated, withdrawn or replaced with new material, was reissued as EPR-ENATOM (2000) to reflect new technological developments, operational concepts, views on standards in the area of emergency preparedness and response, and Member States' expectations. A separate publication, EPR-JPLAN (2000), the Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (Joint Plan'), described a common understanding of how each of six co-sponsoring international organizations will act during a response and in making preparedness arrangements. It is intended that the ENATOM is reviewed and reissued biennially in line with the review cycle of the Joint Plan. Since the

  7. Radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response. How well are we prepared?; Radiologischer und nuklearer Notfallschutz. Wie gut sind wir vorbereitet?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geick, Gunther H.G. [Dataport, Altenholz (Germany); Herrmann, Andre R. [HERRMANN Consultant, Basel (Switzerland); Koch, Doris [Ministerium fuer Justiz, Gleichstellung und Integration, Kiel (Germany); Meisenberg, Oliver [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany); Rauber, Dominique [Bundesamt fuer Bevoelkerungsschutz (BABS), Zuerich (CH). Eidgenoessisches Dept. fuer Verteidigung, Bevoelkerungsschutz und Sport (VBS); Stuerm, Rolf P. [SafPro AG, Basel (Switzerland); Weiss, Wolfgang [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany); Miska, Horst; Schoenhacker, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    The contributions to this topic are dealing, in a broad overview, with important aspects of Nuclear Emergency Preparedness and Response, like the influence of the new ICRP recommendations number 103 and number 109 on emergency preparedness and on planning for response, possible problems in installing and operating emergency care centres, experience from exercises as well as the training of response personnel in Austria and Germany. Finally, measures in emergency preparedness with regard to a dirty bomb attack are reported by means of an INEX-4-exercise in Switzerland. (orig.)

  8. Major incidents in Kenya: the case for emergency services development and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachira, Benjamin W; Smith, Wayne

    2013-04-01

    Kenya's major incidents profile is dominated by droughts, floods, fires, terrorism, poisoning, collapsed buildings, accidents in the transport sector and disease/epidemics. With no integrated emergency services and a lack of resources, many incidents in Kenya escalate to such an extent that they become major incidents. Lack of specific training of emergency services personnel to respond to major incidents, poor coordination of major incident management activities, and a lack of standard operational procedures and emergency operation plans have all been shown to expose victims to increased morbidity and mortality. This report provides a review of some of the major incidents in Kenya for the period 2000-2012, with the hope of highlighting the importance of developing an integrated and well-trained Ambulance and Fire and Rescue service appropriate for the local health care system.

  9. High-speed LWR transients simulation for optimizing emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.; Stritar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of computer-assisted emergency response in nuclear power plants, and the requirements for achieving such a response, are presented. An important requirement is the attainment of realistic high-speed plant simulations at the reactor site. Currently pursued development programs for plant simulations are reviewed. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is presented for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computer hardware to achieve high-speed simulations. A newly developed technology for high-speed power plant simulation is described and results are presented. It is shown that simulation speeds ten times greater than real-time process-speeds are possible, and that plant instrumentation can be made part of the computational loop in a small, on-site minicomputer. Additional technical issues are presented which must still be resolved before the newly developed technology can be implemented in a nuclear power plant

  10. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state's emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor's designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments

  11. Just-in-time training of dental responders in a simulated pandemic immunization response exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Michael D; Hirst, Jeremy L; Vesper, Benjamin J; DeTella, George E; Tsagalis, Mila P; Roberg, Mary J; Peters, David E; Wallace, Jimmy D; James, James J

    2014-06-01

    The reauthorization of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act in 2013 incorporated the dental profession and dental professionals into the federal legislation governing public health response to pandemics and all-hazard situations. Work is now necessary to expand the processes needed to incorporate and train oral health care professionals into pandemic and all-hazard response events. A just-in-time (JIT) training exercise and immunization drill using an ex vivo porcine model system was conducted to demonstrate the rapidity to which dental professionals can respond to a pandemic influenza scenario. Medical history documentation, vaccination procedures, and patient throughput and error rates of 15 dental responders were evaluated by trained nursing staff and emergency response personnel. The average throughput (22.33/hr) and medical error rates (7 of 335; 2.08%) of the dental responders were similar to those found in analogous influenza mass vaccination clinics previously conducted using certified public health nurses. The dental responder immunization drill validated the capacity and capability of dental professionals to function as a valuable immunization resource. The ex vivo porcine model system used for JIT training can serve as a simple and inexpensive training tool to update pandemic responders' immunization techniques and procedures supporting inoculation protocols.

  12. Using paradox theory to understand responses to tensions between service and training in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Roberts, Ruby; Kitto, Simon; Strand, Pia; Johnston, Peter

    2018-03-01

    The tension between service and training in pressured health care environments can have a detrimental impact on training quality and job satisfaction. Yet the management literature proposes that competing demands are inherent in organisational settings: it is not the demands as such that lead to negative outcomes but how people and organisations react to opposing tensions. We explored how key stakeholders responded to competing service-training demands in a surgical setting that had recently gone through a highly-publicised organisational crisis. This was an explanatory case study of a general surgery unit. Public documents informed the research questions and the data were triangulated with semi-structured interviews (n = 14) with key stakeholders. Data coding and analysis were initially inductive but, after the themes emerged, we used a paradox lens to group themes into four contextual dimensions: performing, organising, belonging and learning. Tensions were apparent in the data, with managers, surgeons and trainees or residents in conflict with each other because of different goals or priorities and divergent perspectives on the same issue of balancing service and training (performing). This adversely impacted on relationships across and within groups (belonging, learning) and led to individuals prioritising their own goals rather than working for the 'greater good' (performing, belonging). Yet although relationships and communication improved, the approach to getting a better balance maintained the 'compartmentalisation' of training (organising) rather than acknowledging that training and service cannot be separated. Stakeholder responses to the tensions provided temporary relief but were unlikely to lead to real change if the tension between service and training was considered to be an interdependent and persistent paradox. Reframing the service-training paradox in this way may encourage adjusting responses to create effective working partnerships. Our findings

  13. Emergency preparedness and response: achievements, future needs and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.N.

    2000-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident had a profound effect on emergency preparedness and response world-wide and particularly within Europe. Deficiencies in arrangements for dealing with such a large accident, at both national and international levels (eg, world trade in foodstuffs), led to many problems of both a practical and political nature. Many lessons were learnt and considerable resources have since been committed to improve emergency preparedness and avoid similar problems in future. Improvements have been made at national, regional and international levels and have been diverse in nature. Some of the more notable at an international level are the convention on early notification, limits for the contamination of foodstuffs in international trade and broad agreement on the principles of intervention (albeit less so on their practical interpretation). At a regional level, many bi and multi-lateral agreements have been brought into to force for the timely exchange of information and the efficacy of these arrangements is increasingly being demonstrated by regional exercises. At a national level, the improvements have been diverse, ranging from the installation of extensive networks of gamma monitors to provide early warning of an accident to more robust and effective arrangements between the many organisations with a role or responsibility in an emergency. More than a decade after Chernobyl, it is timely to reflect on what has been achieved in practice and, in particular, whether there is a need for further improvement and, if so, where these aspects will be addressed in the context of the likelihood the decreasing resources will be allocated to this area in future as memories fade post Chernobyl. Particular attention will be given to: the potential for advances in informatics, communications and decision support to provide better emergency preparedness and response at reduced cost; the adequacy of guidance on intervention for the long tern management of containment areas

  14. Application of a geographic information system for radiologic emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.G.; Doyle, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) is a multifunctional analytical tool that can be used to compile available data and derive information. A GIS is a computerized database management system for the capture, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display of spatial data. Maps are the most common type of spatial data, but any type of data that can be referenced by an x-y location or geographic coordinate can be used in a GIS. In a radiological emergency, it is critical that data of all types be rapidly compiled into a common format in order to make accurate observations and informed decisions. Developing a baseline GIS for nuclear facilities would offer a significant incentive for all organizations to contribute to and utilize this powerful data management tool. The system being developed could integrate all elements of emergency planning, from the initial protective actions based on models through the emergency monitoring phase, and finally ending with the complex reentry and recovery phase. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. To demonstrate the potential of GIS for emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises. An interactive GIS system has been deployed and used to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. For this application, both hardcopy and real-time spatial displays were generated with the GIS. Composite maps with different sizes, scales, and themes were produced to support the exercises

  15. Three-year emergency medicine training program in The Netherlands: first evaluation from the residents' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Salomon Willem; Gaakeer, Menno Iskander; Veugelers, Rebekka

    2013-07-26

    The Netherlands' 3-year training in Emergency Medicine (EM) was formally approved and introduced in November 2008. To identify areas for improvement, we conducted the first evaluation of this curriculum from the residents' perspective. A questionnaire was composed on ten aspects of the curriculum. It contained multiple-choice, open and opinion questions; answers to the latter were classified using the Likert scale. The questionnaires were mailed to all enrolled residents. We mailed questionnaires to all 189 enrolled residents, and 105 responded (55.6%). Although they were satisfied with their training overall, 96.2% thought it was currently too short: 18.3% desired extension to 4 years, 76.0% to 5 and 1.9% to 6 years. Nevertheless, residents expected that they would function effectively as emergency physicians (EPs) after finishing their 3-year training program. Bedside teaching was assessed positively by 35.2%. All rotations were assessed positively, with the general practice rotation seen as contributing the least to the program. According to 43.7%, supervising EPs were available for consultation; 40.7% thought that, in a clinical capacity, the EP was sufficiently present during residents' shifts. When EPs were present, 82.5% found them to be easily accessible, and 66.6% viewed them as role models. In the Emergency Medicine Departments (EDs) with a higher number of EPs employed, residents tended to perceive better supervision and were more likely to see their EPs as role models. While residents were stimulated to do research, actual support and assistance needed to be improved. Although overall, the current training program was evaluated positively, the residents identified four areas for improvement: (1) in training hospitals, trained EPs should be present more continuously for clinical supervision; (2) bedside teaching should be improved, (3) scientific research should be facilitated more and (4) the training program should be extended.

  16. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  17. Initial operations in local nuclear emergency response headquarter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the Fukushima nuclear accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake and the tsunami that occurred thereafter, local nuclear emergency response headquarters (local headquarters) was set up at off-site center (OFC). However, several obstacles such as the collapse of means of communication resulting from severed communication lines, food and fuel shortage resulting from stagnant physical distribution, and increasing radiation dose around the center significantly restricted originally intended operation of local headquarters. In such severe situation, the personnel gathered at the OFC from the government, local public bodies and electric companies from March 11 to 15 acted without sufficient food, sleep or rest and did all they could against successively occurring unexpected challenges by using limited means of communication. However, issues requiring further consideration were activities of each functional group, location of OFC and the functions of equipment, machines and materials and reflecting the consideration results into future protective measures and revision of the manual for nuclear emergency response were greatly important. This report described investigated results on initial operations in local headquarters such as situation of activities conducted by local headquarters and operations at functional groups. (T. Tanaka)

  18. An environmental BeO-OSL dosimeter for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woda, Clemens; Kaiser, Jan Christian; Urso, Laura; Greiter, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented to use measurements of localized absorbed dose in inner cities for production of high resolution maps of the radioactive contamination following a nuclear emergency or radiological attack. The doses are derived from luminescent detectors pre-fixed at places of high importance (e.g. public squares). For such an environmental dosimeter, BeO is used, which can be read out using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). A suitable casing of black Perspex has been developed to give a sufficiently accurate estimate of the air kerma value at the detector position. The dosimeter is characterized according to light tightness, dose response and angular photon energy dependence. A short overview of the approach for map production is also given. - Highlights: ► An inexpensive, environmentally stable BeO based OSL dosimeter has been developed for emergency response. ► The detector enables fast readouts and shows highly favorable dosimetric properties. ► A conceptual design is described to produce maps of radioactive contamination from localized dose measurements in urban areas.

  19. A new emergency response model for MACCS. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanin, D.I.

    1992-01-01

    Under DOE sponsorship, as directed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the MACCS code (version 1.5.11.1) [Ch92] was modified to implement a series of improvements in its modeling of emergency response actions. The purpose of this effort has been to aid the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) in its performance of the Level III analysis for the Savannah River Site (SRS) probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) of K Reactor [Wo90]. To ensure its usefulness to WSRC, and facilitate the new model's eventual merger with other MACCS enhancements, close cooperation with WSRC and the MACCS development team at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was maintained throughout the project. These improvements are intended to allow a greater degree of flexibility in modeling the mitigative actions of evacuation and sheltering. The emergency response model in MACCS version 1.5.11.1 was developed to support NRC analyses of consequences from severe accidents at commercial nuclear power plants. The NRC code imposes unnecessary constraints on DOE safety analyses, particularly for consequences to onsite worker populations, and it has therefore been revamped. The changes to the code have been implemented in a manner that preserves previous modeling capabilities and therefore prior analyses can be repeated with the new code

  20. Evaluating the success of an emergency response medical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petter, Stacie; Fruhling, Ann

    2011-07-01

    STATPack™ is an information system used to aid in the diagnosis of pathogens in hospitals and state public health laboratories. STATPack™ is used as a communication and telemedicine diagnosis tool during emergencies. This paper explores the success of this emergency response medical information system (ERMIS) using a well-known framework of information systems success developed by DeLone and McLean. Using an online survey, the entire population of STATPack™ users evaluated the success of the information system by considering system quality, information quality, system use, intention to use, user satisfaction, individual impact, and organizational impact. The results indicate that the overall quality of this ERMIS (i.e., system quality, information quality, and service quality) has a positive impact on both user satisfaction and intention to use the system. However, given the nature of ERMIS, overall quality does not necessarily predict use of the system. Moreover, the user's satisfaction with the information system positively affected the intention to use the system. User satisfaction, intention to use, and system use had a positive influence on the system's impact on the individual. Finally, the organizational impacts of the system were positively influenced by use of the system and the system's individual impact on the user. The results of the study demonstrate how to evaluate the success of an ERMIS as well as introduce potential changes in how one applies the DeLone and McLean success model in an emergency response medical information system context. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Establishing a mobile automatic monitoring station for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hsin-Fa

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A radiological/nuclear emergency event may cause environmental contamination. The emergency response works always need to plan an environmental survey programme incorporating the assessment results to see what is happening. The places where are assessed to have the highest radioactive contamination/radiation dose will catch more concern and need continuous monitoring. It will cause unnecessary dangers and dose to command that personnel conduct surveying in such places when the radiological/nuclear accident become more severe. A mobile automatic monitoring station has been established for emergency response by INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research) to solve the problem practically. The monitoring station involves a HPIC to monitor radiation dose, an anemometer to monitor wind speed and direction, a GPS to get position data, a GPRS/3G communication module to send monitoring and positioning data to the monitoring centre where can show the monitoring result directly on a map shown on the computer. These instruments are integrated in a trailer easy to be towed to the place need to be monitored. The electric power of the station is supplied by s a solar power energy system. It can supply the station working at least 10 days without extra electric power supply designed based on the expected time length of a nuclear power plant event. The HPIC is very sensitive and stable that can discriminate a 10 nSv/hr increasing of dose rate with the monitoring time period every ten seconds. Where the radiological dispersion device events happened is not predictable, it is difficult to get suitable wind monitoring data to assess the result of radiological dispersion device events. The anemometer added on the station can provide the real time wind monitoring data to help assessment works. (author)

  2. IAEA response assistance network. Incident and Emergency Centre. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 May 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    This publication is intended to serve as a tool for supporting the provision of international assistance in the case of nuclear or radiological incident or emergency, cooperation between States, their Competent Authorities and the IAEA, and harmonization of response capabilities of States offering assistance. The publication is issued under the authority of the Director General of the IAEA: (1) under the auspices of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the Assistance Convention) [1], to promote, facilitate and support cooperation between States Parties to coordinate and/or provide assistance to a State Party and/or Member State; and (2) in the case of an incident or emergency, as statutory functions, to provide for the application of its safety standards, upon request by a Member State, and to act as an intermediary for the purposes of securing the performance of services or the supplying of materials, equipment or facilities by one Member State for another. The publication sets out the following: a) the RANET concept and the organizational structure for providing assistance; b) functions, responsibilities and activities within the RANET; c) the RANET response operations and arrangements needed for preparedness; and d) the prerequisites for RANET membership and conditions of registration. The RANET is divided into four sections. After the introduction in Section 1, the RANET concept, objectives and scope are described in Section 2. Section 3 presents the concept of operations of the RANET and Section 4 describes expected tasks, capabilities and resources. In addition, EPR-RANET (2006) has three supporting documents, which are issued separately, as follows: 1. Assistance Action Plans with samples of Assistance Action Plans for providing international assistance. 2. Registry with the details of the registry and instructions on how to register national assistance capabilities for the RANET. 3. Technical Guidelines

  3. Incidence of emergency contacts (red responses to Norwegian emergency primary healthcare services in 2007 – a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Elisabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The municipalities are responsible for the emergency primary health care services in Norway. These services include casualty clinics, primary doctors on-call and local emergency medical communication centres (LEMC. The National centre for emergency primary health care has initiated an enterprise called "The Watchtowers", comprising emergency primary health care districts, to provide routine information (patients' way of contact, level of urgency and first action taken by the out-of-hours services over several years based on a minimal dataset. This will enable monitoring, evaluation and comparison of the respective activities in the emergency primary health care services. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of emergency contacts (potential life-threatening situations, red responses to the emergency primary health care service. Methods A representative sample of Norwegian emergency primary health care districts, "The Watchtowers" recorded all contacts and first action taken during the year of 2007. All the variables were continuously registered in a data program by the attending nurses and sent by email to the National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care at a monthly basis. Results During 2007 the Watchtowers registered 85 288 contacts, of which 1 946 (2.3% were defined as emergency contacts (red responses, corresponding to a rate of 9 per 1 000 inhabitants per year. 65% of the instances were initiated by patient, next of kin or health personnel by calling local emergency medical communication centres or meeting directly at the casualty clinics. In 48% of the red responses, the first action taken was a call-out of doctor and ambulance. On a national basis we can estimate approximately 42 500 red responses per year in the EPH in Norway. Conclusion The emergency primary health care services constitute an important part of the emergency system in Norway. Patients call the LEMC or meet directly at casualty clinics

  4. 30 CFR 254.41 - Training your response personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... procedures; (3) Oil-spill trajectory analysis and predicting spill movement; and (4) Any other... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training your response personnel. 254.41 Section 254.41 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL...

  5. Examining the Efficacy of Personal Response Devices in Army Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Angelina; Babbitt, Bea

    2013-01-01

    Benefits of personal response devices (PRDs) have been demonstrated in a variety of settings and disciplines in higher education. This study looked outside of higher education to investigate the efficacy of PRDs in an Army training course in terms of trainee performance, engagement, and satisfaction. Instructors were also surveyed to determine…

  6. Mechanisms of the training response in patients with peripheral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by Gardner et al.18 of 21 studies on exercise training in patients with PAD, PFWD increased 179% and the .... causes an inequality in the supply of and demand for oxygen. Aerobic generation of ATP becomes .... Pohl U, Holtz J, Busse R, Bassenge E. Crucial role of endothelium in the vasodilator response to increased flow ...

  7. Child Welfare Research and Training: A Response to David Stoesz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brenda D.; Vandiver, Vikki L.

    2016-01-01

    In this response to David Stoesz' critique, "The Child Welfare Cartel," the authors agree that child welfare research and training must be improved. The authors disagree, however, with Stoesz' critique of social work education, his assessment of the most-needed forms of child welfare research, and his depiction of the goals and…

  8. Methodology for determining the value of complexity parameter for emergency situation during driving of the train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Horobchenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. During development of intelligent control systems for locomotive there is a need in the evaluation of the current train situation in the terms of traffic safety. In order to estimate the probability of the development of various emergency situations in to the traffic accidents, it is necessary to determine their complexity. The purpose of this paper is to develop the methodology for determining the complexity of emergency situations during the locomotive operation. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the statistical material of traffic safety violations was accumulated. The causes of violations are divided into groups: technical factors, human factors and external influences. Using the theory of hybrid networks it was obtained a model that gives the output complexity parameter of the emergency situation. Network type: multilayer perceptron with hybrid neurons of the first layer and the sigmoid activation function. The methods of the probability theory were used for the analysis of the results. Findings. The approach to the formalization of manufacturing situations that can only be described linguistically was developed, that allowed to use them as input data to the model for emergency situation. It was established and proved that the exponent of complexity for emergency situation during driving the train is a random quantity and obeys to the normal distribution law. It was obtained the graph of the cumulative distribution function, which identified the areas for safe operation and an increased risk of accident. Originality. It was proposed theoretical basis for determining the complexity of emergency situations in the train work and received the maximum complexity value of emergency situations that can be admitted in the operating conditions. Practical value. Constant monitoring of this value allows not only respond to the threat of danger, but also getting it in numerical form and use it as one of the input parameters for the

  9. Characteristics of training and motivation of physicians working in emergency medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Soares Feitosa-Filho

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Emergency medicine is an area in which correct decisions often need to be made fast, thus requiring a well-prepared medical team. There is little information regarding the profile of physicians working at emergency departments in Brazil. Objective: To describe general characteristics of training and motivation of physicians working in the emergency departments of medium and large hospitals in Salvador, Brazil. Method: A cross-sectional study with standardized interviews applied to physicians who work in emergency units in 25 medium and large hospitals in Salvador. At least 75% of the professionals at each hospital were interviewed. One hospital refused to participate in the study. Results: A total of 659 physicians were interviewed, with a median age of 34 years (interquartile interval: 29-44 years, 329 (49.9% were female and 96 (14.6% were medical residents working at off hours. The percentage of physicians who had been trained with Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support and Advanced Trauma Life Support courses was 5.2, 18.4 and 11.0%, respectively, with a greater frequency of Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support training among younger individuals (23.6% versus 13.9%; p<0.001. Thirteen percent said they were completely satisfied with the activity, while 81.3% expressed a desire to stop working in emergency units in the next 15 years, mentioning stress levels as the main reason. Conclusion: The physicians interviewed had taken few emergency immersion courses. A low motivational level was registered in physicians who work in the emergency departments of medium and large hospitals in Salvador.

  10. 78 FR 33467 - Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy: Response, Recovery & Resiliency; Correction... allocation of $3.7 billion under the Public Transportation Emergency Relief Program to the four FTA...

  11. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  12. A special purpose vehicle for radiological emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeck, K.

    1995-01-01

    The scope of this paper encompasses the design and application of a Contamination Control Station (CCS) Response Vehicle. The vehicle is part of emergency response assets at the Department of Energy Pantex Plant, the nation's final assembly and disassembly point for nuclear weapons. The CCS Response Vehicle was designed to satisfy the need for a rapid deployment of equipment for the setup of a Contamination Control Station. This deployment may be either on the Pantex Plant site, or, if directed by the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office, to any location in the US or worldwide to a site having radioactive contamination and needing response assets of this type. Based on the specialized nature of the vehicle and its mission, certain design criteria must be considered. The vehicle must be air transportable. This criteria alone poses size, weight, and material restrictions due to the transporting aircraft and temperature/pressure variations. This paper first focuses on the overall mission of the vehicle, then highlights some of the design considerations

  13. A simulation-based training program improves emergency department staff communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lynn A; Warren, Otis; Gardner, Liz; Rojek, Adam; Lindquist, David G

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of Project CLEAR!, a novel simulation-based training program designed to instill Crew Resource Management (CRM) as the communication standard and to create a service-focused environment in the emergency department (ED) by standardizing the patient encounter. A survey-based study compared physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the quality of communication before and after the training program. Surveys were developed to measure ED staff perceptions of the quality of communication between staff members and with patients. Pretraining and posttraining survey results were compared. After the training program, survey scores improved significantly on questions that asked participants to rate the overall communication between staff members and between staff and patients. A simulation-based training program focusing on CRM and standardizing the patient encounter improves communication in the ED, both between staff members and between staff members and patients.

  14. Defining our destiny: trainee working group consensus statement on the future of emergency surgery training in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, A E; Gokani, V J; Harries, R L; Pearce, L; Smith, S R; Ali, O; Chu, H; Dubois, A; Ferguson, H; Humm, G; Marsden, M; Nepogodiev, D; Venn, M; Singh, S; Swain, C; Kirkby-Bott, J

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom National Health Service treats both elective and emergency patients and seeks to provide high quality care, free at the point of delivery. Equal numbers of emergency and elective general surgical procedures are performed, yet surgical training prioritisation and organisation of NHS institutions is predicated upon elective care. The increasing ratio of emergency general surgery consultant posts compared to traditional sub-specialities has yet to be addressed. How should the capability gap be bridged to equip motivated, skilled surgeons of the future to deliver a high standard of emergency surgical care? The aim was to address both training requirements for the acquisition of necessary emergency general surgery skills, and the formation of job plans for trainee and consultant posts to meet the current and future requirements of the NHS. Twenty nine trainees and a consultant emergency general surgeon convened as a Working Group at The Association of Surgeons in Training Conference, 2015, to generate a united consensus statement to the training requirement and delivery of emergency general surgery provision by future general surgeons. Unscheduled general surgical care provision, emergency general surgery, trauma competence, training to meet NHS requirements, consultant job planning and future training challenges arose as key themes. Recommendations have been made from these themes in light of published evidence. Careful workforce planning, education, training and fellowship opportunities will provide well-trained enthusiastic individuals to meet public and societal need.

  15. Perceived Facilitators and Barriers to Local Health Department Workers' Participation in Infectious Disease Emergency Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Lainie; Paul, Amy; Taylor, Holly A; Barnett, Daniel J

    Local health departments play a key role in emergency preparedness and respond to a wide range of threats including infectious diseases such as seasonal influenza, tuberculosis, H1N1, Ebola virus disease, and Zika virus disease. To successfully respond to an infectious disease outbreak, local health departments depend upon the participation of their workforce; yet, studies indicate that sizable numbers of workers would not participate in such a response. The reasons why local health department workers participate, or fail to participate, in infectious disease responses are not well understood. To understand why local health department workers are willing, or not willing, to report to work during an infectious disease response. From April 2015 to January 2016, we conducted 28 semistructured interviews with local health department directors, preparedness staff, and nonpreparedness staff. Interviews were conducted with individuals throughout the United States. We interviewed 28 individuals across 3 groups: local health department directors (n = 8), preparedness staff (n = 10), and nonpreparedness staff (n = 10). Individuals' descriptions of why local health department workers are willing, or not willing, to report to work during an infectious disease response. Factors that facilitate willingness to respond to an infectious disease emergency included availability of vaccines and personal protective equipment; flexible work schedule and childcare arrangements; information sharing via local health department trainings; and perceived commitments to one's job and community. Factors that hinder willingness to respond to an infectious disease emergency included potential disease exposure for oneself and one's family; logistical considerations for care of children, the elderly, and pets; and perceptions about one's role during an infectious disease response. Our findings highlight opportunities for local health departments to revisit their internal policies and engage in

  16. Information for nuclear emergency response: a case study based on ANGRA nuclear power plant emergency simulation exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Paulo V.R. de

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Current nuclear emergency management procedures do not always satisfactorily address issues related to the information availability and to how people in emergency control centres use this information to respond to an nuclear accident. The lack of an adequate and prompt information may lead to a response that can be very different from what authorities recommend and thus create confusion, mistrust, and widespread uncertainty. This is a potentially serious problem for emergency planners. An adequate and prompt access to relevant information is a critical requirement that emergency teams face while they work towards reducing the undesired consequences of the emergency. There are three basic types of knowledge according to a conceptual framework developed to deal with emergency response: Previous Personal, Previous and, Current Contextual knowledge. Most decisions in emergency control centres require a dynamic combination of all types of knowledge, particularly the current contextual that comes from the emergency settings, including all information about the activities of other emergency teams. The aim of this paper is to describe the concepts and the structure of a system that aims at storing and disseminating the previous formal and contextual knowledge to help teams make the correct decisions during the evolution of an emergency. The elicitation of critical requirements are provided by a case study based on Cognitive Work Analysis and Naturalistic Decision Making methods, applied to a nuclear emergency response simulation. The framework and a prototype system were tested in a controlled experiment. The paper reports the results of this experiment. (author)

  17. Optimal training for emergency needle thoracostomy placement by prehospital personnel: didactic teaching versus a cadaver-based training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabo, Daniel; Inaba, Kenji; Hammer, Peter; Karamanos, Efstathios; Skiada, Dimitra; Martin, Matthew; Sullivan, Maura; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2014-09-01

    Tension pneumothorax can rapidly progress to cardiac arrest and death if not promptly recognized and appropriately treated. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of traditional didactic slide-based lectures (SBLs) as compared with fresh tissue cadaver-based training (CBT) for placement of needle thoracostomy (NT). Forty randomly selected US Navy corpsmen were recruited to participate from incoming classes of the Navy Trauma Training Center at the LAC + USC Medical Center and were then randomized to one of two NT teaching methods. The following outcomes were compared between the two study arms: (1) time required to perform the procedure, (2) correct placement of the needle, and (3) magnitude of deviation from the correct position. During the study period, a total of 40 corpsmen were enrolled, 20 randomized to SBL and 20 to CBT arms. When outcomes were analyzed, time required to NT placement was not different between the two arms. Examination of the location of needle placement revealed marked differences between the two study groups. Only a minority of the SBL group (35%) placed the NT correctly in the second intercostal space. In comparison, the majority of corpsmen assigned to the CBT group demonstrated accurate placement in the second intercostal space (75%). In a CBT module, US Navy corpsmen were better trained to place NT accurately than their traditional didactic SBL counterparts. Further studies are indicated to identify the optimal components of effective simulation training for NT and other emergent interventions.

  18. Disaster Education: A Survey Study to Analyze Disaster Medicine Training in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Ritu R; Cattamanchi, Srihari; Alqahtani, Abdulrahman; Aljohani, Majed; Keim, Mark; Ciottone, Gregory R

    2017-08-01

    The increase in natural and man-made disasters occurring worldwide places Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians at the forefront of responding to these crises. Despite the growing interest in Disaster Medicine, it is unclear if resident training has been able to include these educational goals. Hypothesis This study surveys EM residencies in the United States to assess the level of education in Disaster Medicine, to identify competencies least and most addressed, and to highlight effective educational models already in place. The authors distributed an online survey of multiple-choice and free-response questions to EM residency Program Directors in the United States between February 7 and September 24, 2014. Questions assessed residency background and details on specific Disaster Medicine competencies addressed during training. Out of 183 programs, 75 (41%) responded to the survey and completed all required questions. Almost all programs reported having some level of Disaster Medicine training in their residency. The most common Disaster Medicine educational competencies taught were patient triage and decontamination. The least commonly taught competencies were volunteer management, working with response teams, and special needs populations. The most commonly identified methods to teach Disaster Medicine were drills and lectures/seminars. There are a variety of educational tools used to teach Disaster Medicine in EM residencies today, with a larger focus on the use of lectures and hospital drills. There is no indication of a uniform educational approach across all residencies. The results of this survey demonstrate an opportunity for the creation of a standardized model for resident education in Disaster Medicine. Sarin RR , Cattamanchi S , Alqahtani A , Aljohani M , Keim M , Ciottone GR . Disaster education: a survey study to analyze disaster medicine training in emergency medicine residency programs in the United States. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):368-373.

  19. Effects of a training workshop on suicide prevention among emergency room nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Yasuhiro; Otsuka, Kotaro; Akiyama, Keiko; Yamada, Tomoki; Sakamoto, Yumiko; Yanagisawa, Yaeko; Morimura, Hiroshi; Kawanishi, Chiaki; Higashioka, Hiroaki; Miyake, Yasushi; Thurber, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Suicide attempts are frequently encountered by emergency department nurses. Such encounters can potentially provide a foundation for secondary suicide prevention. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of a 7-hr training program for emergency room nursing personnel in Japan. In all, 52 nurses completed the questionnaires before the workshop and 1 month after the workshop. The nurses' understanding of and willingness to care for suicidal patients positively changed. It is feasible to provide a 7-hr, relatively short, workshop on suicidal prevention aimed at emergency medical staff and to improve attitudes during a follow-up of 1 month. It is uncertain whether the positive attitudes of emergency nurses toward suicide and/or educational interventions could impact the outcomes of these interventions. Further studies are needed to address these important questions in this field.

  20. The introduction of emergency cricothyroidotomy simulation training in Zimbabwe contributed to the saving of two lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avnstorp, M. B.; Jensen, P. V. F.; Dzongodza, T.

    2016-01-01

    and neck progressing to cardiac arrest. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated and a secure surgical airway was established via an emergency cricothyroidotomy, saving the patient. A 70-year-old male presented with upper airway obstruction secondary to intubation for an elective procedure. When...... extubated, the patient exhibited severe stridor followed by respiratory arrest. Re-intubation attempts were unsuccessful and emergency cricothyroidotomy was performed to secure the airway, preserving the life of the patient. Conclusion: Emergency cricothyroidotomy training should be considered for all......Background: In developing countries with limited access to ENT services, performing emergency cricothyroidotomy in patients with upper airway obstruction may be a life-saving last resort. An established Danish-Zimbabwean collaboration of otorhinolaryngologists enrolled Zimbabwean doctors...

  1. CAI and training system for the emergency operation procedure in the advanced thermal reactor, FUGEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaki, T.; Imanaga, K.; Nakamura, S.; Maeda, K.; Sakurai, N.; Miyamoto, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the Advanced Thermal Reactor (ATR ) of the JNC, 'FUGEN', a symptom based Emergency Operating Procedure (EOF) was introduced in order to operate Fugen more safely and it became necessary for the plant operators to master the EOF. However it took a lot of time for the instructor to teach the EOP to operators and to train them. Thus, we have developed a Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) and Training System for the EOP, by which the operators can learn the EOP and can be trained. This system has two major functions, i.e., CAI and training. In the CAI function, there are three learning courses, namely, the EOP procedure, the simulation with guidance and Q and A, and the free simulation. In the training function, all of necessary control instruments (indicators, switches, annunciators and so forth) and physics models for the EOP training are simulated so that the trainees can be trained for all of the EOPs. In addition, 50 kinds of malfunction models are installed in order to perform appropriate accident scenarios for the EOP. The training of the EOP covers the range from AOO (Anticipated Operational Occurrence) to Over-DBAs (Design Based Accidents). This system is built in three personal computers that are connected by the computer network. One of the computers is expected to be used for the instructor and the other two are for the trainees. The EOP is composed of eight guidelines, such as 'Reactor Control' and 'Depression and Cooling', and the operation screens which are corresponded to the guidelines are respectively provided. According to the trial, we have estimated that the efficiency of the learning and the training would be improved about 30% for the trainee and about 75% for the instructor in the actual learning and training. (author)

  2. Simulation training for emergency obstetric and neonatal care in Senegal preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, M; Moreira, P M; Faye-Dieme, M E; Ndiaye-Gueye, M D; Gassama, O; Kane-Gueye, S M; Diouf, A A; Niang, M M; Diadhiou, M; Diallo, M; Dieng, Y D; Ndiaye, O; Diouf, A; Moreau, J C

    2017-06-01

    To describe a new training approach for emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) introduced in Senegal to strengthen the skills of healthcare providers. The approach was based on skills training according to the so-called "humanist" method and on "lifesaving skills". Simulated practice took place in the classroom through 13 clinical stations summarizing the clinical skills needed for EmONC. Evaluation took place in all phases, and the results were recorded in a database to document the progress of each learner. This approach was used to train 432 providers in 10 months and to document the increase in each participants' technical achievements. The combination of training with the "learning by doing" model ensured that providers learned and mastered all EmONC skills and reduced the missed learning opportunities observed in former EmONC training sessions. Assessing the impact of training on EmONC indicators and introducing this learning modality in basic training are the two major challenges we currently face.

  3. Stimulation of demand response through evaluation and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encinas, N.; Alfonso, D.; Alvarez, C.; Mendez, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Perez-Navarro, A.; Gabaldon, A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of Demand Response is to enhance customer choice opportunities by means of price-responsive mechanisms in contrast to direct load control practices and associated revenues based on fixed incentives. In this way, the new approach complements the traditional concept of Demand Side Management by including the voluntary nature to customer participation. This voluntary feature implies a change in customers' traditional behaviour and therefore stimulation and training is needed to achieve an optimal participation. This paper presents a methodology developed to stimulate and train customers for Demand Response practices as well as to identify the suitable products for different customers. Finally, the paper includes an example of the methodology considering a university as a customer. (au)

  4. Metabolic Response to Four Weeks of Muscular Endurance Resistance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Farrell III

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous investigations have shown that muscular endurance resistance training (MERT is conducive in improving the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA. However, the metabolic response and time course for adaption is still unclear. Objective: The aims of the current study were to evaluate and track the metabolic response to an individual session of MERT as well as to assess performance adaptations of supplementing an aerobic exercise training program with four weeks of MERT. Methods: Seventeen aerobically active men were randomly assigned to either the experimental (EX or control group (CON, 9 EX and 8 CON. Baseline measures included a graded exercise test (GXT and 1-repetition maximum (1RM testing for leg press (LP, leg curl (LC, and leg extension (LE. CON continued their regular aerobic activity while the EX supplemented their regular aerobic exercise with 4 weeks of MERT. Results: No significant group differences were observed for all pre-training variables. Following four weeks of training no significant differences in cardiorespiratory or metabolic variables were observed for either group. However, significant improvements in LC and LE 1-RM were observed in EX compared to CON. Substantial accumulations in blood lactate were observed following each MERT session. Conclusion: Four weeks of MERT did not improve cardiorespiratory or metabolic variables, but did significantly improve LC and LE. MERT was also observed to induce a blood lactate response similar to that of HIIT. These findings suggest greater than four weeks is need to see metabolic adaptations conducive for improved aerobic performance using MERT.

  5. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    or current tracheostomy. Twenty-three patients (6%) required emergent surgical airways. Sixty-two patients (17%) were stabilized and transported to the operating room for definitive airway management. There were no airway management-related deaths, sentinel events, or malpractice claims in adult patients managed by DART. Five in situ simulations conducted in the first program year improved DART's teamwork, communication, and response times and increased the functionality of the difficult airway carts. Over the 5-year period, we conducted 18 airway courses, through which more than 200 providers were trained. Conclusions DART is a comprehensive program for improving difficult airway management. Future studies will examine the comparative effectiveness of the DART program and evaluate how DART has impacted patient outcomes, operational efficiency, and costs of care. PMID:26086513

  6. Difficult airway response team: a novel quality improvement program for managing hospital-wide airway emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J; Herzer, Kurt R; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I; Berkow, Lauren C; Haut, Elliott R; Hillel, Alexander T; Miller, Christina R; Feller-Kopman, David J; Schiavi, Adam J; Xie, Yanjun J; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W; Mirski, Marek A

    2015-07-01

    -three patients (6%) required emergent surgical airways. Sixty-two patients (17%) were stabilized and transported to the operating room for definitive airway management. There were no airway management-related deaths, sentinel events, or malpractice claims in adult patients managed by DART. Five in situ simulations conducted in the first program year improved DART's teamwork, communication, and response times and increased the functionality of the difficult airway carts. Over the 5-year period, we conducted 18 airway courses, through which >200 providers were trained. DART is a comprehensive program for improving difficult airway management. Future studies will examine the comparative effectiveness of the DART program and evaluate how DART has impacted patient outcomes, operational efficiency, and costs of care.

  7. Nuclear emergency response planning based on participatory decision analytic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkko, K.

    2004-10-01

    This work was undertaken in order to develop methods and techniques for evaluating systematically and comprehensively protective action strategies in the case of a nuclear or radiation emergency. This was done in a way that the concerns and issues of all key players related to decisions on protective actions could be aggregated into decision- making transparently and in an equal manner. An approach called facilitated workshop, based on the theory of Decision Analysis, was tailored and tested in the planning of actions to be taken. The work builds on case studies in which it was assumed that a hypothetical accident in a nuclear power plant had led to a release of considerable amounts of radionuclides and therefore different types of protective actions should be considered. Altogether six workshops were organised in which all key players were represented, i.e., the authorities, expert organisations, industry and agricultural producers. The participants were those responsible for preparing advice or presenting matters for those responsible for the formal decision-making. Many preparatory meetings were held with various experts to prepare information for the workshops. It was considered essential that the set-up strictly follow the decision- making process to which the key players are accustomed. Key players or stakeholders comprise responsible administrators and organisations, politicians as well as representatives of the citizens affected and other persons who will and are likely to take part in decision-making in nuclear emergencies. The realistic nature and the disciplined process of a facilitated workshop and commitment to decision-making yielded up insight in many radiation protection issues. The objectives and attributes which are considered in a decision on protective actions were discussed in many occasions and were defined for different accident scenario to come. In the workshops intervention levels were derived according justification and optimisation

  8. Emerging Diseases in European Forest Ecosystems and Responses in Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna B. Boberg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available New diseases in forest ecosystems have been reported at an increasing rate over the last century. Some reasons for this include the increased disturbance by humans to forest ecosystems, changed climatic conditions and intensified international trade. Although many of the contributing factors to the changed disease scenarios are anthropogenic, there has been a reluctance to control them by legislation, other forms of government authority or through public involvement. Some of the primary obstacles relate to problems in communicating biological understanding of concepts to the political sphere of society. Relevant response to new disease scenarios is very often associated with a proper understanding of intraspecific variation in the challenging pathogen. Other factors could be technical, based on a lack of understanding of possible countermeasures. There are also philosophical reasons, such as the view that forests are part of the natural ecosystems and should not be managed for natural disturbances such as disease outbreaks. Finally, some of the reasons are economic or political, such as a belief in free trade or reluctance to acknowledge supranational intervention control. Our possibilities to act in response to new disease threats are critically dependent on the timing of efforts. A common recognition of the nature of the problem and adapting vocabulary that describe relevant biological entities would help to facilitate timely and adequate responses in society to emerging diseases in forests.

  9. Method for the development of emergency response preparedness for nuclear or radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    This report supplements IAEA emergency preparedness guidance published in the 1980s, and is consistent with the new international guidance. It provides practical advice for the development of an emergency response capability based on the potential nature and magnitude of the risk. In order to apply this method, emergency planners should have a good understanding of the basic radiological emergency response principles. Therefore, other applicable international guidance should be reviewed before using this report. This report provides a practical step-by-step method for developing integrated user, local and national emergency response capabilities. It can also be used as the basis for conducting an audit of an existing emergency response capability

  10. Method for the development of emergency response preparedness for nuclear or radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This report supplements IAEA emergency preparedness guidance published in the 1980s, and is consistent with the new international guidance. It provides practical advice for the development of an emergency response capability based on the potential nature and magnitude of the risk. In order to apply this method, emergency planners should have a good understanding of the basic radiological emergency response principles. Therefore, other applicable international guidance should be reviewed before using this report. This report provides a practical step-by-step method for developing integrated user, local and national emergency response capabilities. It can also be used as the basis for conducting an audit of an existing emergency response capability

  11. Experiences and findings from the operators' point of view 'Emergency protection training'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauf, E.

    1992-01-01

    To exercise in-plant emergency measures, under special marginal conditions, proves to be as useful and necessary as the training of design basis accidents. The strating phase which is particularly difficult for shift personnel, because it is labour-intensive, has to be exercised and considered with special attention and close to reality. That is the only way to detect weak spots and to get rid of them if necessary also in hardware installations, by well-aimed measures, such as modification of organizational sequences, optimization of emergency procedures. (orig.) [de

  12. Table-top trainings in radiation protection. Educational element or emergency planning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolar, A.

    2009-01-01

    Education plays an important role in emergency management to prepare members of all levels of management for the worst case scenario. The mission that organizations have to deal with, is based on the application of fundamental knowledge, accumulated know-how and knowledge of the intersections and abilities of the participating organizations. An effective, safe and resource-saving way to get effective help in preparing disasters are table-top trainings. What great warlords helped to win centuries ago, is now increasingly anchored on a statutory basis and introduced in the emergency planning. (orig.)

  13. Response in the late phase to a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, M.; Nisbet, A.; Thome, D.; Savkin, M.; Hoe, S.; Brynildsen, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper looks at the key issues that need to be addressed during the transition from the emergency phase to the late phase of a radioactive release, and the development of the initial late phase strategy. It discusses the extent to which current