WorldWideScience

Sample records for emergency response programs

  1. Federal and State Responses to the Emergency Response Communications Program. Draft Report, March 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    requirements too general; specific system description pre- Space Administration mature; need for economic/ marketing studies Identified U.S. Postal...34. Our principal interest in satellite communications is for emergency medical services in rural areas as well as backupIcommunications in case of...comentarios relacionados con el informe titulado "Emergency Response Communications Program". Le agradecer6 estudie este informe y favor de enviarle

  2. Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for first responders, industry, federal, state and local governments on EPA's role and available resources for response to oil spills, chemical, biological, radiological releases, and large-scale national emergencies.

  3. Emergency Response Program Designing Based On Case Study ERP Regulations In Ilam Gas Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Tahmasbi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Emergency response plan designing is one of the most important prevention approaches in crisis management. This study aims to design emergency response plan based on case study ERP regulations in Ilam gas refinery. On the basis of risk assessment and identification techniques such as HAZOP and FMEA in Ilam gas refinery the risks have been prioritized and then according to this prioritization the design of possible scenarios which have the highest rate of occurrence and the highest level of damage has been separated. Possible scenarios were simulated with PHAST software. Then emergency response program has been designed for the special mode or similar cases. According to the internal emergency response plan for Ilam gas refinery and predictable conditions of the process special instructions should be considered at the time of the incident to suffer the least damage on people and environment in the shortest time possible.

  4. Industry's voluntary program: Community Awareness and Emergency Response Program and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.S. (Hill and Knowlton Public Affairs Worldwide, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This paper describes the chemical industry's Community Awareness and Emergency Response (CAER) Program, and voluntary and mandatory actions by the chemical industry to comply with the major environmental legislation. The chemical industry started the voluntary CAER Program soon after the Bhopal Disaster in 1984; it is coordinated through the Chemical Manufacturer's Association. This program, which began in March 1985, is a long-term industry commitment to develop a community outreach program and to improve local emergency response planning. The Congress of the United States began, in 1985, to consider proposals for mandatory programs. This led to enactment of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, known as SARA. A portion of this Act, entitled Title III is also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. Although this legislation has many mandatory requirements, it should be emphasized that a significant degree of voluntary industrial participation is needed if the purposes of the statute are to be achieved. Title III has created an intricate and still evolving system that ties together the EPA, industrial plant managers, state emergency response commissions, local emergency planning committees and fire departments with jurisdiction over the facility. Each of these groups has a different role and responsibilities but must work cooperatively with other participants. Because of the intricate network of participants, the magnitude of the information flow, and the continuing evolution of the system, unique public relations problems exist in order to comply with Title III.

  5. Emergency management program operational responses to weapons of mass destruction: Veterans Health Administration, 2001-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Michael J; Bierenbaum, Arnold; Mather, Susan; Brown, Mark A; Beatty, John; Scott, Margie; Brewster, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Despite the recognition of chemical emergencies, terrorist events, and ongoing threats, little practical guidance exists for healthcare facilities. An approach and materials developed by the Veterans Health Administration in a five-element program over the last 2 years to enhance the existing emergency management program is outlined. Nine steps to the development of a comprehensive all-hazards, emergency plan and program, with auditing and improvement tools are offered. Cognitive aids for clinical use are available on-line and in hard copy. A hazard assessment modeled patients as emission sources documenting the operations strategies under which level C personal protective equipment will protect healthcare workers. The development of this response program appears to support a broader, long-standing VHA approach to problem solving. This involves bringing together individual talented field staff, representing specific skills, geographic regions, and work styles; investing in face-to-face consensus development; and developing programs with extensive internal peer-review ("field-based," "bottom-up and top-down," and external reviews). Comprehensive and effective programs can be constructed at low cost with reasonable speed within large systems with a public mandate, leading to responsible use of public funds internally, and as models for private sector programs. It is the long-term operational cost implications, under budget constraints in health care, which often present the true challenge. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Optimization of in-vivo monitoring program for radiation emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In case of radiation emergencies, internal exposure monitoring for the members of public will be required to confirm internal contamination of each individual. In-vivo monitoring technique using portable gamma spectrometer can be easily applied for internal exposure monitoring in the vicinity of the on-site area. In this study, minimum detectable doses (MDDs) for '1'3'4Cs, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 131}I were calculated adjusting minimum detectable activities (MDAs) from 50 to 1,000 Bq to find out the optimal in-vivo counting condition. DCAL software was used to derive retention fraction of Cs and I isotopes in the whole body and thyroid, respectively. A minimum detectable level was determined to set committed effective dose of 0.1 mSv for emergency response. We found that MDDs at each MDA increased along with the elapsed time. 1,000 Bq for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 100 Bq for {sup 131}I were suggested as optimal MDAs to provide in-vivo monitoring service in case of radiation emergencies. In-vivo monitoring program for emergency response should be designed to achieve the optimal MDA suggested from the present work. We expect that a reduction of counting time compared with routine monitoring program can achieve the high throughput system in case of radiation emergencies.

  7. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

  8. Reforming Disaster and Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t REFORMING DISASTER AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE BY COLONEL MARK D. JOHNSON United States Army...From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reforming Disaster and Emergency Response 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has focused too much on day- to-day disasters , from snow storms to forest fires, tripling the number

  9. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  10. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting.

  11. OEM Emergency Response Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management retains records of all incident responses in which it participates. This data asset includes three major sources of information:...

  12. Responsive Space Program Brief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dors, Eric E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-11

    The goal of the Responsive Space program is to make significant, integrated science and technology contributions to the end-to-end missions of the U.S. Government that protect against global emerging and nuclear threats, from the earliest adversary planning through resilient event response report describes the LANL space program, mission, and other activities. The report describes some of their activities.

  13. Emergency Response Guideline Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. Storrick

    2007-09-30

    Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design – specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design – precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design™ philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

  14. Evaluation of chlorine dispersion from storage unit in a petrochemical complex to providing an emergency response program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parsarad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims  Chlorine gas is a dangerous material that is used in chemical industries. In spite of the attempts for chlorine gas release control, sudden releases still occur in the related installations. Not taking proper emergency measures after chlorine gas dispersion may result in serious harm to health of the personnel and the people residing around the industrial area. The present study considers chlorine gas dispersion scenarios, determines emergency levels and presents an optimized pattern for more effective and faster response with the least required measures for emergency conditions control.   Methods   In the present paper by using Hazard and Operability Study (HAZOP and risk matrix the possible scenarios of chlorine gas dispersion in storage tanks unit of a petrochemical complex were considered. Then the intervals of these scenarios were determined with a view to Emergency Response Planning Guideline 1-2-3. With a view to the intensity of pollution extension and the population exposed to risk the scenarios were classified in the four emergency levels defined by Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS. Finally for each class of scenarios with a view to the related emergency level an optimum pattern of response plan in emergency conditions was presented.   Results  On the basis of the results of this study, chlorine gas dispersion scenario of the catastrophic explosion of the tank and scrubber system failure in the summer was classified in emergency level 4, in the winter in emergency level 3, chlorine gas dispersion due to chlorine lines rupture in the summer and winter in emergency level 3 and chlorine gas dispersion due to leakage of flanges and gaskets in emergency level 2 according to emergency levels of CCPS.  Conclusion The results of this study showed that systematic process risks analysis by use of risks recognition methods such as HAZOP and consequence analysis may have an effective role in recognition of the

  15. Emergency medical services response to active shooter incidents: provider comfort level and attitudes before and after participation in a focused response training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jerrilyn; Kue, Ricky; Mitchell, Patricia; Eblan, Gary; Dyer, K Sophia

    2014-08-01

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) routinely stage in a secure area in response to active shooter incidents until the scene is declared safe by law enforcement. Due to the time-sensitive nature of injuries at these incidents, some EMS systems have adopted response tactics utilizing law enforcement protection to expedite life-saving medical care. Describe EMS provider perceptions of preparedness, adequacy of training, and general attitudes toward active shooter incident response after completing a tactical awareness training program. An unmatched, anonymous, closed-format survey utilizing a five-point Likert scale was distributed to participating EMS providers before and after a focused training session on joint EMS/police active shooter rescue team response. Descriptive statistics were used to compare survey results. Secondary analysis of responses based on prior military or tactical medicine training was performed using a chi-squared analysis. Two hundred fifty-six providers participated with 88% (225/256) pretraining and 88% (224/256) post-training surveys completed. Post-training, provider agreement that they felt adequately prepared to respond to an active shooter incident changed from 41% (92/225) to 89% (199/224), while agreement they felt adequately trained to provide medical care during an active shooter incident changed from 36% (82/225) to 87% (194/224). Post-training provider agreement that they should never enter a building with an active shooter changed from 73% (165/225) to 61% (137/224). Among the pretraining surveys, significantly more providers without prior military or tactical experience agreed they should never enter a building with an active shooter until the scene was declared safe (78% vs 50%, P = .002), while significantly more providers with prior experience felt both adequately trained to provide medical care in an active shooter environment (56% vs 31%, P = .007) and comfortable working jointly with law enforcement within a building if a

  16. Youth with Mental Health Disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses. Also: Wraparound Milwaukee Program: Suicide Prevention in Juvenile Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile Justice, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This issue of Juvenile Justice presents three main articles. "Youth with Mental Health Disorders: Issues and Emerging Responses" (J. J. Cocozza and K. Skowyra) discusses tragic mass homicides by juveniles, documented cases of neglect and inadequate services, and federal policy focusing on providing systems of care for at-risk juveniles that have…

  17. Emergency Response Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on the National Contingency Plan, EPA defines the following types: classic emergencies, requiring on-site activities within minutes/hours; time-critical actions, which must occur within 6 months; and non-time-critical actions, which can take longer.

  18. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  19. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, D.K.; Chester, R.O.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response.

  20. NOAA Emergency Response Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is in response to natural disasters. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The majority...

  1. Emergency Response and Management Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    This quarterly report, highlighting accomplishments over the past several months, showcases EPA’s unique emergency response capabilities through the use of cutting-edge technologies and innovative cleanup strategies.

  2. Data modelling for emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilo, Arta; Zlatanova, Sidi

    2010-01-01

    Emergency response is one of the most demanding phases in disaster management.The fire brigade, paramedics, police and municipality are the organisations involved in the first response to the incident. They coordinate their work based on welldefined policies and procedures, but they also need the

  3. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  4. Development of emergency response training program based on human factors; Developpement d'un programme de formation pour la reaction aux situations d'urgences base sur les facteurs humains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Y. [Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    A training program has been developed at Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. to improve personal response to emergency situations by enabling plant shift chiefs to understand the unique human behavioral patterns that appear during emergencies. The program provides comprehensive and systematic training consisting of lectures and seminars based on a Human Factor Handbook, simulation training, and feedback training. The program can also be applied to all areas of the process industry. (author)

  5. 75 FR 70083 - Emergency Forest Restoration Program and Emergency Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... CFR Part 701 RIN 0560-AH89 Emergency Forest Restoration Program and Emergency Conservation Program... implement the new Emergency Forest Restoration Program (EFRP). EFRP will provide financial assistance to... after January 1, 2010. This interim rule also reorganizes existing Emergency Conservation Program (ECP...

  6. Emergency response readiness for primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Jeff; Kanasa, Harry; Pendergast, Donna; Clark, Ken

    2015-09-14

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether a 1-day basic life support (BLS) training program can significantly increase emergency response readiness for primary school children.Methods One hundred and seven children aged 11-12 years completed a program led by surf lifesaving instructors. A 50-item quiz was administered 1 week before and 1 and 8 weeks after training.Results Significant improvements were gained in knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; P school-based training that provides a general foundation for emergency response readiness.What is known about this topic? The importance and value of teaching BLS to school children is well established in the US, UK and Europe. However, in the past 20 years there has been little or no published Australian evaluation research in this area, despite thousands of training programs running each year around the country for children in first aid, CPR and water safety.What does this paper add? This paper confirms that Australian primary school children can benefit significantly from short, targeted BLS training programs that provide the basic skills and confidence for them to respond in an emergency situation.What are the implications for practitioners? The paper provides a training and evaluation framework that can be used by health educators for age-appropriate BLS programs. The study shows that making training real-world and relevant, especially having hands-on CPR practice with manikins, can address common barriers to performing first aid and CPR reported by young people.

  7. The expanding role of civil society in the global HIV/AIDS response: what has the President's Emergency Program For AIDS Relief's role been?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Alex; Roxo, Uchechi; Epino, Henry; Muganzi, Alex; Dorward, Emily; Pick, Billy

    2012-08-15

    Civil society has been part of the HIV/AIDS response from the very beginning of the epidemic, often becoming engaged before national governments. Traditional roles of civil society--advocacy, activism, serving as government watchdog, and acting as community caretaker--have been critical to the response. In addition, civil society organizations (CSOs) play an integral part in providing world-class HIV prevention and treatment services and helping to ensure continuity of care. The President's Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has significantly increased the global scale-up of combination antiretroviral therapy reaching for more than 5 million people in developing countries, as well as implementation of effective evidence-based combination prevention approaches. PEPFAR databases in 5 countries and annual reports from a centrally managed initiative were mined and analyzed to determine the numbers and types of CSOs funded by PEPFAR over a 5-year period (2006-2011). Data are also presented from Uganda showing the overall resource growth in CSO working for HIV. Case studies document the evolution of 3 indigenous CSOs that increased the capacity to implement activities with PEPFAR funding. A legacy of PEPFAR has been the growth of civil society to address social and health issues as well as recognition by governments that partnerships with beneficiaries and civil society result in better outcomes. Scale-up of the global response could not have happened without the involvement of civil society and people living with HIV. This game changing partnership to jointly tackle the problems that countries face may well be the greatest benefit emerging from the HIV epidemic.

  8. Emergency Planning and Right to Know Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes how the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) improves community access to information about chemical hazards and facilitates the development of chemical emergency response plans by tribal governments.

  9. EMERGENCY RESPONSE FOR PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane Katrina resulted in damage and destruction to local water supplies in Mississippi and Louisiana affecting millions of people. Immediately following the devastation, a multidisciplinary team of 30 EPA emergency response, research, and water program personnel joined force...

  10. Emergency Food Programs: Untapped Opportunities for Extension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Amy R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports results from a questionnaire that assessed the frequency and type of nutrition questions asked at emergency food programs to determine if Extension professionals need to increase direct outreach efforts. Emergency food program workers (n = 460) were recruited via mail to complete a self-administered survey. More than one-third…

  11. The Student Volunteer Army: a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Sally; Mills, Colleen E

    2017-10-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to understanding of the factors associated with an effective emergent emergency response organisation and to provide new insights into this understudied area. It examines, through an analysis of a range of textual resources, the emergence and re-emergence of the Student Volunteer Army (SVA) during the devastating earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, in 2010-11. This evaluation is conducted in relation to the four key features of an effective emergency response organisation: adaptability; direction; leadership; and communication. In addition, the paper aims to further understanding of 'emergency entrepreneurship' and thus of the values and strategies that underpin social entrepreneur organisations in times of normalcy. The paper concludes that the unique position of the SVA as a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation enabled it to innovate continually and to improve repeatedly its systems, relationships, and image, such that it exhibited features common to emergent and established emergency response organisations. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  12. Emergency Preparedness and Response Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvarez, Maria D

    2006-01-01

    .... Natural and man-made disasters, such as earthquakes, floods, plane crashes, high-rise building collapses, or major nuclear facility malfunctions, pose an ever-present danger challenge to public emergency services...

  13. A Tactical Emergency Response Management System (Terms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... of mobile technology to enhance communication between emergency response personnel. The test results obtained revealed that if fully implemented, this technology can improve the speed of intervention between the use cases ... the impact of an emergency on the public and the environment. Emergency ...

  14. Public Health Emergency Response in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Tsui-Feng

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, growth of international travel and trade, as well as climate change, has resulted in the frequent emergence and reemergence of infectious diseases such as Ebola, Zika, and MERS. In 2016, Taiwan used the Joint External Evaluation (JEE) tool to evaluate its public health emergency response capacities and understand important areas for improvement. This article presents Taiwan's disaster and public health emergency response organizational structure, real-time integrated information, response processes, and command center structure. After reviewing the results of the JEE tool and drawing lessons from emergency response efforts in the United States, we provide 3 recommendations that may enhance Taiwan's public health emergency response capacities: establish common principles for disaster response regardless of which agency is in charge, standardize operation procedures, and perform regular training that includes nongovernmental organizations and a range of government departments. PMID:28418737

  15. Use of Bibliometric Analysis to Assess the Scientific Productivity and Impact of the Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System Program, 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaves, Erik J; Valle, Ruben; Chandrasekera, Ruvani M; Soto, Giselle; Burke, Ronald L; Cummings, James F; Bausch, Daniel G; Kasper, Matthew R

    2017-05-01

    Scientific publication in academic literature is a key venue in which the U.S. Department of Defense's Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (GEIS) program disseminates infectious disease surveillance data. Bibliometric analyses are tools to evaluate scientific productivity and impact of published research, yet are not routinely used for disease surveillance. Our objective was to incorporate bibliometric indicators to measure scientific productivity and impact of GEIS-funded infectious disease surveillance, and assess their utility in the management of the GEIS surveillance program. Metrics on GEIS program scientific publications, project funding, and countries of collaborating institutions from project years 2006 to 2012 were abstracted from annual reports and program databases and organized by the six surveillance priority focus areas: respiratory infections, gastrointestinal infections, febrile and vector-borne infections, antimicrobial resistance, sexually transmitted infections, and capacity building and outbreak response. Scientific productivity was defined as the number of scientific publications in peer-reviewed literature derived from GEIS-funded projects. Impact was defined as the number of citations of a GEIS-funded publication by other peer-reviewed publications, and the Thomson Reuters 2-year journal impact factor. Indicators were retrieved from the Web of Science and Journal Citation Report. To determine the global network of international collaborations between GEIS partners, countries were organized by the locations of collaborating institutions. Between 2006 and 2012, GEIS distributed approximately US $330 million to support 921 total projects. On average, GEIS funded 132 projects (range 96-160) with $47 million (range $43 million-$53 million), annually. The predominant surveillance focus areas were respiratory infections with 317 (34.4%) projects and $225 million, and febrile and vector-borne infections with 274 (29

  16. Adaptive workflow simulation of emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Guido Wybe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Recent incidents and major training exercises in and outside the Netherlands have persistently shown that not having or not sharing information during emergency response are major sources of emergency response inefficiency and error, and affect incident mitigation outcomes through workflow planning

  17. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  18. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  19. 4-H Teen Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Lynette; Powell, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program is designed to train Americans to safely help themselves and their community in the event of a widespread disaster. This program is designed for adults. Despite youth increasingly becoming recognized as valuable resources, able to equally partner with adults in leadership and decision-making…

  20. Disaster Response and Preparedness Application: Emergency Environmental Response Tool (EERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, James; Carr, Hugh; Jester, Keith

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Office at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) developed an Environmental Geographic Information Systems (EGIS) database. NASA had previously developed a GIS database at SSC to assist in the NASA Environmental Office's management of the Center. This GIS became the basis for the NASA-wide EGIS project, which was proposed after the applicability of the SSC database was demonstrated. Since its completion, the SSC EGIS has aided the Environmental Office with noise pollution modeling, land cover assessment, wetlands delineation, environmental hazards mapping, and critical habitat delineation for protected species. At SSC, facility management and safety officers are responsible for ensuring the physical security of the facilities, staff, and equipment as well as for responding to environmental emergencies, such as accidental releases of hazardous materials. All phases of emergency management (planning, mitigation, preparedness, and response) depend on data reliability and system interoperability from a variety of sources to determine the size and scope of the emergency operation. Because geospatial data are now available for all NASA facilities, it was suggested that this data could be incorporated into a computerized management information program to assist facility managers. The idea was that the information system could improve both the effectiveness and the efficiency of managing and controlling actions associated with disaster, homeland security, and other activities. It was decided to use SSC as a pilot site to demonstrate the efficacy of having a baseline, computerized management information system that ultimately was referred to as the Emergency Environmental Response Tool (EERT).

  1. Risk communications and the Chemical Stockpile Emergency-Planning Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, B.M.; Sorensen, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    The CSEPP (Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program) was created to improve emergency planning and response capabilities at the eight sites around the country that store chemical weapons. These weapons are scheduled to be destroyed in the near future. In preparation of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DPEIS) for the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), it was proposed that the Army mitigate accidents through an enhanced community emergency preparedness program at the eight storage sites. In 1986, the Army initiated the development of an Emergency Response Concept Plan (ERCP) for the CSDP, one of 12 technical support studies conducted during preparation of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS). The purpose of this document is to provide a fairly comprehensive source book on risk, risk management, risk communication research and recommended risk communication practices. It does not merely summarize each publication in the risk communication literature, but attempts to synthesize them along the lines of a set of organizing principles. Furthermore, it is not intended to duplicate other guidance manuals (such as Covello et al.`s manual on risk comparison). The source book was developed for the CSEPP in support of the training module on risk communications. Although the examples provided are specific to CSEPP, its use goes beyond that of CSEPP as the findings apply to a broad spectrum of risk communication topics. While the emphasis is on communication in emergency preparedness and response specific to the CSEPP, the materials cover other non-emergency communication settings. 329 refs.

  2. Emergency Response to Gold King Mine Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Description of August 5, 2015 release of contaminated waters from the Gold King Mine into Cement Creek and the Animas River, and the resulting emergency response remediation efforts, including monitoring of affected waterways.

  3. Media Spaces, Emergency Response and Palpable Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Morten; Kristensen, Margit

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter we present and discuss a case on the development and use of technologies for emergency response, which shares important aspects with Media Spaces. We first describe the characteristics of emergency response, based on field and literature studies. We then present visions...... for technological support of emergency responders and outline important design issues and principles regarding the design. We finally reflect upon our findings in relation to Media Spaces, and describe a number of possibilities and related challenges, by the use of examples. We suggest that moving from symmetry...

  4. Evaluation of Emergency Medicine Community Educational Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia, Estevan Adan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Out-of-hospital emergencies occur frequently, and laypersons are often the first to respond to these events. As an outreach to our local communities, we developed “Basic Emergency Interventions Everyone Should Know,” a three-hour program addressing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator use, heart attack and stroke recognition and intervention, choking and bleeding interventions and infant and child safety. Each session lasted 45 minutes and was facilitated by volunteers from the emergency department staff. A self-administered 13-item questionnaire was completed by each participant before and after the program. A total of 183 participants completed the training and questionnaires. Average score pre-training was nine while the average score post-training was 12 out of a possible 13 (P< .0001. At the conclusion of the program 97% of participants felt the training was very valuable and 100% would recommend the program to other members of their community. [West J Emerg Med. 2010;11(5:416-418.

  5. Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generoso, Jose Roberto; Latoures, Renee Elizabeth; Acar, Yahya; Miller, Dean Scott; Ciano, Mark; Sandrei, Renan; Vieira, Marlon; Luong, Sean; Hirsch, Jan; Fidler, Richard Lee

    2016-06-01

    STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the author have any conflicts of interest to disclose. Little has been published about nurses' responses in the first 5 minutes of in-hospital emergencies. This study aimed to test a simulation curriculum based on institutional priorities using high-intensity, short-duration, frequent in situ content delivery based on deliberate practice. The study design was a prospective, single-center, mixed-methods quasi-experimental study. Scenarios used in this study were ventricular fibrillation, opiate-related respiratory depression, syncopal fall, and hemorrhagic stroke. The convenience sample included 41 teams (147 participants). Improvements were noted in initiating chest compressions (p = .018), time to check blood glucose (p = .046), and identification of heparin as a contributor to stroke (p = .043). Establishing in situ simulation-based teaching program is feasible and well received. This approach appears effective in increasing confidence, initiating life-saving measures, and empowering nurses to manage emergencies. Future studies should evaluate and improve on the curriculum, on data collection tools quantitatively, and on overcoming barriers to high-quality emergency care. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(6):255-263. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Emergent Entities and Emergent Processes: Constructing Emergence through Multi-Agent Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilensky, Uri

    The use of programming language was studied in an eighth grade science classroom. The goal of the EMERGE curriculum is to enable students to understand the global patterns that they observe. EMERGE was used in an eighth-grade classroom of 12 students, with a range of abilities (3 had learning disabilities), in 21 sessions over 3 months. For the…

  7. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  8. Emergency Response Virtual Environment for Safe Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Ayman; Walker, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    An intelligent emergency response virtual environment (ERVE) that provides emergency first responders, response planners, and managers with situational awareness as well as training and support for safe schools is presented. ERVE incorporates an intelligent agent facility for guiding and assisting the user in the context of the emergency response operations. Response information folders capture key information about the school. The system enables interactive 3D visualization of schools and academic campuses, including the terrain and the buildings' exteriors and interiors in an easy to use Web..based interface. ERVE incorporates live camera and sensors feeds and can be integrated with other simulations such as chemical plume simulation. The system is integrated with a Geographical Information System (GIS) to enable situational awareness of emergency events and assessment of their effect on schools in a geographic area. ERVE can also be integrated with emergency text messaging notification systems. Using ERVE, it is now possible to address safe schools' emergency management needs with a scaleable, seamlessly integrated and fully interactive intelligent and visually compelling solution.

  9. Emergency responses to water disasters in coalmines, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Zhou, Wanfang; Guan, Entai

    2009-07-01

    Emergency response to water-related disasters is an important part of many coalmine operations in China. It usually consists of both incident prevention measures and rescue counter-plans. In principle, prevention is always the top priority, followed by rescue. The prevention measures relies on thorough understanding of the mine hydrogeology, correct identification of water burst risk levels, and an effective monitoring program for inundations. The emergency rescue is initiated when an accident occurs, and a rescue plan often includes a self-rescue and mutual-rescue program.

  10. Standardized emergency management system and response to a smallpox emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Farley, Robert J; Celentano, John T; Gunter, Carol; Jones, Jessica W; Stone, Rogelio A; Aller, Raymond D; Mascola, Laurene; Grigsby, Sharon F; Fielding, Jonathan E

    2003-01-01

    The smallpox virus is a high-priority, Category-A agent that poses a global, terrorism security risk because it: (1) easily can be disseminated and transmitted from person to person; (2) results in high mortality rates and has the potential for a major public health impact; (3) might cause public panic and social disruption; and (4) requires special action for public health preparedness. In recognition of this risk, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC-DHS) developed the Smallpox Preparedness, Response, and Recovery Plan for LAC to prepare for the possibility of an outbreak of smallpox. A unique feature of the LAC-DHS plan is its explicit use of the Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) framework for detailing the functions needed to respond to a smallpox emergency. The SEMS includes the Incident Command System (ICS) structure (management, operations, planning/intelligence, logistics, and finance/administration), the mutual-aid system, and the multi/interagency coordination required during a smallpox emergency. Management for incident command includes setting objectives and priorities, information (risk communications), safety, and liaison. Operations includes control and containment of a smallpox outbreak including ring vaccination, mass vaccination, adverse events monitoring and assessment, management of confirmed and suspected smallpox cases, contact tracing, active surveillance teams and enhanced hospital-based surveillance, and decontamination. Planning/intelligence functions include developing the incident action plan, epidemiological investigation and analysis of smallpox cases, and epidemiological assessment of the vaccination coverage status of populations at risk. Logistics functions include receiving, handling, inventorying, and distributing smallpox vaccine and vaccination clinic supplies; personnel; transportation; communications; and health care of personnel. Finally, finance/administration functions include monitoring

  11. 78 FR 19357 - Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Federal Transit Administration Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to...,000 under the Public Transportation Emergency Relief Program (Emergency Relief Program, Catalogue of... disaster that affects public transportation systems. The Appropriations Act provides $10.9 billion for FTA...

  12. Emergency Response: Elearning for Paramedics and Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on an innovative research project with academics, software developers, and organizational pilot sites to design and develop elearning software for an emergency response simulation with supporting collaborative tools. In particular, this article focuses on the research that the author has conducted to provide the theoretical…

  13. Simulation analysis of the use of emergency resources during the emergency response to a major fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Reniers, G.L.L.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    During an emergency response to an accident or disaster, emergency response actions often need to use various emergency resources. The use of resources plays an important role in the successful implementation of emergency response, but there may be conflicts in the use of resources for emergency

  14. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  15. Value of the internet in emergency response.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzenberg, C. L.; Newsom, D. E.; Swietlik, C. E.

    1999-05-26

    Can the Internet be of value in emergency response? The answer is yes, judging by its use in the Kobe earthquake in Japan in 1995, ice storms in the US and Canada in 1998, and other disasters. Current and future areas of application are numerous, including exchanging messages, documents, and data files via e-mail; accessing operational data on-line; visualizing events via photos and maps; providing backup communications in lieu of broadcast media, exchanging information between crisis managers and responders; and providing information to media and the public. However, the Internet has some drawbacks, such as hardware/software requirements, computer literacy requirements, traffic jams, dependence on power and communication networks, and risks to information integrity and security. This paper examines some of the advantages, drawbacks, concerns, and potential uses of the Internet for emergency response.

  16. Kemptville site of upcoming live emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2011-05-15

    Propane transfer facilities are now required to submit a risk and safety management plan (RSMP). Beginning in January 2011, Ontario's propane facilities will have to provide an emergency response and preparedness plan to the province's Technical Standards and Safety Authority. W.O. Stinson and Son, a family business working in the propane supplier since 2006, decided to do a complete emergency response exercise in order to give them a template for their RSMP. During this exercise, an engine fire at the Stinson bar was to be simulated, then people at the gas bar or nearby were to be evacuated and traffic diverted with local fire and police departments taking part.

  17. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-04-08

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site.

  18. Improvements in emergency preparedness and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, Gerald [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Berlin (Germany); Wirth, Erich [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Radioaktivitaet

    2012-07-01

    The accident of Fukushima was characterized by long term releases with intensive release peaks. In this contribution it is analyzed what kind of improvements in the emergency preparedness and response system are needed to evaluate and manage such a radiological situation. The paper focuses on the external radiation protection and deals with the specific lessons learned for measures and intervention levels, evaluation of the radiological situation and on the protection of citizens abroad. (orig.)

  19. Challenges During a Chlorine Gas Emergency Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bryan E; Duncan, Mary Anne; King, Sallyann C; Hunter, Candis; Ruckart, Perri; Orr, Maureen F

    2016-08-01

    A chlorine gas release occurred at a poultry processing plant as a result of an accidental mixing of sodium hypochlorite and an acidic antimicrobial treatment. We evaluated the public health and emergency medical services response and developed and disseminated public health recommendations to limit the impact of future incidents. We conducted key informant interviews with the state health department; local fire, emergency medical services, and police departments; county emergency management; and representatives from area hospitals to understand the response mechanisms employed for this incident. After being exposed to an estimated 40-pound chlorine gas release, 170 workers were triaged on the scene and sent to 5 area hospitals. Each hospital redistributed staff or called in extra staff (eg, physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists) in response to the event. Interviews with hospital staff emphasized the need for improved communication with responders at the scene of a chemical incident. While responding, hospitals handled the patient surge without outside assistance because of effective planning, training, and drilling. The investigation highlighted that greater interagency communication can play an important role in ensuring that chemical incident patients are managed and treated in a timely manner. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:553-556).

  20. Dormancy programs as emerging antimetastasis therapeutic alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Maria Soledad

    2016-01-01

    We recently published that the retinoid-responsive gene NR2F1 (nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group F, member 1) mediates postsurgical dormancy of local residual tumor cells and disseminated tumor cells. Importantly, the combination of azacytidine with retinoids induces dormancy of malignant tumor cells by reinstating the NR2F1-regulated gene program. These findings open the door to the development of strategies that may stop minimal residual disease from becoming life-threatening metastases. PMID:27308542

  1. Achieving reliable communication in dynamic emergency responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipara, Octav; Plymoth, Anders N; Liu, Fang; Huang, Ricky; Evans, Brian; Johansson, Per; Rao, Ramesh; Griswold, William G

    2011-01-01

    Emergency responses require the coordination of first responders to assess the condition of victims, stabilize their condition, and transport them to hospitals based on the severity of their injuries. WIISARD is a system designed to facilitate the collection of medical information and its reliable dissemination during emergency responses. A key challenge in WIISARD is to deliver data with high reliability as first responders move and operate in a dynamic radio environment fraught with frequent network disconnections. The initial WIISARD system employed a client-server architecture and an ad-hoc routing protocol was used to exchange data. The system had low reliability when deployed during emergency drills. In this paper, we identify the underlying causes of unreliability and propose a novel peer-to-peer architecture that in combination with a gossip-based communication protocol achieves high reliability. Empirical studies show that compared to the initial WIISARD system, the redesigned system improves reliability by as much as 37% while reducing the number of transmitted packets by 23%.

  2. Principles for emergency response to bioterrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, M; Kaufmann, A F

    1999-08-01

    The recent occurrence of a series of anthrax-related hoaxes illustrates the need to educate emergency services personnel about how to best ensure patient and worker safety in the case of suspected exposure to biological threat agents. There are very few data to support the methods being used or the variation in current care. Emergency physicians, first responders, and hazardous materials response teams need a standardized approach to the management of patients who may have been exposed to biological threat agents. Currently recommended hospital infection control procedures seem appropriate for the level of risk involved with aerosolized biological threat agents. Such recommendations include standard and transmission-based precautions. These groups need a working knowledge of the isolation and infection control measures recommended for the treatment of patients exposed to those biological threat agents at outlined in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guideline for Isolation Precautions in Hospitals.

  3. 7 CFR 1410.12 - Emergency Forestry Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency Forestry Program. 1410.12 Section 1410.12... Emergency Forestry Program. (a) In addition to other allowable enrollments, certain non-industrial private... damage from hurricanes in calendar year 2005 may be enrolled through the Emergency Forestry Conservation...

  4. 75 FR 16623 - Emergency Management for Higher Education Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Education Emergency Management for Higher Education Grant Program; Notices #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75... Higher Education Grant Program Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.184T. AGENCY... requirements for the Emergency Management for Higher Education (EMHE) grant program. The Assistant Deputy...

  5. Some Qualitative Requirements for Testing of Nuclear Emergency Response Robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Heungseop; Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Youngsoo; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is carrying out the project 'Development of Core Technology for Remote Response in Nuclear Emergency Situation', and as a part of the project, we are studying the reliability and performance requirements of nuclear emergency response robots. In this paper, we described some qualitative requirements for testing of nuclear emergency response robots which are different to general emergency response robots. We briefly introduced test requirements of general emergency response robots and described some qualitative aspects of test requirements for nuclear emergency response robots. When considering an immature field-robot technology and variety of nuclear emergency situations, it seems hard to establish quantitative test requirements of these robots at this time. However, based on studies of nuclear severe accidents and the experience of Fukushima NPP accident, we can expect some test requirements including quantitative ones for nuclear emergency response robots.

  6. Incidence of emergency contacts (red responses to Norwegian emergency primary healthcare services in 2007 – a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Elisabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The municipalities are responsible for the emergency primary health care services in Norway. These services include casualty clinics, primary doctors on-call and local emergency medical communication centres (LEMC. The National centre for emergency primary health care has initiated an enterprise called "The Watchtowers", comprising emergency primary health care districts, to provide routine information (patients' way of contact, level of urgency and first action taken by the out-of-hours services over several years based on a minimal dataset. This will enable monitoring, evaluation and comparison of the respective activities in the emergency primary health care services. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of emergency contacts (potential life-threatening situations, red responses to the emergency primary health care service. Methods A representative sample of Norwegian emergency primary health care districts, "The Watchtowers" recorded all contacts and first action taken during the year of 2007. All the variables were continuously registered in a data program by the attending nurses and sent by email to the National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care at a monthly basis. Results During 2007 the Watchtowers registered 85 288 contacts, of which 1 946 (2.3% were defined as emergency contacts (red responses, corresponding to a rate of 9 per 1 000 inhabitants per year. 65% of the instances were initiated by patient, next of kin or health personnel by calling local emergency medical communication centres or meeting directly at the casualty clinics. In 48% of the red responses, the first action taken was a call-out of doctor and ambulance. On a national basis we can estimate approximately 42 500 red responses per year in the EPH in Norway. Conclusion The emergency primary health care services constitute an important part of the emergency system in Norway. Patients call the LEMC or meet directly at casualty clinics

  7. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  8. Technical information management in an emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, H.A.; Greve, C.; Best, R.G.; Phillipson, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Through many experiences in responding to real radiation accidents and emergency response exercises, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a technical information management system that will be used in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in the event of a major radiological accident. The core of the system is the Data Center in the FRMAC, utilizing a computerized database of all off-site environmental radiological data. The information contained and managed by the Data Center will be comprehensive, accountable, and traceable, providing information to the assessors for immediate health and safety needs as well as for long-term documentation requirements. A DOE task force has been formed to develop compatibility guidelines for video, automated data processing, and communication systems. An electronic mail, information status, and bulletin board system is also being developed to assist in the dissemination of information. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offer a giant step forward in displaying and analyzing information in a geographically referenced system.

  9. Planning guidance for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumpert, B.L.; Watson, A.P.; Sorensen, J.H. [and others

    1995-02-01

    This planning guide was developed under the direction of the U.S. Army and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which jointly coordinate and direct the development of the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). It was produced to assist state, local, and Army installation planners in formulating and coordinating plans for chemical events that may occur at the chemical agent stockpile storage locations in the continental United States. This document provides broad planning guidance for use by both on-post and off-post agencies and organizations in the development of a coordinated plan for responding to chemical events. It contains checklists to assist in assuring that all important aspects are included in the plans and procedures developed at each Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP) location. The checklists are supplemented by planning guidelines in the appendices which provide more detailed guidance regarding some issues. The planning guidance contained in this document will help ensure that adequate coordination between on-post and off-post planners occurs during the planning process. This planning guide broadly describes an adequate emergency planning base that assures that critical planning decisions will be made consistently at every chemical agent stockpile location. This planning guide includes material drawn from other documents developed by the FEMA, the Army, and other federal agencies with emergency preparedness program responsibilities. Some of this material has been developed specifically to meet the unique requirements of the CSEPP. In addition to this guidance, other location-specific documents, technical studies, and support studies should be used as needed to assist in the planning at each of the chemical agent stockpile locations to address the specific hazards and conditions at each location.

  10. Using spatial hypertext to visualize composite knowledge in emergency responses

    OpenAIRE

    Canos, Jose H.; Penades, Maria Carmen; Solis, Carlos; Borges, Marcos R.S.; Llavador, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed Having the right information at the right time is crucial to make decisions during emergency responses. To fulfill this requirement, emergency management systems must provide emergency managers with knowledge management and visualization tools. The goal is twofold: on one hand, to organize knowledge coming from different sources, mainly the emergency response plans (the formal knowledge) and the information extracted from the emergency development (the contextual knowledge); ...

  11. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the emergency response laws and regulations in place in the various states within the southern region for use by legislators, emergency response planners, the general public and all persons concerned about the existing legal framework for emergency response. SSEB expects to periodically update the report as necessary. Radiation protection regulations without emergency response provisions are not included in the summary. The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ``natural disasters.`` Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic, others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms. State-by-state breakdowns are given for specific states.

  12. Program Elimination, Financial Emergency, and Student Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olswang, Steven Glenn; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The rights of students to complete programs into which they have matriculated and the obligations of colleges and universities to maintain these programs for sufficient periods of time to fulfill any existing contracts with students are discussed. Contract principles are applied in protecting a student's right to complete degree programs. (MLW)

  13. Increasing access and support for emergency management higher education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiak, Carol L

    2014-01-01

    The number of emergency management higher education programs has grown dramatically since 1994 when the FEMA Higher Education Program was created to propagate and support such growth. Data collected annually since 2007 from emergency management higher education programs shows that these programs face some consistent challenges. These challenges were coupled with annual data on program access and support indicators via dimensional analysis to answer the questions: To what extent are the challenges linked to a lack of access or support? If there is linkage, what can be gleaned from these linkages that can help address the challenges through improving access and support? The analysis showed that lack of access to funding and resources, and lack of support from partner organizations, has an impact on emergency management higher education. Discussion of that impact is followed with detailed recommendations that are focused on strengthening both internal and external access and support relationships for emergency management higher education programs.

  14. Disaster response and the international charter program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryker, Timothy; Jones, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    In a meeting held in Vienna, Austria in 1999, a small group of space agencies conceived and approved a program to provide emergency response satellite data to those affected by disasters anywhere in the world. The purpose of this group, which came to be known as the “International Charter - Space and Major Disasters”, is to promote cooperation among space agencies in the use of satellite data to manage crises during and after disasters. When tropical storms, floods, oil spills, earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes or fires endanger human life, the Charter member agencies provide valuable information about these events’ extent and impact.

  15. Web GIS for Airport Emergency Response - UML Model

    OpenAIRE

    Martina Baučić; Damir Medak

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of integrating Web GIS in airport emergency response should be to provide the most appropriate geospatial information to all participants. Airport emergency response still needs a model that will explain its complexity: its participants, their tasks and information needs. This paper presents the UML model of airport emergency response. Such a model facilitates a common understanding of the system by participants coming from airport, police, fire brigade, etc. It also enable...

  16. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ``natural disasters.`` Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic; others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms.

  17. Emerging Leaders: AED's Open World Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Open World Program, funded and administered by the Library of Congress, with support from private organizations such as the Academy for Educational Development (AED). Open World Program allows community colleges to participate by hosting delegations from other countries. Some themes include: environment, women as leaders, economic…

  18. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state`s emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor`s designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  19. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state's emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor's designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  20. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  1. Stroke Education in Canadian Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Devin R; Teal, Philip; Turton, Matthew; Lahiffe, Brian; Pulfrey, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are common disorders treated by Canadian emergency physicians. The diagnosis and management of these conditions is time-sensitive and complex, requiring that emergency physicians have adequate training. This study sought to determine the extent of stroke and TIA training in Canadian emergency medicine residency programs. A two-page survey was emailed to directors of all English-speaking emergency medicine residency programs in Canada. This included both the Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada (FRCPC) and the College of Family Physicians Enhanced Training [CCFP(EM)] residency programs. The number of mandatory and elective rotations, lectures, and examinations relevant to stroke and TIA were assessed. Nine FRCPC programs responded (of 11; RR=82%) and 11 CCFP(EM) programs responded (of 18; RR=61%), representing 20 of 29 programs in Canada (RR: 20/29=69%). Mandatory general neurology (3/9) and stroke neurology (2/9) rotations were offered in a minority of FRCPC programs and not at all in CCFP(EM) programs (0/11). Neuroradiology rotations were mandatory in 1/9 FRCPC programs and no CCFP(EM) programs (0/11). Acute ischemic stroke was allocated 3 hours of lecture time per year in all residency programs, regardless of route of training. Despite the fact that 100% of respondents train residents in facilities that administer thrombolysis for stroke, only 1/11 (9%) CCFP(EM) programs and 0/9 FRCPC programs have residents act as stroke team leaders. Formal training in stroke and TIA is limited in Canadian emergency medicine residency programs. Enhanced training opportunities should be developed as this disease is sudden, life-threatening, and can have disabling or fatal consequences, and therapeutic options are time sensitive.

  2. Putting It All Together: Integrating Ordinary People Into Emergency Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scanlon, J.; Helsloot, I.; Groenendaal, J.

    2014-01-01

    Ordinary citizens may play an important role in the response to large or even small-scale emergencies. This however is often not recognized in the emergency plans and procedures developed by emergency services. As a consequence, the help of ordinary citizens is often underutilized or even rejected

  3. From Then to Now: Emerging Directions for Youth Program Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Arnold

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the impact of youth development programs has been an important topic since the programs first began, and the past 25 years in particular have witnessed considerable advances in the evaluation of youth development programs. This article presents a brief history of youth development program evaluation, considering how it has changed over the years. From there, three contemporary trends related to youth program evaluation are examined: 1 a new evaluation focus, which is the emphasis on evaluating program quality; 2 organizational structures related to effective program evaluation, primarily in the area of program evaluability and evaluation capacity building; and 3 an emerging evaluation approach, involving youth in evaluating the programs that affect them. The article concludes with a call for programs to attend carefully to program implementation quality.

  4. Intergovernmental consultation and coordination and emergency response: The relationship between ICCB (Intergovernmental Consultation and Coordination Board) and SARA (Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986) Title III in the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, D.L.

    1989-02-01

    The relationship between Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and the Intergovernmental Consultation and Coordination Board (ICCB) in the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP) is examined from four perspectives: (1) the current status and likely future direction of SARA implementation in the eight CSDP continental United States sites; (2) the applicability of SARA to the CSDP; (3) the effect of SARA information management upon the ICCB; and (4) challenges posed by SARA in the areas of public participation and intergovernmental relations which make the interface between emergency planning and intergovernmental relations in the CSDP more complex than originally envisioned in the program's Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. The emergency planning structures developed by SARA have important parallels with the CSDP's ICCB. It is important to maintain a separation between these emergency planning structures and ICCBs, which will handle additional concerns other than emergency planning. While considerable variation exists in patterns of SARA Title III implementation in CSDP states, shared characteristics include: (1) Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) faced with problems of staffing, resources, and membership attrition; (2) unclear lines of planning authority in some LEPCs; and (3) the legitimization of unconventional participation in emergency planning. 34 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Emergency response training with the BNL plant analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H.S.; Guppy, J.G.; Mallen, A.N.; Wulff, W.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the experience in the use of the BNL Plant Analyzer for NRC emergency response training to simulated accidents in a BWR. The unique features of the BNL Plant Analyzer that are important for the emergency response training are summarized. A closed-loop simulation of all the key systems of a power plant in question was found essential to the realism of the emergency drills conducted at NRC. The faster than real-time simulation speeds afforded by the BNL Plant Analyzer have demonstrated its usefulness for the timely conduct of the emergency response training.

  6. Designing Academic Leadership Minor Programs: Emerging Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Lamine; Gerhardt, Kris

    2017-01-01

    With a growing number of leadership programs in universities and colleges in North America, leadership educators and researchers are engaged in a wide ranging dialogue to propose clear processes, content, and designs for providing academic leadership education. This research analyzes the curriculum design of 52 institutions offering a "Minor…

  7. Contraceptive Availability During an Emergency Response in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Sascha R; Kourtis, Athena P; Curtis, Kathryn M; Tepper, Naomi; Gorman, Susan; Jamieson, Denise J; Zotti, Marianne; Barfield, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    This article provides the evidence for contraceptive need to prevent unintended pregnancy during an emergency response, discusses the most appropriate types of contraceptives for disaster situations, and details the current provisions in place to provide contraceptives during an emergency response. PMID:23421580

  8. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies (2012 update)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  9. Web GIS for Airport Emergency Response - UML Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Baučić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of integrating Web GIS in airport emergency response should be to provide the most appropriate geospatial information to all participants. Airport emergency response still needs a model that will explain its complexity: its participants, their tasks and information needs. This paper presents the UML model of airport emergency response. Such a model facilitates a common understanding of the system by participants coming from airport, police, fire brigade, etc. It also enables institutional agreements for sharing data. The developers have got specifications of geospatial data and GIS functions imposed by participants and standards. A prototype Web GIS application is developed and presented to the users for evaluation. The prototype has shown how GIS functions can improve airport emergency response. The users have shown great interest, and they have great expectations in further integration of Web GIS in airport emergency response.

  10. [Emergency Doctor Training for Psychiatric Emergencies: Evaluation of an Interactive Training Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flüchter, Peter; Müller, Vincent; Bischof, Felix; Pajonk, Frank-Gerald Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    Aim Emergency physicians are often confronted with psychiatric emergencies, but are not well trained for it and often feel unable to cope sufficiently with them. The aim of this investigation was to examine whether multisensoric training may improve learning effects in the training of emergency physicians with regard to psychiatric emergencies. Method Participation in a multi-modal, multi-media training program with video case histories and subsequent evaluation by questionnaire. Results 66 emergency physicians assessed their learning effects. 75 % or 73 % rated it as "rather high" or "very high". In particular, in comparison with classical training/self-study 89 % assessed the effects in learning as "rather high" or "very high" . Conclusion This training receives a high level of acceptance. Using videos, learning content may be provided more practice-related. Thus, emergency physicians are able to develop a greater understanding of psychiatric emergencies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Emergency medicine program targets "brain drain" in Ethiopia ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-29

    Apr 29, 2016 ... TAAAC-EM2.jpg With IDRC support, the TAAC-EM program has. retained 80% of the first graduating class of 2013 in jobs in Ethiopia's public sector; ​published 54 open access, online teaching modules; ​developed a research program focusing on evidence-based emergency care and services at AAU.

  12. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrow, James P; Barabási, Albert-László; 10.1371/journal.pone.0017680

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  13. Development of agent based model for predicting emergency response time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak Bandyopadhyay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining the time to reach any incident location by an emergency service is a very important aspect for emergency management. In most of the developing countries road network is considered as a main infrastructure for transporting emergency services. Therefore in order to predict the response time consideration must be given to the characteristics of road segments and driving behaviour of emergency vehicle drivers. In this paper real time driving data by Fire emergency service of Allahabad city is collected using GPS logger HOLUX M1000C. The spatial trajectories collected from GPS logger are analysed in GIS along with road network, population density and landuse data to determine the driver's route deciding behaviour. Based on the integrated analysis the Fire Emergency Vehicle Agent is designed. The Agent based model is simulated to determine the response time which is subsequently compared with the real response time.

  14. Collective Response of Human Populations to Large-Scale Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabási, Albert-László

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response. PMID:21479206

  15. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Bagrow

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  16. Evaluation of emergency medicine training programs in Egypt: Trainees’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Montaser*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: Egyptian Emergency medicine trainees are not satisfied with their training and owing that to the unclear vision toward Emergency medicine as specialty from the policy makers and lack of professional staff responsible for education and evaluation. It is highly recommended that the training and mentoring go hand in hand and trainees should take part in the continuous evaluation process.

  17. Radiation Detection Overview for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-16

    This presentation discusses the fundamentals of gamma and neutron detection; presents an overview of the DOE Triage and JTOT Programs, gamma, and neutron signatures in select measurements; and offers a detector demonstration.

  18. Preparedness Measures for Emergency and Disaster Response

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson Granberg, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative preparedness measures can be used to calculate the level of preparedness for handling disasters or emergencies. They are useful for evaluating plans and preparations, and for comparing areas and organizations with each other. This chapter gives an introduction to the construction and use of such measures, and proposes a general methodology that can be applied when developing them. The methodology is exemplified on two case studies, the first concerning disaster preparedness, and ...

  19. CDC Online Course: Reproductive Health in Emergency Preparedness and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Marianne E; Ellington, Sascha R; Perez, Mirna

    2016-09-01

    In an emergency, the needs of women of reproductive age, particularly pregnant and postpartum women, introduce unique challenges for public health and clinical care. Incorporating reproductive health issues and considerations into emergency preparedness and response is a relatively new field. In recent years, several resources and tools specific to reproductive health have been developed. However, there is still a need for training about the effects of emergencies on women of reproductive age. In an effort to train medical and public health professionals about these topics, the CDC Division of Reproductive Health developed Reproductive Health in Emergency Preparedness and Response, an online course that is available across the United States.

  20. Science in Emergency Response at CDC: Structure and Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Dale A.; Ghiya, Neelam D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent high-profile activations of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) include responses to the West African Ebola and Zika virus epidemics. Within the EOC, emergency responses are organized according to the Incident Management System, which provides a standardized structure and chain of command, regardless of whether the EOC activation occurs in response to an outbreak, natural disaster, or other type of public health emergency. By embedding key scientific roles, such as the associate director for science, and functions within a Scientific Response Section, the current CDC emergency response structure ensures that both urgent and important science issues receive needed attention. Key functions during emergency responses include internal coordination of scientific work, data management, information dissemination, and scientific publication. We describe a case example involving the ongoing Zika virus response that demonstrates how the scientific response structure can be used to rapidly produce high-quality science needed to answer urgent public health questions and guide policy. Within the context of emergency response, longer-term priorities at CDC include both streamlining administrative requirements and funding mechanisms for scientific research. PMID:28892452

  1. Science in Emergency Response at CDC: Structure and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, John; Rose, Dale A; Ghiya, Neelam D

    2017-09-01

    Recent high-profile activations of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) include responses to the West African Ebola and Zika virus epidemics. Within the EOC, emergency responses are organized according to the Incident Management System, which provides a standardized structure and chain of command, regardless of whether the EOC activation occurs in response to an outbreak, natural disaster, or other type of public health emergency. By embedding key scientific roles, such as the associate director for science, and functions within a Scientific Response Section, the current CDC emergency response structure ensures that both urgent and important science issues receive needed attention. Key functions during emergency responses include internal coordination of scientific work, data management, information dissemination, and scientific publication. We describe a case example involving the ongoing Zika virus response that demonstrates how the scientific response structure can be used to rapidly produce high-quality science needed to answer urgent public health questions and guide policy. Within the context of emergency response, longer-term priorities at CDC include both streamlining administrative requirements and funding mechanisms for scientific research.

  2. The effect of the emergency medical services vehicle location and response strategy on response times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein, C.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Response time is currently considered to be an important performance indicator in Emergency Medical Services (EMS systems. A number of factors may affect response times, including the location of emergency vehicles and the type of response system design used. This study aimed to assess the effects of emergency vehicle location and response system design on response time performance in a model of a large South African urban EMS system, using discrete-event simulation. Results indicated that both the emergency vehicle location and response system design factors had a significant effect on response time performance.

  3. Evolutionary emergence of responsive and unresponsive personalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M.; Van Doorn, G.S.; Weissing, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    In many animal species, individuals differ consistently in suites of correlated behaviors, comparable with human personalities. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the fundamental factors structuring personality differences is the responsiveness of individuals to environmental stimuli. Whereas

  4. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  5. Current status of research on emergency response measures at JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigami, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Kensuke [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    If an accident occurs at a nuclear power plant and if it affects, or is anticipated to affect, the environment by radioactive material release, it is important to minimize consequences to the public by conducting appropriate protective measures, in evaluating source terms (an amount of fission products released to the environment), environmental radiological consequences, effects of the protective measures, and so on. It is also important to give necessary information on the protective measures to the public so as to conduct the measures effectively. In order to support radiological emergency response measures and to contribute to improve emergency plans, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is developing a computerized support system for the Emergency Technical Advisory Body and a computerized system for optimizing off-site emergency protective measures, and is studying appropriate information transmission methods in an emergency. This report describes current status of research on emergency response measures performed at JAERI. (author)

  6. Exploring mHealth Participation for Emergency Response Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Schwartz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the challenges of participation by members of emergency response communities who share a similar condition and treatment, and are called upon to participate in emergency events experienced by fellow members. Smartphones and location-based social networking technologies present an opportunity to re-engineer certain aspects of emergency medical response. Life-saving prescription medication extended in an emergency by one individual to another occurs on a micro level, anecdotally documented. We illustrate the issues and our approach through the example of an app to support patients prone to anaphylaxis and prescribed to carry epinephrine auto-injectors. We address unique participation challenges in an mHealth environment in which interventions are primarily short-term interactions which require clear and precise decision-making and constant tracking of potential participants in responding to an emergency medical event. The conflicting effects of diffused responsibility and shared identity are identified as key factors in modeling participation.

  7. Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-08-18

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

  8. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2016-10-04

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head James Colson. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only addresses emergency response.

  9. 49 CFR 172.602 - Emergency response information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Involving Dangerous Goods” and, aboard vessels, the IMO “Emergency Procedures for Ships Carrying Dangerous... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency response information. 172.602 Section 172.602 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  10. Simulation of Operators' Response in Emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    For the simulation of the accidental course of events in industrial process plants, a model is needed of operators' response to the cues presented by the system. A model is proposed, based on the simplifications which can be made when restricting attention to the operator functions having...

  11. Evaluation of emergency medicine training programs in Egypt: Trainees’ perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Montaser, T.

    2013-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) is in the early development phase in Egypt. There is an Egyptian Board of Emergency Medicine that has been in existence for approximately 10 years, along with academic master degree in EM from three medical schools (Alexandria, Tanta and Suez Canal). Until now, there is not a specialty society in emergency medicine or national annual meetings to evaluate the training progress and give the trainees the chance to see and be seen. It is known that each program has two-fol...

  12. 44 CFR 8.3 - Senior FEMA official responsible for the information security program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... responsible for the information security program. 8.3 Section 8.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION § 8.3 Senior FEMA official responsible for the information security program. The Director of the Security...

  13. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  14. Emergency Response and the International Charter Space and Major Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.; Lamb, R.

    2011-12-01

    thus is helping to mitigate the effects of disasters on human life and property. The International Charter has been in formal operation since November 1, 2000. An Authorized User can call a single number to request the mobilization of satellite imagery and associated ground station support of the Charter's member agencies to obtain data and information on a disaster occurrence. The International Charter is supported by Argentinean, Canadian, European, Indian, Japanese, Chinese, Brazilian, Korean, Russian and U.S. satellite operators, as well as through U.S. and foreign commercial satellite firms and consortia. These operators can provide a wide variety of imagery and information under various environmental conditions (including, in some instances, through cloud cover and darkness). The Charter works in close cooperation with the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO), and with United Nations bodies such as the UN Office of Outer Space Affairs (UN OOSA) and the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) Operational Satellite Applications Programe (UNOSAT). Both UN OOSA and UNOSAT are authorized to request data from Charter members in response to a UN emergency. Sentinel Asia is also allowed to request activations on behalf of its member states. These organizations play an important role in maximizing the Charter's use.

  15. College Student Utilization of a Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Bakhai, Yogesh D.; Warren, Calvert G.

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to identify college students at risk for experiencing a mental health crisis that warranted a psychiatric evaluation at a hospital and/or a psychiatric hospitalization. A retrospective chart review of college students evaluated at a comprehensive psychiatric emergency program during a 1-year period was conducted. Demographic…

  16. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Robert Langabeer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Emergency medical services (EMS agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED, affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. Methods The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. Results During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P<.001. EMS productivity (median time from EMS notification to unit back in service was 44 minutes faster for the ETHAN group (39 vs. 83 minutes, median. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality or patient satisfaction. Conclusion We found that mobile technology-driven delivery models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  17. 77 FR 28765 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Emergency Solutions Grants Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ...The document advises that the interim rule for the Emergency Solutions Grants program, published on December 5, 2011, displayed an incorrect RIN number. This document advises of the correct RIN number, 2506-AC31, as displayed in the heading of this document.

  18. Analysis of emergency response procedures and air traffic accidents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incessant air transport accidents have been a source of concern to stakeholders and aviation experts in Nigeria, yet the response and process has not been adequately appraised. This study attempts an evaluation of the emergency response procedures in the aviation industry with particular focus on Murtala Muhammed ...

  19. Osteopathic emergency medicine programs infrequently publish in high-impact emergency medicine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Sean M; Lin, Christina; Carlson, Jestin N

    2014-11-01

    Both the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) require core faculty to engage in scholarly work, including publication in peer-reviewed journals. With the ACGME/AOA merger, we sought to evaluate the frequency of publication in high-impact peer-reviewed EM journals from authors affiliated with osteopathic emergency medicine (EM) programs. We performed a retrospective literature review using the Journal Citation Report database and identified the top five journals in the category of 'Emergency Medicine' by their 2011 Impact Factor. We examined all publications from each journal for 2011. For each article we recorded article type, authors' names, position of authorship (first, senior or other), the author's degree and affiliated institution. We present the data in raw numbers and percentages. The 2011 EM journals with the highest impact factor were the following: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Resuscitation, Journal of Trauma, Injury, and Academic Emergency Medicine. Of the 9,298 authors published in these journals in 2011; 1,309 (15%) claimed affiliation with U.S.-based EM programs, of which 16 (1%) listed their affiliations with eight different osteopathic EM programs. The 16 authors claimed affiliation with 8 of 46 osteopathic EM programs (17%), while 1,301 authors claimed affiliation with 104 of 148 (70%) U.S.-based allopathic programs. Authors from osteopathic EM programs are under-represented in the top EM journals. With the pending ACGME/AOA merger, there is a significant opportunity for improvement in the rate of publication of osteopathic EM programs in top tier EM journals.

  20. Employer Requirements to Work during Emergency Responses: Key Ethics Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Lainie; Taylor, Holly A; Powell, Tia

    2017-03-01

    Local health departments and their employees are at the forefront of emergency preparedness and response. Yet, recent studies have found that some local public health workers are unwilling to report to work in a variety of disaster scenarios. This can greatly compromise a response, as many local health departments need "all hands on deck" to effectively meet increased demands. To address these concerns, local health departments have employed varied policy strategies to ensure that employees do report to work. After describing different approaches taken by local health departments throughout the United States, we briefly identify and explore key ethics considerations that arise for local health departments when employees are required to report to work for emergency responses. We then discuss how these ethics considerations may inform local health department practices intended to promote a robust emergency response.

  1. The impact of the TelEmergency program on rural emergency care: An implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Sarah A; Seals, Samantha R; Jones, Alan E; King, Melissa H; Galli, Robert L; Isom, Kristen C; Summers, Richard L; Henderson, Kristi A

    2017-07-01

    Introduction Timely, appropriate intervention is key to improving outcomes in many emergent conditions. In rural areas, it is particularly challenging to assure quality, timely emergency care. The TelEmergency (TE) program, which utilizes a dual nurse practitioner and emergency medicine-trained, board-certified physician model, has the potential to improve access to quality emergency care in rural areas. The objective of this study was to examine how the implementation of the TE program impacts rural hospital Emergency Department (ED) operations. Methods Methods included a before and after study of the effect of the TE program on participating rural hospitals between January 2007 and December 2008. Data on ED and hospital operations were collected one year prior to and one year following the implementation of TE. Data from participating hospitals were combined and compared for the two time periods. Results Nine hospitals met criteria for inclusion and participated in the study. Total ED volumes did not significantly change with TE implementation, but ED admissions to the same rural hospital significantly increased following TE implementation (6.7% to 8.1%, p-value = 0.02). Likewise, discharge rates from the ED declined post-initiation (87.1% to 80.0%, p-value = 0.003). ED deaths and transfer rates showed no significant change, while the rate of patient discharge against medical advice significantly increased with TE use. Discussion In this analysis, we found a significant increase in the rate of ED admissions to rural hospitals with TE use. These findings may have important implications for the quality of emergency care in rural areas and the sustainability of rural hospitals' EDs.

  2. We Need to "Catch Them before They Fall": Response to Intervention and Elementary Emergent Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Minda Morren; Mendoza, Marie Arnold

    2013-01-01

    The authors of this case study examine response to intervention (RTI) implementation with Emergent Bilinguals in a large urban district. As participants noted, it is not appropriate to assess, instruct, and intervene with students through a one-size-fits-all approach. Instead, multiple factors such as language background, program participation,…

  3. 76 FR 2686 - Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory Committee; Announcement of Establishment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... COMMISSION Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory Committee; Announcement of Establishment and... Programming and Emergency Access Advisory Committee (``Committee'' or ``VPEAAC'') of the Federal... name to the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (``VPAAC''). The Commission further...

  4. SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

    2006-07-12

    Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

  5. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  6. Emergency response preparedness: the French experience of large scale exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanson, D.; Desnoyers, B. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France); Chabane, J.M. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire (Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection) (France)

    2004-07-01

    In compliance with the IAEA regulations for the transport of radioactive material in the event of accidents during transport of radioactive material, emergency provisions to protect persons, property and environment have to be established and developed by the relevant national organisations. In France, the prefect of the department where the accident occurs is responsible for decisions and measures required to ensure the protection of both population and property at risk owing to the accident. During an accident, the ministers concerned provide the prefect with recommendations and information, in order to help him take the requisite decisions. On their side, the nuclear industry and transport companies also have to be prepared to intervene and to support the authorities at their request, depending on their capacities and their specialities. To prepare the emergency teams properly and acquire effective emergency plans, training exercises have to be conducted regularly with every ministerial department involved, the nuclear industry and transport companies, members of the public and the media. Then, the feedback from such exercises shall be taken into account to improve the emergency procedures. This paper will introduce: - emergency response preparedness: what is required by the relevant regulations? - emergency response preparedness: how is France organised? - the French experience of conducting large training exercises simulating accidents involving the transport of radioactive material; - the main difficulties and lessons learned; - the perspectives.

  7. Integrating Social Media Monitoring Into Public Health Emergency Response Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Tamer A; Fleshler, Keren

    2016-10-01

    Social media monitoring for public health emergency response and recovery is an essential response capability for any health department. The value of social media for emergency response lies not only in the capacity to rapidly communicate official and critical incident information, but as a rich source of incoming data that can be gathered to inform leadership decision-making. Social media monitoring is a function that can be formally integrated into the Incident Command System of any response agency. The approach to planning and required resources, such as staffing, logistics, and technology, is flexible and adaptable based on the needs of the agency and size and scope of the emergency. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has successfully used its Social Media Monitoring Team during public health emergency responses and planned events including major Ebola and Legionnaires' disease responses. The concepts and implementations described can be applied by any agency, large or small, interested in building a social media monitoring capacity. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  8. 76 FR 75953 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Emergency Solutions Grants Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... housing after experiencing a housing crisis and/or homelessness. DATES: Effective date: January 4, 2012... response for addressing the needs of homelessness established administratively by HUD in 1995. The single... revised to broaden existing emergency shelter and homelessness prevention activities and to add short- and...

  9. Multi-objective evolutionary emergency response optimization for major accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiadou, Paraskevi S., E-mail: pgeor@central.ntua.gr [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, Athens 157 80 (Greece); Papazoglou, Ioannis A., E-mail: yannisp@ipta.demokritos.gr [Systems Reliability and Industrial Safety Laboratory, National Center of Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Agia Paraskevi, Athens 153 10 (Greece); Kiranoudis, Chris T., E-mail: kyr@chemeng.ntua.gr [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, Athens 157 80 (Greece); Markatos, Nikolaos C., E-mail: n.markatos@ntua.gr [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, Athens 157 80 (Greece)

    2010-06-15

    Emergency response planning in case of a major accident (hazardous material event, nuclear accident) is very important for the protection of the public and workers' safety and health. In this context, several protective actions can be performed, such as, evacuation of an area; protection of the population in buildings; and use of personal protective equipment. The best solution is not unique when multiple criteria are taken into consideration (e.g. health consequences, social disruption, economic cost). This paper presents a methodology for multi-objective optimization of emergency response planning in case of a major accident. The emergency policy with regards to protective actions to be implemented is optimized. An evolutionary algorithm has been used as the optimization tool. Case studies demonstrating the methodology and its application in emergency response decision-making in case of accidents related to hazardous materials installations are presented. However, the methodology with appropriate modification is suitable for supporting decisions in assessing emergency response procedures in other cases (nuclear accidents, transportation of hazardous materials) or for land-use planning issues.

  10. Government of Alberta emergency response plan for sour gas release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-20

    This plan explains the Government of Alberta's response to a sour gas emergency. The Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) is the lead agency in overseeing government response to the emergency and is responsible for initiating the plan. The industrial operator is required by the ERCB to have a comprehensive emergency plan in place that is initiated as soon as any sour gas release occurs. In the event a release appears imminent, the operator and ERCB will jointly agree on initiating the appropriate plans. This plan includes drilling and operating wells and other sour facilities. Individuals living within a designated emergency planning zone (based on predicted sour gas release rates) are aware of such plans and would be evacuated immediately by the operator if a release occurred. The operator would also commence mobile monitoring for sour gas. An on-site command post is established by the operator to control sour gas release. Local municipalities are advised in the very early municipal and industrial operator's plans must be mutually supportive and co-ordinated. Concurrently, the Government's plan is activated when a sour gas release occurs or is imminent. This plan describes the concept of operations, responsibilities of Alberta Government departments and agencies, and some detailed aspects of the management of the actual emergency. 2 figs.

  11. Climate Literacy and Cyberlearning: Emerging Platforms and Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, M. S.; Wise, S. B.; Buhr, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    With the release of the Essential Principles of Climate Science Literacy: A Guide for Individuals and Communities in the Spring of 2009, an important step toward an shared educational and communication framework about climate science was achieved. Designed as a living document, reviewed and endorsed by the thirteen federal agencies in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (now U.S. Global Change Research Program), the Essential Principles of Climate Literacy complement other Earth system literacy efforts. A variety of emerging efforts have begun to build on the framework using a variety of cyberlearning tools, including an online Climate Literacy course developed by Education and Outreach group at CIRES, the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, and the Independent Learning program of the Continuing Education Division at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The online course, piloted during the Summer of 2009 with formal classroom teachers and informal science educators, made use of the online Climate Literacy Handbook, which was developed by CIRES Education and Outreach and the Encyclopedia of Earth, which is supported by the National Council for Science and the Environment and hosted by Boston University. This paper will explore challenges and opportunities in the use of cyberlearning tools to support climate literacy efforts, highlight the development of the online course and handbook, and note related emerging cyberlearning platforms and programs for climate literacy, including related efforts by the Climate Literacy Network, the NASA Global Climate Change Education programs, the National STEM Education Distributed Learning (NSDL) and AAAS Project 2061.

  12. Exploratory analysis of real personal emergency response call conversations: considerations for personal emergency response spoken dialogue systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Victoria; Rochon, Elizabeth; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-11-14

    The purpose of this study was to derive data from real, recorded, personal emergency response call conversations to help improve the artificial intelligence and decision making capability of a spoken dialogue system in a smart personal emergency response system. The main study objectives were to: develop a model of personal emergency response; determine categories for the model's features; identify and calculate measures from call conversations (verbal ability, conversational structure, timing); and examine conversational patterns and relationships between measures and model features applicable for improving the system's ability to automatically identify call model categories and predict a target response. This study was exploratory and used mixed methods. Personal emergency response calls were pre-classified according to call model categories identified qualitatively from response call transcripts. The relationships between six verbal ability measures, three conversational structure measures, two timing measures and three independent factors: caller type, risk level, and speaker type, were examined statistically. Emergency medical response services were the preferred response for the majority of medium and high risk calls for both caller types. Older adult callers mainly requested non-emergency medical service responders during medium risk situations. By measuring the number of spoken words-per-minute and turn-length-in-words for the first spoken utterance of a call, older adult and care provider callers could be identified with moderate accuracy. Average call taker response time was calculated using the number-of-speaker-turns and time-in-seconds measures. Care providers and older adults used different conversational strategies when responding to call takers. The words 'ambulance' and 'paramedic' may hold different latent connotations for different callers. The data derived from the real personal emergency response recordings may help a spoken dialogue system

  13. Learning lessons in emergency management: the 4th International Conference on Healthcare System Preparedness and Response to Emergencies and Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adini, B; Ohana, A; Furman, E; Ringel, R; Golan, Y; Fleshler, E; Keren, U; Reisner, S

    2016-01-01

    The International Preparedness & Response to Emergencies & Disasters (IPRED) conferences are conducted bi-annually in order to share insights and lessons learned from diverse crises. The aim of the article is to bring the IPRED conferences into better professional attention and to share the main insights that were presented in IPRED IV, which was held in January 2016. The major lessons learned included: Planning, regional/global collaboration and public-private cooperation should be implemented in developing novel technologies. International humanitarian action necessitates coordination between diverse actors concerning all potential threats. Leadership/coordination and decision-making capacities of emergency response leaders should be enhanced to ensure quality of care. Ethics in disaster management: Triage decisions must not discriminate against terrorists, even when attackers and victims are treated simultaneously. Resilience management: Establishing family and community networks increases resilience of individuals and society. Training programs & exercises must be evaluated considering cost-benefits. Human resources: Teams of experts should be transformed into expert teams. Communication: A common disaster-management language needs to be established. Social media is useful due to bi-directional communication. Civil-military cooperation should be established to facilitate a coordinated response including common terminologies and exercises. Animal sheltering: First responders and pet owners are jeopardized if animals are not included in emergency planning. Re-unification of animals with their owners should be included in response models. IPRED conferences provide a platform for sharing insights and lessons learned from diverse emergencies and disasters. The conferences offer a unique opportunity to share knowledge aimed at improving emergency preparedness, networking between various parties, and substantiates the knowledge and experience of all professionals who

  14. Oil supply security -- Emergency response of IEA countries 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-29

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf of Mexico in 2005, the region's oil production and refining infrastructure was devastated and world energy markets were disrupted. The International Energy Agency decided in a matter of days to bring 60 million barrels of additional oil to the market. The emergency response system worked - the collective action helped to stabilise global markets. Since its founding in 1974, oil supply security has been a core mission of the IEA and the Agency has improved its mechanisms to respond to short-term oil supply disruptions. Nevertheless, numerous factors will continue to test the delicate balance of supply and demand. Oil demand growth will continue to accelerate in Asia; oil will be increasingly produced by a shrinking number of countries; and capacities in the supply chain will need to expand. These are just a few of the challenges facing an already tight market. What are the emergency response systems of IEA countries? How are their emergency structures organised? How prepared is the IEA to deal with an oil supply disruption? This publication addresses these questions. It presents another cycle of rigorous reviews of the emergency response mechanisms of IEA member countries. The goal of these reviews is to ensure that the IEA stays ready to respond effectively to oil supply disruptions. This publication also includes overviews of how China, India and countries of Southeast Asia are progressing with domestic policies to improve oil supply security, based on emergency stocks.

  15. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head, James Colson. This document is the second of a two-part analysis on Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2016 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2016 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. The 2013 BNA was approved by NNSA’s Livermore Field Office on January 22, 2014.

  16. Emergency Response using Ephemeral Social Communities across Online Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youna Jung

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In an emergency situation, receiving prompt and organized help from nearby people is of critical importance. The growing use of online social networks (OSNs in emergency situations is a clear indication of the natural applicability of online social networking technologies to emergency responses. Despite this intense interest, a number of fundamental limitations still exist, such as lack of conceptual models and limitations on group organization and cooperation. To address existing limitations, we propose Whistle+ – a cooperation framework for OSN users which can 1 dynamically organize an emergency community with nearby eligible users who are distributed in heterogeneous online social networks, and 2 guarantee secure communication, unrestricted cooperation and resource sharing by leveraging the SocialVPN virtual network and the Jitsi communicator. To test the feasibility and applicability of Whistle+, we present a prototype implementation and demonstrate its applicability to an example use case.

  17. Gamification for data gathering in emergency response exercises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Kenny; Ruhe, Aaron; Soetanto, Marvin; Munkvold, R.; Kolås, L.

    2015-01-01

    Our paper describes how gamification can be implemented in an emergency response exercise. In particular, we focus on the potential of gamification to support self-evaluation processes through the automated gathering of data about the participants' performance. Disaster-exercises are typically

  18. 78 FR 34031 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of interim directive; request for public comment. SUMMARY: The Forest Service is issuing an interim directive to guide its employees in revised procedures for Burned...

  19. 78 FR 44523 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of interim directive; Correction and extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Forest... current Forest Service Manual in the Supplementary Information section of this notice and extends the...

  20. Correlates of emergency response interval and mortality from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study to determine the influence of blood transfusion emergency response interval on Mortality from childhood severe anemia was carried out. An admission record of all children with severe anemia over a 5-year period was reviewed. Those who either died before transfusion or got discharged against ...

  1. 75 FR 43232 - Revisions of the Emergency Response Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Floor, Room W12-140, Routing Symbol M-30, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001. Hand... regulations deemed necessary to ensure the safe transport of hazardous materials in commerce. In addition, the... of PHMSA that all public emergency response vehicles (fire-fighting, police, and rescue squads) will...

  2. Challenges in designing interactive systems for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten; Nielsen, Esben Toftdahl

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents research on participatory design of interactive systems for emergency response. We present the work by going through the design method with a focus on the new elements that we developed for the participatory design toolkit, in particular we emphasize the use of challenges and ...... and maintenance of a situational overview....

  3. Field exercises are useful for improving public health emergency responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Hope

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Emergencies resulting from disease outbreaks and extreme environmental events present significant challenges for health services.Context: Preparing to effectively manage emergencies is a core activity in public health units. Field exercises support consolidation of biopreparedness by testing plans, identifying weaknesses, providing training opportunities and developing surge capacity.Action: An extended field exercise to test response to a novel influenza strain was conducted in New South Wales, Australia in September 2008, eight months before the influenza A(H1N1 2009 pandemic emerged. Lasting four days and involving over 300 participants, the exercise was set in the early response phase with the staggered presentation of 41 cases to 36 emergency departments in the health area. An additional 150 contacts were written into a complex scenario to test the public health response.Outcome: The subsequent pandemic emergence in mid-2009 offered a unique opportunity to assess the field exercise format for disaster preparedness. Most roles were adequately tested with recognized benefit during the actual pandemic response. However, the exercise did not adequately challenge the public health planning team that synthesizes surveillance data and forecasts risk, nor did it identify planning issues that became evident during the subsequent pandemic. Discussion: Field exercises offer the opportunity to rigorously test public health emergency preparedness but can be expensive and labour-intensive. Our exercise provided effective and timely preparation for the influenza A(H1N1 2009 pandemic but showed that more emphasis needs to be placed on the role and training of the public health planning team.

  4. WHO-REMPAN for global health security and strengthening preparedness and response to radiation emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Zhanat

    2010-06-01

    In response to the changing global environment and emerging new issues related to health security, the World Health Organization (WHO) is putting in place new tools for collective defense, such as the revised International Health Regulations (IHR) (2005). The new framework puts additional responsibilities on both Member States and WHO itself in order to effectively implement the IHR (2005) and react effectively in case of public health emergency events of any nature. Since its establishment in 1987, the Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network of WHO (WHO-REMPAN) has become an important asset for the organization's capacity to respond to radiation emergencies and to assist its Member States to strengthen their own response capacities. The paper describes in detail the framework for the WHO's role in preparedness and response to radiation emergencies, including Emergency Conventions and IHR (2005), and how the WHO-REMPAN, through its activities (i.e., technical guidelines development, training, education, research, and information sharing), provides a significant contribution to the organization's program of work towards achievement of the global health security goal.

  5. Quantifying Response of Chickpea Emergence to Air Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Torabi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the response of emergence to temperature in 4 chickpea cultivars (Beauvanij, Arman, Hashem and Jam using 12 sowing dates (one per month under Gorgan environmental conditions (northern Iran in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003. A dent-like function was used to quantify the response of emergence to temperature. Using this function, the cardinal temperatures (base, lower optimum and higher optimum and biological day requirement for emergence were determined for different percentiles. Ceiling temperature was taken constantly as 39 ˚C. There was no significant difference between cultivars for cardinal temperatures of 50% population and they were estimated as 4.5, 20.2 and 29.0 ˚C, respectively. Base temperature of 3.4 and 3.0 ˚C, lower optimum of 23.8 and 20 ˚C and higher optimum of 30.3 and 30.0 ˚C were estimated for 10 and 90% populations without significant difference between cultivars. Cultivar differences for biological day requirement of emergence were not significant for 10, 50 and 90% populations. Biological day requirement was estimated as 4.4, 6.1 and 7.9 days for 10, 50 and 90% populations, respectively. Chickpea emergence could be predicted for different percentiles using estimated parameters of this study and weather data.

  6. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    CERN Document Server

    Simpkins, A A

    2002-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response models estimate dose for inhalation and ground shine pathways. A methodology has been developed to incorporate ingestion doses into the emergency response models. The methodology follows a two-phase approach. The first phase estimates site-specific derived response levels (DRLs) which can be compared with predicted ground-level concentrations to determine if intervention is needed to protect the public. This phase uses accepted methods with little deviation from recommended guidance. The second phase uses site-specific data to estimate a 'best estimate' dose to offsite individuals from ingestion of foodstuffs. While this method deviates from recommended guidance, it is technically defensibly and more realistic. As guidance is updated, these methods also will need to be updated.

  7. Train repathing in emergencies based on fuzzy linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xuelei; Cui, Bingmou

    2014-01-01

    Train pathing is a typical problem which is to assign the train trips on the sets of rail segments, such as rail tracks and links. This paper focuses on the train pathing problem, determining the paths of the train trips in emergencies. We analyze the influencing factors of train pathing, such as transferring cost, running cost, and social adverse effect cost. With the overall consideration of the segment and station capability constraints, we build the fuzzy linear programming model to solve the train pathing problem. We design the fuzzy membership function to describe the fuzzy coefficients. Furthermore, the contraction-expansion factors are introduced to contract or expand the value ranges of the fuzzy coefficients, coping with the uncertainty of the value range of the fuzzy coefficients. We propose a method based on triangular fuzzy coefficient and transfer the train pathing (fuzzy linear programming model) to a determinate linear model to solve the fuzzy linear programming problem. An emergency is supposed based on the real data of the Beijing-Shanghai Railway. The model in this paper was solved and the computation results prove the availability of the model and efficiency of the algorithm.

  8. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  9. Sabbatical programs and the status of academic emergency medicine: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, E; James, T; Bernstein, J

    1999-09-01

    The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) commissioned a survey in 1998 to describe sabbatical programs, academic rank, and tenure, and to shed light on factors affecting the continuum of faculty development, as a context for evaluating the potential importance of emergency medicine (EM) sabbatical programs. The chairs of 120 EM residency programs were surveyed. The response rate was 90%. Of 108 responses, 44 were academic EM departments (AEMDs); ten were their affiliates. The setting was urban for 82%; 37% were publicly funded and 58% privately. AEMDs were more likely to have a tenure track and eligibility for a sabbatical program, but not more likely to use a sabbatical program. Among 2,042 ranked EM faculty, there were 121 professors and 346 associate professors. Mean sabbatical length was six months, provided at full pay requiring a mean of 5.7 years of employment. Among 39 programs reporting eligibility for an EM sabbatical, requirements included: tenure (43%), academic rank of associate professor (78%), an application with multiple approval levels (92%), and a formal report (75%). Thirteen EM programs used sabbaticals; only 40 faculty members altogether (9% of senior faculty) have taken sabbaticals. The mean value of sabbaticals (rated by users on a scale of 1 to 10) was 6.8. Reduced funding, lack of departmental status, difficulty retaining faculty, Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) regulations, graduate medical education (GME) cutbacks, and no release time were identified as challenges for emergency physicians (EPs) wishing to participate in sabbaticals. Strategies proposed to overcome these obstacles include quality customer service, streamlined operations, outside contracts, computerization, hiring individuals with PhDs, collaboration, political activity, and faculty development. A sabbatical can be beneficial for individuals and their institutions, but presently EPs have not been able to maximize use of available opportunities. Some

  10. Sexual Assault Training in Emergency Medicine Residencies: A Survey of Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret K Sande

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is currently no standard forensic medicine training program for emergency medicine residents. In the advent of sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE programs aimed at improving the quality of care for sexual assault victims, it is also unclear how these programs impact emergency medicine (EM resident forensic medicine training. The purpose of this study was togather information on EM residency programs’ training in the care of sexual assault patients and determine what impact SANE programs may have on the experience of EM resident training from the perspective of residency program directors (PDs.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey. The study cohort was all residency PDs from approved EM residency training programs who completed a closed-response self-administered survey electronically.Results: We sent surveys to 152 PDs, and 71 responded for an overall response rate of 47%. Twenty-two PDs (31% reported that their residency does not require procedural competency for the sexual assault exam, and 29 (41% reported their residents are required only to observe sexual assault exam completion to demonstrate competency. Residency PDs were asked how their programs established resident requirements for sexual assault exams. Thirty-seven PDs (52% did not know how their sexual assault exam requirement was established.Conclusion: More than half of residency PDs did not know how their sexual assault guidelines were established, and few were based upon recommendations from the literature. There is no clear consensus as to how PDs view the effect of SANE programs on resident competency with the sexual assault exam. This study highlights both a need for increased awareness of EM resident sexual assault education nationally and also a possible need for a training curriculum defining guidelines forEM residents performing sexual assault exams. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:461–466.

  11. Learning from Japan: strengthening US emergency care and disaster response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Parveen; Arii, Maya; Kayden, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    As Hurricane Katrina demonstrated in 2005, US health response systems for disasters-typically designed to handle only short-term mass-casualty events-are inadequately prepared for disasters that result in large-scale population displacements. Similarly, after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, Japan found that many of its disaster shelters failed to meet international standards for long-term provision of basic needs and health care for the vulnerable populations that sought refuge in the shelters. Hospital disaster plans had not been tested and turned out to be inadequate, and emergency communication equipment did not function. We make policy recommendations that aim to improve US responses to mass-displacement disasters based on Japan's 2011 experience. First, response systems must provide for the extended care of large populations of chronically ill and vulnerable people. Second, policies should ensure that shelters meet or exceed international standards for the provision of food, water, sanitation, and privacy. Third, hospital disaster plans should include redundant communication systems and sufficient emergency provisions for both staff and patients. Finally, there must be routine drills for responses to mass-displacement disasters so that areas needing improvement can be uncovered before an emergency occurs.

  12. The role of programmed and emergent mechanisms of coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim

    Hospitals face substantial coordination challenges. To meet this hospitals more and more use standardized work processes such as care pathways. By drawing on recent coordination theory that increasingly emphasizes the role of lateral and emergent interactions alongside traditional, programmed...... mechanisms of coordination, this paper finds that standardized work processes such as care pathways should be considered as a bundle of coordination mechanisms—plans and rules, objects, routines, roles and proximity—rather than a mechanism of its own. The bundle builds the accountability, predictability...... and common understanding needed to coordinate standardized care tasks. The analysis lends theoretical insights to the traditional view that see standardized work processes as programmed processes. For health care workers who design, implement and use care pathways to solve care tasks, the analysis calls...

  13. Implementation a Medical Simulation Curriculum in Emergency Medicine Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Jahanshir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Applying simulation in medical education is becoming more and more popular. The use of simulation in medical training has led to effective learning and safer care for patients. Nowadays educators have confronted with the challenge of respecting patient safety or bedside teaching. There is widespread evidence, supported by robust research, systematic reviews and meta-analysis, on how much effective simulation is. Simulation supports the acquisition of procedural, technical and non-technical skills through repetitive practice with feedbacks. Our plan was to induct simulation in emergency medicine residency program in order to ameliorate our defects in clinical bedside training. Our residents believed that simulation could be effective in their real medical practice. They mentioned that facilitators’ expertise and good medical knowledge, was the strongest point of the program and lack of proper facilities was the weakest.

  14. A simulator-based nuclear reactor emergency response training exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Edward; Bereznai, George; Shaw, John; Chaput, Joseph; Lafortune, Jean-Francois

    Training offsite emergency response personnel basic awareness of onsite control room operations during nuclear power plant emergency conditions was the primary objective of a week-long workshop conducted on a CANDU® virtual nuclear reactor simulator available at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Canada. The workshop was designed to examine both normal and abnormal reactor operating conditions, and to observe the conditions in the control room that may have impact on the subsequent offsite emergency response. The workshop was attended by participants from a number of countries encompassing diverse job functions related to nuclear emergency response. Objectives of the workshop were to provide opportunities for participants to act in the roles of control room personnel under different reactor operating scenarios, providing a unique experience for participants to interact with the simulator in real-time, and providing increased awareness of control room operations during accident conditions. The ability to "pause" the simulator during exercises allowed the instructors to evaluate and critique the performance of participants, and to provide context with respect to potential offsite emergency actions. Feedback from the participants highlighted (i) advantages of observing and participating "hands-on" with operational exercises, (ii) their general unfamiliarity with control room operational procedures and arrangements prior to the workshop, (iii) awareness of the vast quantity of detailed control room procedures for both normal and transient conditions, and (iv) appreciation of the increased workload for the operators in the control room during a transient from normal operations. Based upon participant feedback, it was determined that the objectives of the training had been met, and that future workshops should be conducted.

  15. 25 CFR 170.921 - What emergency or disaster assistance programs are available?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What emergency or disaster assistance programs are available? 170.921 Section 170.921 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Emergency Relief § 170.921 What emergency or disaster assistance programs are availabl...

  16. The assessment of information technology maturity in emergency response organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael S.; Marcos R. S. Borges; Canos Cerda, José Hilario; Gomes, José Orlando

    2011-01-01

    In emergency response organizations, information technologies are not adequately explored. Sometimes, the mere adoption of new information technologies is not productive, as their efficient use depends on other interrelated technologies and the environment where they are installed. This work describes a model to help organizations understand their capability in respect to the adoption of these technologies. The model also helps the performing of the evaluation from different pe...

  17. The Umbra Simulation and Integration Framework Applied to Emergency Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Paul Lawrence; Britain, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Mine Emergency Response Interactive Training Simulation (MERITS) is intended to prepare personnel to manage an emergency in an underground coal mine. The creation of an effective training environment required realistic emergent behavior in response to simulation events and trainee interventions, exploratory modification of miner behavior rules, realistic physics, and incorporation of legacy code. It also required the ability to add rich media to the simulation without conflicting with normal desktop security settings. Our Umbra Simulation and Integration Framework facilitated agent-based modeling of miners and rescuers and made it possible to work with subject matter experts to quickly adjust behavior through script editing, rather than through lengthy programming and recompilation. Integration of Umbra code with the WebKit browser engine allowed the use of JavaScript-enabled local web pages for media support. This project greatly extended the capabilities of Umbra in support of training simulations and has implications for simulations that combine human behavior, physics, and rich media.

  18. Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program focus groups: A manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, S.A.; Garkovich, C.A.; Shriver, T.E. Jr.

    1991-04-01

    While completing a congressionally mandated destruction of the US stockpile of unitary chemical weapons, the US Army decided that enhanced emergency planning was needed to reduce the consequences of an accidental release of agent. This decision is being implemented cooperatively by the US Department of the Army and the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the form of the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), with additional cooperation from other federal agencies and affected state and local governments. This manual supports that effort by providing information about a commonly used qualitative data and information gathering technique, focus group interviewing, that may be used to design public education materials and other wide enhance communication among CSEPP providers and users. The focus group technique is characterized by structured discussions on a specific topic among a carefully selected group of participants. This manual provides background information on the CSEPP and the current management plan for the CSEPP. It describes the focus group technique and how it may be applied, either by itself or in conjunction with other appropriate research techniques, by state and local government officials to investigate many of the behavioral and organizational impacts of the CSEPP. Sample questions and probes that may be useful in designing and conducting specific CSEPP focus groups are also provided. The manual also includes a list of suggested readings and other reference material that may be useful in designing focus groups. 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Combining internet technology and mobile phones for emergency response management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst. (Finland)

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended for persons involved in radiological emergency response management. An introduction is given to the technical basis of the mobile Internet and ongoing development summarised. Examples are given describing how mobile Internet technology has been used to improve monitoring media coverage of incidents and events, and a test is described where web based information was selectively processed and made available to WAP enabled mobile phones. The report concludes with recommendations stressing the need for following mobile Internet developments and taking them into account when designing web applications for radiological response management. Doing so can make web based material accessible to mobile devices at minimal additional cost. (au)

  20. Emerging concepts in T follicular helper cell responses to malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Diana S; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ly, Ann; Ioannidis, Lisa J; Crompton, Peter D

    2017-02-01

    Antibody responses to malaria and candidate malaria vaccines are short-lived in children, leaving them susceptible to repeated malaria episodes. Because T follicular helper (TFH) cells provide critical help to B cells to generate long-lived antibody responses, they have become the focus of recent studies of Plasmodium-infected mice and humans. The emerging data converge on common themes, namely, that malaria-induced TH1 cytokines are associated with the activation of (i) T-like memory TFH cells with impaired B cell helper function, and (ii) pre-TFH cells that acquire Th1-like features (T-bet expression, IFN-γ production), which impede their differentiation into fully functional TFH cells, thus resulting in germinal center dysfunction and suboptimal antibody responses. Deeper knowledge of TFH cells in malaria could illuminate strategies to improve vaccines through modulating TFH cell responses. This review summarizes emerging concepts in TFH cell responses to malaria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. 44 CFR 352.27 - Federal role in the emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal role in the emergency response. 352.27 Section 352.27 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... Federal Participation § 352.27 Federal role in the emergency response. In addition to the Federal...

  2. WMD first response: requirements, emerging technologies, and policy implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergino, E S; Hoehn, W E

    2000-06-19

    In the US today, efforts are underway to defend against the possible terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) against US cities. These efforts include the development and adaptation of technologies to support prevention and detection, to defend against a possible attack, and, if these fail, to provide both mitigation responses and attribution for a WMD incident. Technologies under development span a range of systems, from early detection and identification of an agent or explosive, to diagnostic and systems analysis tools; and to forensic analysis for law enforcement. Also, many techniques and tools that have been developed for other applications are being examined to determine whether, with some modification, they could be of use by the emergency preparedness, public health, and law enforcement communities. However, anecdotal evidence suggests the existence of a serious disconnect between the technology development communities and these user communities. This disconnect arises because funding for technology development is derived primarily from sources (principally federal agencies) distant from the emergency response communities, which are predominantly state, county, or local entities. Moreover, the first responders with whom we have worked candidly admit that their jurisdictions have been given, or have purchased for them, a variety of technological devices, typically without consulting the emergency responders about their utility. In private discussions, emergency responders derisively refer to these as a closet full of useless toys. Technology developers have many new and relevant technologies currently in the development pipeline, but most have not been adequately vetted against the field needs or validated for field use. The Center for Global Security Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology recently sponsored a two-day workshop to bring together

  3. Optimal network solution for proactive risk assessment and emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tianxing

    Coupled with the continuous development in the field industrial operation management, the requirement for operation optimization in large scale manufacturing network has provoked more interest in the research field of engineering. Compared with the traditional way to take the remedial measure after the occurrence of the emergency event or abnormal situation, the current operation control calls for more proactive risk assessment to set up early warning system and comprehensive emergency response planning. Among all the industries, chemical industry and energy industry have higher opportunity to face with the abnormal and emergency situations due to their own industry characterization. Therefore the purpose of the study is to develop methodologies to give aid in emergency response planning and proactive risk assessment in the above two industries. The efficacy of the developed methodologies is demonstrated via two industrial real problems. The first case is to handle energy network dispatch optimization under emergency of local energy shortage under extreme conditions such as earthquake, tsunami, and hurricane, which may cause local areas to suffer from delayed rescues, widespread power outages, tremendous economic losses, and even public safety threats. In such urgent events of local energy shortage, agile energy dispatching through an effective energy transportation network, targeting the minimum energy recovery time, should be a top priority. The second case is a scheduling methodology to coordinate multiple chemical plants' start-ups in order to minimize regional air quality impacts under extreme meteorological conditions. The objective is to reschedule multi-plant start-up sequence to achieve the minimum sum of delay time compared to the expected start-up time of each plant. All these approaches can provide quantitative decision support for multiple stake holders, including government and environment agencies, chemical industry, energy industry and local

  4. Assessing program efficiency: a time and motion study of the Mental Health Emergency Care - Rural Access Program in NSW Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saurman, Emily; Lyle, David; Kirby, Sue; Roberts, Russell

    2014-01-01

    The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Program (MHEC-RAP) is a telehealth solution providing specialist emergency mental health care to rural and remote communities across western NSW, Australia...

  5. Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

    2005-10-03

    A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of

  6. Supplemental Milestones for Emergency Medicine Residency Programs: A Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterer, Andrew R; Salzman, David H; Branzetti, Jeremy B; Gisondi, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) residency programs may be 36 or 48 months in length. The Residency Review Committee for EM requires that 48-month programs provide educational justification for the additional 12 months. We developed additional milestones that EM training programs might use to assess outcomes in domains that meet this accreditation requirement. This study aims to assess for content validity of these supplemental milestones using a similar methodology to that of the original EM Milestones validation study. A panel of EM program directors (PD) and content experts at two institutions identified domains of additional training not covered by the existing EM Milestones. This led to the development of six novel subcompetencies: "Operations and Administration," "Critical Care," "Leadership and Management," "Research," "Teaching and Learning," and "Career Development." Subject-matter experts at other 48-month EM residency programs refined the milestones for these subcompetencies. PDs of all 48-month EM programs were then asked to order the proposed milestones using the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition for each subcompetency. Data analysis mirrored that used in the original EM Milestones validation study, leading to the final version of our supplemental milestones. Twenty of 33 subjects (58.8%) completed the study. No subcompetency or individual milestone met deletion criteria. Of the 97 proposed milestones, 67 (69.1%) required no further editing and remained at the same level as proposed by the study authors. Thirty milestones underwent level changes: 15 (15.5%) were moved one level up and 13 (13.4%) were moved one level down. One milestone (1.0%) in "Leadership and Management" was moved two levels up, and one milestone in "Operations and Administration" was moved two levels down. One milestone in "Research" was ranked by the survey respondents at one level higher than that proposed by the authors; however, this milestone was kept at its original level assignment

  7. Supplemental Milestones for Emergency Medicine Residency Programs: A Validation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketterer, Andrew R

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency medicine (EM residency programs may be 36 or 48 months in length. The Residency Review Committee for EM requires that 48-month programs provide educational justification for the additional 12 months. We developed additional milestones that EM training programs might use to assess outcomes in domains that meet this accreditation requirement. This study aims to assess for content validity of these supplemental milestones using a similar methodology to that of the original EM Milestones validation study. A panel of EM program directors (PD and content experts at two institutions identified domains of additional training not covered by the existing EM Milestones. This led to the development of six novel subcompetencies: “Operations and Administration,” “Critical Care,” “Leadership and Management,” “Research,” “Teaching and Learning,” and “Career Development.” Subject-matter experts at other 48-month EM residency programs refined the milestones for these subcompetencies. PDs of all 48-month EM programs were then asked to order the proposed milestones using the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition for each subcompetency. Data analysis mirrored that used in the original EM Milestones validation study, leading to the final version of our supplemental milestones. Twenty of 33 subjects (58.8% completed the study. No subcompetency or individual milestone met deletion criteria. Of the 97 proposed milestones, 67 (69.1% required no further editing and remained at the same level as proposed by the study authors. Thirty milestones underwent level changes: 15 (15.5% were moved one level up and 13 (13.4% were moved one level down. One milestone (1.0% in “Leadership and Management” was moved two levels up, and one milestone in “Operations and Administration” was moved two levels down. One milestone in “Research” was ranked by the survey respondents at one level higher than that proposed by the authors; however, this

  8. Formation mechanism of quick emergency response capability for urban rail transit: Inter-organizational collaboration perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanchun Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of urban rail transit in China recently, improving its quick emergency response capability is becoming an important issue. Based on the perspective of inter-organizational collaboration, this article examines the formation mechanism of quick emergency response capability of urban rail transit and proposes the concept model hypothesis, in order to highlight the inter-organizational emergency collaboration relationships and the quick emergency response capability. According to site surveys and analysis of the elements of inter-organizational collaboration in emergency rescue and the meaning of quick emergency response capability, the scale of emergency collaboration and emergency response capability is designed, and the hypothetical concept model is tested by structural equation model. The results indicate that the emergency collaboration can be realized mainly through emergency organizations, resources, plans, and information. These elements interact with each other; the quick emergency response capability includes fast reaction and emergency disposal capability, emergency decision and execution capability, and coordination and joint action capability. These capabilities restrict each other. Moreover, emergency collaboration has significant but different influence on different dimensions of quick emergency response capability. Therefore, allocating and controlling emergency elements are pivotal to realizing inter-organizational emergency collaboration and generating the quick emergency response capability of urban rail transit.

  9. Response of human populations to large-scale emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrow, James; Wang, Dashun; Barabási, Albert-László

    2010-03-01

    Until recently, little quantitative data regarding collective human behavior during dangerous events such as bombings and riots have been available, despite its importance for emergency management, safety and urban planning. Understanding how populations react to danger is critical for prediction, detection and intervention strategies. Using a large telecommunications dataset, we study for the first time the spatiotemporal, social and demographic response properties of people during several disasters, including a bombing, a city-wide power outage, and an earthquake. Call activity rapidly increases after an event and we find that, when faced with a truly life-threatening emergency, information rapidly propagates through a population's social network. Other events, such as sports games, do not exhibit this propagation.

  10. TWO-GRAPH BUILDING INTERIOR REPRESENTATION FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Boguslawski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, in a rapidly developing urban environment with bigger and higher public buildings, disasters causing emergency situations and casualties are unavoidable. Preparedness and quick response are crucial issues saving human lives. Available information about an emergency scene, such as a building structure, helps for decision making and organizing rescue operations. Models supporting decision-making should be available in real, or near-real, time. Thus, good quality models that allow implementation of automated methods are highly desirable. This paper presents details of the recently developed method for automated generation of variable density navigable networks in a 3D indoor environment, including a full 3D topological model, which may be used not only for standard navigation but also for finding safe routes and simulating hazard and phenomena associated with disasters such as fire spread and heat transfer.

  11. Towards Location-Based Access Control in Healthcare Emergency Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Carmen Ruiz; Kirkpatrick, Michael; Ghinita, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in positioning and tracking technologies have led to the emergence of novel location-based applications that allow participants to access information relevant to their spatio-temporal context. Traditional access control models, such as role-based access control (RBAC...... of complex access control decisions based on spatio-temporal relationships among subjects and objects. Furthermore, such relationships change frequently in dynamic environments, requiring efficient mechanisms to monitor and re-evaluate access control decisions. In this position paper, we present a healthcare...... emergency response scenario which highlights the novel challenges that arise when enforcing access control in an environment with moving subjects and objects. To address a realistic application scenario, we consider movement on road networks, and we identify complex access control decisions relevant...

  12. High school automated external defibrillator programs as markers of emergency preparedness for sudden cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toresdahl, Brett G; Harmon, Kimberly G; Drezner, Jonathan A

    2013-01-01

    School-based automated external defibrillator (AED) programs have demonstrated a high survival rate for individuals suffering sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in US high schools. To examine the relationship between high schools having an AED on campus and other measures of emergency preparedness for SCA. Cross-sectional study. United States high schools, December 2006 to September 2009. Principals, athletic directors, school nurses, and certified athletic trainers represented 3371 high schools. Comprehensive surveys on emergency planning for SCA submitted by high school representatives to the National Registry for AED Use in Sports from December 2006 to September 2009. Schools with and without AEDs were compared to assess other elements of emergency preparedness for SCA. A total of 2784 schools (82.6%) reported having 1 or more AEDs on campus, with an average of 2.8 AEDs per school; 587 schools (17.4%) had no AEDs. Schools with an enrollment of more than 500 students were more likely to have an AED (relative risk [RR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.16, P schools were more likely to have an AED than were rural (RR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04, 1.11, P schools (RR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.04, 1.23, P Schools with 1 or more AEDs were more likely to ensure access to early defibrillation (RR = 3.45, 95% CI = 2.97, 3.99, P emergency action plan for SCA (RR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.67, 2.00, P emergency action plan at least annually (RR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.58, 2.50, P emergency medical services to develop the emergency action plan (RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.32, P emergency responders (RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.08, P High schools with AED programs were more likely to establish a comprehensive emergency response plan for SCA. Implementing school-based AED programs is a key step associated with emergency planning for young athletes with SCA.

  13. High School Automated External Defibrillator Programs as Markers of Emergency Preparedness for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toresdahl, Brett G.; Harmon, Kimberly G.; Drezner, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: School-based automated external defibrillator (AED) programs have demonstrated a high survival rate for individuals suffering sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in US high schools. Objective: To examine the relationship between high schools having an AED on campus and other measures of emergency preparedness for SCA. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: United States high schools, December 2006 to September 2009. Patients or Other Participants: Principals, athletic directors, school nurses, and certified athletic trainers represented 3371 high schools. Main Outcome Measure(s): Comprehensive surveys on emergency planning for SCA submitted by high school representatives to the National Registry for AED Use in Sports from December 2006 to September 2009. Schools with and without AEDs were compared to assess other elements of emergency preparedness for SCA. Results: A total of 2784 schools (82.6%) reported having 1 or more AEDs on campus, with an average of 2.8 AEDs per school; 587 schools (17.4%) had no AEDs. Schools with an enrollment of more than 500 students were more likely to have an AED (relative risk [RR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.16, P defibrillation (RR = 3.45, 95% CI = 2.97, 3.99, P < .01), establish an emergency action plan for SCA (RR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.67, 2.00, P < .01), review the emergency action plan at least annually (RR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.58, 2.50, P < .01), consult emergency medical services to develop the emergency action plan (RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.32, P < .01), and establish a communication system to activate emergency responders (RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.08, P < .01). Conclusions: High schools with AED programs were more likely to establish a comprehensive emergency response plan for SCA. Implementing school-based AED programs is a key step associated with emergency planning for young athletes with SCA. PMID:23672389

  14. Emergency response arrangements for the transport of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan-Warren, E. [Radioactive Materials Transport Div., Dept. for Transport, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Response arrangements are required for the transport of radioactive materials, under both transport and health and safety legislation, to safeguard persons, property and the environment in the event of incidents and emergencies. Responsibilities fall on both government and industry: government is responsible for ensuring public safety and providing information and reassurance. This responsibility is discharged for each type of incident by a nominated ''lead department'', supported as appropriate by other government departments and agencies; for their part, operators are obliged to have arrangements in place for dealing with the practicalities of any reasonably foreseeable incident, including recovery and onward transport of a package, and any required clean-up or restoration of the environment. This paper outlines both the government and industry arrangements in Great Britain. The principles of response and intervention are discussed, together with the lead department concept, regulatory requirements, and the plans developed by the transport industry to ensure a nation-wide response capability.

  15. Risk communications and the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, B.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    One of the greater challenges the Army faces is effectively dealing with the concerns of the public, local officials and the news media on the disposal of aging chemical agents. This paper describes the method developed for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). The purpose was to provide a fairly comprehensive document on risk communication research and recommended practices as they related to the CSEPP. Using the communications perspective suggested by Covello and colleagues, the existing practices of communicating risk information about chemical weapons and the associated efforts in emergency planning, storage and eventual disposal are described. Risk communication problems specific to the CSEPP are then examined and described via scenarios. A framework is developed that distinguishes between the major components of risk communication, flow and intent. Within this framework, the research and recommendations are summarized as to direction of flow -- dialogue, or two-way interaction, versus monologue, or one-way communication -- and that of intent -- exchange versus persuasion. The findings and recommendations are synthesized and related to risk events for the CSEPP as posited in the scenarios.

  16. Complex humanitarian emergencies: A review of epidemiological and response models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkle Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex emergencies (CEs have been the most common human-generated disaster of the past two decades. These internal conflicts and associated acts of genocide have been poorly understood and poorly managed. This article provides an epidemiological background and understanding of developing and developed countries, and chronic or smoldering countries′ CEs, and explains in detail the prevailing models of response seen by the international community. Even though CEs are declining in number, they have become more complex and dangerous. The UN Charter reform is expected to address internal conflicts and genocide but may not provide a more effective and efficient means to respond.

  17. Sexual Assault Response Team: overcoming obstacles to program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K; Holmseth, J; Macgregor, M; Letourneau, M

    1998-08-01

    After several years of planning, The SART at Immanuel St. Joseph's--Mayo Health Systems became a reality in August 1997. The nurses who were trained for this program were already providing 24-hour coverage in the emergency department for psychiatric emergencies and patients with chemical dependency. The SANE responsibilities were added to their on-call duties. Five nurses participated in a 40-hour training program by SANE specialists and experts in the local community. As expected, nurses were apprehensive as they conducted their first examinations; however, all has gone well. Over time, the providers' and clients' satisfaction with the program has improved. The examination is completed in less time, and the person assaulted does not have to wait as long for the SANE to arrive. Members of law enforcement and the prosecutor's office are especially pleased with the quality of evidence collected and the procedures followed to maintain chain of evidence so the evidence obtained can be used in prosecution. The program has resulted in kind and compassionate care for persons who have been sexually assaulted. The providers are continuing to meet monthly as an interdisciplinary, interagency team and are addressing concerns as they arise. Members of the SART are developing a good working relationship. Everyone involved agrees that developing this program has been a worthwhile effort and that the hospital is providing a valued service for the community.

  18. 77 FR 36014 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear...-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling- Water Reactors.'' This... testing features of emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs). DATES...

  19. Emergency medicine resident moonlighting: a survey of program directors. CORD Task Force on Resident Moonlighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, M I; Bearie, B; Ritter, M S; Ferkich, A

    1995-04-01

    1) To systematically describe emergency medicine (EM) program directors' perceptions of the benefits and risks of resident moonlighting. 2) To assess moonlighting policies of EM residencies, the degree of compliance with these policies, and the methods of dealing with residents who are out of compliance. A written survey was mailed or hand-delivered to all allopathic and osteopathic EM residency directors in the United States in 1992-93. Incomplete and ambiguous surveys were completed by phone. There was a 96% response rate (113/118). The average EM resident clinical workweek ranged from 38 to 50 hours while the resident was assigned to ED rotations. Most (90%) of the program directors believe moonlighting interferes with residency duties to some degree. Few (10%) programs prohibit moonlighting altogether, although 44% limit moonlighting to an average of 41.5 hours per month. Program directors believe residents moonlight primarily for financial reasons. Most (60%) of the program directors believe moonlighting offers experience not available in the residency, primarily related to autonomous practice. Fifteen programs reported residents who had been sued for malpractice while moonlighting, with one program director named along with the resident. One third of program directors have penalized residents for abuse of moonlighting privileges. EM residency directors are concerned about the effect of moonlighting on resident education. The directors' concerns regarding litigation, excessive work hours, and interference with residency duties are balanced by a general acceptance of the financial need to supplement residency income.

  20. Performance and Participation Dynamics in an Emergency Response Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Marra, David E; Castro, Julian; Gomez, Maribeth; Perna, Claire

    2017-04-01

    This study examined relationships between participation and performance within a team and performance transfer effects between opponents in an Emergency Response (ER) simulation. Classical organizational theories have emphasized the importance of group participation for organizational performance, but there have been few or no attempts to investigate participation-performance relationships in short-interval time series. The experimental task was a Stag Hunt game, as defined in game theory; performance trends would be affected by levels of participation, which in turn should be affected by recent performance experiences that modulate the players' self-efficacy for the task. Participants were 62 undergraduates who were organized into 11 teams of 3 or 4 members playing an ER board game against one attacker. Time series analyses were conducted through nonlinear regression with exponential structural equations and by linear analyses for comparison. Results showed that performance time series of one opponent did not affect the other for teams of this size. Teams showed higher levels of adaptability compared to attackers, as evidenced by higher Lyapunov exponents. Performance affected group participation levels more so than the other way around. There appeared to be emergent group dynamics occurring between two experimental sessions that moderated the validity of the core linear and nonlinear models. Emergent group properties are one of several possible directions for further investigation within this experimental paradigm. Nonlinear models were more accurate than linear models after correcting for correlated residuals.

  1. Defining Roles for Pharmacy Personnel in Disaster Response and Emergency Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalili, Mohammad; Ma, Janice; Grenier, Sylvain

    2017-08-01

    Ongoing provision of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies is of key importance during and following a disaster or other emergency event. An effectively coordinated response involving locally available pharmacy personnel-drawing upon the efforts of licensed pharmacists and unlicensed support staff-can help to mitigate harms and alleviate hardship in a community after emergency events. However, pharmacists and their counterparts generally receive limited training in disaster medicine and emergency preparedness as part of their initial qualifications, even in countries with well-developed professional education programs. Pharmacy efforts have also traditionally focused on medical supply activities, more so than on general emergency preparedness. To facilitate future work between pharmacy personnel on an international level, our team undertook an extensive review of the published literature describing pharmacists' experiences in responding to or preparing for both natural and manmade disasters. In addition to identifying key activities that must be performed, we have developed a classification scheme for pharmacy personnel. We believe that this framework will enable pharmacy personnel working in diverse practice settings to identify and undertake essential actions that are necessary to ensure an effective emergency response and will promote better collaboration between pharmacy team members during actual disaster situations. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:496-504).

  2. Fight or flight: the ethics of emergency physician disaster response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserson, Kenneth V; Heine, Carlton E; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Moskop, John C; Baruch, Jay; Aswegan, Andrew L

    2008-04-01

    Most disaster plans depend on using emergency physicians, nurses, emergency department support staff, and out-of-hospital personnel to maintain the health care system's front line during crises that involve personal risk to themselves or their families. Planners automatically assume that emergency health care workers will respond. However, we need to ask: Should they, and will they, work rather than flee? The answer involves basic moral and personal issues. This article identifies and examines the factors that influence health care workers' decisions in these situations. After reviewing physicians' response to past disasters and epidemics, we evaluate how much danger they actually faced. Next, we examine guidelines from medical professional organizations about physicians' duty to provide care despite personal risks, although we acknowledge that individuals will interpret and apply professional expectations and norms according to their own situation and values. The article goes on to articulate moral arguments for a duty to treat during disasters and social crises, as well as moral reasons that may limit or override such a duty. How fear influences behavior is examined, as are the institutional and social measures that can be taken to control fear and to encourage health professionals to provide treatment in crisis situations. Finally, the article emphasizes the importance of effective risk communication in enabling health care professionals and the public to make informed and defensible decisions during disasters. We conclude that the decision to stay or leave will ultimately depend on individuals' risk assessment and their value systems. Preparations for the next pandemic or disaster should include policies that encourage emergency physicians, who are inevitably among those at highest risk, to "stay and fight."

  3. Assessing Program Efficiency: A Time and Motion Study of the Mental Health Emergency Care — Rural Access Program in NSW Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurman, Emily; Lyle, David; Kirby, Sue; Roberts, Russell

    2014-01-01

    The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Program (MHEC-RAP) is a telehealth solution providing specialist emergency mental health care to rural and remote communities across western NSW, Australia. This is the first time and motion (T&M) study to examine program efficiency and capacity for a telepsychiatry program. Clinical services are an integral aspect of the program accounting for 6% of all activities and 50% of the time spent conducting program activities, but half of this time is spent completing clinical paperwork. This finding emphasizes the importance of these services to program efficiency and the need to address variability of service provision to impact capacity. Currently, there is no efficiency benchmark for emergency telepsychiatry programs. Findings suggest that MHEC-RAP could increase its activity without affecting program responsiveness. T&M studies not only determine activity and time expenditure, but have a wider application assessing program efficiency by understanding, defining, and calculating capacity. T&M studies can inform future program development of MHEC-RAP and similar telehealth programs, both in Australia and overseas. PMID:25089774

  4. Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken place–techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation–the so-called second line of defense.

  5. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  6. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Milissa; Bevc, Christine A; Hegle, Jennifer; Horney, Jennifer A; Davies, Megan; MacDonald, Pia D M

    2012-02-23

    In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness. We describe the specific services public health epidemiologists provide to local health departments, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, and the hospitals in which they are based, and assess the value of these services to stakeholders. We surveyed and/or interviewed public health epidemiologists, communicable disease nurses based at local health departments, North Carolina Division of Public Health staff, and public health epidemiologists' hospital supervisors to 1) elicit the services provided by public health epidemiologists in daily practice and during emergencies and 2) examine the value of these services. Interviews were transcribed and imported into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. Descriptive analyses were performed on quantitative survey data. Public health epidemiologists conduct syndromic surveillance of community-acquired infections and potential bioterrorism events, assist local health departments and the North Carolina Division of Public Health with public health investigations, educate clinicians on diseases of public health importance, and enhance communication between hospitals and public health agencies. Stakeholders place on a high value on the unique services provided by public health epidemiologists. Public health epidemiologists effectively link public health agencies and hospitals to enhance syndromic surveillance, communicable disease management, and public health emergency preparedness and response. This comprehensive description of the program and its value to stakeholders, both in routine daily practice and in responding to a major public health emergency, can inform other states that may wish to establish a similar program as part of their larger public health emergency preparedness and response system.

  7. Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiewicz Milissa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, 11 public health epidemiologists were placed in North Carolina's largest hospitals to enhance communication between public health agencies and healthcare systems for improved emergency preparedness. We describe the specific services public health epidemiologists provide to local health departments, the North Carolina Division of Public Health, and the hospitals in which they are based, and assess the value of these services to stakeholders. Methods We surveyed and/or interviewed public health epidemiologists, communicable disease nurses based at local health departments, North Carolina Division of Public Health staff, and public health epidemiologists' hospital supervisors to 1 elicit the services provided by public health epidemiologists in daily practice and during emergencies and 2 examine the value of these services. Interviews were transcribed and imported into ATLAS.ti for coding and analysis. Descriptive analyses were performed on quantitative survey data. Results Public health epidemiologists conduct syndromic surveillance of community-acquired infections and potential bioterrorism events, assist local health departments and the North Carolina Division of Public Health with public health investigations, educate clinicians on diseases of public health importance, and enhance communication between hospitals and public health agencies. Stakeholders place on a high value on the unique services provided by public health epidemiologists. Conclusions Public health epidemiologists effectively link public health agencies and hospitals to enhance syndromic surveillance, communicable disease management, and public health emergency preparedness and response. This comprehensive description of the program and its value to stakeholders, both in routine daily practice and in responding to a major public health emergency, can inform other states that may wish to establish a similar program as part of their larger public

  8. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  9. Workshop proceedings : Emergency preparedness and response : March 4, 2003 (Grande Prairie) and March 6, 2003 (Calgary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, K. [Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Calgary, AB (Canada); Gibson, T. [Gecko Management Consultants, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-03-01

    Several issues had been identified during the stakeholder consultation program for Guide 71: Emergency Preparedness and Response Requirements For the Upstream Petroleum Industry, and the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) conducted, in May 2002, a workshop to address these issues. In addition, two subsequent workshops were held, one in Grande Prairie on March 4, 2003, and another in Calgary on March 6, 2003. They were held to gather additional information concerning the requirements for testing and exercising emergency preparedness and response capabilities for sour gas facilities. Representatives from a variety of organizations were present, including: energy companies, Emergency Management Alberta, local municipalities, Alberta Health and Wellness and Regional Health Authorities, general public, other regulators, as well as emergency response planning consultants. Special emphasis was placed on the following topics in support of Public Safety and Sour Gas Provincial Advisory Committee recommendations: exercise criteria, EUB participation, and the role of the public in the exercises. The present document contains the opening slide presentation to the workshops, a list of attendees, notes taken throughout the course of the workshops, as well as the written submission from the City of Calgary, Disaster Services.

  10. Use of mock media in emergency management exercises: the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Ken; Meshenberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Disasters of any kind attract significant attention from news media, and media play an important role in disaster response. In a US government program for hazardous materials preparedness, risk communication functions were incorporated into planning and are demonstrated during response exercises. To provide the best training and most realistic play, exercise controllers play the role of news media reporters-mock media-during these exercises. They attend news conferences, interview exercise players in the field, and make calls to participants. They produce news stories including television reports, newspaper articles, radio spots, blog entries, and social media messages. This allows exercise players to experience how their actions and statements would be represented in the media, more effectively mimicking the environment of a real event.

  11. Does Young Age Merit Increased Emergency Department Trauma Team Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes, James F.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: To determine if increased trauma team response results in alterations in resource use in a population of children<6 years, especially in those least injured. Methods: We conducted a retrospective before and after study of children <6 years sustaining blunt trauma and meeting defined prehospital criteria. We compared hospitalization rates and missed injuries (injuries identified after discharge from the emergency department/hospital among patients with and without an upgraded trauma team response. We compared the computed tomography (CT rate and laboratory testing rate among minimally injured patients (Injury Severity Score [ISS] 6. Results: We enrolled 352 patients with 180 (mean age 2.7 ± 1.5 years in the upgrade cohort and 172 (mean age 2.6 ± 1.5 years in the no-upgrade cohort. Independent predictors of hospital admission in a regression analysis included: Glasgow Coma Scale <14 (odds ratio [OR]=11.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3, 56, ISS (OR=1.55, 95% CI 1.33, 1.81, and evaluation by the upgrade trauma team (OR=5.66, 95% CI 3.14, 10.2. In the 275 patients with ISS < 6, CT (relative risk=1.34, 95% CI 1.09, 1.64 and laboratory tests (relative risk=1.71, 95% CI 1.39, 2.11 were more likely to be obtained in the upgrade cohort as compared to the no-upgrade cohort. We identified no cases of a missed diagnosis. Conclusion: Increasing the trauma team response based upon young age results in increased resource use without altering the rate of missed injuries. In hospitals with ED physicians capable of evaluating and treating injured children, increasing ED trauma team resources solely for young age of the patient is not recommended. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(6:569–575.

  12. Quantitative approach of organizational resilience for a Dutch Emergency Response Safety Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Trijp, J. M P; Ulieru, Mihaela; Van Gelder, Pieter H A J M

    2012-01-01

    Resilience of an Emergency Response Organization is an important concept to determine how well a Dutch Emergency Response Safety Region behaves under stress. The main objective of this study is to determine the intrinsic value "Resilience" in case of a Dutch Emergency Response Safety Region. In this

  13. Emergency response networks for disaster monitoring and detection from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, Tanya; Sweeting, Martin N.; Vitanov, Ivan; Vitanov, Valentin I.

    2009-05-01

    Numerous man-made and natural disasters have stricken mankind since the beginning of the new millennium. The scale and impact of such disasters often prevent the collection of sufficient data for an objective assessment and coordination of timely rescue and relief missions on the ground. As a potential solution to this problem, in recent years constellations of Earth observation small satellites and in particular micro-satellites (<100 kg) in low Earth orbit have emerged as an efficient platform for reliable disaster monitoring. The main task of the Earth observation satellites is to capture images of the Earth surface using various techniques. For a large number of applications the resulting delay between image capture and delivery is not acceptable, in particular for rapid response remote sensing aiming at disaster monitoring and detection. In such cases almost instantaneous data availability is a strict requirement to enable an assessment of the situation and instigate an adequate response. Examples include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, flooding, forest fires and oil spills. The proposed solution to this issue are low-cost networked distributed satellite systems in low Earth orbit capable of connecting to terrestrial networks and geostationary Earth orbit spacecraft in real time. This paper discusses enabling technologies for rapid response disaster monitoring and detection from space such as very small satellite design, intersatellite communication, intelligent on-board processing, distributed computing and bio-inspired routing techniques.

  14. Emergent Phototactic Responses of Cyanobacteria under Complex Light Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Rosanna Man Wah; Bhaya, Devaki; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2017-03-07

    Environmental cues can stimulate a variety of single-cell responses, as well as collective behaviors that emerge within a bacterial community. These responses require signal integration and transduction, which can occur on a variety of time scales and often involve feedback between processes, for example, between growth and motility. Here, we investigate the dynamics of responses of the phototactic, unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 to complex light inputs that simulate the natural environments that cells typically encounter. We quantified single-cell motility characteristics in response to light of different wavelengths and intensities. We found that red and green light primarily affected motility bias rather than speed, while blue light inhibited motility altogether. When light signals were simultaneously presented from different directions, cells exhibited phototaxis along the vector sum of the light directions, indicating that cells can sense and combine multiple signals into an integrated motility response. Under a combination of antagonistic light signal regimes (phototaxis-promoting green light and phototaxis-inhibiting blue light), the ensuing bias was continuously tuned by competition between the wavelengths, and the community response was dependent on both bias and cell growth. The phototactic dynamics upon a rapid light shift revealed a wavelength dependence on the time scales of photoreceptor activation/deactivation. Thus, Synechocystis cells achieve exquisite integration of light inputs at the cellular scale through continuous tuning of motility, and the pattern of collective behavior depends on single-cell motility and population growth.IMPORTANCE The photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. exhibits phototaxis that is dependent on the incident light wavelength through the action of various photoreceptors. In natural environments, cells experience a set of highly dynamic and complex light inputs, yet how cells transduce

  15. Ocular responses and visual performance after emergent acceleration stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Ling; Horng, Chi-Ting; Liu, Chun-Cheng; Shieh, Pochuen; Hung, Chun-Ling; Lu, Da-Wen; Chiang, Shang-Yi; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chiou, Wen-Yaw

    2011-11-07

    To evaluate visual function after emergent acceleration stress. Sixteen subjects were enrolled in this study. Human ejection seat trainer was used to induce six times gravitational force in the head-to-toe (z-axis) direction (+6 Gz). Visual performance was evaluated using the visual chart and contrast sensitivity (CS) at indicated times. Ocular reactions were assessed with biomicroscopy and topographic mapping. Temporary visual acuity reduction (0.02 ± 0.05 vs. 0.18 ± 0.08 logMAR visual acuity [VA]; P spatial frequencies immediately after ejection. However, CS returned to the initial range at high spatial frequency by 30 minutes. Emergent acceleration force induces significant ocular responses and visual fluctuation. Prolonged ACD deepening (>15 minutes) and PD (>30 minutes) were noted, but cornea and refraction remain stable. CS at all spatial frequencies revealed remarkable reduction immediately after ejection, and recovered to baseline levels within 30 minutes only at high spatial frequency. Neuroretinal function may involve visual fluctuation after acceleration stress, because visual fluctuation corresponds with the characters of neuroretinal function. However, further studies are necessary.

  16. HAZBOT - A hazardous materials emergency response mobile robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H. W.; Edmonds, G.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe the progress that has been made towards the development of a mobile robot that can be used by hazardous materials emergency response teams to perform a variety of tasks including incident localization and characterization, hazardous material identification/classification, site surveillance and monitoring, and ultimately incident mitigation. In September of 1991, the HAZBOT II vehicle performed its first end-to-end demonstration involving a scenario in which the vehicle: navigated to the incident location from a distant (150-200 ft.) deployment site; entered a building through a door with thumb latch style handle and door closer; located and navigated to the suspected incident location (a chemical storeroom); unlocked and opened the storeroom's door; climbed over the storeroom's 12 in. high threshold to enter the storeroom; and located and identified a broken container of benzene.

  17. Consumer response to food labels in an emerging market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Festila, Alexandra Florina; Chrysochou, Polymeros; Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates consumer response to food labels in an emerging market. More specifically, it measures the levels of awareness, objective and perceived understanding, perceived usefulness and perceived trustworthiness of the most prominent food labels found in the Romanian market. An online...... survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 428 respondents (45.6% males of an average age of 30.6 years). Results revealed that for most respondents awareness levels towards food labels are generally low, except for the Guideline Daily Amount and the organic food labels. Objective understanding...... towards food labels was relatively high, especially towards those food labels that included a clear text element. Perceived understanding, perceived usefulness and perceived trustworthiness were found to be consistently high with regard to the GDA and the national organic food labels, while the European...

  18. 78 FR 33467 - Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in... the Public Transportation Emergency Relief Program to the four FTA recipients most severely affected...

  19. Canadian biodosimetry capacity for response to radiation emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, D. [Defense Research and Development Canada-Ottawa, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0Z4 (Canada)], E-mail: diana.wilkinson@drdc-rddc.gc.ca; Segura, T.; Prud' homme-Lalonde, L.; Mullins, D.; Lachapelle, S. [Defense Research and Development Canada-Ottawa, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0Z4 (Canada); Qutob, S.; Thorleifson, E.; Wilkins, R. [Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, 775 Brookfield Road, PL6303B Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 1C1 (Canada); Morrison, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ont. (Canada); Dolling, J.-A. [Genetics Department, Credit Valley Hospital, 2200 Eglinton Avenue West, Mississauga, Ont., L8S 4L8 (Canada); Boreham, D. [McMaster Institute of Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ont., L5M 2N1 (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    In December 2001, Canada's response to the international political climate was launched by the creation of the Chemical, Biological, Radiological/Nuclear Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI). The National Biological Dosimetry Response Plan (NBDRP), established through partnering the expertise of three federal departments and one university, was created in response to this initiative. The NBDRP objectives were to develop a network of laboratories with expertise to perform biological dosimetry by cytogenetics and to investigate new technologies that may be applicable in the development of the new biodosimetry program. Since the creation of the NBDRP, Canada has made significant progress in enhancing expertise and resources to be better prepared for radiological/nuclear events. Through participation in exercises, the existing capacities were tested and recommendations for improvements were made. This paper describes the results from two exercises. The first exercise was designed to test the culturing, analysis, and reporting procedures within a single laboratory, and the second exercise was intended to test the capacity of the NBDRP. Future exercises will further challenge the network resulting in an improved national response capability.

  20. Manual for best practice for emergency response procedures, part 2: the management of inrushes, fires, explosions and other emergencies.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spencer, KC

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES PART 2 THE MANAGEMENT OF INRUSHES, FIRES, EXPLOSIONS AND OTHER EMERGENCIES Authors: K C Spencer, D M Walters, T P T Page and A G du Plessis. Research Agency: Turgis Technology (Pty) Ltd. Project No. COL 605 Date...-planning .................................................................................................................2 2.2 Awareness of the emergency situation..........................................................................2 2.3 Self contained self rescuers (SCSRs) ...........................................................................3 2...

  1. How Do Emergency Medicine Residency Programs Structure Their Clinical Competency Committees? A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Christopher I; Roppolo, Lynn P; Asher, Shellie; Seamon, Jason P; Bhat, Rahul; Taft, Stephanie; Graham, Autumn; Willis, James

    2015-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recently has mandated the formation of a clinical competency committee (CCC) to evaluate residents across the newly defined milestone continuum. The ACGME has been nonproscriptive of how these CCCs are to be structured in order to provide flexibility to the programs. No best practices for the formation of CCCs currently exist. We seek to determine common structures of CCCs recently formed in the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) member programs and identify unique structures that have been developed. In this descriptive study, an 18-question survey was distributed via the CORD listserv in the late fall of 2013. Each member program was asked questions about the structure of its CCC. These responses were analyzed with simple descriptive statistics. A total of 116 of the 160 programs responded, giving a 73% response rate. Of responders, most (71.6%) CCCs are chaired by the associate or assistant program director, while a small number (14.7%) are chaired by a core faculty member. Program directors (PDs) chair 12.1% of CCCs. Most CCCs are attended by the PD (85.3%) and selected core faculty members (78.5%), leaving the remaining committees attended by any core faculty. Voting members of the CCC consist of the residency leadership either with the PD (53.9%) or without the PD (36.5%) as a voting member. CCCs have an average attendance of 7.4 members with a range of three to 15 members. Of respondents, 53.1% of CCCs meet quarterly while 37% meet monthly. The majority of programs (76.4%) report a system to match residents with a faculty mentor or advisor. Of respondents, 36% include the resident's faculty mentor or advisor to discuss a particular resident. Milestone summaries (determination of level for each milestone) are the primary focus of discussion (93.8%), utilizing multiple sources of information. The substantial variability and diversity found in our CORD survey of CCC structure

  2. The Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers: advancing standardized evaluation of public health preparedness and response trainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hites, Lisle S; Sass, Marcia M; D'Ambrosio, Luann; Brown, Lisa M; Wendelboe, Aaron M; Peters, Karen E; Sobelson, Robyn K

    2014-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers (PERLCs) across the United States. The PERLCs provide training to state, local, and tribal public health organizations to meet workforce development needs in the areas of public health preparedness and response, specialized training, education, and consultation. Using Donald Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model, the PERLC network established 4 evaluation working groups that developed evaluation criteria to address each level of the model. The purpose of the working groups was to inform and promote center-level and program-level evaluation across the PERLC network; identify common training evaluation methods and measures; and share materials, resources, and lessons learned with state, local, and tribal public health organizations for potential replication. The evaluation of education and training, irrespective of its modality (eg, in-person, online, webinars, seminars, symposia) can be accomplished using Kirkpatrick's 4-level taxonomy. The 4 levels aim to measure the following aspects of training programs: (1) trainees' reaction; (2) knowledge acquired, skills improved, or attitudes changed; (3) behavior changed; and (4) results or impact. To successfully evaluate emergency preparedness training, drills and exercises, it is necessary to understand the fundamental tenets of each level and how to apply each to measure training outcomes. The PERLC evaluators have adopted the basic schema of Kirkpatrick's 4-level model and applied its structure to a wide variety of preparedness and emergency response training and related activities. The PERLC evaluation working groups successfully developed and tested survey methods and instruments for each of the 4 levels of Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model. Each can be used for replication by state, local, and tribal public health professionals.

  3. Typhoon emergency response planning for the South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, E.N.; Lynch, R.D.; Riffe, D.; Cardone, V.J.; Cox, A.; Chen, H.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the development, implementation and performance of a comprehensive typhoon emergency response plan (ERP) utilized during 1995 by Arco China Inc. (ACI) for their offshore Hainan Is. South China Sea development. An important component of the enhanced plan is a new system to forecast winds and sea states generated by tropical cyclones (TC) built around known uncertainties in forecasts of cyclones and well proven numerical models of the TC surface wind field and the spectral wave field. The forecast system provides specification of time histories of the winds and waves at the site for the nominally predicted track as well as the probabilities of exceedance of critical evacuation thresholds of wind speed and sea state. The ERP and forecast system were operated throughout the 1995 typhoon season and evaluated at the Yacheng development, which was seriously threatened by 15 tropical cyclones between June and November. The response to these threats in terms of interruption of operations, partial or total evacuation of offshore personnel and average downtime is described and compared to previous experience which used more conventional forecast services. The evaluation has shown the new system to provide significant benefits in terms of safety, efficiency and cost savings. The wind and sea state forecast histories provided year-round by the forecast system are also of significant benefit to the management of floating production systems.

  4. Contributions of Academic Emergency Medicine Programs to U.S. Health Care: Summary of the AAAEM-AACEM Benchmarking Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznek, Martin A; Scheulen, James J; Harbertson, Cathi A; Kotkowski, Kevin A; Kelen, Gabor D; Volturo, Gregory A

    2017-10-26

    The societal contribution of emergency care in the United States has been described. The role and impact of academic emergency departments (EDs) has been less clear. Our report summarizes the results of a benchmarking effort specifically focused on academic emergency medicine (EM) practices. From October through December 2016, the Academy of Academic Administrators of Emergency Medicine (AAAEM) and the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine (AACEM) jointly administered a benchmarking survey to allopathic, academic departments and divisions of emergency medicine. Participation was voluntary and nonanonymous. The survey queried various aspects of the three components of the tripartite academic mission: clinical care, education and research, and faculty effort and compensation. Responses reflected a calendar year from July 1, 2015, to June 30, 2016. Of 107 eligible U.S. allopathic, academic departments and divisions of emergency medicine, 79 (74%) responded to the survey overall, although individual questions were not always answered by all responding programs. The 79 responding programs reported 6,876,189 patient visits at 97 primary and affiliated academic clinical sites. A number of clinical operations metrics related to the care of these patients at these sites are reported in this study. All responding programs had active educational programs for EM residents, with a median of 37 residents per program. Nearly half of the overall respondents reported responsibility for teaching medical students in mandatory EM clerkships. Fifty-two programs reported research and publication activity, with a total of $129,494,676 of grant funding and 3,059 publications. Median faculty effort distribution was clinical effort, 66.9%; education effort, 12.7%; administrative effort, 12.0%; and research effort, 6.9%. Median faculty salary was $277,045. Academic EM programs are characterized by significant productivity in clinical operations, education, and research. The

  5. DOE Response to the Fukushima Accident: Advancing the Science of Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The US Department of Energy maintains specialized technical teams to respond to radiological/nuclear emergencies. They apply well-established laboratory nuclear measurement techniques in field environments, conduct rapid analysis, and deliver data products to government leaders in support of real-time public safety decisions. Meeting these requirements, often in the face of incomplete and imperfect information, takes a great deal of training and practice to effectively translate science into operations. Since large-scale emergencies are rare, the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011 provided an opportunity to employ these teams. Their timely support to both US and Japanese decision makers provides an excellent case study in the application of instrumentation, analysis methods, data presentation, and training to emergency response.

  6. UTILIZING SAR AND MULTISPECTRAL INTEGRATED DATA FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Havivi

    2016-06-01

    complete scene for the emergency response following an event.

  7. Utilizing SAR and Multispectral Integrated Data for Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havivi, S.; Schvartzman, I.; Maman, S.; Marinoni, A.; Gamba, P.; Rotman, S. R.; Blumberg, D. G.

    2016-06-01

    the emergency response following an event.

  8. A FTA-based method for risk decision-making in emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Decision-making problems in emergency response are usually risky and uncertain due to the limited decision data and possible evolvement of emergency scenarios. This paper focuses on a risk decisionmaking problem in emergency response with several distinct characteristics including dynamic...

  9. Emergent Learning Opportunities in an Inner-City Youth Gardening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, Jrene

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study of an inner-city youth gardening program and the kinds of learning opportunities it supported that emerged from youth-initiated actions. Examines the ways in which the garden environment and the experiential nature of the program gave support to the emergence of learning opportunities while making connections between science,…

  10. National Assessment of Quality Programs in Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlener, Michael; Olivieri, Patrick; Loo, George T; Munjal, Kevin; Hilton, Michael T; Potkin, Katya Trudeau; Levy, Michael; Rabrich, Jeffrey; Gunderson, Michael R; Braithwaite, Sabina A

    2018-01-03

    This study aims to understand the adoption of clinical quality measurement throughout the United States on an EMS agency level, the features of agencies that do participate in quality measurement, and the level of physician involvement. It also aims to barriers to implementing quality improvement initiatives in EMS. A 46-question survey was developed to gather agency level data on current quality improvement practices and measurement. The survey was distributed nationally via State EMS Offices to EMS agencies nation-wide using Surveymonkey©. A convenience sample of respondents was enrolled between August and November, 2015. Univariate, bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to describe demographics and relationships between outcomes of interest and their covariates using SAS 9.3©. A total of 1,733 surveys were initiated and 1,060 surveys had complete or near-complete responses. This includes agencies from 45 states representing over 6.23 million 9-1-1 responses annually. Totals of 70.5% (747) agencies reported dedicated QI personnel, 62.5% (663) follow clinical metrics and 33.3% (353) participate in outside quality or research program. Medical director hours varied, notably, 61.5% (649) of EMS agencies had quality measures compared to fire-based agencies. Agencies in rural only environments were less likely to follow clinical quality metrics. (OR 0.47 CI 0.31 -0.72 p quality improvement resources, medical direction and specific clinical quality measures. More research is needed to understand the impact of this variation on patient care outcomes.

  11. Experiences of an Engineer working in Reactor Safety and Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Douglas

    2015-04-01

    emergency at SNL/NM include: (1) Onsite Protective Actions (2) Offsite Protective Action Recommendations (3) Event categorization (4) Event classification Other consequence-based decisions supported by the CAT include: (1) Response planning and operations (2) Event termination (3) Reentry planning and operations (4) Recovery planning and operations Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  12. Emergency department patient characteristics: Potential impact on emergency medicine residency programs in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshove-Bolk, J.; Mencl, F.; Rijswijck, B.T. van; Weiss, I.M.; Simons, M.P.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We set out to study emergency department patient characteristics at a busy level-2 trauma center, to gain insight into the practise of emergency medicine, which is not yet recognized as a specialty in the Netherlands. METHODS: From May 27 to July 4 2001, the following data were recorded

  13. Emergency response to landslide using GNSS measurements and UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Koukouvelas, Ioannis K.

    2017-10-01

    Landslide monitoring can be performed using many different methods: Classical geotechnical measurements like inclinometer, topographical survey measurements with total stations or GNSS sensors and photogrammetric techniques using airphotos or high resolution satellite images. However all these methods are expensive or difficult to be developed immediately after the landslide triggering. In contrast airborne technology and especially the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) make response to landslide disaster easier as UAVs can be launched quickly in dangerous terrains and send data about the sliding areas to responders on the ground either as RGB images or as videos. In addition, the emergency response to landslide is critical for the further monitoring. For proper displacement identification all the above mentioned monitoring methods need a high resolution and a very accurate representation of the relief. The ideal solution for the accurate and quick mapping of a landslide is the combined use of UAV's photogrammetry and GNSS measurements. UAVs have started their development as expensive toys but they currently became a very valuable tool in large scale mapping of sliding areas. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an effective solution for the initial landslide mapping immediately after the occurrence of the phenomenon and the possibility of the periodical assessment of the landslide. Three different landslide cases from Greece are presented in the current study. All three landslides have different characteristics: occurred in different geomorphologic environments, triggered by different causes and had different geologic bedrock. In all three cases we performed detailed GNSS measurements of the landslide area, we generated orthophotos as well as Digital Surface Models (DSMs) at an accuracy of less than +/-10 cm. Slide direction and velocity, mass balances as well as protection and mitigation measurements can be derived from the application of the UAVs

  14. Faster response time : effective use of resources : integrating transportation systems and emergency management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This brochure discusses how coordinating the efforts of emergency dispatchers with transportation management agencies can improve efficiency and response times. It is noted that when emergency services agencies share facilities and traffic monitoring...

  15. Hanford Site emergency response needs, Volumes 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, D.E.

    1996-04-16

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive third party needs assessment of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD), conducted by Hughes Associates Inc. The assessment was commissioned with the intent of obtaining an unbiased report which could be used as a basis for identifying needed changes/modifications to the fire department and its services. This report serves several functions: (1) it documents current and future site operations and associated hazards and risks identified as a result of document review, site and facility surveys, and interviews with knowledgeable personnel; (2) describes the HFD in terms of organization, existing resources and response capabilities; (3) identifies regulatory and other requirements that are applicable to the HFD and includes a discussion of associated legal liabilities; and (4) provides recommendations based on applicable requirements and existing conditions. Each recommendation is followed by a supporting statement to clarify the intent or justification of the recommendation. This report will be followed by a Master Plan document which will present an implementation method for the recommendations (with associated costs) considered to be essential to maintaining adequate, cost effective emergency services at the Hanford site in the next five to seven years.

  16. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications.

  17. Rapid screening of radioactivity in food for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, A; Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Syed, U-F; Roselan, A; Haines, D K; Roth, G; West, L; Arndt, M

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the development of methods for the rapid screening of gross alpha (GA) and gross beta (GB) radioactivity in liquid foods, specifically, Tang drink mix, apple juice, and milk, as well as screening of GA, GB, and gamma radioactivity from surface deposition on apples. Detailed procedures were developed for spiking of matrices with (241)Am (alpha radioactivity), (90)Sr/(90)Y (beta radioactivity), and (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am (gamma radioactivity). Matrix stability studies were performed for 43 days after spiking. The method for liquid foods is based upon rapid digestion, evaporation, and flaming, followed by gas proportional (GP) counting. For the apple matrix, surface radioactivity was acid-leached, followed by GP counting and/or gamma spectrometry. The average leaching recoveries from four different apple brands were between 63% and 96%, and have been interpreted on the basis of ion transport through the apple cuticle. The minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs) were calculated from either the background or method-blank (MB) measurements. They were found to satisfy the required U.S. FDA's Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) in all but one case. The newly developed methods can perform radioactivity screening in foods within a few hours and have the potential to capacity with further automation. They are especially applicable to emergency response following accidental or intentional contamination of food with radioactivity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Acute pain management curriculum for emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motov, Sergey M; Marshall, John P

    2011-10-01

    Pain is the most common reason people visit emergency departments (EDs); this implies that emergency physicians (EPs) should be experts in managing acute painful conditions. The current trend in the literature, however, demonstrates that EPs possess inadequate knowledge and lack formal training in acute pain management. The purpose of this article is to create a formal educational curriculum that would assist emergency medicine (EM) residents in proper assessment and treatment of acute pain, as well as in providing a solid theoretical and practical knowledge base for managing acute pain in the ED. The authors propose a series of lectures, case-oriented study groups, practical small group sessions, and class-specific didactics with the goal of enhancing the theoretical and practical knowledge of acute pain management in the ED. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. EPA’s Role in Emergency Response - Special Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Response Team; Radiological Response Team; Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Consequence Management Advisory Division; and National Criminal Enforcement Response Team provide specialized support.

  20. Emergency radiology fellowship training in the USA: a web-based survey of academic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Mougnyan; Hansberry, David; Balasubramanya, Rashmi; Li, Zhengteng; Gandhe, Ashish; Selvarajan, Santosh; Sharma, Pranshu

    2017-02-01

    Interest in emergency radiology as a distinct subspecialty within radiology continues to rise in the USA and globally. While acute care imaging has been performed since the earliest days of the specialty, fellowship training in emergency radiology is a relatively new phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to examine the current status of emergency radiology training in the USA, using data derived from the official websites of US residency training programs. The most current list of radiology residency programs participating in the 2017 match was obtained from the official Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) website. The total number of emergency radiology fellowships was recorded after visiting available websites of each academic radiology program. The total number of subspecialty fellowships offered by each academic radiology program was also recorded. There were 12 confirmed emergency radiology fellowships offered in the USA for a combined total of 22 fellowship positions. Eleven programs were 1 year in duration, with one program offering a one- or two-year option. One hundred eight of the 174 (approximately 62 %) surveyed academic radiology programs offered at least one subspecialty fellowship. Emergency radiology fellowships are on the rise, paralleling the growth of emergency radiology as a distinct subspecialty within radiology.

  1. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ers through emergencies as part of managing risks in the water supply system. Emergencies in the water supply system may result from, among other causes, natural disasters, inappropri- ate or poor design and planning, system neglect or poor main- tenance, poor operations and intentional acts (e.g. vandalism).

  2. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... among other causes, natural disasters, equipment failure, human error and intentional acts (e.g. vandalism). Simply put, an ERP prepares the organisation for emergencies and gives specific instructions about what to do if there is an emergency situation that may affect the water system. To assist water services institutions ...

  3. Lessons Learned from Emergency Response Vaccination Efforts for Cholera, Typhoid, Yellow Fever, and Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walldorf, Jenny A; Date, Kashmira A; Sreenivasan, Nandini; Harris, Jennifer B; Hyde, Terri B

    2017-12-01

    Countries must be prepared to respond to public health threats associated with emergencies, such as natural disasters, sociopolitical conflicts, or uncontrolled disease outbreaks. Rapid vaccination of populations vulnerable to epidemic-prone vaccine-preventable diseases is a major component of emergency response. Emergency vaccination planning presents challenges, including how to predict resource needs, expand vaccine availability during global shortages, and address regulatory barriers to deliver new products. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention supports countries to plan, implement, and evaluate emergency vaccination response. We describe work of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in collaboration with global partners to support emergency vaccination against cholera, typhoid, yellow fever, and Ebola, diseases for which a new vaccine or vaccine formulation has played a major role in response. Lessons learned will help countries prepare for future emergencies. Integration of vaccination with emergency response augments global health security through reducing disease burden, saving lives, and preventing spread across international borders.

  4. Formation mechanism of quick emergency response capability for urban rail transit: Inter-organizational collaboration perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Yanchun; Zou, Dejian; Zheng, Junwei; Fang, Xiaoping; Luo, Haijuan

    2016-01-01

    .... Based on the perspective of inter-organizational collaboration, this article examines the formation mechanism of quick emergency response capability of urban rail transit and proposes the concept...

  5. 78 FR 16862 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB: Emergency Shelter Grants Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... requirements that Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG) program recipients will be expected to implement and retain. This submission is limited to the record keeping burden under the ESG entitlement program, formerly... HEARTH Act. To see the regulations for the new ESG program and applicable supplementary documents, visit...

  6. 75 FR 81286 - Emergency Comment Request; Indian Housing Block Grants (IHBG) Program Reporting; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Emergency Comment Request; Indian Housing Block Grants (IHBG) Program Reporting... Grants (IHBG) Program Reporting. Description of Information Collection: Recipients of Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) funds provide plans for low-income housing programs in their communities and submit...

  7. Geographic Information System Technology Leveraged for Crisis Planning, Emergency, Response, and Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is piloting the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology that can be leveraged for crisis planning, emergency response, and disaster management/awareness. Many different organizations currently use GIS tools and geospatial data during a disaster event. ASDC datasets have not been fully utilized by this community in the past due to incompatible data formats that ASDC holdings are archived in. Through the successful implementation of this pilot effort and continued collaboration with the larger Homeland Defense and Department of Defense emergency management community through the Homeland Infrastructure Foundation-Level Data Working Group (HIFLD WG), our data will be easily accessible to those using GIS and increase the ability to plan, respond, manage, and provide awareness during disasters. The HIFLD WG Partnership has expanded to include more than 5,900 mission partners representing the 14 executive departments, 98 agencies, 50 states (and 3 territories), and more than 700 private sector organizations to directly enhance the federal, state, and local government's ability to support domestic infrastructure data gathering, sharing and protection, visualization, and spatial knowledge management.The HIFLD WG Executive Membership is lead by representatives from the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs - OASD (HD&ASA); the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate's Office of Infrastructure Protection (NPPD IP); the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Integrated Working Group - Readiness, Response and Recovery (IWG-R3); the Department of Interior (DOI) United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP), and DHS Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  8. Expressway and Freeway Emergencies. California Fire Service Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Industrial Education.

    This manual has been prepared to assist in training fire department personnel for extending emergency service on expressways and freeways. Information provided in the manual is designed to answer questions dealing with these topics: (1) Expressway and Freeway Incidents and Operations, (2) Special Expressway and Freeway Problems, (3) Sizing Up…

  9. Cost-effectiveness of Access to Critical Cerebral Emergency Support Services (ACCESS): a neuro-emergent telemedicine consultation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetten, Justin; van der Goes, David N; Tran, Huy; Moffett, Maurice; Semper, Colin; Yonas, Howard

    2018-01-19

    Access to Critical Cerebral Emergency Support Services (ACCESS) was developed as a low-cost solution to providing neuro-emergent consultations to rural hospitals in New Mexico that do not offer comprehensive stroke care. ACCESS is a two-way audio-visual program linking remote emergency department physicians and their patients to stroke specialists. ACCESS also has an education component in which hospitals receive training from stroke specialists on the triage and treatment of patients. This study assessed the clinical and economic outcomes of the ACCESS program in providing services to rural New Mexico from a healthcare payer perspective. A decision tree model was constructed using findings from the ACCESS program and existing literature, the likelihood that a patient will receive a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), cost of care, and resulting quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Data from the ACCESS program includes emergency room patients in rural New Mexico from May 2015 to August 2016. Outcomes and costs have been estimated for patients who were taken to a hospital providing neurological telecare and patients who were not. The use of ACCESS decreased neuro-emergent stroke patient transfers from rural hospitals to urban settings from 85% to 5% (no tPA) and 90% to 23% (tPA), while stroke specialist reading of patient CT/MRI imaging within 3 h of onset of stroke symptoms increased from 2% to 22%. Results indicate that use of ACCESS has the potential to save $4,241 ($3,952-$4,438) per patient and increase QALYs by 0.20 (0.14-0.22). This increase in QALYs equates to ∼73 more days of life at full health. The cost savings and QALYs are expected to increase when moving from a 90-day model to a lifetime model. The analysis demonstrates potential savings and improved quality-of-life associated with the use of ACCESS for patients presenting to rural hospitals with acute ischemic stroke (AIS).

  10. Clinician Response to Child Abuse Presentations in the Vietnamese Hospital Emergency Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemington, Tara; Fowler, Cathrine; Tran, Quang Nhat; Fraser, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    Ongoing fiscal stability has enabled the National Assembly in Vietnam to turn its attention to improving the health and well-being of women and children. Training pediatric health care professionals in the recognition and response to child abuse presentations in the emergency setting has the potential to improve outcomes for the disproportionate number of vulnerable children presenting to the emergency setting with nonaccidental injuries. This study explored the training needs and expectations of the staff preparing to undertake such a clinical training program. This qualitative study is based on semistructured interviews with 16 clinicians from the emergency setting of a leading pediatric hospital in Vietnam. Interview questions focused on current practice in recognizing and responding to child abuse and neglect presentations, the level of training and experience of participants, and subjective reports of confidence in recognizing abuse. Interviews were conducted in English and Vietnamese, with check-translation of transcripts performed by an independent translator. A culture of collegiality and innovative workplace practices was revealed. Analysis revealed two overarching themes that were related to the need for evidence, forensic analysis, respecting families, and consultation. Despite participant confidence in recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect presentations, knowledge deficits were found. This article presents a critical analysis of the context within which the first evidence-based clinical training program of its kind in Vietnam was developed and implemented in a pediatric children's hospital. Clinicians felt a strong moral obligation to protect children from further harm, however encountered a number of barriers inhibiting this process. Findings significantly shaped the Safe Children Vietnam training program and will also contribute to the development of protocols and improvement of community support services at the study site.

  11. A data model for operational and situational information in emergency response: The Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilo, Arta; Zlatanova, Sidi

    2011-01-01

    Many software systems have been created to help the emergency responders in their activities all over the world. These systems are usually dedicated to a specific emergency situation or emergency response sector. Exchange of information between the different systems is difficult or not possible.

  12. The New Mexico School Nurse and Emergency Medical Services Emergency Preparedness Course: Program Description and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Robert; Sapien, Robert E.; Fullerton-Gleason, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    Illness and injuries are common among students and school staff. Therefore, school nurses must be prepared. In this study, a 16-hour scenario-based emergency preparedness course for school nurses was evaluated for its effectiveness. Effectiveness was measured by (a) traditional methods (written exams and confidence surveys) and (b) skills and…

  13. A Framework for Evaluating Emergency Preparedness Plans and Response Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    A. Larson

    2008-01-01

    A framework for evaluating emergency preparedness plans is presented, aimed at preparedness plans requiring multi-agency cooperation and coordination. The approach relies on an evaluation by criteria, assessing degrees of fulfillment for criteria which are collected from findings in social science research on emergency management. The criteria are categorised into 1) organisational criteria, 2) maturity criteria, and 3) effectiveness criteria. The first category is concerned with properties ...

  14. R and D strategy on remote response technology for emergency situations of nuclear facilities in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Eom, Heung Seup; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Hoch Ul; Lee, Sung Uk; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Generally speaking, robotic technologies are anticipated to be very useful for hazardous works in nuclear facilities because robotic systems are relatively immune to radiation exposure. But the application of robotic systems for such environments has not been increasing during past 20 years. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts in the design and construction of NPPs, there is very little probability of accidents occurring or radioactive materials being released into the environments. As a precaution, however NPPs are prepared with emergency response procedures and routinely conduct exercises for post accident circumstances based on these procedures. The last year's accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant promotes the needs for remote response technologies based on mobile robotic system to recognize the internal status and mitigate the unanticipated events of nuclear power plants in emergency situations. For initial observation of reactor buildings two robots named 'PackBot' were used because the internal conditions were unknown so as to allow human workers for entrance into the reactor building. But there were severe limitations for the robots to perform the given tasks from various obstacles and poor visibility inside though they provided crucial information such as views of internal structures, dose level and temperature that supported the decision for human worker's entrance. The application of robots for emergency response tasks for post accidents in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots were sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could have received a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI 2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. A robot was used for several years

  15. Emergency fuels utilization guidebook. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The basic concept of an emergency fuel is to safely and effectively use blends of specification fuels and hydrocarbon liquids which are free in the sense that they have been commandeered or volunteered from lower priority uses to provide critical transportation services for short-duration emergencies on the order of weeks, or perhaps months. A wide variety of liquid hydrocarbons not normally used as fuels for internal combustion engines have been categorized generically, including limited information on physical characteristics and chemical composition which might prove useful and instructive to fleet operators. Fuels covered are: gasoline and diesel fuel; alcohols; solvents; jet fuels; kerosene; heating oils; residual fuels; crude oils; vegetable oils; gaseous fuels.

  16. 43 CFR 20.202 - Ethics program responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethics program responsibilities. 20.202... AND CONDUCT Department Ethics Program § 20.202 Ethics program responsibilities. (a) The Designated Agency Ethics Official (or the alternate agency ethics official in his or her absence) shall coordinate...

  17. Development of urban planning guidelines for improving emergency response capacities in seismic areas of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Kambod Amini; Jafari, Mohammad Kazem; Hosseini, Maziar; Mansouri, Babak; Hosseinioon, Solmaz

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of research carried out to improve emergency response activities in earthquake-prone areas of Iran. The research concentrated on emergency response operations, emergency medical care, emergency transportation, and evacuation-the most important issues after an earthquake with regard to saving the lives of victims. For each topic, some guidelines and criteria are presented for enhancing emergency response activities, based on evaluations of experience of strong earthquakes that have occurred over the past two decades in Iran, notably Manjil (1990), Bam (2003), Firouz Abad-Kojour (2004), Zarand (2005) and Broujerd (2006). These guidelines and criteria are applicable to other national contexts, especially countries with similar seismic and social conditions as Iran. The results of this study should be incorporated into comprehensive plans to ensure sustainable development or reconstruction of cities as well as to augment the efficiency of emergency response after an earthquake.

  18. The EMERGE Summer Program: Supporting Incoming Freshmen's Success in Mathematics Developmental Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Katherine; Oppland-Cordell, Sarah; Hibdon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development, results, and future directions of the mathematics component of the EMERGE Summer Program at Northeastern Illinois University. Initiated summer 2014, EMERGE offered English and mathematics sessions for incoming freshmen. The mathematics session aimed to strengthen participants' mathematical foundations,…

  19. 78 FR 79081 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Emergency Preparedness Requirements for Medicare and Medicaid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... disasters. The SNS program ensures the availability of necessary medicines, antidotes, medical supplies, and... ensure that they adequately plan for both natural and man-made disasters, and coordinate with federal... participants during disasters and emergency situations. We are proposing emergency preparedness requirements...

  20. The EMERGE Summer Program: Supporting Incoming Freshmen's Success in Mathematics Developmental Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Katherine; Oppland-Cordell, Sarah; Hibdon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development, results, and future directions of the mathematics component of the EMERGE Summer Program at Northeastern Illinois University. Initiated summer 2014, EMERGE offered English and mathematics sessions for incoming freshmen. The mathematics session aimed to strengthen participants' mathematical foundations,…

  1. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M.; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S.; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. Methods: During April 2015, 1...

  2. Globalizing Technical Communication Programs: Visions, Challenges, and Emerging Directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Mousten, Birthe; Vandepitte, Sonia

    translation in Europe to create procedural documents in Danish, Dutch, English, French, German and/or Italian. They will provide guidelines for  how international partnerships of this kind can be established between technical communication programs and translation programs anywhere, even in the abscence...... of any sort of written institutional agreements and with minimal technology. Drawing on pedagogical and communication theories, such as Freinet and Steehouder and van der Meij, to facilitate student learning, the presenters will illustrate how international collaborative projects on technical documents...... help achieve common program objectives, particularly in regard to intercultural negotiation and mediation processes. In addition, they will describe how they met course-specific objectives. For the technical writing course, such objectives included broadening students' awareness of the needs of readers...

  3. Commander’s Emergency Response Program: A Flawed Metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    several trips made to South Vietnam by Henry Kissinger, then a Harvard academic and adviser to New York governor Nelson Rockefeller. Upon visiting the...number of “fake sheikh” strongmen, increased dishonesty among the U.S. ranks and wasted CERP dollars. As a representative illustration of these

  4. Selected Resources for Emergency and Disaster Preparedness and Response from the United States National Library of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, Colette; Arnesen, Stacey; Goshorn, Jeanne; Szczur, Marti

    2009-01-01

    The Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) of the National Library of Medicine® (NLM) works to organize and provide access to a wide range of environmental health and toxicology resources. In recent years, the demand for, and availability of, information on health issues related to natural and man-made emergencies and disasters has increased. Recognizing that access to information is essential in disaster preparedness, a new focus of NLM’s 2006–2016 Long Range Plan calls for the establishment of a Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) that will aid in collecting, disseminating, and sharing information related to health and disasters. This paper introduces several of TEHIP’s resources for emergency/disaster preparedness and response, such as the Radiation Event Medical Management Web site (REMM) and the Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER) . Several of NLM’s other disaster preparedness and response resources will also be reviewed. PMID:18689200

  5. Selected resources for emergency and disaster preparedness and response from the United States National Library of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, Colette; Arnesen, Stacey; Goshorn, Jeanne; Szczur, Marti

    2008-01-01

    The Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) works to organize and provide access to a wide range of environmental health and toxicology resources. In recent years, the demand for, and availability of, information on health issues related to natural and man-made emergencies and disasters has increased. Recognizing that access to information is essential in disaster preparedness, a new focus of NLM's 2006-2016 Long Range Plan calls for the establishment of a Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) that will aid in collecting, disseminating, and sharing information related to health and disasters. This paper introduces several of TEHIP's resources for emergency/disaster preparedness and response, such as the Radiation Event Medical Management Web site (REMM) and the Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER) . Several of NLM's other disaster preparedness and response resources will also be reviewed.

  6. Emergency response network design for hazardous materials transportation with uncertain demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Shahanaghi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Transportation of hazardous materials play an essential role on keeping a friendly environment. Every day, a substantial amount of hazardous materials (hazmats, such as flammable liquids and poisonous gases, need to be transferred prior to consumption or disposal. Such transportation may result in unsuitable events for people and environment. Emergency response network is designed for this reason where specialist responding teams resolve any issue as quickly as possible. This study proposes a new multi-objective model to locate emergency response centers for transporting the hazardous materials. Since many real-world applications are faced with uncertainty in input parameters, the proposed model of this paper also assumes that reference and demand to such centre is subject to uncertainty, where demand is fuzzy random. The resulted problem formulation is modelled as nonlinear non-convex mixed integer programming and we used NSGAII method to solve the resulted problem. The performance of the proposed model is examined with several examples using various probability distribution and they are compared with the performance of other existing method.

  7. The first 7 years of the metropolitan fire brigade emergency responder program – an overview of incidents attended

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm J Boyle

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Malcolm J Boyle1, Brett Williams1, Colin Bibby2, Allan Morton2, Chris Huggins11Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2Emergency Medical Services, Metropolitan Fire and Emergency Services Board, Richmond, Victoria, AustraliaPurpose: The Melbourne Metropolitan Fire and Emergency Services Board (MFESB was the first fire service in Australia to implement a service-wide emergency medical response (EMR program in 2001. No additional scientific analysis of the first responder program has been reported since the pilot program. The objective of this study was to report the first 7 years of responses by firefighters as first responders.Patients and methods: The MFESB have three separate datasets with cardiac arrest information: (i callout record; (ii patient care record; and (iii cardiac arrest record, including data from the automatic external defibrillator. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the demographic and specific outcome data. Ethics approval was granted.Results: A total of 8227 incidents were attended over the first 7 years. The most incidents attended were cardiac arrest 54% (n = 4450 followed by other medical 19% (n = 1579, and drug overdose 11% (n = 908; the remainder were <10% each. Sixty-three percent of incidents involved males. Average age was 57.2 years, median age 63 years, range from <1 month to 101 years; average response time was 6.1 minutes, median response time 5.6 minutes, range from 9 seconds to 31.5 minutes. Firefighters provided “initial care” in 57% and assisted in 26% of the incidents. Firefighters spent on average 4.8 minutes with the patient before handing over to paramedics; median 3.9 minutes, range of a few seconds to 39.2 minutes.Conclusion: This study suggests that the MFESB EMR program is providing firefighter first responders to emergency situations in a short timeframe to assist the ambulance service.Keywords: emergency

  8. Emerging Connections: Quantum & Classical Optics Incubator Program Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesky, Marcia [Optical Society of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-11-06

    The Emerging Connections: Quantum & Classical Optics Incubator was a scientific meeting held in Washington, DC on 6-8 November 2016. This Incubator provided unique and focused experiences and valuable opportunities to discuss advances, challenges and opportunities regarding this important area of research. Quantum optics and classical optics have coexisted for nearly a century as two distinct, but consistent descriptions of light in their respective domains. Recently, a number of detailed examinations of the structure of classical light beams have revealed that effects widely thought to be solely quantum in origin also have a place in classical optics. These new quantum-classical connections are informing classical optics in meaningful ways specifically by expanding understanding of optical coherence. Simultaneously, relationships discovered with classical light beams now also serve as a vehicle to illuminate concepts that no longer solely belong to the quantum realm. Interference, polarization, coherence, complementarity and entanglement are a partial list of elementary notions that now appear to belong to both quantum and classical optics. The goal of this meeting was to bring emerging quantum-classical links into wider view and to indicate directions in which forthcoming and future work would promote discussion and lead to a more unified understanding of optics.

  9. Intelligent Emergency Response System for Police Vehicles in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganeshan, Ishan; Memon, Nasrullah

    2015-01-01

    When faced with emergency situations there might be several critical factors that could preclude the possibility for the victims to call for the help. In situations like kidnapping, rape, robbery making use of the traditional voice based methods to call for the help might alert the offenders and ...

  10. The effect of emergency medical services response on outcome of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Due to resource constrained pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMSs) there is a significant delay in injured patients arriving at Groote Schuur Hospital Trauma Centre (GSHTC). The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of EMSs in transferring trauma patients to GSHTC. The effect of any ...

  11. Massive Open Online Librarianship: Emerging Practices in Response to MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mune, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs, have recently emerged as a disruptive pedagogy gaining rapid momentum in higher education. In some states, proposed legislations would accredit MOOCs to provide college-credit courses in the name of cost saving, efficiency and access. While debates rage regarding the place of MOOCs in higher education, some…

  12. [What response in the face of health emergencies?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeran, Pierick

    2015-01-01

    Heat wave, extreme cold, air pollution, epidemics, nuclear plant accidents, production incidents in the pharmaceutical or agro-food sectors, bioterrorism, social movements: over the last thirty years, health emergencies have multiplied. What is the strategy to adopt? Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Physiological response of emergency care students during a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty emergency care students performed i) a simulated (SIM) extrication of a patient trapped in a light motor vehicle, where maximum VO2, VE, HR and RER were measured. These results were compared to values measured during a maximal incremental treadmill test in the laboratory (LAB). VO2max (SIM) was ...

  14. Context-dependent conservation responses to emerging wildlife diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate E Langwig; Jamie Voyles; Mark Q Wilber; Winifred F Frick; Kris A Murray; Benjamin M Bolker; James P Collins; Tina L Cheng; Matthew C Fisher; Joseph R Hoyt; Daniel L Lindner; Hamish I McCallum; Robert Puschendorf; Erica Bree Rosenblum; Mary Toothman; Craig KR Willis; Cheryl J Briggs; A Marm Kilpatrick

    2015-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases pose an important threat to wildlife. While established protocols exist for combating outbreaks of human and agricultural pathogens, appropriate management actions before, during, and after the invasion of wildlife pathogens have not been developed. We describe stage-specific goals and management actions that minimize disease impacts on...

  15. Sustainable Eco Coastal Development Through Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmanissazly, Arsi; Mursito Ardy, Yong; Abdullah

    2017-02-01

    Besides technical problems the company’s operational constraints that may effect high deficiency for the company is the company - community conflicts. Company - community conflict can also arise depends on the geographic conditions and characteristics of the community itself. Some studies has show that coastal community have higher level of social risk when compared to non-coastal community. Also, the coastal community ussually only rely on what sea provides as their main livelihood. Because of the level of education still contemtible the community couldn’t optimized the potential of their own area. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) har emerged as an important approach for addressing the social and environmental impact of company activities. Through CSR program, PT Pertamina EP Asset 3 Tambun Field (PEP) try to form value integration by utilizing resources from the community and the company by making sustainable eco - coastal living in Desa Tambaksari, Karawang, one of PEP working area. Using sustainable livelihood approach begin with compiling data by doing social mapping PEP has initiate the area to becoming Fish Processing Industry Centre. By implementing PDCA in every steps of the program, PEP has multiplied some other programs such as Organic Fish Feed Processing, Seaweed Farming and Waste Bank for Green Coastal Village. These program is PEP’s effort to create a sustainability environment by enhancing the community’s potentials as well as resolving social problems around Tambaksari. The most important result besides getting our license to operate from the community, is the community itself can grow into an eco coastal sustainable system.

  16. Hybrid Decision-making Method for Emergency Response System of Unattended Train Operation Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suitable selection of the emergency alternatives is a critical issue in emergency response system of Unattended Train Operation (UTO metro system of China. However, there is no available method for dispatcher group in Operating Control Center (OCC to evaluate the decision under emergency situation. It was found that the emergency decision making in UTO metro system is relative with the preferences and the importance of multi-dispatcher in emergency. Regarding these factors, this paper presents a hybrid method to determinate the priority weights of emergency alternatives, which aggregates the preference matrix by constructing the emergency response task model based on the Weighted Ordered Weighted Averaging (WOWA operator. This calculation approach derives the importance weights depending on the dispatcher emergency tasks and integrates it into the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA operator weights based on a fuzzy membership relation. A case from train fire is given to demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of the proposed methods for Group Multi-Criteria Decision Making (GMCDM in emergency management of UTO metro system. The innovation of this research is paving the way for a systematic emergency decision-making solution which connects the automatic metro emergency response system with the GMCDM theory.

  17. 76 FR 54072 - Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program, Livestock Indemnity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... to the Supplemental Agricultural Disaster Assistance Programs, authorized by the Food, Conservation... Agricultural Disaster Assistance Programs AGENCY: Farm Service Agency, USDA. ACTION: Final rule, technical... This rule makes a technical correction to 7 CFR 760, subpart C, ``Emergency Assistance for Livestock...

  18. 79 FR 59298 - Amendment to the Anti-Terrorism and Emergency Assistance Program Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    .... Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) announces a minor... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Office for Victims of Crime Amendment to the Anti-Terrorism and Emergency...

  19. Uncertainties in modeling hazardous gas releases for emergency response

    OpenAIRE

    Kathrin Baumann-Stanzer; Sirma Stenzel

    2011-01-01

    In case of an accidental release of toxic gases the emergency responders need fast information about the affected area and the maximum impact. Hazard distances calculated with the models MET, ALOHA, BREEZE, TRACE and SAMS for scenarios with chlorine, ammoniac and butane releases are compared in this study. The variations of the model results are measures for uncertainties in source estimation and dispersion calculation. Model runs for different wind speeds, atmospheric stability and roughness...

  20. Japan introduces a SPEEDI response to emergencies. [System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Shigeru (Nuclear Safety Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    The system for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information (SPEEDI), has been under development since 1980 by the Science and Technology Agency of Japan (STA), JAERI, and the Japan Meteorological Research Institute. SPEEDI provides realistic dose assessments and estimates of radiation concentrations they may result from an atmospheric release of radioactive materials, using advanced computer-based data communications and processing systems to calculate atmospheric dispersion for radiation consequence assessments. These assessments include applicable meteorological data and source term information. (Author).

  1. Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers: Using a Public Health Systems Approach to Improve All-Hazards Preparedness and Response

    OpenAIRE

    Leinhos, Mary; Qari,Shoukat H.; Williams-Johnson, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, at the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) prepared a report identifying knowledge gaps in public health systems preparedness and emergency response and recommending near-term priority research areas. In accordance with the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act mandating new public health systems research for preparedness and emergency response, CDC provided competitive awards establishing nine Preparedness and Emergenc...

  2. Emergence of microbial networks as response to hostile environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeo, Dario; Comolli, Luis R; Mocenni, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    The majority of microorganisms live in complex communities under varying conditions. One pivotal question in evolutionary biology is the emergence of cooperative traits and their sustainment in altered environments or in the presence of free-riders. Co-occurrence patterns in the spatial distribution of biofilms can help define species' identities, and systems biology tools are revealing networks of interacting microorganisms. However, networks of inter-dependencies involving micro-organisms in the planktonic phase may be just as important, with the added complexity that they are not bounded in space. An integrated approach linking imaging, "Omics" and modeling has the potential to enable new hypothesis and working models. In order to understand how cooperation can emerge and be maintained without abilities like memory or recognition we use evolutionary game theory as the natural framework to model cell-cell interactions arising from evolutive decisions. We consider a finite population distributed in a spatial domain (biofilm), and divided into two interacting classes with different traits. This interaction can be weighted by distance, and produces physical connections between two elements allowing them to exchange finite amounts of energy and matter. Available strategies to each individual of one class in the population are the propensities or "willingness" to connect any individual of the other class. Following evolutionary game theory, we propose a mathematical model which explains the patterns of connections which emerge when individuals are able to find connection strategies that asymptotically optimize their fitness. The process explains the formation of a network for efficiently exchanging energy and matter among individuals and thus ensuring their survival in hostile environments.

  3. Emergence of microbial networks as response to hostile environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario eMadeo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The majority of microorganisms live in complex communities under varying conditions. One pivotal question in evolutionary biology is the emergence of cooperative traits and their sustainment in altered environments or in the presence of free-riders. Co-occurrence patterns in the spatial distribution of biofilms can help define species' identities, and systems biology tools are revealing networks of interacting microorganisms. However, networks of inter-dependencies involving micro-organisms in the planktonic phase may be just as important, with the added complexity that they are not bounded in space. An integrated approach linking imaging, ``Omics'' and modeling has the potential to enable new hypothesis and working models. In order to understand how cooperation can emerge and be maintained without abilities like memory or recognition we use evolutionary game theory as the natural framework to model cell-cell interactions arising from evolutive decisions. We consider a finite population distributed in a spatial domain (biofilm, and divided into two interacting classes with different traits. This interaction can be weighted by distance, and produces physical connections between two elements allowing them to exchange finite amounts of energy and matter. Available strategies to each individual of one class in the population are the propensities or ``willingness'' to connect any individual of the other class. Following evolutionary game theory, we propose a mathematical model which explains the patterns of connections which emerge when individuals are able to find connection strategies that asymptotically optimize their fitness. The process explains the formation of a network for efficiently exchanging energy and matter among individuals and thus ensuring their survival in hostile environments.

  4. "Reverse Racism": Students' Response to Equity Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Carl E.

    1995-01-01

    With reference to class discussions of racism and equity, this article explores how white college and university students conceptualize racism and perceive equity programs as affecting their career opportunities. It concludes that through class discussions, educators can help students understand equity programs as a benefit to all students.…

  5. Emerging applications of stimuli-responsive polymer materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuart, M.A.C.; Genzer, J.; Muller, M.; Ober, C.; Stamm, M.; Sukhorukov, G.B.; Szleifer, I.; Tsukruk, V.V.; Urban, M.; Winnik, F.; Zauscher, S.; Luzinov, I.; Minko, S.

    2010-01-01

    Responsive polymer materials can adapt to surrounding environments, regulate transport of ions and molecules, change wettability and adhesion of different species on external stimuli, or convert chemical and biochemical signals into optical, electrical, thermal and mechanical signals, and vice

  6. A secure mobile multimedia system to assist emergency response teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belala, Yacine; Issa, Omneya; Gregoire, Jean-Charles; Wong, James

    2008-08-01

    Long wait times after injury and greater distances to travel between accident scenes and medical facilities contribute to increased, possibly unnecessary deaths. This paper describes a mobile emergency system aimed at reducing mortality by improving the readiness of hospital personnel, therefore allowing for more efficient treatment procedures to be performed when the victim arrives. The system is designed to provide a secure transmission of voice, medical data, and video in real-time over third-generation cellular networks. Test results obtained on a commercial network under real-life conditions demonstrate the ability to effectively transmit medical data over 3G networks, making them a viable option available to healthcare professionals.

  7. A Strategy to Enhance Student Experiences in Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response: Medical Reserve Corps Nursing Student Summer Externship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Loren Nell Melton

    Development of the public health nursing workforce is crucial to advancing our nation's health. Many organizations, including the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Department of Health and Human Services, have identified the need for strengthening academia's connection to public health and tailoring experiences to enhance workforce competency. The Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps (OKMRC) Nursing Student Summer Externship was developed as a strategy to provide nursing students with strengthened knowledge and skills in disaster response through a structured summer volunteer experience with nurse educators within the OKMRC. The Medical Reserve Corps is a national organization with more than 200 000 volunteers dedicated to strengthening public health, improving emergency response capabilities, and building community resiliency. In the summer of 2015, the OKMRC offered a 10-week public health emergency preparedness and response externship pilot program to 8 nursing students. In the summer of 2016, the program expanded to include 3 Oklahoma baccalaureate nursing programs. Students completed trainings and participated in activities designed to provide a broad base of knowledge, an awareness of the local disaster plans, and leadership skills to assist their communities with preparedness and disaster response.

  8. Privatizing or socializing corporate responsibility: business participation in voluntary programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, L.W.; Burgoon, B.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores why companies choose some Corporate Responsibility initiatives over others. The focus is on competing voluntary programs to oversee and protect labor standards. These programs may differ with regard to two aspects: the governance of the program and the financial and managerial

  9. A whole community approach to emergency management: Strategies and best practices of seven community programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobelson, Robyn K; Wigington, Corinne J; Harp, Victoria; Bronson, Bernice B

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) published the Whole Community Approach to Emergency Management: Principles, Themes, and Pathways for Action, outlining the need for increased individual preparedness and more widespread community engagement to enhance the overall resiliency and security of communities. However, there is limited evidence of how to build a whole community approach to emergency management that provides real-world, practical examples and applications. This article reports on the strategies and best practices gleaned from seven community programs fostering a whole community approach to emergency management. The project team engaged in informal conversations with community stakeholders to learn about their programs during routine monitoring activities, site visits, and during an in-person, facilitated workshop. A total of 88 community members associated with the programs examples contributed. Qualitative analysis was conducted. The findings highlighted best practices gleaned from the seven programs that other communities can leverage to build and maintain their own whole community programs. The findings from the programs also support and validate the three principles and six strategic themes outlined by FEMA. The findings, like the whole community document, highlight the importance of understanding the community, building relationships, empowering action, and fostering social capital to build a whole community approach.

  10. Emerging strategic corporate social responsibility partnership initiatives in agribusiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pötz, Katharina Anna; Haas, Rainer; Balzarova, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has gained momentum in business practices and strategies. In the agribusiness sector, the need for CSR integration has recently triggered a number of private sector led initiatives that should contribute to sustainable...

  11. Institutionalizing Emerging Technology Assessment Process into National Incident Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    operations • High Interest Technology Test ( HITT ) Team and/or NOAA’s ARTES desktop evaluation and/or field test. • Closing response to correspondent...and access to High Interest Technology Testing ( HITT ) resources and direct RP funding gave them a distinct advantage over IATAP in terms of field

  12. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weili; He, Bin

    2015-07-10

    In addition to property damage and loss of lives, environment pollution, such as water pollution and air pollution caused by accidents in chemical industrial parks (CIPs) is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS) was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study. Using a scenario analysis, the stages of emergency response were divided into three levels, after introducing the domino effect, and fundamental requirements of ERS design were confirmed. The framework of ERS was composed mainly of a monitoring system, an emergency command center, an action system, and a supporting system. On this basis, six main emergency rescue steps containing alarm receipt, emergency evaluation, launched corresponding emergency plans, emergency rescue actions, emergency recovery, and result evaluation and feedback were determined. Finally, an example from the XiaoHu Chemical Industrial Park (XHCIP) was presented to check on the integrality, reliability, and maneuverability of the ERS, and the result of the first emergency drill with this ERS indicated that the developed ERS can reduce delays, improve usage efficiency of resources, and raise emergency rescue efficiency.

  13. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duan, Weili; He, Bin

    2015-01-01

    ...) is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS) was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study...

  14. A Framework of Task-Oriented Decision Support System in Disaster Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Zou, Qin; Cheng, Shaochuan; Wang, Kanliang

    Based on the analysis of organizing of rescuing process of Wenchuan Earthquake in China, the paper developed a task-oriented management model to deal with the disaster emergency response. The management mechanism of task generating in emergency response has been established. Four kinds of task generation mechanism have been studied and three decision-making patterns have been suggested. The routings to produce task system were discussed, which could dispose the essential task into sub-task and form the task system through the processes of Work Breakdown Structure (WBS). A framework of decision support system in emergency response has been proposed, which based on the Hall for Workshop of Mate-synthetic Engineering. It could help the operation team to transfer the predetermined plan to execution plan in emergency response and to assign and dynamic supervise the task system.

  15. Uses of the Internet in post-emergency response: Some issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzenberg, C.L.

    1998-09-01

    Can the Internet be of value in post-emergency response? The answer is yes, to judge by its use following the Kobe earthquake in Japan and the ice storms in the US and Canada last winter. This will not be a technical account of the Internet, but rather a quick look at some advantages, disadvantages, promising applications, and issues that may arise in using the Internet for post-emergency response.

  16. Monitor and Evaluate the Impacts of Air Quality Assurance and Emergency Response Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.; Xiao, H.; Tong, L.; He, J.; Yu, H.; Xu, H.; Dai, X.; Zhang, H.; Huang, Z.; Zheng, J.

    2016-12-01

    During major national events, some much stricter air quality assurance programs and emergency response strategies were implemented by the Chinese government. The 2008 Beijing Olympic game and 2014 APEC meeting were just two of these examples. Such practices provided us some rare opportunities to compare and characterize the different type of sources and evaluate the impacts of these pollutant control policies. The mixing ratios of ozone and nitrogen oxides at several sites around Hangzhou city were continuously measured from August to late September 2016 to investigate the spatiotemporal characteristics of air pollutants and their relationships with environmental variables. The aerosol samples were also collected from these sites before, during and after the G20 2016 Summit. The organic components and carbon isotope ratio of these particle samples were analyzed. Through comparing the chemical composition and isotope ratio variation before and after the implement of the pollutant control program, we try to identify/distinguish the characteristics of stationary and mobile sources, and evaluate the contribution of local sources and long range atmospheric transport to the experimental area with the help of statistical and modeling tools.

  17. Effect of Medicaid disease management programs on emergency admissions and inpatient costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Matthew S

    2013-08-01

    To determine the impact of state Medicaid diabetes disease management programs on emergency admissions and inpatient costs. National InPatient Sample sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Project for the years from 2000 to 2008 using 18 states. A difference-in-difference methodology compares costs and number of emergency admissions for Washington, Texas, and Georgia, which implemented disease management programs between 2000 and 2008, to states that did not undergo the transition to managed care (N = 103). Costs and emergency admissions were extracted for diabetic Medicaid enrollees diagnosed in the reform and non-reform states and collapsed into state and year cells. In the three treatment states, the implementation of disease management programs did not have statistically significant impacts on the outcome variables when compared to the control states. States that implemented disease management programs did not achieve improvements in costs or the number of emergency of admissions; thus, these programs do not appear to be an effective way to reduce the burden of this chronic disease. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  18. Assessing Program Efficiency: A Time and Motion Study of the Mental Health Emergency Care — Rural Access Program in NSW Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Emily Saurman; David Lyle; Sue Kirby; Russell Roberts

    2014-01-01

    The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Program (MHEC-RAP) is a telehealth solution providing specialist emergency mental health care to rural and remote communities across western NSW, Australia. This is the first time and motion (T&M) study to examine program efficiency and capacity for a telepsychiatry program. Clinical services are an integral aspect of the program accounting for 6% of all activities and 50% of the time spent conducting program activities, but half of this time ...

  19. A case of timely satellite image acquisitions in support of coastal emergency environmental response management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Werle, Dirk; Lu, Zhong; Rangoonwala, Amina; Suzuoki, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    The synergistic application of optical and radar satellite imagery improves emergency response and advance coastal monitoring from the realm of “opportunistic” to that of “strategic.” As illustrated by the Hurricane Ike example, synthetic aperture radar imaging capabilities are clearly applicable for emergency response operations, but they are also relevant to emergency environmental management. Integrated with optical monitoring, the nearly real-time availability of synthetic aperture radar provides superior consistency in status and trends monitoring and enhanced information concerning causal forces of change that are critical to coastal resource sustainability, including flooding extent, depth, and frequency.

  20. Emergency response planning to reduce the impact of contaminated drinking water during natural disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Craig L.; Adams, Jeffrey Q.

    2011-12-01

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water systems. Prior to an event, utilities and municipalities can use "What if"? scenarios to develop emergency operation, response, and recovery plans designed to reduce the severity of damage and destruction. Government agencies including the EPA are planning ahead to provide temporary supplies of potable water and small drinking water treatment technologies to communities as an integral part of emergency response activities that will ensure clean and safe drinking water.

  1. The IAEAs incident and emergency centre: the global focal point for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buglova, E.

    2016-08-01

    The continuous use of nuclear power to generate electricity and the continued threat of radioactive materials being used for nefarious reasons reminds us of the importance to stay prepared to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies. Stringent nuclear safety and nuclear security requirements, the training of personnel, operational checks and legal frameworks cannot always prevent radiation-related emergencies. Though these events can range in severity, each has the potential to cause harm to the public, employees, patients, property and the environment. Until the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, there was no international information exchange system. Immediately following that accident, the international community negotiated the so-called Emergency Conventions to ensure that the country suffering an accident with an international transboundary release of radioactive material would issue timely, authenticated information, while the States that could field technical support, would do so in a coordinated fashion. The Conventions also place specific legal obligations on the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) with regard to emergency preparedness and response. (Author)

  2. Uncertainties in modeling hazardous gas releases for emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann-Stanzer, Kathrin; Stenzel, Sirma [Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geodynamik, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    In case of an accidental release of toxic gases the emergency responders need fast information about the affected area and the maximum impact. Hazard distances calculated with the models MET, ALOHA, BREEZE, TRACE and SAMS for scenarios with chlorine, ammoniac and butane releases are compared in this study. The variations of the model results are measures for uncertainties in source estimation and dispersion calculation. Model runs for different wind speeds, atmospheric stability and roughness lengths indicate the model sensitivity to these input parameters. In-situ measurements at two urban near-traffic sites are compared to results of the Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA) in order to quantify uncertainties in the meteorological input. The hazard zone estimates from the models vary up to a factor of 4 due to different input requirements as well as due to different internal model assumptions. None of the models is found to be 'more conservative' than the others in all scenarios. INCA wind-speeds are correlated to in-situ observations at two urban sites in Vienna with a factor of 0.89. The standard deviations of the normal error distribution are 0.8 ms{sup -1} in wind speed, on the scale of 50 degrees in wind direction, up to 4 C in air temperature and up to 10 % in relative humidity. The observed air temperature and humidity are well reproduced by INCA with correlation coefficients of 0.96 to 0.99. INCA is therefore found to give a good representation of the local meteorological conditions. Besides of real-time data, the INCA-short range forecast for the following hours may support the action planning of the first responders. (orig.)

  3. Uncertainties in modeling hazardous gas releases for emergency response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Baumann-Stanzer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In case of an accidental release of toxic gases the emergency responders need fast information about the affected area and the maximum impact. Hazard distances calculated with the models MET, ALOHA, BREEZE, TRACE and SAMS for scenarios with chlorine, ammoniac and butane releases are compared in this study. The variations of the model results are measures for uncertainties in source estimation and dispersion calculation. Model runs for different wind speeds, atmospheric stability and roughness lengths indicate the model sensitivity to these input parameters. In-situ measurements at two urban near-traffic sites are compared to results of the Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA in order to quantify uncertainties in the meteorological input. The hazard zone estimates from the models vary up to a factor of 4 due to different input requirements as well as due to different internal model assumptions. None of the models is found to be 'more conservative' than the others in all scenarios. INCA wind-speeds are correlated to in-situ observations at two urban sites in Vienna with a factor of 0.89. The standard deviations of the normal error distribution are 0.8 ms-1 in wind speed, on the scale of 50 degrees in wind direction, up to 4°C in air temperature and up to 10 % in relative humidity. The observed air temperature and humidity are well reproduced by INCA with correlation coefficients of 0.96 to 0.99. INCA is therefore found to give a good representation of the local meteorological conditions. Besides of real-time data, the INCA-short range forecast for the following hours may support the action planning of the first responders.

  4. Analysis of the resilience of team performance during a nuclear emergency response exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José Orlando; Borges, Marcos R S; Huber, Gilbert J; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R

    2014-05-01

    The current work presents results from a cognitive task analysis (CTA) of a nuclear disaster simulation. Audio-visual records were collected from an emergency room team composed of individuals from 26 different agencies as they responded to multiple scenarios in a simulated nuclear disaster. This simulation was part of a national emergency response training activity for a nuclear power plant located in a developing country. The objectives of this paper are to describe sources of resilience and brittleness in these activities, identify cues of potential improvements for future emergency simulations, and leveraging the resilience of the emergency response system in case of a real disaster. Multiple CTA techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the cognitive dimensions of the activity and to identify team coordination and crisis management patterns that emerged from the simulation exercises. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Adapting an ambient monitoring program to the challenge of managing emerging pollutants in the San Francisco Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenicke, Rainer; Oros, Daniel R; Oram, John J; Taberski, Karen M

    2007-09-01

    While over seven million organic and inorganic compounds that have been indexed by the American Chemical Society's Chemical Abstracts Service in their CAS Registry are commercially available, most pollution monitoring programs focus only on those chemical stressors for which regulatory benchmarks exist, and have been traditionally considered responsible for the most significant human and environmental health risks. Until the late 1990s, the San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program was no exception in that regard. After a thorough external review, the monitoring program responded to the need for developing a pro-active surveillance approach for emerging pollutants in recognition of the fact that the potential for the growing list of widely used chemical compounds to alter the integrity of water is high. We describe (1) the scientific and analytical bases underlying a new surveillance monitoring approach; (2) summarize approaches used and results obtained from a forensic retrospective; (3) present the growing data set on emerging pollutants from surveillance monitoring and related efforts in the San Francisco Bay Area to characterize newly targeted compounds in wastewater streams, sediment, storm water runoff, and biota; and (4) suggest next steps in monitoring program development and applied research that could move beyond traditional approaches of pollutant characterization. Based on the forensic analysis of archived chromatograms and chemical and toxicological properties of candidate compounds, we quantified a variety of synthetic organic compounds which had previously not been targeted for analysis. Flame retardant compounds, pesticides and insecticide synergists, insect repellents, pharmaceuticals, personal care product ingredients, plasticizers, non-ionic surfactants, and other manufacturing ingredients were detected in water, sediment, and/or biological tissue samples. Several of these compounds, especially polybrominated diphenyl ether flame

  6. A Vision-Based Emergency Response System with a Paramedic Mobile Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Il-Woong; Choi, Jin; Cho, Kyusung; Seo, Yong-Ho; Yang, Hyun Seung

    Detecting emergency situation is very important to a surveillance system for people like elderly live alone. A vision-based emergency response system with a paramedic mobile robot is presented in this paper. The proposed system is consisted of a vision-based emergency detection system and a mobile robot as a paramedic. A vision-based emergency detection system detects emergency by tracking people and detecting their actions from image sequences acquired by single surveillance camera. In order to recognize human actions, interest regions are segmented from the background using blob extraction method and tracked continuously using generic model. Then a MHI (Motion History Image) for a tracked person is constructed by silhouette information of region blobs and model actions. Emergency situation is finally detected by applying these information to neural network. When an emergency is detected, a mobile robot can help to diagnose the status of the person in the situation. To send the mobile robot to the proper position, we implement mobile robot navigation algorithm based on the distance between the person and a mobile robot. We validate our system by showing emergency detection rate and emergency response demonstration using the mobile robot.

  7. Renaissance CFO emerges in response to market pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A 1995 survey of chief financial officers (CFOs) in healthcare organizations finds that as the healthcare industry reshapes itself through mergers, acquisitions, and downsizing, the CFOs of the mid-1990s also are reshaping themselves into "Renaissance CFOs." They are acquiring new skills and expertise beyond the traditional area of finance. About one-third of the CFOs who took part in the February 1995 survey, which updates similar surveys in 1992 and 1990, said they are working to enhance their knowledge of managed care because they expect to assume responsibility for managed care as part of their expanding CFO responsibilities. Other new areas survey respondents said they expect to oversee before the decade's end are financial costing and pricing and physician relations. The 1995 CFO survey was commissioned by HFMA and Executive Risk Management Associates, Inc., and was conducted by Elrick & Lavidge, Inc. Previous CFO profile surveys have included analysis of CFO compensation data. This year, however, a separate, more indepth survey of CFO compensation was commissioned by HFMA; the findings of this survey will be presented in the October issue of HFM.

  8. Effects of Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response on Hospital Focusing on Ancillary and Support Services: Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-12

    2007 FINAL REPORT I JULY 2006 to JULY 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sm. CONTRACT NUMBER Effects of Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response on...public release; distribution is unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Emergency preparedness and disaster response requires collaboration...training, personnel, equipment, supplies and large amounts of funding. Disaster response strains not only the emergency departments of hospitals, but also

  9. Creating tomorrow's leaders today: the Emerging Nurse Leaders Program of the Texas Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, Susan; Wieck, Lynn; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Light, Kathleen M; Jordan, Clair

    2010-06-01

    The Texas Nurses Association initiated an Emerging Nurse Leaders Program as an approach to engaging new nurses in the leadership of the professional association. This article explains the program's origin, the commitment of the Texas Nurses Association to this process, the implementation of the plan, and the discussions that launched a new way of connecting leaders across generations. Further, it is an approach that any professional organization can use to encourage the involvement of new leaders.

  10. Sustainability Ethics Emergency and Media Responsibility in the Consumption Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Bianchi de Araujo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is discussed the sustainable development and the importance of the environmental cause, in order to create models of development that consider the sustainability and environmental preservation for the future generations. The participation of all society is essential in this debate. The establishment of new habits that do not compromise the subsistence and the conscience of the real self-destruction possibility must be studied and analysed; they consist in challenging intentions, which detach the relevance and the moral duty of the media to restore a new ethics and a new way to understand the reality, as well as to divulge the impact of this different perception in the human life. Therefore occurs the requirement of a responsible compromise relating to the development, by way of understanding the biosphere as the social life basis, considering that, in these ecosystems, the human being is only one of the many species that live in an interdependence relationship.

  11. Integrating international responses to complex emergencies, unconventional war, and terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Frederick M

    2005-01-01

    The world is experiencing unprecedented violence and threats of violence, taking the form of complex internal nation-state conflicts, unconventional or guerrilla warfare against established governments, and stateless threats of terrorism by potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear weapons. What happens locally has immediate ramifications internationally. Real and potential health consequences of these events have evoked global concerns and realization that capacities and capabilities to respond to such events require unparalleled integration, coordination, and cooperation of the international community. However, politics and the institutions singular governments form are inherently limited in their objectives and capability to effectively respond. Public health, broadly defined, must be recognized as a security and strategic requirement, one that serves to build a foundation for an international integrated response capacity.

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Koru: A Mindfulness Program for College Students and Other Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeson, Jeffrey M.; Juberg, Michael K.; Maytan, Margaret; James, Kiera; Rogers, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Koru, a mindfulness training program for college students and other emerging adults. Participants: Ninety students (66% female, 62% white, 71% graduate students) participated between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Methods: Randomized controlled trial. It was hypothesized that Koru, compared with a wait-list…

  13. Delivering MBA Programs in Emerging Markets: The Challenge of National Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, Western-style MBA programs are being delivered in emerging markets, as the developed countries become more and more saturated with MBAs and related offerings. This article, based on the global experience of the author in teaching and assessing MBA modules including thesis and dissertation research and writing, suggests approaches to…

  14. "Changing the Way We Talk": Developing Librarians' Competence in Emerging Technologies through a Structured Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegrum, Mark; Kiel, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the implementation of a professional development program in emerging technologies for librarians at the University of Western Australia. Set up in 2008 to address a lack of pedagogically grounded training in this area, it has now graduated three cohorts. A qualitative analysis of participants' online contributions and…

  15. LEADERS: Lightweight Epidemiology Advanced Detection and Emergency Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Todd A.

    2002-06-01

    Technological advancements in molecular biology now offer a wide-range of applications for bio-warfare defense, medical surveillance, agricultural surveillance and pure research. Idaho Technology has designed and produced the world's fastest DNA-based identifiers. The R.A.P.I.D. TM (Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Identification Device) provides several options for using sensitive and specific molecular biology-based technology One of the key features of the RAPID is a software package called Detector*. Detector* allows Minimally Trained Care Providers (MTCP) to operate the instrument by automating the steps of running PCR and automatically analyzing the sample data. Pathogen identification is carried out automatically using positive and negative controls to protect against false positive and false negative results. As part of the LEADER system, the Remote RAPID Viewer (RRV) component allows for real-time remote monitoring of PCR reactions run on the RAPID, thus giving the Subject Matter Expert (SME) the ability to request specific tests when triggered by the auto-analysis system. In addition the RRV component facilitates in result verification of tests run by MTCP, assists in tracking outbreaks, and helps coordinate large scale real-time crisis management. The system will allow access to epidemiological data from thin client (i.e. web browser), thus allowing the SME to connect from anywhere with an internet connection. In addition the LEADER system will automatically contact and alert SME when threshold criteria are met, helping reduce the time to first response.

  16. Responsive Feeding: Implications for Policy and Program Implementation12

    OpenAIRE

    Engle, Patrice L.; Pelto, Gretel H.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine responsive feeding as a nutrition intervention, with an emphasis on the development and incorporation of responsive feeding into policies and programs over the last 2 decades and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of responsive feeding interventions. A review of policy documents from international agencies and high-income countries reveals that responsive feeding has been incorporated into nutrition policies. Official guidelines from international age...

  17. An Ontology-Underpinned Emergency Response System for Water Pollution Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Meng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the unceasing development and maturation of environment geographic information system, the response to water pollution accidents has been digitalized through the combination of monitoring sensors, management servers, and application software. However, most of these systems only achieve the basic and general geospatial data management and functional process tasks by adopting mechanistic water-quality models. To satisfy the sustainable monitoring and real-time emergency response application demand of the government and public users, it is a hotspot to study how to make the water pollution information being semantic and make the referred applications intelligent. Thus, the architecture of the ontology-underpinned emergency response system for water pollution accidents is proposed in this paper. This paper also makes a case study for usability testing of the water ontology models, and emergency response rules through an online water pollution emergency response system. The system contributes scientifically to the safety and sustainability of drinking water by providing emergency response and decision-making to the government and public in a timely manner.

  18. Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses ``lessons learned`` from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

  19. Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses lessons learned'' from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

  20. [Consciousness and abilities on health emergency and the roles of emergency response among public at the communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Dong, Xao-mei; Wang, Sheng-yong; Tian, Jun-zhang; Ye, Ze-bing; Yang, Jian; Li, Guan-ming; Peng, Lin; Zhang, Si-heng

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the consciousness of health emergency and the abilities on self- and mutual medical aids among the public at the community level, as well as the community responses on health-related emergencies and other factors. Random equidistant sampling method was used to extract 617 households before choosing a family member sampled by Kish Grid method. All the members were investigated face to face on a questionnaire-"Health emergency and related ability regarding self and mutual medical aids of the residents". Data were entered into computer database by using software Epi Data 3.1 and were analyzed by SPSS 21.0. Among the 617 households under survey, 47.84% of the public had general awareness on health-related emergencies. Regarding the following items as:prevention and isolation strategies of infectious disease, on safely procedures of earthquake and fires, on prevention of food poisoning, on prevention and first aid of emerging infectious diseases etc., the rates of awareness were 65.04%, 62.92%, 43.62% and 18.79% respectively. Proportions of households which had the first aid supplies were:first aid medicine box as 56.08%; fire extinguisher as 43.60%; spare water and food as 39.40%; having facilities as ropes, whistles and smoke masks for escape were all less than 15%. Rates of awareness on the following items as: correct use of gas switch as 81.52%, knowing the location of the circuit with gear and the fire hydrant as 74.39% and 35.98% , respectively. The correct disposal rates of the residents on the following items were:electric shock and falls (89.63%), patients of infectious diseases (83.31%), gas poisoning (82.98%), suspected symptoms on infectious diseases(82.66%), explosion and burns (66.78%), scald (62.72%)and sprain (57.05%). Scores on the related abilities were as follows: emergency(7.65, out of 10 points), escape(3.55, out of 5 points), self- and mutual medical aids (10.71, out of 16 points). Proportions of having learned and applied of first aid

  1. Development and application of a water pollution emergency response system for the Three Gorges Reservoir in the Yangtze River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Peng, Shujuan; Zhai, Jun; Xiao, Haiwen

    2011-01-01

    There are many watercraft and production accidents in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA) of the Yangtze River in China every year. Accidents threaten the water quality of the 1085 km2 surface area of the TGRA and millions of local people if oil and chemical leakage were to occur. A water pollution management system for emergency response (WPMS_ER) was therefore designed for the management of pollution in this area. An integrated geographic information system (GIS)-based water pollution management information system for the TGRA, called WPMS_ER_TGRA, was developed in this study. ArcGIS engine was used as the system development platform, and Visual Basic as the programming language. The models for hydraulic and water quality simulation and the generation of body-fitted coordinates were developed and programmed as a dynamically linked library file using Visual Basic, and they can be launched by other computer programs. Subsequently, the GIS-based information system was applied to the emergency water pollution management of a shipwreck releasing 10 tons of phenol into the Yangtze River during two hours. The results showed that WPMS_ER_TGRA can assist with emergency water pollution management and simulate the transfer and diffusion of accidental pollutants in the river. Furthermore, it can quickly identify the affected area and how it will change over time within a few minutes of an accident occurring.

  2. [Factors related to the psychological stress response of nurses working in emergency and critical care centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Kazu; Morioka, Ikuharu

    2011-01-01

    This questionnaire survey was performed in order to reveal the characteristics of work-related stressors on nurses working in emergency and critical care centers (emergency nurses) and factors related to their stress responses. There were 347 subjects who replied to the survey: 199 emergency nurses and 148 nurses working in internal medicine departments (control group) in 11 hospitals in the Kinki and Tokai areas of Japan. The work-related stressor scores among the emergency nurses were significantly higher than those in the control group for 6 out of 8 factors: work difficulties, patient life-support duties, relationships with patients and their families, dealing with patient death, relationships with doctors and technical innovation. The work-related stressor score was significantly lower among the emergency nurses for one factor: lack of communication. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the stress response and the other factors such as work-related stressors, individual and situational factors, non-work factors and social support. Risk factors related to the stress response of the emergency nurses were: perceived stress due to work difficulties, negative lifestyles and desiring a career change. Important aspects of mental health support for emergency nurses are: strengthening technical support, such as holding study sessions to reduce work difficulties, as well as adjusting the working environment to improve individual lifestyles.

  3. Radiological emergency response for community agencies with cognitive task analysis, risk analysis, and decision support framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Travis S; Muething, Joseph Z; Lima, Gustavo Amoras Souza; Torres, Breno Raemy Rangel; del Rosario, Trystyn Keia; Gomes, José Orlando; Lambert, James H

    2012-01-01

    Radiological nuclear emergency responders must be able to coordinate evacuation and relief efforts following the release of radioactive material into populated areas. In order to respond quickly and effectively to a nuclear emergency, high-level coordination is needed between a number of large, independent organizations, including police, military, hazmat, and transportation authorities. Given the complexity, scale, time-pressure, and potential negative consequences inherent in radiological emergency responses, tracking and communicating information that will assist decision makers during a crisis is crucial. The emergency response team at the Angra dos Reis nuclear power facility, located outside of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, presently conducts emergency response simulations once every two years to prepare organizational leaders for real-life emergency situations. However, current exercises are conducted without the aid of electronic or software tools, resulting in possible cognitive overload and delays in decision-making. This paper describes the development of a decision support system employing systems methodologies, including cognitive task analysis and human-machine interface design. The decision support system can aid the coordination team by automating cognitive functions and improving information sharing. A prototype of the design will be evaluated by plant officials in Brazil and incorporated to a future trial run of a response simulation.

  4. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges.

  5. Responsive Classroom?: A Critique of a Social Emotional Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Clio

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks critically at the Responsive Classroom (RC) program, a social/emotional learning program used ubiquitously in elementary schools for teacher and student training, in the US as well as in Australia, the UK, and other parts of Western Europe. The paper examines empirical studies on RC's efficacy and outcomes, many of which were…

  6. Ready for discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition of Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona E. Gallahue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9% of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency.

  7. Ready for Discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition-of-Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallahue, Fiona E; Betz, Amy E; Druck, Jeffrey; Jones, Jonathan S; Burns, Boyd; Hern, Gene

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM) residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9%) of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency.

  8. Response surface model predictions of emergence and response to pain in the recovery room: an evaluation of patients emerging from an isoflurane and fentanyl anesthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syroid, Noah D.; Johnson, Ken B.; Pace, Nathan L.; Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Tyler, Diane; Brühschwein, Frederike; Albert, Robert W.; Roalstad, Shelly; Costy-Bennett, Samuel; Egan, Talmage D.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sevoflurane - remifentanil interaction models that predict responsiveness and response to painful stimuli have been evaluated in patients undergoing elective surgery. Preliminary evaluations of model predictions were found to be consistent with observations in patients anesthetized with sevoflurane, remifentanil and fentanyl. The present study explored the feasibility of adapting the predictions of sevoflurane-remifentanil interaction models to an isoflurane-fentanyl anesthetic. We hypothesized that model predictions adapted for isoflurane and fentanyl are consistent with observed patient responses and are similar to the predictions observed in our prior work with sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetics. Methods Twenty-five patients scheduled for elective surgery received a fentanyl-isoflurane anesthetic. Model predictions of unresponsiveness were recorded at emergence and predictions of a response to noxious stimulus were recorded when patients first required analgesics in the recovery room. Model predictions were compared to observations with graphical and temporal analyses. Results were also compared to our prior predictions following a sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetic. Results While patients were anesthetized, model predictions indicated a high likelihood that patients would be unresponsive (≥ 99%). Following termination of the anesthetic, model predictions of responsiveness well described the actual fraction of patients observed to be responsive during emergence. Half of the patients awoke within 2 minutes of the 50% model predicted probability of unresponsiveness; 70% awoke within 4 minutes. Similarly, predictions of a response to a noxious stimulus were consistent with the number of patients who required fentanyl in the recovery room. Model predictions following an isoflurane-fentanyl anesthetic were similar to model predictions following a sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetic. Discussion Results confirmed our study

  9. Insights into public export promotion programs in an emerging economy: the case of Malaysian SMEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayob, Abu H; Freixanet, Joan

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluates the impact of public export promotion programs (EPPs) among small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Malaysia. Three indicators, level of awareness, frequency of use, and perception of usefulness, were examined according to a firm's export status. The global evaluation suggests that exporters are more frequent users of EPPs and perceive them to be more useful than non-exporters. Nonetheless, both groups demonstrate higher levels of awareness, are frequent users, and perceive the programs relating to export info/knowledge are more usefulness than programs relating to financial assistance. Further analysis also reveals that the frequency of use and the perception of usefulness for most programs are positively related to export experience, but not to export turnover. This study offers insights into the effectiveness of export programs for encouraging export initiation and expansion in an emerging economy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Coordinating a Team Response to Behavioral Emergencies in the Emergency Department: A Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrose H. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While treating potentially violent patients in the emergency department (ED, both patients and staff may be subject to unintentional injury. Emergency healthcare providers are at the greatest risk of experiencing physical and verbal assault from patients. Preliminary studies have shown that a teambased approach with targeted staff training has significant positive outcomes in mitigating violence in healthcare settings. Staff attitudes toward patient aggression have also been linked to workplace safety, but current literature suggests that providers experience fear and anxiety while caring for potentially violent patients. The objectives of the study were (1 to develop an interprofessional curriculum focusing on improving teamwork and staff attitudes toward patient violence using simulation-enhanced education for ED staff, and (2 to assess attitudes towards patient aggression both at pre- and post-curriculum implementation stages using a survey-based study design. Methods: Formal roles and responsibilities for each member of the care team, including positioning during restraint placement, were predefined in conjunction with ED leadership. Emergency medicine residents, nurses and hospital police officers were assigned to interprofessional teams. The curriculum started with an introductory lecture discussing de-escalation techniques and restraint placement as well as core tenets of interprofessional collaboration. Next, we conducted two simulation scenarios using standardized participants (SPs and structured debriefing. The study consisted of a survey-based design comparing pre- and post-intervention responses via a paired Student t-test to assess changes in staff attitudes. We used the validated Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale (MAVAS consisting of 30 Likert-scale questions grouped into four themed constructs. Results: One hundred sixty-two ED staff members completed the course with >95% staff participation

  11. The Need for Clinical Hand Education in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Jenifer; Culbertson, Maya Deza; Munyak, John; Choueka, Jack; Patel, Nima P

    2016-09-01

    Complaints related to the hands, wrists, and fingers comprise approximately 3.7 million emergency department visits annually. The complexity of this subject can confound timely diagnosis and treatment, particularly if the treating physician has not received specialized training. We set out to determine whether emergency medicine training in the USA provides adequate preparation for dealing with the identification, management, and treatment of hand, wrist, and finger injuries. The curricula for 160 accredited U.S. emergency medicine programs were obtained. Each of these was examined to see whether a clinical "hand" rotation was included as a required module. Clinical hand rotations were then classified by length of rotation, the postgraduate years in which they were offered, and if they were offered as stand-alone modules or combined with other rotations. Of the 160 programs, 21 (13.1%) require a clinical hand rotation. Sixteen offer a dedicated module, and five are part of another rotation. The mean amount of time dedicated to hand education was 3 weeks. The 16 dedicated hand rotations had a mean duration of 2.69 weeks; combined rotations were 4 weeks. Four incorporated hand education in the first postgraduate year (PGY-1), 13 into the second (PGY-2), and 3 into the third (PGY-3). Despite the preponderance of hand injuries seen by emergency physicians, the clinical and legal pitfalls that accompany these conditions, and the benefits to be gained from specialized training, very few programs emphasize clinical hand training in an equivalent fashion.

  12. Ubiquitous robust communications for emergency response using multi-operator heterogeneous networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verikoukis Christos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A number of disasters in various places of the planet have caused an extensive loss of lives, severe damages to properties and the environment, as well as a tremendous shock to the survivors. For relief and mitigation operations, emergency responders are immediately dispatched to the disaster areas. Ubiquitous and robust communications during the emergency response operations are of paramount importance. Nevertheless, various reports have highlighted that after many devastating events, the current technologies used, failed to support the mission critical communications, resulting in further loss of lives. Inefficiencies of the current communications used for emergency response include lack of technology inter-operability between different jurisdictions, and high vulnerability due to their centralized infrastructure. In this article, we propose a flexible network architecture that provides a common networking platform for heterogeneous multi-operator networks, for interoperation in case of emergencies. A wireless mesh network is the main part of the proposed architecture and this provides a back-up network in case of emergencies. We first describe the shortcomings and limitations of the current technologies, and then we address issues related to the applications and functionalities a future emergency response network should support. Furthermore, we describe the necessary requirements for a flexible, secure, robust, and QoS-aware emergency response multi-operator architecture, and then we suggest several schemes that can be adopted by our proposed architecture to meet those requirements. In addition, we suggest several methods for the re-tasking of communication means owned by independent individuals to provide support during emergencies. In order to investigate the feasibility of multimedia transmission over a wireless mesh network, we measured the performance of a video streaming application in a real wireless metropolitan multi

  13. Environmental monitoring program for radiological emergencies at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Lilia M.J. Belem; Ramos Junior, Anthenor C.; Gomes, Carlos A.; Carvalho, Zenildo L.; Gouveia, Vandir; Estrada, Julio; Ney, Cezar [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1997-12-31

    In order to respond to a major radiological emergency at the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant, located in Angra do Reis, Rio de Janeiro, the Emergency Response Team of the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD/CNEN) established a program of environmental monitoring. A monitoring trend to assess the off-site radiological conditions and give support to decision making for implementing protective measure in case of a radiological accident is presented. For the selection of the monitoring points, the program takes into account atmospheric diffusion, population conglomerates and their habits, water and land use; it includes the entire Emergency Planning Zone of 15 km radius. The program has been organized in the form of a handbook to facilitate handling by field teams 2 refs., 1 fig.; e-mail: lilia at ird.gov.br

  14. Strategic Models and the Response of Government Agencies to Extreme Emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casler, Catherine; Pierides, Dean

    and address how military and strategic management models organize the response of government agencies to extreme emergencies whilst also failing to address their core organizational problems. We are interested in the relatively recent creation of centralized organizations like the US Federal Emergency...... to emergency management in the Australian State of Victoria after the catastrophic 2009 ‘Black Saturday’ bushfires. In the public inquiry into the disaster, centralization became an important antidote for previous shortcomings in ‘command, control and coordination’, eventually leading to the creation...

  15. Guidelines for preparation of emergency response plans for drilling, completion and testing of sour wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of an emergency response plan is to describe procedures to ensure the health and safety of the public in the event of a release of sour gas during well drilling, completion, and testing operations. This guideline has been prepared to assist Canadian companies in preparation of such plans. It has been prepared to establish a high standard in planning for emergency situations where the health and safety of the public may be threatened. It describes when an emergency response plan is required and sets out the minimum degree of detail required, and also suggests a format for the plan and provides information on how to prepare a plan. While each plan must be site-specific, the content and format of most plans can be similar. Plans must be quite specific in setting out all actions to be taken in the event of an emergency. Contents of a plan include emergency definition and action, evacuation procedures, communications, monitoring, ignition procedures, post-emergency procedures, emergency and an equipment list. Appendices include characteristics and dangers of H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/ and a sample resident information package.

  16. Preparing Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies II: Impact Detection/Attribution and Field Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstock, J. J.; Battisti, D.; Caldeira, K.; Eardley, D. M.; Katz, J. I.; Keith, D. W.; Koonin, S. E.; Patrinos, A. A.; Schrag, D. P.; Socolow, R. H.

    2008-12-01

    Through a one-week intensive study, the authors of this abstract explored the question: What program of comprehensive technical research over the next decade would maximally reduce the uncertainties associated with climate engineering responses to climate emergencies? The motivations underlying this question, our group's focus on climate engineering concepts for manipulating incident short-wave solar radiation, and our in-depth consideration of stratospheric aerosol interventions as a case example are all described in a previous presentation (Keith et al. in this session). This second of two presentations on our study group's findings concentrates specifically on our technical evaluation of the issues associated with climate impact detection and attribution. Our analyses begin by examining the natural variability (noise) and equilibration timescales (temporal response) of a number of specific climate parameters (e.g. surface radiative flux, surface temperature, atmospheric ozone concentrations, etc.) at both the global and regional scales. First, using the assumption of immediate response for all climate parameters, order-of-magnitude signal-to-noise ratio calculations are used to estimate the minimum intervention durations and amplitudes needed for climate impacts of predicted magnitude to be attributably detected. Next, a number of relevant processes (physical, chemical and biological) within the climate system are evaluated to provide order-of-magnitude estimates for the actual temporal response of these climate parameters (e.g. delay in global temperature response due to ocean heat capacity). Cumulatively, these first-order quantitative estimates reveal a number of basic limits to the timescale over which equilibrium climatic parameter impacts of a climate engineering intervention could be detected. Building from these basic results, we examine current climate monitoring capabilities across four broad categories of climate parameters: (1) radiative; (2

  17. Prince Edward Island: building capacity--the implementation of a critical care/emergency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Judith

    2012-03-01

    Like other Canadian provinces, Prince Edward Island has a shortage of experienced nurses, especially in critical and emergency care. To increase the numbers of competent nurses, a PEI-based nursing course in these areas was identified as key to building capacity. This Research to Action pilot program successfully involved nurses in PEI-based emergency and critical care courses developed by the Nova Scotia Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre and funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The programs were offered on a full-time basis, lasted 14 weeks and included classroom and simulation laboratory time, along with a strong clinical component.Sixteen RNs graduated from the courses and became Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) certified. An additional 12 RNs were trained as preceptors. Feedback from participants indicates greater job satisfaction and increased confidence in providing patient assessments and care. Based on the program's success, the RTA partners proposed the establishment of an ongoing, PEI-based critical care and emergency nursing program utilizing 80/20 staffing models and mentorship. Their proposal was approved, with courses set to resume in January, 2012.

  18. Survey of state and tribal emergency response capabilities for radiological transportation incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilardo, F J; Mitter, E L; Palmer, J A; Briggs, H C; Fesenmaier, J [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (USA). School of Public and Environmental Affairs

    1990-05-01

    This publication is the final report of a project to survey the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and selected Indian Tribal jurisdictions to ascertain their emergency-preparedness planning and capabilities for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. The survey was conducted to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other federal agencies with information concerning the current level of emergency-response preparedness of the states and selected tribes and an assessment of the changes that have occurred since 1980. There have been no major changes in the states' emergency-response planning strategies and field tactics. The changes noted included an increased availability of dedicated emergency-response vehicles, wider availability of specialized radiation-detection instruments, and higher proportions of police and fire personnel with training in the handling of suspected radiation threats. Most Indian tribes have no capability to evaluate suspected radiation threats and have no formal relations with emergency-response personnel in adjacent states. For the nation as a whole, the incidence of suspected radiation threats declined substantially from 1980 to 1988. 58 tabs.

  19. Seismic Safety Program: Ground motion and structural response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    In 1964, John A. Blume & Associates Research Division (Blume) began a broad-range structural response program to assist the Nevada Operations Office of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in ensuring the continued safe conduct of underground nuclear detonation testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Blume`s long experience in earthquake engineering provided a general basis for the program, but much more specialized knowledge was required for the AEC`s purposes. Over the next 24 years Blume conducted a major research program to provide essential understanding of the detailed nature of the response of structures to dynamic loads such as those imposed by seismic wave propagation. The program`s results have been embodied in a prediction technology which has served to provide reliable advanced knowledge of the probable effects of seismic ground motion on all kinds of structures, for use in earthquake engineering and in building codes as well as for the continuing needs of the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). This report is primarily an accounting of the Blume work, beginning with the setting in 1964 and the perception of the program needs as envisioned by Dr. John A. Blume. Subsequent chapters describe the structural response program in detail and the structural prediction procedures which resulted; the intensive data acquisition program which, as is discussed at some length, relied heavily on the contributions of other consultant-contractors in the DOE/NV Seismic Safety Support Program; laboratory and field studies to provide data on building elements and structures subjected to dynamic loads from sources ranging from testing machines to earthquakes; structural response activities undertaken for testing at the NTS and for off-NTS underground nuclear detonations; and concluding with an account of corollary studies including effects of natural forces and of related studies on building response.

  20. 78 FR 63516 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors AGENCY... Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors.'' This RG describes testing methods the NRC staff...)-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors.'' DG-1277...

  1. Disaster Education: A Survey Study to Analyze Disaster Medicine Training in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Ritu R; Cattamanchi, Srihari; Alqahtani, Abdulrahman; Aljohani, Majed; Keim, Mark; Ciottone, Gregory R

    2017-08-01

    The increase in natural and man-made disasters occurring worldwide places Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians at the forefront of responding to these crises. Despite the growing interest in Disaster Medicine, it is unclear if resident training has been able to include these educational goals. Hypothesis This study surveys EM residencies in the United States to assess the level of education in Disaster Medicine, to identify competencies least and most addressed, and to highlight effective educational models already in place. The authors distributed an online survey of multiple-choice and free-response questions to EM residency Program Directors in the United States between February 7 and September 24, 2014. Questions assessed residency background and details on specific Disaster Medicine competencies addressed during training. Out of 183 programs, 75 (41%) responded to the survey and completed all required questions. Almost all programs reported having some level of Disaster Medicine training in their residency. The most common Disaster Medicine educational competencies taught were patient triage and decontamination. The least commonly taught competencies were volunteer management, working with response teams, and special needs populations. The most commonly identified methods to teach Disaster Medicine were drills and lectures/seminars. There are a variety of educational tools used to teach Disaster Medicine in EM residencies today, with a larger focus on the use of lectures and hospital drills. There is no indication of a uniform educational approach across all residencies. The results of this survey demonstrate an opportunity for the creation of a standardized model for resident education in Disaster Medicine. Sarin RR , Cattamanchi S , Alqahtani A , Aljohani M , Keim M , Ciottone GR . Disaster education: a survey study to analyze disaster medicine training in emergency medicine residency programs in the United States. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):368-373.

  2. Responsive feeding: implications for policy and program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Patrice L; Pelto, Gretel H

    2011-03-01

    In this article, we examine responsive feeding as a nutrition intervention, with an emphasis on the development and incorporation of responsive feeding into policies and programs over the last 2 decades and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of responsive feeding interventions. A review of policy documents from international agencies and high-income countries reveals that responsive feeding has been incorporated into nutrition policies. Official guidelines from international agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and professional organizations often include best practice recommendations for responsive feeding. Four potential explanations are offered for the rapid development of policies related to responsive feeding that have occurred despite the relatively recent recognition that responsive feeding plays a critical role in child nutrition and growth and the paucity of effectiveness trials to determine strategies to promote responsive feeding. Looking to the future, 3 issues related to program implementation are highlighted: 1) improving intervention specificity relative to responsive feeding; 2) developing protocols that facilitate efficient adaptation of generic guidelines to national contexts and local conditions; and 3) development of program support materials, including training, monitoring, and operational evaluation.

  3. Responsive Feeding: Implications for Policy and Program Implementation12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Patrice L.; Pelto, Gretel H.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine responsive feeding as a nutrition intervention, with an emphasis on the development and incorporation of responsive feeding into policies and programs over the last 2 decades and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of responsive feeding interventions. A review of policy documents from international agencies and high-income countries reveals that responsive feeding has been incorporated into nutrition policies. Official guidelines from international agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and professional organizations often include best practice recommendations for responsive feeding. Four potential explanations are offered for the rapid development of policies related to responsive feeding that have occurred despite the relatively recent recognition that responsive feeding plays a critical role in child nutrition and growth and the paucity of effectiveness trials to determine strategies to promote responsive feeding. Looking to the future, 3 issues related to program implementation are highlighted: 1) improving intervention specificity relative to responsive feeding; 2) developing protocols that facilitate efficient adaptation of generic guidelines to national contexts and local conditions; and 3) development of program support materials, including training, monitoring, and operational evaluation. PMID:21270361

  4. Update of the Nuclear Criticality Slide Rule for the Emergency Response to a Nuclear Criticality Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duluc Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AWE (UK, IRSN (France, LLNL (USA and ORNL (USA began a long term collaboration effort in 2015 to update the nuclear criticality Slide Rule for the emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident. This document, published almost 20 years ago, gives order of magnitude estimates of key parameters, such as number of fissions and doses (neutron and gamma, useful for emergency response teams and public authorities. This paper will present, firstly the motivation and the long term objectives for this update, then the overview of the initial configurations for updated calculations and preliminary results obtained with modern 3D codes.

  5. Emergency Medicine Resident Orientation: How Training Programs Get Their Residents Started.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Jillian; Barrie, Michael; Way, David P

    2017-01-01

    The first formal orientation program for incoming emergency medicine (EM) residents was started in 1976. The last attempt to describe the nature of orientation programs was by Brillman in 1995. Now almost all residencies offer orientation to incoming residents, but little is known about the curricular content or structure of these programs. The purpose of this project was to describe the current composition and purpose of EM resident orientation programs in the United States. In autumn of 2014, we surveyed all U.S. EM residency program directors (n=167). We adapted our survey instrument from one used by Brillman (1995). The survey was designed to assess the orientation program's purpose, structure, content, and teaching methods. The survey return rate was 63% (105 of 167). Most respondents (77%) directed three-year residencies, and all but one program offered intern orientation. Orientations lasted an average of nine clinical (Std. Dev.=7.3) and 13 non-clinical days (Std. Dev.=9.3). The prototypical breakdown of program activities was 27% lectures, 23% clinical work, 16% skills training, 10% administrative activities, 9% socialization and 15% other activities. Most orientations included activities to promote socialization among interns (98%) and with other members of the department (91%). Many programs (87%) included special certification courses (ACLS, ATLS, PALS, NRP). Course content included the following: use of electronic medical records (90%), physician wellness (75%), and chief complaint-based lectures (72%). Procedural skill sessions covered ultrasound (94%), airway management (91%), vascular access (90%), wound management (77%), splinting (67%), and trauma skills (62%). Compared to Brillman (1995), we found that more programs (99%) are offering formal orientation and allocating more time to them. Lectures remain the most common educational activity. We found increases in the use of skills labs and specialty certifications. We also observed increases in

  6. Preparedness and emergency response research centers: using a public health systems approach to improve all-hazards preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinhos, Mary; Qari, Shoukat H; Williams-Johnson, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, at the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) prepared a report identifying knowledge gaps in public health systems preparedness and emergency response and recommending near-term priority research areas. In accordance with the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act mandating new public health systems research for preparedness and emergency response, CDC provided competitive awards establishing nine Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRCs) in accredited U.S. schools of public health. The PERRCs conducted research in four IOM-recommended priority areas: (1) enhancing the usefulness of public health preparedness and response (PHPR) training, (2) creating and maintaining sustainable preparedness and response systems, (3) improving PHPR communications, and (4) identifying evaluation criteria and metrics to improve PHPR for all hazards. The PERRCs worked closely with state and local public health, community partners, and advisory committees to produce practice-relevant research findings. PERRC research has generated more than 130 peer-reviewed publications and nearly 80 practice and policy tools and recommendations with the potential to significantly enhance our nation's PHPR to all hazards and that highlight the need for further improvements in public health systems.

  7. Accreditation of emerging oral health professions: options for dental therapy education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmon, Sherril B; Tresidder, Anna Foucek

    2011-01-01

    The study explored the options for accreditation of educational programs to prepare a new oral health provider, the dental therapist. A literature review and interviews of 10 content experts were conducted. The content experts represented a wide array of interests, including individuals associated with the various dental stakeholder organizations in education, accreditation, practice, and licensure, as well as representatives of non-dental accrediting organizations whose experience could inform the study. Development of an educational accreditation program for an emerging profession requires collaboration among key stakeholders representing education, practice, licensure, and other interests. Options for accreditation of dental therapy education programs include establishment of a new independent accrediting agency; seeking recognition as a committee within the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs; or working with the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) to create a new accreditation program within CODA. These options are not mutually exclusive, and more than one accreditation program could potentially exist. An educational accreditation program is built upon a well-defined field, where there is a demonstrated need for the occupation and for accreditation of educational programs that prepare individuals to enter that occupation. The fundamental value of accreditation is as one player in the overall scheme of improving the quality of higher education delivered to students and, ultimately, the delivery of health services. Leaders concerned with the oral health workforce will need to consider future directions and the potential roles of new oral health providers as they determine appropriate directions for educational accreditation for dental therapy.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Koru: A Mindfulness Program for College Students and Other Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeson, Jeffrey M.; Juberg, Michael K.; Maytan, Margaret; James, Kiera; Rogers, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Koru, a mindfulness training program for college students and other emerging adults. Participants Ninety students (66% female, 62% white, 71% graduate students) participated between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Methods Randomized controlled trial. We hypothesized that Koru, compared to a wait-list control group, would reduce perceived stress and sleep problems, and increase mindfulness, self-compassion, and gratitude. Results As hypothesized, results showed significant Group (Koru, wait-list) X Time (pre, post) interactions for improvements in perceived stress (F=4.50, df [1, 76.40], p=.037, d=.45), sleep problems (F= 4.71, df [1,79.49], p=.033, d=.52), mindfulness (F=26.80, df [1, 79.09], pstress, sleep problems, mindfulness, and self-compassion. Conclusions Results support the effectiveness of the Koru program for emerging adults in the university setting. PMID:24499130

  9. An analysis of a case manager-driven emergent dialysis program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Christopher S; Myers, Isaac J; Huffman, Gretchen; Vohito, Rancia; Herceg, Dorian

    2012-01-01

    With the undocumented immigrant population in the United States on the rise, an increase in the number of patients with end-stage renal disease without access to a regular dialysis chair continues. This leaves hospital systems with the difficult decision of how best to care for this population. We sought to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and costs of a case manager-driven emergent dialysis program. We hypothesized that this program would be feasible and would result in similar costs as the previous regularly scheduled dialysis program in place at our institution. The study was conducted at Wishard Memorial Hospital, which is an urban public hospital in Indianapolis, IN. We performed a before (March 11, 2010, to June 11, 2010) and after (June 14, 2010, to September 14, 2010) study to compare the treatment of a 6-patient cohort of dialysis patients without a "dialysis home" before and after the case manager-driven emergent dialysis program, using secondary data. The case manager-driven emergent dialysis process was feasible and led to a total expense of $101,802 as compared with a total cost of $122,890 when providing regular dialysis to this subset of patients. There were no differences in intensive care unit days, length of stay, and complications between the 2 groups in the short study period. The dialysis population without a "dialysis home" is a high-risk population in need of intensive medical care but the approach to these patients continues to be debated. Although this study does not prove or necessarily support a dialysis on "emergent" basis approach over chronic, scheduled dialysis, the study does demonstrate that case management can play a significant role in the care of these patients. Case management oversight and management of our patient population resulted in costs equal to, or better than, those who received chronic dialysis care without a difference in complications over a 6-month study period.

  10. USGS Emergency Response and the International Charter Space and Major Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. K.

    2009-12-01

    Responding to catastrophic natural disasters requires information. When the flow of information on the ground is interrupted by crises such as earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes, hurricanes, and floods, satellite imagery and aerial photographs become invaluable tools in revealing post-disaster conditions and in aiding disaster response and recovery efforts. USGS is a global clearinghouse for remotely sensed disaster imagery. It is also a source of innovative products derived from satellite imagery that can provide unique overviews as well as important details about the impacts of disasters. Repeatedly, USGS and its resources have proven their worth in assisting with disaster recovery activities in the United States and abroad. USGS has a well-established role in emergency response in the United States. It works closely with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) by providing first responders with satellite and aerial images of disaster-impacted sites and products developed from those images. FEMA’s partnership with the USGS began in 1999 when the agency established USGS as its executive agent for the acquisition and coordination of aerial and satellite remote sensing data. Understanding the terrain affords FEMA the vital perspective needed to effectively respond to the devastation many disasters leave behind. The combination of the USGS image archive, coupled with its global data transfer capability and on-site science staff, was instrumental in the USGS becoming a participating agency in the International Charter Space and Major Disasters. This participation provides the USGS with access to international members space agencies, to information on their methodology in disaster response, and to data from the satellites they operate. Such access enhances the USGS’ ability to respond to global emergencies and to disasters that occur in the United States (US). As one example, the Charter agencies provided over 75 images to the US in support of Hurricane

  11. New insights into flood warning reception and emergency response by affected parties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Müller, Meike; Schröter, Kai; Thieken, Annegret H.

    2017-11-01

    Flood damage can be mitigated if the parties at risk are reached by flood warnings and if they know how to react appropriately. To gain more knowledge about warning reception and emergency response of private households and companies, surveys were undertaken after the August 2002 and the June 2013 floods in Germany. Despite pronounced regional differences, the results show a clear overall picture: in 2002, early warnings did not work well; e.g. many households (27 %) and companies (45 %) stated that they had not received any flood warnings. Additionally, the preparedness of private households and companies was low in 2002, mainly due to a lack of flood experience. After the 2002 flood, many initiatives were launched and investments undertaken to improve flood risk management, including early warnings and an emergency response in Germany. In 2013, only a small share of the affected households (5 %) and companies (3 %) were not reached by any warnings. Additionally, private households and companies were better prepared. For instance, the share of companies which have an emergency plan in place has increased from 10 % in 2002 to 34 % in 2013. However, there is still room for improvement, which needs to be triggered mainly by effective risk and emergency communication. The challenge is to continuously maintain and advance an integrated early warning and emergency response system even without the occurrence of extreme floods.

  12. Study on emergency response to critical accident of the nuclear fuel processing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urabe, Itsumasa [Fukuyama Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    2000-03-01

    On the review of information concerning JCO accident sent to the authorities of government, prefecture and Tokaimura and their responses, the author studied what the early emergency response should be. The time series of the information and response after the accident, from 10:35, September 30, 1999 (alarm at the JCO office site) to October 7, 1999, described in detail in this review, revealed the slight difference in the earliest understanding of the emergency between the government and the actual accident regions: At the early stage, the possibility of criticality was recognized by people near the actual site. The importance of decision making based on professional knowledge at the actual region was emphasized for the effective response to nuclear power accident. (K.H.)

  13. The embryonic origins and genetic programming of emerging haematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Patient, Roger

    2016-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge from the haemogenic endothelium (HE) localised in the ventral wall of the embryonic dorsal aorta (DA). The HE generates HSCs through a process known as the endothelial to haematopoietic transition (EHT), which has been visualised in live embryos and is currently under intense study. However, EHT is the culmination of multiple programming events, which are as yet poorly understood, that take place before the specification of HE. A number of haematopoietic precursor cells have been described before the emergence of definitive HSCs, but only one haematovascular progenitor, the definitive haemangioblast (DH), gives rise to the DA, HE and HSCs. DHs emerge in the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) and have a distinct origin and genetic programme compared to other, previously described haematovascular progenitors. Although DHs have so far only been established in Xenopus embryos, evidence for their existence in the LPM of mouse and chicken embryos is discussed here. We also review the current knowledge of the origins, lineage relationships, genetic programming and differentiation of the DHs that leads to the generation of HSCs. Importantly, we discuss the significance of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that controls the programming of DHs, a better understanding of which may aid in the establishment of protocols for the de novo generation of HSCs in vitro. © 2016 The Authors. FEBS Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. A survey on the graduates from the combined emergency medicine/pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolridge, Dale P; Lichenstein, Richard

    2007-02-01

    The guidelines for dual training in Emergency Medicine (EM) and Pediatrics over a 5-year program have long existed. Many have questioned the benefit of such training in relation to either specialty and in relation to Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) sub-specialty training. We report on the professional outcome, career focus, and job satisfaction of these graduates. Surveys were returned from 91% (n = 29) of graduates, all of whom reported completing either of the two combined training programs. All respondents reported practicing in an emergency medicine setting either with or without an additional pediatric emphasis. Fifty-nine percent reported an academic EM affiliation. Almost all (96.5%) would choose to repeat combined training and all reported they would recommend the combined program to medical students interested in Pediatrics and EM. Combined graduates report a high level of satisfaction with their training and overwhelmingly would recommend such training to medical students. Combined graduates seem to universally work in an ED setting, although a number maintain their pediatric involvement. Over half of the graduates participate in academic EM.

  15. The effectiveness of an educational program on preventing and treating compassion fatigue in emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flarity, Kathleen; Gentry, J Eric; Mesnikoff, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the treatment effectiveness of a multifaceted education program to decrease compassion fatigue (CF) and burnout (BO) symptoms and increase compassion satisfaction of emergency nurses participating in the training. The goal of the CF multifaceted intervention program was to demonstrate a statistically significant improvement in the 3 CF subscales: an increase on the Compassion Satisfaction (CS) subscale and a decrease on the Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) and BO subscales in the participants' pretest and posttest scores as measured by The Professional Quality of Life test (B. H. , ). The study sites were 2 emergency departments in Colorado Springs, CO. A convenience sample consisted of emergency nurses who self-selected to participate in the study. Univariate statistics were used, and data were examined for normalcy of distribution. Because these data were not distributed normally, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to evaluate the differences between the baseline and postintervention groups. The multifaceted education program resulted in a statistically significant increase in CS (p = 0.004) and a decrease in BO (p = 0.001 or less) and STS (p = 0.001) symptoms.

  16. Environmental fellows program - professional development in environmental management for emerging world leaders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquez, R.B.; Bhada, R.K. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A unique program, the Environmental Fellows Program (EFP), has been established by the Waste-management Education & Research Consortium. The mission of the program is to expand the world`s capability to address issues associated with the management of wastes. The mission will be accomplished by establishing a world-wide community of highly qualified administrators, engineers, and scientists in the field of environmental management. The EFP is the only program in the world that provides intensive graduate level training to world leaders emerging from academia, government, and industry. Through this program, future strategies of the international community of leaders will be directed with an understanding of the technology, economics, the risk awareness, and other issues related to environmental management. The program includes five components: Professional Fellows Training Program, Graduate Fellows Program, Colloquium series featuring world-class experts in environmental management, Annual international conference focusing on a timely, relevant, specific issue of environmental management, and Practical internship. The Professional Fellows Training Program and Graduate Program are provided to individuals selected from industry and government on the basis of their technical and administrative abilities. These Fellows receive intensive graduate level training at a New Mexico university in an area relevant to environmental management. This program has been initiated with nine Fellows from Mexico selected jointly by the Mexican authorities and the U.S. The Colloquim Series is designed to bring the Fellows together on a frequent basis to discuss specific environmental issues, thus using their expertise to shed light on a major international environmental issue, the conference on environmental management. The practical internship will be made available to the Fellows who desire practical experience at a government laboratory, university, or industry.

  17. Bereavement Photography for Children: Program Development and Healthcare Professionals’ Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Blehart, Kathleen; Hochberg, Todd; James, Kristin; Frader, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Reports of in-hospital bereavement photography focus largely on stillborns and neonates. Empiric data regarding the implementation of bereavement photography in pediatrics beyond the neonatal period and the impact of such programs on healthcare professionals (HCPs) is lacking. We describe the implementation of a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bereavement photography program and use questionnaire data from HCPs to describe HCPs’ reflections on the program and to identify program barriers. From July, 2007 through April, 2010 families of 59 (36%) of the 164 patients who died in the PICU participated in our bereavement photography program. Forty questionnaires from 29 HCPs caring for 39 participating patients/families indicated that families seemed grateful for the service (n=34, 85%) and that the program helped HCPs feel better about their role (n=30, 70%). Many HCPs disagreed that the program consumed too much of his/her time (n=34, 85%) and that the photographer made his/her job difficult (n=37, 92.5%). Qualitative analysis of responses to open ended questions revealed four categories: the program’s general value; positive aspects of the program; negative aspects of the program; and suggestions for improvements. Implementing bereavement photography in the PICU is feasible though some barriers exist. HCPs may benefit from such programs. PMID:24520925

  18. Decision support system for the response to infectious disease emergencies based on WebGIS and mobile services in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-pin Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For years, emerging infectious diseases have appeared worldwide and threatened the health of people. The emergence and spread of an infectious-disease outbreak are usually unforeseen, and have the features of suddenness and uncertainty. Timely understanding of basic information in the field, and the collection and analysis of epidemiological information, is helpful in making rapid decisions and responding to an infectious-disease emergency. Therefore, it is necessary to have an unobstructed channel and convenient tool for the collection and analysis of epidemiologic information in the field. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Baseline information for each county in mainland China was collected and a database was established by geo-coding information on a digital map of county boundaries throughout the country. Google Maps was used to display geographic information and to conduct calculations related to maps, and the 3G wireless network was used to transmit information collected in the field to the server. This study established a decision support system for the response to infectious-disease emergencies based on WebGIS and mobile services (DSSRIDE. The DSSRIDE provides functions including data collection, communication and analyses in real time, epidemiological detection, the provision of customized epidemiological questionnaires and guides for handling infectious disease emergencies, and the querying of professional knowledge in the field. These functions of the DSSRIDE could be helpful for epidemiological investigations in the field and the handling of infectious-disease emergencies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The DSSRIDE provides a geographic information platform based on the Google Maps application programming interface to display information of infectious disease emergencies, and transfers information between workers in the field and decision makers through wireless transmission based on personal computers, mobile phones and

  19. Bulgarian Emergency Response System (BERS) in case of nuclear accident with exposure doses estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Slavov, K.; Veleva, B.

    2015-07-01

    A PC-oriented Emergency Response System in case of nuclear accident (BERS) is developed and works operationally in the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology (NIMH). The creation and development of BERS was highly stimulated by the ETEX (European Tracer Experiment) project. BERS comprises two main parts - the operational and the accidental ones. The operational part, run automatically every 12 hours, prepares the input meteorological file used by both trajectory and dispersion models, runs the trajectory models, visualizes the results and uploads the maps of trajectories to a dedicated web-site. The accidental part is activated manually when a real radioactive releases occur or during emergency exercises. Its core is the Bulgarian dispersion models EMAP. Outputs are concentration, accumulated deposition and selected doses fields. In the paper, the BERS overall structure is described and examples of its products are presented. Key words: nuclear accident, emergency response, early warning system, air dispersion models, radioactive exposure dose. (Author)

  20. Availability of Insurance Linkage Programs in U.S. Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Kanak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As millions of uninsured citizens who use emergency department (ED services are now eligible for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, the ED is ideally situated to facilitate linkage to insurance. Forty percent of U.S. EDs report having an insurance linkage program. This is the first national study to examine the characteristics of EDs that offer or do not offer these programs. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from the National Survey for Preventive Health Services in U.S. EDs conducted in 2008-09. We compared EDs with and without insurance programs across demographic and operational factors using univariate analysis. We then tested our hypotheses using multivariable logistic regression. We also further examined program capacity and priority among the sub-group of EDs with no insurance linkage program. Results: After adjustment, ED-insurance linkage programs were more likely to be located in the West (RR= 2.06, 95% CI = 1.33 – 2.72. The proportion of uninsured patients in an ED, teaching hospital status, and public ownership status were not associated with insurance linkage availability. EDs with linkage programs also offer more preventive services (RR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.37–2.35 and have greater social worker availability (RR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.12–2.33 than those who do not. Four of five EDs with a patient mix of ≥25% uninsured and no insurance linkage program reported that they could not offer a program with existing staff and funding. Conclusion: Availability of insurance linkage programs in the ED is not associated with the proportion of uninsured patients served by an ED. Policy or hospital-based interventions to increase insurance linkage should first target the 27% of EDs with high rates of uninsured patients that lack adequate program capacity. Further research on barriers to implementation and cost effectiveness may help to facilitate increased adoption of insurance linkage programs. [West J

  1. Manual for best practice for emergency response procedures, part 3: a review of the department of Minerals and Energy guidelines relevant to inrushes, fires, explosions and other emergencies.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spencer, KC

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available PRACTICE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES PART 3 A REVIEW OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MINERALS AND ENERGY GUIDELINES RELEVANT TO INRUSHES, FIRES, EXPLOSIONS AND OTHER EMERGENCIES Authors: K C Spencer, D M Walters, T P T Page and A G du Plessis. Research.... 12) This comprehensive draft document was drawn up by a tripartite working group. The document also appears to be satisfactory. 3 Conclusions It is our opinion that no further guidelines with respect to emergencies in collieries require...

  2. Emotional Intelligence in Library Disaster Response Assistance Teams: Which Competencies Emerged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Frances C.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the relationship between emotional intelligence competencies and the personal attributes of library disaster response assistance team (DRAT) members. Using appreciative inquiry protocol to conduct interviews at two academic libraries, the study presents findings from emergent thematic coding of interview…

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of burned area emergency response (BAER) efforts after the 2003 wildfires, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter M. Wohlgemuth; Ken R. Hubbert; Jan L. Beyers; David R. Weise

    2007-01-01

    Wildfires burned approximately 300,000 hectares (750,000 acres) across southern California in the fall of 2003. Over 10 million dollars were spent on Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) treatments following these fires. To support the BAER efforts, we designed a comprehensive strategy with standardized protocols to evaluate the effectiveness of various erosion...

  4. Evaluation of the Emergency Education Response for Syrian Refugee Children and Host Communities in Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Culbertson, S.; Ling, T.; Henham, M.L.; Corbett, J.; Karam, R.; Pankowska, P.K.P.; Saunders, C.L.; Bellasio, J.; Baruch, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Emergency Education Response Programme (EER), launched by UNICEF, the Government of Jordan and partners in 2012, aims to provide free public formal education, as well as safe and appropriate supportive educational services, for Syrian refugee children living in Jordan. RAND's evaluation

  5. Experience Report: Constraint-Based Modelling and Simulation of Railway Emergency Response Plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Sandberg, Lene

    2016-01-01

    We report on experiences from a case study applying a constraint-based process-modelling and -simulation tool, dcrgraphs.net, to the modelling and rehearsal of railway emergency response plans with domain experts. The case study confirmed the approach as a viable means for domain experts to analyse...

  6. A data model for operational and situational information in emergency response: the Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlatanova, S.; Dilo, Arta

    2010-01-01

    During emergency response a lot of dynamic information is created and needs to be studied and analysed in the decision-making process. However, this analysis of data is difficult and often not possible. A major reason for this is that a lot of information coming from the field operations is not

  7. Work Scope for Developing Standards for Emergency Preparedness and Response: Fiscal Year 2004 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, Robert D.

    2005-09-28

    Summarizes the fiscal year 2004 work completed on PNNL's Department of Homeland Security Emergency Preparedness and Response Standards Development Project. Also, the report includes key draft standards, in various stages of development and publication, that were associated with various tasks of the fiscal year 2004 scope of the project.

  8. Design of a High Power Robotic Manipulator for Emergency Response to the Nuclear Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jongwon; Bae, Yeong-Geol; Kim, Myoung Ho; Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    An accident in a nuclear facility causes a great social cost. To prevent an unexpected nuclear accident from spreading to the catastrophic disaster, emergency response action in early stage is required. However, high radiation environment has been proved as a challenging obstacle for human workers to access to the accident site and take an action in previous accident cases. Therefore, emergency response robotic technology to be used in a nuclear accident site instead of human workers are actively conducted in domestically and internationally. Robots in an accident situation are required to carry out a variety of tasks depend on the types and patterns of accidents. An emergency response usually includes removing of debris, make an access road to a certain place and handling valves. These tasks normally involve high payload handling. A small sized high power robotic manipulator can be an appropriate candidate to deal with a wide spectrum of tasks in an emergency situation. In this paper, we discuss about the design of a high power robotic manipulator, which is capable of handling high payloads for an initial response action to the nuclear facility accident. In this paper, we presented a small sized high power robotic manipulator design. Actuator types of manipulator was selected and mechanical structure was discussed. In the future, the servo valve and hydraulic pump systems will be determined. Furthermore, control algorithms and test bed experiments will be also conducted.

  9. A data model for operational and situational information in emergency response : The Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlatanova, S.; Dilo, A.

    2010-01-01

    During emergency response a lot of dynamic information is created and needs to be studied and analysed in the decision-making process. However, this analysis of data is difficult and often not possible. A major reason for this is that a lot of information coming from the field operations is not

  10. 77 FR 35962 - Utilizing Rapidly Deployable Aerial Communications Architecture in Response to an Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Utilizing Rapidly Deployable Aerial Communications Architecture in Response to an Emergency AGENCY... seeks comment on the role of deployable aerial communications architecture (DACA) in facilitating... eRulemaking Portal, or (3) by filing paper copies. Comments and reply comments may be filed...

  11. Brief Report: Effects of Tact Training on Emergent Intraverbal Vocal Responses in Adolescents with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Richard J.; Hawkins, Emma; Dymond, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the emergence of intraverbal responses following tact training with three adolescents diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. Participants were taught to tact the name of a cartoon character (e.g., "What is the name of this monster?" ["Simon"]) and that character's preferred food (e.g., "What food does this monster…

  12. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

  13. Emergency Preparedness and Response in the School Setting--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Christine M.; Haynie, Kathey; Davis, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) provides leadership in all phases of emergency preparedness and response. School nurses are a vital part of the school team responsible for developing emergency response procedures for the…

  14. Development and field test of a responsible alcohol service program. Volume 2, Server education program materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    This report describes a program of server education designed to foster the responsible service of alcohol in bars, restaurants, and other on-sale establishments. The program is administered in two phases. The first phase, three hours in length, is in...

  15. Can merging the roles of public health preparedness and emergency management increase the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency planning and response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielot, Nadja A; Horney, Jennifer A

    2014-03-10

    Some jurisdictions have reduced workforce and reallocated responsibilities for public health preparedness and emergency management to more efficiently use resources and improve planning and response. Key informant interviews were conducted in six counties in North Carolina (USA) to discuss perceptions of the challenges and opportunities provided by the new shared positions. Respondents feel that planning and response have improved, but that requirements related to activities or equipment that are eligible for funding (particularly on the public health side) can present an impediment to consolidating public health preparedness and emergency management roles. As the financial resources available for public health preparedness and emergency management continue to be reduced, the merging of the roles and responsibilities of public health preparedness and emergency management may present jurisdictions with an effective alternative to reducing staff, and potentially, readiness.

  16. Can Merging the Roles of Public Health Preparedness and Emergency Management Increase the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Emergency Planning and Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja A. Vielot

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some jurisdictions have reduced workforce and reallocated responsibilities for public health preparedness and emergency management to more efficiently use resources and improve planning and response. Key informant interviews were conducted in six counties in North Carolina (USA to discuss perceptions of the challenges and opportunities provided by the new shared positions. Respondents feel that planning and response have improved, but that requirements related to activities or equipment that are eligible for funding (particularly on the public health side can present an impediment to consolidating public health preparedness and emergency management roles. As the financial resources available for public health preparedness and emergency management continue to be reduced, the merging of the roles and responsibilities of public health preparedness and emergency management may present jurisdictions with an effective alternative to reducing staff, and potentially, readiness.

  17. Addressing the challenge of the emerging NCD epidemic: lessons learned from Botswana's response to the HIV epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M J A; Mosepele, M; Tsima, B M; Gross, R

    2012-09-21

    Botswana has the second highest prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in the world, and yet it has built one of Africa's most progressive and comprehensive HIV programs. While public health infrastructure has responded remarkably to the HIV epidemic, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), particularly diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, in both HIV-infected and non-infected individuals, is increasing rapidly. Applying lessons learned from the scale-up of HIV/AIDS services may help with the implementation of an effective response to the challenges of the emerging NCD epidemic. We suggest that a successful response should include integrated service delivery, capacity building to provide disease-specific care, and strong partnerships to mobilize communities.

  18. The Systemic Impacts of New York's Universal Pre-Kindergarten Program: A Response to Ackerman, Apple, Barnett, and Goffin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Taryn W.; Lekies, Kristi S.; Cochran, Moncrieff M.

    2007-01-01

    We thank Debra J. Ackerman, Peggy L. Apple, W. Steven Barnett, and Stacie G. Goffin for their thoughtful commentaries on our article "Implementing New York's Universal Pre-Kindergarten Program: An Exploratory Study of Systemic Impacts" (this issue). Our response focuses on two main themes that emerged from the commentaries: (a) the…

  19. 48 CFR 3019.705 - Responsibilities for the contracting officer under the subcontracting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contracting officer under the subcontracting program. 3019.705 Section 3019.705 Federal Acquisition...) SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The Small Business Subcontracting Program 3019.705 Responsibilities for the contracting officer under the subcontracting program. ...

  20. Emergency response to disaster-struck scale-free network with redundant systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Min; Yu, Ming-Hui; Huang, Xiang-Zhao; Luan, En-Jie

    2008-07-01

    Disasters cause tremendous damage every year. In this paper, we have specifically studied emergency response to disaster-struck scale-free networks when some nodes in the network have redundant systems. If one node collapses, its redundant system will substitute it to work for a period of time. In the first part, according to the network structure, several redundant strategies have been formulated, and then our studies focused on their effectiveness by means of simulation. Results show that the strategy based on total degrees is the most effective one. However, many nodes still collapse in the end if redundant systems do not have sufficient capability, so emergency responses are necessary. Several emergent strategies controlling the distribution of external resources have been proposed in the second part. The effectiveness of those emergent strategies are then studied from three aspects, such as the effect of strategies on spreading processes, minimum sufficient quantities of external resources and determination of the most appropriate emergent strategy. In addition, the effects of redundant intensity on these aspects have been discussed as well.

  1. Assessment of the level of knowledge of Physicians in Bushehr Province about preparedness and response for Nuclear Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshagh Abbasi

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Responses to recent incidents involving radiation indicate that most general practitioners are uncertain about the health consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation and the medical management of exposed patients. Acute radiation syndrome is an acute illness caused by irradiation of the entire body by a high dose of penetrating radiation in a very short period of time. In order to assess the level of knowledge of physicians in Bushehr province about preparedness and response for nuclear emergency, we used a questionnaire based on IAEA-WHO protocol. A total of 233 doctors (47 of specialist and 186 of general practitioners participated in a cross-sectional study. The mean of score for doctors was 3.99 (from 13 3.7 score for general practitioners and 4.28 scores for specialists. Overall, the doctors did not gain the acceptable scores in subjects like physics of radiation, diagnosis and management of acute radiation syndrome, triage and management of nuclear accidents. In conclusion, the level of doctors’ knowledge in Bushehr province about preparedness and response to nuclear or radiological emergency is deficient. Therefore, medical education and postgraduate training programs for doctors should be designed.

  2. Rapid response seismic networks in Europe: lessons learnt from the L'Aquila earthquake emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Strollo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    The largest dataset ever recorded during a normal fault seismic sequence was acquired during the 2009 seismic emergency triggered by the damaging earthquake in L'Aquila (Italy. This was possible through the coordination of different rapid-response seismic networks in Italy, France and Germany. A seismic network of more than 60 stations recorded up to 70,000 earthquakes. Here, we describe the different open-data archives where it is possible to find this unique set of data for studies related to hazard, seismotectonics and earthquake physics. Moreover, we briefly describe some immediate and direct applications of emergency seismic networks. At the same time, we note the absence of communication platforms between the different European networks. Rapid-response networks need to agree on common strategies for network operations. Hopefully, over the next few years, the European Rapid-Response Seismic Network will became a reality.

  3. Do social media have a place in public health emergency response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David R; Dietz, J Eric; Stirratt, Amanda A; Coster, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain whether analyses of social media trends for various Twitter responses following a major disaster produce implications for improving the focus on public health resources and messaging to disaster victims. Radian6 and trend analyses were used to analyze 12-hour counts of Twitter data before, during, and after the March 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami. Radian6 was used to organize tweets into categories of preparedness, emergency response, and public health. Radian6 revealed that 49 percent of tweets were either positive or somewhat positive in sentiment about preparedness and only 7 percent were negative or somewhat negative. Trend analyses revealed a rapid onset of tweet activity associated with all keywords followed by mostly fast exponential decline. Analyses indicate that opportunities for improving public health awareness by leveraging social media communications exist for as much as 5 days after a disaster. Analyses suggest key times for public health social media communication to promote emergency response.

  4. The Emergence of Ethic Banks and Social Responsibility in Financing Local Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora Barbu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the present offer of banking products and services in the developed countries as well in the emerging ones shows the extent to which they fulfill or not the principles specific to social responsibility and ethics in economics. Considering heightened competition, some institutions adopt new strategies based on the creation of new concepts where human finality is to replace economical finality. Thus, banking ethics and social responsibility are concepts which are found at the level of credit cooperative and ethical banks. Oriented mainly towards rural financing and financing social responsible projects, within the study, the two approaches complete and sustain each other.

  5. Inter-association task force recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of sudden cardiac arrest in high school and college athletic programs: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezner, Jonathan A; Courson, Ron W; Roberts, William O; Mosesso, Vincent N; Link, Mark S; Maron, Barry J

    2007-04-01

    To assist high school and college athletic programs prepare for and respond to a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). This consensus statement summarizes our current understanding of SCA in young athletes, defines the necessary elements for emergency preparedness, and establishes uniform treatment protocols for the management of SCA. Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in young athletes. The increasing presence of and timely access to automated external defibrillators (AEDs) at sporting events provides a means of early defibrillation and the potential for effective secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. An Inter-Association Task Force was sponsored by the National Athletic Trainers' Association to develop consensus recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of SCA in athletes. Comprehensive emergency planning is needed for high school and college athletic programs to ensure an efficient and structured response to SCA. Essential elements of an emergency action plan include establishing an effective communication system, training of anticipated responders in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and AED use, access to an AED for early defibrillation, acquisition of necessary emergency equipment, coordination and integration of onsite responder and AED programs with the local emergency medical services system, and practice and review of the response plan. Prompt recognition of SCA, early activation of the emergency medical services system, the presence of a trained rescuer to initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and access to early defibrillation are critical in the management of SCA. In any collapsed and unresponsive athlete, SCA should be suspected and an AED applied as soon as possible for rhythm analysis and defibrillation if indicated.

  6. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - New Zealand 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in New Zealand for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  7. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Luxembourg 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Luxembourg for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  8. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Denmark 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Denmark for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  9. Response time evaluation for emergency medical service as a part of its performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchateau, François-Xavier; Garnier-Connois, Delphine; Ricard-Hibon, Agnès; Josseaume, Julien; Casalino, Enrique

    2013-09-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the response time (RT) of a French physician-staffed emergency medical service unit in both first-line and second-line service zones a part of its performance and how best to integrate it into its geographical specificity and showed acceptable RTs (mostly <10 min). Interestingly, because of the particular location next to other districts, RTs are in the same range for some municipalities that are adjacent to the first-line and area. In a new system in which catching areas would not only be based on administrative criteria anymore but also on performance evaluation, RTs for emergency medical service might be optimised.

  10. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Czech Republic 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Czech Republic for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  11. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Poland 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Poland for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  12. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Belgium 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Belgium for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  13. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Portugal 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Portugal for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  14. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - United Kingdom 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in United Kingdom for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  15. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Canada 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Canada for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  16. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Norway 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Norway for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  17. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Italy 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Italy for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  18. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Greece 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Greece for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  19. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Slovak Republic 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Slovak Republic for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  20. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Ireland 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Ireland for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  1. Oil and Gas Security. Emergency Response of IEA Countries - Spain 2011 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in Spain for responding to an oil supply crisis. Initially prepared as a chapter in the overarching publication on the emergency response mechanisms in various IEA member countries, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew the full larger publication, the IEA will be making available updates to the country chapters as these become available following the country's review.

  2. Designing Culturally Responsive and Relevant Individualized Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Brenda L.; Miller, Darcy; Hsiao, Yun-Ju; Dunn, Michael; Petersen, Sara; Hollingshead, Aleksandra; Banks, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Developing culturally responsive and relevant individualized educational programs (IEP) is becoming increasingly more important as the student population becomes more diverse. Current supports available for IEP teams primarily address the technical aspects of the IEP (e.g., writing goals that are measurable) but offer little assistance in…

  3. Implementation and Effectiveness of the Response to Intervention (RTI) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hite, Jessica Elaine; McGahey, James Todd

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine whether or not student test scores on the Georgia Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) were positively impacted by the implementation of the Response to Intervention (RTI) program. This paper will review the implementation and effectiveness of the RTI method.

  4. Crisis Reliability Indicators Supporting Emergency Services (CRISES): A Framework for Developing Performance Measures for Behavioral Health Crisis and Psychiatric Emergency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Margaret E; Tanner, Kathleen; Jurica, Paul J; Rhoads, Richard; Carson, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Crisis and emergency psychiatric services are an integral part of the healthcare system, yet there are no standardized measures for programs providing these services. We developed the Crisis Reliability Indicators Supporting Emergency Services (CRISES) framework to create measures that inform internal performance improvement initiatives and allow comparison across programs. The framework consists of two components-the CRISES domains (timely, safe, accessible, least-restrictive, effective, consumer/family centered, and partnership) and the measures supporting each domain. The CRISES framework provides a foundation for development of standardized measures for the crisis field. This will become increasingly important as pay-for-performance initiatives expand with healthcare reform.

  5. Social Mobilization and Community Engagement Central to the Ebola Response in West Africa: Lessons for Future Public Health Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Amaya M; Obregon, Rafael; El Asawi, Rania; Richey, Catherine; Manoncourt, Erma; Joshi, Kshiitij; Naqvi, Savita; Pouye, Ade; Safi, Naqibullah; Chitnis, Ketan; Quereshi, Sabeeha

    2016-12-23

    Following the World Health Organization (WHO) declaration of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern regarding the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in July 2014, UNICEF was asked to co-lead, in coordination with WHO and the ministries of health of affected countries, the communication and social mobilization component-which UNICEF refers to as communication for development (C4D)-of the Ebola response. For the first time in an emergency setting, C4D was formally incorporated into each country's national response, alongside more typical components such as supplies and logistics, surveillance, and clinical care. This article describes the lessons learned about social mobilization and community engagement in the emergency response to the Ebola outbreak, with a particular focus on UNICEF's C4D work in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. The lessons emerged through an assessment conducted by UNICEF using 4 methods: a literature review of key documents, meeting reports, and other articles; structured discussions conducted in June 2015 and October 2015 with UNICEF and civil society experts; an electronic survey, launched in October and November 2015, with staff from government, the UN, or any partner organization who worked on Ebola (N = 53); and key informant interviews (N = 5). After triangulating the findings from all data sources, we distilled lessons under 7 major domains: (1) strategy and decentralization: develop a comprehensive C4D strategy with communities at the center and decentralized programming to facilitate flexibility and adaptation to the local context; (2) coordination: establish C4D leadership with the necessary authority to coordinate between partners and enforce use of standard operating procedures as a central coordination and quality assurance tool; (3) entering and engaging communities: invest in key communication channels (such as radio) and trusted local community members; (4) messaging: adapt messages and strategies continually as patterns

  6. Utility Green Pricing Programs: Design, Implementation, and Consumer Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Swezey, B.; Aabakken, J.

    2004-02-01

    The term green pricing refers to programs offered by utilities in traditionally regulated electricity markets, which allow customers to support the development of renewable energy sources by paying a small premium on their electric bills. Since the introduction of the concept in the United States, the number of unique utility green pricing programs has expanded from just a few programs in 1993 to more than 90 in 2002. About 10% of U.S. utilities offered a green pricing option to about 26 million consumers by the end of 2002. This report provides: (1) aggregate industry data on consumer response to utility programs, which indicate the collective impact of green pricing on renewable energy development nationally; and (2) market data that can be used by utilities as a benchmark for gauging the relative success of their green pricing programs. Specifically, the paper presents current data and trends in consumer response to green pricing, as measured by renewable energy sales, participants, participation rates, and new renewable energy capacity supported. It presents data on various aspects of program design and implementation, such as product pricing, ownership of supplies, retention rates, marketing costs, the effectiveness of marketing techniques, and methods of enrolling and providing value to customers.

  7. Tangible computer programming: Exploring the use of emerging technology in classrooms and science museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Michael S.

    In considering ways to improve the use of digital technology in educational settings, it is helpful to look beyond desktop computers and conventional modes of interaction and consider the flood of emerging technologies that already play a prominent role in the everyday lives of children. In this dissertation, I will present a research project that builds on tangible user interface (TUI) technology to support computer programming and robotics activities in education settings. In particular, I will describe the design and implementation of a novel tangible computer programming language called Tern. I will also describe an evaluation of Tern's use in both formal and informal educational settings--as part of an interactive exhibit on robotics and computer programming called Robot Park on display at the Boston Museum of Science; and as part of a curriculum unit piloted in several kindergarten classrooms in the greater Boston area. In both cases, Tern allows children to create simple computer programs to control a robot. However, rather than using a keyboard or mouse to write programs on a computer screen, children instead use Tern to construct physical algorithmic structures using a collection of interlocking wooden blocks. The goal of this work is not to propose that tangible programming languages are general purpose tools that should replace existing graphical programming languages; rather, I will present evidence to support the argument that tangible programming begins to make sense when one considers the contexts and constraints of specific educational settings. Moreover, in these settings tangible languages can compensate for some of the shortcomings of graphical and text-based systems that have limited their use.

  8. Real-Time Surveillance in Emergencies Using the Early Warning Alert and Response Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Kristina M; Cookson, Susan T; Boyd, Andrew T; Hardy, Colleen; Malik, Mamunur Rahman; Mala, Peter; El Tahir, Khalid; Everard, Marthe; Jasiem, Mohamad; Husain, Farah

    2017-11-01

    Humanitarian emergencies often result in population displacement and increase the risk for transmission of communicable diseases. To address the increased risk for outbreaks during humanitarian emergencies, the World Health Organization developed the Early Warning Alert and Response Network (EWARN) for early detection of epidemic-prone diseases. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has worked with the World Health Organization, ministries of health, and other partners to support EWARN through the implementation and evaluation of these systems and the development of standardized guidance. Although protocols have been developed for the implementation and evaluation of EWARN, a need persists for standardized training and additional guidance on supporting these systems remotely when access to affected areas is restricted. Continued collaboration between partners and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for surveillance during emergencies is necessary to strengthen capacity and support global health security.

  9. Price-Responsive Load (PRL) Program - Framing Paper No.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Charles A.

    2002-03-01

    By definition, effective and efficient competitive markets need a supply side and a demand side. One criticism of electric restructuring efforts in many states is that most of the attention has been focused on the supply side, in a market focused on the short term. In general, the demand side of the market has been under-addressed. The objective of the New England Demand Response Initiative (NEDRI) is to develop a comprehensive, coordinated set of demand response programs for the New England regional power markets. NEDRI aims to maximize the capability of demand response to compete in the wholesale market and to improve the economic efficiency and environmental profile of the electric sector. To those ends, NEDRI is focusing its efforts in four interrelated areas: (1) ISO-level reliability programs, (2) Market-based price-responsive load programs, (3) Demand response at retail through pricing, rate design, and advanced metering, and (4) End-use energy efficiency resources as demand response. The fourth area, energy efficiency, is the subject of this framing paper. Energy efficiency reduces the energy used by specific end-use devices and systems, typically without affecting the level of service and without loss of amenity. Energy savings and peak load reductions are achieved by substituting technically more advanced equipment, processes, or operational strategies to produce the same or an improved level of end-use service with less electricity. In contrast, load management programs lower peak demand during specific, limited time periods by either (1) influencing the timing of energy use by shifting load to another time period, or (2) reducing the level of energy use by curtailing or interrupting the load, typically with some loss of service or amenity.

  10. Training for the medical response in radiological emergency experiences and results; Capacitacion para la respuesta medica en emergencias radiologicas experiencias y resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2003-07-01

    The use of the nuclear techniques in the social practice confers a special imporatnce to the relative aspects to the safety of the practices and radiationsources, for what the implementation of efficient programs of radiation protection constitutes a priority. However in spite of the will before expressed, regrettably radiological situations happen accidental assocaited to multiple causes taht suggest the creation of response capacities to intervention before these fortuitous facts. The experiences accumulated in the last decades related with accidental exposures have evidenced the convenience of having properly qualified human resources for the Medical Response in Radiological Emergencies. The training in the medical aspects of the radiological emergencies acquires a singular character. In such a sense when valuing the national situation put onof manifest deficiences as for the training in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies that advised the development of training programs in such aspects for the different response groups linked to the topic. After identified the training necessities and the scope of the same ones, the contents of the training program were elaborated. The program has as general purpose the invigoration of the capacity of the medical response in front of accidental radiological situations, by means of actions that they bear to prepare groups of medical response in the handling of people accident victims and to the identification of potentials,accidental scenarios, as well as of the necessary resources to confront them. The program content approaches theoretical and paractical aspects to the medical aspect to radiological emergencies. The program include the different topics about fundamental of physical biological to radiation protection, radiation protection during exposure of radiological accidents, medical care for overexposed or contaminated persons, drill, exercises and concludes with designation of a strategy as preparation and

  11. Emerging Space Powers The New Space Programs of Asia, the Middle East, and South America

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Brian; Pirard, Théo

    2010-01-01

    This work introduces the important emerging space powers of the world. Brian Harvey describes the origins of the Japanese space program, from rocket designs based on WW II German U-boats to tiny solid fuel 'pencil' rockets, which led to the launch of the first Japanese satellite in 1970. The next two chapters relate how Japan expanded its space program, developing small satellites into astronomical observatories and sending missions to the Moon, Mars, comet Halley, and asteroids. Chapter 4 describes how India's Vikram Sarabhai developed a sounding rocket program in the 1960s. The following chapter describes the expansion of the Indian space program. Chapter 6 relates how the Indian space program is looking ahead to the success of the moon probe Chandrayan, due to launch in 2008, and its first manned launching in 2014. Chapters 7, 8, and 9 demonstrate how, in Iran, communications and remote sensing drive space technology. Chapter 10 outlines Brazil's road to space, begun in the mid-1960's with the launch of th...

  12. State Emergency Response and Field Observation Activities in California (USA) during the March 11, 2011, Tohoku Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. M.; Wilson, R. I.; Goltz, J.; Fenton, J.; Long, K.; Dengler, L.; Rosinski, A.; California Tsunami Program

    2011-12-01

    . Exercises and workshops have enhanced communications between state and local agencies, and emergency managers are more educated about what to expect. Areas for improvement include keeping people out of the hazard area; educating the non-English speaking community; and reinforcing the long duration and unpredictable peak damaging waves of these events to emergency managers. The Governor proclaimed a state of emergency in six counties and the President declared a major disaster on April 18, 2011, allowing federal assistance to support repairs and economic recovery. Detailed evaluation of local maritime response activities, harbor damage, and measured and observed tsunami current velocity data will help the California Tsunami Program develop improved tsunami hazard maps and guidance for maritime communities. The state program will continue to emphasize the importance of both tsunami warnings and advisories, the unpredictable nature of each tsunami, and encourage public understanding of tsunamis to prepare and protect themselves in the future.

  13. Prehospital Response Time Delays for Emergency Patients in Events of Concurrent Mass Casualty Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungeun; Kim, Chu Hyun; Shin, Sang Do; Park, Ju Ok

    2017-09-19

    We investigated the extent of delays in the response time of emergency medical services (EMS) as an impact of mass casualty incidences (MCIs) in the same area. We defined an MCI case as an event that resulted in 6 or more patients being transported by EMS, and prehospital response time as the time from the call to arrival at the scene. We matched patients before and after MCIs by dividing them into categories of 3 hours before, 0-1 hour after, 1-2 hours after, and 2-3 hours after the MCIs. We compared prehospital response times using multiple linear regression. A total of 33,276 EMS-treated patients were matched. The prehospital response time for the category of 3 hours before the MCIs was 8.8 minutes (SD: 8.2), treated as the reference, whereas that for the category of 0-1 hour after the MCI was 11.3 minutes (Pprehospital response time increased by 2.5 minutes (95% CI: 2.3-2.8) during the first hour and by 0.3 minutes (95% CI: 0.1-0.6) during the second hour after MCIs. There were significant delays in the prehospital response time for emergency patients after MCIs, and it lasted for 2 hours as the spillover effect. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017; page 1 of 7).

  14. Increasing Resident Diversity in an Emergency Medicine Residency Program: A Pilot Intervention With Three Principal Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunson, Java; Boatright, Dowin; Oberfoell, Stephanie; Bakes, Katherine; Angerhofer, Christy; Lowenstein, Steven; Zane, Richard; King, Renee; Druck, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    Much work remains to be done to align the diversity of the health care workforce with the changing racial and ethnic backgrounds of patients, especially in the field of emergency medicine. In academic year (AY) 2012-2013, to increase the number of underrepresented minority (URM) candidates who were interviewed and matched, the Denver Health Residency in Emergency Medicine program (DHREM) initiated a focused pilot intervention with three principal strategies: (1) a scholarship-based externship program, (2) a funded second-look event, and (3) increased involvement and visibility of URM faculty in the interview and recruitment process. One year after implementation of the pilot intervention, the percentage of URMs among all applicants invited to interview at the DHREM doubled (7.1% [20/282] in AY 2011-2012, 7.0% [24/344] in AY 2012-2013, and 14.8% [58/393] in AY 2013-2014) (95% confidence interval [CI] = 5-10, 4-11, and 11-19, respectively). Of all DHREM interviewees in AY 2013-2014, 17.6% (49/279) (95% CI = 12-23) were URMs, nearly a threefold increase from AY 2012-2013 (6.2% [14/226], 95% CI = 3-10). In AY 2013-2014, 23.5% (4/17) (95% CI = 7-50) of all new DHREM residents were URMs, compared with 5.9% (1/17) in AY 2011-2012 and 5.6% (1/18) in AY 2012-2013 (95% CI = 0-29 and 0-27, respectively). Additional studies are needed to determine whether these results are sustainable and generalizable to other residency programs in emergency medicine and other specialties.

  15. Response of vetch, lentil, chickpea and red pea to pre- or post-emergence applied herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vasilakoglou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Broad-leaved weeds constitute a serious problem in the production of winter legumes, but few selective herbicides controlling these weeds have been registered in Europe. Four field experiments were conducted in 2009/10 and repeated in 2010/11 in Greece to study the response of common vetch (Vicia sativa L., lentil (Lens culinaris Medik., chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and red pea (Lathyrus cicera L. to several rates of the herbicides pendimethalin, S-metolachlor, S-metolachlor plus terbuthylazine and flumioxazin applied pre-emergence, as well as imazamox applied post-emergence. Phytotoxicity, crop height, total weight and seed yield were evaluated during the experiments. The results of this study suggest that common vetch, lentil, chickpea and red pea differed in their responses to the herbicides tested. Pendimethalin at 1.30 kg ha-1, S-metolachlor at 0.96 kg ha-1 and flumioxazine at 0.11 kg ha-1 used as pre-emergence applied herbicides provided the least phytotoxicity to legumes. Pendimethalin at 1.98 kg ha-1 and both rates of S-metolachlor plus terbuthylazine provided the greatest common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L. control. Imazamox at 0.03 to 0.04 kg ha-1 could also be used as early post-emergence applied herbicide in common vetch and red pea without any significant detrimental effect.

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  17. Feasibility of a computer-assisted alcohol SBIRT program in an urban emergency department: patient and research staff perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Mary K; Bijur, Polly E; Rosenbloom, David; Bernstein, Steven L; Gallagher, E John

    2013-01-01

    ...) program to identify at-risk alcohol users among adult emergency department (ED) patients. The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a computerized screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment...

  18. Development and process evaluation of a Web-based responsible beverage service training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaher, Brian G; Dresser, Jack; Shaw, Tracy; Severson, Herbert H; Tyler, Milagra S; Maxwell, Elisabeth D; Christiansen, Steve M

    2012-09-22

    Responsible beverage service (RBS) training designed to improve the appropriate service of alcohol in commercial establishments is typically delivered in workshops. Recently, Web-based RBS training programs have emerged. This report describes the formative development and subsequent design of an innovative Web-delivered RBS program, and evaluation of the impact of the program on servers' knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy. Formative procedures using focus groups and usability testing were used to develop a Web-based RBS training program. Professional alcohol servers (N = 112) who worked as servers and/or mangers in alcohol service settings were recruited to participate. A pre-post assessment design was used to assess changes associated with using the program. Participants who used the program showed significant improvements in their RBS knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy. Although the current study did not directly observe and determine impact of the intervention on server behaviors, it demonstrated that the development process incorporating input from a multidisciplinary team in conjunction with feedback from end-users resulted in creation of a Web-based RBS program that was well-received by servers and that changed relevant knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy. The results also help to establish a needed evidence base in support of the use of online RBS training, which has been afforded little research attention.

  19. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  20. Study on Inland River Vessel Fuel-oil Spillage and Emergency Response Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. C.; Shi, N.; Wang, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    by making statistics and conducting regression analysis on the carrying volume of vessels navigating on inland rivers and coastal waters, the linear relation between the oil volume carried by a vessel and its gross tonnage (GT) is found. Based on the linear relation, the possible spillage of a 10,000 GT vessel is estimated by using the empirical formula method which is commonly used to measure oil spillage from any vessel spill incident. In the waters downstream of Yangtze River, the trajectory and fates model is used to predict the drifting paths and fates of the spilled oil under three weather scenarios, and then, the emergency response strategies for vessel oil spills are put forth. The results of the research can be used to develop an empirical method to quickly estimate oil spillage and provide recommendations on oil spill emergency response strategies for decision-makers.

  1. Emergency Response to and Preparedness for Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liao, Yongfeng; Yang, Linsheng; Li, Hairong; Ye, Bixiong; Wang, Wuyi

    2016-03-01

    China has achieved impressive rapid economic growth over the past 30 years but accompanied by significant extreme weather events and environmental changes caused by global change and overfast urbanization. Using the absolute hazards index (AHI), we assessed the spatial distribution patterns and related health effects of 4 major extreme natural disasters, including drought, floods (landslides, mudslides), hails, and typhoons from 2000 to 2011 at the provincial level in China. The results showed that (1) central and south China were the most affected by the 4 natural disasters, and north China suffered less; (2) the provinces with higher AHI suffered most from total death, missing people, collapse, and emergently relocated population; (3) the present health emergency response system to disasters in China mainly lacks a multidisciplinary approach. In the concluding section of this article, suggestions on preparedness and rapid response to extreme health events from environmental changes are proposed. © 2014 APJPH.

  2. "Hits" emerge through self-organized coordination in collective response of free agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Anindya S.; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2016-10-01

    Individuals in free societies frequently exhibit striking coordination when making independent decisions en masse. Examples include the regular appearance of hit products or memes with substantially higher popularity compared to their otherwise equivalent competitors or extreme polarization in public opinion. Such segregation of events manifests as bimodality in the distribution of collective choices. Here we quantify how apparently independent choices made by individuals result in a significantly polarized but stable distribution of success in the context of the box-office performance of movies and show that it is an emergent feature of a system of noninteracting agents who respond to sequentially arriving signals. The aggregate response exhibits extreme variability amplifying much smaller differences in individual cost of adoption. Due to self-organization of the competitive landscape, most events elicit only a muted response but a few stimulate widespread adoption, emerging as "hits".

  3. Immune regulation of therapy-resistant niches: emerging targets for improving anticancer drug responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinushi, Masahisa

    2014-09-01

    Emerging evidence has unveiled a critical role for immunological parameters in predicting tumor prognosis and clinical responses to anticancer therapeutics. On the other hand, responsiveness to anticancer drugs greatly modifies the repertoires, phenotypes, and immunogenicity of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, serving as a critical factor to regulate tumorigenic activities and the emergence of therapy-resistant phenotypes. Tumor-associated immune functions are influenced by distinct or overlapping sets of therapeutic modalities, such as cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or molecular-targeted therapy, and various anticancer modalities have unique properties to influence the mode of cross-talk between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments. Thus, it is critical to understand precise molecular machineries whereby each anticancer strategy has a distinct or overlapping role in regulating the dynamism of reciprocal communication between tumor and immune cells in tumor microenvironments. Such an understanding will open new therapeutic opportunities by harnessing the immune system to overcome resistance to conventional anticancer drugs.

  4. Emergency Medicine Resident Orientation: How Training Programs Get their Residents Started

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrath, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The first formal orientation program for incoming emergency medicine (EM residents was started in 1976. The last attempt to describe the nature of orientation programs was by Brillman in 1995. Now almost all residencies offer orientation to incoming residents, but little is known about the curricular content or structure of these programs. The purpose of this project was to describe the current composition and purpose of EM resident orientation programs in the United States. In autumn of 2014, we surveyed all U.S. EM residency program directors (n=167. We adapted our survey instrument from one used by Brillman (1995. The survey was designed to assess the orientation program’s purpose, structure, content, and teaching methods. The survey return rate was 63% (105 of 167. Most respondents (77% directed three-year residencies, and all but one program offered intern orientation. Orientations lasted an average of nine clinical (Std. Dev.=7.3 and 13 non-clinical days (Std. Dev.=9.3. The prototypical breakdown of program activities was 27% lectures, 23% clinical work, 16% skills training, 10% administrative activities, 9% socialization and 15% other activities. Most orientations included activities to promote socialization among interns (98% and with other members of the department (91%. Many programs (87% included special certification courses (ACLS, ATLS, PALS, NRP. Course content included the following: use of electronic medical records (90%, physician wellness (75%, and chief complaint-based lectures (72%. Procedural skill sessions covered ultrasound (94%, airway management (91%, vascular access (90%, wound management (77%, splinting (67%, and trauma skills (62%. Compared to Brillman (1995, we found that more programs (99% are offering formal orientation and allocating more time to them. Lectures remain the most common educational activity. We found increases in the use of skills labs and specialty certifications. We also observed increases in

  5. Web-based training on weapons of mass destruction response for emergency medical services personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Robyn R M; Canton, Allison N; Magda, Lori A; DiMaggio, Charles; Gonzalez, Dario; Dul, Mitchell W

    2009-01-01

    To develop, implement, and assess a web-based simulation training program for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel on recognition and treatment of ocular injuries resulting from weapons of mass destruction (WMD) attacks. The training program consisted of six modules: WMD knowledge and event detection, ocular anatomy, ocular first aid (ie, flushing, cupping, and patching), and three WMD simulations (ie, sarin gas release, anthrax release, and radioactive dispersal device). Pretest, post-test, and 1-month follow-up test and a program evaluation were used to measure knowledge gain and retention and to assess the effectiveness of the program. New York State EMS. Four hundred and sixty-four individuals participated in the training program and all waves of the testing (86 percent retention rate). The effectiveness of the training intervention was measured using pretest and post-test questionnaires and analyzed using dependent t-tests. Assessment scores for overall knowledge increased from the pretest (mean = 15.7, standard deviation [SD] = 2.1) to the post-test (mean = 17.8, SD = 1.3), p < 0.001, and from pretest (mean = 15.7, SD = 2.1) to 1-month follow-up test (mean = 16.6, SD = 2.0), p < 0.001. Ninety-two percent of respondents indicated that the program reinforced understanding of WMDs. This training method provides an effective and low-cost approach to educate and evaluate EMS personnel on emergency treatment of eye trauma associated with the use of WMD. Online training should also be supplemented with hands-on practice and refresher trainings.

  6. American Dreaming: Critical Perspectives on a Media Training Program for Emerging Democracies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miglena Mantcheva Sternadori

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the end of the Cold War, the International Media Training Center has brought dozens of Eastern European journalists to study in non-degree programs at U.S. universities. This study is a cultural critique of one such program. The analysis is based on in-depth interviews, participant observation, and articles from university newsletters. The trainees reveal that support from mentors is often insufficient, and some participants face significant hostility after returning to their native countries. The fast-paced media environments in those countries have not forgiven their yearlong absence: organizational power has been redistributed, connections have been weakened, and new colleagues have aggressively taken over one's old turf. The findings suggest that training a few journalists from disparate media outlets is unlikely to have much effect on media professionalism in emerging democracies, unless the trainees are guaranteed an opportunity to become trainers. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs100376

  7. In the Face of an Emergency: What Makes a Responsive and Resilient Society?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montine L Walters

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to highlight the ways in which the response required to deal with terrorist threats of the 21st Century differs from that required to respond to threats the UK has faced in the past. In addition it will assess ways in which the UK may strengthen the population’s resilience and the ability of the population to respond to emergency incidents.

  8. Future Roles for Autonomous Vertical Lift in Disaster Relief and Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.

    2006-01-01

    System analysis concepts are applied to the assessment of potential collaborative contributions of autonomous system and vertical lift (a.k.a. rotorcraft, VTOL, powered-lift, etc.) technologies to the important, and perhaps underemphasized, application domain of disaster relief and emergency response. In particular, an analytic framework is outlined whereby system design functional requirements for an application domain can be derived from defined societal good goals and objectives.

  9. ANSI/ANS-8.23-1997: nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, J. S. (James S.)

    2004-01-01

    American National Standard ANSUANS-8.23 was developed to expand upon the basic emergency response guidance given in American National Standard, 'Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety' ANSI/ANS-8.19-1996 (Ref. 1). This standard provides guidance for minimizing risks to personnel during emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident outside reactors. This standard is intended to apply to those facilities for which a criticality accident alarm system, as specified in American National Standard, 'Criticality Accident Alarm System', ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 (Ref. 2) is in use. The Working Group was established in 1990, with Norman L. Pruvost as chairman. The Working Group had up to twenty-three members representing a broad range of the nuclear industry, and has included members from Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom. The initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23 was approved by the American National Standards Institute on December 30, 1997. It provides guidance for the following topics: (1) Management and technical staff responsibilities; (2) Evaluation of a potential criticality accident; (3) Emergency plan provisions; (4) Evacuation; (5) Re-entry, rescue and stabilization; and (6) Classroom training, exercises and evacuation drills. This guidance is not for generic emergency planning issues, but is specific to nuclear criticality accidents. For example, it assumes that an Emergency Plan is already established at facilities that implement the standard. During the development of the initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23, each Working Group member evaluated potential use of the standard at a facility with which the member was familiar. This revealed areas where a facility could have difficulty complying with the standard. These reviews helped identify and eliminate many potential problems and ambiguities with the guidance. The Working Group has received very limited feedback from the user community since the first edition of the standard was

  10. A system-wide solution to antidote stocking in emergency departments: the Nova Scotia antidote program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nancy G; Bona, D Ruth; Hurley, Theresa A

    2017-09-20

    Inadequate stocking of essential antidotes in hospitals is an internationally documented problem. A concrete and sustainable system-wide solution for easy access to antidotes in emergency departments (EDs) was developed and implemented in Nova Scotia, Canada. Antidote stocking guidelines and a systemwide antidote management strategy were established. A standardized collection of antidotes housed in highly visible containers in provincial EDs was implemented for timely access. Antidote-specific online administration guidelines were developed. Using the poison centre for surveillance, the antidote program maintained a database of antidote utilization patterns; 11 years of data were available for analysis. 2/2 (100%) tertiary care, 9/9 (100%) regional EDs, and 21/25 (84%) community EDs in Nova Scotia stock antidote kits, for an overall compliance rate of 32/36 (89%). A total of 678 antidotes (excluding N-acetylcysteine) were used for 520 patients. The distribution of antidote use by hospital type was 99/678 (14.6%) at community hospitals, 379/678 (55.9%) at regional hospitals, and 200/678 (29.5%) at tertiary care hospitals. The five most commonly used antidotes were: naloxone 143/678 (21.1%), fomepizole 111/678 (16.4%), glucagon 94/678 (13.9%), calcium 70/678 (10.3%), and sodium bicarbonate 67/678 (9.9%). Of the 520 patients in whom antidotes were used, death occurred in 3% (15/520), major outcomes in 35% (183/520), and moderate outcomes in 39% (205/520). The Nova Scotia Antidote Program demonstrates that a solution to inadequate antidote stocking is achievable and requires a system-wide approach with ongoing maintenance and surveillance. The frequency and distribution of antidote usage documented in this program supports the need for enhancement of emergency preparedness. The poison centre and hospital pharmacies are crucial to surveillance and maintenance of this program.

  11. Linking seasonal streamflow forecast performance to operational value in emergency response settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sean; Bennett, James; Robertson, David; Galelli, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    In this work we investigate the operational value of seasonal streamflow forecasts for water reservoirs. We consider two different operating settings, namely continually adjusted and emergency response operations—the former represents systems for which the water release decisions are adjusted at frequent intervals, while the latter is typical of systems for which key management decisions are made relatively infrequently (e.g., urban water supply systems). We define the operational value as the difference between the long-term operating objective provided by forecast-informed operations—a rolling horizon, adaptive control approach—and more traditional operating rules. In a first set of experiments carried out in four contrasting catchments located in Australia, we use synthetic forecasts of different quality to show that the operational value increases with the forecast skill for continuously adjusted operations. By contrast, we find a weaker relation between forecast skill and value for emergency response settings. In a second set of experiments carried out with a modern experimental forecasting systems, called Forecast Guided Stochastic Scenarios (FoGSS), we show that the forecast value for emergency response operations can be largely explained by the forecast skill at the time during which critical release decisions are made.

  12. Biosafety Practices and Emergency Response at the Idaho National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank F. Roberto; Dina M. Matz

    2008-03-01

    Strict federal regulations govern the possession, use, and transfer of pathogens and toxins with potential to cause harm to the public, either through accidental or deliberate means. Laboratories registered through either the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA), or both, must prepare biosafety, security, and incident response plans, conduct drills or exercises on an annual basis, and update plans accordingly. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), biosafety, laboratory, and emergency management staff have been working together for 2 years to satisfy federal and DOE/NNSA requirements. This has been done through the establishment of plans, training, tabletop and walk-through exercises and drills, and coordination with local and regional emergency response personnel. Responding to the release of infectious agents or toxins is challenging, but through familiarization with the nature of the hazardous biological substances or organisms, and integration with laboratory-wide emergency response procedures, credible scenarios are being used to evaluate our ability to protect workers, the public, and the environment from agents we must work with to provide for national biodefense.

  13. Evaluasi dan Analisis Dampak Program Corporate Social Responsibility Badak LNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanes Utama

    2017-08-01

    programs that implemented, and also to evaluate the CSR impact. The research methods are, input output and impact study by peoples satisfactory index, Importance Performance Analysis, and Compass Sustainability Analysis. The research result shows that the peoples satisfaction towards CSR program are in the very good category. The appropriate between satisfaction performance and people urgency also in a very good category. The performance, responsibility, ability, kindness, and the certain of services cost of assistant officer belongs to high prospect indicator from the society. Therefore, company has a very good performance in that program. The positive impact of CSR programs in the nature, well-being, economy, social in Bontang City are very high. There is an improvement of environment quality, the utilization of nature potential, the increase of people income, poverty reduction, SME’s tenacity improvement, cultural advertisement, and people satisfaction are in the high level towards CSR programs of Badak LNG.

  14. Emotion Regulation in Emerging Adult Couples: Temperament, Attachment, and HPA Response to Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Heidemarie; Powers, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Difficulty managing the stress of conflict in close relationships can lead to mental and physical health problems, possibly through dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the neuroendocrine stress response system. Temperament, an individual characteristic, and attachment, a dyadic characteristic, have both been implicated in emotion regulation processes and physiological reactivity, yet there is no clear consensus on how the two work together to influence the stress response, especially after childhood. The present study investigated the ways in which temperament and attachment together predict HPA response in emerging adult couples. Analyses using multilevel modeling (HLM) found that partners' dyadic fit on attachment avoidance impacted females' cortisol response patterns, and attachment avoidance further moderated the effect of males' emotionality on both their own and their partners' cortisol. Results are discussed in terms of emotional coregulation processes in romantic attachment. PMID:17681662

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection

  16. Analysis of an international emergency medical service train-the-trainer program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrallo, R G; Wolff, M; Simpson, D E; Hargarten, S W

    1995-05-01

    To assess the effectiveness of an international emergency medical services (EMS) train-the-trainer program. Seven bilingual Polish physicians attended a 350-hour US-based EMS training program. The physicians returned to Poland to train Polish-speaking EMS personnel. The Polish training was assessed by means of a pretest, a final examination, a series of skill stations, and a retrospective self-assessment instrument created by the authors. The retrospective self-assessment instrument, using a six-point Likert scale, measured the degree of self-reported competence before and after training in three areas: basic trauma, advanced medical, and basic medical. One hundred seventy-nine Polish students were assessed. Pretest scores ranged from 17% to 100% (mean, 74% +/- 11%). Ninety-one percent passed the final examination (mean, 91% +/- 4.0%; range, 74% to 99%). All students passed all skill stations. The before-and-after instrument indicated that the Polish students' prior competence ranged from not competent (Likert score 1) to fully competent (Likert score 6). Mean scores were: basic trauma, 2.6 +/- 4; advanced medical, 2.5 +/- 7; and basic medical, 2.8 +/- 7. After-course scores demonstrated improved competence. Before-and-after instrument score differences were significant for each area (P < .0001). Despite differences in language, culture, technology, and resources, an international train-the-trainer program can be evaluated. In addition to standard testing, a retrospective before-and-after self-assessment instrument provides corroborative evidence of program success.

  17. Effective teaching and feedback skills for international emergency medicine "train the trainers" programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Scott G; Totten, Vicken Y; Jacquet, Gabrielle A; Douglass, Katherine; Birnbaumer, Diane M; Promes, Susan B; Martin, Ian B K

    2013-11-01

    As the specialty of Emergency Medicine (EM) develops around the world, it has become common for practitioners from countries with mature EM systems to assist those in regions with developing systems. One effective and frequently used model is "train the trainers," in which a group of consultant teachers instructs a cadre of clinicians in the host region to then become the future teachers of EM in that area. This model has the advantage of overcoming cultural barriers to instruction and can lead to providing a lasting training infrastructure in the region. A key to a successful program is the use of effective and culturally appropriate teaching and feedback skills. The goal of this article is to bring together experts in adult education with experts in training in the international setting to present teaching and feedback skills and how they can be applied in different settings and cultures. Cutting edge instruction and evaluation techniques that can be employed in intercultural "train the trainers" programs will be presented. The characteristics of successful programs, using specifics from actual programs, will also be shared. Applying the described teaching and evaluation skills with modifications based on local culture will help empower newly trained teachers who will contribute in turn to the longevity of EM in the region and set a high teaching standard that will benefit generations of future colleagues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of Koru: a mindfulness program for college students and other emerging adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeson, Jeffrey M; Juberg, Michael K; Maytan, Margaret; James, Kiera; Rogers, Holly

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Koru, a mindfulness training program for college students and other emerging adults. Ninety students (66% female, 62% white, 71% graduate students) participated between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Randomized controlled trial. It was hypothesized that Koru, compared with a wait-list control group, would reduce perceived stress and sleep problems, and increase mindfulness, self-compassion, and gratitude. As hypothesized, results showed significant Group (Koru, Wait-List)×Time (Pre, Post) interactions for improvements in perceived stress (F[1, 76.40]=4.50, p=.037, d=.45), sleep problems (F [1, 79.49]=4.71, p=.033, d=.52), mindfulness (F [1, 79.09]=26.80, p<.001, d=95), and self-compassion (F[1, 74.77]=18.08, p<.001, d=.75). All significant effects were replicated in the wait-list group. Significant correlations were observed among changes in perceived stress, sleep problems, mindfulness, and self-compassion. Results support the effectiveness of the Koru program for emerging adults in the university setting.

  19. Emergent Toxins in North Atlantic Temperate Waters: A Challenge for Monitoring Programs and Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB are complex to manage due to their intermittent nature and their severe impact on the economy and human health. The conditions which promote HAB have not yet been fully explained, though climate change and anthropogenic intervention are pointed as significant factors. The rise of water temperature, the opening of new sea canals and the introduction of ship ballast waters all contribute to the dispersion and establishment of toxin-producing invasive species that promote the settling of emergent toxins in the food-chain. Tetrodotoxin, ciguatoxin, palytoxin and cyclic imines are commonly reported in warm waters but have also caused poisoning incidents in temperate zones. There is evidence that monitoring for these toxins exclusively in bivalves is simplistic and underestimates the risk to public health, since new vectors have been reported for these toxins and as well for regulated toxins such as PSTs and DSTs. In order to avoid public health impacts, there is a need for adequate monitoring programs, a need for establishing appropriate legislation, and a need for optimizing effective methods of analysis. In this review, we will compile evidence concerning emergent marine toxins and provide data that may indicate the need to restructure the current monitoring programs of HAB.

  20. Emergent toxins in North Atlantic temperate waters: a challenge for monitoring programs and legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marisa; Pratheepa, Vijaya K; Botana, Luis M; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-03-16

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) are complex to manage due to their intermittent nature and their severe impact on the economy and human health. The conditions which promote HAB have not yet been fully explained, though climate change and anthropogenic intervention are pointed as significant factors. The rise of water temperature, the opening of new sea canals and the introduction of ship ballast waters all contribute to the dispersion and establishment of toxin-producing invasive species that promote the settling of emergent toxins in the food-chain. Tetrodotoxin, ciguatoxin, palytoxin and cyclic imines are commonly reported in warm waters but have also caused poisoning incidents in temperate zones. There is evidence that monitoring for these toxins exclusively in bivalves is simplistic and underestimates the risk to public health, since new vectors have been reported for these toxins and as well for regulated toxins such as PSTs and DSTs. In order to avoid public health impacts, there is a need for adequate monitoring programs, a need for establishing appropriate legislation, and a need for optimizing effective methods of analysis. In this review, we will compile evidence concerning emergent marine toxins and provide data that may indicate the need to restructure the current monitoring programs of HAB.

  1. 48 CFR 319.705 - Responsibilities of the Contracting Officer under the subcontracting assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Contracting Officer under the subcontracting assistance program. 319.705 Section 319.705 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Subcontracting... Responsibilities of the Contracting Officer under the subcontracting assistance program. ...

  2. 48 CFR 219.705 - Responsibilities of the contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program. 219.705 Section 219.705 Federal Acquisition... BUSINESS PROGRAMS The Small Business Subcontracting Program 219.705 Responsibilities of the contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program. ...

  3. 48 CFR 2019.705 - Responsibilities of the contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program. 2019.705 Section 2019.705 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Subcontracting... Responsibilities of the contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program. ...

  4. Evaluation of Coordination of Emergency Response Team through the Social Network Analysis. Case Study: Oil and Gas Refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadfam, Iraj; Bastani, Susan; Esaghi, Mahbobeh; Golmohamadi, Rostam; Saee, Ali

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cohesions status of the coordination within response teams in the emergency response team (ERT) in a refinery. For this study, cohesion indicators of social network analysis (SNA; density, degree centrality, reciprocity, and transitivity) were utilized to examine the coordination of the response teams as a whole network. The ERT of this research, which was a case study, included seven teams consisting of 152 members. The required data were collected through structured interviews and were analyzed using the UCINET 6.0 Social Network Analysis Program. The results reported a relatively low number of triple connections, poor coordination with key members, and a high level of mutual relations in the network with low density, all implying that there were low cohesions of coordination in the ERT. The results showed that SNA provided a quantitative and logical approach for the examination of the coordination status among response teams and it also provided a main opportunity for managers and planners to have a clear understanding of the presented status. The research concluded that fundamental efforts were needed to improve the presented situations.

  5. The Costa Rican emergency medicine residency: design and implementation of a new specialty training program in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, C; Rodríguez-Gomez, G; Quesada-Rodriguez, D; Waller, J

    1999-12-01

    A program of physician training in the specialty of emergency medicine was developed in Costa Rica, Central America, during the years 1993 and 1994. The program involved 2 phases: a faculty preparation course, and the residency itself. The preparation of faculty members for the residency was undertaken in Costa Rica, with a US emergency faculty physician residing in the host country to assist in the development of the program. Twenty-one faculty members were prepared to teach the residency curriculum. A core group of Costa Rican physician educators with assistance from the US emergency medicine specialist developed a curriculum suitable for the needs of the region. A selection process for prospective applicants to the residency program is described. The first residents began training in February 1994, just before completion of the faculty program. The first emergency medicine specialists graduated from the 3-year training program in 1997. The residency program continues to function at the time of this publication. This description is offered as one model for the initiation of emergency medicine specialty training in a developing country.

  6. Establishing an autologous versus allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant program in nations with emerging economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Naeem A; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Almohareb, Fahad I; Alzahrani, Hazzaa A; Bashir, Qaiser; Savani, Bipin; Gupta, Vikas; Hashmi, Shahrukh K

    2017-12-01

    More than 70,000 hematopoietic cell transplants are currently performed each year, and these continue to increase every year. However, there is a significant variation in the number of absolute transplants and transplant rates between centers, countries, and global regions. The prospect for emerging countries to develop a hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) program, as well as to decide on whether autologous HCT (auto-HCT) or allogeneic HCT (allo-HCT) should be established to start with, relies heavily on factors that can explain differences between these two procedures. Major factors that will influence a decision about establishing the type of HCT program are macroeconomic factors such as organization of the healthcare network, available resources and infrastructure. Prevalence of specific diseases in the region as well genetic background of donors and recipients will also influence the mandate or priority of the HCT in the national healthcare plan to explain some of the country-specific differences. Furthermore, microeconomic factors play a role, such as center-specific experience in treating various disorders requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, along with accreditation status and patient volume. The objective of the transplant procedure was to improve the survival and quality of life of patients. The regional difference that one notices in emerging countries about the higher number of allo-HCT compared with auto-HCT procedures performed is primarily based on suboptimal healthcare network in treating various malignant disorders that are the primary indication for auto-stem cell transplantation. In this context, nonmalignant disorders such as bone marrow failure syndromes, inherited genetic disorders and hemoglobinopathies have become the major indication for stem cell transplantation. Better understanding of these factors will assist in establishing new transplant centers in the emerging countries to achieve their specific objectives and

  7. A Survey of Graduates of Combined Emergency Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Ashley M; Chasm, Rose M; Woolridge, Dale P

    2016-10-01

    In 1998, emergency medicine-pediatrics (EM-PEDS) graduates were no longer eligible for the pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) sub-board certification examination. There is a paucity of guidance regarding the various training options for medical students who are interested in PEM. We sought to to determine attitudes and personal satisfaction of graduates from EM-PEDS combined training programs. We surveyed 71 graduates from three EM-PEDS residences in the United States. All respondents consider their combined training to be an asset when seeking a job, 92% find it to be an asset to their career, and 88% think it provided added flexibility to job searches. The most commonly reported shortcoming was their ineligibility for the PEM sub-board certification. The lack of this designation was perceived to be a detriment to securing academic positions in dedicated children's hospitals. When surveyed regarding which training offers the better skill set for the practice of PEM, 90% (44/49) stated combined EM-PEDS training. When asked which training track gives them the better professional advancement in PEM, 52% (23/44) chose combined EM-PEDS residency, 27% (12/44) chose a pediatrics residency followed by a PEM fellowship, and 25% (11/44) chose an EM residency then a PEM fellowship. No EM-PEDS respondents considered PEM fellowship training after the completion of the dual training program. EM-PEDS graduates found combined training to be an asset in their career. They felt that it provided flexibility in job searches, and that it was ideal training for the skill set required for the practice of PEM. EM-PEDS graduates' practices varied, including mixed settings, free-standing children's hospitals, and community emergency departments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Containment atmosphere response (CAR) program. Second status report. [HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landoni, J.A.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains a summary of the work performed under the Containment Atmosphere Response (CAR) Program of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Safety Research Task since the publication of the previous status report (February 1978). The work concentrated on development of models describing containment phenomena during core heatup in support of probabilistic risk assessment studies. Models were completed for fission product iodine sorption on coated surfaces, diffusivity and retentivity of untreated concrete, iodine interaction with condensing steam on the containment atmosphere boundaries, and the cleanup filter system. These models were incorporated into a new computer program called CARCAS, a substantial extension of the CNTB computer program, and applied to Accident Initiation and Progression Analysis for Phase II core heatup sequences. Development was begun on models describing the postulated behavior of particulate fission products or aerosols within and leaking out of the containment.

  9. DOE enforcement program roles and responsibilities: DOE handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Price-Anderson Act provides indemnification to DOE contractors who manage and conduct nuclear activities in the DOE complex. The government acts as an insurer for these contractors against any findings of liability from the nuclear activities of the contractor within the scope of its contract. 10 CFR Part 820 establishes the legal framework for implementing DOE`s Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. Integration with other DOE organizations and programs would assure that the enforcement process properly considers the actual or potential safety significance of a violation when determining an appropriate enforcement sanction. Achieving a proactive contractor compliance assurance rather than a heavy enforcement hand, will require a foundation of cooperation and teamwork across DOE organizations. This handbook identifies the areas of interface for the DOE Enforcement Program and provides guidance on roles and responsibilities for the key DOE organizational areas. It complements DOE-HDBK-1087-95 and 1089-95.

  10. Association Between Home Visit Programs and Emergency Preparedness Among Elderly Vulnerable People in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, W Kathy; Agho, Kingsley; Williams Tetteh, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the association between home visit programs and emergency preparedness among elderly vulnerable people in New South Wales, Australia. Method: The study used data acquired from an intervention program run by emergency agencies and consisted of 370 older people. Seven emergency outcome measures were examined by adjusting for key demographic factors, using a generalized estimating equation model, to examine the association between home visit programs and emergency preparedness. Results: The study revealed that knowledge demonstrated by participants during visits and post home visits showed significant improvements in the seven emergency outcome measures. The odds of finding out what emergencies might affect one's area were significantly lower among older participants who were born outside Australia and those who were women. Discussion: The findings suggest that the intervention via home visits and periodic reminders post these visits may be a useful intervention in improving emergency preparedness among older people, especially among men and those who were born outside of Australia. In addition, other reminders such as safety messaging via mobile or landline telephone calls may also be a supplementary and useful intervention to improve emergency preparedness among older people.

  11. Association Between Home Visit Programs and Emergency Preparedness Among Elderly Vulnerable People in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kathy Tannous PhD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the association between home visit programs and emergency preparedness among elderly vulnerable people in New South Wales, Australia. Method: The study used data acquired from an intervention program run by emergency agencies and consisted of 370 older people. Seven emergency outcome measures were examined by adjusting for key demographic factors, using a generalized estimating equation model, to examine the association between home visit programs and emergency preparedness. Results: The study revealed that knowledge demonstrated by participants during visits and post home visits showed significant improvements in the seven emergency outcome measures. The odds of finding out what emergencies might affect one’s area were significantly lower among older participants who were born outside Australia and those who were women. Discussion: The findings suggest that the intervention via home visits and periodic reminders post these visits may be a useful intervention in improving emergency preparedness among older people, especially among men and those who were born outside of Australia. In addition, other reminders such as safety messaging via mobile or landline telephone calls may also be a supplementary and useful intervention to improve emergency preparedness among older people.

  12. Longitudinal Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response to Wildfire, Bastrop County, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Katie R; Feldt, Bonnie A; Zane, David F; Haywood, Tracy; Jones, Russell W; Horney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    On September 4, 2011, a wildfire ignited in Bastrop County, Texas, resulting in losses of 34,068 acres of land and 1,645 homes and 2 deaths. At the request of the Texas Department of State Health Services Health Service Region 7 and the Bastrop County Office of Emergency Management, Community Assessments for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) were conducted in the weeks following the wildfire and again 3.5 years later to assess both the immediate and long-term public health and preparedness impacts of the wildfire. The objective of these assessments was to learn more about the trajectory of disaster recovery, including rebuilding, evacuation, household emergency planning, and mental and physical health outcomes among both adults and children. In 2015, households exposed to the 2011 wildfires were significantly more likely to have established a family meeting place and evacuation route, to have confidence in the local government's ability to respond to disaster, and to report symptoms of depression and higher stress. Longitudinal assessments using the CASPER method can provide actionable information for improved planning, preparedness, and recovery to public health and emergency management agencies and community residents.

  13. The French responses organisation for dealing with radiological emergencies; L'organisation francaise de gestion des crises radiologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boude, B. [Secretariat General de la Defense Nationale, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2006-07-15

    To meet the goal of population protection, the response that the authorities will have to implement in the event of a radiological emergency has to be organised. In a context of significant change at the beginning of this century, the response organisation was revised in depth. This article aims to describe the roles, structures and methods of action of the various parties involved in the current emergency response system. (author)

  14. Offshore industry: medical emergency response in the offshore oil and gas industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsonby, Will; Mika, Frano; Irons, Greg

    2009-08-01

    The hunt for oil and gas has taken workers into new more distant locations including those offshore. The remoteness of the offshore platforms and vessels coupled with the potential risk of being cut off by bad weather presents particular challenges for medical emergency response (MER). Firstly to define the challenges for MER in terms of locations, population and epidemiology of injuries and illnesses in the offshore environment. Secondly to give examples of legal requirements and industry standards to manage MER. Thirdly to look at existing and emerging practice to manage these challenges. A review of published literature was supplemented with a summary of current practice in the industry. Medical professionals (medics) working offshore on installations and vessels are primarily responsible for the medical care of the workers. The medics have clinics with suitable medical equipment for managing emergencies as well as providing limited primary care. Some countries have legislation that stipulate minimum requirements. Where there is no national legislation, industry and company guidance is used to define the MER standards. Supervision of the offshore medics is often provided by doctors on shore via radio and phone links. These methods of communication are now being augmented with more sophisticated telemedicine solutions such as the Internet and live video links. These newer solutions allow for prompt high-quality care and provide the scope for a variety of new treatment options to be available for the offshore workforce.

  15. Reflection on pastoral care in Africa: Towards discerning emerging pragmatic pastoral ministerial responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhumani Magezi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pastoral care takes different forms in responding to people’s needs in their context. Accordingly, over the centuries it has evolved in response to emerging needs. Historical developments in pastoral care are well-documented. However, pastoral care in Africa has a short and unsystematically documented history. Scholarly discussions on pastoral care concerning the continent tend to be considered under African theological frameworks. Notwithstanding the already existing weaknesses in African theological discussion, pastoral care in Africa has remained fragmented with diverse and seemingly knee-jerk approaches in guiding individuals who provide pastoral care. In view of this, this article firstly aims to provide a broad overview and initiate a discussion on the current challenges in pastoral care in Africa. Secondly, it aims to reveal some gaps worth pursuing by scholars in the discipline. Thirdly, it sheds some light on approaches employed by pastoral practitioners in pastoral ministry practice. In doing so, this article opens the lid on some perspectives adopted in ministry work on the frontlines, that is, providing pastoral care to people in their communities – particularly church communities. This article first outlines the problem to be addressed followed by an overview of pastoral care in Africa. It then proceeds to address potential research opportunities within the discipline. Finally, it highlights some emerging approaches in providing pastoral care in the communities. This article does not focus on one particular pastoral care issue, but gives an overview of the situation relative to pastoral care in Africa and the emerging responses.

  16. Secure Utilization of Beacons and UAVs in Emergency Response Systems for Building Fire Hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung-Hyun; Choi, Jung-In; Song, Jinseok

    2017-09-25

    An intelligent emergency system for hazard monitoring and building evacuation is a very important application area in Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Through the use of smart sensors, such a system can provide more vital and reliable information to first-responders and also reduce the incidents of false alarms. Several smart monitoring and warning systems do already exist, though they exhibit key weaknesses such as a limited monitoring coverage and security, which have not yet been sufficiently addressed. In this paper, we propose a monitoring and emergency response method for buildings by utilizing beacons and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an IoT security platform. In order to demonstrate the practicability of our method, we also implement a proof of concept prototype, which we call the UAV-EMOR (UAV-assisted Emergency Monitoring and Response) system. Our UAV-EMOR system provides the following novel features: (1) secure communications between UAVs, smart sensors, the control server and a smartphone app for security managers; (2) enhanced coordination between smart sensors and indoor/outdoor UAVs to expand real-time monitoring coverage; and (3) beacon-aided rescue and building evacuation.

  17. Examining critical factors affecting graduate retention from an emergency medicine training program in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a qualitative study of stakeholder perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Jane Kuipers

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Ethiopia, improvement and innovation of the emergency care system is hindered by lack of specialist doctors trained in emergency medicine, underdeveloped emergency care infrastructure, and consumable resource limitations. Our aim was to examine the critical factors affecting retention of graduates from the Addis Ababa University (AAU post-graduate emergency medicine (EM training program within the Ethiopian health care system. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with current AAU EM residents and stakeholders in Ethiopian EM. Mixed-methods inductive thematic analysis was performed. Results: Resident and stakeholder participants identified critical factors in three domains: the individual condition, the occupational environment, and the national context. Within each domain, priority themes emerged from the responses, including the importance of career satisfaction over the career continuum (individual condition, the opportunity to be involved in the developing EM program and challenges associated with resource, economic, and employment constraints (occupational environment, and perceptions regarding the state of awareness of EM and the capacity for change at the societal level (national context. Conclusions: This work underscores the need to resolve multiple systemic and cultural issues within the Ethiopian health care landscape in order to address EM graduate retention. It also highlights the potential success of a retention strategy focused on the career ambitions of keen EM doctors.

  18. Rapid emergence of free-riding behavior in new pediatric immunization programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris T Bauch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mathematical models have formalized how free-rider effects can threaten the stability of high vaccine coverage levels under established voluntary vaccination programs. However, little research has addressed the question of when free-riding begins to develop when a new vaccine is first introduced in a population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we combine a game theoretical model of vaccinating behavior with an age-structured compartmental model to analyze rational vaccinating behavior in the first years of a universal immunization program, where a new vaccine is free to all children of a specified age. The model captures how successive birth cohorts face different epidemiological landscapes that have been shaped by the vaccinating decisions of previous birth cohorts, resulting in a strategic interaction between individuals in different birth cohorts. The model predicts a Nash equilibrium coverage level of for the first few birth cohorts under the new program. However, free-riding behavior emerges very quickly, with the Nash equilibrium vaccine coverage dropping significantly within 2-5 years after program initiation. Subsequently, a rich set of coupled dynamics between infection prevalence and vaccinating behaviors is possible, ranging from relatively stable (but reduced coverage in later birth cohorts to wide fluctuations in vaccine coverage from one birth cohort to the next. Individual tolerance for vaccine risk also starts out at relatively high levels before dropping significantly within a few years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that even relatively new immunization programs can be vulnerable to drops in vaccine coverage caused by vaccine scares and exacerbated by herd immunity effects, necessitating vigilance from the start.

  19. Rapid emergence of free-riding behavior in new pediatric immunization programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Chris T; Bhattacharyya, Samit; Ball, Robert F

    2010-09-15

    Mathematical models have formalized how free-rider effects can threaten the stability of high vaccine coverage levels under established voluntary vaccination programs. However, little research has addressed the question of when free-riding begins to develop when a new vaccine is first introduced in a population. Here, we combine a game theoretical model of vaccinating behavior with an age-structured compartmental model to analyze rational vaccinating behavior in the first years of a universal immunization program, where a new vaccine is free to all children of a specified age. The model captures how successive birth cohorts face different epidemiological landscapes that have been shaped by the vaccinating decisions of previous birth cohorts, resulting in a strategic interaction between individuals in different birth cohorts. The model predicts a Nash equilibrium coverage level of for the first few birth cohorts under the new program. However, free-riding behavior emerges very quickly, with the Nash equilibrium vaccine coverage dropping significantly within 2-5 years after program initiation. Subsequently, a rich set of coupled dynamics between infection prevalence and vaccinating behaviors is possible, ranging from relatively stable (but reduced) coverage in later birth cohorts to wide fluctuations in vaccine coverage from one birth cohort to the next. Individual tolerance for vaccine risk also starts out at relatively high levels before dropping significantly within a few years. These results suggest that even relatively new immunization programs can be vulnerable to drops in vaccine coverage caused by vaccine scares and exacerbated by herd immunity effects, necessitating vigilance from the start.

  20. Should osteopathic students applying to allopathic emergency medicine programs take the USMLE Exam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizberg, Moshe; Kass, Dara; Husain, Abbas; Cohen, Jennifer; Hahn, Barry

    2014-02-01

    Board scores are an important aspect of an emergency medicine (EM) residency application. Residency directors use these standardized tests to objectively evaluate an applicant's potential and help decide whether to interview a candidate. While allopathic (MD) students take the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), osteopathic (DO) students take the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination (COMLEX). It is difficult to compare these scores. Previous literature proposed an equation to predict USMLE based on COMLEX. Recent analyses suggested this may no longer be accurate. DO students applying to allopathic programs frequently ask whether they should take USMLE to overcome this potential disadvantage. The objective of the study is to compare the likelihood to match of DO applicants who reported USMLE to those who did not, and to clarify how important program directors consider it is whether or not an osteopathic applicant reported a USMLE score. We conducted a review of Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) and National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) data for 2010-2011 in conjunction with a survey of EM residency programs. We reviewed the number of allopathic and osteopathic applicants, the number of osteopathic applicants who reported a USMLE score, and the percentage of successful match. We compared the percentage of osteopathic applicants who reported a USMLE score who matched compared to those who did not report USMLE. We also surveyed allopathic EM residency programs to understand how important it is that osteopathic (DO) students take USMLE. There were 1,482 MD students ranked EM programs; 1,277 (86%, 95% CI 84.3-87.9) matched. There were 350 DO students ranked EM programs; 181 (52%, 95% CI 46.4-57.0) matched (difference=34%, 95% CI 29.8-39.0, posteopathic students take USMLE, 38% stated it is somewhat important, and 22% responded not at all important. DO students who reported USMLE were more likely to match. DO students

  1. Development of emergency medicine and critical care masters program for nurses at Addis Ababa University, School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W/Tsadik, Assefu; Azazh, Aklilu; Teklu, Sisay; Seyum, Nebiyu; Geremew, Haimaot; Rankin, Pete; Erschen, Mary Jean

    2014-07-01

    In Ethiopia, though all health care facilities have rooms available for ill and injured patients, emergency care has always remained suboptimal. Poor organization, lack of properly trained staff and lack of timely identification of the critically sick are the reasons. The role of nurses in the emergency rooms is very vital to im- prove patient survival. To address this pressing health care need and improve the emergency rooms (ER) nursing care, Addis Ababa University School of Medicine (AAU-SM) prioritized Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Nursing Training Program. The initial training began in September 2010 with a class of 20 students. Of these, 18 nurses successfully completed the Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Masters of Nursing program and graduated in 2012. To review the Emergency medicine and Critical Care Masters training program for nurses developed and implemented at AAU-SM in partnership with the University of Wisconsin (UW) and the University of Toronto (UT) and to evaluate the progress and challenges to date. An Emergency Medicine Task Force (EMTF) organized at AAU-SM developed a two years modular type of EM and Critical Care masters program curriculum for nurses that is co-implemented by faculty teachers from AAU-SM, UT and UW. In this article both the curriculum and other relevant materials are used as a resource. Thirty eight nurses have already graduated with Masters in Emergency Medicine and Critical Care. Equal number of trainees are currently in full-time training. Their skill and competency log book is going according to the curriculum expectation. This EM and Critical Care masters training program for nurses is successfully implemented. This program has also shown that the number and qualification of trained personnel capacity in low resource setting health care system can be effectively improved by partnership with developed training institutions.

  2. Impact of a Community Dental Access Program on Emergency Dental Admissions in Rural Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Sandi; Leider, Jonathon P; Davidson, Clare; Brady, Joanne; Knudson, Alana

    2016-12-01

    To characterize the expansion of a community dental access program (CDP) in rural Maryland providing urgent dental care to low-income individuals, as well as the CDP's impact on dental-related visits to a regional emergency department (ED). We used de-identified CDP and ED claims data to construct a data set of weekly counts of CDP visits and dental-related ED visits among Maryland adults. A time series model examined the association over time between visits to the CDP and ED visits for fiscal years (FYs) 2011 through 2015. The CDP served approximately 1600 unique clients across 2700 visits during FYs 2011 through 2015. The model suggested that if the CDP had not provided services during that time period, about 670 more dental-related visits to the ED would have occurred, resulting in $215 000 more in charges. Effective ED dental diversion programs can result in substantial cost savings to taxpayers, and more appropriate and cost-effective care for the patient. Community dental access programs may be a viable way to patch the dental safety net in rural communities while holistic solutions are developed.

  3. A dynamic vulnerability evaluation model to smart grid for the emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhen; Wu, Xiaowei; Fang, Diange

    2018-01-01

    Smart grid shows more significant vulnerability to natural disasters and external destroy. According to the influence characteristics of important facilities suffered from typical kinds of natural disaster and external destroy, this paper built a vulnerability evaluation index system of important facilities in smart grid based on eight typical natural disasters, including three levels of static and dynamic indicators, totally forty indicators. Then a smart grid vulnerability evaluation method was proposed based on the index system, including determining the value range of each index, classifying the evaluation grade standard and giving the evaluation process and integrated index calculation rules. Using the proposed evaluation model, it can identify the most vulnerable parts of smart grid, and then help adopting targeted emergency response measures, developing emergency plans and increasing its capacity of disaster prevention and mitigation, which guarantee its safe and stable operation.

  4. Cortisol Awakening Response, Internalizing Symptoms, and Life Satisfaction in Emerging Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shen Chong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The cortisol awakening response (CAR has been associated with depression and a broader range of internalizing problems. Emerging adulthood is characterized by numerous stressful transitional life events. Furthermore, the functioning of the neurobiological stress system changes across development. These considerations underscore the importance of evaluating the physiological stress system in emerging adults in identifying the extent to which cortisol levels vary with risk and protective factors for mental health. The present study evaluated the association between internalizing symptoms and perceived life satisfaction with CAR in 32 young adults. Three saliva samples were collected to measure cortisol levels upon awakening and participants completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS and Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS. Results show a significant positive correlation between area under the curve for CAR with internalizing symptoms (DASS total and the DASS-depression subscale, but not with life satisfaction. Study limitations, implications, and future directions for these finding were discussed.

  5. Requirements and Challenges of Location-Based Access Control in Healthcare Emergency Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Carmen Ruiz; Kirkpatrick, Michael; Ghinita, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    ), are not sufficient to address the new challenges introduced by these location-based applications. Several recent research efforts have enhanced RBAC with spatio-temporal features. Nevertheless, the state-of-the-art does not deal with mobility of both subjects and objects and does not support the utilization......Recent advances in positioning and tracking technologies have led to the emergence of novel location-based applications that allow participants to access information relevant to their spatio-temporal context. Traditional access control models, such as role-based access control (RBAC...... emergency response scenario which highlights the novel challenges that arise when enforcing access control in an environment with moving subjects and objects. To address a realistic application scenario, we consider movement on road networks, and we identify complex access control decisions relevant...

  6. Bulgarian Emergency Response System (BERS) in case of nuclear accident with exposure doses’estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrakov, M.; Prodanova, M.; Slavov, K.; Veleva, B.

    2015-07-01

    A PC-oriented Emergency Response System in case of nuclear accident (BERS) is developed and works operationally in the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology (NIMH). The creation and development of BERS was highly stimulated by the ETEX (European Tracer Experiment) project. BERS comprises two main parts - the operational and the accidental ones. The operational part, run automatically every 12 hours, prepares the input meteorological file used by both trajectory and dispersion models, runs the trajectory models, visualizes the results and uploads the maps of trajectories to a dedicated web-site. The accidental part is activated manually when a real radioactive releases occur or during emergency exercises. Its core is the Bulgarian dispersion models EMAP. Outputs are concentration, accumulated deposition and selected doses fields. In the paper, the BERS overall structure is described and examples of its products are presented. (Author)

  7. Risk-Averse Evolutionary Game Model of Aviation Joint Emergency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study effects of risk-averse attitude of both participators in aviation joint emergency response on the coevolution of cooperation mechanisms and individual preferences between airport and nonprofit organization. First, based on the current aviation joint emergency mechanism in China, we put forward two mechanisms to select the joint nonprofit organization, including reputation cooperation and bidding competition. Meanwhile, we consider two preferences including altruism and selfishness. Then we build replicator dynamics equations using the theory of conditional value-at-risk (CVaR taking risk aversion attitude into account. Finally, we introduce the factor of government and give all participators some suggestions. We show that the risk-averse attitude of the other game participator affects the one participator’s decision and the effects subject to some parameters.

  8. Faculty Development for Metro New York City Postdoctoral Dental Program Directors: Delphi Assessment and Program Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Marcie S; Millery, Mari; Edelstein, Burton L

    2017-03-01

    Faculty development for dental academicians is essential to cultivate a continuous faculty workforce, retain existing faculty members, enhance their teaching skill sets, and remain responsive to changing program requirements and curricular reforms. To maximize the utility of dental faculty development, it is important to systematically assess and address faculty members' perceived training needs. The aims of this study were to determine priority topics among one group of postdoctoral program directors and to translate those topics into faculty development programs as part of Columbia University's Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)-sponsored faculty training program for primary care educators. The study was conducted in 2013-16. A Delphi consensus technique was implemented with three sequential surveys of 26 New York City metropolitan area general, pediatric, and public health dentistry residency program directors. On the first survey, the five respondents (19% response rate) identified 31 topics. On the second survey, 17 respondents (response rate 65%) rated the 15 most important topics. In the third and final round, 19 respondents (73% response rate) ranked teaching research methods and teaching literature reviews as the topics of greatest interest. Overall, the responses highlighted needs for faculty development on teaching research methods, motivating trainees, trainee evaluation, and clinical care assessment. Based on these results, a series of six Faculty Forums was developed and implemented for dental educators in the metropolitan area, starting with the topic of teaching research methods. The process flow used for assessing training needs and developing and evaluating training can be applied to a variety of populations of educators.

  9. Emergency Food Assistance in Northern Syria: An Evaluation of Transfer Programs in Idleb Governorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Tappis, Hannah; Lyles, Emily; Witiw, Joseph; Aken, Vicki

    2017-06-01

    The war in Syria has left millions struggling to survive amidst violent conflict, pervasive unemployment, and food insecurity. Although international assistance funding is also at an all-time high, it is insufficient to meet the needs of conflict-affected populations, and there is increasing pressure on humanitarian stakeholders to find more efficient, effective ways to provide assistance. To evaluate 3 different assistance programs (in-kind food commodities, food vouchers, and unrestricted vouchers) in Idleb Governorate of Syria from December 2014 and March 2015. The evaluation used repeated survey data from beneficiary households to determine whether assistance was successful in maintaining food security at the household level. Shopkeeper surveys and program monitoring data were used to assess the impact on markets at the district/governorate levels and compare the cost-efficiency and cost-effectiveness of transfer modalities. Both in-kind food assistance and voucher programs showed positive effects on household food security and economic measures in Idleb; however, no intervention was successful in improving all outcomes measured. Food transfers were more likely to improve food access and food security than vouchers and unrestricted vouchers. Voucher programs were found to be more cost-efficient than in-kind food assistance, and more cost-effective for increasing household food consumption. Continuation of multiple types of transfer programs, including both in-kind assistance and vouchers, will allow humanitarian actors to remain responsive to evolving access and security considerations, local needs, and market dynamics.

  10. Magnitude-Based Postfire Debris Flow Rainfall Accumulation-Duration Thresholds for Emergency-Response Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, S. H.; Boldt, E. M.; Laber, J. L.; Kean, J. W.; Staley, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Following wildfires, emergency-response and public-safety agencies can be faced with evacuation and resource-deployment decisions well in advance of coming winter storms and during storms themselves. Information critical to these decisions is needed for recently burned areas in the San Gabriel Mountains of southern California. A compilation of information on the hydrologic response to winter storms from recently burned areas in southern California steeplands is used to develop a system for classifying magnitudes of hydrologic response in this setting. The four-class system describes combinations of reported volumes of individual debris flows, consequences of debris flows and floods in an urban setting, and spatial extents of the hydrologic response. Magnitude 0 events show a negligible response, while Magnitude I events are characterized by small (storm drains may be blocked, a few streets may be partially flooded or blocked by water and debris, and a few buildings near the mountain front may be damaged. Magnitude II events are characterized by two to five moderately-sized (1,000 to 10,000 m3) debris flows or one large (>10,000 m3) event. Several culverts or storm drains may be blocked or fail, several streets may be flooded or completely blocked by water and debris, and buildings, streets, and bridges may be damaged or destroyed. Magnitude III events consist of widespread and abundant debris flows of volumes >10,000 m3 and high discharge flooding causing significant impact to the built environment. Many streets, storm drains, and streets may be completely blocked by debris, making many streets unsafe for travel. Several large buildings, sections of infrastructure corridors and bridges may be damaged or destroyed. The range of rainfall conditions associated with different magnitude classes are defined by correlating local rainfall data with the response magnitude information. Magnitude 0 events can be expected when within-storm rainfall accumulations (A) of given

  11. Development and evaluation of an integrated emergency response facility location model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Dong Hong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose and compare the performance of the “two” robust mathematical models, the Robust Integer Facility Location (RIFL and the Robust Continuous Facility Location (RCFL models, to solve the emergency response facility and transportation problems in terms of the total logistics cost and robustness. Design/methodology/approach: The emergency response facilities include distribution warehouses (DWH where relief goods are stored, commodity distribution points (CDP, and neighborhood locations. Authors propose two robust models: the Robust Integer Facility Location (RIFL model where the demand of a CDP is covered by a main DWH or a backup CDP; the Robust Continuous Facility Location (RCFL model where that of a CDP is covered by multiple DWHs. The performance of these models is compared with each other and to the Regular Facility Location (RFL model where a CDP is covered by one main DWH. The case studies with multiple scenarios are analyzed. Findings: The results illustrate that the RFL outperforms others under normal conditions while the RCFL outperforms others under the emergency conditions. Overall, the total logistics cost and robustness level of the RCFL outperforms those of other models while the performance of RFL and RIFL is mixed between the cost and robustness index. Originality/value: Two new emergency distribution approaches are modeled, and evaluated using case studies. In addition to the total logistics cost, the robustness index is uniquely presented and applied. The proposed models and robustness concept are hoped to shed light to the future works in the field of disaster logistics management.

  12. A UAV BASED CLOSE-RANGE RAPID AERIAL MONITORING SYSTEM FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Choi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As the occurrences and scales of disasters and accidents have been increased due to the global warming, the terrorists' attacks, and many other reasons, the demand for rapid responses for the emergent situations also has been thus ever-increasing. These emergency responses are required to be customized to each individual site for more effective management of the emergent situations. These requirements can be satisfied with the decisions based on the spatial changes on the target area, which should be detected immediately or in real-time. Aerial monitoring without human operators is an appropriate means because the emergency areas are usually inaccessible. Therefore, a UAV is a strong candidate as the platform for the aerial monitoring. In addition, the sensory data from the UAV system usually have higher resolution than other system because the system can operate at a lower altitude. If the transmission and processing of the data could be performed in real-time, the spatial changes of the target area can be detected with high spatial and temporal resolution by the UAV rapid mapping systems. As a result, we aim to develop a rapid aerial mapping system based on a UAV, whose key features are the effective acquisition of the sensory data, real-time transmission and processing of the data. In this paper, we will introduce the general concept of our system, including the main features, intermediate results, and explain our real-time sensory data georeferencing algorithm which is a core for prompt generation of the spatial information from the sensory data.

  13. Designing Mobile Applications for Emergency Response: Citizens Acting as Human Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Marco; Onorati, Teresa; Aedo, Ignacio; Diaz, Paloma

    2016-03-19

    When an emergency occurs, citizens can be a helpful support for the operation centers involved in the response activities. As witnesses to a crisis, they initially can share updated and detailed information about what is going on. Moreover, thanks to the current technological evolution people are able to quickly and easily gather rich information and transmit it through different communication channels. Indeed, modern mobile devices embed several sensors such as GPS receivers, Wi-Fi, accelerometers or cameras that can transform users into well-equipped human sensors. For these reasons, emergency organizations and small and medium enterprises have demonstrated a growing interest in developing smart applications for reporting any exceptional circumstances. In this paper, we present a practical study about this kind of applications for identifying both limitations and common features. Based on a study of relevant existent contributions in this area and our personal direct experience in developing and evaluating emergency management solutions, our aim is to propose several findings about how to design effective and efficient mobile emergency notification applications. For this purpose we have exploited the basic sensors of modern mobile devices and the users' aptitude for using them. The evaluation consists of a practical and a theoretical part. In the practical part, we have simulated a traffic accident as closely as possible to a real scenario, with a victim lying on the ground near a car in the middle of a street. For the theoretical part, we have interviewed some emergency experts for collecting their opinions about the utility of the proposed solution. Results from this evaluation phase confirm the positive impact that EN application have for both operators' and citizens' perspective. Moreover, we collected several findings useful for future design challenges in the same area, as shown in the final redesign of the proposed application.

  14. Leadership development in MHA programs: a response and commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, Roger; Hill, James; Levey, Samuel; Weil, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    The transformation of healthcare from a relatively sheltered sector of the economy into one characterized by market competition and volatility has tested the values, abilities, and leadership strategies of healthcare executives. Changes in the scale and complexity of healthcare organizations and in provider reimbursement impose demands on executives that bear little resemblance to those of the past. In light of these challenges, health management programs are reassessing their responsibilities and capacities in the preparation of MHA graduates. Unfortunately, there is a lack of consensus on how students should be trained, advised, and mentored for leadership responsibilities. In our view, MHA programs can begin to address this problem through support of a balanced normative model for leadership training whereby classroom immersion in academic subjects is complemented by exposure to practice and experience. This model must be value-oriented, balancing business imperatives with traditional service ideals, and reality-oriented, balancing the teaching methods of theory and practice. In our view, MHA programs can begin to adapt to this model though student selection, curriculum reform, and involvement by practitioners and alumni.

  15. EPA's role and requirements in Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD) Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J.; Becker, N.

    2007-12-01

    The National Response Plan (NRP)'s Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex describes how federal agencies should coordinate their actions when responding to nuclear/radiological incidents This would include sabotage and terrorist incidents, such as terrorist use of radiological dispersal devices (RDDs) or improvised nuclear devices, as well as reactor plant accidents (commercial or weapons production facilities), orphan radioactive material sources, transportation and foreign accidents involving nuclear/radioactive material, . For an Incident of National Significance (INS), DHS is always responsible for overall coordination of the Federal response taking the lead on external affairs (public, state/local, Congressional, White House), while working in consultation with the Coordinating Agency. The primary role of the Coordinating Agency during an INS is to focus on managing the technical aspects of the Federal radiological response, including establishing site perimeters, site characterization, contaminant control measures, data management, ensuring coordination of technical data, decontamination/cleanup, and waste management. EPA becomes the Coordinating Agency for non-terrorist incidents at nuclear facilities that are not DOD, DOE, or NRC/Agreement-State licensed facilities.even though DOD, DOE, and NRC become the Coordinating Agency for their own facilities, weapons, and materials. For all other radiological terrorist incidents, such as a RDD in a city, DOE is the initial Coordinating Agency. EPA will be expected to provide radiological emergency response of a magnitude, scope, and rapidity of response greater than in all their past experience. The EPA and Los Alamos National Laboratory have formed a partnership to current research to aid in response planning and enhance preparedness. Currently Los Alamos is defining the boundaries of contamination from an urban RDD using urban dispersion modeling, in order for the EPA to be able to identify, quantify and establish a

  16. The technical state of the art on an emergency response robot for a nuclear fuel handling machine in PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Y. C.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, C. H.; Shin, H. C.; Lee, S. U.; Jeong, K. M.; Jeong, S. H.; Jo, J. W.; Choi, Y. S

    2009-02-15

    The purpose of this research is to survey the state of art on restore a disabled nuclear fuel handling machine which is attached to pressure tube and also to suggest basic materials about emergency fuel handling machine response technology for future. The result of this research can apply to develop an emergency response robot which can maintain the safety of nuclear fuel handling machine in PHWR and could be utilized as basic materials for developing an emergency response robot for fuel handling machine which is planned for future.

  17. Locating helicopter emergency medical service bases to optimise population coverage versus average response time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Alan A; van den Berg, Pieter L

    2017-10-16

    New South Wales (NSW), Australia has a network of multirole retrieval physician staffed helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) with seven bases servicing a jurisdiction with population concentrated along the eastern seaboard. The aim of this study was to estimate optimal HEMS base locations within NSW using advanced mathematical modelling techniques. We used high resolution census population data for NSW from 2011 which divides the state into areas containing 200-800 people. Optimal HEMS base locations were estimated using the maximal covering location problem facility location optimization model and the average response time model, exploring the number of bases needed to cover various fractions of the population for a 45 min response time threshold or minimizing the overall average response time to all persons, both in green field scenarios and conditioning on the current base structure. We also developed a hybrid mathematical model where average response time was optimised based on minimum population coverage thresholds. Seven bases could cover 98% of the population within 45mins when optimised for coverage or reach the entire population of the state within an average of 21mins if optimised for response time. Given the existing bases, adding two bases could either increase the 45 min coverage from 91% to 97% or decrease the average response time from 21mins to 19mins. Adding a single specialist prehospital rapid response HEMS to the area of greatest population concentration decreased the average state wide response time by 4mins. The optimum seven base hybrid model that was able to cover 97.75% of the population within 45mins, and all of the population in an average response time of 18 mins included the rapid response HEMS model. HEMS base locations can be optimised based on either percentage of the population covered, or average response time to the entire population. We have also demonstrated a hybrid technique that optimizes response time for a given

  18. Rapid post-earthquake modelling of coseismic landslide intensity and distribution for emergency response decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Robinson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Current methods to identify coseismic landslides immediately after an earthquake using optical imagery are too slow to effectively inform emergency response activities. Issues with cloud cover, data collection and processing, and manual landslide identification mean even the most rapid mapping exercises are often incomplete when the emergency response ends. In this study, we demonstrate how traditional empirical methods for modelling the total distribution and relative intensity (in terms of point density of coseismic landsliding can be successfully undertaken in the hours and days immediately after an earthquake, allowing the results to effectively inform stakeholders during the response. The method uses fuzzy logic in a GIS (Geographic Information Systems to quickly assess and identify the location-specific relationships between predisposing factors and landslide occurrence during the earthquake, based on small initial samples of identified landslides. We show that this approach can accurately model both the spatial pattern and the number density of landsliding from the event based on just several hundred mapped landslides, provided they have sufficiently wide spatial coverage, improving upon previous methods. This suggests that systematic high-fidelity mapping of landslides following an earthquake is not necessary for informing rapid modelling attempts. Instead, mapping should focus on rapid sampling from the entire affected area to generate results that can inform the modelling. This method is therefore suited to conditions in which imagery is affected by partial cloud cover or in which the total number of landslides is so large that mapping requires significant time to complete. The method therefore has the potential to provide a quick assessment of landslide hazard after an earthquake and may therefore inform emergency operations more effectively compared to current practice.

  19. Rapid post-earthquake modelling of coseismic landslide intensity and distribution for emergency response decision support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tom R.; Rosser, Nicholas J.; Densmore, Alexander L.; Williams, Jack G.; Kincey, Mark E.; Benjamin, Jessica; Bell, Heather J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Current methods to identify coseismic landslides immediately after an earthquake using optical imagery are too slow to effectively inform emergency response activities. Issues with cloud cover, data collection and processing, and manual landslide identification mean even the most rapid mapping exercises are often incomplete when the emergency response ends. In this study, we demonstrate how traditional empirical methods for modelling the total distribution and relative intensity (in terms of point density) of coseismic landsliding can be successfully undertaken in the hours and days immediately after an earthquake, allowing the results to effectively inform stakeholders during the response. The method uses fuzzy logic in a GIS (Geographic Information Systems) to quickly assess and identify the location-specific relationships between predisposing factors and landslide occurrence during the earthquake, based on small initial samples of identified landslides. We show that this approach can accurately model both the spatial pattern and the number density of landsliding from the event based on just several hundred mapped landslides, provided they have sufficiently wide spatial coverage, improving upon previous methods. This suggests that systematic high-fidelity mapping of landslides following an earthquake is not necessary for informing rapid modelling attempts. Instead, mapping should focus on rapid sampling from the entire affected area to generate results that can inform the modelling. This method is therefore suited to conditions in which imagery is affected by partial cloud cover or in which the total number of landslides is so large that mapping requires significant time to complete. The method therefore has the potential to provide a quick assessment of landslide hazard after an earthquake and may therefore inform emergency operations more effectively compared to current practice.

  20. ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  1. Effect of Culture-Independent Diagnostic Tests on Future Emerging Infections Program Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Gayle; Besser, John; Iwamoto, Martha; Lessa, Fernanda C; Cronquist, Alicia; Skoff, Tami H; Chaves, Sandra; Boxrud, Dave; Pinner, Robert W; Harrison, Lee H

    2015-09-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program (EIP) network conducts population-based surveillance for pathogens of public health importance. Central to obtaining estimates of disease burden and tracking microbiological characteristics of these infections is accurate laboratory detection of pathogens. The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs) in clinical settings presents both opportunities and challenges to EIP surveillance. Because CIDTs offer better sensitivity than culture and are relatively easy to perform, their use could potentially improve estimates of disease burden. However, changes in clinical testing practices, use of tests with different sensitivities and specificities, and changes to case definitions make it challenging to monitor trends. Isolates are still needed for performing strain typing, antimicrobial resistance testing, and identifying other molecular characteristics of organisms. In this article, we outline current and future EIP activities to address issues associated with adoption of CIDTs, which may apply to other public health surveillance.

  2. Emergency department tobacco cessation program: staff participation and intervention success among patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marna Rayl; Weinstock, Michael; Fenimore, Deborah Gaston; Sierzega, Gina M

    2008-08-01

    The emergency department (ED) is often the primary source of healthcare for uninsured and underinsured patients. To evaluate ED staff attitudes toward and participation in referring patients to a tobacco cessation program, and to assess the program's effectiveness. A nonvalidated survey on smoking cessation and preventative services for ED patients was mailed to ED staff at a suburban hospital. After survey completion, ED staff was encouraged to refer smokers with diagnoses substantially worsened by tobacco use to a brief intervention delivered in the ED. An incentive was provided to staff beginning in the second month of the 3-month period. Referred patients were briefly counseled by a hospital social worker or an ED physician or nurse. Follow-up telephone interviews with patients occurred 1 to 3 months postintervention. Of the 70 ED staff contacted, 63 (90%) responded to the survey. Most staff members (81%) agreed that they should facilitate clinical prevention. Fewer staff (60%) were comfortable advising patients to quit tobacco use (Pstaff should assist patients in tobacco cessation (PStaff referrals increased with program incentives (P=.008), with a total of 150 interventions occurring in the 3-month span. Of the 36 patients (24%) reached for follow-up, 13 (36%) attempted to quit and 6 (17%) succeeded. Overall, 45% of the patients reached for follow-up either cut down or quit tobacco use. Staff members' attitudes toward tobacco cessation are not a firm barrier to the successful implementation of an ED tobacco cessation program. In addition, the ED provides an important opportunity to encourage patients to quit or cut down tobacco use.

  3. Controlled Optimal Design Program for the Logit Dose Response Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqiao Hu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of dose-response is an integral component of the drug development process. Parallel dose-response studies are conducted, customarily, in preclinical and phase 1, 2 clinical trials for this purpose. Practical constraints on dose range, dose levels and dose proportions are intrinsic issues in the design of dose response studies because of drug toxicity, efficacy, FDA regulations, protocol requirements, clinical trial logistics, and marketing issues. We provide a free on-line software package called Controlled Optimal Design 2.0 for generating controlled optimal designs that can incorporate prior information and multiple objectives, and meet multiple practical constraints at the same time. Researchers can either run the web-based design program or download its stand-alone version to construct the desired multiple-objective controlled Bayesian optimal designs. Because researchers often adopt ad-hoc design schemes such as the equal allocation rules without knowing how efficient such designs would be for the design problem, the program also evaluates the efficiency of user-supplied designs.

  4. Prescription monitoring programs and emergency department visits involving opioids, 2004–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Brandon C.; Bachhuber, Marcus A.; Mitra, Nandita; Starrels, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) implementation and emergency department (ED) visits involving opioid analgesics. Methods Rates of ED visits involving opioid analgesics per 100,000 residents were estimated from the Drug Abuse Warning Network dataset for 11 geographically diverse metropolitan areas in the United States on a quarterly basis from 2004 to 2011. Generalized estimating equations assessed whether implementation of a prescriber-accessible PDMP was associated with a difference in ED visits involving opioid analgesics. Models were adjusted for calendar quarter, metropolitan area, metropolitan area-specific linear time trends, and unemployment rate. Results Rates of ED visits involving opioid analgesics increased in all metropolitan areas. PDMP implementation was not associated with a difference in ED visits involving opioid analgesics (mean difference of 0.8 visits [95% CI: −3.7 to 5.2] per 100,000 residents per quarter). Conclusions During 2004–2011, PDMP implementation was not associated with a change in opioid-related morbidity, as measured by emergency department visits involving opioid analgesics. Urgent investigation is needed to determine the optimal PDMP structure and capabilities to improve opioid analgesic safety. PMID:26454836

  5. The Cambia Sojourns Scholars Leadership Program: Conversations with Emerging Leaders in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Oliver, Dulce M; Bernacki, Rachelle; Cooper, Zara; Grudzen, Corita; Izumi, Seiko; Lafond, Deborah; Lam, Daniel; LeBlanc, Thomas W; Tjia, Jennifer; Walter, Jennifer

    2017-08-01

    There is a pressing workforce shortage and leadership scarcity in palliative care to adequately meet the demands of individuals with serious illness and their families. To address this gap, the Cambia Health Foundation launched its Sojourns Scholars Leadership Program in 2014, an initiative designed to identify, cultivate, and advance the next generation of palliative care leaders. This report intends to summarize the second cohort of Sojourns Scholars' projects and their reflection on their leadership needs. This report summarizes the second cohort of sojourns scholars' project and their reflection on leadership needs. After providing a written reflection on their own projects, the second cohort participated in a group interview (fireside chat) to elicit their perspectives on barriers and facilitators in providing palliative care, issues facing leadership in palliative care in the United States, and lessons from personal and professional growth as leaders in palliative care. They analyzed the transcript of the group interview using qualitative content analysis methodology. Three themes emerged from descriptions of the scholars' project experience: challenges in palliative care practice, leadership strategies in palliative care, and three lessons learned to be a leader were identified. Challenges included perceptions of palliative care, payment and policy, and workforce development. Educating and collaborating with other clinicians and influencing policy change are important strategies used to advance palliative care. Time management, leading team effort, and inspiring others are important skills that promote effectiveness as a leader. Emerging leaders have a unique view of conceptualizing contemporary palliative care and shaping the future. Providing comprehensive, coordinated care that is high quality, patient and family centered, and readily available depends on strong leadership in palliative care. The Cambia Scholars Program represents a unique opportunity.

  6. S(PEEDKITS & Smart Packaging. Novel textile application to redesign the emergency response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Zanelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The essay aims to give an overview of the on-going S(PEEDKITS collaborative project, co-financed by European Union, under 7FP - Activity SEC- 2011.4.2-3. In particular the research activities carried out the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI are highlighted, both on the field of the Industrial Design and on Architectural Technology. The theme of designing new emergency response kits in situations of great disasters outlines a new frontier for the disciplines of Architectural Technology that aims to combine the traditional vocation of the components’ design with the innovative researches of technical textiles and lightweight construction.

  7. Stakeholder Attitudes Toward and Values Embedded in a Sensor-Enhanced Personal Emergency Response System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Yngve; Farshchian, Babak; Vilarinho, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical understanding of concerns that the application of a sensor-enhanced medical alert system, or personal emergency response (PER) system, raises from the perspective of care receivers (users) and care providers. Data were gathered in the context of a field trial...... of a PER system supporting both user-initiated alerts and automatic fall detection alerts. The system was tested at two residential care facilities for 3 weeks. Drawing on data primarily from post-trial group and pair interviews, we describe and compare care receivers' and providers' views on the following...

  8. An Emergency Simulation Course in a Postdoctoral General Dentistry Program: The New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medicine Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Marsha E; Hansen, Heidi J

    2017-11-01

    Dentists can encounter life-threatening medical emergencies during the provision of routine dental care and must therefore be comfortable with the management of these emergencies. High-fidelity simulation has been used routinely in medical and surgical training and is a recognized and effective educational and assessment tool. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a new high-fidelity simulation training course in medical emergency management for residents in the General Practice Residency program at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medicine. In academic years 2014-16, first-year GPR residents were required to take a simulation course covering medical emergency scenarios that are commonly encountered in the dental office. The course involved a team approach to emergency management with active participation by faculty and residents and with each training session followed by feedback and a formal review of the emergencies covered. Evaluation was achieved through completion of questionnaires by the residents following each session. A total of 14 residents (seven in each year) participated, completing 78 questionnaires in the two-year period. They gave the course an overall rating of 4.91 on a scale from 1 to 5, indicating strong agreement with the utility of the course as a learning tool in medical emergency management training. This course is now fully integrated into the GPR educational program at this institution and is a successful component of the emergency medicine curriculum.

  9. Performance of UNHCR nutrition programs in post-emergency refugee camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Tappis, Hannah; Haskew, Christopher; Wilkinson, Caroline; Spiegel, Paul

    2011-10-26

    The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) launched a health information system (HIS) in 2005 to enhance quality and consistency of routine health information available in post-emergency refugee camps. This paper reviews nutrition indicators and examines their application for monitoring and evaluating the performance of UNHCR nutrition programs in more than 90 refugee camps in 18 countries. The HIS is a primary source of feeding program data which is collected using standardized case definitions and reporting formats across refugee camps in multiple settings. Data was aggregated across time periods and within and across countries for analysis. Basic descriptive statistics were then compared to UNHCR program performance standards. Camp populations covered by the HIS ranged from 192,000 to 219,000 between 2007 and mid-2009; 87% of under five children covered by the HIS were in Africa and 13% in Asia. Average moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) and severe acute malnutrition (SAM) rates reported in 74 of 81 camps for the 2007-2009 time periods were 7.0% and 1.6%, respectively. The supplementary feeding program (SFP) admission rate was 151/1000/yr with 93% of SFP admissions occurring in Africa. SFP performance consistently exceeded all UNHCR standards with the exception of length of enrollment. Average length of SFP enrollment was 12 weeks in Africa and 22 weeks in Asia as compared to the UNHCR standard of UNHCR standards with the exception of daily weight gain. Inclusion of children identified as moderately and severely wasted in the HIS would allow UNHCR to better track and respond to changes in nutrition status. Improved growth monitoring coverage or active malnutrition surveillance would increase UNHCR's ability to identify and treat cases of acute malnutrition. Expansion of nutrition reporting to address the transition to community-based therapeutic care is essential for adequate performance monitoring in the future. In terms of program priorities, a

  10. A two-stage optimization model for emergency material reserve layout planning under uncertainty in response to environmental accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Jiping; Jiang, Dexun; Liu, Rentao; Wang, Peng

    2016-06-05

    In the emergency management relevant to pollution accidents, efficiency emergency rescues can be deeply influenced by a reasonable assignment of the available emergency materials to the related risk sources. In this study, a two-stage optimization framework is developed for emergency material reserve layout planning under uncertainty to identify material warehouse locations and emergency material reserve schemes in pre-accident phase coping with potential environmental accidents. This framework is based on an integration of Hierarchical clustering analysis - improved center of gravity (HCA-ICG) model and material warehouse location - emergency material allocation (MWL-EMA) model. First, decision alternatives are generated using HCA-ICG to identify newly-built emergency material warehouses for risk sources which cannot be satisfied by existing ones with a time-effective manner. Second, emergency material reserve planning is obtained using MWL-EMA to make emergency materials be prepared in advance with a cost-effective manner. The optimization framework is then applied to emergency management system planning in Jiangsu province, China. The results demonstrate that the developed framework not only could facilitate material warehouse selection but also effectively provide emergency material for emergency operations in a quick response. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Encountering Anger in the Emergency Department: Identification, Evaluations and Responses of Staff Members to Anger Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheshin Arik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients’ angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines. Methods. Observations of staff patient interaction in EDs and personal interviews of staff (n=38 were conducted. Two questionnaires were administered (n=80 & n=144. Assessment was based mainly on regression statistic tests. Results. Staff recognizes two types of anger displays. Magnitude of anger expressions were correlated with staff’s fear level. Staff’s responses ranged from ignoring incidents, giving in to patients’ requests or immediately calling security. When staff felt fear and became angry they tended to call security. Staff was more likely to ignore anger when incident responsibility was assigned to patients. Discussion. Anger encounters are differentiated according to intensity level, which influences interpretations and response. Organizational policy has an effect on staff’s response. Conclusions. Staff recognizes anger at varying levels and responds accordingly. The level of danger staff feels is a catalyst in giving in or calling security. Call security is influenced by fear, and anger. Permanent guidelines can help staff in responding to anger encounters.

  12. Planning guidance for emergency response to a hypothetical nuclear attack on Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubayr, Nasser Ali M.

    The threat of nuclear attack will remain imminent in an ever-advancing society. Saudi Arabia is not immune to this threat. This dissertation establishes planning guidance for response to a nuclear attack on Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia, based on a hypothetical scenario of a nuclear detonation. A case scenario of a one-megaton thermonuclear bomb detonated at ground level over Riyadh is used to support the thesis. Previous nuclear tests and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings have been used to present possible effects on Riyadh. US planning guidance and lessons learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear plants accidents have been used to develop the emergency response guidance. The planning guidance outlines a rapid response to the nuclear detonation. Four damage zones have been identified; severe damage zone, moderate damage zone, light damage zone and dangerous fallout zone. Actions that are recommended, and those that should be avoided, have been determined for each zone. Shelter/ evacuation evaluation for blast-affected and fallout-affected areas is the basis for the recommendation that shelter in place is the best decision for the first hours to days after the attack. Guidelines for medical care response and population monitoring and decontamination are included to reduce the early and long-term effects of the attack. Recommendations to the Saudi Arabian authorities have been made to facilitate suitable preparedness and response for such an event.

  13. A 'mixed reality' simulator concept for future Medical Emergency Response Team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert J; Guest, R; Mahoney, P; Lamb, D; Gibson, C

    2017-08-01

    The UK Defence Medical Service's Pre-Hospital Emergency Care (PHEC) capability includes rapid-deployment Medical Emergency Response Teams (MERTs) comprising tri-service trauma consultants, paramedics and specialised nurses, all of whom are qualified to administer emergency care under extreme conditions to improve the survival prospects of combat casualties. The pre-deployment training of MERT personnel is designed to foster individual knowledge, skills and abilities in PHEC and in small team performance and cohesion in 'mission-specific' contexts. Until now, the provision of airborne pre-deployment MERT training had been dependent on either the availability of an operational aircraft (eg, the CH-47 Chinook helicopter) or access to one of only two ground-based facsimiles of the Chinook's rear cargo/passenger cabin. Although MERT training has high priority, there will always be competition with other military taskings for access to helicopter assets (and for other platforms in other branches of the Armed Forces). This paper describes the development of an inexpensive, reconfigurable and transportable MERT training concept based on 'mixed reality' technologies-in effect the 'blending' of real-world objects of training relevance with virtual reality reconstructions of operational contexts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. The Boston Marathon bombings: a post-event review of the robust emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    With as many as five level I trauma centers, Boston is well-positioned to mount an emergency response, but the two terrorist bombs that went off near the finish line of the city's annual marathon on April 15 put high levels of stress and demand on emergency personnel. In post-crisis reviews, hospital administrators say that all the emergency planning and drilling that they carry out on a regular basis was instrumental in helping them quickly care for nearly 200 victims while also securing their facilities at a time when the threat to the city was not well understood. Medical personnel working in tents on site at the marathon were able to respond to the injured quickly, while also giving area EDs a heads-up on what to expect. ED leaders report that a robust effort from the upper floors of their hospitals was critical in: helping them clear their EDs for incoming patients; establishing a security perimeter around the facilities to thoroughly check any people entering or leaving to guard against potential external threats; and focusing on improving how many extra staff show up to help during the crisis because it actually requires extra resources to manage the personnel.

  15. From reactive to proactive use of social media in emergency response: A critical discussion of the Twitcident Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, F.K.; Diks, D.; Ferguson, J.E.; Wolbers, J.J.; Silvius, G.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the introduction and implementation of the pilot project Twitcident in an emergency response room setting. Twitcident is a web-based system for filtering, searching and analyzing data on real-world incidents or crises. Social media data is seen as important for emergency

  16. Factors affecting the United Nations' response to natural disasters: what determines the allocation of the Central Emergency Response Fund?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler D; Oliveira, Thiago M; Kayden, Stephanie

    2017-10-01

    Natural disasters can overwhelm the domestic response of a country, leaving it dependent on external humanitarian relief. The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) of the United Nations centralises humanitarian funding and thus allows for a rapid response. This study combined data to analyse the factors that affected the allocation of CERF funding to countries that suffered a natural disaster between 2007 and 2013. It generated descriptive statistics and information on relative risks, and performed regressions of CERF funding across countries. There were 4,346 disasters in total in 188 countries between 2007 and 2013. CERF provided USD 2.98 billion to 87 countries, comprising 3.3 per cent of their total humanitarian funding. CERF more frequently supplied aid to countries in North Africa and the Middle East, and to those that had suffered geophysical disasters. Appropriately, it funds vulnerable countries experiencing severe natural disasters, yet its funding may be affected by variables beyond severity and vulnerability. Further investigation is warranted, therefore. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  17. Increasing market opportunities through standardization and responsible care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert MUHA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of Environment Management Systems (EMS commenced as a response to global environmental issues and as a recognition of awareness that sustainable development is prerequisite for keeping the natural system in a proper balance. Transport of dangerous goods by road is quite a complex activity that poses a major potential threat to people and the environment. Therefore, the introduction of certain system tools (standardization of business contributes to a safer and better road transport operations of dangerous goods. Chemical industry combining their efforts for safety and the environment under the Responsible care program (RC. Such efforts have resulted in the development Safety and Quality Assessment System (SQAS to assess the haulers. This paper presents tools standardization of business as an opportunity to improve the market positions of dangerous goods haulers.

  18. Increasing market opportunities through standardization and responsible care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert MUHA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of Environment Management Systems (EMS commenced as a response to global environmental issues and as a recognition of awareness that sustainable development is prerequisite for keeping the natural system in a proper balance. Transport of dangerous goods by road is quite a complex activity that poses a major potential threat to people and the environment. Therefore, the introduction of certain system tools (standardization of business contributes to a safer and better road transport operations of dangerous goods. Chemical industry combining their efforts for safety and the environment under the Responsible care program (RC. Such efforts have resulted in the development Safety and Quality Assessment System (SQAS to assess the haulers. This paper presents tools standardization of business as an opportunity to improve the market positions of dangerous goods haulers.

  19. Development of an automated speech recognition interface for personal emergency response systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailidis Alex

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demands on long-term-care facilities are predicted to increase at an unprecedented rate as the baby boomer generation reaches retirement age. Aging-in-place (i.e. aging at home is the desire of most seniors and is also a good option to reduce the burden on an over-stretched long-term-care system. Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERSs help enable older adults to age-in-place by providing them with immediate access to emergency assistance. Traditionally they operate with push-button activators that connect the occupant via speaker-phone to a live emergency call-centre operator. If occupants do not wear the push button or cannot access the button, then the system is useless in the event of a fall or emergency. Additionally, a false alarm or failure to check-in at a regular interval will trigger a connection to a live operator, which can be unwanted and intrusive to the occupant. This paper describes the development and testing of an automated, hands-free, dialogue-based PERS prototype. Methods The prototype system was built using a ceiling mounted microphone array, an open-source automatic speech recognition engine, and a 'yes' and 'no' response dialog modelled after an existing call-centre protocol. Testing compared a single microphone versus a microphone array with nine adults in both noisy and quiet conditions. Dialogue testing was completed with four adults. Results and discussion The microphone array demonstrated improvement over the single microphone. In all cases, dialog testing resulted in the system reaching the correct decision about the kind of assistance the user was requesting. Further testing is required with elderly voices and under different noise conditions to ensure the appropriateness of the technology. Future developments include integration of the system with an emergency detection method as well as communication enhancement using features such as barge-in capability. Conclusion The use of an automated

  20. Experience and policy implications of children presenting with dental emergencies to US pediatric dentistry training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Burton; Vargas, Clemencia M; Candelaria, Devanie; Vemuri, Maryen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and substantiate the experience of children, their families, and their caregivers with children's dental pain and to explore implications of these experiences for public policy. Data for 301 children presenting to 35 pediatric dentistry training programs during a 1-week period in 2000 for pain relief were collected with a questionnaire asking for: (1) sociodemographic characteristics; (2) oral health status; (3) dental care history; (4) presenting problem; (5) clinical findings; and (6) clinical disposition. Descriptive statistics are presented. Among children presenting to training programs with oral pain, 28% were under age 6, 57% were on Medicaid, and 38% were regarded by their dentists to have "likely or obvious" functional impairment-with 22% reporting the highest pain level. Parents reported that 59% had "poor or fair oral health" and 29% had a prior dental emergency in the previous year. Pain, experienced for several days by 73% of children, was associated with difficulty: (1) eating; (2) sleeping; (3) attending school; and (4) playing. Parent-reported barriers to seeking dental care included: (1) missed work (24%); (2) transportation costs (12%); and (3) arranging child care (10%). In this study of children with dental pain, many suffered significant pain: (1) duration; (2) intensity; (3) recurrence; and (4) consequences. This study demonstrates the ongoing need for public policies that assure timely, comprehensive, and affordable dental care for vulnerable children.

  1. Caregiver and adolescent mental health in Ethiopian Kunama refugees participating in an emergency education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Theresa S; Yudron, Monica; Wheaton, Wendy; Smith-Fawzi, Mary C

    2012-10-01

    To examine the role of caregiver mental health and risk and protective factors in influencing levels of internalizing and externalizing emotional and behavioral symptoms over time among a sample of refugee adolescents. Prospective study of 153 Kunama refugee adolescents receiving an emergency education intervention while living in a camp in Ethiopia. Surveys were collected in 2001 (T1) and 2002 (T2). Adolescent and caregiver mental health were assessed using a Kunamenga adaptation of the Youth Self Report; caregiver mental health was assessed using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Attitudes toward education, satisfaction with education programming, socioeconomic status, and perceptions of access to services were also explored as variables potentially influencing adolescent mental health at follow-up. Caregiver distress was significantly associated with youth externalizing behavior symptoms (β = 8.34, p education intervention had a lower internalizing score (β = -6.34, p refugee displacement. Results suggest that programs targeting mental health in refugee children should consider children within the larger family system, including caregiver influence on child and adolescent mental health adjustment over time. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of light paths coupled with personal emergency response systems in preventing functional decline among the elderly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lachal, Florent; Tchalla, Achille Edem; Cardinaud, Noëlle; Saulnier, Isabelle; Nessighaoui, Hichem; Laubarie-Mouret, Cécile; Dantoine, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    .... Dependency could be delayed by preventing one of its major determinants: falls. Light paths coupled with personal emergency response systems could prevent the functional decline through fall prevention. Methods...

  3. TRI Reporting Failures from No. Canaan, Conn. Companies Nets Emergency Response Equipment for Local Fire Departments under EPA Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    An EPA settlement with two North Canaan mineral processing companies for the companies' alleged failure to file required toxic release inventory information requires that two local emergency response units be provided with $28,700 of equipment...

  4. CF3DODA-Me induces apoptosis, degrades Sp1, and blocks the transformation phase of the blebbishield emergency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Rikiya; Jinesh, Goodwin G; Xue, Wenrui; Safe, Stephen; Kamat, Ashish M

    2017-05-01

    Cancer stem cells are capable of undergoing cellular transformation after commencement of apoptosis through the blebbishield emergency program in a VEGF-VEGFR2-dependent manner. Development of therapeutics targeting the blebbishield emergency program would thus be important in cancer therapy. Specificity protein 1 (Sp1) orchestrates the transcription of both VEGF and VEGFR2; hence, Sp1 could act as a therapeutic target. Here, we demonstrate that CF3DODA-Me induced apoptosis, degraded Sp1, inhibited the expression of multiple drivers of the blebbishield emergency program such as VEGFR2, p70S6K, and N-Myc through activation of caspase-3, inhibited reactive oxygen species; and inhibited K-Ras activation to abolish transformation from blebbishields as well as transformation in soft agar. These findings confirm CF3DODA-Me as a potential therapeutic candidate that can induce apoptosis and block transformation from blebbishields.

  5. Design Concepts of Emergency Response Robot Platform K-R2D2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sun Young; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    From the analysis for various mobile robots competed in DARPA Robotics Challenge, there are some drawbacks in using two or four legs because bipedal locomotion is not yet suitable for maintaining stability and quadrupedal locomotion is difficult to go through narrow aisles. Motivated by the above observations, we propose a K-R2D2 robot platform with three legs arranged in the form of a triangle like as R2-D2 robot which is a fictional robot character in the Star Wars movies. This robot has 3 legs with tracks in each sole of the leg. It is statically stable since there are three contact points to ground. In addition, three legs are also possible to design a structure walking stairs that can expand and contract in the vertical direction. This paper has presented the conceptual design, it is developed on the purpose of quick response instead of emergent workers to the extreme conditions disasters. This robot is emergency response robot platform KR2D2 with three legs, which is statically stable to walk or wheel depending on the terrains and move quickly as possible as on uneven terrain or stairs.

  6. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Boccardo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author’s group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

  7. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardo, Piero; Chiabrando, Filiberto; Dutto, Furio; Tonolo, Fabio Giulio; Lingua, Andrea

    2015-07-02

    Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author's group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

  8. Risk perception and effectiveness of uncoordinated behavioral responses in an emerging epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Piero; Ajelli, Marco; Merler, Stefano

    2012-08-01

    Beyond control measures imposed by public authorities, human behavioral changes can be triggered by uncoordinated responses driven by the risk perception of an emerging epidemic. In order to account for spontaneous social distancing, a model based on an evolutionary game theory framework is here proposed. Behavioral changes are modeled through an imitation process in which the convenience of different behaviors depends on the perceived prevalence of infections. Effects of misperception of risk induced by partial or incorrect information concerning the state of the epidemic are considered as well. Our findings highlight that, if the perceived risk associated to an epidemic is sufficiently large, then even a small reduction in the number of potentially infectious contacts (as a response to the epidemic) can remarkably affect the infection spread. In particular, the earlier the warning about the epidemic appears, the larger the possible reduction of the peak prevalence, and of the final epidemic size. Moreover, the epidemic spread is delayed if individuals' perception of risk is based on a memory mechanism and the risk of infection is initially overestimated. In conclusion, this analysis allows noteworthy inferences about the role of risk perception and the effectiveness of spontaneous behavioral changes during an emerging epidemic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness of light paths coupled with personal emergency response systems in preventing functional decline among the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Florent Lachal; Achille Edem Tchalla; Noëlle Cardinaud; Isabelle Saulnier; Hichem Nessighaoui; Cécile Laubarie-Mouret; Thierry Dantoine

    2016-01-01

    International audience; INTRODUCTION:The elderly population is at high risk of functional decline, which will induce significant costs due to long-term care. Dependency could be delayed by preventing one of its major determinants: falls. Light paths coupled with personal emergency response systems could prevent the functional decline through fall prevention.METHODS:This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of light paths coupled with personal emergency response systems on the functional ...

  10. Public-private implementation of integrated emergency response services: Case study of GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute in Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Veena M; Gururaj, Gopalkrishna; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-12-01

    Emergency medical services are important to the functioning of health systems, but these services tend to be neglected in low- and middle-income countries, such as India. In recent years, several models of pre-hospital emergency medical services have emerged in India. Research on these models holds important lessons for existing and future emergency medical service programs in low- and middle-income countries. Our objective was to provide a comprehensive description of the organizational structure and service delivery model of a public-private partnership in the southern Indian state of Karnataka, GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute, with a particular focus on its operations in Bengaluru. A case study methodology was used to explore systematically the organizational model of GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute in Karnataka. Qualitative data were collected through an in-person site visit to GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute headquarters in Bengaluru in July 2013. Three sources were used: in-depth, semistructured interviews, document review, and nonparticipant observation. Data were analyzed according to the health system "building blocks" proposed by the World Health Organization. The organization follows a standardized model across the states and union territories where they have contractual arrangements, including Karnataka. Processes for fleet maintenance, information systems/information technology and training, and deployment were well structured at the organizational level. The public-private partnership appears pro-poor in orientation; however, further demand-side research is required on the perspective of patients. Our study reveals a functional structure at the organizational level, which provides a key service at no cost to users. Detailed analyses of this nature can help inform global efforts for the development and strengthening of emergency medical services systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nurses’ roles, knowledge and experience in national disaster pre-paredness and emergency response: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Grochtdreis

    2016-12-01

    Results: The sub-themes of the first main theme (a roles of nurses during emergency response include the expectations of the hospital and the public, general and special roles of nurses, assignments of medical tasks, special role during a pandemic influenza, role conflicts during a disaster, willingness to respond to a disaster. For (b disaster preparedness knowledge of nurses, the corresponding sub-themes include the definition of a disaster, core competencies and curriculum, undergraduate nursing education and continuing education programs, disaster drills, training and exercises, preparedness. The sub-themes for the last theme (c disaster experiences of nurses include the work environment, nursing care, feelings, stressors, willingness to respond as well as lessons learned and impacts. Conclusion: There is consensus in the literature that nurses are key players in emergency response. However, no clear mandate for nurses exists concerning their tasks during a disaster. For a nurse, to be able to respond to a disaster, personal and professional preparedness, in terms of education and training, are central. The Framework of Disaster Nursing Competencies of the WHO and ICN, broken down into national core competencies, will serve as a sufficient complement to the knowledge and skills of nurses already acquired through basic nursing curricula. During and after a disaster, attention should be applied to the work environment, feelings and stressors of nurses, not only to raise the willingness to respond to a disaster. Where non-existent, national directives and concepts for disaster nursing should be developed and nurses should be aware of their duties. Nursing educators should prepare nurses for disasters, by adjusting the curricula and by meeting the increased need for education and training in disaster nursing for all groups of nurses. The appropriateness of theoretical and practical preparation of disaster nursing competencies in undergraduate nursing courses and

  12. 48 CFR 1419.705 - Responsibilities of the contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program. 1419.705 Section 1419.705 Federal Acquisition... Business Subcontracting Program 1419.705 Responsibilities of the contracting officer under the subcontracting assistance program. ...

  13. Coping responses of emergency physicians and nurses to the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, D H; Tang, H K; Tham, K Y

    2005-04-01

    During the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, health care workers (HCWs) experienced unusual stressors. The study hospital introduced psychosocial interventions to help HCWs. This study aimed to examine the coping strategies adopted by the emergency department (ED) HCWs who cared for the SARS patients. In November 2003, a self-administered questionnaire of physicians and nurses was conducted in the hospital ED that is the national SARS screening center in Singapore. Data collected included demographics and responses to these instruments: 1) the Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (COPE) to assess coping strategies, 2) the Impact of Event Scale (IES) to measure psychological reactions, and 3) the General Health Questionnaire 28 (GHQ 28) to measure psychiatric morbidity. Thirty-eight of 41 (92.7%) physicians and 58 of 83 (69.9%) nurses responded. The respondents reported a preference for problem-focused and emotion-focused coping measures. The physicians chose humor as a coping response significantly more frequently (p GHQ 28, with the trend for physicians to report lower psychiatric morbidity. With a supportive hospital environment, ED HCWs chose adaptive coping in response to the outbreak and reported low psychiatric morbidity. Physicians chose humor and Filipinos chose turning to religion as their preferred responses. Psychosocial interventions to help HCWs need to take these preferences into account.

  14. Care and Respect for Elders in Emergencies program: a preliminary report of a volunteer approach to enhance care in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, Martine; Baumlin, Kevin M; Kaplan, Shari Sirkin; Grudzen, Corita R

    2014-02-01

    Older adults who present to an emergency department (ED) generally have more-complex medical conditions with complicated care needs and are at high risk for preventable adverse outcomes during their ED visit. The Care and Respect for Elders with Emergencies (CARE) volunteer initiative is a geriatric-focused volunteer program developed to help prevent avoidable complications such as falls, delirium and use of restraints, and functional decline in vulnerable elders in the ED. The CARE program consists of bedside volunteer interventions ranging from conversation to various short activities designed to engage and reorient high-risk, older, unaccompanied individuals in the ED. This article describes the development and characteristics of the CARE program, the services provided, the experiences of the elderly patients and their volunteers, and the growth of the program over time. CARE volunteers provide elders with the additional attention needed in an often chaotic, unfamiliar environment by enhancing their care, improving satisfaction, and preventing potential decline. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Resident response to integration of simulation-based education into emergency medicine conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ernest E; Beaumont, Jennifer; Kharasch, Morris; Vozenilek, John A

    2008-11-01

    Utilization of simulation-based training has become increasingly prevalent in residency training. The authors compared emergency medicine (EM) resident feedback for simulation sessions to traditional lectures from an EM residency didactic program. The authors performed a retrospective review of all written EM conference evaluations over a 29-month period. Evaluation questions were scored on a 1-9 Likert scale. Lectures and simulation accounted for 77.6 and 22.4% of the conferences, respectively. Scored means (+/-standard deviations [SDs]) were as follows: overall, lecture 7.97 +/- 0.74 versus simulation 8.373 +/- 0.44 (p higher than traditional lectures. The scores over time suggest that this preference for simulation can be sustainable long term. Residents perceive simulation as more desirable teaching method compared to the traditional lecture format.

  16. A process evaluation of PRONTO simulation training for obstetric and neonatal emergency response teams in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Dilys M; Holme, Francesca; Zelek, Sarah T; Olvera-García, Marisela; Montoya-Rodríguez, Airaín; Fritz, Jimena; Fahey, Jenifer; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Cohen, Susanna; Kestler, Edgar

    2015-07-24

    Despite expanding access to institutional birth in Guatemala, maternal mortality remains largely unchanged over the last ten years. Enhancing the quality of emergency obstetric and neonatal care is one important strategy to decrease mortality. An innovative, low-tech, simulation-based team training program (PRONTO) aims to optimize care provided during obstetric and neonatal emergencies in low-resource settings. We conducted PRONTO simulation training between July 2012 and December 2012 in 15 clinics in Alta Verapaz, Huehuetenango, San Marcos, and Quiche, Guatemala. These clinics received PRONTO as part of a larger pair-matched cluster randomized trial of a comprehensive intervention package. Training participants were obstetric and neonatal care providers that completed pre- and post- training assessments for the two PRONTO training modules, which evaluated knowledge of evidence-based practice and self-efficacy in obstetric and neonatal topics. Part of the training included a session for trained teams to establish strategic goals to improve clinical practice. We utilized a pre/post-test design to evaluate the impact of the course on both knowledge and self-efficacy with longitudinal fixed effects linear regression with robust standard errors. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the correlation between knowledge and self-efficacy. Poisson regression was used to assess the association between the number of goals achieved and knowledge, self-efficacy, and identified facility-level factors. Knowledge and self-efficacy scores improved significantly in all areas of teaching. Scores were correlated for all topics overall at training completion. More than 60 % of goals set to improve clinic functioning and emergency care were achieved. No predictors of goal achievement were identified. PRONTO training is effective at improving provider knowledge and self-efficacy in training areas. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of the training on

  17. Epidemiology of emergency medical service responses to older people who have fallen: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Paul M; Bendall, Jason C; Tiedemann, Anne; Lord, Stephen R; Close, Jacqueline C T

    2014-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of older people who fall and call an emergency ambulance, and the operational and clinical impact of the ambulance responses they receive. A prospective cohort study of people aged ≥65 who had fallen and called for an ambulance was conducted between October 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. Fall-related data were collected using a project-specific data collection tool. These data were then linked to routinely collected ambulance service clinical records and dispatch data, providing a sequential description of fall-related cases from time of ambulance dispatch through to the end of the prehospital episode of care. There were 1,610 cases eligible for analysis. The median response time was 15 minutes (IQR 10-24) and "long-lies" (>60 minutes on the ground) occurred in 13% of cases. Patients were predominantly female (61%) and community dwelling (82%). Forty-four percent had never previously called an ambulance for a fall, whereas 248 (15%) had called within the past month. The most common patient-reported reasons for falling were loss of balance (30%) and "simple trips" (25%). New injury and/or pain was documented for 1,172 (73%) of patients, and 656 (41%) presented with "abnormal" physiology; only 238 (15%) presented with no new injury/pain and normal physiology. The nontransport rate was 28%. In this population, ambulance services appear to provide timely responses to older people who have fallen, and "long-lies" are relatively uncommon. More than one-quarter of patients were not transported to an emergency department, and repeat use of ambulance resources appears to be common. Opportunities exist to explore alternate pathways and models of care that maximize outcomes for nontransport patients as well as improving operational efficiency of the ambulance service.

  18. A dasymetric data supported earthquake disaster loss quick assessment method for emergency response in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; An, J.; Nie, G.

    2015-02-01

    Improving earthquake disaster loss estimation speed and accuracy is one of key factors in effective earthquake response and rescue. The presentation of exposure data by applying a dasymetric map approach has good potential for addressing this issue. With the support of 30'' × 30'' areal exposure data (population and building data in China), this paper presents a new two-phase earthquake disaster loss estimation method for emergency response situations. This method has two phases: a pre-earthquake phase and a co-earthquake phase. In the pre-earthquake phase, we pre-calculate the earthquake loss related to different seismic intensities and store them in a 30'' × 30'' grid format, which has four stages: determining the earthquake loss calculation factor, gridding possible damage matrixes, the building damage calculation and the people loss calculation. The dasymetric map approach makes this possible. Then, in the co-earthquake phase, there are two stages of estimating loss: generating a theoretical isoseismal map to depict the spatial distribution of the seismic intensity field; then, using the seismic intensity field to extract statistics of disaster loss from pre-calculated loss estimation data to obtain the final estimation results. The method is validated by four actual earthquakes that occurred in China. The method not only significant improves the speed and accuracy of loss estimation, but gives spatial distribution for the loss, which will be effective in aiding earthquake emergency response and rescue. Additionally, related pre-calculated earthquake loss estimation data in China could serve to provide disaster risk analysis before earthquakes happen. Currently, the pre-calculated loss estimation data and the two-phase estimation method are used by the China Earthquake Administration.

  19. A quick earthquake disaster loss assessment method supported by dasymetric data for emergency response in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinghai; An, Jiwen; Nie, Gaozong

    2016-04-01

    Improving earthquake disaster loss estimation speed and accuracy is one of the key factors in effective earthquake response and rescue. The presentation of exposure data by applying a dasymetric map approach has good potential for addressing this issue. With the support of 30'' × 30'' areal exposure data (population and building data in China), this paper presents a new earthquake disaster loss estimation method for emergency response situations. This method has two phases: a pre-earthquake phase and a co-earthquake phase. In the pre-earthquake phase, we pre-calculate the earthquake loss related to different seismic intensities and store them in a 30'' × 30'' grid format, which has several stages: determining the earthquake loss calculation factor, gridding damage probability matrices, calculating building damage and calculating human losses. Then, in the co-earthquake phase, there are two stages of estimating loss: generating a theoretical isoseismal map to depict the spatial distribution of the seismic intensity field; then, using the seismic intensity field to extract statistics of losses from the pre-calculated estimation data. Thus, the final loss estimation results are obtained. The method is validated by four actual earthquakes that occurred in China. The method not only significantly improves the speed and accuracy of loss estimation but also provides the spatial distribution of the losses, which will be effective in aiding earthquake emergency response and rescue. Additionally, related pre-calculated earthquake loss estimation data in China could serve to provide disaster risk analysis before earthquakes occur. Currently, the pre-calculated loss estimation data and the two-phase estimation method are used by the China Earthquake Administration.

  20. Decision support for emergency response how best can it be improved? Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, W.; Kelly, G.N.; French, S. [eds.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarises the results of a Workshop which was organised by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection and the European Commission in December 1997. The main objective of the Workshop was to identify where future resources could be most effectively allocated to improve decision support for off-site emergency preparedness and response. The Workshop covered all aspects of off-site emergency preparedness. It comprised four main Sessions: The first three dealt, respectively, with the early, intermediate and late phases of an emergency and were followed by a concluding Session where the outcomes of the previous Sessions were integrated. Each of the first three Sessions were opened by a presentation from a rapporteur which summarised the current status of emergency preparedness and response (i.e. that indicative of current best practice) and identified where weaknesses exist and how they might be overcome. In each case consideration was given to arrangements at local, national and international levels. Open discussion of the issues followed the rapporteurs`presentation under the direction of a facilitator. The rapporteurs papers together with the major aspects of the discussions are presented in section 5 of this report. (orig.) [Deutsch] Dieser Bericht fasst die Ergebnisse eines Workshops zusammen, der im Dezember 1997 vom Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz und der Kommission der Europaeischen Gemeinschaft veranstaltet wurde. Das Hauptziel des Workshops bestand darin, die Bereiche zu identifizieren, in denen in Zukunft Mittel bestmoeglich eingesetzt werden sollten, um die Bedingungen fuer die Entscheidungsunterstuetzung bei der anlagenexternen Notfallvorsorge und im Notfallschutz zu verbessern. Der Workshop deckte alle Aspekte der anlagenexternen Notfallvorsorge ab. Er war in vier Abschnitte unterteilt. Die ersten drei behandelten die Frueh-, Mittel- und Spaetphase eines Unfallgeschehens. Im anschliessenden vierten Teil wurden die vorher erarbeiteten