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Sample records for emergency response plans

  1. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures

  2. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

  3. Transport accident emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallette-Fontaine, M.; Frantz, P.

    1998-01-01

    To comply with the IAEA recommendations for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan as described in Safety Series 87, Transnucleaire, a company deeply involved in the road and rail transports of the fuel cycle, masters means of Emergency Response in the event of a transport accident. This paper aims at analyzing the solutions adopted for the implementation of an Emergency Response Plan and the development of a technical support and adapted means for the recovery of heavy packagings. (authors)

  4. Emergency response planning in Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Release reporting and spill clean-up requirements by Saskatchewan Energy and Mines were reviewed. Wascana's experience in response planning was discussed. It was suggested that the key to prevention was up-front due diligence, including facility and oil well analysis. Details of Wascana's emergency plan, and details of Saskatchewan Energy and Mines release reporting procedures were also provided

  5. Emergency response planning in Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In the decade since the accident at Three Mile Island, emergency planning for response to these events has undergone a significant change in Pennsylvania, as elsewhere. Changes respond to federal guidance and to state agency initiatives. The most singular change is the practice of implementing a protective action throughout the entire emergency planning zone (EPZ). Due to Pennsylvania agency experiences during the accident, the decision was made soon after to develop a staff of nuclear engineers, each giving special day-to-day attention to a specific nuclear power station in the state. Changes in communications capabilities are significant, these being dedicated phone lines between the Commonwealth and each power station, and the reorientation of the Department of Environmental Resources radio network to accommodate direction of field monitoring teams from Harrisburg. Changes that are being or will be implemented in the near future include assessing the emergency response data system for electronic delivery of plant parameter data form facilities during accidents, increased participation in exercises, emergency medical planning, and training, the inclusion of all 67 counties in Pennsylvania in an ingestion EPZ, and the gradual severance of dependence on land-line emergency communication systems

  6. Responsibility modelling for civil emergency planning

    OpenAIRE

    Sommerville, Ian; Storer, Timothy; Lock, Russell

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to analysing and understanding civil emergency planning based on the notion of responsibility modelling combined with HAZOPS-style analysis of information requirements. Our goal is to represent complex contingency plans so that they can be more readily understood, so that inconsistencies can be highlighted and vulnerabilities discovered. In this paper, we outline the framework for contingency planning in the United Kingdom and introduce the notion of respons...

  7. Exercising the federal radiological emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gant, K.S.; Adler, M.V.; Wolff, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Multiagency exercises were an important part of the development of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. This paper concentrates on two of these exercises, the Federal Field Exercise in March 1984 and the Relocation Tabletop Exercise in December 1985. The Federal Field Exercise demonstrated the viability and usefulness of the draft plan; lessons learned from the exercise were incorporated into the published plan. The Relocation Tabletop Exercise examined the federal response in the postemergency phase. This exercise highlighted the change over time in the roles of some agencies and suggested response procedures that should be developed or revised. 8 refs

  8. Radiological emergency response planning in Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The most important aspect of emergency preparedness is to recognize and accept the fact that there exists a potential for a problem or a condition and that it requires some attention. Emergency plans should be sufficiently flexible so as to accommodate the emergency situation as it unfolds. Of the several emergency responses that may be taken following a nuclear power plant accident evacuation evokes the greatest attention and discussion as to whether it is truly a feasible option. Movements of people confined to mass care facilities or on life support systems involve special requirements. The Three Mile Island accident has been the most studied nuclear incident in the history of the nuclear power reactor industry. The findings of these reports will have a major influence on nuclear power issues as they are addressed in the future. The question remains as to whether the political leadership will be willing to provide the resources required by the emergency plan. Future safety and emergency response to nuclear accidents depend upon Government and industry acting responsibly and not merely responding to regulations. The Three Mile Island accident has had some beneficial side effects for the emergency management community. It has: increased the level of awareness and importance of emergency planning; served as a catalyst for the sharing of experiences and information; encouraged standardization of procedures; and emphasized the need for identifying and assigning responsibilities. The Emergency Management Organization in responding to a disaster situation does not enjoy the luxury of time. It needs to act decisively and correctly. It does not often get a second chance. Governments, at all levels, and the nuclear power industry have been put on notice as a result of Three Mile Island. The future of nuclear energy may well hang in the balance, based upon the public's perception of the adequacy of preparedness and safety measures being taken. (author)

  9. An emergency response plan for transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, M.V.; Guerel, E.

    2000-01-01

    Transnucleaire is involved in road and rail transport of nuclear fuel cycle materials. To comply with IAEA recommendations, Transnucleaire has to master methods of emergency response in the event of a transport accident. Considering the utmost severe situations, Transnucleaire has studied several cases and focused especially on an accident involving a heavy cask. In France, the sub-prefect of each department is in charge of the organisation of the emergency teams. The sub-prefect may request Transnucleaire to supply experts, organisation, equipment and technical support. The Transnucleaire Emergency Response Plan covers all possible scenarios of land transport accidents and relies on: (i) an organisation ready for emergency situations, (ii) equipment dedicated to intervention, and (iii) training of its own experts and specialised companies. (author)

  10. Radioactive materials transportation emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmali, N.

    1987-05-01

    Ontario Hydro transports radioactive material between its nuclear facilities, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at Chalk River Laboratories and Radiochemical Company in Kanata, on a regular basis. Ontario Hydro also occasionally transports to Whiteshell Laboratories, Hydro-Quebec and New Brunswick Electric Power Commission. Although there are stringent packaging and procedural requirements for these shipments, Ontario Hydro has developed a Radioactive Materials Transportation Emergency Response Plan in the event that there is an accident. The Transportation Emergency Response plan is based on six concepts: 1) the Province id divided into three response areas with each station (Pickering, Darlington, Bruce) having identified response areas; 2) response is activated via a toll-free number. A shift supervisor at Pickering will answer the call, determine the hazards involved from the central shipment log and provide on-line advice to the emergency worker. At the same time he will notify the nearest Ontario Hydro area office to provide initial corporate response, and will request the nearest nuclear station to provide response assistance; 3) all stations have capability in terms of trained personnel and equipment to respond to an accident; 4) all Ontario Hydro shipments are logged with Pickering NGS. Present capability is based on computerized logging with the computer located in the shift office at Pickering to allow quick access to information on the shipment; 5) there is a three tier structure for emergency public information. The local Area Manager is the first Ontario Hydro person at the scene of the accident. The responding facility technical spokesperson is the second line of Corporate presence and the Ontario Hydro Corporate spokesperson is notified in case the accident is a media event; and 6) Ontario Hydro will respond to non-Hydro shipments of radioactive materials in terms of providing assistance, guidance and capability. However, the shipper is responsible

  11. Building a year 2000 emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riopel, P.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation emphasized the importance of developing an emergency plan to minimize any impacts in the event that something may go wrong when the clock changes over at midnight on December 31, 1999. It is usually impossible to anticipate what kinds of emergencies will happen. Planning for emergencies does not have to be an intimidating task. Hazard analysis is a subjective way to investigate what can go wrong, the likelihood of it happening relative to some other potential emergency, and the seriousness of the event. In general, emergency planning for Y2K should not be significantly different from planning for any other type of emergency. Y2K is not the emergency. The events that occur as a consequence of Y2K are. It is these events that should be the focus of a Year 2000 emergency plan

  12. Planning and implementing nuclear emergency response facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    After Three Mile Island, Arkansas Nuclear One produced a planning document called TMI-2 Response Program. Phase I of the program defined action plans in nine areas: safety assessment, training, organization, public information, communication, security, fiscal-governmental, technical and logistical support. Under safety assessment, the staff was made even better prepared to handle radioactive material. Under training, on site simulators for each unit at ANO were installed. The other seven topics interface closely with each other. An emergency control center is diagrammed. A habitable technical support system was created. A media center, with a large media area, and an auditorium, was built. Electric door strike systems increased security. Phone networks independently run via microwave were installed. Until Three Mile Island, logistical problems were guesswork. That incident afforded an opportunity to better identify and prepare for these problems

  13. A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a results, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request. 2 tabs

  14. Emergency planning and response preparedness in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.; Frlin-Lubi, A.; Usenicnik, B.

    2000-01-01

    Disasters do occur and so do nuclear or radiological accidents. Experience has shown that advance emergency response preparedness is essential in order to mitigate the consequences of an accident. In Slovenia, the Civil Protection Organization is the responsible authority for emergency preparedness and response to any kind of disasters. The Krko Nuclear Power Plant is the only nuclear power plant in Slovenia. To date the plant has operated safely and no serious incidents have been recorded. Slovenia nevertheless, maintains a high level of emergency preparedness, which is reflected in the area of prevention and safety and in the area of emergency response preparedness. The emergency management system for nuclear emergencies is incorporated into an overall preparedness and response system. The paper presents an overview of nuclear or radiological emergency response preparedness in Slovenia and its harmonization with the international guidelines. (author)

  15. Evaluation criteria for emergency response plans in radiological transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, M.K.; Perry, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper identifies a set of general criteria which can be used as guides for evaluating emergency response plans prepared in connection with the transportation of radiological materials. The development of criteria takes the form of examining the meaning and role of emergency plans in general, reviewing the process as it is used in connection with natural disasters and other nonnuclear disasters, and explicitly considering unique aspects of the radiological transportation setting. Eight areas of critical importance for such response plans are isolated: notification procedures; accident assessment; public information; protection of the public at risk; other protective responses; radiological exposure control; responsibility for planning and operations; and emergency response training and exercises. (Auth.)

  16. Emergency response planning for transport accidents involving radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The document presents a basic discussion of the various aspects and philosophies of emergency planning and preparedness along with a consideration of the problems which might be encountered in a transportation accident involving a release of radioactive materials. Readers who are responsible for preparing emergency plans and procedures will have to decide on how best to apply this guidance to their own organizational structures and will also have to decide on an emergency planning and preparedness philosophy suitable to their own situations

  17. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All water services systems, irrespective of size, location etc., should have emergency response plans (ERPs) to guide officials, stakeholders and consumers through emergencies, as part of managing risks in the water supply system. Emergencies in the water supply system may result from, among other causes, natural ...

  18. Using principles from emergency management to improve emergency response plans for research animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelweid, Catherine M

    2013-10-01

    Animal research regulatory agencies have issued updated requirements for emergency response planning by regulated research institutions. A thorough emergency response plan is an essential component of an institution's animal care and use program, but developing an effective plan can be a daunting task. The author provides basic information drawn from the field of emergency management about best practices for developing emergency response plans. Planners should use the basic principles of emergency management to develop a common-sense approach to managing emergencies in their facilities.

  19. AECB emergency response plan - in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The AECB's mission is to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment. The mission applies before, during and after emergencies

  20. ANS-8.23: Criticality accident emergency planning and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruvost, N.L.

    1991-01-01

    A study group has been formed under the auspices of ANS-8 to examine the need for a standard on nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response. This standard would be ANS-8.23. ANSI/ANS-8.19-1984, Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety, provides some guidance on the subject in Section 10 titled -- Planned Response to Nuclear Criticality Accidents. However, the study group has formed a consensus that Section 10 is inadequate in that technical guidance in addition to administrative guidance is needed. The group believes that a new standard which specifically addresses emergency planning and response to a perceived criticality accident is needed. Plans for underway to request the study group be designated a writing group to create a draft of such a new standard. The proposed standard will divide responsibility between management and technical staff. Generally, management will be charged with providing the necessary elements of emergency planning such as a criticality detection and alarm system, training, safe evacuation routes and assembly areas, a system for timely accountability of personnel, and an effective emergency response organization. The technical staff, on the other hand, will be made responsible for establishing specific items such as safe and clearly posted evacuation evacuation routes and dose criteria for personnel assembly areas. The key to the question of responsibilities is that management must provide the resources for the technical staff to establish the elements of an emergency response effort

  1. Emergency response planning in hospitals, United States: 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niska, Richard W; Burt, Catharine W

    2007-08-20

    This study presents baseline data to determine which hospital characteristics are associated with preparedness for terrorism and natural disaster in the areas of emergency response planning and availability of equipment and specialized care units. Information from the Bioterrorism and Mass Casualty Preparedness Supplements to the 2003 and 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys was used to provide national estimates of variations in hospital emergency response plans and resources by residency and medical school affiliation, hospital size, ownership, metropolitan statistical area status, and Joint Commission accreditation. Of 874 sampled hospitals with emergency or outpatient departments, 739 responded for an 84.6 percent response rate. Estimates are presented with 95 percent confidence intervals. About 92 percent of hospitals had revised their emergency response plans since September 11, 2001, but only about 63 percent had addressed natural disasters and biological, chemical, radiological, and explosive terrorism in those plans. Only about 9 percent of hospitals had provided for all 10 of the response plan components studied. Hospitals had a mean of about 14 personal protective suits, 21 critical care beds, 12 mechanical ventilators, 7 negative pressure isolation rooms, and 2 decontamination showers each. Hospital bed capacity was the factor most consistently associated with emergency response planning and availability of resources.

  2. 45 CFR 673.5 - Emergency response plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ensure that: (a) The vessel owner's or operator's shipboard oil pollution emergency plan, prepared and... Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto (MARPOL 73/78), has provisions for prompt and effective response action to such emergencies as might arise in the performance of...

  3. Emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Rahmah Hidayati; Pande Made Udiyani

    2009-01-01

    All nuclear facilities in Indonesia are owned and operated by the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN). The programs and activities of emergency planning and preparedness in Indonesia are based on the existing nuclear facilities, i.e. research reactors, research reactor fuel fabrication plant, radioactive waste treatment installation and radioisotopes production installation. The assessment is conducted to learn of status of emergency preparedness and response plan for nuclear facilities in Indonesia and to support the preparation of future Nuclear Power Plant. The assessment is conducted by comparing the emergency preparedness and response system in Indonesia to the system in other countries such as Japan and Republic of Korea, since the countries have many Nuclear Power Plants and other nuclear facilities. As a result, emergency preparedness response plan for existing nuclear facility in Indonesia has been implemented in many activities such as environmental monitoring program, facility monitoring equipment, and the continuous exercise of emergency preparedness and response. However, the implementation need law enforcement for imposing the responsibility of the coordinators in National Emergency Preparedness Plan. It also needs some additional technical support systems which refer to the system in Japan or Republic of Korea. The systems must be completed with some real time monitors which will support the emergency preparedness and response organization. The system should be built in NPP site before the first NPP will be operated. The system should be connected to an Off Site Emergency Center under coordination of BAPETEN as the regulatory body which has responsibility to control of nuclear energy in Indonesia. (Author)

  4. Nuclear emergency planning and response in the Netherlands after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, L.J.W.M.; Kerkhoven, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    After Chernobyl an extensive project on nuclear emergency planning and response was started in the Netherlands. The objective of this project was to develop a (governmental) structure to cope with accidents with radioactive materials, that can threaten the Dutch community and neighbouring countries. The project has resulted in a new organizational structure for nuclear emergency response, that differs on major points from the existing plans and procedures. In this paper an outline of the new structure is given. Emphasis is placed on accidents with nuclear power plants

  5. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  6. Emergency planning and response - role nad responsibilities of the regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizamska, M.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a emergency plan and organisation of adequate emergency preparedness in case of radiological accident in NPP cannot be effective without the appropriate preparatory work. In most countries, also in Republic of Bulgaria, several organisations are identified to have a potential role to play in a radiological emergency. For these reason is very important to have a national organisation, with a mandate to organise, inspect and co-ordinate the possibility of ministries and institution to react in case of radiological emergency, i.e. to quarantine the possibility for implementation of adequate counter measure for protection of the population and environment in case of radiological emergency in NPP. For the purposes of the emergency planning and response the NPP operator, ministries and the institutions developed an Emergency plan - NPP Emergency Plan and National Emergency Plan. The development of the emergency plans will be impossible without the good co-operation of the organisations which have a responsibilities in a radiological emergency. Once emergency plans are adopted, each individual organisation, also the NPP operator, must ensure that in can carry out its role effectively in accordance with the emergency plan and can develop the appropriate organisation for action and implementation of protection counter measures. For testing the emergency plans a regular exercise must be organised. Periodic reviews of the plan and modifications, based on actual events and exercise experience must be performed. The main aim of these report is to present the Bulgarian emergency planning organisation and response by explaining the national emergency panning and response legislation, implementation of IAEA recommendations and exercise experience

  7. Ontario Hydro's transportation of radioactive material and emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmali, N.

    1993-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has been transporting radioactive material for almost 30 years without any exposure to the public or release to the environment. However, there have been three accidents involving Hydro's shipments of radioactive material. In addition to the quality packaging and shipping program, Ontario Hydro has an Emergency Response Plan and capability to deal with an accident involving a shipment of radioactive material. The Corporation's ability to respond, to effectively control and contain the situation, site remediation, and to provide emergency public information in the event of a road accident minimizes the risk to the public and the environment. This emphasizes their commitment to worker safety, public safety and impact to the environment. Response capability is mandated under various legislation and regulations in Canada

  8. Innovations in emergency response plans : making the useful application of the 2007 CDA guidelines for emergency response plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, A.J. [Columbia Power Corp., Castlegar, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Columbia Power Corporation (CPC) changed its perspective and approach to emergency response plans (ERP) between 2002 and 2007 from one of administrative necessity to one of important functional reference. The new 2007 Canadian Dam Association Guidelines helped facilitate that transition for both CPC and all dam owners. As part of the licensing requirements for its new facility, CPC had an ERP commissioned and developed in 2002. A potential dam safety event occurred in 2004, which necessitated the need for the ERP to be put to use. However, at the time, it was found to be lacking in functionality for field personnel. As a result, CPC recognized the significance of having a functional ERP for field staff and undertook a substantial redraft between 2005 and 2007. This paper discussed the development of the ERP with particular reference to assessing the top potential emergency scenarios for the facility; development of response plans for the identified scenarios; a flow chart to guide personnel through the required actions; response checklist; detailed inspection checklists and any required forms, photos or specific information. It was concluded that the new ERP has been well received and has improved facility awareness and emergency preparedness. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  9. Nuclear accident/radiological emergency assistance plan. NAREAP - edition 2000. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Nuclear Accident/Radiological Emergency Assistance Plan (NAREAP) is to describe the framework for systematic, integrated, co-ordinated, and effective preparedness and response for a nuclear accident or radiological emergency involving facilities or practices that may give rise to a threat to health, the environment or property. The purpose of the NAREAP is: to define the emergency response objectives of the Agency's staff in a nuclear accident or a radiological emergency; to assign responsibilities for performing the tasks and authorities for making the decisions that comprise the Agency staff's response to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency; to guide the Agency managers who must ensure that all necessary tasks are given the necessary support in discharging the Agency staff responsibilities and fulfilling its obligations in response to an emergency; to ensure that the development and maintenance of detailed and coherent response procedures are well founded; to act as a point of reference for individual Agency staff members on their responsibilities (as an individual or a team member) throughout a response; to identify interrelationships with other international intergovernmental Organizations; and to serve as a training aid to maintain readiness of personnel. The NAREAP refers to the arrangements of the International Atomic Energy Agency and of the United Nations Security and Safety Section at the Vienna International Centre (UNSSS-VIC) that may be necessary for the IAEA to respond to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, as defined in the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions. It covers response arrangements for any situation that may have actual, potential or perceived radiological consequences and that could require a response from the IAEA, as well as the arrangements for developing, maintaining and exercising preparedness. The implementing procedures themselves are not included in the NAREAP, but they are required

  10. Emergency response plan for accidents in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Solaiman, K.M.; Al-Arfaj, A.M.; Farouk, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the general emergency plan for accidents involving radioactive materials in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Uses of radioactive materials and radiation sources and their associated potential accident are specified. Most general accident scenarios of various levels have been determined. Protective measures have been specified to reduce individual and collective doses arising during accident situations. Intervention levels for temporary exposure situations, as established in the IAEA's basic safety standards for protection against ionising radiation and for the safety of radiation sources, are adopted as national intervention levels. General procedures for implementation of the response plan, including notification and radiological monitoring instrumentation and equipment, are described and radiation monitoring teams are nominated. Training programs for the different parties which may be called upon to respond are studied and will be started. (author)

  11. New Structure of Emergency Response Plan in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcic, I.; Subasic, D.; Cavlina, N.

    1998-01-01

    The new structure of a national emergency response plan in the case of nuclear accident is based on general requirements of modernization according to international recommendations, with a new Technical Support Center as a so-called lead technical agency, with the plan adapted to the organization of the Civil Protection, with all necessary elements of preparedness for the event of a nuclear accident in Krsko NPP and Paks NPP and with such a plan of procedures that will, to greatest possible extent, be compatible with the existing plan in neighboring countries Slovenia and Hungary. The main requirement that direct s a new organization scheme for taking protective actions in the event of a nuclear accident, is the requirement of introducing a Technical Support Center. The basic role of TSC is collecting data and information on nuclear accident, analyzing and estimating development of an accident, and preparing proposals for taking protective actions and for informing the public. TSC is required to forward those proposals to the Civil Protection, which on the basis of evaluation of proposals makes decisions on implementation and surveillance of implementation of protective measures. (author)

  12. Nuclear emergency response planning based on participatory decision analytic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkko, K.

    2004-10-01

    This work was undertaken in order to develop methods and techniques for evaluating systematically and comprehensively protective action strategies in the case of a nuclear or radiation emergency. This was done in a way that the concerns and issues of all key players related to decisions on protective actions could be aggregated into decision- making transparently and in an equal manner. An approach called facilitated workshop, based on the theory of Decision Analysis, was tailored and tested in the planning of actions to be taken. The work builds on case studies in which it was assumed that a hypothetical accident in a nuclear power plant had led to a release of considerable amounts of radionuclides and therefore different types of protective actions should be considered. Altogether six workshops were organised in which all key players were represented, i.e., the authorities, expert organisations, industry and agricultural producers. The participants were those responsible for preparing advice or presenting matters for those responsible for the formal decision-making. Many preparatory meetings were held with various experts to prepare information for the workshops. It was considered essential that the set-up strictly follow the decision- making process to which the key players are accustomed. Key players or stakeholders comprise responsible administrators and organisations, politicians as well as representatives of the citizens affected and other persons who will and are likely to take part in decision-making in nuclear emergencies. The realistic nature and the disciplined process of a facilitated workshop and commitment to decision-making yielded up insight in many radiation protection issues. The objectives and attributes which are considered in a decision on protective actions were discussed in many occasions and were defined for different accident scenario to come. In the workshops intervention levels were derived according justification and optimisation

  13. The nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuertes Menendez, M. J.; Gasco Leonarte, L.; Granada Ferrero, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Planning of the response to emergencies in nuclear plants is regulated by the Basic Nuclear Emergency Plan (PLABEN). This basic Plan is the guidelines for drawing up, implementing and maintaining the effectiveness of the nuclear power plant exterior nuclear emergency plans. The five exterior emergency plans approved as per PLABEN (PENGUA, PENCA, PENBU, PENTA and PENVA) place special emphasis on the preventive issues of emergency planning, such as implementation of advance information programs to the population, as well as on training exercises and drills. (Author)

  14. Emergency planning, response and assessment: a concept for a center of excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses a general concept for a center of excellence devoted to emergency planning, response and assessment. A plan is presented to implement the concept, based on experience gained from emergency response as it relates to the nuclear and toxic chemical industries. The role of the World Laboratory in this endeavor would complement and enhance other organizations than are involved in related activities

  15. The development and revision of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gant, K.S.; Adler, M.V.; Wolff, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1985, federal agencies have been using the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) in exercises and real events. This experience and the development of other emergency response guidance (e.g., National System for Emergency Coordination) are fueling current efforts to review and revise the FRERP to reflect what the agencies have learned since the FRERP was published. Revision efforts are concentrating on clarifying the plan and addressing deficiencies. No major changes are expected in the general structure of the federal response nor should states need to revise their plans because of these modifications. 5 refs

  16. Emergency response planning and preparedness for transport accidents involving radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this Guide is to provide assistance to public authorities and others (including consignors and carriers of radioactive materials) who are responsible for ensuring safety in establishing and developing emergency response arrangements for responding effectively to transport accidents involving radioactive materials. This Guide is concerned mainly with the preparation of emergency response plans. It provides information which will assist those countries whose involvement with radioactive materials is just beginning and those which have already developed their industries involving radioactive materials and attendant emergency plans, but may need to review and improve these plans. The need for emergency response plans and the ways in which they are implemented vary from country to country. In each country, the responsible authorities must decide how best to apply this Guide, taking into account the actual shipments and associated hazards. In this Guide the emergency response planning and response philosophy are outlined, including identification of emergency response organizations and emergency services that would be required during a transport accident. General consequences which could prevail during an accident are described taking into account the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 43 refs, figs and tabs

  17. Developing a highway emergency response plan for incidents involving hazardous materials, second edition, March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This provides minimum guidelines for developing an emergency response plan for incidents involving hazardous liquid hydrocarbons, such as gasoline and crude oil, transported in MC 306/DOT 406 and MC 307/DOT 407 aluminum cargo tanks and for coordinating and cooperating with local, state, and federal officials. This publication covers response plan priorities, personnel training, special equipment, media relations, environmental relations, and post-response activities. The apprendixes to this recommended practice outline a highway emergency response plan and suggest a procedure for removing liquid hydrocarbons from overturned cargo tanks and righting the tank vehicles

  18. Planning and Preparing for Emergency Response to Transport Accidents Involving Radioactive Material. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on various aspects of emergency planning and preparedness for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material, including the assignment of responsibilities. It reflects the requirements specified in Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, and those of Safety Series No. 115, International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Framework for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 3. Responsibilities for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 4. Planning for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 5. Preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; Appendix I: Features of the transport regulations influencing emergency response to transport accidents; Appendix II: Preliminary emergency response reference matrix; Appendix III: Guide to suitable instrumentation; Appendix IV: Overview of emergency management for a transport accident involving radioactive material; Appendix V: Examples of response to transport accidents; Appendix VI: Example equipment kit for a radiation protection team; Annex I: Example of guidance on emergency response to carriers; Annex II: Emergency response guide.

  19. Planning and preparing for emergency response to transport accidents involving radioactive material. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance to the public authorities and others (including consignors, carriers and emergency response authorities) who are responsible for developing and establishing emergency arrangements for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material. It may assist those concerned with establishing the capability to respond to such transport emergencies. It provides guidance for those Member States whose involvement with radioactive material is just beginning. It also provides guidance for those Member States that have already developed their radioactive material industries and the attendant emergency plans but that may need to review and improve these plans

  20. Environmental emergency response plans (EERPs): A single plan approach to satisfy multiple regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzyka, L.

    1995-01-01

    Conrail is a freight railroad operating in twelve northeast and midwestern states transporting goods and materials over 11,700 miles of railroad. To repair, maintain, rebuild, and manufacture locomotives and rail cars, and to maintain the track, right of way, bridges, tunnels and other structures, Conrail uses petroleum products, solvents and cleaners. These products are stored in hundreds of storage tanks in and around the yards and right of way. To power the trains, locomotives are fueled with diesel fuel. With large volumes of fuel, lubricants, solvents and cleaners, safe and efficient handling of petroleum and chemicals is crucial to avoid negative impacts on the environment. Conrail recently revisited the issue of environmental emergency response planning. In an attempt to assure full compliance with a myriad of federal, state, and local regulation, a ''single plan approach'' was chosen. Single plans for each facility, coined EERPs, were decided on after careful review of the regulations, and evaluation of the company's operational and organizational needs

  1. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    what to do if there is an emergency situation that may affect the water system. To assist water ... need to expand the water treatment system, a desire to improve the efficiency ..... notes on drinking-water, sanitation and hygiene in emergencies.

  2. Responsibilities and tasks of the Emergency planning organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, B.

    1983-10-01

    In order to strengthen the emergency preparedness of the most essential agencies so that all types of nuclear accidents can be mastered, the following measures will be taken: - special training for decision-makers and other personnel - introduction of continuously operating staff emergency organization - introduction of a prompt radiation measurement organization - introduction of reliable telecommunications links. (author)

  3. Lessons learned from the second Federal Radiology Emergency Response Plan Field Exercise (FFE-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.; Weiss, B.H.; Wolff, W.F.; Adler, V.

    1988-01-01

    The FFE-2, held in 1987 at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, provided a large-scale, multiagency, field test of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). The FRERP provided workable guidance for coordinating the federal response efforts and effectively supplementing the states' resources. Needs for more training for responders and clarification in portions of the response were identified

  4. Introduction of an Emergency Response Plan for flood loading of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, N. F. Md; Sidek, L. M.; Basri, H.; Muda, R. S.; Razad, A. Z. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Sultan Abu Bakar Dam Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is designed to assist employees for identifying, monitoring, responding and mitigation dam safety emergencies. This paper is outlined to identification of an organization chart, responsibility for emergency management team and triggering level in Sultan Abu Bakar Dam ERP. ERP is a plan that guides responsibilities for proper operation of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in respond to emergency incidents affecting the dam. Based on this study four major responsibilities are needed for Abu Bakar Dam owing to protect any probable risk for downstream which they can be Incident Commander, Deputy Incident Commander, On-Scene Commander, Civil Engineer. In conclusion, having organization charts based on ERP studies can be helpful for decreasing the probable risks in any projects such as Abu Bakar Dam and it is a way to identify and suspected and actual dam safety emergencies.

  5. Experience Report: Constraint-Based Modelling and Simulation of Railway Emergency Response Plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Sandberg, Lene

    2016-01-01

    ways to proceed, including ways not necessarily anticipated in the paper-based emergency response plans. The case study was undertaken as part of a short research, ProSec, project funded by the Danish Defence Agency, with the aim of applying and developing methods for collaborative mapping of emergency...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1507 - Emergency Response Plan; refuge alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... accident at a mine. (3) Permissions to cross properties, build roads, and construct drill sites. (4.... 75.1507 Section 75.1507 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75...

  7. Development of urban planning guidelines for improving emergency response capacities in seismic areas of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Kambod Amini; Jafari, Mohammad Kazem; Hosseini, Maziar; Mansouri, Babak; Hosseinioon, Solmaz

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of research carried out to improve emergency response activities in earthquake-prone areas of Iran. The research concentrated on emergency response operations, emergency medical care, emergency transportation, and evacuation-the most important issues after an earthquake with regard to saving the lives of victims. For each topic, some guidelines and criteria are presented for enhancing emergency response activities, based on evaluations of experience of strong earthquakes that have occurred over the past two decades in Iran, notably Manjil (1990), Bam (2003), Firouz Abad-Kojour (2004), Zarand (2005) and Broujerd (2006). These guidelines and criteria are applicable to other national contexts, especially countries with similar seismic and social conditions as Iran. The results of this study should be incorporated into comprehensive plans to ensure sustainable development or reconstruction of cities as well as to augment the efficiency of emergency response after an earthquake.

  8. Addressing the gap between public health emergency planning and incident response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Ariela M; Mindlin, Michele; Morley, Christopher; Griffin, Meghan; Wooten, Wilma; Miner, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Since 9/11, Incident Command System (ICS) and Emergency Operations Center (EOC) are relatively new concepts to public health, which typically operates using less hierarchical and more collaborative approaches to organizing staff. This paper describes the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak in San Diego County to explore the use of ICS and EOC in public health emergency response. Methods: This study was conducted using critical case study methodology consisting of document review and 18 key-informant interviews with individuals who played key roles in planning and response. Thematic analysis was used to analyze data. Results: Several broad elements emerged as key to ensuring effective and efficient public health response: 1) developing a plan for emergency response; 2) establishing the framework for an ICS; 3) creating the infrastructure to support response; 4) supporting a workforce trained on emergency response roles, responsibilities, and equipment; and 5) conducting regular preparedness exercises. Conclusions: This research demonstrates the value of investments made and that effective emergency preparedness requires sustained efforts to maintain personnel and material resources. By having the infrastructure and experience based on ICS and EOC, the public health system had the capability to surge-up: to expand its day-to-day operation in a systematic and prolonged manner. None of these critical actions are possible without sustained funding for the public health infrastructure. Ultimately, this case study illustrates the importance of public health as a key leader in emergency response. PMID:28228983

  9. Guidance Manual for preparing Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammed, Kabiru [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Young [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan(NREPRP) describes the capabilities, responsibilities and authorities of government agencies and a conceptual basis for integrating the activities of these agencies to protect public health and safety. The NREPRP addresses issues related to actual or perceived radiation hazard requiring a national response in order to: i. Provide co-ordination of a response involving multi-jurisdictions or significant national responsibilities; or ii. Provide national support to state and local governments. The objective of this research is to establish Guidance Manual for preparing a timely, organized and coordinated emergency response plan for Authorities/agencies to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. The manual will not provide sufficient details for an adequate response. This level of details is contained in standard operating procedures that are being developed based on the plan developed. Base on the data obtain from integrated planning levels and responsibility sharing, the legal document of major government agencies participating in NREPRP form the legal basis for the response plan. Also the following documents should be some international legal binding documents. Base on the international safety requirement and some countries well developed NREPRP, we have drafted a guidance manual for new comer countries for easy development of their countries NREPRP. Also we have taken in to consideration lessons learn from most accident especially Fukushima accident.

  10. Guidance Manual for preparing Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammed, Kabiru; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan(NREPRP) describes the capabilities, responsibilities and authorities of government agencies and a conceptual basis for integrating the activities of these agencies to protect public health and safety. The NREPRP addresses issues related to actual or perceived radiation hazard requiring a national response in order to: i. Provide co-ordination of a response involving multi-jurisdictions or significant national responsibilities; or ii. Provide national support to state and local governments. The objective of this research is to establish Guidance Manual for preparing a timely, organized and coordinated emergency response plan for Authorities/agencies to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. The manual will not provide sufficient details for an adequate response. This level of details is contained in standard operating procedures that are being developed based on the plan developed. Base on the data obtain from integrated planning levels and responsibility sharing, the legal document of major government agencies participating in NREPRP form the legal basis for the response plan. Also the following documents should be some international legal binding documents. Base on the international safety requirement and some countries well developed NREPRP, we have drafted a guidance manual for new comer countries for easy development of their countries NREPRP. Also we have taken in to consideration lessons learn from most accident especially Fukushima accident

  11. Joint radiation emergency management plan of the international organizations. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    directives and regulations that bear on emergency response arrangements among some States. There are also bilateral agreements between some international organizations that also have relevance to preparedness and response arrangements. In March 2002, the IAEA Board of Governors approved a Safety Requirements document to be issued according to the IAEA's statutory function 'to establish ... standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. These Safety Requirements, entitled 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency' (GS-R-2), are being jointly sponsored by the FAO, IAEA, the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA/OECD), the United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and WHO. These safety standards imply additional expectations with regard to operational emergency response arrangements. It has been recognized by the organizations responsible for emergency response, and reflected in the above requirements, that good planning in advance of an emergency can substantially improve the response. Moreover, one of the most important features of emergency response plans is to have clear lines of responsibility and authority. With this in mind, the IAEA, the organizations party to the Conventions, and some other international organizations that participate in the activities of the IACRNA develop and maintain this 'Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations' (the Joint Plan), which describes: the objectives of response; the organizations involved in response, their roles and responsibilities, and the interfaces among them and between them and States; operational concepts; and preparedness arrangements. These practical arrangements are reflected in the various organizations own emergency plans. The IAEA is the main co-ordinating body for development and maintenance of the

  12. Problems related to public perceptions of radiological emergency planning and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, Margaret A.

    1989-01-01

    Beyond the scientific, the administrative and procedural issues of radiological emergency planning and response there is the issue of public perception. This paper emphasises that, radiation crises being a rare occurrence there is no enough database for generating scholarly quantitative reports. It suggests the need for disseminating timely and accurate information through a single spokesman from a responsible public agency

  13. Legislative framework on establishing emergency response plan in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Valcic, I.; Biscan, R.

    2000-01-01

    To give an overview of the legislative framework, which defined emergency planning in Croatia in the case of a nuclear accident, it's necessary to look at all international recommendations and obligations and the national legislation, acts and regulations. It has to be emphasized that Croatia signed three international conventions in this field, and by that took over some responsibilities and obligations. Beside that, it is also in Croatian interest to follow the recommendations of international institutions such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA standards and technical documents). On the other hand, national legislation in this field consists of several laws, which cover nuclear safety measures, governmental organization, natural disasters and acts (decree, decisions) of responsible authority for emergency planning in the case of a nuclear accident (Ministry of Economy). This paper presents an overview of the international and Croatian legislation which influenced the emergency planning in the case of a nuclear accident. (author)

  14. Planning for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper aims to stimulate discussions between nuclear engineers and the radiological protection professions in order to facilitate planning for nuclear emergencies. A brief review is given of the response to nuclear accidents. Studying accidents can lead to prevention, but some effort must be put into emergency response. Such issues as decontamination and decommissioning, socio-economic consequences, education and training for nuclear personnel and exercises and drills, are raised. (UK)

  15. Indian Point Nuclear Power Station: verification analysis of County Radiological Emergency-Response Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, J.; Whitfield, R.

    1983-05-01

    This report was developed as a management tool for use by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region II staff. The analysis summarized in this report was undertaken to verify the extent to which procedures, training programs, and resources set forth in the County Radiological Emergency Response Plans (CRERPs) for Orange, Putnam, and Westchester counties in New York had been realized prior to the March 9, 1983, exercise of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Station near Buchanan, New York. To this end, a telephone survey of county emergency response organizations was conducted between January 19 and February 22, 1983. This report presents the results of responses obtained from this survey of county emergency response organizations

  16. The One Plan Project: A cooperative effort of the National Response Team and the Region 6 Regional Response Team to simplify facility emergency response planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staves, J.; McCormick, K.

    1997-01-01

    The National Response Team (NRT) in coordination with the Region 6 Response Team (RRT) have developed a facility contingency plan format which would integrate all existing regulatory requirements for contingency planning. This format was developed by a multi-agency team, chaired by the USEPA Region 6, in conjunction with various industry, labor, and public interest groups. The impetus for this project came through the USEPA Office of Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention (CEPPO). The current national oil and hazardous material emergency preparedness and response system is an amalgam of federal, state, local, and industrial programs which are often poorly coordinated. In a cooperative effort with the NRT, the CEPPO conducted a Presidential Review of federal agency authorities and coordination responsibilities regarding release prevention, mitigation, and response. Review recommendations led to a Pilot Project in USEPA Region 6. The Region 6 Pilot Project targeted end users in the intensely industrialized Houston Ship Channel (HSC) area, which is comprised of petroleum and petrochemical companies

  17. Report to Congress on status of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This report responds to a request (Public Law 96-295, Section 109) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to report to Congress on the status of emergency response planning in support of nuclear power reactors. The report includes information on the status of this planning as well as on the Commission actions relating to emergency preparedness. These actions include a summary of the new regulatory requirements and the preliminary results of two comprehensive Evacuation Time Estimate studies; one requested by the NRC including 50 nuclear power plant sites and one conducted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for 12 high population density sites. FEMA provided the information in this report on the status of State and local planning, including projected schedules for joint State/county/licensee emergency preparedness exercises. Included as Appendicies are the NRC Emergency Planning Final Regulations, 10 CFR Part 50 (45 FR 55402), the FEMA Proposed Rule, 'Review and Approval of State and Local Radiological Emergency Plans and Preparedness', 44 CFR Part 350 (45 FR 42341) and the NRC/FEMA Memorandums of Understanding

  18. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations

  19. Joint radiation emergency management plan of the international organizations. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 January 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    binding treaties and have directives and regulations that bear on emergency response arrangements among some States. There are also bilateral agreements between some international organizations that also have relevance to preparedness and response arrangements. In March 2002, the IAEA issued Safety Requirements, entitled 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency' (GS-R-2), jointly sponsored by the FAO, IAEA, the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and WHO. These safety standards imply additional expectations with regard to operational emergency response arrangements. It is recognized by the participating organizations, and reflected in the above requirements, that good planning in advance of an emergency can substantially improve the response. With this in mind, the IAEA, the organizations party to the Conventions, and some other international organizations that participate in the activities of the IACRNA develop and maintain this 'Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations' (the Joint Plan), which describes: the objectives of response; the organizations involved in response, their roles and responsibilities, and the interfaces among them and between them and States; operational concepts; and preparedness arrangements. The various organizations reflect these arrangements in their own emergency plans. The IAEA is the main co-ordinating body for development and maintenance of the Joint Plan. All States irrespective whether they are party to one or other of the two Conventions are invited to adopt arrangements that are compatible with those described here when providing relevant information about nuclear or radiological emergencies to relevant international organizations, in order to minimize the radiological consequences and to facilitate the

  20. Radiological emergency response planning: Handbook for Federal Assistance to State and Local Governments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The handbook is directed toward those federal agencies involved in providing direct field assistance to state and local governments in radiological emergency response planning. Its principal purpose is to optimize the effectiveness of this effort by specifying the functions of the following federal agencies: Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of Transportation, Defense Civil Preparedness Agency, Federal Disaster Assistance Administration, and Federal Preparedness Agency

  1. Joint radiation emergency management plan of the international organizations. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    directives and regulations that bear on emergency response arrangements among some States. The IAEA is the main co-ordinating body for development and maintenance of the Joint Plan. All States irrespective whether they are party to one or other of the two Conventions are invited to adopt arrangements that are compatible with those described here when providing relevant information about nuclear or radiological emergencies to relevant international organizations, in order to minimize the radiological consequences and to facilitate the prompt provision of information and assistance. This document is the third edition of the Joint Plan

  2. Rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for postfire debris-flow emergency-response planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, S.H.; Boldt, E.M.; Laber, J.L.; Kean, J.W.; Staley, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Following wildfires, emergency-response and public-safety agencies can be faced with evacuation and resource-deployment decisions well in advance of coming winter storms and during storms themselves. Information critical to these decisions is provided for recently burned areas in the San Gabriel Mountains of southern California. A compilation of information on the hydrologic response to winter storms from recently burned areas in southern California steeplands is used to develop a system for classifying magnitudes of hydrologic response. The four-class system describes combinations of reported volumes of individual debris flows, consequences of debris flows and floods in an urban setting, and spatial extents of the hydrologic response. The range of rainfall conditions associated with different magnitude classes is defined by integrating local rainfall data with the response magnitude information. Magnitude I events can be expected when within-storm rainfall accumulations (A) of given durations (D) fall above the threshold A = 0.4D0.5 and below A = 0.5D0.6 for durations greater than 1 h. Magnitude II events will be generated in response to rainfall accumulations and durations between A = 0.4D0.5 and A = 0.9D0.5 for durations less than 1 h, and between A = 0.5D0.6 and A = 0.9D0.5 or durations greater than 1 h. Magnitude III events can be expected in response to rainfall conditions above the threshold A = 0.9D0.5. Rainfall threshold-magnitude relations are linked with potential emergency-response actions as an emergency-response decision chart, which leads a user through steps to determine potential event magnitudes and identify possible evacuation and resource-deployment levels. Use of this information in planning and response decision-making process could result in increased safety for both the public and emergency responders. ?? 2011 US Government.

  3. The national radiological emergency preparedness and response plan in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdezco, Eulinia Mendoza

    2007-01-01

    The use of radiation sources of various types and activities is now widespread in the fields of industry, medicine, research and education in the Philippines. These radiation sources have been under the regulatory control of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) to ensure that these materials are used in a safe manner and stored in a safe and secure location, and that those which have exceeded their useful life are appropriately disposed of. And while the safety record of the nuclear industry remains admirable compared to other industries, the occurrence of an accident affecting members of the public is always a possibility but with very low probability. In 2001, the National Disaster Coordinating Council (NDCC) approved the revised National Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan (RADPLAN). This plan outlines the activities and organizations necessary to mitigate the effects of nuclear emergencies or radiation related accidents. An important component of this plan is the education of the public as well as the emergency responders such as the police authorities fire emergency personnel, medical responders, community leaders and the general public. The threat of nuclear terrorism as an aftermath of the September 11 incident in the United States has also been considered in the latest revision of this document. (author)

  4. Assessing the integration of health center and community emergency preparedness and response planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineman, Nicole V; Braun, Barbara I; Barbera, Joseph A; Loeb, Jerod M

    2007-11-01

    To assess the state of health center integration into community preparedness, we undertook a national study of linkages between health centers and the emergency preparedness and response planning initiatives in their communities. The key objectives of this project were to gain a better understanding of existing linkages in a nationally representative sample of health centers, and identify health center demographic and experience factors that were associated with strong linkages. The objectives of the study were to gain a baseline understanding of existing health center linkages to community emergency preparedness and response systems and to identify factors that were associated with strong linkages. A 60-item questionnaire was mailed to the population of health centers supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Bureau of Primary Health Care in February 2005. Results were aggregated and a chi square analysis identified factors associated with stronger linkages. Overall performance on study-defined indicators of strong linkages was low: 34% had completed a hazard vulnerability analysis in collaboration with the community emergency management agency, 30% had their role documented in the community plan, and 24% participated in community-wide exercises. Stronger linkages were associated with experience responding to a disaster and a perception of high risk for experiencing a disaster. The potential for health centers to participate in an integrated response is not fully realized, and their absence from community-based planning leaves an already vulnerable population at greater risk. Community planners should be encouraged to include health centers in planning and response and centers should receive more targeted resources for community integration.

  5. The response to a worst-case scenario - the national emergency plan for nuclear accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham D, John [Radiological Protection Inst. of Ireland (Ireland)

    1996-10-01

    The Chernobyl accident in 1986 highlighted many deficiencies in the preparedness of countries to deal with a major accident. It demonstrated how vulnerable countries are to transboundary contamination. Ireland had no emergency plan at the time of the accident and only minimal facilities with which to assess the consequences of the accident. Nonetheless, the then Nuclear Energy Board with the assistance of Government Departments and the Civil Defence organisation reacted quickly to assess the situation despite the complete lack of information about the accident from the then USSR. Even countries with advanced nuclear technologies faced similar difficulties. It was quickly recognised by Government that the national laboratory facilities were totally inadequate. The Nuclear Energy Board was provided with additional resources to assist it to cope in the short term with the very large demand for monitoring. In the longer term a new national radiation laboratory was provided and the Board was formally replaced by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland. It was given statutory responsibility to monitor radiation levels, to advise measures to be taken for the protection of the public and to provide information for the public. An emergency plan based on the Chernobyl experience was drafted in 1987, amended and published in 1992. Certain features of this plan were implemented from 1987 onwards, notably the classification of responsibilities and the installation of a national continuous radiation monitoring system. The paper outlines the responsibilities of those who could be involved in a response to a nuclear incident, the procedures used to evaluate its consequences and the provision of information for the public. The plan provides an integrated management system which has sufficient flexibility to enable a rapid response to be made to a major or minor crisis, either foreseen or unforeseen and whatever its cause.

  6. Applications of the new program system UFOMOD in the field of emergency response planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, K.; Ehrhardt, J.; Hasemann, I.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to the main purpose of assessing the consequences of nuclear accidents, the new program system UFOMOD is designed to be a very flexible tool for investigation of alternatives in emergency response planning and emergency management, and for studies of the differences in collective exposure due to different response of parts of the population (disregard or misinterpretation of alarms, spontaneous evacuation etc.). After a brief summary of the main features of the countermeasures submodel, scope, flexibility and variety of results are demonstrated by means of calculations with both an early short and a slightly delayed longer lasting release. Risks and benefits of 3 types of evacuation, i.e. prophylactic, during release and after passage of the plume, are discussed by comparing CCFDs of early fatalities. The number of injuries and fatalities as well as areas and numbers of persons affected by countermeasures may depend considerably on the intervention levels applied. Correlations between these quantities obtained within a parameter study are presented

  7. Planning guidance for emergency response to a hypothetical nuclear attack on Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubayr, Nasser Ali M.

    The threat of nuclear attack will remain imminent in an ever-advancing society. Saudi Arabia is not immune to this threat. This dissertation establishes planning guidance for response to a nuclear attack on Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia, based on a hypothetical scenario of a nuclear detonation. A case scenario of a one-megaton thermonuclear bomb detonated at ground level over Riyadh is used to support the thesis. Previous nuclear tests and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings have been used to present possible effects on Riyadh. US planning guidance and lessons learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear plants accidents have been used to develop the emergency response guidance. The planning guidance outlines a rapid response to the nuclear detonation. Four damage zones have been identified; severe damage zone, moderate damage zone, light damage zone and dangerous fallout zone. Actions that are recommended, and those that should be avoided, have been determined for each zone. Shelter/ evacuation evaluation for blast-affected and fallout-affected areas is the basis for the recommendation that shelter in place is the best decision for the first hours to days after the attack. Guidelines for medical care response and population monitoring and decontamination are included to reduce the early and long-term effects of the attack. Recommendations to the Saudi Arabian authorities have been made to facilitate suitable preparedness and response for such an event.

  8. ANSI/ANS-8.23-1997: nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    American National Standard ANSUANS-8.23 was developed to expand upon the basic emergency response guidance given in American National Standard, 'Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety' ANSI/ANS-8.19-1996 (Ref. 1). This standard provides guidance for minimizing risks to personnel during emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident outside reactors. This standard is intended to apply to those facilities for which a criticality accident alarm system, as specified in American National Standard, 'Criticality Accident Alarm System', ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 (Ref. 2) is in use. The Working Group was established in 1990, with Norman L. Pruvost as chairman. The Working Group had up to twenty-three members representing a broad range of the nuclear industry, and has included members from Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom. The initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23 was approved by the American National Standards Institute on December 30, 1997. It provides guidance for the following topics: (1) Management and technical staff responsibilities; (2) Evaluation of a potential criticality accident; (3) Emergency plan provisions; (4) Evacuation; (5) Re-entry, rescue and stabilization; and (6) Classroom training, exercises and evacuation drills. This guidance is not for generic emergency planning issues, but is specific to nuclear criticality accidents. For example, it assumes that an Emergency Plan is already established at facilities that implement the standard. During the development of the initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23, each Working Group member evaluated potential use of the standard at a facility with which the member was familiar. This revealed areas where a facility could have difficulty complying with the standard. These reviews helped identify and eliminate many potential problems and ambiguities with the guidance. The Working Group has received very limited feedback from the user community since the first edition of the standard was published. Suggestions

  9. Nuclear emergency planning and response in the Netherlands: Experiences obtained from large scale exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetsers, R.C.G.M.; Pruppers, M.J.M.; Sonderen, J.F. van

    2000-01-01

    In 1986 the Chernobyl accident led the Dutch Government to a reconsideration of their possibilities for managing nuclear emergencies. It was decided to improve both the national emergency management organization and the infrastructure for collecting and presenting technical information. The first improvement resulted in the National Plan for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response (EPR) and the second in a series of technical facilities for the assessment of radiation doses. Since 1990, following the implementation of the EPR and most of the technical facilities, several emergency exercises have taken place to test the effectiveness of organization and infrastructure. Special emphasis has been given to the early phase of the simulated accidents. This paper summarises the experiences obtained from these exercises. Major obstacles appear to be: (1) keeping all participants properly informed during the process, (2) the difference in working attitude of technical experts and decision-makers, (3) premature orders for countermeasures and (4) the (too) large number of people involved in the decision-making process. From these experiences requirements for instruments can be deduced. Such instruments include predictive models, to be used for dose assessment in the early phase of an accident which, apart from being fast, should yield uncomplicated results suitable for decision-makers. Refinements of models, such as taking into account the specific nature of the (urban) environment, are not needed until the recovery phase of a nuclear accident. (author)

  10. Experience from implementing international standards in national emergency response planning national adjustments and suggestions for improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naadland Holo, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A process has been going on for some time in Norway to establish a harmonized background for emergency response planning for any kind of nuclear or radiological accident. The national emergency preparedness organisation with the crisis committee for nuclear accident, consisting of representatives from civil defence, defence, police-, health-, and food control authorities, has the authority to implement countermeasures to protect health, environment and national interests in case of an accident or in case of nuclear terrorism. However, in an early phase, the response plans need to be fully harmonized to ensure that every operational level knows their responsibility and the responsibilities of others. Our intention is to implement the IAEA standard 'preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency'. We believe this will simplify national and international communication and also simplify the crisis management if an accident occurs. In revising the national plans, and also the planning basis at regional and local level, as well as the planning basis for response to accidents at national nuclear facilities and in connection with arrival of nuclear submarines in Norwegian harbours, we have seen the need to make national adjustments to the international standards. In addition to the standard, there exist several other processes and routines for reporting different kinds of incidents. We have seen a need to coordinate this internally at the competent authority to simplify the routines. This paper will focus on the challenges we have met, our national solutions and some suggestions for simplification. National adjustments to the international standard. - Firstly, the threat categorization needs to be adjusted. First of all, we do not have nuclear power plants in Norway. In the aftermath of 11 September 2001 we also have focused more an the potential for nuclear terrorism. Nuclear terrorism is unlikely but puts up some new requirements in the

  11. Design basis of off-site emergency response plans for fuel cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzepka, J.P.; Dubiau, Ph.; Jouve, A.C.; Charles, T.; Mercier, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    In France, the term 'off-site emergency response plan' refers to all the arrangements which should be made by the government authorities to protect the population in the event of an accident affecting the installations of the site considered. The outline of the method of defining typical accidents, evaluation of 'source-terms' and health consequences is presented. Two applications to installations from the front-end and from the back-end of the fuel cycle are discussed. (K.A.). 1 tab

  12. Emergencies and emergency planning in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jammet, H.

    1986-01-01

    The organization for dealing with radiation emergencies in France is complex and centralized. It consists of the Radiation Security Council with participants from the Premier Ministre and the Ministers of Interior, Industry, Health, and Defense. A permanent general secretary for radiation security coordinates the work of the various departments. Planning for nuclear power emergencies is divided between on-site, in which organization and intervention are the responsibilities of the manager of the plant, and off-site, in which organization and intervention are the responsibility of the regional governor. Both on-site and off-site planning have models integrated into a special code of practice called the radiation emergency organization

  13. Experiences in planning and response for the radiological emergencies in a radioactive facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador B, Z.H.; Perez P, S.; Torres B, M.B.; Ayra P, F.E.

    2006-01-01

    It is internationally recognized the importance of the planning and the assurance for the effective response to the radiological emergencies. In the work those experiences on this thematic one in the Isotopes Center (CENTIS), the radioactive facility where the biggest radioactive inventory is manipulated in Cuba are presented. Due to CENTIS is also the sender and main transport of radioactive materials, it is included this practice. The revision of the abnormal situations during the years 1997 at the 2005, starting from the classification adopted by the Regulatory Authority of the country is carried out. Its are register the details of these occurrences in the Radiological Events Database (BDSR). A correspondence among the radiological impact evaluated in the Emergency Plan for the possible events and that of the registered ones is obtained. The complete training programs and realization of the exercises are carried out. Those results of 3 mockeries made to full scale are picked up. It was concluded that the operational experience and the maintained infrastructure, determine the answer capacity for radiological emergencies in the CENTIS. (Author)

  14. On-site emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture covers the Emergency Planning of the Operating organization and is based on the Code of Practice and Safety Guides of the IAEA as well as on arrangements in use at the Swiss Nuclear Power Station Beznau and - outlines the basis and content of an emergency plan - describes the emergencies postulated for emergency planning purposes - describes the responsibilities, the organization and the procedures of the operating organization to cope with emergency situations and the liaison between the operating organization, the regulatory body and public authorities - describes the facilities and equipment which should be available to cope with emergency sitauations - describes the measures and actions to be taken when an emergency arises in order to correct abnormal plant conditions and to protect the persons on-and off-site - describes the aid to be given to affected personnel - describes the aspects relevant to maintaining the emergency plan and organization in operational readiness. (orig./RW)

  15. The production and operation of the nuclear industry road emergency response plan (NIREP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, J.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, radioactive material, ranging from small sources used for medical and commercial purposes to large consignments of irradiated fuel, has been safely moved by road in Great Britain. All such movements are controlled by law and have to meet clearly specified safety requirements concerning packaging and shielding to ensure that if the transporting vehicle is involved in an accident, there is no increase in the hazards involved because of the nature of its load. There are currently some 40,000 movements by road every year, but over more than 25 years, there has never been an accident which has led to any significant radiological impact to members of the public. A national scheme to provide contingency arrangements in the event of a road accident involving radioactive materials has now been set up by the major users and consignors of radioactive material. Called NIREP (Nuclear Industry Road Emergency Response Plan), the member industries have agreed immediately to despatch, from the nearest organisation to the incident, qualified health physicist personnel to deal with any incident involving radioactive material belonging to (or consigned by) any of the participating companies. With their widespread location of establishments, all parts of the UK mainland are covered. Vehicles covered by the scheme will display a NIREP placard, thus giving the Police, or other emergency services, an emergency telephone number of a coordinating centre and information on the site responsible for the load. (author)

  16. Geographic Information System Technology Leveraged for Crisis Planning, Emergency, Response, and Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is piloting the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology that can be leveraged for crisis planning, emergency response, and disaster management/awareness. Many different organizations currently use GIS tools and geospatial data during a disaster event. ASDC datasets have not been fully utilized by this community in the past due to incompatible data formats that ASDC holdings are archived in. Through the successful implementation of this pilot effort and continued collaboration with the larger Homeland Defense and Department of Defense emergency management community through the Homeland Infrastructure Foundation-Level Data Working Group (HIFLD WG), our data will be easily accessible to those using GIS and increase the ability to plan, respond, manage, and provide awareness during disasters. The HIFLD WG Partnership has expanded to include more than 5,900 mission partners representing the 14 executive departments, 98 agencies, 50 states (and 3 territories), and more than 700 private sector organizations to directly enhance the federal, state, and local government's ability to support domestic infrastructure data gathering, sharing and protection, visualization, and spatial knowledge management.The HIFLD WG Executive Membership is lead by representatives from the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs - OASD (HD&ASA); the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate's Office of Infrastructure Protection (NPPD IP); the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Integrated Working Group - Readiness, Response and Recovery (IWG-R3); the Department of Interior (DOI) United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP), and DHS Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  17. Handling of emergency situations: organization and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindell, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    Sources of exposure and foreseeable types of accidents; responsibilities for the prevention and control of accidents; organization for controlling emergency situations; emergency control plans. (HP) [de

  18. Criteria for preparation and evaluation of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a common reference and interim guidance source for: state and local governments and nuclear facility operators in the development of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other Federal agency personnel engaged in the review of state, local government, and licensee plans and preparedness

  19. Emergency Response Planning to Reduce the Impact of Contaminated Drinking Water during Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water system...

  20. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response

  1. Contingency planning and emergency response in construction activities: Training the construction worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.

    1987-01-01

    Construction activities have the potential for environmental and/or health impacts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) particularly as site cleanup and restoration plans are initiated. ORNL has instituted special training for all construction workers and related contractors. Individuals learn how construction activities at ORNL can potentially have adverse effects on the environment and their health, and to learn how to respond to potential chemical and radiation hazards. Workers are given a review of basic information on radiation and chemicals in a framework that emphasizes the situations in which workers or the environment may be exposed to potential risk. Specific instructions are presented on what to do when contamination is suspected, with identification of emergency procedures and response personnel. 5 refs., 1 fig

  2. Compliance with federal and state regulations regarding the emergency response plan and physical security plan at the Oregon State TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.G.; Ringle, J.C.; Anderson, T.V.

    1976-01-01

    Recent legislative actions within the State of Oregon have had a significant impact upon the OSU TRIGA Emergency Response Plan, and to a lesser extent upon the Physical Security Plan. These state imposed changes will be reviewed in light of existing federal requirements. With the upcoming acquisition of FLIP fuel in August 1976, NRC required several major changes to the existing Physical Security Plan. Within the limitations of public disclosure, these changes will be contrasted to the present plan. (author)

  3. Method for Developing a Communication Strategy and Plan for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response. Publication Date: July 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical resource for emergency planning in the area of public communication in the development of a radiation emergency communication plan (RECP). The term 'public communication' is defined as any activity that communicates information to the public and the media during a nuclear or radiological emergency. To avoid confusion, the term public communication has been used in this publication rather than public information, which may be used in other IAEA publications and documents to ensure consistency with the terminology used in describing the command and control system. This publication also aims to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(11) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research with regard to the response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. This publication is intended to provide guidance to national and local authorities on developing an RECP which incorporates the specific functions, arrangements and capabilities that will be required for public communication during a nuclear or radiological emergency. The two main features of this publication are the template provided to develop an RECP and detailed guidance on developing a communication strategy for emergency preparedness and response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The template is consistent with the outline of the national radiation emergency plan proposed in Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (EPR-Method 2003). This publication is part of the IAEA

  4. Assessment of emergency response planning and implementation in the aftermath of major natural disasters and technological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligan, Patricia A.; Jones, Joseph; Walton, F.; Smith, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency planning around nuclear power plants represents some of the most mature and well developed emergency planning in the United States. Since the implementation of NUREG-0654 / FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, A Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants (NRC, 1980a) the licensees, local, and State agencies have developed detailed Radiological Emergency Response Programs. An important component of these plans is the evacuation of the population in the event of a general emergency condition at the plant. In January 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the landmark report, 'Identification and Analysis of Factors Affecting Emergency Evacuations' (NUREG/CR 6864/), which represented the most comprehensive investigation of public evacuations in the United States in more than 15 years. Since the completion of this research, several high profile evacuations have occurred, including Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Hurricane Rita in Houston, as well as major wildfires across the western U.S. The NRC commissioned an update to its 2005 evacuation case study publication to evaluate the evacuation experience of the selected communities (e.g., timeliness, related injuries, hazard avoidance); the level of preplanning that was in place for the affected areas and extent that the pre planned requirements were implemented during the emergency response; the critical factors contributing to the efficiency of or impediments to the evacuations (e.g., training, drills, preparedness, experience, resources, facilities, and organizational structure); and additional factors that may have contributed to less than satisfactory public response (i.e., availability of personal transportation, use of public transportation, lack of availability of shelters, etc.). The comprehensive report will be published in fall of 2008 as NUREG/CR-6981, Assessment of Emergency Response Planning and

  5. Review of off-site emergency preparedness and response plan of Indian NPPs based on experience of Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Hukum; Dash, M.; Shukla, Vikas; Vijayan, P.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plants in India are designed, constructed and operated based on the principle of the highest priority to nuclear safety. To deal with any unlikely situation of radiological emergency, the emergency preparedness and response plans are ensured to be in place at all NPPs prior to their commissioning. These plans are periodically reviewed and tested by conducting emergency exercise with the participation of various agencies such as Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, NDMA, district authorities, regulatory body and general public. On March 11, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni followed by tsunami waves of height 15 meters above reference sea level. This resulted in large scale release of radioactive material from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. This led to the evacuation of a large number of people from the areas surrounding the affected nuclear power plants. The event was rated as level 7 event in International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The event also revealed the challenges in handling radiological emergency situation in adverse environmental conditions, The experience of managing radiological emergency situation during Fukushima nuclear accident provides opportunities to review and improve emergency preparedness and response programme. The present paper presents the chronology of the emergency situation, challenges faced and handled in Fukushima. Even though the possibility of a Fukushima type nuclear accident in India is very remote due to the low probability of a high intensity earthquake followed by tsunami at NPP sites, the efforts needs to be initiated from the regulatory point of view for an effective Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans of NPP sites were reviewed in the light of unique challenges of accident at Fukushima. It is realized that multi unit events are the realities that must be addressed as part of Emergency

  6. Review of off-site emergency preparedness and response plan of Indian NPPs based on experience of Fukushima nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hukum; Dash, M.; Shukla, Vikas; Vijayan, P.; Krishnamurthy, P.R., E-mail: vshukla@aerb.gov.in [Operating Plants Safety Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear power plants in India are designed, constructed and operated based on the principle of the highest priority to nuclear safety. To deal with any unlikely situation of radiological emergency, the emergency preparedness and response plans are ensured to be in place at all NPPs prior to their commissioning. These plans are periodically reviewed and tested by conducting emergency exercise with the participation of various agencies such as Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, NDMA, district authorities, regulatory body and general public. On March 11, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni followed by tsunami waves of height 15 meters above reference sea level. This resulted in large scale release of radioactive material from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. This led to the evacuation of a large number of people from the areas surrounding the affected nuclear power plants. The event was rated as level 7 event in International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The event also revealed the challenges in handling radiological emergency situation in adverse environmental conditions, The experience of managing radiological emergency situation during Fukushima nuclear accident provides opportunities to review and improve emergency preparedness and response programme. The present paper presents the chronology of the emergency situation, challenges faced and handled in Fukushima. Even though the possibility of a Fukushima type nuclear accident in India is very remote due to the low probability of a high intensity earthquake followed by tsunami at NPP sites, the efforts needs to be initiated from the regulatory point of view for an effective Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans of NPP sites were reviewed in the light of unique challenges of accident at Fukushima. It is realized that multi unit events are the realities that must be addressed as part of Emergency

  7. Report on the emergency evacuation review team on emergency response plans for the Perry and Davis-Besse nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a report by Ohio's Emergency Evacuation Review Team, at the request of Governor Richard Celeste. The Team concludes that the current emergency response plan for Ohio's reactors is inadequate to protect the public and recommends changes in the current emergency plant requirements. The report also includes a summary of the litigation that has occurred since Celeste withdrew his support for the plans, a list of experts consulted, and sources used to prepare the report. An important document, and a study which every state should undertake

  8. Educational program emergency planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tammy

    2009-01-01

    Tragic university shootings have prompted administrators of higher education institutions to re-evaluate their emergency preparedness plans and take appropriate measures for preventing and responding to emergencies. To review the literature and identify key components needed to prevent shootings at higher education institutions in the United States, and in particular, institutions housing radiologic science programs. Twenty-eight emergency preparedness plans were retrieved electronically and reviewed from a convenience sample of accredited radiologic science programs provided by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology Web site. The review of the 28 emergency preparedness plans confirmed that most colleges are prepared for basic emergencies, but lack the key components needed to successfully address mass-casualty events. Only 5 (18%) of the 28 institutions addressed policies concerning school shootings.

  9. Upgrading France's emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moures, Y.

    1991-01-01

    In France as elsewhere, the Chernobyl accident spurred a new stage in the development of nuclear safety. In the months following the accident, France's Minister of Industry launched a campaign to strengthen research and safety measures to: prevent reactor accidents; reinforce the concept of quality in operations; train staff, in areas such as crisis management; systematically review plans, installations and techniques related to crisis management; study accident containment procedures. There was also a systematic review of communication links with authorities and outside emergency organizations during the critical phase of an accident. On the operational level regulatory monitoring procedures were reorganized and reinforced. France has not opted for the permanent presence of on-site inspectors, but rather for the total, continuous responsibility of the power plant operator, with the safety authority intervening at frequent intervals. A major programme was also established to increase capabilities for investigation and intervention in a radioactive environment in nuclear installations. (author)

  10. ARAC: a centralized computer-assisted emergency planning, response, and assessment system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Knox, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an emergency planning, response, and assessment service, developed by the US Departments of Energy and Defense, and focused, thus far, on atmospheric releases of nuclear material. For the past 14 years ARAC has responded to over 150 accidents, potential accidents, and major exercises. The most notable accident responses are the COSMOS 954 reentry, the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident and subsequent purge of 85 Kr from the containment vessel, the recent UF 6 accident at the Kerr-McGee Plant, Gore, Oklahoma, and the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union. Based on experience in the area of emergency response, developed during the past 14 years, this paper describes the cost effectiveness and other advantages of a centralized emergency planning, response, and assessment service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material

  11. ARAC: a centralized computer assisted emergency planning, response, and assessment system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Knox, J.B.

    1986-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an emergency planning, response, and assessment service, developed by the US Departments of Energy and Defense, and focused, thus far, on atmospheric releases of nuclear material. For the past 14 years ARAC has responded to over 150 accidents, potential accidents, and major exercises. The most notable accident responses are the COSMOS 954 reentry, the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident and subsequent purge of 85 Kr from the containment vessel, the recent UF 6 accident at the Kerr-McGee Plant, Gore, Oklahoma, and the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union. Based on experience in the area of emergency response, developed during the past 14 years, this paper describes the cost effectiveness and other advantages of a centralized emergency planning, response, and assessment service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material

  12. Emergency planning and long-term care: least paid, least powerful, most responsible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covan, Eleanor Krassen; Fugate-Whitlock, Elizabeth

    2010-11-01

    As disasters can occur anywhere, planning to avoid emergencies is an international concern. Our research specifically addresses planning for the needs and safety of a vulnerable population, long-term care residents. Our initial purposes in this evaluation research were to assess the utility of a template to gather emergency management information for individual long-term care communities, to report on how prepared they are to cope with emergencies that have occurred elsewhere in areas like ours, and to assess the effectiveness of employing gerontology students in the planning process. As we began analyzing our data, we realized that it is imperative to consider whether it is possible for long-term care communities to respond effectively to disasters. In our findings we focus on the impact of gender in the planning process, the importance of size with regard to template utility, the positive and negative consequences of student aid, and the fact that gathering plans for individual long-term care communities may have detracted from collaborative community planning.

  13. Hurricane Hugo: Emergency Preparedness Planning and Response for Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Nancy C.; And Others

    This report describes how, in the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo, the South Carolina Department of Mental Health activated its Emergency Preparedness Plan to assist mental health centers and their staff in providing crisis counseling services to the general public. The first section explains the history and structure of the involvement by the…

  14. Clarification of TMI action plan requirements. Requirements for emergency response capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This document, Supplement 1 to NUREG-0737, is a letter from D. G. Eisenhut, Director of the Division of Licensing, NRR, to licensees of operating power reactors, applicants for operating licenses, and holders of construction permits forwarding post-TMI requirements for emergency response capability which have been approved for implementation. On October 30, 1980, the NRC staff issued NUREG-0737, which incorporated into one document all TMI-related items approved for implementation by the Commission at that time. In this NRC report, additional clarification is provided regarding Safety Parameter Display Systems, Detailed Control Room Design Reviews, Regulatory Guide 1.97 (Revision 2) - Application to Emergency Response Facilities, Upgrade of Emergency Operating Procedures, Emergency Response Facilities, and Meteorological Data

  15. Emergency plan belgian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clymans, A.

    1989-01-01

    The Chernobyl disaster prompted authorities in Belgium to carry out a comprehensive review of all emergency plans and, in particular, those designed specifically for nuclear accidents. This review was aimed at determining what type of plans existed and to what extent such plans were operational. This paper sets out to present a broad overview of different aspects of this problem: organization of public emergency plans, co-ordination of operations, merits and demerits of centralization as opposed to decentralization, planning zones, obligation to release information to the public and relations with the media, and finally the international dimension to the problem. The author expresses the hope that the latter area will inspire practical suggestions [fr

  16. Criteria for preparation and evaluation of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of nuclear power plants: Criteria for utility offsite planning and preparedness: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podolak, E.M. Jr.; Sanders, M.E.; Wingert, V.L.; Donovan, R.W.

    1988-09-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have added a supplement to NUREG-0654/FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1 that provides guidance for the development, review, and evaluation of utility offsite radiological emergency response planning and preparedness for those situations in which state and/or local governments decline to participate in emergency planning. While this guidance primarily applies to plants that do not have full-power operating licenses, it does have relevance to operating nuclear power plants

  17. Addressing the gap between public health emergency planning and incident response

    OpenAIRE

    Freedman, Ariela M; Mindlin, Michele; Morley, Christopher; Griffin, Meghan; Wooten, Wilma; Miner, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Since 9/11, Incident Command System (ICS) and Emergency Operations Center (EOC) are relatively new concepts to public health, which typically operates using less hierarchical and more collaborative approaches to organizing staff. This paper describes the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak in San Diego County to explore the use of ICS and EOC in public health emergency response. Methods:?This study was conducted using critical case study methodology consisting of document review and 18 k...

  18. Off-site emergency response plans in case of technological catastrophes: the case Angra dos Reis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Junior, M.D. de.

    1990-04-01

    In the first part of the thesis a discussion of the technical, operational and methodological features of the current practices for emergency planning in case of a nuclear fallout. Based on this general reference is possible to evaluate the features in the natural and social environment of Angra dos Reis that probably will obstruct the application of the protective countermeasures to the public. These critical points are enhanced to permit the discussion of a methodological approach that is supposed to be suitable to the reality of Angra dos Reis. The approach was developed specifically to this region and was introduced as a part of the general emergency off-site plan to the Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto (CNAAA). Starting from this experience will be possible to enlarge this approach in a further research, in order to study this potential hazards of other industrial plants. (author)

  19. Development of Earthquake Emergency Response Plan for Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Prince, Haiti. The consequences for Nepal if a comparable or bigger disaster happens in Kathmandu would likely be worse than in Port–au-Prince because the...procedures adopted in other countries. The framework was made compatible with ICAO standards and TIA’s current existing emergency plan for other...Flight Rules (VFR) in daylight and Instrument Flight Rule ( IFR ). A. Restore Airport Perimeter Security B. Restore Flight Operations a

  20. Emergency preparedness: a comprehensive plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company (ARHCO) has developed comprehensive plans for coping with emergencies ranging from criticality to civil disturbance. A unique notification system provides for immediate contact with key personnel by using a central communications center, crash alarm warning networks, and a continuing telephone cascade notification system. There is also the capability of immediately contacting other contractor key personnel. Certain jobs have been predetermined as necessary for coping with an emergency. An emergency staff consisting of responsible management, with alternates, has been preselected to automatically fill these jobs when notified. Control centers for headquarters and ''field'' are established with telephone and radio communication capabilities and are also supplied with some source materials to assist initiating plans for containing an emergency for recovery. A comprehensive emergency procedures manual has been developed, which contains information of company-wide application and procedures for specific facilities covering almost all accident situations

  1. Emergency planning zone reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the process used by a large industrial Department of Energy (DOE) site to communicate changing hazards to its stakeholders and install the confidence necessary to implement the resulting emergency planning changes. Over the last decade as the sites missions have shifted from full-scale production to a greater emphasis on environmental restoration and waste management, the off-site threat from its operations has substantially decreased. The challenge was to clearly communicate the reduced hazards, install confidence in the technical analysis that documented the hazard reduction, and obtain stakeholder buy-in on the path forward to change the emergency management program. The most significant change to the emergency management program was the proposed reduction of the sites Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ). As the EPZ is defined as an area for which planning is needed to protect the public in the event of an accident, the process became politically challenging. An overview of how the site initially approached this problem and then learned to more substantially involve the state and local emergency preparedness agencies and the local Citizens Advisory Board will be presented. (author)

  2. On-site emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K.

    1981-01-01

    This lecture covers the Emergency Planning of the Operating Organization and does not describe the functions and responsibilities of the Regulatory Body and public authorities. The lecture is based on the Codes of Practice and Safety Guides of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and arrangements as in use in the Swiss Nuclear Power Station Beznau. (orig.)

  3. Post-Chernobyl emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report is the result of a study ordered by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate and the National Swedish Institute of Radiation Protection to evaluate the measurements taken in Sweden in response to the Chernobyl accident. The enquiry was also given the task of suggesting improvements of the nuclear accidents emergency planning and other activities relevant to nuclear accidents. Detailed accounts are given of the course of events in Sweden at the Chernobyl accident and the steps taken by central or local authorities are discussed. Several alterations of the emergency planning are proposed and a better coordination of the affected organizations is suggested. (L.E.)

  4. Emergency Response and Long Term Planning: Two sides of the Coin for Managing Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metchis, K.; Beller-Simms, N.

    2014-12-01

    As projected by the US National Climate Assessment and the IPCC, extreme climate and weather events are occurring more frequently and with more intensity across the nation. Communities - and the water resource managers that serve them - are facing difficult choices to increase emergency preparedness, recover from costly impacts, and increase long term resilience. The presentation is based on a recent set of case studies about what happened in six communities that experienced one or more extreme events, focusing on water resource management. Two of the case studies will be presented, revealing that building climate resilience is not just about long term planning - it is also about taking the steps to be prepared for - and to be able to recover from - emergency events. The results of this study have implications for educating local officials on ways to think about resilience to balance both long-term and short-term preparedness.

  5. Emergency planning and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, O.; Breniere, J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive lessons from operating experience for the planning of emergency measures. This operating experience has two facets: it is obtained not only from the various incidents and accidents which have occurred in countries with nuclear power programmes and from the resulting application of emergency plans but also from the different exercises and simulations carried out in France and in other countries. Experience generally confirms the main approaches selected for emergency plans. The lessons to be derived are of three types: first, it appears necessary to set forth precisely the responsibilities of each person involved in order to prevent a watering-down of decisions in the event of an accident; secondly, considerable improvements need to be made in the different communication networks to be used; and thirdly, small accidents with minor radiological consequences deserve as systematic and thorough an approach as large and more improbable accidents. (author)

  6. Supporting system in emergency response plan for nuclear material transport accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagome, Y.; Aoki, S.

    1993-01-01

    As aiming to provide the detailed information concerning nuclear material transport accidents and to supply it to the concerned organizations by an online computer, the Emergency Response Supporting System has been constructed in the Nuclear Safety Technology Center, Japan. The system consists of four subsystems and four data bases. By inputting initial information such as name of package and date of accident, one can obtain the appropriate initial response procedures and related information for the accident immediately. The system must be useful for protecting the public safety from nuclear material transport accidents. But, it is not expected that the system shall be used in future. (J.P.N.)

  7. Radiological emergencies - planning and preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-12-31

    This information and training film in three parts deals with the technical background for emergency planning, emergency planning concepts and emergency preparedness. It describes the technical characteristics of radiological emergencies on which important emergency planning concepts are based and the purpose of those concepts. The film also demonstrates how emergency organizations must work together to ensure adequate preparedness. The programme reflects the standards, guidance and recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

  8. Project management plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the Hanford Site will involve the handling and cleanup of toxic substances. Thousands of workers involved in these new activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and associated risks. This project is an important part of the Hanford Site mission and will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to meet high standards for safety. The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center (HAMMER) project will construct a centralized regional training center dedicated to training hazardous materials workers and emergency responders in classrooms and with hands-on, realistic training aids representing actual field conditions. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a cost-effective, high-quality way to meet the Hanford Site training needs. The training center creates a partnership among DOE; government contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and selected institutions of higher education

  9. Preliminary study on Malaysian Nuclear Agency emergency response and preparedness plan from ICT perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amy Hamijah Ab Hamid; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Abdul Muin Abdul Rahman; Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Mohamad Safuan Sulaiman; Hasfazilah Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Emergency response and preparedness (ERP) is an important components of a safety programme developed for any nuclear research centre or nuclear power plant to ensure that the facility can be operated safely and immediate response and actions can be taken to minimize the risk in case of unplanned events and incidences. ERP inclusion in the safety program has been made compulsory by most of the safety standard systems introduced currently including those of ISO 14000, OSHAS 18001 and IAEA. ERP has been included in the Nuclear Malaysia's Safety Health and Environment Management System (SHE-MS) for similar purpose. The ERP has been developed based on guidelines stipulated by AELB, IAEA, DOSH, Fire Brigade and Police Force, taking into consideration all possible events and incidences that can happen within the laboratories and irradiation facilities as a result of activities carried out by its personnel. This paper briefly describes the overall structure of the Nuclear Malaysia ERP, how it functions and being managed, and a brief historical perspective. However ERP is not easily implemented because of human errors and other weaknesses identified. Some ERP cases are analysed and assessed which based on the challenges, strategies and lessons learned from an ICT (Information and Communication Technology) perspective. Therefore, results of the analysis could then be used as inputs to develop a new system of Decision Support System (DSS) for ERP that is more effective in managing emergencies. This system is to be incorporated into the existing SHE-MS of Nuclear Malaysia. (Author)

  10. Emergency planning for fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    In April 1989, NRC published new emergency planning regulations which apply to certain by-product, source, and special nuclear materials licensees including most fuel cycle facilities. In addition to these NRC regulations, other regulatory agencies such as EPA, OSHA, and DOT have regulations concerning emergency planning or notification that may apply to fuel cycle facilities. Emergency planning requirements address such areas as emergency classification, organization, notification and activation, assessment, corrective and protective measures, emergency facilities and equipment, maintaining preparedness, records and reports, and recovery. This article reviews applicable regulatory requirements and guidance, then concentrates on implementation strategies to produce an effective emergency response capability

  11. External plans for radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, G.; Vizuet G, J.; Benitez S, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1989, the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico shares in the task of Food and Water Control corresponding to the FT-86 task force of External Plans for Radiological Emergency (PERE), in charge of the Veracruz Health Services. In the PERE preparation stage previous actions are necessary developed for the preparation and updating of this plan and the task organization with the purpose to maintaining standing and operable in any time and circumstance, the capability to response in the face of an emergency. This stage englobes activities which must be realized before to carry out the Plan as they are the specialized training of personnel which participates and the execution of exercises and simulacrums. Until 1998, training and exercises for this task had been realized under diverse possible sceneries but in conditions that simulated the presence of radioactive material. For this reason, it should be emphasized the training realized during the days 6th, 7th, 8th July, 1999, in the emergency planning zone of the Plan, which to carry out using radioactive material. The National Institute of Nuclear Research had in charge of the training. This work describes all the activities for the realization of this training. (Author)

  12. Off-site emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narrog, J.

    1980-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear accident, the actions taken to protect the public from off-site consequences must be effective. An effective organization of emergency actions is based on two components: the actions of the operator of the nuclear facility and the actions of the competent authorities. The measures of the operator are of special importance in the first hours after the beginning of the nuclear accident, because there is no other help. Therefore the operator of a nuclear facility shall be obliged under the nuclear licensing procedure to make provisions of his own and carry out protective measures which should be compiled in a so-called 'alarm-plan'. On the other hand the means of the operator are too small in many cases and there is a need for actions by the responsible authorities. The actions of the authorities should be compiled in a so-called 'emergency response plan'. The emergency response plan shall apply to all cases in which, as a result of occurrences in or at a nuclear facility, a damaging impact on the environment is expected or has occurred requiring the authorities in charge to intervene for its prevention or limitation. (orig./RW)

  13. Opportunities in SMR Emergency Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Wayne L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Advanced Reactor Technologies Program

    2014-10-01

    Using year 2014 cost information gathered from twenty different locations within the current commercial nuclear power station fleet, an assessment was performed concerning compliance costs associated with the offsite emergency Planning Standards contained in 10 CFR 50.47(b). The study was conducted to quantitatively determine the potential cost benefits realized if an emergency planning zone (EPZ) were reduced in size according to the lowered risks expected to accompany small modular reactors (SMR). Licensees are required to provide a technical basis when proposing to reduce the surrounding EPZ size to less than the 10 mile plume exposure and 50 mile ingestion pathway distances currently being used. To assist licensees in assessing the savings that might be associated with such an action, this study established offsite emergency planning costs in connection with four discrete EPZ boundary distances, i.e., site boundary, 2 miles, 5 miles and 10 miles. The boundary selected by the licensee would be based on where EPA Protective Action Guidelines are no longer likely to be exceeded. Additional consideration was directed towards costs associated with reducing the 50 mile ingestion pathway EPZ. The assessment methodology consisted of gathering actual capital costs and annual operating and maintenance costs for offsite emergency planning programs at the surveyed sites, partitioning them according to key predictive factors, and allocating those portions to individual emergency Planning Standards as a function of EPZ size. Two techniques, an offsite population-based approach and an area-based approach, were then employed to calculate the scaling factors which enabled cost projections as a function of EPZ size. Site-specific factors that influenced source data costs, such as the effects of supplemental funding to external state and local agencies for offsite response organization activities, were incorporated into the analysis to the extent those factors could be

  14. System model for evaluation of an emergency response plan for a nuclear power plant based on an assessment of nuclear emergency exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcos Vinicius C.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are designed and built with systems dedicated to provide a high degree of protection to its workers, the population living in their neighborhoods and the environment. Among the requirements for ensuring safety there are the existence of the nuclear emergency plan. Due to the relationship between the actions contemplated in the emergency plan and the nuclear emergency exercise, it becomes possible to assess the quality of the nuclear emergency plan, by means of emergency exercise evaluation, The techniques used in this work aim at improving the evaluation method of a nuclear emergency exercise through the use of performance indicators in the evaluation of the structures, actions and procedures involved. The proposed model enables comparisons between different moments of an emergency plan directed to a nuclear power plant as well as comparisons between plans dedicated to different facilities. (author)

  15. System model for evaluation of an emergency response plan for a nuclear power plant based on an assessment of nuclear emergency exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcos Vinicius C.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear power plants are designed and built with systems dedicated to provide a high degree of protection to its workers, the population living in their neighborhoods and the environment. Among the requirements for ensuring safety there are the existence of the nuclear emergency plan. Due to the relationship between the actions contemplated in the emergency plan and the nuclear emergency exercise, it becomes possible to assess the quality of the nuclear emergency plan, by means of emergency exercise evaluation, The techniques used in this work aim at improving the evaluation method of a nuclear emergency exercise through the use of performance indicators in the evaluation of the structures, actions and procedures involved. The proposed model enables comparisons between different moments of an emergency plan directed to a nuclear power plant as well as comparisons between plans dedicated to different facilities. (author)

  16. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    The Province of Ontario Nuclear Emergency Plan has been developed pursuant to Section 8 of the Emergency Plans Act, 1983. This plan replaces the Province of Ontario Nuclear Contingency Off-Site Plan (June 1980) which is no longer applicable. The wastes plan includes planning, preparation, emergency organization and operational responsibilities and policy

  17. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 4. Radiological emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, W.W.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report reviews the state of emergency response planning for nuclear power plants in California. Attention is given to the role of Federal agencies, particularly the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in planning for both on and off site emergency measures and to the role of State and local agencies for off site planning. The relationship between these various authorities is considered. Existing emergency plans for nuclear power plants operating or being constructed in California are summarized. The developing role of the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission is examined

  18. Joint radiation emergency management plan of the International Organizations. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions allocated to it under these Conventions, to which the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full Parties. Since 1989, the arrangements between these organizations for facilitating the practical implementation of those articles of the two Conventions which are operational in nature have been documented by the IAEA in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). This manual describes the conceptual link between the IAEA, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations, States which are IAEA Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, and other States under the terms of the two Conventions. The ENATOM is intended for use primarily by Contact Points as defined in the Convention

  19. Plan for radiological emergencies situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada Figueroa, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    The objective for the Emergencies plan it is to reestablish the stock that they should be executed by the regulatory Entity in Guatemala during a real potential radiological emergency situation in the national territory

  20. Radiation Emergency Planning in Petroleum Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shinawy, R.M.K.; El-Naggar, M.A.; Abdel-Fattah, A.T.; Gomaa, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Similar to all industrial activities utilizing radiation sources, or dealing with radioactive materials in its operations, petroleum industry requires the organization of a Radiation Emergency Plan. This plan should be based on a comprehensive and subtle understanding of the extensive multidisciplinary operations involved in petroleum processing and the dangers that threaten human health, environment and property; both from ordinary emergency situations common to petroleum industry activities and also from radiation emergency events. Radiation emergencies include radiological source accidents involving occurrence of high dose exposures. Radioactive contamination or spill are also major problems that may cause low dose exposures and environmental radioactive contamination. The simultaneous occurrence of other industrial emergency events such as fires or structural collapses will add to the seriousness of the emergency situation. The essential aspects of Radiation Emergency Planning include notification, assessment of situation, foresight, definition of roles and responsibilities including health safety and environmental concepts. An important contribution to the Emergency Planning is the proper intelligent medical response. Another essential parameter is the training of personnel that will undertake the responsibility of executing the emergency procedures according to the various emergency situations. The main features of the radiation Emergency Plan in Petroleum industry is presented in the text

  1. Major issues on establishing an emergency plan in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhu-zhou

    1988-03-01

    Several major issues on emergency planning and preparation in nuclear facilities were discussed -- such as the importance of emergency planning and preparation, basic principles of intervention and implementation of emergency plan and emergency training and drills to insure the effectiveness of the emergency plan. It is emphasized that the major key point of emergency planning and response is to avoid the occurrence of serious nonrandom effect. 12 refs., 3 tabs

  2. Heavy precipitation and the responses within emergency management - a new approach for emergency planning and disaster prevention by utilizing fire brigade operation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschker, Thomas; Glade, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    industrial and traffic infrastructure. This new concept might support a sophisticated emergency planning and also better disaster prevention efforts for the authorities. Especially municipal civil protection authorities are liable to prepare new strategies and emergency plans for their particular field of responsibility, regarding their neighbor communities and to cope the "German national adaption strategy to the climate change" as a future goal. Keywords: municipal emergency planning, critical infrastructure, heavy-precipitation

  3. A model national emergency plan for radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a result, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request

  4. Water Utility Planning for an Emergency Drinking Water Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reviews roles and responsibilities among various levels of government regarding emergency water supplies and seeks to encourage collaboration and partnership regarding emergency water supply planning.

  5. Planning and training in emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    Link Simulation Systems Division of the Singer Company is combining its tactical simulation and display system with state-of-the-art decision and control technology to provide a combined operations, planning, and training (COPAT) system. This system provides for the total integration of the three primary responsibilities of emergency managers: planning and training for and decision and control of an emergency. The system is intended to be a complete operations center for emergency management personnel. In the event of a natural disaster or man-made emergency, the national, state, county, and city emergency managers require a secure and reliable operations center. The COPAT system combines the decision and control capabilities with proven simulation techniques allowing for integrated planning and training. The hardware system, software, data bases, and maps used during planning and training are the same as those used during actual emergencies

  6. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  7. Chapter No.9. Emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Emergency preparedness is a set of measures the aim of which is to mitigate possible impacts of events during the operation of nuclear facilities, transport of nuclear materials and radioactive waste as well as to reduce consequences to environment and population. An emergency planning of UJD is understood as an establishment of technical and organisational means determined for prognosis of development of events having radiation consequences together with capability to suggest the countermeasures needed to minimise the impact to population. Emergency Response Centre (ERC) of UJD is a technical support tool of UJD and at the same time it fulfils the role of advisory body for the National Emergency Commission for Radiation Accidents (NECRA) In 2001 UJD continued in further increase of equipment quality in the ERC by completion of facilities necessary to transmit necessary data from nuclear facilities, for communication and other HW and SW means. That it is why the application of geographic information systems (GIS), higher quality of data transmission from nuclear facilities and installation of new database platform could be enabled. Also the documentation of ERC has been completed by the emergency procedures of NPP Mochovce and guides of the RODOS system were finished. In the area of emergency preparedness UJD activities in 2001 were focused on preparation and realisation of emergency exercises and execution of inspections. In accordance with the inspection plan inspectors executed several inspections which were targeted to control the course of exercises at nuclear facilities, documentation and the way of training of members of the UJD headquarters. The function of systems of notification and warning, communication, monitoring and technical support means of both NPP Bohunice and NPP Mochovce has been verified and checked as well. The ultimate attention, however, was paid to the preparation of UJD emergency headquarters. The preparation was realised in a form of

  8. Emergency planning for industrial hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, H.B.F.; Kay, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The European Communities have produced a Directive on the Major Accident Hazards of Certain Industrial Activities which sets out standards for the control and mitigation of the hazards presented by sites and storages which contain significant quantities of dangerous substances. An essential element of these controls is the provision of effective on-and off-site emergency plans. This conference explores the considerable research effort which is going on throughout the world in the improvement of systems for emergency planning. Attention was also drawn to areas where difficulties still exist, for example in predicting the consequences of an accident, the complexities of communication problems and the difficulties arising from involvement of the public. The proceedings are in six parts which deal with organizations implementing emergency planning: on- and off-site emergency planning and design; techniques for emergency plans; expenses and auditing of emergency plans; lessons learnt from the emergency management of major accidents; information to the public to and during emergencies. (author)

  9. The usefulness of time-dependent reactor accident consequence modelling for emergency response planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.; Jacob, P.; Mueller, H.; Proehl, G.

    1989-01-01

    After major releases of radionuclides into the atmosphere fast reaction of authorities will be necessary to inform the public of potential consequences and to consider and optimize mitigating actions. These activities require availability of well designed computer models, adequate and fast measurements and prior training of responsible persons. The quantitative assessment models should be capable of taking into account of actual atmospheric dispersion conditions, actual deposition situation (dry, rain, snow, fog), seasonal status of the agriculture, food processing and distribution pathways, etc. In this paper the usefulness of such models will be discussed, their limitations, the relative importance of exposure pathways and a selection of important methods to decrease the activity in food products after an accident. Real-time reactor accident consequence models should be considered as a condition sine qua non for responsible use of nuclear power for electricity production

  10. On-site emergency preparedness and response PLAN for EDF Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOSSARD, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    Considering nuclear safety concepts applied to reactor design and preventive measures taken by EDF during operation, and although the probability of a nuclear accident, even minor, on a unit is very low, it still cannot be considered nil. Therefore, the operator must be prepared, if such an event should occur, by defining and implementing a 'crisis organisation' in cooperation with the Safety Authorities. The crisis organisation has been set up in order to master and control the accident, i.e. in order to prevent, in real time, the accident developing into a more serious situation and to limit the consequences regarding technical and radiological concerns. EDF crisis organisation is integrated into the current organisation at local level as well as at national level. In addition to the operation team in 'shifts', crisis organisation is based 'on-call' personnel available at home (local level) or within a restricted area (national level). This organisation includes Managers, Experts, Participants EDF (+FRAMATOME), each of the them working, in case of an emergency, in his field of skills

  11. Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marianno, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Recently a member of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Consequence Management Response Team took part in outreaches and an exercise in different foreign countries. In Brazil and South Korea, the outreaches revolved around a nuclear power plant exercise. In Canada, participation was limited to a table top Consequence Management exercise. This talk will briefly discuss each event and resulting pertinent observations. In each case, it became evident that governments respond to disasters very differently, and that these differences are not only culturally based, but also influenced by each government's respective experience in dealing with natural disasters

  12. Regional cooperation for emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, D.S.L.; Liu, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    It has become increasingly evident since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident that a sound emergency plan is indispensable to the overall nuclear power generation program. In some developing countries in Eastern Aisa, the availability of manpower resources and facilities to handle a nuclear power plant accident are rather limited. Therefore, the establishment of a regional mutual emergency plan is deemed necessary. A preliminary idea concerning this establishment is presented for deliberation by this Conference

  13. Effective nuclear and radiation emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes how to develop a balanced emergency plan, which realistically reflect the interfaces with various emergency organizations. The use of resources should be optimized with focusing on the most likely accidents. The pitfalls of writing an emergency plan without ''big picture'' in mind should be avoided. It is absolutely essential to have a clear definition of responsibilities and to have proper understanding of the tasks in between all counterparts in the emergency preparedness. Special attention should be paid to off-site part of the nuclear emergency preparedness, because the people involved in it usually receive less training than the on-site personnel and they are not specialized for nuclear emergencies but deal with all sorts of emergencies. (author)

  14. Regulatory aspects of emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamgochian, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the advances that have been made in the USA in the field of emergency planning over the past several years and considers regulatory changes that may be on the horizon. The paper examines the importance of severe accident source terms and their relationship to emergency preparedness, recent research results of work on source terms, and the experience gained from evaluation of licensee performance during annual emergency preparedness exercises. (author)

  15. Nuclear emergency planning in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baarli, J.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear emergency planning in Norway is forming a part of the Search and Rescue Service of the country. Due to the fact that Norway do not have any nucleat power reactor, the nuclear emergency planning has not been given high priority. The problems however are a part of the activity of the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene, and the emergency preparedness is at the present time to a large extent based on the availability of professional health physicists and their knowledge, rather than established practices

  16. Radiation emergency planning for medical organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerez Vergueria, Sergio F.; Jerez Vergueria, Pablo F.

    1997-01-01

    The possible occurrence of accidents involving sources of ionizing radiation demands response plans to mitigate the consequences of radiological accidents. This paper offers orientations in order to elaborate emergency planning for institutions with medical applications of ionizing radiation. Taking into account that the prevention of accidents is of prime importance in dealing with radioactive materials and others sources of ionizing radiation, such as X-rays, it is recommended that one include in emergency instructions and procedures several aspects relative to causes which originate these radiological events. Topics such as identification of radiological events in these practices and their consequences, protective measures, planning for and emergency response and maintenance of emergency capacity, are considered in this article. (author)

  17. OEM Emergency Response Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management retains records of all incident responses in which it participates. This data asset includes three major sources of information:...

  18. Emergency response workers workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapeev, S.A.; Glukhikh, E.N.; Tyurin, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A training workshop entitled Current issues and potential improvements in Rosatom Corporation emergency prevention and response system was held in May-June, 2012. The workshop combined theoretical training with full-scale practical exercise that demonstrated the existing innovative capabilities for radiation reconnaissance, diving equipment and robotics, aircraft, emergency response and rescue hardware and machinery. This paper describes the activities carried out during the workshop [ru

  19. Emergency planning knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheorghe, A.; Vamanu, D.

    1996-01-01

    This book is an essay in dealing with the risks and consequences of disruptive events in some emblematical enterprises of our time. The striking relevance of the variability factor in emergency management makes it difficult to encompass the entire difficulty in a fully generic, streamlined discourse. That is why, while trying its best to extract generic pieces of wisdom from the varied experience reported in the exploding literature around that deals with the subject, this text would rather focus on a few case histories at hand, that may more eloquently, if implicitly, illustrate authors' stand. The three projects that served the purpose - ETH-NUMERISK, MONITOT.HSK, and ETH-CHEMRISK - are components of a research project in the Swiss academic and educational environment. figs., tabs., refs,

  20. Fire Department Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.; Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services

  1. Institutional planning for radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keil, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    Persons providing health care pride themselves on their ability to handle emergencies. This pride is born of the daily experience of caring for the sick and injured. Emergencies include traumatic injuries, sudden changes in health status, and various minor disturbances in the physical environment inside the hospital. The effectiveness of this ability is unquestioned in limited-scale problems. However, survey experience of the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAH) reveals weaknesses when health care organizations are faced with larger scale problems such as earthquakes and plane crashes. One may speculate that a massive emergency such as occurred at Chernobyl would overwhelm this ability. Based on the same survey experience, JCAH believes that health care organizations can plan and train to prepare for large-scale emergencies in a careful and systematic manner. Through such study and practice, their existing confidence and ability to deal with limited emergencies can be explained

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory emergency management plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, G.F.

    1998-07-15

    The Laboratory has developed this Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to assist in emergency planning, preparedness, and response to anticipated and actual emergencies. The Plan establishes guidance for ensuring safe Laboratory operation, protection of the environment, and safeguarding Department of Energy (DOE) property. Detailed information and specific instructions required by emergency response personnel to implement the EMP are contained in the Emergency Management Plan Implementing Procedure (EMPIP) document, which consists of individual EMPIPs. The EMP and EMPIPs may be used to assist in resolving emergencies including but not limited to fires, high-energy accidents, hazardous material releases (radioactive and nonradioactive), security incidents, transportation accidents, electrical accidents, and natural disasters.

  3. Double shell tanks emergency pumping plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangen, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a formal plan for the emergency transfer of waste from a leaking double shell tank to a designated receiver tank has been developed. This plan is in response to the priority 2 safety issue ''Response to a leaking double-shell tank'' in the DOE Report to Congress, 1991. The plan includes the tanks in four of the east tank farms and one of the west farms. The background information and supporting calculations used for the creation of the emergency plan are discussed in this document. The scope of this document is all of the double shell tanks in the AN, AP, AW, AY, and SY farms. The transfer lines, flush pits, and valve pits involved in the transfer of waste between these farms are also included in the scope. Due to the storage of high heat waste, AZ farm is excluded at this time

  4. 76 FR 47055 - Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... (ERP) AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Rural Utilities Service... 12, 2004, at 69 FR 60541 requiring all borrowers to maintain an Emergency Response Plan (ERP) that... major natural or manmade disaster or other causes. This ERP requirement was not entirely new to the...

  5. Guided preparedness planning with lay communities: enhancing capacity of rural emergency response through a systems-based partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, O Lee; Perry, Charlene; Azur, Melissa; Taylor, Henry G; Gwon, Howard; Mosley, Adrian; Semon, Natalie; Links, Jonathan M

    2013-02-01

    , LHDs, FBOs, and AHCs can work effectively to plan, implement, and evaluate what appears to be an effective, practical, and durable model of capacity building for public mental health emergency planning.

  6. Emergency response strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrilo, D.; Dias de la Cruz, F.

    1984-01-01

    In the present study is estimated, on the basis of a release category (PWR4) and several accident scenarios previously set up, the emergency response efficacy obtained in the application of different response strategies on each of the above mentioned scenarios. The studied strategies contemplate the following protective measures: evacuation, shelter and relocation. The radiological response has been obtained by means of CRAC2 (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) code, and calculated in terms of absorbed dose equivalent (Whole body and thyroid), as well as early and latent biological effects. (author)

  7. Survey of Canadian hospitals radiation emergency plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C [Social Data Research Ltd./The Flett Consulting Group, Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of Canadian hospitals conducted by Social Data Research Ltd. during the Spring and Summer, 1995. The main objective of the survey was to determine the state of readiness of Canadian hospitals in respect of radiation emergency planning. In addition, the AECB was interested in knowing the extent to which a report by the Group of Medical Advisors, `GMA-3: Guidelines on Hospital Emergency Plans for the Management of Minor Radiation Accidents`, which was sponsored and distributed in 1993, was received and was useful to hospital administrators and emergency personnel. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 598 acute care hospitals, and 274 responses were received. The main conclusion of this study is that, with the exception of a few large institutions, hospitals generally do not have specific action plans to handle minor radiation accidents. (author).

  8. Survey of Canadian hospitals radiation emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of Canadian hospitals conducted by Social Data Research Ltd. during the Spring and Summer, 1995. The main objective of the survey was to determine the state of readiness of Canadian hospitals in respect of radiation emergency planning. In addition, the AECB was interested in knowing the extent to which a report by the Group of Medical Advisors, 'GMA-3: Guidelines on Hospital Emergency Plans for the Management of Minor Radiation Accidents', which was sponsored and distributed in 1993, was received and was useful to hospital administrators and emergency personnel. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 598 acute care hospitals, and 274 responses were received. The main conclusion of this study is that, with the exception of a few large institutions, hospitals generally do not have specific action plans to handle minor radiation accidents. (author)

  9. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, M. A. W.; Ali, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency. (authors)

  10. National emergency plan for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The national emergency plan for nuclear accidents is a plan of action designed to provide a response to accidents involving the release or potential release of radioactive substances into the environment, which could give rise to radiation exposure to the public. The plan outlines the measures which are in place to assess and mitigate the effects of nuclear accidents which might pose a radiological hazard in ireland. It shows how accident management will operate, how technical information and monitoring data will be collected, how public information will be provided and what measures may be taken for the protection of the public in the short and long term. The plan can be integrated with the Department of Defence arrangements for wartime emergencies

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan - Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, Carl J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 151.1C, Comprehensive Emergency Management System requires that each Department of Energy field element documents readiness assurance activities, addressing emergency response planning and preparedness. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, as prime contractor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), has compiled this Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan to provide this assurance to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office. Stated emergency capabilities at the INL are sufficient to implement emergency plans. Summary tables augment descriptive paragraphs to provide easy access to data. Additionally, the plan furnishes budgeting, personnel, and planning forecasts for the next 5 years.

  12. Wind emergency response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, A.J.; Buckner, M.R.; Mueller, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The WIND system is an automated emergency response system for real-time predictions of the consequences of liquid and airborne releases from SRP. The system consists of a minicomputer and associated peripherals necessary for acquisition and handling of large amounts of meteorological data from a local tower network and the National Weather Service. The minicomputer uses these data and several predictive models to assess the impact of accidental releases. The system is fast and easy to use, and output is displayed both in tabular form and as trajectory map plots for quick interpretation. The rapid response capabilities of the WIND system have been demonstrated in support of SRP operations

  13. Adaptive workflow simulation of emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Guido Wybe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Recent incidents and major training exercises in and outside the Netherlands have persistently shown that not having or not sharing information during emergency response are major sources of emergency response inefficiency and error, and affect incident mitigation outcomes through workflow planning

  14. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.

    1996-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, it became painfully obvious to the international community that there was an urgent need to establish a system for the coordination of international disaster assistance. It became the task of the United Nations Office for Disaster Relief (UNDRO) to develop such a system. The former UNDRO was subsumed into the Department of Humanitarian Affairs (DHA), established in January 1992 on the basis of UN General Assembly Resolution 46/182 adopted in December 1991, and the disaster relief system presently found in DHA is a further evolution of the system established by UNDRO. One particular importance in relation to nuclear accidents is the fact that UNDRO and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) signed a Memorandum of Understanding defining their respective responsibilities and the need for cooperation in case of accidents involving the unintentional release of nuclear radiation. In essence, the MOU makes it clear that the responsibilities of the IAEA, in connection with accidents at Nuclear Power Plants, related to the technical and radiological aspects, in particular to accident prevention, to the on-site preparedness, and to remedial measures within the 30-km zone outside the NPP. DHA's responsibilities, on the other hand, relate to the general preparedness and the rescue efforts outside the 30 km zone. In this respect, the preparedness and emergency response system is no different from the system employed in any other type of sudden-onset emergency

  15. Comparison of nuclear plant emergency plans of PBNCC members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, W.Y.; Hopwood, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSWG) of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee initiated cooperation among Pacific Basin areas based primarily around emergency planning. The NSWG conducted a review of the emergency response plans of members. This paper briefly reviews and makes a comparison of the emergency response plans, with particular attention on the response organization, the planning zone, and the protective action guidelines for emergencies. Although all areas have adopted the same basic elements of emergency planning and are similar, there are also variances due to different governmental structures, population densities, and available resources. It is found that the most significant difference is in the size of the emergency planning zone. The paper concludes with a discussion on possible future cooperative activities of the working group. (author)

  16. Planned home birth: the professional responsibility response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B; Brent, Robert L; Levene, Malcolm I; Arabin, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the recrudescence of and new support for midwife-supervised planned home birth in the United States and the other developed countries in the context of professional responsibility. Advocates of planned home birth have emphasized patient safety, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and respect for women's rights. We provide a critical evaluation of each of these claims and identify professionally appropriate responses of obstetricians and other concerned physicians to planned home birth. We start with patient safety and show that planned home birth has unnecessary, preventable, irremediable increased risk of harm for pregnant, fetal, and neonatal patients. We document that the persistently high rates of emergency transport undermines patient safety and satisfaction, the raison d'etre of planned home birth, and that a comprehensive analysis undermines claims about the cost-effectiveness of planned home birth. We then argue that obstetricians and other concerned physicians should understand, identify, and correct the root causes of the recrudescence of planned home birth; respond to expressions of interest in planned home birth by women with evidence-based recommendations against it; refuse to participate in planned home birth; but still provide excellent and compassionate emergency obstetric care to women transported from planned home birth. We explain why obstetricians should not participate in or refer to randomized clinical trials of planned home vs planned hospital birth. We call on obstetricians, other concerned physicians, midwives and other obstetric providers, and their professional associations not to support planned home birth when there are safe and compassionate hospital-based alternatives and to advocate for a safe home-birth-like experience in the hospital. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. State of emergency preparedness for US health insurance plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M; Finne, Kristen; Lardy, Barbara; Veselovskiy, German; Korba, Caey; Margolis, Gregg S; Lurie, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Health insurance plans serve a critical role in public health emergencies, yet little has been published about their collective emergency preparedness practices and policies. We evaluated, on a national scale, the state of health insurance plans' emergency preparedness and policies. A survey of health insurance plans. We queried members of America's Health Insurance Plans, the national trade association representing the health insurance industry, about issues related to emergency preparedness issues: infrastructure, adaptability, connectedness, and best practices. Of 137 health insurance plans queried, 63% responded, representing 190.6 million members and 81% of US plan enrollment. All respondents had emergency plans for business continuity, and most (85%) had infrastructure for emergency teams. Some health plans also have established benchmarks for preparedness (eg, response time). Regarding adaptability, 85% had protocols to extend claim filing time and 71% could temporarily suspend prior medical authorization rules. Regarding connectedness, many plans shared their contingency plans with health officials, but often cited challenges in identifying regulatory agency contacts. Some health insurance plans had specific policies for assisting individuals dependent on durable medical equipment or home healthcare. Many plans (60%) expressed interest in sharing best practices. Health insurance plans are prioritizing emergency preparedness. We identified 6 policy modifications that health insurance plans could undertake to potentially improve healthcare system preparedness: establishing metrics and benchmarks for emergency preparedness; identifying disaster-specific policy modifications, enhancing stakeholder connectedness, considering digital strategies to enhance communication, improving support and access for special-needs individuals, and developing regular forums for knowledge exchange about emergency preparedness.

  18. Dangerous goods emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a general overview of the State of Western Australia including: the legal framework of the Dangerous Goods and Emergency response management scenarios (which consist mainly of fuel products such as LP gas); particular problems unique to the Western Australian environment; what has been done to overcome those problems. Western Australia has an area of about two and a half million square kilometers. The demography of the State is such that the population is concentrated in the south-west corner of the State with isolated pockets, mainly associated with mineral development but also associated with agriculture, scattered throughout the State

  19. Emergency Response Guideline Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary D Storrick

    2007-01-01

    Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled 'Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor' focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design--specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design--precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I and C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions

  20. 10 CFR 76.91 - Emergency planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency planning. 76.91 Section 76.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safety § 76.91 Emergency planning... Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Public Law 99-499, or other State or...

  1. Brazilian emergency planning for radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    Brazilian emergency planning for radiological accidents is organized to respond promptly to any emergency at nuclear power plants or other installations utilizing nuclear fuel. It consists of several committees: a general coordination committee with representatives from several federal departments, with final decision with the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), and the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (SEMA). Some committees conduct support activities. For example, the Operational Coordination Committee supervises the tasks undertaken by the Army, Navy, and Air Force in response to the needs and decisions of the general coordination committee

  2. Beyond defense-in-depth: cost and funding of state and local government radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of commercial nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, S.N.

    1979-10-01

    Inadequate, sporadic, uncertain and frustrating are words local, state and Federal officials use to describe the current hodgepodge funding approach to State and local government radiological emergency response plans and preparedeness in support of commercial nuclear power stations. The creation of a Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness Fund for State and Local Government is offered as a preferred solution. Monies for the Fund could be derived from a one time Fee of $1 million levied on the operator of each nuclear power station. Every five years, adjustments could be made in the Fee to assure full recovery of costs because of inflation, revised criteria and other cost related factors. Any surplus would be refunded to the utilities. Any state that has obtained NRC concurrence or is in the process could be reimbursed for previous expenditures up to two years prior to NRC concurrence. Concurrence in all state and local government plans is the objective of the funding program. The Fund should be administered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report also discusses actions by Federal and state agencies and points to long range considerations, such as a training institute, including transportation and non-commercial and other fixed nuclear facilities, where preparedness could be enhanced by a coherent funding mechanism. All recommendations are based on an inquiry by the Office of state Programs, NRC, into the historical and future costs and funding of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness at the state and local government levels and are derived from discussions with many local, State and Federal officials

  3. Land Transport Emergency Response Technology Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOTSON, LORI J.; PIERCE, JIM D.

    2003-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was tasked by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) to provide assistance in developing an emergency response plan for radioactive material transportation activities. Those tasks included compiling radioactive materials (RAM) transportation accident data FR-om the open literature and databases, investigating emergency response plans for radioactive materials transport in the United States, and developing specific recommendations for the JNC' nuclear material transport emergency response plan, based on information gathered during the first two tasks. These recommendations include developing a RAM database, a public transparency Internet website, an emergency response inFR-astructure designed specifically for transportation needs, and a clear set of directives to provide authority in the case of transportation accidents or incidents involving RAM

  4. External plans for radiological emergency; Plan de emergencia radiologica externo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, G; Vizuet G, J; Benitez S, J A [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    Since 1989, the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico shares in the task of Food and Water Control corresponding to the FT-86 task force of External Plans for Radiological Emergency (PERE), in charge of the Veracruz Health Services. In the PERE preparation stage previous actions are necessary developed for the preparation and updating of this plan and the task organization with the purpose to maintaining standing and operable in any time and circumstance, the capability to response in the face of an emergency. This stage englobes activities which must be realized before to carry out the Plan as they are the specialized training of personnel which participates and the execution of exercises and simulacrums. Until 1998, training and exercises for this task had been realized under diverse possible sceneries but in conditions that simulated the presence of radioactive material. For this reason, it should be emphasized the training realized during the days 6th, 7th, 8th July, 1999, in the emergency planning zone of the Plan, which to carry out using radioactive material. The National Institute of Nuclear Research had in charge of the training. This work describes all the activities for the realization of this training. (Author)

  5. What was learned in developing the 1987 Zion Federal Field Exercise that can be used in planning other emergency response exercises?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, B.H.; Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The second Federal Field Exercise (FFE-2) was held in conjunction with the 1988 full participation exercise at the Zion nuclear power plant. This three-day exercise focused on the evaluation of the Federal Response plan and the numerous interfaces of the Federal agencies with the offsite authorities and the utility. Because of the many unique aspects of this exercise and the large number of participants, the planning effort for this exercise was considerably more involved than routine exercises. This paper provides a discussion of the process of developing such an exercise (i.e., the decisions, organization, resources, documents, and staffing that were necessary) plus the lessons learned from the FFE-2 that might be applied to other emergency response exercises

  6. Nuclear emergency planning and response in industrial areas. Results of a qualitative study in 9 industrial companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, N.; Hardeman, F.; Soudan, K.

    1998-11-01

    Substantial economic losses and potential dangerous situations may result when industrial companies unexpectedly have to shut down their activities in an abrupt way. With respect to the industrial companies located in the Antwerp harbour region, the reason for such an unplanned shut-down could be the decision to (preventively) evacuate their workers, or to have them sheltered, in case of an alarm situation at a nearby nuclear power plant of Doel or in any other adjacent industrial factory. Between January and August 1998, the prevention advisors of nine industrial companies have been interviewed to gain insight in the scale and relative importance of several economic costs and practical difficulties that may arise. Moreover, the appropriateness of the existing nuclear emergency response decision structure and intervention philosophy was investigated. The main conclusions drawn from the interviews are reported. Recommendations are made to increase the efficiency of implementing countermeasures in industrial areas

  7. Nuclear emergency planning and response in industrial areas. Results of a qualitative study in 9 industrial companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauwels, N.; Hardeman, F.; Soudan, K

    1998-11-01

    Substantial economic losses and potential dangerous situations may result when industrial companies unexpectedly have to shut down their activities in an abrupt way. With respect to the industrial companies located in the Antwerp harbour region, the reason for such an unplanned shut-down could be the decision to (preventively) evacuate their workers, or to have them sheltered, in case of an alarm situation at a nearby nuclear power plant of Doel or in any other adjacent industrial factory. Between January and August 1998, the prevention advisors of nine industrial companies have been interviewed to gain insight in the scale and relative importance of several economic costs and practical difficulties that may arise. Moreover, the appropriateness of the existing nuclear emergency response decision structure and intervention philosophy was investigated. The main conclusions drawn from the interviews are reported. Recommendations are made to increase the efficiency of implementing countermeasures in industrial areas.

  8. A model national emergency plan for radiological accidents; Plan modelo nacional de respuesta de emergencia para accidentes radiologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a result, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request.

  9. The View from the Trenches Part 1: Emergency Medical Response Plans and the Need for EPR Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougelet, Robert M.; Rea, Michael E.; Nicolalde, Roberto J.; Geiling, James A.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-01-01

    Few natural disasters or intentional acts of war or terrorism have the potential for such severe impact upon a population and infrastructure as the intentional detonation of a nuclear device within a major U.S. city. In stark contrast to other disasters or even a “dirty bomb,” hundreds of thousands will be affected and potentially exposed to a clinically significant dose of ionizing radiation. This will result in immediate deaths and injuries and subsequently the development of Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS). Additionally, millions more who are unlikely to develop ARS will seek medical evaluation and treatment, overwhelming the capacity of an already compromised medical system. In this paper, we propose that in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry be utilized to screen large numbers of potentially exposed victims, and that this screening process be incorporated into the medical-surge framework that is currently being implemented across the nation for other catastrophic public health emergencies. The National Incident Management System (NIMS), the National Response Framework (NRF), the Target Capabilities list (TCL), Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPD), as well as additional guidance from multiple federal agencies provides a solid framework for this response. The effective screening of potentially exposed victims directly following a nuclear attack could potentially decrease the number of patients seeking immediate medical care by greater than 90%. PMID:20065673

  10. Planning for a radiological emergency in health care institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerez Vegueria, S.F.; Jerez Vegueria, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    The possible occurrence of accidents involving sources of ionizing radiation calls for response plans to mitigate the consequences of radiological accidents. An emergency planning framework is suggested for institutions which use medical applications of ionizing radiation. Bearing in mind that the prevention of accidents is of prime importance in dealing with radioactive materials and other sources of ionizing radiation, it is recommended that emergency instructions and procedures address certain aspects of the causes of these radiological events. Issues such as identification of radiological events in medical practices and their consequences, protective measures, planning for an emergency response and maintenance of emergency capacity are considered. (author)

  11. Plan for national nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The responsibility for Denmark's preparedness for nuclear emergencies lies with the Ministry of the Interior and the Civil Defense administration. The latter is particularly responsible for the presented plan which clarifies the organization and the measures to be taken in order to protect the public where, in the event of such an emergency, it could be in danger of radiation from radioactive materials. The main specifications of the plan, the activation of which covers the whole country, are that daily monitoring should be carried out so that warnings of nuclear accidents can be immediately conveyed to the relevant parties and that immediate action can be taken. These actions should result in the best possible protection against nuclear radiation so that acute and chronic damage to the health of members of the public can be restricted. The public, and relevant authorities should be informed of the situation and it should be attempted to regulate the reactions of individuals and of the society in general in such a way that damage to health, or social and economical conditions, can be restricted as much as possible. Denmark has not itself any atomic power plants, but some are located in neighbour countries and there are other sources such as nuclear research reactors, passing nuclear-driven ships etc. The detailed plan also covers possible sources of radiation, the nature of related damage to health, international cooperation, legal aspects, and a very detailed description of the overall administration and of the responsibilities of the organizations involved. (AB)

  12. Experiences in planning and response for the radiological emergencies in a radioactive facility; Experiencias en la planificacion y respuesta para las emergencias radiologicas en una instalacion radiactiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador B, Z.H.; Perez P, S.; Torres B, M.B.; Ayra P, F.E. [Centro de Isotopos, Ave. Monumental y Carretera La Rada, Km. 3, Guanabacoa, Apartado 3415, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: dsr@centis.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    It is internationally recognized the importance of the planning and the assurance for the effective response to the radiological emergencies. In the work those experiences on this thematic one in the Isotopes Center (CENTIS), the radioactive facility where the biggest radioactive inventory is manipulated in Cuba are presented. Due to CENTIS is also the sender and main transport of radioactive materials, it is included this practice. The revision of the abnormal situations during the years 1997 at the 2005, starting from the classification adopted by the Regulatory Authority of the country is carried out. Its are register the details of these occurrences in the Radiological Events Database (BDSR). A correspondence among the radiological impact evaluated in the Emergency Plan for the possible events and that of the registered ones is obtained. The complete training programs and realization of the exercises are carried out. Those results of 3 mockeries made to full scale are picked up. It was concluded that the operational experience and the maintained infrastructure, determine the answer capacity for radiological emergencies in the CENTIS. (Author)

  13. The technical bases for government emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, D.; Herviou, K.

    2006-01-01

    Despite technical and organisational existing arrangements to prevent human and equipment failures, the occurrence of a severe accident inducing an important release of radioactive or toxic products could not be totally excluded. Public authorities are responsible for the development of emergency plans which main objective is the protection of the population in case of accident. The efficiency of emergency plans assumes they have been established before the occurrence of any accident, taking into account specificities of the installation and its environment. On the basis of the list of possible events likely to induce releases into the environment, some 'envelope' scenarios are selected and their consequences are assessed- The comparison of the consequences to reference levels for which protective actions are recommended gives the area where actions may be required. This approach is applied for the different nuclear facilities in France. Examples are given in the article on the definition of emergency plans technical basis for nuclear power plants, other nuclear facilities and transportation of radioactive materials. (authors)

  14. Integration of Probabilistic and Multi-Hazard Risk Assessment Within Urban Development Planning and Emergency Preparedness and Response:Application to Manizales, Colombia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriel A.Bernal; Mario A.Salgado-Gálvez; Daniela Zuloaga; Julián Tristancho; Diana González; Omar-Dar(i)o Cardona

    2017-01-01

    The details of a multi-hazard and probabilistic risk assessment,developed for urban planning and emergency response activities in Manizales,Colombia,are presented in this article.This risk assessment effort was developed under the framework of an integral disaster risk management project whose goal was to connect risk reduction activities by using open access and state-of-theart risk models.A probabilistic approach was used for the analysis of seismic,landslide,and volcanic hazards to obtain stochastic event sets suitable for probabilistic loss estimation and to generate risk results in different metrics after aggregating in a rigorous way the losses associated to the different hazards.Detailed and high resolution exposure databases were used for the building stock and infrastructure of the city together with a set of vulnerability functions for each of the perils considered.The urban and territorial ordering plan of the city was updated for socioeconomic development and land use using the hazard and risk inputs and determinants,which cover not only the current urban area but also those adjacent areas where the expansion of Manizales is expected to occur.The emergency response capabilities of the city were improved by taking into account risk scenarios and after updating an automatic and real-time post-earthquake damage assessment.

  15. Radiological emergency response - a functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, P.

    1998-01-01

    The state of Louisiana's radiological emergency response programme is based on the federal guidance 'Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants' (NUREG-0654, FEMA-REP-1 Rev. 1). Over the past 14 years, the planning and implementation of response capabilities became more organized and efficient; the training programme has strengthened considerably; co-ordination with all participating agencies has assumed a more co-operative role, and as a result, a fairly well integrated response planning has evolved. Recently, a more 'functional' approach is being adopted to maximize the programme's efficiency not only for nuclear power plant emergency response, but radiological emergency response as a whole. First, several broad-based 'components' are identified; clusters of 'nodes' are generated for each component; these 'nodes' may be divided into 'sub-nodes' which will contain some 'attributes'; 'relational bonds' among the 'attributes' will exist. When executed, the process begins and continues with the 'nodes' assuming a functional and dynamic role based on the nature and characteristics of the 'attributes'. The typical response based on stand-alone elements is thus eliminated, the overlapping of functions is avoided, and a well structured and efficient organization is produced, that is essential for today's complex nature of emergency response. (author)

  16. Summary statement on emergency planning for transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S S

    1983-08-01

    Present federal policy relies mainly on market forces for assuring adequate energy supplies. In addition to national oil stockpiles, the federal government has developed, but not yet tested, an early warning system for energy shortages, in cooperation with the Department of Defense. Primary responsibility for detailed contingency planning rests with the states. Transportation systems are undergoing general change and adaptation, which government should promote while managing its own transportation resources optimally. Government planning for emergencies of all varieties should be inter-agency directed, but constrained by full recognition of extensive remedial action taken at the local level. Industry emergency planning encompasses measures by the manufacturing sector, including optimal fuel economy for vehicles and the possible use of alternative fuels. Railroad contingency planning requires some federal and regional government regulatory reforms. The federal fuel allocation program was detrimental to all transportation modes. The appropriate degree of fuel price stabilization during shortages remains highly controversial, partly on the grounds that controls lower GNP. The prevalent view was that priority allocations at any level are worse than price allocations. Equity issues should be addressed at the local level and transfers carried out in the form of money. Field evaluations, combined with quantitative modeling of the issues raised here, would be highly desirable.

  17. Standard review plan for the review and evaluation of emergency plans for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This document provides a Standard Review Plan to assure that complete and uniform reviews are made of research and test reactor radiological emergency plans. The report is organized under ten planning standards which correspond to the guidance criteria in American National Standard ANSI/ANS 15.16 - 1982 as endorsed by Revision 1 to Regulatory Guide 2.6. The applicability of the items under each planning standard is indicated by subdivisions of the steady-state thermal power levels at which the reactors are licensed to operate. Standard emergency classes and example action levels for research and test reactors which should initiate these classes are given in an Appendix. The content of the emergency plan is as follows: the emergency plan addresses the necessary provisions for coping with radiological emergencies. Activation of the emergency plan is in response to the emergency action levels. In addition to addressing those severe emergencies that will fall within one of the standard emergency classes, the plan also discusses the necessary provisions to deal with radiological emergencies of lesser severity that can occur within the operations boundary. The emergency plan allows for emergency personnel to deviate from actions described in the plan for unusual or unanticipated conditions

  18. Basic data of emergency response centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenieek, O.

    1995-01-01

    Emergency Response Centre (ERC) of Czech Republic is a highly specialized institution belonging to Nuclear Safety State Administration (SONS), which assures its activities both organizationally and technically. Main function of the ERC in the case of nuclear emergency is to fulfil the needs of SONS, Governmental Committee for Nuclear Emergencies in ER (GCNE ER) and the regional organs of State Authorities concerning the emergency planning and preparedness, evaluation of nuclear emergency consequences, including the emergency management and response. In the case of major failure or accident on NPP, the ERC carries out the performance analysis and review of a given NPP. It also monitors the dosimetric situation and transfers the recommendation to GCNE ER, Regional Emergency Management Committees and to NPP

  19. Oil spill response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    The plan outlined in this document specifies the actions that the Canadian Wildlife Service Atlantic Region is mandated to take in the event of an oil spill, or on discovering oiled migratory birds in terrestrial, fresh water, marine and inter-tidal habitats. In addition to describing the role and responsibilities of the Canadian Wildlife Service, the document also describes response plans of other agencies for dealing with all wildlife species affected by oil spills. Reporting paths, the lead agency concept, shared responsibilities with other Canadian Wildlife Service regional offices, provincial agencies, Heritage Canada, non-government wildlife response agencies, oil spill response organizations, and international organizations are outlined. An overview of the reporting and communications process is also provided

  20. Danish emergency plan for Barsebaeck Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A revised edition of the Danish emergency plan for the Swedish Power Plant Barsebaeck (about 20 km from the Danish Territory) is prepared at the request of Environmental Council in cooperation with police management and civil defense organisations. The plan is valid from October 1981. The emergency plan defines the emergency organization and the provisions to be taken quickly to protect the population if it is exposed to ionizing radiation from release of radioactive effluents as a result of an accident in the Barsebaeck power plant. The emergency plan is based upon Regulation no. 278, June 27, 1963 and Regulation no. 502, October 1, 1974. (EG)

  1. Relations Between Rainfall and Postfire Debris-Flow and Flood Magnitudes for Emergency-Response Planning, San Gabriel Mountains, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Susan H.; Boldt, Eric M.; Kean, Jason W.; Laber, Jayme; Staley, Dennis M.

    2010-01-01

    magnitude III events can be expected. Rainfall trigger-magnitude relations are linked with potential emergency-response actions in the form of an emergency-response decision chart. The chart leads a user through steps to determine potential event magnitudes, and identify possible evacuation and resource-deployment levels as a function of either individual storm forecasts or measured precipitation during storms. The ability to use this information in the planning and response decision-making process may result in significant financial savings and increased safety for both the public and emergency responders.

  2. Emergency Meal Planning for Diabetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emergency . What should I expect during an emergency situation? Many things we depend on daily may not ... 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc., 30 East 33rd Street, New York, NY 10016, 1-800-622-9010. ...

  3. Relations between Rainfall and Postfire Debris-Flow- and Flood-Event Magnitudes for Emergency-Response Planning, San Gabriel Mountains, Southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Susan; Collins, Larry; Boldt, Eric; Staley, Dennis

    2010-05-01

    .46defines the rainfall conditions above which Magnitude III events can be expected. Rainfall trigger-event magnitude relations are linked with potential emergency-response actions in the form of an emergency-response decision chart. The chart leads a user through steps to 1) determine potential event magnitudes, and 2) identify possible evacuation and resource-deployment levels as a function of either individual storm forecasts or measured precipitation during storms. The ability to use this information in the planning and response decision-making process may result in significant financial savings and increased safety for both the public and emergency responders.

  4. Planning and preparedness for radiological emergencies at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, R.; Muzzarelli, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiological Emergency Preparedness (REP) Program was created after the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assists state and local governments in reviewing and evaluating state and local REP plans and preparedness for accidents at nuclear power plants, in partnership with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which evaluates safety and emergency preparedness at the power stations themselves. Argonne National Laboratory provides support and technical assistance to FEMA in evaluating nuclear power plant emergency response exercises, radiological emergency plans, and preparedness

  5. The Brazilian emergency response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Raul dos

    1997-01-01

    With the objective of improving the response actions to potential or real emergency situations generated by radiological or nuclear accidents, the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) installed an integrated response system on a 24 hours basis. All the natiowide notifications on events that may start an emergency situation are converged to this system. Established since July 1990, this system has received around 300 notifications in which 5% were classified as potential emergency situation. (author)

  6. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.K.; Chester, R.O.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response

  7. Emergency Planning and Preparedness in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, D.; Maris, M.

    1998-01-01

    The present Belgian nuclear emergency planning and preparedness is based on experience cumulated since the early eighties. This paper describes the organisation, actuation process, the emergency planning zones and the applicable intervention guidance levels. The role of AVN as on-site inspector, nuclear emergency adviser and emergency assessor is explained as well as its human and technical resources. Finally the paper presents briefly the experience feedback on emergency exercises and training in Belgium as well as AVN's views on some debatable topics. (author)

  8. Emergency planning and preparedness of the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, B.V.

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of measures taken in case of accident or emergency to protect the site personnel, the general public and the environment will depend heavily on the adequacy of the emergency plan prepared in advance. For this reason, an emergency plan of the operating organization shall cover all activities planned to be carried out in the event of an emergency, allow for determining the level of the emergency and corresponding level of response according to the severity of the accident condition, and be based on the accidents analysed in the SAR as well as those additionally postulated for emergency planning purposes. The purpose of this paper is to present the practice of the emergency planning and preparedness in the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI) for responding to accidents/incidents that may occur at the DNRI. The DNRI emergency plan and emergency procedures developed by the DNRI will be discussed. The information in the DNRI emergency plan such as the emergency organization, classification and identification of emergencies; intervention measures; the co-ordination with off-site organizations; and emergency training and drills will be described in detail. The emergency procedures in the form of documents and instructions for responding to accidents/incidents such as accidents in the reactor, accidents out of the reactor but with significant radioactive contamination, and fire and explosion accidents will be mentioned briefly. As analysed in the Safety Analysis Report for the DNRI, only the in-site actions are presented in the paper and no off-site emergency measures are required. (author)

  9. Integrating hospitals into community emergency preparedness planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Barbara I; Wineman, Nicole V; Finn, Nicole L; Barbera, Joseph A; Schmaltz, Stephen P; Loeb, Jerod M

    2006-06-06

    Strong community linkages are essential to a health care organization's overall preparedness for emergencies. To assess community emergency preparedness linkages among hospitals, public health officials, and first responders and to investigate the influence of community hazards, previous preparation for an event requiring national security oversight, and experience responding to actual disasters. With expert advice from an advisory panel, a mailed questionnaire was used to assess linkage issues related to training and drills, equipment, surveillance, laboratory testing, surge capacity, incident management, and communication. A simple random sample of 1750 U.S. medical-surgical hospitals. Of 678 hospital representatives that agreed to participate, 575 (33%) completed the questionnaire in early 2004. Respondents were hospital personnel responsible for environmental safety, emergency management, infection control, administration, emergency services, and security. Prevalence and breadth of participation in community-wide planning; examination of 17 basic elements in a weighted analysis. In a weighted analysis, most hospitals (88.2% [95% CI, 84.1% to 92.3%]) engaged in community-wide drills and exercises, and most (82.2% [CI, 77.8% to 86.5%]) conducted a collaborative threat and vulnerability analysis with community responders. Of all respondents, 57.3% (CI, 52.1% to 62.5%) reported that their community plans addressed the hospital's need for additional supplies and equipment, and 73.0% (CI, 68.1% to 77.9%) reported that decontamination capacity needs were addressed. Fewer reported a direct link to the Health Alert Network (54.4% [CI, 49.3% to 59.5%]) and around-the-clock access to a live voice from a public health department (40.0% [CI, 35.0% to 45.0%]). Performance on many of 17 basic elements was better in large and urban hospitals and was associated with a high number of perceived hazards, previous national security event preparation, and experience in actual

  10. NOAA Emergency Response Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is in response to natural disasters. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The majority...

  11. Rural transportation emergency preparedness plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Improving the emergency preparedness of rural transportation systems is the overall goal of this research. Unique characteristics exist in rural transportation systems including widely dispersed and diverse populations and geographic areas. Exploring...

  12. Radiation emergency planning in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niewodniczanski, J [National Atomic Energy Agency, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-08-01

    The paper presents a schematic outline of the radiation emergency policy in Poland, rather from the point of view of logistics of the problem than discussing details of existing or proposed procedures. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig.

  13. Emergency preparedness planning: A process to insure effectiveness and efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, A.J. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Prevention is undoubtedly the preferred policy regarding emergency response. Unfortunately, despite best intentions, emergencies do occur. It is the prudent operator that has well written and exercised plans in place to respond to the full suite of possible situations. This paper presents a planning process to help personnel develop and/or maintain emergency management capability. It is equally applicable at the field location, the district/regional office, or the corporate headquarters. It is not limited in scope and can be useful for planners addressing incidents ranging from fires, explosions, spills/releases, computer system failure, terrorist threats and natural disasters. By following the steps in the process diagram, the planner will document emergency management capability in a logical and efficient manner which should result in effective emergency response and recovery plans. The astute planner will immediately see that the process presented is a continuing one, fully compatible with the principles of continuous improvement

  14. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L.

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig

  15. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L. (UNESA, Madrid (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig.

  16. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical resource for planning the medical response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. Effective medical response is a necessary component of the overall response to nuclear or radiological (radiation) emergencies. In general, the medical response may represent a difficult challenge for the authorities due to the complexity of the situation, often requiring specialized expertise, and special organizational arrangements and materials. To be effective, adequate planning and preparedness are needed. This manual, if implemented, should help to contribute to coherent international response. The manual provides the practical tools and generic procedures for use by emergency medical personnel during an emergency situation. It also provides guidance to be used at the stage of preparedness for development of medical response capabilities. The manual also addresses mass casualty emergencies resulting from malicious acts involving radioactive material. This part was supported by the Nuclear Security Fund. The manual was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, it must be reviewed and revised as part of the planning process to match the potential accidents, threats, local conditions and other unique characteristics of the facility where it may be used

  17. Preparation of site emergency preparedness plans for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Safety of public, occupational workers and the protection of environment should be assured while activities for economic and social progress are pursued. These activities include the establishment and utilisation of nuclear facilities and use of radioactive sources. This safety guidelines is issued as a lead document to facilitate preparation of specific site manuals by the responsible organisation for emergency response plans at each site to ensure their preparedness to meet any eventuality due to site emergency in order to mitigate its consequences on the health and safety of site personnel. It takes cognizance of an earlier AERB publications on the subject: Safety manual on site emergency plan on nuclear installations. AERB/SM/NISD-1, 1986 and also takes into consideration the urgent need for promoting public awareness and drawing up revised emergency response plans, which has come about in a significant manner after the accidents at Chernobyl and Bhopal

  18. The Veterinary Public Health Service and the National Organization for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response in the Netherlands: Development of a measurement strategy in case of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembrechts, J.F.M.M.; Pruppers, M.J.M.

    1993-12-01

    In this report the position of the Veterinary Public Health Service (VHI), which is part of the Ministry of Welfare, Health and Cultural Affairs, within the National Organisation for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response (NPK), is evaluated. NPK is activated in case of nuclear accidents in order to describe and model the evolution of the environmental contamination, to advise on countermeasures and to supervise their application and effects. Within this organisation VHI has to organize or execute measurements on animals and veterinary products and to coordinate countermeasures pertaining to their field of work. The suggestion is made to integrate the tasks of VHI and those of the Inspectorate for Health Protection (IGB) and to attune the activities of VHI and those of the State Institute for Quality Control of Agricultural Products (RIKILIT). Advices are given on how to detail the tasks of VHI adequately in the context of NPK, amongst others by describing methods to collect and interpret data. It is suggested to firstly put into practice in vivo monitoring techniques for '3'I and 134 Cs/ 137 Cs and to agree with other institutions on plans for sampling, sample preparation and measurements of milk. Finally a monitoring strategy for VHI is broadly outlined. It provides the framework for the definition of a detailed programme on sampling and measurement in case of a real accident. The monitoring strategy gives answers on the crucial question 'what has to be measured why and how by which person'. Since questions on where, when and how frequently measurements have to made should be tailored to the actual emergency situation, they are not dealt with in this report. 5 figs., 5 tabs., 66 refs

  19. First Response to Medical Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manisah Saedon; Sarimah Mahat; Muhamad Nurfalah Karoji; Hasnul Nizam Osman

    2015-01-01

    Accident or medical emergencies, both minor and critical, occurs each day and can happen in any workplace. In any medical emergencies, time is a critical factor because the first person to arrive at the scene of an accident has a key role in the rescue of a victim. With the knowledge of some common medical procedures and emergency actions, this first responder can make a positive contribution to the welfare of the accident victim. In some cases, this contribution can make difference between life and death. Improper response to medical emergencies by an untrained person can result in worsen injuries or death. Therefore, first aids training are necessary to provide the information. (author)

  20. Mobile emergency response unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadi, W.J.; Trolan, R.T.; Becker, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The Hotspot quick-response unit was the solution to a requirement to find, identify, and control areas of radioactive contamination at the scene of a nuclear weapons accident. The unit consists of two trucks and two trailers, and is designed to be transported by one U.S. Air Force C-141. One truck (generator truck) carries a 40 kW generator-heater-air conditioner combination, spare tires, and accessories. The other (water truck) carries supplies and a 250-gal water tank. One trailer (counting trailer) contains detecting, counting, and recording equipment. The other (decontaminating trailer) contains a shower, sink, 30-gal hot water tank, and supplies

  1. Planning in emergencies and disasters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgical training - although this mainly comprises the clinical aspect of it. A disaster is a large-scale emergency and thus involves many other disciplines other than medical. In the last .... old, refugees and migrants .... Thought should be put into the preservation, dignity ... especially rescue workers and volunteers, working in.

  2. Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The LEPC data set contains over 3000 listings, as of 2008, for name and location data identifying Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs). LEPCs are people...

  3. New Basic Nuclear Emergency Plan (Plaben)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin, M.; Gil, E.; Martin, M.; Ramon, J.; Serrano, I.

    2004-01-01

    Ever since Plaben came into force in 1989, the national civil protection system has experienced a large evolution among other reasons due to the Autonomous Community governments assuming authority in this matter. In parallel, the regulation and international practice in matters of planning and nuclear emergency response has evolved as a consequence of the lessons learned following the long-term Chernobyl accident. Both circumstance recommended that Plaben be revised in order to adopt it to this new environment. The New Plaben was approved in June of this year and from that moment implantation has begun. Described in the article is the New Plaben, the modifications that respect the former the role that the CSN played in is revision and the main activities required to put it into practice. (Author)

  4. CEGB nuclear power stations basic emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    The introduction states that this is a typical emergency plan for a nuclear power station employing about 500 people, having two reactors and a total electrical output of 500 Megawatts in an intensively farmed rural area. The document has the following headings: definitions ('site incident', etc); functions of the site emergency organization; conditions for taking emergency action; persons empowered to declare or cancel a site incident or an emergency; emergency actions by staff; control centres; communication; collaboration with other bodies; warnings; transport; house rules; public information centre. (U.K.)

  5. A system for radiation monitoring at the site for emergency planning and response in a nuclear station potentialities and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakov, V.; Moskovska, N.; Madzharov, M.; Angelov, V.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the existing system for radiation monitoring of the NPP region. The location of the devices puts a number of problems as maintenance of the radiometric equipment and urgent collecting and processing of the measuring data. Undeniably, to get an effective and timely decision, it is necessary to have on hand information as complete and prompt as possible, about the radiological situation in the regions, towns, villages and sites. As a result of daily observation and registration, an amount of enough in volume data could be accumulated. This data may be used as a base in case of a sudden change of the radiological situation and/or in case of arising of some local contaminations as a result of a volley type of emission, accidents at the nuclear power stations and releases fractions of radioactive and rare gases. The data obtained for a comparatively large region (about 700 square kilometers) with a high degree of gamma detectors distribution density are discussed. In the conditions of a progressively complicating radiological situation, they allow to determine the possible directions of the emission and also to undertake some response actions for protection of the population in time. (author)

  6. Research on evacuation planning as nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2007-10-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has introduced new concepts of precautionary action zone (PAZ) and urgent protective action planning zone (UPZ) in 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency' (GS-R-2 (2002)), in order to reduce substantially the risk of severe deterministic health effects. Open literature based research was made to reveal problems on evacuation planning and the preparedness for nuclear emergency arising from introduction of PAZ into Japan that has applied the emergency planning zone (EPZ) concept currently. In regard to application of PAZ, it should be noted that the requirements for preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency are not only dimensional but also timely. The principal issue is implementation of evacuation of precautionary decided area within several hours. The logic of evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency and the methods of advance public education and information in the U.S. is effective for even prompt evacuation to the outside of the EPZ. As concerns evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency in Japan, several important issues to be considered were found, that is, selection of public reception centers which are outside area of the EPZ, an unique reception center assigned to each emergency response planning area, public education and information of practical details about the evacuation plan in advance, and necessity of the evacuation time estimates. To establish a practical evacuation planning guide for nuclear emergencies, further researches on application of traffic simulation technology to evacuation time estimates and on knowledge of actual evacuation experience in natural disasters and chemical plant accidents are required. (author)

  7. Coordinating International Response to Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bice, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    Pandemic disease, natural disasters and terrorism can affect thousands of people in a relatively short period of time anywhere in the world. Our recent international experience with hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis and infectious diseases (AIDS, TB and highly pathogenic avian influenza) show us that we must respond with a coordinated approach or we will fail the very people we intend to help. Nations from around the world are often eager to send assistance to the site of a disaster, but coordinating the incoming aid is more often flawed and imprecise than it must be in order to save lives and mitigate suffering. How can any one country, suffering from a horrendous calamity coordinate the incoming aid from around the world? Can any one agency hope to coordinate the myriad nation's response let alone that of the hundreds of non-governmental organizations? Currently, the answer is sadly, no. The purpose of this presentation is not to recommend one over the many international bodies which claim to oversee humanitarian assistance; the purpose of this presentation is to discuss the elements of only one aspect of the overall response effort: public health and medical response coordination. Public health response is of course different than a purely medical response. Traditionally, in a natural disaster, immediate public health concerns center around water, sewerage/waste disposal, potential for disease outbreaks, etc, whereas medical response concentrates on triage, saving those who can be saved, patching up the injured, and to a lesser extent, primary care to the survivors. In order to avoid political controversy, this presentation will use the example of Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii, September 1992, to illustrate key concepts. The State of Hawaii is no stranger to natural disasters. Their emergency response mechanisms are well honed, exercised and quite capable. However, the local community leaders on Kauai Island went thru each of the following phases before they

  8. The emergency plan of the ININ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz C, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The emergency plan of the ININ, it was elaborated in 1988 and revised by the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (CNSNS) in 1989. At the beginning of 1990 and with the support of the IAEA it was practiced the first revision to the text of this plan, for what the proposal revision is what constitutes the development of this report

  9. The emergency plan of a firm

    OpenAIRE

    Lonk, David

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to describe an emergency plan for a firm in area of a preventing riskiness and usability of the plan in time of crisis situation. The thesis also analyzes methods and approaches to a creation of the plan. It examines in detail the formation from an identification of possible hazards through a suggestion of solutions to testing and updating of the plan. Last but not least, my thesis describes the most suitable structure of the plan with respects to its utiliz...

  10. Emergency Preparedness and Response: A Safety Net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, H., E-mail: hannele.aaltonen@stuk.fi [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Full text: The objective of nuclear regulatory work is to prevent accidents. Nevertheless, possibility of a severe accident cannot be totally excluded, which makes a safety net, efficient emergency preparedness and response, necessary. Should the possibility of accidents be rejected, the result would be in the worst case inadequate protection of population, functions of society, and environment from harmful effects of radiation. Adequate resources for maintenance and development of emergency arrangement are crucial. However, they need to be balanced taking into account risks assessments, justified expectations of society, and international requirements. To successfully respond to an emergency, effective emergency preparedness, such as up-to-date plans and procedures, robust arrangements and knowledgeable and regularly trained staff are required. These, however, are not enough without willingness and proactive attitude to • communicate in a timely manner; • co-operate and coordinate actions; • provide and receive assistance; and • evaluate and improve emergency arrangements. In the establishment and development of emergency arrangements, redundant and diverse means or tools used are needed in, for example, communication and assessment of hazard. Any severe nuclear emergency would affect all countries either directly or indirectly. Thus, national emergency arrangements have to be compatible to the extent practicable with international emergency arrangements. It is important to all countries that the safety nets of emergency arrangements are reliable - and operate efficiently in a coordinated manner when needed - on national, regional and international level. (author)

  11. The emergency plan implementing procedures for HANARO facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Tai; Khang, Byung Oui; Lee, Goan Yup; Lee, Moon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    The radiological emergency plan implementing procedures of HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) facility is prepared based on the Korea Atomic Law, the Civil Defence Law, Disaster Protection Law and the emergency related regulatory guides such as Guidance for Evolution of Radiation Emergency Plans in Nuclear Research Facilities (KAERI/TR-956/98, Feb.1998) and the emergency plan of HANARO. These procedures is also prepared to ensure adequate response activities to the rediological events which would cause a significant risk to the KAERI staffs and the public nea to the site. Periodic trainning and exercise for the reactor operators and emergency staffs will reduce accident risks and the release of radioactivities to the environment. 61 refs., 81 tabs. (Author)

  12. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Region 7 Extract)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  13. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Region 10 Extract)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  14. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Region 5 Extract)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  15. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Region 4 Extract)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  16. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Region 1 Extract)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  17. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Region 9 Extract)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  18. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Region 6 Extract)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  19. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Downloadable Data)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  20. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Region 2 Extract)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  1. 1:6000 Scale (6K) Quadrangles developed by USEPA to Support Reconnaissance, and Tactical and Strategic Planning for Emergency Responses and Homeland Security Events (Region 8 Extract)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Reference quads for emergency response reconnaissance developed for use by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Grid cells are based on densification of the USGS...

  2. AEA Technology, Harwell site emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This plan, describes the site arrangements and facilities for dealing with an emergency at Harwell. These arrangements consist of amongst other things provision of suitably qualified, experienced and trained staff to take up posts, provision of suitable facilities and equipment, arrangements to alert and protect persons on and off the site, liaison and contact arrangements with external agencies and organisations and supply of information before and during any emergency. Other organisations have their own arrangements for dealing with an emergency at AEA Technology Harwell. The arrangements for dealing with any off-site consequences are drawn together in the ''Oxfordshire County Council Essential Services Emergency Plan (Off-Site) for AEA Technology, Harwell''. Prior information for members of the public who may be affected in the event of an emergency at Harwell is issued in the form of leaflets. (author)

  3. Coastal pollution emergency plan. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semanov, G.; Volkov, V.; Somkin, V.; Iljushenko-Krylov, D.

    1997-12-31

    A higher degree of ecological safety in ship traffic depends on onboard measures as well as reception facilities on shore, treatment of ship generated wastes and preparedness for combating emergency oil spills. The problem is particularly acute in the North Sea Route (NSR) due to high vulnerability of the Arctic ecosystems, low rates of natural degradation of oil, absence of forward coastal infrastructure, low efficiency of oil combating means in ice conditions and severe climatic conditions. Oil spills in the NSR are likely to occur as the offshore production and transportation of oil increase. Therefore a regional Oil Spill Contingency Plan (OSCP) is being constructed and developed on 3 levels: 1) Development of concept, definition of response organisations and their technical ability (Part I). 2) Collection and analysis of information, development of scenarios of probable oil spills, clearing of the funding mechanism and basis for additional outside co-operation from other Russian regions and circumpolar countries (part II). 3) Development of NSR OSCP (part III). The present report (part I) provides the plan concept, rescue organisations and data on types and amounts of the oil spill combating technical means and of the floating facilities available in the NSR or it`s vicinity. The concept takes into account subdivision of the Route, interaction and links between responsible organisations, realities of the Russian Arctic such as transport, communications, energy, labour resources etc. and requirements of the IMO and of the International Convention OPRC 90. According to Russian legislation implementation of combating operations at sea is the responsibility of the Maritime Pollution Control and Salvage Administration that consists of a Central Administration and basin emergency divisions situated in Murmansk and Nahodka. The body is responsible for carrying out cleaning operations at sea from installations and may be assisted by resources and means of the co

  4. The TransPetro emergency response system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filho, A.T.F.; Cardoso, V.F.; Carbone, R.; Berardinelli, R.P. [Petrobras-TransPetro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Carvalho, M.T.M.; Casanova, M.A. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Informatica, TeCGraf

    2004-07-01

    Petrobras-TransPetro developed the TransPetro Emergency Response System in response to emergency situations at large oil pipelines or at terminal facilities located in sea or river harbour areas. The standard of excellence includes full compliance with environmental regulations set by the federal government. A distributed workflow management software called InfoPAE forms the basis of the system in which actions are defined, along with geographic and conventional data. The first prototype of InfoPAE was installed in 1999. Currently it is operational in nearly 80 installations. The basic concepts and functionality of the TransPetro Emergency Response System were outlined in this paper with reference to the mitigative actions that are based on an evaluation of the organization of the emergency teams; the communication procedures; characterization of the installations; definition of accidental scenarios; environmental sensitivity maps; simulation of oil spill trajectories and dispersion behaviour; geographical data of the area surrounding the installations; and, other conventional data related to the installations, including available equipment. The emergency response team can take action as soon as an accident is detected. The action plan involves characterizing several scenarios and delegating mitigative actions to specific sub-teams, each with access to geographic data on the region where the emergency occurred. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Special event planning for the emergency manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Peter T

    2009-11-01

    In the domain of emergency management and homeland security there is a lack of a formal planning process at the local level when it comes to special event planning. The unique nature of special event planning demands an understanding of the planning process for both traditional and non-traditional planning partners. This understanding will make certain that local governments apply due diligence when planning for the safety of the public. This paper offers a practical roadmap for planning at the local level. It will address those 'special events' that are beyond routine local events but not of a sufficient scale to be granted National Special Security Event status. Due to the infrequency of 'special events' in most communities, it is imperative that deliberate planning takes place. Upon conclusion, the reader will be able to construct a planning process tailored to the needs of their community, guide both traditional and non-traditional planning partners through the planning process, determine priorities, explore alternatives, plan for contingencies, conduct a confirmation brief, facilitate operations and assemble an after-action report and improvement plan.

  6. Recent emergency planning trends in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howieson, J.Q.; Ali, F.B.

    1988-01-01

    Two significant reviews have recently been completed which have affected the approach to emergency planning in Canada. The two reviews have occurred in the province of Ontario where 21 of Canada's 23 reactors are located. Both reviews (one dealing with safety in general, and the other specifically with emergency planning) were performed for the Government of Ontario and were primarily motivated by the severe consequences of the accident at Chernobyl. It was determined that two tiers of emergency planning are needed: (i) the first tier (termed the Maximum Planning Accident or MPA) provides for detailed planning for accidents which can be quantitatively determined to be as low as once in 10 5 station-years. (about once in 10 6 reactor-years for Ontario Hydro's multi-unit sites). For this tier, planning assures public exposure to radioactive doses is kept less than the Protective Action Levels. (ii) the second tier (termed the Worst Credible Radiation Emission or WCRE) provides for planning for accidents which are lower in frequency or whose frequency cannot be quantified (e.g., gross human error or hostile action). For this tier, planning protects against the onset of early morbidity (sickness) and the onset of early mortality (death) in a member of the public

  7. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  8. Assessment of Evacuation Protective Action Strategies For Emergency Preparedness Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joomyung; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Kwangil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This report which studies about evacuation formation suggests some considerable factors to reduce damage of radiological accidents. Additional details would be required to study in depth and more elements should be considered for updating emergency preparedness. However, this methodology with sensitivity analysis could adapt to specific plant which has total information such as geological data, weather data and population data. In this point of view the evacuation study could be contribute to set up emergency preparedness plan and propose the direction to enhance protective action strategies. In radiological emergency, residents nearby nuclear power plant should perform protective action that is suggested by emergency preparedness plan. The objective of emergency preparedness plan is that damages, such as casualties and environmental damages, due to radioactive accident should be minimized. The recent PAR study includes a number of subjects to improve the quality of protective action strategies. For enhancing protective action strategies, researches that evaluate many factors related with emergency response scenario are essential parts to update emergency preparedness plan. Evacuation is very important response action as protective action strategy.

  9. Assessment of Evacuation Protective Action Strategies For Emergency Preparedness Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joomyung; Jae, Moosung; Ahn, Kwangil

    2013-01-01

    This report which studies about evacuation formation suggests some considerable factors to reduce damage of radiological accidents. Additional details would be required to study in depth and more elements should be considered for updating emergency preparedness. However, this methodology with sensitivity analysis could adapt to specific plant which has total information such as geological data, weather data and population data. In this point of view the evacuation study could be contribute to set up emergency preparedness plan and propose the direction to enhance protective action strategies. In radiological emergency, residents nearby nuclear power plant should perform protective action that is suggested by emergency preparedness plan. The objective of emergency preparedness plan is that damages, such as casualties and environmental damages, due to radioactive accident should be minimized. The recent PAR study includes a number of subjects to improve the quality of protective action strategies. For enhancing protective action strategies, researches that evaluate many factors related with emergency response scenario are essential parts to update emergency preparedness plan. Evacuation is very important response action as protective action strategy

  10. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site

  11. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-04-08

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site.

  12. Report of the emergency preparedness and response task force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynes, R.R.; Purcell, A.H.; Wenger, D.E.; Stern, P.S.; Stallings, R.A.; Johnson, Q.T.

    1979-10-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) marked the first time in the US when traditional planning for emergencies was applied to a possible radiological emergency. This report examines the planning that existed in the counties surrounding the plant and at the state and federal levels. It also examines the responses of the various governmental units following the initial accident

  13. Report of the Emergency Preparedness and Response Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynes, R.R.; Purcell, A.H.; Wenger, D.E.; Stern, P.S.; Stallings, R.A.; Johnson, Q.T.

    1979-10-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) marked the first time in the US when traditional planning for emergencies was applied to a possible radiological emergency. This report examines the planning that existed in the counties surrounding the plant and at the state and federal levels. It also examines the responses of the various governmental units following the initial accident

  14. Technical basis for PWR emergency plans forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homme, A.; Manesse, D.; Gauvain, J.; Crabol, B.

    1989-10-01

    Our speech first summarizes the french approach concerning the management of severe accidents which could occur on PWR stations. Then it defines the source-term which is being used as a general support for elaborating the emergency plans devoted to the protection of the population. It describes next the consequences of this source-term on the site and in the environment, which constitute the technical bases for defining actions of utilities and concerned authorities. It gives lastly information on the present status of the different emergency plans and the complementary work undertaken to improve them [fr

  15. Nuclear emergency planning in Spain. The PLABEN review project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo Lentijo, J. C.; Vila Pena, M.

    2002-01-01

    The international rules and recommendations for nuclear emergency planning and the Spanish experience gained in the management of event with radiological risk have noticed that is necessary to review the planning radiological bases for emergencies in nuclear power plants and to define the planning radiological bases for radiological emergencies that could happen in radioactive facilities or in activities out of the regulatory framework. The paper focuses on CSN actions concerning the Plaben review project related to define the new radiological principles taking into account the current international recommendations for interventions, make a proposal about the organisation and operation of the provincial radiological action group and the national support level for radiological emergency response. (Author) 7 refs

  16. An innovative approach to capability-based emergency operations planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the innovative use information technology for assisting disaster planners with an easily-accessible method for writing and improving evidence-based emergency operations plans. This process is used to identify all key objectives of the emergency response according to capabilities of the institution, community or society. The approach then uses a standardized, objective-based format, along with a consensus-based method for drafting capability-based operational-level plans. This information is then integrated within a relational database to allow for ease of access and enhanced functionality to search, sort and filter and emergency operations plan according to user need and technological capacity. This integrated approach is offered as an effective option for integrating best practices of planning with the efficiency, scalability and flexibility of modern information and communication technology.

  17. Towards accurate emergency response behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reactor operator emergency response behavior has persisted as a training problem through lack of information. The industry needs an accurate definition of operator behavior in adverse stress conditions, and training methods which will produce the desired behavior. Newly assembled information from fifty years of research into human behavior in both high and low stress provides a more accurate definition of appropriate operator response, and supports training methods which will produce the needed control room behavior. The research indicates that operator response in emergencies is divided into two modes, conditioned behavior and knowledge based behavior. Methods which assure accurate conditioned behavior, and provide for the recovery of knowledge based behavior, are described in detail

  18. Planning guidance for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumpert, B.L.; Watson, A.P.; Sorensen, J.H. [and others

    1995-02-01

    This planning guide was developed under the direction of the U.S. Army and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which jointly coordinate and direct the development of the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). It was produced to assist state, local, and Army installation planners in formulating and coordinating plans for chemical events that may occur at the chemical agent stockpile storage locations in the continental United States. This document provides broad planning guidance for use by both on-post and off-post agencies and organizations in the development of a coordinated plan for responding to chemical events. It contains checklists to assist in assuring that all important aspects are included in the plans and procedures developed at each Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP) location. The checklists are supplemented by planning guidelines in the appendices which provide more detailed guidance regarding some issues. The planning guidance contained in this document will help ensure that adequate coordination between on-post and off-post planners occurs during the planning process. This planning guide broadly describes an adequate emergency planning base that assures that critical planning decisions will be made consistently at every chemical agent stockpile location. This planning guide includes material drawn from other documents developed by the FEMA, the Army, and other federal agencies with emergency preparedness program responsibilities. Some of this material has been developed specifically to meet the unique requirements of the CSEPP. In addition to this guidance, other location-specific documents, technical studies, and support studies should be used as needed to assist in the planning at each of the chemical agent stockpile locations to address the specific hazards and conditions at each location.

  19. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  20. Emergency response in the Newfoundland offshore industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation reviewed current offshore oil activities with respect to safety issues regarding year-round marine operations in a harsh environment. Considerable logistics support is required for all offshore activities, including seismic and geotechnical surveys; exploration and production drilling; well testing; subsea construction; on-site production; and, delivery to market. Response to an offshore emergency must address the urgency of the incident along with stakeholder concerns. This presentation described the different types of emergencies and addressed issues regarding contingency planning; preventative measures; response philosophy; response scope; response at site; emergency management; communications links; and, oil spill response. The following current operations were highlighted: ExxonMobil's production drilling from the gravity-based concrete platform at Hibernia; Petro-Canada's production drilling at the Terra Nova FPSO; Husky Energy's production drilling at White Rose; and Chevron Canada's exploration drilling at the Orphan Basin. It was noted that in an emergency situation, the focus is on the welfare of offshore personnel. On an average day, the total offshore population is in the order of 1000 workers, all registered in the Personnel Logistics System which is updated with the departure of every helicopter from St. John's, Newfoundland or from the offshore platform. It is possible to prepare for foreseeable emergency incidents such as fire, explosion or gas leaks; spills to the marine environment; structural damage or collisions; persons lost at sea; helicopter or support vessel accidents; vessel sinking; sabotage; serious injuries or loss of life; severe ice events; and, loss of well control. The establishment of permanent safety zones at the Hibernia, White Rose and Terra Nova production fields are among the preventative measures, along with standby vessels that provide a rescue service for offshore installations. Supply vessels are also

  1. Status and developing of nuclear emergency response techniques in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiangang, Zhang; Bing, Zhao; Rongyao, Tang; Xiaoxiao, Xu

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Emergency preparedness and response in China is consistent with international basic principle of nuclear safety and emergency response. Nuclear emergency response techniques in China developed with nuclear power from 1980s. The status of nuclear emergency techniques in China are: 1) China have plentiful experiences and abilities in the fields of nuclear facility emergency planning and preparedness, nuclear accident consequence assessment, emergency monitoring, and emergency advisory; 2) Emergency assistance ability in China has a foundation, however it cannot satisfy national requirement; 3) Emergency planning and preparedness is not based on hazard assessment; 4) Remote monitoring and robot techniques in not adaptable to the requirements of nuclear emergency response; 5) A consistent emergency assessment system is lack in China. In this paper, it is analyzed what is the developing focal points of nuclear emergency response techniques in China, and it is proposed that the main points are: a) To develop the research of emergency preparedness on the base of hazard analysis; b) To improve remote monitoring and robot ability during nuclear emergency; c) To develop the response technique research with anti-terrorism. (author)

  2. Numerical models and their role in emergency response: a perspective on dispersion modeling for emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenly, G.D.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1983-03-01

    Numerical models on several levels of complexity should be available to the emergency response planner. They are a basic tool but must be used in conjunction with both measurements and experience. When these tools are used in a complimentary fashion they greatly enhance the capability of the consequence manager to respond in an emergency situation. Because each accident or incident develops it's own characteristics and requirements the system must be capable of a flexible response. Interaction and feedback between model results from a suite of models and measurements (including airborne measurements) serve the emergency response planner's spectrum of needs, ranging from planning exercises and emergency precalculations to a real-time emergency response

  3. Recent developments in the applications of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) for emergency response planning and operational forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, W.A.; Tremback, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The authors will summarize ten years of developing and applying the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to emergency response and operational dispersion forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). RAMS forms the core of two workstation-based operational systems, ERDAS (the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System) and PROWESS (Parallelized RAMS Operational Weather Simulation System) which are undergoing extensive operational testing prior to potential deployment as part of the range forecasting system at KSC. RAMS has been interfaced with HYPACT (the Hybrid Particle and Concentration Transport Model) to produce detailed 3-D dispersion forecasts from a variety of sources including cold spills, routine launch operations, and explosive conflagrations of launch vehicles

  4. Family emergency preparedness plans in severe tornadoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Zhen; Liang, Daan; Luo, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Tornadoes, with warnings usually issued just minutes before their touchdowns, pose great threats to properties and people's physical and mental health. Few studies have empirically investigated the association of family emergency preparedness planning and observed protective behaviors in the context of tornadoes. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors for the action of taking shelter at the time of tornadoes. Specifically, this study investigated whether having a family emergency preparedness plan was associated with higher likelihood of taking shelter upon receiving tornado warnings. This study also examined the effects of socioeconomic status and functional limitations on taking such actions. A telephone survey based on random sampling was conducted in 2012 with residents in Tuscaloosa AL and Joplin MO. Each city experienced considerable damages, injuries, and casualties after severe tornadoes (EF-4 and EF-5) in 2011. The working sample included 892 respondents. Analysis was conducted in early 2013. Logistic regression identified emergency preparedness planning as the only shared factor that increased the likelihood of taking shelter in both cities and the only significant factor in Joplin. In Tuscaloosa, being female and white also increased the likelihood of taking shelter. Disability was not found to have an effect. This study provided empirical evidence on the importance of having a family emergency preparedness plan in mitigating the risk of tornadoes. The findings could be applied to other rapid-onset disasters. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine Published by American Journal of Preventive Medicine All rights reserved.

  5. Hanford emergency management plan - release 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARPENTER, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Hanford emergency management plan for the US Department of Energy Richland, WA and Office of River Protection. The program was developed in accordance with DOE Orders as well as Federal and State regulations to protect workers and public health and safety

  6. Hanford emergency management plan - release 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARPENTER, G.A.

    1999-07-19

    The Hanford emergency management plan for the US Department of Energy Richland, WA and Office of River Protection. The program was developed in accordance with DOE Orders as well as Federal and State regulations to protect workers and public health and safety.

  7. Quantitative risk analysis as a basis for emergency planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogui, Regiane Tiemi Teruya [Bureau Veritas do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Macedo, Eduardo Soares de [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Several environmental accidents happened in Brazil and in the world during the 70's and 80's. This strongly motivated the preparation for emergencies in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Environmental accidents affect the environment and the communities that are neighbor to the industrial facilities. The present study aims at subsidizing and providing orientation to develop Emergency Planning from the data obtained on Quantitative Risk Analysis, elaborated according to the Technical Standard P4.261/03 from CETESB (Sao Paulo Environmental Agency). It was observed, during the development of the research, that the data generated on these studies need a complementation and a deeper analysis, so that it is possible to use them on the Emergency Plans. The main issues that were analyzed and discussed on this study were the reevaluation of hazard identification for the emergency plans, the consequences and vulnerability analysis for the response planning, the risk communication, and the preparation to respond to the emergencies of the communities exposed to manageable risks. As a result, the study intends to improve the interpretation and use of the data deriving from the Quantitative Risk Analysis to develop the emergency plans. (author)

  8. Aquatic emergency response model at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant emergency response plans include a stream/river emergency response model to predict travel times, maximum concentrations, and concentration distributions as a function of time at selected downstream/river locations from each of the major SRP installations. The menu driven model can be operated from any of the terminals that are linked to the real-time computer monitoring system for emergency response

  9. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In order to review the advances made over the past seven years in the area of emergency planning and preparedness supporting nuclear facilities and consider developments which are on the horizon, the IAEA at the invitation of the Government of Italy, organized this International Symposium in co-operation with the Italian Commission for Nuclear and Alternative Energy Sources, Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Health Protection (ENEA-DISP). There were over 250 designated participants and some 70 observers from 37 Member States and four international organizations in attendance at the Symposium. The Symposium presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: emergency planning (20 papers), accident assessment (30 papers), protective measures and recovery operations (10 papers) and emergency preparedness (16 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  10. Improvement Methods in NPP's Radiation Emergency Plan: An Administrative Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon Wook; Yang, He Sun

    2009-01-01

    The Radiation Emergency Plan (REP) can be divided into a technical and an administrative responses. The domestic NPP's REPs are reviewed from the viewpoint of the administrative response and improvement methods are also suggested in this treatise. The fields of the reviews are the composition of the emergency response organizations, the activation criteria of the organizations, the selection of the staffings and the reasonableness of the REP's volume. In addition, the limitations of the current radiation exercises are reviewed and the improvement method of the exercise is presented. It is expected that the suggested recommendations will be helpful in establishing useful REPs and making practical radiation exercises in Korea

  11. Risk analysis in oil spill response planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernoplekov, A.N.; Alexandrov, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Tiered response is a basic approach to emergency plans, including oil spill response (OSR). This paper delineates a huge set of accidental scenarios within a certain tier of response generated by a computer during risk assessment. Parameters such as the amount of oil spilled, duration of discharge and types of losses should be provided in OSR scenarios. Examples of applications include offshore installations, sub sea or onshore pipelines, and localized onshore facilities. The paper demonstrates how to use risk analysis results for delineating all likely spills into groups that need a specific tier response. The best world practices and Russian regulatory approaches were outlined and compared. Corresponding algorithms were developed and their application in pipelines was presented. The algorithm combines expert's skills and spill trajectory modeling with the net environmental benefit analysis principle into the incident specific emergency response planning. 9 refs., 13 tabs., 2 figs

  12. Training to the Nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Navascues, I.

    2003-01-01

    In 1994 the Civil Protection Directorate outlined a formation plan related to the Nuclear emergency plans with the purpose of guaranteeing for the communities involved in this material a basic and homogeneous formation. In the preparation of this Plan the following phases had been developed: 1. Study of formative needs of the different participant communities involved in nuclear plans. This has been done throw the information collected by: nuclear emergency plans and procedures that develop them, questionnaires, observation list, exercise, drills, etc. 2. With all the needs detected and in function of them was designed the objectives to teach in relation with the knowledge and the abilities that the formation can give to the participants. 3. Definition of thematic areas related with the different matters to teach, derived from the different objectives. 4. Organization: The development of the formative activities through a specific material with orientations for the professors (content of material to impart, didactic resources, etc.) and a short summary of the Didactic Units imparted to the students. The methodology is based in short theoretical classes and in the active implication through practice activities exercises and drills to train its functions and the coordination of the different implied organizations. 5. Evaluation: the implantation of the formation plan contributes new formative needs. (Author)

  13. Radiation emergency planning for medical organizations; Plan de emergencia radiologica en entidades de salud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerez Vergueria, Sergio F. [Instituto de Medicina del Trabajo, La Habana (Cuba); Jerez Vergueria, Pablo F. [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba)

    1997-12-31

    The possible occurrence of accidents involving sources of ionizing radiation demands response plans to mitigate the consequences of radiological accidents. This paper offers orientations in order to elaborate emergency planning for institutions with medical applications of ionizing radiation. Taking into account that the prevention of accidents is of prime importance in dealing with radioactive materials and others sources of ionizing radiation, such as X-rays, it is recommended that one include in emergency instructions and procedures several aspects relative to causes which originate these radiological events. Topics such as identification of radiological events in these practices and their consequences, protective measures, planning for and emergency response and maintenance of emergency capacity, are considered in this article. (author) 16 refs., 1 tab.; e-mail: sfjerez at rdc.puc-rio.br

  14. Where is the evidence for emergency planning: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challen, Kirsty; Lee, Andrew C K; Booth, Andrew; Gardois, Paolo; Woods, Helen Buckley; Goodacre, Steve W

    2012-07-23

    Recent terrorist attacks and natural disasters have led to an increased awareness of the importance of emergency planning. However, the extent to which emergency planners can access or use evidence remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify, analyse and assess the location, source and quality of emergency planning publications in the academic and UK grey literature. We conducted a scoping review, using as data sources for academic literature Embase, Medline, Medline in Process, Psychinfo, Biosis, Science Citation Index, Cinahl, Cochrane library and Clinicaltrials.gov. For grey literature identification we used databases at the Health Protection Agency, NHS Evidence, British Association of Immediate Care Schemes, Emergency Planning College and the Health and Safety Executive, and the websites of UK Department of Health Emergency Planning Division and UK Resilience.Aggregative synthesis was used to analyse papers and documents against a framework based on a modified FEMA Emergency Planning cycle. Of 2736 titles identified from the academic literature, 1603 were relevant. 45% were from North America, 27% were commentaries or editorials and 22% were event reports.Of 192 documents from the grey literature, 97 were relevant. 76% of these were event reports.The majority of documents addressed emergency planning and response. Very few documents related to hazard analysis, mitigation or capability assessment. Although a large body of literature exists, its validity and generalisability is unclear There is little evidence that this potential evidence base has been exploited through synthesis to inform policy and practice. The type and structure of evidence that would be of most value of emergency planners and policymakers has yet to be identified.

  15. Where is the evidence for emergency planning: a scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Challen Kirsty

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent terrorist attacks and natural disasters have led to an increased awareness of the importance of emergency planning. However, the extent to which emergency planners can access or use evidence remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify, analyse and assess the location, source and quality of emergency planning publications in the academic and UK grey literature. Methods We conducted a scoping review, using as data sources for academic literature Embase, Medline, Medline in Process, Psychinfo, Biosis, Science Citation Index, Cinahl, Cochrane library and Clinicaltrials.gov. For grey literature identification we used databases at the Health Protection Agency, NHS Evidence, British Association of Immediate Care Schemes, Emergency Planning College and the Health and Safety Executive, and the websites of UK Department of Health Emergency Planning Division and UK Resilience. Aggregative synthesis was used to analyse papers and documents against a framework based on a modified FEMA Emergency Planning cycle. Results Of 2736 titles identified from the academic literature, 1603 were relevant. 45% were from North America, 27% were commentaries or editorials and 22% were event reports. Of 192 documents from the grey literature, 97 were relevant. 76% of these were event reports. The majority of documents addressed emergency planning and response. Very few documents related to hazard analysis, mitigation or capability assessment. Conclusions Although a large body of literature exists, its validity and generalisability is unclear There is little evidence that this potential evidence base has been exploited through synthesis to inform policy and practice. The type and structure of evidence that would be of most value of emergency planners and policymakers has yet to be identified.

  16. Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility

  17. Emergency plans for civil nuclear installations in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    The operators of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom have plans to deal with accidents or emergencies at their nuclear sites. These plans provide for any necessary action, both on and off the nuclear site, to protect members of the public and are regularly exercised. The off-site actions involve the emergency services and other authorities which may be called upon to implement measures to protect the public in any civil emergency. In a recent review of these plans by Government Departments and agencies and the nuclear site operators, a number of possible improvements were identified. These improvements are concerned mainly with the provisions made for liaison with local and national authorities and for public information and have been incorporated into existing plans. An outline is given of the most likely consequences of an accidental release of radioactive material and the scope of emergency plans. Details are also provided on the responsibilities and functions of the operator and other organizations with duties under the plans and the arrangements made for public information. (author)

  18. Collaborative Radiological Response Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    DOE and EPA national laboratories .55 Additionally, the GAO conducted a survey of emergency management officials in cities, states and federal...for Biosecurity of UPMC, (2012). After fukushima: Managing the consequences of a radiological release. Retrieved from : http://issuu.com

  19. OntoEmergePlan: variability of emergency plans supported by a domain ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, Maria I.G.B; Moreira, João; Campos, Maria Luiza M.; Braga, Bernardo F.B; Sales, Tiago P.; de Cordeiro, Kelli F.; Borges, Marcos R.S.

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of high quality emergency plans to guide operational decisions is an approach to mitigate the emergency management complexity. In such multidisciplinary scenario, teams with different perspectives need to collaborate towards a common goal and interact within a common understanding.

  20. Employee Perceptions of Their Organization's Level of Emergency Preparedness Following a Brief Workplace Emergency Planning Educational Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Lauren A; Terrigino, Elizabeth A; Azim, Sabiya; Snider, Elsa; Rhodes, Darson L; Cox, Carol C

    2016-06-01

    A brief emergency planning educational presentation was taught during work hours to a convenience sample of employees of various workplaces in Northern Missouri, USA. Participants were familiarized with details about how an emergency plan is prepared by management and implemented by management-employee crisis management teams - focusing on both employee and management roles. They then applied the presentation information to assess their own organization's emergency preparedness level. Participants possessed significantly (p employees to become more involved in their organization's emergency planning and response. Educational strategies that involve management-employee collaboration in activities tailored to each workplace's operations and risk level for emergencies should be implemented.

  1. Risk communications and the Chemical Stockpile Emergency-Planning Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, B.M.; Sorensen, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    The CSEPP (Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program) was created to improve emergency planning and response capabilities at the eight sites around the country that store chemical weapons. These weapons are scheduled to be destroyed in the near future. In preparation of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DPEIS) for the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), it was proposed that the Army mitigate accidents through an enhanced community emergency preparedness program at the eight storage sites. In 1986, the Army initiated the development of an Emergency Response Concept Plan (ERCP) for the CSDP, one of 12 technical support studies conducted during preparation of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS). The purpose of this document is to provide a fairly comprehensive source book on risk, risk management, risk communication research and recommended risk communication practices. It does not merely summarize each publication in the risk communication literature, but attempts to synthesize them along the lines of a set of organizing principles. Furthermore, it is not intended to duplicate other guidance manuals (such as Covello et al.`s manual on risk comparison). The source book was developed for the CSEPP in support of the training module on risk communications. Although the examples provided are specific to CSEPP, its use goes beyond that of CSEPP as the findings apply to a broad spectrum of risk communication topics. While the emphasis is on communication in emergency preparedness and response specific to the CSEPP, the materials cover other non-emergency communication settings. 329 refs.

  2. On some problems concerning the national emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, V.; Bonchev, Ts.; Semova, T.; Georgiev, V.

    1995-01-01

    The basic principles of national emergency planning and preparedness in case of severe nuclear accident are discussed. Recommendations concerning the participating authorities in Bulgaria and their cooperation are given. The need to synchronize the plan with the NPP Kozloduy emergency plan is pointed out. The introduction of new legislation outlining the necessity of national emergency planning is stressed. 13 refs

  3. On some problems concerning the national emergency planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelov, V [Civil Defence Administration, Sofia (Bulgaria); Bonchev, Ts [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet; Andonov, S [Civil Defence Administration, Sofia (Bulgaria); Semova, T [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet; Ganchev, N [Committee on the Use of Atomic Energy for Peaceful Purposes, Sofia (Bulgaria); Georgiev, V [Energoproekt, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    The basic principles of national emergency planning and preparedness in case of severe nuclear accident are discussed. Recommendations concerning the participating authorities in Bulgaria and their cooperation are given. The need to synchronize the plan with the NPP Kozloduy emergency plan is pointed out. The introduction of new legislation outlining the necessity of national emergency planning is stressed. 13 refs.

  4. Planning of elimination of emergency consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kovalenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The volume of useful information in the planning of elimination of emergency consequences process is reasonable to assess with calculatory problems and mathematical models. Materials and methods. The expert survey method is used to calculate quantitative values of probability and to determine the optimal solution before the information in condition is received. Results. It is determined that the quality of the solution of elimination emergency consequences depends primarily on the number of factors that are taken into account in particular circumstances of the situation; on the level of information readiness of control bodies to take decision to eliminate emergency consequences as soon as possible and to consider several options for achieving reasonableness and concreteness of a particular decision. The ratio between volume of useful information collected and processed during operation planning which is required for identifying optimal solution is calculated. This ratio allows to construct a graph of probability of identifying a solution in existing environment and probability value of identifying optimal solution before information in P*condition is obtained. This graph also shows the ratio volume of useful information collected and processed during operation planning and necessary volume of information for identifying optimal solution. Conclusion. The results of this research can be used for improving control bodies decisions to ensure safe working conditions for employees of food industry.

  5. Automated emergency meteorological response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    A sophisticated emergency response system was developed to aid in the evaluation of accidental releases of hazardous materials from the Savannah River Plant to the environment. A minicomputer system collects and archives data from both onsite meteorological towers and the National Weather Service. In the event of an accidental release, the computer rapidly calculates the trajectory and dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere. Computer codes have been developed which provide a graphic display of predicted concentration profiles downwind from the source, as functions of time and distance

  6. Human Response to Emergency Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J.

    2009-12-01

    Almost every day people evacuate from their homes, businesses or other sites, even ships, in response to actual or predicted threats or hazards. Evacuation is the primary protective action utilized in large-scale emergencies such as hurricanes, floods, tornados, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, or wildfires. Although often precautionary, protecting human lives by temporally relocating populations before or during times of threat remains a major emergency management strategy. One of the most formidable challenges facing emergency officials is evacuating residents for a fast-moving and largely unpredictable event such as a wildfire or a local tsunami. How to issue effective warnings to those at risk in time for residents to take appropriate action is an on-going problem. To do so, some communities have instituted advanced communications systems that include reverse telephone call-down systems or other alerting systems to notify at-risk residents of imminent threats. This presentation examines the effectiveness of using reverse telephone call-down systems for warning San Diego residents of wildfires in the October of 2007. This is the first systematic study conducted on this topic and is based on interviews with 1200 households in the evacuation areas.

  7. Emergency planning and preparedness: pre- and post-Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.E.

    1980-01-01

    The problems of radiological emergency response planning revealed by the Three-Mile Island nuclear power plant accident, are discussed. The most pressing problems are the need for an adequate planning basis, the improvement of accident assessment, the improvement and development of training programs, the need for adequate fundina and the development of emergency planning auidance. (H.K.)

  8. Planning for spontaneous evacuation during a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) radiological emergency preparedness program ignores the potential problem of spontaneous evacuation during a nuclear reactor accident. To show the importance of incorporating the emergency spatial behaviors of the population at risk in radiological emergency preparedness and response plans, this article presents empirical evidence that demonstrates the potential magnitude and geographic extent of spontaneous evacuation in the event of an accident at the Long Island Lighting Company's Shoreham Nuclear Power Station. The results indicate that, on the average, 39% of the population of Long Island is likely to evacuate spontaneously and thus to cast an evacuation shadow extending at least 25 miles beyond the plant. On the basis of these findings, necessary revisions to FEMA's radiological emergency preparedness program are outlined

  9. 29 CFR 1910.38 - Emergency action plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Means of Egress § 1910.38 Emergency action plans. (a) Application. An... plans. An emergency action plan must be in writing, kept in the workplace, and available to employees... information about the plan or an explanation of their duties under the plan. (d) Employee alarm system. An...

  10. A Tactical Emergency Response Management System (Terms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... information is a result of collaboration between accident response personnel. ... Tactical Emergency Response Management System (TERMS) which unifies all these different ... purpose of handling crisis and emergency.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan — Fiscal Year 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None, None

    2016-01-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, the prime contractor for Idaho National Laboratory (INL), provides this Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan (ERAP) for Fiscal Year 2016 in accordance with DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.” The ERAP documents the readiness of the INL Emergency Management Program using emergency response planning and preparedness activities as the basis. It describes emergency response planning and preparedness activities, and where applicable, summarizes and/or provides supporting information in tabular form for easy access to data. The ERAP also provides budget, personnel, and planning forecasts for Fiscal Year 2017. Specifically, the ERAP assures the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office that stated emergency capabilities at INL are sufficient to implement PLN 114, “INL Emergency Plan/RCRA Contingency Plan.”

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan — Fiscal Year 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, the prime contractor for Idaho National Laboratory (INL), provides this Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan (ERAP) for Fiscal Year 2014 in accordance with DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.” The ERAP documents the readiness of the INL Emergency Management Program using emergency response planning and preparedness activities as the basis. It describes emergency response planning and preparedness activities, and where applicable, summarizes and/or provides supporting information in tabular form for easy access to data. The ERAP also provides budget, personnel, and planning forecasts for Fiscal Year 2015. Specifically, the ERAP assures the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office that stated emergency capabilities at INL are sufficient to implement PLN-114, “INL Emergency Plan/RCRA Contingency Plan.”

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan — Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-09-13

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, the prime contractor for Idaho National Laboratory (INL), provides this Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan (ERAP) for Fiscal Year 2016 in accordance with DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.” The ERAP documents the readiness of the INL Emergency Management Program using emergency response planning and preparedness activities as the basis. It describes emergency response planning and preparedness activities, and where applicable, summarizes and/or provides supporting information in tabular form for easy access to data. The ERAP also provides budget, personnel, and planning forecasts for Fiscal Year 2017. Specifically, the ERAP assures the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office that stated emergency capabilities at INL are sufficient to implement PLN 114, “INL Emergency Plan/RCRA Contingency Plan.”

  14. Distinguishing human responses to radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.H. Jr.; Ziegler, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Inherent in the revised emergency planning regulations recently issued by the federal government is the assumption that people will follow official protective action advisories during a nuclear reactor accident. In this paper the authors argue that this is an unrealistic assumption and present empirical evidence which supports the proposition that a radiological emergency in likely to give rise to a high degree of extreme public behavior. Their analyses indicate that less than one-third of the households on Long Island are likely to follow instructions in the event of an accident at the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station. Among the families who would not follow instructions, some would underreact but most would overreact. Perceived distance from the plant and age of household head appear to be the strongest discriminators among those who are most likely to follow orders, those most likely to underreact, and those most likely to overreact. Implications for radiological emergency preparedness and response planning are discussed. 71 references, 3 figures, 8 tables

  15. Emergency response in the Newfoundland offshore industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dempsey, J. [Cormorant Ltd., St. John' s, NL (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This presentation reviewed current offshore oil activities with respect to safety issues regarding year-round marine operations in a harsh environment. Considerable logistics support is required for all offshore activities, including seismic and geotechnical surveys; exploration and production drilling; well testing; subsea construction; on-site production; and, delivery to market. Response to an offshore emergency must address the urgency of the incident along with stakeholder concerns. This presentation described the different types of emergencies and addressed issues regarding contingency planning; preventative measures; response philosophy; response scope; response at site; emergency management; communications links; and, oil spill response. The following current operations were highlighted: ExxonMobil's production drilling from the gravity-based concrete platform at Hibernia; Petro-Canada's production drilling at the Terra Nova FPSO; Husky Energy's production drilling at White Rose; and Chevron Canada's exploration drilling at the Orphan Basin. It was noted that in an emergency situation, the focus is on the welfare of offshore personnel. On an average day, the total offshore population is in the order of 1000 workers, all registered in the Personnel Logistics System which is updated with the departure of every helicopter from St. John's, Newfoundland or from the offshore platform. It is possible to prepare for foreseeable emergency incidents such as fire, explosion or gas leaks; spills to the marine environment; structural damage or collisions; persons lost at sea; helicopter or support vessel accidents; vessel sinking; sabotage; serious injuries or loss of life; severe ice events; and, loss of well control. The establishment of permanent safety zones at the Hibernia, White Rose and Terra Nova production fields are among the preventative measures, along with standby vessels that provide a rescue service for offshore installations

  16. Emergency response packaging: A conceptual outline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, R.E.; McClure, J.D.; Bennett, P.C.; Wheeler, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Packaging and Transportation Needs in the 1990's (PATN) component of the Transportation Assessment and Integration (TRAIN) program (DOE Nov. 1991) was designed to survey United States Department of Energy programs, both ongoing and planned, to identify needs for packaging and transportation services over the next decade. PATN also identified transportation elements that should be developed by the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (DOE EM) Transportation Management Program (TMP). As a result of the predominant involvement of the TMP in radioactive material shipment issues and DOE EM's involvement with waste management issues, the primary focus of PATN was on waste packaging issues. Pending DOE regulations will formalize federal guidelines and regulations for transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials within the boundaries of DOE reservations and facilities and reflect a growing awareness of concern regarding safety environmental responsibility activities on DOE reservations. Future practices involving the transportation of radioactive material within DOE reservations will closely parallel those used for commercial and governmental transportation across the United States. This has added to the perceived need for emergency recovery packaging and emergency response features on primary packaging, for both on-site shipments and shipments between DOE facilities (off-site). Historically, emergency response and recovery functions of packaging have not been adequately considered in packaging design and construction concepts. This paper develops the rationale for emergency response packaging, including both overpack concepts for repackaging compromised packaging and primary packaging redesign to facilitate the recovery of packages via mobile remote handling equipment. The rationale will examine concepts for determination of likely use patterns to identify types of shipments where recovery packaging may have the most favorable payoff

  17. Employee Perceptions of Their Organization's Level of Emergency Preparedness Following a Brief Workplace Emergency Planning Educational Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A. Renschler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A brief emergency planning educational presentation was taught during work hours to a convenience sample of employees of various workplaces in Northern Missouri, USA. Participants were familiarized with details about how an emergency plan is prepared by management and implemented by management-employee crisis management teams – focusing on both employee and management roles. They then applied the presentation information to assess their own organization’s emergency preparedness level. Participants possessed significantly (p < 0.05 higher perceptions of their organization’s level of emergency preparedness than non-participants. It is recommended that an assessment of organizational preparedness level supplement emergency planning educational presentations in order to immediately apply the material covered and encourage employees to become more involved in their organization’s emergency planning and response. Educational strategies that involve management-employee collaboration in activities tailored to each workplace’s operations and risk level for emergencies should be implemented.

  18. Emergency preparedness 1995 site support plan WBS 6.7.2.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulk, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The Emergency Preparedness Program provides an emergency management system including occurrence notification; development, coordination, and direction of planning, preparedness, and readiness assurance for response to emergency events on the Hanford Site; and emergency management support to Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL)

  19. Emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear installations are designed, constructed and operated in such a way that the probability for an incident or accident is very low and the probability for a severe accident with catastrophic consequences is extremely small. These accidents represent the residual risk of the nuclear installation, and this residual risk can be decreased on one hand by a better design, construction and operation and on the other hand by planning and taking emergency measures inside the facility and in the environment of the facility. By way of introduction and definition it may be indicated to define some terms pertaining to the subject in order to make for more uniform understanding. (orig./DG)

  20. Assessing Emergency Preparedness and Response Capacity Using Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response Methodology: Portsmouth, Virginia, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkjian, Katie M; Winz, Michelle; Yang, Jun; Corvese, Kate; Colón, Ana; Levine, Seth J; Mullen, Jessica; Ruth, Donna; Anson-Dwamena, Rexford; Bayleyegn, Tesfaye; Chang, David S

    2016-04-01

    For the past decade, emergency preparedness campaigns have encouraged households to meet preparedness metrics, such as having a household evacuation plan and emergency supplies of food, water, and medication. To estimate current household preparedness levels and to enhance disaster response planning, the Virginia Department of Health with remote technical assistance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a community health assessment in 2013 in Portsmouth, Virginia. Using the Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) methodology with 2-stage cluster sampling, we randomly selected 210 households for in-person interviews. Households were questioned about emergency planning and supplies, information sources during emergencies, and chronic health conditions. Interview teams completed 180 interviews (86%). Interviews revealed that 70% of households had an emergency evacuation plan, 67% had a 3-day supply of water for each member, and 77% had a first aid kit. Most households (65%) reported that the television was the primary source of information during an emergency. Heart disease (54%) and obesity (40%) were the most frequently reported chronic conditions. The Virginia Department of Health identified important gaps in local household preparedness. Data from the assessment have been used to inform community health partners, enhance disaster response planning, set community health priorities, and influence Portsmouth's Community Health Improvement Plan.

  1. Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, J.

    1990-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has begun implementation of the Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) to upgrade its ability to acquire data from nuclear power plants in the event of an emergency at the plant. ERDS provides a direct real-time transfer of data from licensee plant computers to the NRC Operations Center. The system has been designed to be activated by the licensee during an emergency which has been classified at an ALERT or higher level. The NRC portion of ERDS will receive the data stream, sort and file the data. The users will include the NRC Operations Center, the NRC Regional Office of the affected plant, and if requested the States which are within the ten mile EPZ of the site. The currently installed Emergency Notification System will be used to supplement ERDS data. This report provides the minimum guidance for implementation of ERDS at licensee sites. It is intended to be used for planning implementation under the current voluntary program as well as for providing the minimum standards for implementing the proposed ERDS rule

  2. Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, J.

    1991-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has begun implementation of the Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) to upgrade its ability to acquire data from nuclear power plants in the event of an emergency at the plant. ERDS provides a direct real-time transfer of data from licensee plant computers to the NRC Operations Center. The system has been designed to be activated by the licensee during an emergency which has been classified at an ALERT or higher level. The NRC portion of ERDS will receive the data stream, sort and file the data. The users will include the NRC Operations Center, the NRC Regional Office of the affected plant, and if requested the States which are within the ten mile EPZ of the site. The currently installed Emergency Notification System will be used to supplement ERDS data. This report provides the minimum guidance for implementation of ERDS at licensee sites. It is intended to be used for planning implementation under the current voluntary program as well as for providing the minimum standards for implementing the proposed ERDS rule. 4 refs., 3 figs

  3. RTSTEP regional transportation simulation tool for emergency planning - final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, H.; Sokolov, V.; Hope, M.; Auld, J.; Zhang, K.; Park, Y.; Kang, X. (Energy Systems)

    2012-01-20

    Large-scale evacuations from major cities during no-notice events - such as chemical or radiological attacks, hazardous material spills, or earthquakes - have an obvious impact on large regions rather than on just the directly affected area. The scope of impact includes the accommodation of emergency evacuation traffic throughout a very large area; the planning of resources to respond appropriately to the needs of the affected population; the placement of medical supplies and decontamination equipment; and the assessment and determination of primary escape routes, as well as routes for incoming emergency responders. Compared to events with advance notice, such as evacuations based on hurricanes approaching an affected area, the response to no-notice events relies exclusively on pre-planning and general regional emergency preparedness. Another unique issue is the lack of a full and immediate understanding of the underlying threats to the population, making it even more essential to gain extensive knowledge of the available resources, the chain of command, and established procedures. Given the size of the area affected, an advanced understanding of the regional transportation systems is essential to help with the planning for such events. The objectives of the work described here (carried out by Argonne National Laboratory) is the development of a multi-modal regional transportation model that allows for the analysis of different evacuation scenarios and emergency response strategies to build a wealth of knowledge that can be used to develop appropriate regional emergency response plans. The focus of this work is on the effects of no-notice evacuations on the regional transportation network, as well as the response of the transportation network to the sudden and unusual demand. The effects are dynamic in nature, with scenarios changing potentially from minute to minute. The response to a radiological or chemical hazard will be based on the time-delayed dispersion of

  4. Emergency planning and preparedness for a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahe, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Based on current regulations, FEMA approves each site-specific plan of state and local governments for each power reactor site after 1) formal review offsite preparedness, 2) holding a public meeting at which the preparedness status has been reviewed, and 3) a satisfactory joint exercise has been conducted with both utility and local participation. Annually, each state, within any position of the 10-mile emergency planning zone, must conduct a joint exercise with the utility to demonstrate its preparedness for a nuclear accident. While it is unlikely that these extreme measures will be needed as a result of an accident at a nuclear power station, the fact that these plans have been well thought out and implemented have already proven their benefit to society. The preparedness for a nuclear accident can be of great advantage in other types of emergencies. For example, on December 11, 1982, a non-nuclear chemical storage tank exploded at a Union Carbide plant in Louisiana shortly after midnight. More than 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes. They were evacuated under the emergency response plan formulated for use in the event of a nuclear accident at the nearby Waterford Nuclear plants. Clearly, this illustrates how a plan conceived for one purpose is appropriate to handle other types of accidents that occur in a modern industrial society

  5. Integration of new biological and physical retrospective dosimetry methods into EU emergency response plans - joint RENEB and EURADOS inter-laboratory comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Badie, Christophe; Barnard, Stephen; Manning, Grainne; Moquet, Jayne; Abend, Michael; Antunes, Ana Catarina; Barrios, Lleonard; Bassinet, Celine; Beinke, Christina; Bortolin, Emanuela; Bossin, Lily; Bricknell, Clare; Brzoska, Kamil; Buraczewska, Iwona; Castaño, Carlos Huertas; Čemusová, Zina; Christiansson, Maria; Cordero, Santiago Mateos; Cosler, Guillaume; Monaca, Sara Della; Desangles, François; Discher, Michael; Dominguez, Inmaculada; Doucha-Senf, Sven; Eakins, Jon; Fattibene, Paola; Filippi, Silvia; Frenzel, Monika; Georgieva, Dimka; Gregoire, Eric; Guogyte, Kamile; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Hadjiiska, Ljubomira; Hristova, Rositsa; Karakosta, Maria; Kis, Enikő; Kriehuber, Ralf; Lee, Jungil; Lloyd, David; Lumniczky, Katalin; Lyng, Fiona; Macaeva, Ellina; Majewski, Matthaeus; Vanda Martins, S; McKeever, Stephen W S; Meade, Aidan; Medipally, Dinesh; Meschini, Roberta; M'kacher, Radhia; Gil, Octávia Monteiro; Montero, Alegria; Moreno, Mercedes; Noditi, Mihaela; Oestreicher, Ursula; Oskamp, Dominik; Palitti, Fabrizio; Palma, Valentina; Pantelias, Gabriel; Pateux, Jerome; Patrono, Clarice; Pepe, Gaetano; Port, Matthias; Prieto, María Jesús; Quattrini, Maria Cristina; Quintens, Roel; Ricoul, Michelle; Roy, Laurence; Sabatier, Laure; Sebastià, Natividad; Sholom, Sergey; Sommer, Sylwester; Staynova, Albena; Strunz, Sonja; Terzoudi, Georgia; Testa, Antonella; Trompier, Francois; Valente, Marco; Hoey, Olivier Van; Veronese, Ivan; Wojcik, Andrzej; Woda, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    RENEB, 'Realising the European Network of Biodosimetry and Physical Retrospective Dosimetry,' is a network for research and emergency response mutual assistance in biodosimetry within the EU. Within this extremely active network, a number of new dosimetry methods have recently been proposed or developed. There is a requirement to test and/or validate these candidate techniques and inter-comparison exercises are a well-established method for such validation. The authors present details of inter-comparisons of four such new methods: dicentric chromosome analysis including telomere and centromere staining; the gene expression assay carried out in whole blood; Raman spectroscopy on blood lymphocytes, and detection of radiation-induced thermoluminescent signals in glass screens taken from mobile phones. In general the results show good agreement between the laboratories and methods within the expected levels of uncertainty, and thus demonstrate that there is a lot of potential for each of the candidate techniques. Further work is required before the new methods can be included within the suite of reliable dosimetry methods for use by RENEB partners and others in routine and emergency response scenarios.

  6. Inspection of licensee activities in emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Binnebeek, J.J.; Gutierrez Ruiz, Luis Miguel; Bouvrie, E. des; Aro, Ilari; Gil, J.; Balloffet, Yves; Forsberg, Staffan; Klonk, H.; Lang, Hans-Guenter; Fichtinger, G.; Warren, T.; Manzella, P.; Gallo, R.; Koizumi, Hiroyoshi; Johnson, M.; Pittermann, P.

    1998-01-01

    The CNRA believes that safety inspections are a major element in the regulatory authority's efforts to ensure the safe operation of nuclear facilities. Considering the importance of these issues, the Committee has established a special Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP). The purpose of WGIP, is to facilitate the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA Member countries Following discussions at several meetings on the topic of what is expected by the regulatory body regarding inspection criteria, WGIP proposed putting together a compilation of Member countries practices on regulatory inspection practices with respect to licensee emergency planning. CNRA approved this task and this report. Information was collected from a questionnaire which was issued in 1996. The report presents information on regulatory inspection activities with respect to emergency planning in NEA Member countries. The focus of the report is on the third section. It reviews the similarities and differences in inspection practices to evaluate compliance with the requirements over which the regulatory body (RB) has jurisdiction

  7. Healthcare logistics in disaster planning and emergency management: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanVactor, Jerry D

    2017-12-01

    This paper discusses the role of healthcare supply chain management in disaster mitigation and management. While there is an abundance of literature examining emergency management and disaster preparedness efforts across an array of industries, little information has been directed specifically toward the emergency interface, interoperability and unconventional relationships among civilian institutions and the US Department of Defense (US DoD) or supply chain operations involved therein. To address this imbalance, this paper provides US DoD healthcare supply chain managers with concepts related to communicating and planning more effectively. It is worth remembering, however, that all disasters are local - under the auspice of tiered response involving federal agencies, the principal responsibility for responding to domestic disasters and emergencies rests with the lowest level of government equipped and able to deal with the incident effectively. As such, the findings are equally applicable to institutions outside the military. It also bears repeating that every crisis is unique: there is no such thing as a uniform response for every incident. The role of the US DoD in emergency preparedness and disaster planning is changing and will continue to do so as the need for roles in support of a larger effort also continues to change.

  8. The Student Volunteer Army: a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Sally; Mills, Colleen E

    2017-10-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to understanding of the factors associated with an effective emergent emergency response organisation and to provide new insights into this understudied area. It examines, through an analysis of a range of textual resources, the emergence and re-emergence of the Student Volunteer Army (SVA) during the devastating earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, in 2010-11. This evaluation is conducted in relation to the four key features of an effective emergency response organisation: adaptability; direction; leadership; and communication. In addition, the paper aims to further understanding of 'emergency entrepreneurship' and thus of the values and strategies that underpin social entrepreneur organisations in times of normalcy. The paper concludes that the unique position of the SVA as a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation enabled it to innovate continually and to improve repeatedly its systems, relationships, and image, such that it exhibited features common to emergent and established emergency response organisations. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  9. Emergency response facility technical data system of Taiwan Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, E.; Liang, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company (Taipower) has developed its emergency response facility program since 1981. This program is integrated with the following activities to enhance the emergency response capability of nuclear power plants: (1) survey of the plant instrumentation based on the requirements of R.G. 1.97; (2) improvement of plant specific emergency operating procedures based on the emergency response guidelines developed by the Owners group; (3) implementation of the detailed control room design review with the consideration of human engineering and task analysis; and (4) organization, staff and communication of emergency planning of nuclear power plant. The emergency response facility programs of Taipower are implemented in Chinshan (GE BWR4/MARK I), Kuosheng (GE BWR6/MARK III) and Maanshan (W PWR). The major items included in each program are: (1) to establish new buildings for On-Site Technical Support Center, Near-Site Emergency Operation Facility; (2) to establish an Emergency Executive Center at Taipower headquarters; (3) to establish the communication network between control room and emergency response facilities; and (4) to install a dedicated Emergency Response Facility Technical Data System (ERFTDS) for each plant. The ERFTDS provides the functions of data acquisition, data processing, data storage and display in meeting with the requirements of NUREG 0696. The ERFTDS is designed with plant specific requirements. These specific requirements are expected to be useful not only for the emergency condition but also for normal operation conditions

  10. Emergency Preparedness and Response at Nuclear Power Plants in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, L. A.; Qamar, M. A.; Liaquat, M.R., E-mail: samasl@yahoo.com [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-10-15

    Emergency preparedness and response arrangements at Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) in Pakistan have been reevaluated in the light of Fukushima Daiichi accident. Appropriate measures have been taken to strengthen and effectively implement the on-site and off-site emergency plans. Verification of these plans is conducted through regulatory review and by witnessing periodic emergency drills and exercises conducted by the NPPs in the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements. Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) have been revised at NPPs. A multi discipline reserve force has been formed for assistance during severe accidents. Nuclear Emergency Management System (NEMS) has been established at the national level in order to make necessary arrangements for responding to nuclear and radiological emergencies. Training programs for first responders and medical professionals have been launched. Emergencies coordination centres have been established at national and corporate levels. Public awareness program has been initiated to ensure that the surrounding population is provided with appropriate information on emergency planning and response. To share national and international operational experience, Pakistan has arranged various workshops and developed a strong link with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  11. Strategic Planning for Emergencies: Lessons Learned from Katrina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M. G.; Mashhadi, H.; Habeck, D.

    2007-01-01

    The tragedy that was unleashed when hurricane Katrina hit the United States southern coast and most particularly New Orleans is still being examined. Regardless of the allocation of blame for the response, or lack thereof, several very important components of what needs to be included in effective strategic, management, and response plans were revealed in the aftermath. The first tenet is to be sure not to make the problem worse. In other words, the goal is to prevent emergencies from becoming a disaster that subsequently grows to a catastrophe. Essential components that need to be addressed start with protection and rescue of affected people. Several characteristics of an effective strategic plan that will address saving lives include leadership, continuity of government and business, effective communications, adequate evacuation plans and security of electronic infrastructure. Katrina analysis confirms that the process to integrate all the components is too complex to be accomplished ad hoc. This presentation will outline objective methodology to successfully integrate the various facets that comprise an effective strategic plan, management plan, and tactical plans.(author)

  12. Preparing a laboratory for radioanalytical emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.; Webb, C.J.; Isch, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the state of the nation's ability to respond to a radiological event is examined, it has become apparent that both capacity and capability are lacking. Department of Homeland Security National Planning Scenario 11 is designed to address the planning activities for the response to an attack using radiological dispersal devices. The scenario details show that the cleanup activity will take several years, and that there will be between 360 000 and 1 000 000 environmental samples in the first year. Based on existing capacity and capabilities it would take four to six years to analyze the samples generated at the lower end of the sample range. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been given responsibility for the remediation activities following a radiological event, and has awarded cooperative agreements to several laboratories to start the process of developing capacity and capabilities. The Connecticut Department of Public Health Laboratory (DPHL) was awarded one of the cooperative agreements. The DPHL has started activities to further those goals by investigating and implementing procedures to ensure that samples with activity higher than normal background can be processed safely, as well as implementing more rapid methods for radiochemical analysis. The DPHL already served as the primacy radiochemistry laboratory for several New England states and thus had a solid foundation to build upon. The DPHL has taken a process flow approach in preparing for radiological emergency response and recommends that radioanalytical laboratories that are reviewing their roles in such a response: - Ensure that their Nuclear Regulatory Commission licenses allow for appropriate radioisotope types and activities; - Develop procedures and processes to ensure that samples with higher activities can be processed safely, with due regard for sample screening and aliquanting samples; - Provide for enhanced radioanalytical contamination control, with careful consideration of sample

  13. 40 CFR 264.227 - Emergency repairs; contingency plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency repairs; contingency plans... FACILITIES Surface Impoundments § 264.227 Emergency repairs; contingency plans. (a) A surface impoundment... days after detecting the problem. (c) As part of the contingency plan required in subpart D of this...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1477 - Nevada air pollution emergency plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nevada air pollution emergency plan. 52.1477 Section 52.1477 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Nevada § 52.1477 Nevada air pollution emergency plan. Section 6.1.5 of...

  15. 40 CFR 52.274 - California air pollution emergency plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false California air pollution emergency plan. 52.274 Section 52.274 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.274 California air pollution emergency plan. (a) Since the...

  16. Training programs for emergency response personnel at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Three Mile Island reactor accident has focused attention on emergency planning and preparedness including selection and training of personnel. At Hanford, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is in the unique position of providing emergency response personnel, planning, training and equipment not only for its own organization and facilities but also for the Hanford Site in general, as well as the Interagency Radiological Assistance Plan (IRAP) Region 8 Team. Team members are chosen for one or more of the emergency teams based upon professional education and/or experience as well as interest, aptitude and specialized knowledge. Consequently, the initial training orientation of each new team member is not directed toward general professional ability, but rather toward specialized knowledge required to carry out their assigned emergency tasks. Continual training and practice is necessary to maintain the interest and skills for effectively coping with major emergencies. The types of training which are conducted include: tests of emergency systems and/or procedures; drills involving plant employees and/or emergency team members (e.g., activation of emergency notification systems); short training sessions on special topics; and realistic emergency exercises involving the simulation of major accidents wherein the emergency team must solve specific problems on a real time basis

  17. Utilising the emergency planning cycle for the transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.

    2004-01-01

    As a world leader in the transport of radioactive material (RAM) British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) and its subsidiary Pacific Nuclear Transport Limited (PNTL) recognise the importance of adopting the emergency planning cycle. The emergency response arrangements prepared and maintained in support of the International Transport business have been developed through this cycle to ensure that their emergency response section may achieve its aim and that the business unit is able to respond to any International Transport related incident in a swift, combined and co-ordinated manner. This paper outlines the eight key stages of the planning cycle and the experience that BNFL has gained in respect of its emergency response activities

  18. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  19. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  20. Development of a statewide hospital plan for radiologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Delli Carpini, Domenico; Bohan, Michael; Werdmann, Michael; Wilds, Edward; Barlow, Agnus; Beck, Charles; Cheng, David; Daly, Nancy; Glazer, Peter; Mas, Peter; Nath, Ravinder; Piontek, Gregory; Price, Kenneth; Albanese, Joseph; Roberts, Kenneth; Salner, Andrew L.; Rockwell, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Although general guidelines have been developed for triage of victims in the field and for hospitals to plan for a radiologic event, specific information for clinicians and administrators is not available for guidance in efficient management of radiation victims during their early encounter in the hospital. A consensus document was developed by staff members of four Connecticut hospitals, two institutions of higher learning, and the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Office of Emergency Preparedness, with assistance of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. The objective was to write a practical manual for clinicians (including radiation oncologists, emergency room physicians, and nursing staff), hospital administrators, radiation safety officers, and other individuals knowledgeable in radiation monitoring that would be useful for evaluation and management of radiation injury. The rationale for and process by which the radiation response plan was developed and implemented in the State of Connecticut are reviewed. Hospital admission pathways are described, based on classification of victims as exposed, contaminated, and/or physically injured. This manual will be of value to those involved in planning the health care response to a radiologic event

  1. Standard format and content for emergency plans for fuel cycle and materials facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This regulatory guides is being developed to provide guidance acceptable to the NRC staff on the information to be included in emergency plans and to establish a format for presenting the information. Use of a standard format will help ensure uniformity and completeness in the preparation of emergency plans. An acceptable emergency plan should describe the licensed activities conducted at the facility and the types of accidents that might occur. It should provide information on classifying postulated accidents and the licensee's procedures for notifying and coordinating with offsite authorities. The plan should provide information on emergency response measures that might be necessary, the equipment and facilities available to respond to an emergency, and how the licensee will maintain emergency preparedness capability. It should describe the records and reports that will be maintained. There should also be a section on recovery after an accident and plans for restoring the facility to a safe condition. 4 refs

  2. Responses to emergencies in Mexico and Central America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation emergencies have two main aspects: radiation safety, which concerns control of the radiation source, and, more importantly, health effects, which entail diagnoses, treatment, and rehabilitation. The physician participates directly in a radiation emergency because he or she is the professional who knows best the human body and the methodology to re-establish health. However, because these types of incidents are infrequent, many physicians are poorly prepared to deal with such emergencies. Two main aspects of emergency response plans are: (1) prevention, including public education for behavior and planning for appropriate response; and (2) application, including prophylactic measures, assessing the extent of exposure and contamination, controlling public anxiety, and managing and treating the victims

  3. Emergency planning and emergency drill for a 5 MW district heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhongqi; Wu Zhongwang; Hu Jingzhong; Feng Yuying; Li Zhongsan; Dong Shiyuan

    1991-01-01

    The authors describes the main contents of the emergency planning for a 5 MW nuclear district heating reactor and some considerations for the planning's making, and presents the situation on implementing emergency preparedness and an emergency drill that has been carried out

  4. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, AHA., E-mail: amyhamijah@nm.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A. [Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder’s intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties’ absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex.

  5. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, AHA.; Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder’s intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties’ absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex

  6. Prototyping and validating requirements of radiation and nuclear emergency plan simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, AHA.; Rozan, MZA.; Ibrahim, R.; Deris, S.; Selamat, A.

    2015-04-01

    Organizational incapability in developing unrealistic, impractical, inadequate and ambiguous mechanisms of radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan (EPR) causing emergency plan disorder and severe disasters. These situations resulting from 65.6% of poor definition and unidentified roles and duties of the disaster coordinator. Those unexpected conditions brought huge aftermath to the first responders, operators, workers, patients and community at large. Hence, in this report, we discuss prototyping and validating of Malaysia radiation and nuclear emergency preparedness and response plan simulation model (EPRM). A prototyping technique was required to formalize the simulation model requirements. Prototyping as systems requirements validation was carried on to endorse the correctness of the model itself against the stakeholder's intensions in resolving those organizational incapability. We have made assumptions for the proposed emergency preparedness and response model (EPRM) through the simulation software. Those assumptions provided a twofold of expected mechanisms, planning and handling of the respective emergency plan as well as in bringing off the hazard involved. This model called RANEPF (Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework) simulator demonstrated the training emergency response perquisites rather than the intervention principles alone. The demonstrations involved the determination of the casualties' absorbed dose range screening and the coordination of the capacity planning of the expected trauma triage. Through user-centred design and sociotechnical approach, RANEPF simulator was strategized and simplified, though certainly it is equally complex.

  7. On-site emergency intervention plan for nuclear accident situation at SCN-Pitesti TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, S.; Oprea, I.

    2008-01-01

    A 14 MW TRIGA research reactor is operated on the Institute for Nuclear Research site. In the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency that may affect the public the effectiveness of protective actions depends on the adequacy of intervention plans prepared in advance. Considerable planning is necessary to reduce to manageable levels the types of decisions leading to effective responses to protect the public in such an event. The essential structures of our on-site, off-site and county emergency intervention plan and the correlation between emergency intervention plans are presented. (authors)

  8. RMP Guidance for Warehouses - Chapter 8: Emergency Response Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implementing an emergency response program along with your risk management plan may be required if you have at least one Program 2 or 3 process in place, and if your employees will respond to some releases involving regulated toxic or flammable substances.

  9. MMS: An electronic message management system for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.B.; Garde, H.; Andersen, V.

    1998-01-01

    among messages can be viewed in a graphic tree-like display. By employing the extensive filtration facilities offered by the MMS. users are able to monitor the current status of messages. And, in general, filtration provides users with means of surveying a possibly large number of responses to messages...... contingency plan and procedures to be applied during predefined stages of an emergency....

  10. Some issues on nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear emergency preparedness and response have comprehensively been developed over ten years in China. In order to promote the sound development of emergency preparedness and response, it is useful to retrospect the process of emergency preparedness and response, to summarize the experiences and absorb the experiences from foreign countries. The main issues are as follows: 1) The preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological accident is basically the same as the response to any accident involving hazardous material. 2) The classification of emergency planning, not only for nuclear facilities, but also irradiation installation, etc. 3) The hazard assessment-- a top priority. 4) The emergency planning zones. 5) Psychological impact

  11. Multi-objective evolutionary emergency response optimization for major accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiadou, Paraskevi S.; Papazoglou, Ioannis A.; Kiranoudis, Chris T.; Markatos, Nikolaos C.

    2010-01-01

    Emergency response planning in case of a major accident (hazardous material event, nuclear accident) is very important for the protection of the public and workers' safety and health. In this context, several protective actions can be performed, such as, evacuation of an area; protection of the population in buildings; and use of personal protective equipment. The best solution is not unique when multiple criteria are taken into consideration (e.g. health consequences, social disruption, economic cost). This paper presents a methodology for multi-objective optimization of emergency response planning in case of a major accident. The emergency policy with regards to protective actions to be implemented is optimized. An evolutionary algorithm has been used as the optimization tool. Case studies demonstrating the methodology and its application in emergency response decision-making in case of accidents related to hazardous materials installations are presented. However, the methodology with appropriate modification is suitable for supporting decisions in assessing emergency response procedures in other cases (nuclear accidents, transportation of hazardous materials) or for land-use planning issues.

  12. State-level emergency preparedness and response capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Sharon M; Perrotta, Dennis M; Stanbury, Martha; Heumann, Michael; Anderson, Henry; Simms, Erin; Huang, Monica

    2011-03-01

    Prior assessments of public health readiness had identified gaps in radiation preparedness. In recent years, preparedness planning has involved an "all-hazards" approach. Current assessment of the national status related to radiation public health emergency preparedness capabilities at the state and local health department levels was needed. A survey of state health departments related to radiation readiness was undertaken in 2010 by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE). States with nuclear power plants were instructed to consider their responses exclusive of capabilities and resources related to the plants given that the emergency response plans for nuclear power plants are specific and unique. Thirty-eight (76%) state health departments responded to the survey, including 26 of the 31 states with nuclear power plants. Specific strengths noted at the state level included that the majority of states had a written radiation response plan and most plans include a detailed section for communications issues during a radiation emergency. In addition, more than half of the states indicated that their relationship with federal partners is sufficient to provide resources for radiation emergencies, indicating the importance states placed on federal resources and expertise. Specific weaknesses are discussed and include that most states had completed little to no planning for public health surveillance to assess potential human health impacts of a radiation event; less than half had written plans to address exposure assessment, environmental sampling, human specimen collection and analysis, and human health assessment. Few reported having sufficient resources to do public health surveillance, radiation exposure assessment, laboratory functions and other capabilities. Levels of planning, resources and partnerships varied among states, those with nuclear power plants were better prepared. Gaps were evident in all states; however and additional training and

  13. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability

  14. 7 CFR 1730.28 - Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP). 1730.28 Section... § 1730.28 Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP). (a) Each borrower with an approved RUS electric program loan as of October 12, 2004 shall have a written ERP no later than January 12, 2006. The ERP should be...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.35 - Employee emergency action plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Provisions § 1926.35 Employee emergency action plans. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all...) Names or regular job titles of persons or departments who can be contacted for further information or... the employee in the event of an emergency. The written plan shall be kept at the workplace and made...

  16. Understanding Public Responses to Emerging Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macnaghten, Philip; Davies, S.R.; Kearnes, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies aimed at understanding public responses to emerging technologies have given limited attention to the social and cultural processes through which public concerns emerge. When probed, these have tended to be explained either in cognitive social psychological terms, typically in the

  17. Caire - A real-time feedback system for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Brenk, H.D.; de Witt, H.

    1991-01-01

    In cases of nuclear emergencies it is the primary task of emergency response forces and decision making authorities to act properly. Whatever the specific reason for the contingency may be, a quick and most accurate estimate of the radiation exposure in consequence of the emergency must be made. This is a necessary prerequisite for decisions on protective measures and off-site emergency management. With respect to this fact ant the recent experience of the Chernobyl accident, remote monitoring systems have increased their importance as an inherent part of environmental surveillance installations in the FRG and in other countries. The existing systems in Germany are designed to cover both, routine operation and emergency situations. They provide site specific meteorological data, gross effluent dose rates, and dose rate measurements at on-site and approximately 30 off-site locations in the vicinity of a plant. Based on such telemetric surveillance networks an advanced automatic on-line system named CAIRE (Computer Aided Response to Emergencies) has been developed as a real time emergency response tool for nuclear facilities. this tool is designed to provide decision makers with most relevant radiation exposure data of the population at risk. The development phase of CAIRE has already been finished. CAIRE is now in an operational status and available for applications in emergency planning and response

  18. Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY)

  19. What Chernobyl has taught us about emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orchard, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses the U.K. government review of existing emergency plans in the light of experience of the Chernobyl accident, together with the nuclear industry review of the causes and consequences of the accident. Aspects of emergency planning covered by this outline review include the need for information, pressures brought to bear on site emergency organisation by public and news media, evacuation, the need for national inventories of equipment, protective clothing, health physics instruments, road transport vehicles etc. (U.K.)

  20. Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations of the International Organizations. Date Effective: 1 March 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This Joint Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (Joint Plan) describes the interagency framework of preparedness for and response to an actual, potential or perceived nuclear or radiological emergency independent of whether it arises from an accident, natural disaster, negligence, nuclear security event or any other cause. The IAEA is the main coordinating body for development and maintenance of the Joint Plan. The Joint Plan is intended to support and underpin the efforts of national governments and seeks to ensure a coordinated and harmonized international response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. It is not intended to interfere with or replace the emergency preparedness and response arrangements of international organizations (or States).

  1. Elements of a national emergency response system for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest elements for a general emergency response system, employed at a national level, to detect, evaluate and assess the consequences of a radiological atmospheric release occurring within or outside of national boundaries. These elements are focused on the total aspect of emergency response ranging from providing an initial alarm to a total assessment of the environmental and health effects. Elements of the emergency response system are described in such a way that existing resources can be directly applied if appropriate; if not, newly developed or an expansion of existing resources can be employed. The major thrust of this paper is toward a philosophical discussion and general description of resources that would be required to implementation. If the major features of this proposal system are judged desirable for implementation, then the next level of detail can be added. The philosophy underlying this paper is preparedness - preparedness through planning, awareness and the application of technology. More specifically, it is establishment of reasonable guidelines including the definition of reference and protective action levels for public exposure to accidents involving nuclear material; education of the public, government officials and the news media; and the application of models and measurements coupled to computer systems to address a series of questions related to emergency planning, response and assessment. It is the role of a proven national emergency response system to provide reliable, quality-controlled information to decision makers for the management of environmental crises

  2. Development and use of consolidated criteria for evaluation of emergency preparedness plans for DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, K.; Kier, P.H.; Baldwin, T.E.

    1995-01-01

    Emergency preparedness at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is promoted by development and quality control of response plans. To promote quality control efforts, DOE has developed a review document that consolidates requirements and guidance pertaining to emergency response planning from various DOE and regulatory sources. The Criteria for Evaluation of Operational Emergency Plans (herein referred to as the Criteria document) has been constructed and arranged to maximize ease of use in reviewing DOE response plans. Although developed as a review instrument, the document also serves as a de facto guide for plan development, and could potentially be useful outside the scope of its original intended DOE clientele. As regulatory and DOE requirements are revised and added in the future, the document will be updated to stay current

  3. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  4. Developments in emergency planning within Scottish nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Scottish Nuclear has recently completed a major program of improvements to its nuclear emergency facilities. The improvements include the construction of a purpose built Off-Site Emergency Centre for each of its two power stations and the development of a computer based information management system to facilitate the rapid distribution of information on an emergency to local, regional and national agencies. A computer code has also been developed to allow the rapid assessment of the effects of any accidental release on the local population. The improvements to the emergency facilities have been coupled with changes in local and national arrangements for dealing with a civil nuclear emergency. The use of airborne surveying techniques for rapidly determining levels of deposited activity following an accident is also being examined and preliminary airborne surveys have been carried out. (author)

  5. Emergency Response Resources guide for nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience was this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly from those organizations within the Federal Government. This first revision of that guide broadens the focus of the original document. Also, new information defines the major Federal response facilities. This guide should assist State and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when their resources have been exhausted

  6. Off-site response for radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, J.S.; Oakes, T.W.; Hubbard, H.M.; Hibbitts, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Environmental radiological surveillance under emergency conditions at off-site locations is one of the advisory functions provided by DOE within the ORO jurisdiction. The Department of Environmental Management of ORNL has been requested to provide sampling and analytical assistance at such emergency response activities. We have assembled and identified specific individuals and equipment to provide a rapid response force to perform field measurements for environmental radioactivity releases as a consequence of nuclear accidents. Survey teams for sample collection and field measurements are provided along with analytical assistance to operate the radioactivity measuring equipment in the DOE emergency van

  7. Emergency Response to Radioactive Material Transport Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-shinawy, R.M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Although transport regulations issued by IAEA is providing a high degree of safety during transport opertions,transport accidents involving packages containing radioactive material have occurred and will occur at any time. Whenever a transport accident involving radioactive material accurs, and many will pose no radiation safety problems, emergency respnose actioms are meeded to ensure that radiation safety is maintained. In case of transport accident that result in a significant relesae of radioactive material , loss of shielding or loss of criticality control , that consequences should be controlled or mitigated by proper emergency response actions safety guide, Emergency Response Plamming and Prepardness for transport accidents involving radioactive material, was published by IAEA. This guide reflected all requirememts of IAEA, regulations for safe transport of radioactive material this guide provide guidance to the publicauthorites and other interested organziation who are responsible for establishing such emergency arrangements

  8. Integrating Social Media Monitoring Into Public Health Emergency Response Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Tamer A; Fleshler, Keren

    2016-10-01

    Social media monitoring for public health emergency response and recovery is an essential response capability for any health department. The value of social media for emergency response lies not only in the capacity to rapidly communicate official and critical incident information, but as a rich source of incoming data that can be gathered to inform leadership decision-making. Social media monitoring is a function that can be formally integrated into the Incident Command System of any response agency. The approach to planning and required resources, such as staffing, logistics, and technology, is flexible and adaptable based on the needs of the agency and size and scope of the emergency. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has successfully used its Social Media Monitoring Team during public health emergency responses and planned events including major Ebola and Legionnaires' disease responses. The concepts and implementations described can be applied by any agency, large or small, interested in building a social media monitoring capacity. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  9. Involvement of the Public Health Authority in emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztanyik, L.B.

    1986-01-01

    It is required by the Hungarian Atomic Energy Act and its enacting clause of 1980 that facilities established for the application of atomic energy be designed, constructed and operated in such a manner that abnormal operational occurrences can be avoided and unplanned exposures to radiation and radioactive substances can be prevented. The primary responsibility for planning and implementing emergency actions rests with the management of the operating organization. Thus one of the prerequisites of licensing the first nuclear power plant in Hungary was the preparation and submission for approval of an emergency plan by the operating organization. In addition to this, the council of the county where the power plant is located has also been obliged to prepare a complementary emergency plan, in co-operation with other regional and national authorities, for the prevention of consequences from an emergency that may extend beyond the site boundary of the plant. In preparing the complementary plan, the emergency plan of the facility had to be taken into account. Unlike most national authorities involved in nuclear matters, the Public Health Authority is involved in the preparation of plans for every kind of emergency in a nuclear facility, including even those whose consequences can probably be confined to the plant site. The paper discusses in detail the role and responsibility of the Public Health Authority in emergency planning and preparedness for nuclear facilities. (author)

  10. Effective operational oil spill response planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    An operational Contingency Plan is one of the single most important aspects of effective oil spill response operations. It is a spill control game plan. A thorough contingency plan provides a set of guidelines that can be used to help direct all phases of spill response activities. More than simple a compilation of lists and rosters, the contingency plan reflects strategic and philosophical elements of spill response that help to ensure a viable response to any spill incident. Facilities and oil carrying vessels should have well maintained contingency plans with these features. This paper describes the requirement for effective oil spill response pans and the training required to exercise them

  11. Medical management and planning for radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongirwar, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation Emergencies which result as a consequence of nuclear or radiological accidents can produce a spectrum of different types of radiation injuries which could include cases of whole body irradiation causing Acute Radiation Syndrome, partial body irradiation, radiation burns (localized irradiation), radioactive contamination and combined injuries having component of conventional injuries. General principles of managing these cases entail doing triage, offering immediate emergency care and instituting definitive treatment. Infra-structural facilities which are required to facilitate their management include first aid post at plant site, personnel decontamination centre, site clinic and specialized hospital which can offer comprehensive investigational and treatment modalities. Training of medical and paramedical personnel is crucial as part of emergency preparedness programme and if needed, help can be sought from WHO's Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network Centres. (author)

  12. Attitudes towards emergency plans, information and tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultaaker, Oe.

    1986-11-01

    The staff composed of policemen, firemen, home-guards and coast-guards having emergency service at the Ringhals nuclear power plant have been interviewed as to their viewpoints. They have a similar attitude to nuclear power as the general public which is varying. They accept, however, the actual risk evaluation to a large extent. There are also opponents of nuclear power who are difficult to motivate about the training for emergency service. (G.B.)

  13. Using risk based tools in emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, B.W.; Ferns, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques are used by the nuclear industry to model the potential response of a reactor subjected to unusual conditions. The knowledge contained in these models can aid in emergency response decision making. This paper presents requirements for a PRA based emergency response support system to date. A brief discussion of published work provides background for a detailed description of recent developments. A rapid deep assessment capability for specific portions of full plant models is presented. The program uses a screening rule base to control search space expansion in a combinational algorithm

  14. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  15. Amatchmethod Based on Latent Semantic Analysis for Earthquakehazard Emergency Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, D.; Zhao, S.; Zhang, Z.; Shi, X.

    2017-09-01

    The structure of the emergency plan on earthquake is complex, and it's difficult for decision maker to make a decision in a short time. To solve the problem, this paper presents a match method based on Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA). After the word segmentation preprocessing of emergency plan, we carry out keywords extraction according to the part-of-speech and the frequency of words. Then through LSA, we map the documents and query information to the semantic space, and calculate the correlation of documents and queries by the relation between vectors. The experiments results indicate that the LSA can improve the accuracy of emergency plan retrieval efficiently.

  16. AMATCHMETHOD BASED ON LATENT SEMANTIC ANALYSIS FOR EARTHQUAKEHAZARD EMERGENCY PLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the emergency plan on earthquake is complex, and it’s difficult for decision maker to make a decision in a short time. To solve the problem, this paper presents a match method based on Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA. After the word segmentation preprocessing of emergency plan, we carry out keywords extraction according to the part-of-speech and the frequency of words. Then through LSA, we map the documents and query information to the semantic space, and calculate the correlation of documents and queries by the relation between vectors. The experiments results indicate that the LSA can improve the accuracy of emergency plan retrieval efficiently.

  17. Development and verification for review plan of emergency action level (EAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Emergency action levels (EALs) are used as the trigger in order to implement the precautionary protective actions at the nuclear emergency. In this study the framework for applying the EAL in Japan and the process for developing the review plan, such as procedures to review the basis of EAL submitted by the licensee, have been investigated based on the survey for EAL review executed in the United States. In addition, issues to reflect the EAL framework in enhancement of the local government emergency planning and emergency response support system have been investigated. (author)

  18. NPP accident scenario. Which emergency measures are planned in Switzerland?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    As a consequence of the reactor accident in Fukushima the Swiss government has ordered an extensive analysis of emergency planning in case of a NPP accident Switzerland. A special working group has analyzed the possible improvements of Swiss emergency planning based on the experiences in Japan. Under the special direction of the Bundesamt fuer Bevoelkerungsschutz (BABS) the agreed improvements were integrated into the emergency concept. The reference scenarios have been re-assessed and the zone concept adapted. The emergency measures include shelter-type rooms (basement or window-less rooms), the preventive distribution of iodine pills, measures concerning agriculture, aquatic systems, preventive evacuation, traffic regulations, and delayed evacuation.

  19. Business continuity, emergency planning and special needs: How to protect the vulnerable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Emergencies and disasters affect all segments of the population. Some segments are more at risk during the emergency response and recovery efforts owing to vulnerabilities that increase the risk of harm. These vulnerabilities are due to individuals' disabilities, which must be incorporated into emergency and business continuity planning. Some disabilities are obvious, such as impaired vision, hearing or mobility, while other are less evident, but equally disabling, such as cognitive disorders, geographical or language isolation, and numerous age-related factors. Taken together when creating emergency or business continuity plans, the issues identified as disabilities can be grouped by functionality and termed as special needs. This paper will detail the identification of special needs populations, explain how these persons are vulnerable during the emergency or disaster response and recovery process, and provide examples of how to partner with individuals within identified special needs populations to improve the planning process.

  20. [The Hospital Emergency Plan: Important Tool for Disaster Preparedness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurmb, Thomas; Scholtes, Katja; Kolibay, Felix; Rechenbach, Peer; Vogel, Ulrich; Kowalzik, Barbara

    2017-09-01

    Hospitals need to be prepared for any kind of disaster. The terrorist attacks and mass shootings that took place in Europe in recent years impressively demonstrated the capability of hospitals to manage such challenging and disastrous events. To be adequately prepared, the hospital emergency plan is a very important tool. In this article we describe the entire process of drafting the emergency plan. We discuss the theoretical background as well as different models of disaster planning and we give important practical hints and tips for those in charge of the hospital disaster planning. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Preventative maintenance plan for emergency pumping trailers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggins, D.D.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose/goal of this document is to identify the maintenance requirements and resources available to properly maintain the readiness and condition of the Emergency Pumping Equipment controlled by the Tank Waste Remediation System Tank Farms Plant Engineering and Tank Stabilization Operations. This equipment is intended to pump a single-shell tank (SST) that has been identified as an assumed leaking tank. The goal is to commence pumping (submersible or jet) as soon as safely possible after identifying a SST as an assumed leaking tank. Important information pertaining to the Emergency Pumping Equipment, Over-Ground Piping installation, and procedures is found in WHC-SD-WM-AP-005, ''Single Shell Tank Leak Emergency Pumping Guide.''

  2. Preparation of off-site emergency preparedness plans for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Safety of public, occupational workers and the protection of environment should be assured while activities for economic and social progress are pursued. These activities include the establishment and utilisation of nuclear facilities and use of radioactive sources. This document is issued as a lead document to facilitate preparation of specific site manuals by the Responsible Organisation for emergency response plans at each site to ensure their preparedness to meet any eventuality due to site emergency in order to mitigate its consequences on the health and safety of site personnel. It takes cognizance of an earlier AERB publication on the subject: Safety Manual on Off-Site Emergency Plan for Nuclear Installations, AERB/SM/NISD-2, 1988 and also takes into consideration the urgent need for promoting public awareness and drawing up revised emergency response plans, which has come out in a significant manner after the accidents at Chernobyl and Bhopal

  3. An expert system for improving nuclear emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salame-Alfie, A.; Goldbogen, G.C.; Ryan, R.M.; Wallace, W.A.; Yeater, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The accidents at TMI-2 and Chernobyl have produced initiatives aimed at improving nuclear plant emergency response capabilities. Among them are the development of emergency response facilities with capabilities for the acquisition, processing, and diagnosis of data which are needed to help coordinate plant operations, engineering support and management under emergency conditions. An effort in this direction prompted the development of an expert system. EP (EMERGENCY PLANNER) is a prototype expert system that is intended to help coordinate the overall management during emergency conditions. The EP system was built using the GEN-X expert system shell. GEN-X has a variety of knowledge representation mechanisms including AND/OR trees, Decision trees, and IF/THEN tables, and runs on an IBM PC-XT or AT computer or compatible. Among the main features, EP is portable, modular, user friendly, can interact with external programs and interrogate data bases. The knowledge base is made of New York State (NYS) Procedures for Emergency Classification, NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Plan (REPP) and knowledge from experts of the NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Group and the Office of Radiological Health and Chemistry of the New York Power Authority (NYPA)

  4. The public transportation system security and emergency preparedness planning guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Recent events have focused renewed attention on the vulnerability of the nation's critical infrastructure to major events, including terrorism. The Public Transportation System Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Guide has been prepared to s...

  5. Civil-Military Emergency Planning Council Denver Conference Proceedings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lidy, A

    2000-01-01

    ...) program formed by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) since 1990. One small but important element of this engagement program is the use of the Civil-Military Emergency Planning (CMEP...

  6. Brief on nuclear emergency planning and preparedness in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Ontario has an excellent conceptual plan to ensure the safety of its inhabitants in the event of a nuclear accident anywhere in the world. This plan still needs to be translated into tangible preparedness to deal with such an emergency. The province is confident that, with the assistance of Ontario Hydro, a high level of nuclear emergency preparedness will soon be established for the people of the province

  7. Method for Developing a Communication Strategy and Plan for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical resource for emergency planning in the area of public communication in the development of a radiation emergency communication plan (RECP). The term 'public communication' is defined as any activity that communicates information to the public and the media during a nuclear or radiological emergency. To avoid confusion, the term public communication has been used in this publication rather than public information, which may be used in other IAEA publications and documents to ensure consistency with the terminology used in describing the command and control system. This publication also aims to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(11) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research with regard to the response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. This publication is intended to provide guidance to national and local authorities on developing an RECP which incorporates the specific functions, arrangements and capabilities that will be required for public communication during a nuclear or radiological emergency. The two main features of this publication are the template provided to develop an RECP and detailed guidance on developing a communication strategy for emergency preparedness and response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The template is consistent with the outline of the national radiation emergency plan proposed in Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (EPR-Method 2003). This publication is part of the IAEA

  8. Post-emergency response resources guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience is this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly those organizations within the federal government. This guide should assist state and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when theirs have been exhausted

  9. Information technology and emergency management: preparedness and planning in US states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of information technology (IT) on emergency preparedness and planning by analysing a survey of US state government departments of emergency management. The research results show that there has been a significant impact of IT on emergency planning. IT has proven to be effective for all phases of emergency management, but especially for the response phase. There are numerous technologies used in emergency management, ranging from the internet, Geographic Information Systems and wireless technologies to more advanced hazard analysis models. All were generally viewed as being effective. Lack of financial resources and support from elected officials is a perennial problem in public administration, and was found to be prevalent in this study of IT and emergency management. There was evidence that state governments rating high on a performance index were more likely to use IT for emergency management. © 2011 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2011.

  10. Critical Infrastructure Awareness Required by Civil Emergency Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.; Klaver, M.H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Modern societies are increasingly dependent on a set of critical products and services which comprise the Critical Infrastructure (CI). This makes Critical infrastructures increasingly important as a planning factor in case of emergencies. For that reason, we studied a number of emergencies and a

  11. 76 FR 41273 - National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Tribal Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2011-0025] National Emergency Communications Plan... Communications (CS&C), Office of Emergency Communications (OEC), will submit the following information collection request (ICR) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and clearance in accordance with the...

  12. Critical examination of emergency plans for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catsaros, Nicolas.

    1986-08-01

    An analysis of emergency plans of various countries for nuclear installations on- and off-site emergency preparedness is presented. The analysis is focused on the off-site organization and countermeasures to protect public health and safety. A critical examination of the different approaches is performed and recommendations for effectiveness improvement and optimization are formulated. (author)

  13. Guide for the elaboration of plans to control emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This Venezuelan standard establishes the lines for the elaboration of plans to control emergencies. It includes general aspects for the control of any emergency originated by operational flaws, for the nature or for acts of third, in any industrial installation, working center, public or private building [es

  14. Development of effective emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    It has been discussed that there were many differences to international standards and the delay for prior planning implementation of unclear emergency preparedness. Therefore, it was necessary to promote the study to take the concept of the international standard to the Guide 'Emergency Preparedness for Nuclear Facilities', and to apply the Precautionary Action Zone (PAZ) etc. as the protective actions procedure. This study was started since the fiscal year 2010 to enhance the effectiveness of the protective actions, which are corresponding to these requirements based on international aspects in the nuclear disaster occurrence. And the study was conducted to introduce the emergency action level (EAL) as decision criteria and to apply urgent protective action considering PAZ, and the results from this study will be used as the basic data necessary to modify and improve the Guide. In order to fulfill the purposes described above, in fiscal year 2011, followings are executed, (1) analysis and verification for basic evacuation area such as the PAZ, (2) analysis with regard to the EAL and prototype of protective actions for public, and (3) analysis with regard to prototype of protective actions for public including evacuation plan. However, taking account of the significance of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, Japanese emergency preparedness strategy should be studied and reconstructed in logically, systematically, and with international standard, but also being based on the reflection of individual lessons from this accident. (author)

  15. Dungeness Power Station off-site emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This off-site Emergency Plan in the event of an accidental release of radioactivity at the Dungeness Nuclear power station sets out the necessary management and coordination processes between Nuclear Electric, operators of the site, the emergency services and relevant local authorities. The objectives promoting the aim are identified and the activities which will be undertaken to protect the public and the environment in the event of an emergency are outlined. (UK)

  16. 29 CFR 1918.100 - Emergency action plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... action plans. (a) Scope and application. This section requires all employers to develop and implement an... departments that can be contacted for further information or explanation of duties under the plan. (c) Alarm... emergency action or for reaction time for safe escape of employees from the workplace or the immediate work...

  17. Nuclear emergency plans in France. Strengths and weaknesses. Report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, David; Josset, Mylene

    2016-01-01

    This report first presents nuclear emergency plans in France (specific intervention plans, action at the municipal level, creation of a national plan, planning of the post-accidental phase, integration of the international and cross-border dimension. Then, it analyses strengths and weaknesses of these plans. It outlines the necessity to take the most severe accident scenarios into account (issue of selection of reference accidents, necessity of reviewing emergency planning areas, and assessment of the number of inhabitants about French nuclear installations). It proposes a review of measures of protection of populations (information, sheltering, iodine-based prophylaxis, evacuation, food control and restrictions, protection of human resources, cross-border problems). It discusses how to put an end to the emergency situation, and the assessment and collaboration on emergency plans. The next part proposes an analysis of noticed strengths and weaknesses in some PPIs (specific intervention plans) in terms of text accessibility, of description of the site and of its environment, of intervention area, of operational measures, and of preparation to the post-accidental phase

  18. Emergency response guide for Point Lepreau area residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The design, construction and operating procedures of CANDU nuclear generating stations ensure that an accident causing a significant risk to people living near these stations is extremely unlikely. However, despite the excellent safety record of nuclear stations, it is common practice to prepare an emergency plan for such facilities. In this regard, The New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization is responsible for developing and implementing the Off-Site Emergency Plan for the Point Lepreau Generating Station. Work for the Off-Site Emergency Plan began in 1976 and, under the leadership of N.B.E.M.O., a number of government agencies co-operated in this project. The completed plan thus represents agreement among a number of Province of New Brunswick departments, various community groups, NB Power, and representatives of the Government of Canada. Also, information gathered in the annual door-to-door survey of the Lepreau area enabled government planners to make specialized arrangements such as an extensive warden service, a siren system, and evacuation assistance for the disabled

  19. 10 CFR 50.47 - Emergency plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... initial facility accident response in key functional areas is maintained at all times, timely augmentation... standards with offsite aspects: (1) Arrangements for requesting and effectively using offsite assistance on...

  20. Integrated simulation of emergency response in disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Taro; Furuta, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    An integrated simulation system of emergency response in disasters is under development that can consider various factors of disasters, such as disaster phenomena, activities of response organizations, resident behavior, and their environment. The aim of this system is to provide support for design and assessment of disaster management systems. This paper introduces the conceptual design of the entire system and presents simulators of organizational behavior in nuclear and earthquake disasters. (author)

  1. Exercises for radiological and nuclear emergency response. Planing - performance - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, A.; Faleschini, J.; Goelling, K.; Stapel, R.; Strobl, C.

    2010-01-01

    The report of the study group emergency response seminar covers the following topics: (A) purpose of exercises and exercise culture: fundamentals and appliances for planning, performance and evaluation; (B) exercises in nuclear facilities; (C) exercises of national authorities and aid organizations on nuclear scenarios; exercises of national authorities and aid organizations on other radiological scenarios; (D) exercises in industrial plants, universities, medical facilities and medical services, and research institutes; (E) transnational exercises, international exercises; (F): exercises on public information.

  2. Emergency response preparedness: the French experience of large scale exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanson, D.; Desnoyers, B.; Chabane, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In compliance with the IAEA regulations for the transport of radioactive material in the event of accidents during transport of radioactive material, emergency provisions to protect persons, property and environment have to be established and developed by the relevant national organisations. In France, the prefect of the department where the accident occurs is responsible for decisions and measures required to ensure the protection of both population and property at risk owing to the accident. During an accident, the ministers concerned provide the prefect with recommendations and information, in order to help him take the requisite decisions. On their side, the nuclear industry and transport companies also have to be prepared to intervene and to support the authorities at their request, depending on their capacities and their specialities. To prepare the emergency teams properly and acquire effective emergency plans, training exercises have to be conducted regularly with every ministerial department involved, the nuclear industry and transport companies, members of the public and the media. Then, the feedback from such exercises shall be taken into account to improve the emergency procedures. This paper will introduce: - emergency response preparedness: what is required by the relevant regulations? - emergency response preparedness: how is France organised? - the French experience of conducting large training exercises simulating accidents involving the transport of radioactive material; - the main difficulties and lessons learned; - the perspectives

  3. Collaborative situational mapping during emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunawan, L.T.; Oomes, A.H.J.; Neerincx, M.; Brinkman, W.-P.; Alers, H.

    2009-01-01

    During emergency response, individuals observe only part of the picture, sharing of information is needed to get the required complete picture. The aim of our study is to get insight in the collaborative mapping process in order to derive requirements for a map-sharing tool. First, we analyzed the

  4. L-007: Objectives preparation and Emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This lecture explains the preparation and response in a nuclear and radiological emergency. Must be taken into consideration a program of preparedness, the public health and environment protection, propagation of contamination limit, first aid and treatment radiation damage, the stochastic, psychological and physical effects reduction

  5. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head, James Colson. This document is the second of a two-part analysis on Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2016 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2016 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. The 2013 BNA was approved by NNSA’s Livermore Field Office on January 22, 2014.

  6. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan part V - Chalk River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-10-01

    The aim of Part 5 of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Plan is to describe the measures that shall be undertaken to deal with a nuclear emergency caused by the Chalk River Laboratories. This plan deals mainly with actions at the Provincial level and shall by supplemented by the appropriate Municipal Plan. The Townships of Rolph, Buchanan, Wylie, and McKay, the Town of Deep River and the Village of Chalk River are the designated municipalities with respect to CRL. 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  7. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan part V - Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The aim of Part 5 of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Plan is to describe the measures that shall be undertaken to deal with a nuclear emergency caused by the Chalk River Laboratories. This plan deals mainly with actions at the Provincial level and shall by supplemented by the appropriate Municipal Plan. The Townships of Rolph, Buchanan, Wylie, and McKay, the Town of Deep River and the Village of Chalk River are the designated municipalities with respect to CRL. 2 tabs., 5 figs

  8. ALWR utility requirements - A technical basis for updated emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaver, David E.W.; DeVine, John C. Jr.; Santucci, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    U.S. utilities, with substantial support from international utilities, are developing a comprehensive set of design requirements in the form of a Utility Requirements Document (URD) as part of an industry wide effort to establish a technical foundation for the next generation of light water reactors. A key aspect of the URD is a set of severe accident-related design requirements which have been developed to provide a technical basis for updated emergency planning for the ALWR. The technical basis includes design criteria for containment performance and offsite dose during severe accident conditions. An ALWR emergency planning concept is being developed which reflects this severe accident capability. The main conclusion from this work is that the likelihood and consequences of a severe accident for an ALWR are fundamentally different from that assumed in the technical basis for existing emergency planning requirements, at least in the U.S. The current technical understanding of severe accident risk is greatly improved compared to that available when the existing U.S. emergency planning requirements were established nearly 15 years ago, and the emerging ALWR designs have superior core damage prevention and severe accident mitigation capability. Thus, it is reasonable and prudent to reflect this design capability in the emergency planning requirements for the ALWR. (author)

  9. Application of geographic information system for radiologic emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.G.; Doyle, J.F.; Mueller, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Comprehensive and timely radiological, cultural, and environmental data are required in order to make informed decisions during a radiological emergency. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. The most recent addition to this essential function has been the development of the Field Analysis System for Emergency Response (FASER). It is an integrated system with compatible digital image processing and Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities. FASER is configured with commercially available off-the-shelf hardware and software components. To demonstrate the potential of the FASER system for radiological emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. (R.P.)

  10. Agency procedures for the NRC incident response plan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The NRC Incident Response Plan, NUREG-0728/MC 0502 describes the functions of the NRC during an incident and the kinds of actions that comprise an NRC response. The NRC response plan will be activated in accordance with threshold criteria described in the plan for incidents occurring at nuclear reactors and fuel facilities involving materials licensees; during transportation of licensed material, and for threats against facilities or licensed material. In contrast to the general overview provided by the Plan, the purpose of these agency procedures is to delineate the manner in which each planned response function is performed; the criteria for making those response decisions which can be preplanned; and the information and other resources needed during a response. An inexperienced but qualified person should be able to perform functions assigned by the Plan and make necessary decisions, given the specified information, by becoming familiar with these procedures. This rule of thumb has been used to determine the amount of detail in which the agency procedures are described. These procedures form a foundation for the training of response personnel both in their normal working environment and during planned emergency exercises. These procedures also form a ready reference or reminder checklist for technical team members and managers during a response

  11. Radiological emergency response - a functional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Prosanta [Louisiana Radiation Protection Div., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The radiological emergency response program in the State of Louisiana is discussed. The improved approach intends to maximize the efficiency for both nuclear power plant and radiological emergency response as a whole. Several broad-based components are identified: cluster of `nodes` are generated for each component; these `nodes` may be divided into `sub-nodes` which will contain some `attributes`; `relational bonds` among the `attributes` will exist. When executed, the process begins and continues with the `nodes` assuming a functional and dynamic role based on the nature and characteristics of the `attributes`. The typical response based on stand-alone elements is eliminated; overlapping of functions is avoided, and is produced a well-structure and efficient organization 1 ref., 6 figs.; e-mail: prosanta at deq.state.la.us

  12. Radiological emergency response - a functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Prosanta

    1997-01-01

    The radiological emergency response program in the State of Louisiana is discussed. The improved approach intends to maximize the efficiency for both nuclear power plant and radiological emergency response as a whole. Several broad-based components are identified: cluster of 'nodes' are generated for each component; these 'nodes' may be divided into 'sub-nodes' which will contain some 'attributes'; 'relational bonds' among the 'attributes' will exist. When executed, the process begins and continues with the 'nodes' assuming a functional and dynamic role based on the nature and characteristics of the 'attributes'. The typical response based on stand-alone elements is eliminated; overlapping of functions is avoided, and is produced a well-structure and efficient organization

  13. Nuclear emergency preparedness and response in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miska, H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-site nuclear emergency response in Germany is divided into disaster response under the responsibility of the Laender and measures for precautionary radiation protection pursuant to the Precautionary Radiation Protection Act under the lead of federal authorities. Early countermeasures at the regional level require a different management than long-term and comprehensive actions of precautionary radiation protection. As situations may arise in which measures of both approaches overlap with regard to place and time, it is essential to make thorough preparations in order to avoid problems with implementation. (orig.)

  14. Simulation analysis of the use of emergency resources during the emergency response to a major fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Reniers, G.L.L.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    During an emergency response to an accident or disaster, emergency response actions often need to use various emergency resources. The use of resources plays an important role in the successful implementation of emergency response, but there may be conflicts in the use of resources for emergency

  15. Gender Responsive Community Based Planning and Budgeting ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... Responsive Community Based Planning and Budgeting Tool for Local Governance ... in data collection, and another module that facilitates gender responsive and ... In partnership with UNESCO's Organization for Women in Science for the ...

  16. Medical response to radiation emergencies in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo A.; Perez, Maria del R.; Dubner, Diana L.; Michelin, Severino C.; Vazquez, M.; Demayo, O.

    2006-01-01

    Although radiation accidents are not frequent, the increasing use of radioisotopes in medicine and industry increases the likelihood of such accidental situations. Additionally, risks posed by the malevolent use of radiation sources have been highlighted during the last few years. In this context, the enhancement of national capabilities for medical assistance of victims in radiation emergencies becomes relevant. This communication describes the organization of medical response to radiation emergencies existing in Argentina. A three-level system for medical response has been developed: pre-hospital response given on-site by local emergency services, assistance provided by emergency departments of local general hospitals and central reference hospitals for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination. An education and training program is regularly executed at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been elaborated and implemented. Research and development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of radiation injuries are promoted by ARN in close collaboration with physicians belonging to reference hospitals. (author)

  17. Short radiological emergency response training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.D.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of a radiological emergency response training program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the health physics and safety training staff. This course is given to groups from local, county, state, and federal agencies and industrial organizations. It is normally three days in length, although the structure is flexible to accommodate individual needs and prior training. An important feature of the course is an emergency exercise utilizing a short lived radionuclide to better simulate real accident conditions. Groups are encouraged to use their own instruments to gain better familiarity with their operating characteristics under field conditions. Immediately following the exercise, a critical review of the students' performance is conducted

  18. Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations. Date Effective: 1 January 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this Plan is to describe the inter-agency framework for preparedness for and response to a radiation5 incident or emergency irrespective of its cause. In particular, its objectives are: 1. To provide a common understanding of the emergency preparedness and response roles and responsibilities, objectives, authorities, capabilities and arrangements of each participating international organization, and any relevant inter-agency arrangements; 2. To provide an overall concept of operations between the international organizations based on the emergency response objectives, responsibilities, authorities, capabilities and arrangements of each participating international organization, and any existing inter-agency arrangements, in order to facilitate a timely, effective and co-ordinated response; 3. To facilitate development of agreements among the participating international organizations on practical issues, if appropriate; 4. To provide a common understanding of the process for improving and changing the inter-agency response arrangements; 5. To provide a common understanding of roles and responsibilities of the participating international organizations with respect to: international standards, supporting national capabilities through provision of guidance and training, relevant research, emergency exercises and other preparedness considerations; 6. To guide the managers in each participating organization who need to ensure that all appropriate arrangements are given the necessary support within their organization; 7. To facilitate the well founded development, maintenance and training of plans and procedures for each organization; 8. To draw the attention of personnel in States and international organizations6 to these arrangements and to facilitate the development of compatible arrangements, if appropriate. The Joint Plan describes the arrangements of the participating international organizations7 for responding to a radiation incident or emergency

  19. Technical basis for the preparation of emergency plans relating to pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homme, A.; Manesse, D.; Gauvain, J.; Crabol, B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper begins by summarizing the standard French approach to management of severe accidents at PWR plants. It goes on to define the source term used as a general basis for emergency plans for protection of the civil population. The paper describes the impact this source term has on both the site and the environment, which is subsequently used as a technical basis for determining the response of the utility and the public authorities concerned. The discussion concludes with a brief outline of the current status of various emergency plans and a description of additional work currently in progress and aimed at improving these plans [fr

  20. Emergency response arrangements for the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan-Warren, E.

    2004-01-01

    Response arrangements are required for the transport of radioactive materials, under both transport and health and safety legislation, to safeguard persons, property and the environment in the event of incidents and emergencies. Responsibilities fall on both government and industry: government is responsible for ensuring public safety and providing information and reassurance. This responsibility is discharged for each type of incident by a nominated ''lead department'', supported as appropriate by other government departments and agencies; for their part, operators are obliged to have arrangements in place for dealing with the practicalities of any reasonably foreseeable incident, including recovery and onward transport of a package, and any required clean-up or restoration of the environment. This paper outlines both the government and industry arrangements in Great Britain. The principles of response and intervention are discussed, together with the lead department concept, regulatory requirements, and the plans developed by the transport industry to ensure a nation-wide response capability

  1. Planning of emergency medical treatment in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko

    1989-01-01

    Medical staffs and health physicists have shown deep concerning at the emergency plans of nuclear power plants after the TMI nuclear accident. The most important and basic countermeasure for accidents was preparing appropriate and concrete organization and plans for treatment. We have planed emergency medical treatment for radiation workers in a nuclear power plant institute. The emergency medical treatment at institute consisted of two stages, that is on-site emergency treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and treatment at facility medical service. In first step of planning in each stage, we selected and analyzed all possible accidents in the institute and discussed on practical treatments for some possible accidents. The manuals of concrete procedure of emergency treatment for some accidents were prepared following discussion and facilities and equipment for medical treatment and decontamination were provided. All workers in the institute had periodical training and drilling of on-site emergency treatment and mastered technique of first aid. Decontamination and operation rooms were provided in the facillity medical service. The main functions at the facility medical service have been carried out by industrial nurses. Industrial nurses have been in close co-operation with radiation safety officers and medical doctors in regional hospital. (author)

  2. Emergency planning practices and criteria in the OECD countries after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeri, G.; Wiktorsson, C.

    1988-09-01

    This critical review has been prepared at the request of the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH), on the basis of information collected from Member countries on their emergency planning practices and criteria, and on changes being considered as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident. This information was officially provided to the Secretariat in response to a questionnaire. Other material has also been used, such as official papers describing national practices and reports presented at meetings organised by the NEA. In these cases the sources are given in the list of references. The information in this report reflects the situation in the Member countries at the end of 1987 and it might well be that additional changes were introduced in the emergency planning practices and criteria of several countries after the answers were sent to the Secretariat. It should also be noted that several of the questions were mainly relevant to nuclear power reactor operations. However, the basic philosophy for emergency planning is general, i.e. radiological criteria, emergency organisation, medical assistance, information to the public, etc., and applies in similar ways to different emergencies. Therefore, the information in the report should be valid for different types of radiological emergencies, although emphasis is placed in the report is on nuclear power reactor emergencies. For non-nuclear power Member countries the information refers mainly to plans to cope with other types of radiation emergencies, and to emergencies of a transboundary origin. Finally, the information covers only the off-site part of emergency planning, apart from some reflections in Chapter 1 on on-site emergency planning and the measures taken at nuclear facilities to prevent an accident or mitigate its consequences

  3. Emergency planning requirements and short-term countermeasures for commercial nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, F.; Hogan, R.; Mohseni, A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit, the United States Nuclear Regulatory's Commission (NRC's) emergency planning regulations are now considered and an important part of the regulatory framework for protecting the public health and safety. Many aspects of the countermeasures are presented: Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ), off-Site emergency planning and preparedness, responsibilities of nuclear power plants operators and states and local government. Finally, protective action recommendations are given as well as the federal response to an emergency. The authors noted that the use of potassium iodide is not considered as an effective countermeasure for the public protection in the US. (TEC). 1 fig

  4. Optimization of emergency response to major nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, I.A.; Christou, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for the optimization of the short-term emergency response in the event of a nuclear accident has been developed. The method aims at an optimum combination of protective actions in the presence of a multitude of conflicting objectives and under uncertainty. Conflicting objectives arise when the minimization of the potential adverse effects of an accident and the simultaneous minimization of the associated socioeconomic impacts is attempted. Additional conflicting objectives appear whenever an emergency plan tends to decrease a particular health effect (e.g. acute deaths) while at the same time it increases another (e.g. latent deaths). The uncertainty is due to the multitude of the possible accident scenarios and their respective probability of occurrence, the stochastic variability in the weather conditions and in the variability and/or lack of knowledge in the parameters of the risk assessment models. A multiobjective optimization approach is adopted in a dynamic programming scheme. An emergency protective plan consists of defining a protective action (e.g. evacuation, sheltering) at each spatial cell around the plant. Three criteria (evaluators) are used as the objective functions of the problem, namely, acute fatalities, latent effects and socioeconomic cost. The optimization procedure defines the efficient frontier, i.e. all emergency plans that are not dominated by another in all three criteria. No value trade-offs are necessary up to this point

  5. Media and public relation. Part of emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, I.A.; Debrecin, N.; Feretic, D.; Skanata, D.

    2000-01-01

    In the event of an emergency, media relation should be considered as one of the most important functions in emergency management. Individuals should be trained to be able to provide factual information to the media and the citizens during nuclear emergencies. Media can be also acquainted with the scope, ways and means of providing information related to nuclear emergencies during the predefined and regular media training or workshops, or as a part of regular training routine of involved organizations and institutions. This paper is through various approaches trying to present one of the possible ways that media and public relation can be treated during the emergencies and inside the developed emergency plans and procedures. It also represents an idea, based on the authors' experience, on a way in which things can be organized in the Croatian Technical Support Center when it comes to the media/public relation issue. (author)

  6. Emergency response capabilities developed in the United States to deal with nuclear materials transportation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandevender, S.G.; Reese, R.T.; Schilling, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    The non-existence of emergency response programs is frequently stated as a reason for restricting the movement of radioactive materials through states or local jurisdictions. Yet, studies discussed here indicate that emergency response capability, while not in the best condition, is getting more money, interest and attention, and in most states response networks exist which could be effective in responding to radiological emergencies. Awareness of such capabilities by the public is an important feature in increasing the public's confidence in the ability of federal, state and local officials in controlling hazards. One aspect of this awareness program could be in broader availability of radioactive emergency techniques for possible first responders to emergencies. This training, public awareness and more emphasis on workable emergency plans will help to assure reliable and workable emergency response plans

  7. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) emergency response system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998)

  8. Updating Dosimetry for Emergency Response Dose Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCair, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an update to the 1992 Protective Action Guides (PAG) Manual. The PAG Manual provides guidance to state and local officials planning for radiological emergencies. EPA requested public comment on the proposed revisions, while making them available for interim use by officials faced with an emergency situation. Developed with interagency partners, EPA's proposal incorporates newer dosimetric methods, identifies tools and guidelines developed since the current document was issued, and extends the scope of the PAGs to all significant radiological incidents, including radiological dispersal devices or improvised nuclear devices. In order to best serve the emergency management community, scientific policy direction had to be set on how to use International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60 age groups in dose assessment when implementing emergency guidelines. Certain guidelines that lend themselves to different PAGs for different subpopulations are the PAGs for potassium iodide (KI), food, and water. These guidelines provide age-specific recommendations because of the radiosensitivity of the thyroid and young children with respect to ingestion and inhalation doses in particular. Taking protective actions like using KI, avoiding certain foods or using alternative sources of drinking water can be relatively simple to implement by the parents of young children. Clear public messages can convey which age groups should take which action, unlike how an evacuation or relocation order should apply to entire households or neighborhoods. New in the PAG Manual is planning guidance for the late phase of an incident, after the situation is stabilized and efforts turn toward recovery. Because the late phase can take years to complete, decision makers are faced with managing public exposures in areas not fully remediated. The proposal includes quick-reference operational guidelines to inform re-entry to

  9. Participation of the ININ in the external radiological emergency plan of the Laguna Verde power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez S, R.; Cervini L, A.

    1991-01-01

    The planning of performances in radiological emergencies, with the object of reducing the consequences as much as possible on the population to accidental liberations of radioactive material coming from Nuclear power plant, it has been of main interest in the nuclear community in the world. In Mexico it has not been the exception, since with the setting in march of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant exists an executive program of planning for emergencies that it outlines the activities to follow trending to mitigate the consequences that are derived of this emergency. As integral part of this program this the External Plan of Radiological Emergency (PERE) that covers the emergencies that could leave the frontiers of the Laguna Verde power plant. In the PERE it settles down the planning, address and control of the preparation activities, response and recovery in emergencies, as well as the organization and coordination of the institutions that participate. The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), like integral part of these institutions in the PERE, has an infrastructure that it allows to participate in the plan in a direct way in the activities of 'Control of the radiological exhibition the response personnel and control of water and foods' and of support way and consultant ship in the activities of 'Monitoring, Classification and decontamination of having evaluated' and 'Specialized medical radiological attention'. At the moment the ININ has a radiological mobile unit and this conditioning a second mobile unit to carry out part of the activities before mentioned; also accounts with 48 properly qualified people that directly intervene in the plan. In order to guarantee an adequate response in the PERE an organization it has been structured like that of the annex as for the personnel, transport, team, procedures and communication system, with the objective always of guaranteeing the security and the population's health in emergency situations in the

  10. 27 September 1991-Royal Order establishing an emergency plan for nuclear risks on Belgian territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This emergency plan is to serve as guidance for the protection measures to be taken whenever necessary. It establishes the duties of the different services and bodies, in accordance with their responsibilities under the national laws and regulations. The plan, which describes the general organisation, must be supplemented by intervention plans at the different action levels: by the provincial authorities, the communal authorities and the various services and institutions concerned. This plan mainly concerns large nuclear installations and transport of nuclear fuels and radioactive materials; however, lower risks from other activities are also covered. (NEA)

  11. An emergency response centre (ERC) for the preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Abani, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the requirement for a state of the art Emergency Response Centre (ERC) to be developed and kept in readiness for the quick response to any nuclear or radiological emergencies. For an effective response to any major nuclear emergency an ERC having the facilities of i) environmental dose rate monitoring network established using both mobile and fixed units ii) on-line meteorological data collection and information station iii) on-line computation and prediction of isodose curves in real time and iv) properly developed and tested monitoring methodologies are essential. Vehicles with on-line data transfer facility to the ERC and equipped with different type of monitoring systems can function as Mobile Monitoring Laboratories (MMLs) and can help in quick decision making even during a radiological emergency far away from the ERC. (author)

  12. Chemical toxicity approach for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the event of an airborne release of chemical agent or toxic industrial chemical by accidental or intentional means, emergency responders must have a reasonable estimate of the location and size of the resulting hazard area. Emergency responders are responsible for warning persons downwind of the hazard to evacuate or shelter-in-place and must know where to look for casualties after the hazard has passed or dissipated. Given the same source characterization, modern hazard assessment models provide comparable concentration versus location and time estimates. Even urban hazard assessment models often provide similar predictions. There is a major shortcoming, though, in applying model output to estimating human toxicity effects. There exist a variety of toxicity values for non-lethal effects ranging from short-term to occupational to lifetime exposures. For health and safety purposes, these estimates are all safe-sided in converting animal data to human effects and in addressing the most sensitive subset of the population. In addition, these values are usually based on an assumed 1 hour exposure duration at constant concentration and do not reflect either a passing clouds concentration profile or duration. Emergency responders need expected value toxicity parameters rather than the existing safe-sided ones. This presentation will specify the types of toxicity values needed to provide appropriate chemical hazard estimates to emergency responders and will demonstrate how dramatically their use changes the hazard area.(author)

  13. Energy emergency planning guide: Winter 1977-78

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-11-01

    This Energy Emergency Planning Guide for Winter, 1977-78 has been prepared in order to: identify and evaluate actions available to deal with energy emergencies this winter; provide an advance indication to the public of those actions considered most likely to be taken by the government, and provide industry, state, and local governments with suggestions about actions which they can take to deal with energy emergencies. The Guide contains specifications for over 50 standby programs and procedures, recommended implementation guidelines for using these programs keyed to a pre-emergency phase and three phases of shortfalls, and a design for an Energy Emergency Center. Flexible implementation guidelines are proposed for natural gas, petroleum, electricity/coal, and propane shortages. (MCW)

  14. Global approach of emergency response, reflection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco Garcia, E.; Garcia Ahumada, F.; Albaladejo Vidal, S.

    1998-01-01

    The emergency response management approach must be dealt with adequately within company strategy, since a badly managed emergency situation can adversely affect a company, not only in terms of asset, but also in terms of the negative impact on its credibility, profitability and image. Thereby, it can be said that there are three main supports to manage the response in an emergency situation. a) Diagnosis b) Prognosis. c) Communications. To reach these capabilities it is necessary a co-ordination of different actions at the following levels. i. Facility Operation implies Local level. ii. Facility Property implies National level iii. Local Authority implies Local level iv. National Authority implies National level Taking into account all the last, these following functions must be covered: a) Management: incorporating communication, diagnosis and prognosis areas. b) Decision: incorporating communication and information means. c) Services: in order to facilitate the decision, as well as the execution of this decision. d) Analysis: in order to facilitate the situations that make easier to decide. e) Documentation: to seek the information for the analysts and decision makers. (Author)

  15. Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations. Date Effective: 1 July 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    European Commission) are party to legally binding treaties and have directives and regulations which have a bearing on the emergency response arrangements in their Member States. There are also bilateral agreements between some international organizations that also have relevance to preparedness and response arrangements. In 2002, the IAEA issued Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), jointly sponsored by the FAO, the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and WHO. The requirements established therein imply additional expectations with regard to operational emergency preparedness and response arrangements. It is recognized by the participating organizations, and reflected in the above requirements, that good planning in advance of an emergency can substantially improve the response. With this in mind, international organizations that participate in the IACRNE develop, maintain and co-sponsor this Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (the 'Joint Plan'). The IAEA is the main coordinating body for the development and maintenance of the Joint Plan. The Joint Plan does not prescribe arrangements between the participating organizations, but describes a common understanding of how each organization acts during a response and in making preparedness arrangements. Nothing in the Joint Plan should be construed as superseding the arrangements in place in the international organizations (or States). However, all international organizations (and States), irrespective of whether they are members of IACRNE, are invited to consider these arrangements in their own emergency management plans. This publication is the sixth edition of the Joint Plan. It includes new arrangements/initiatives which were introduced after

  16. Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations. Date Effective: 1 July 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    European Commission) are party to legally binding treaties and have directives and regulations which have a bearing on the emergency response arrangements in their Member States. There are also bilateral agreements between some international organizations that also have relevance to preparedness and response arrangements. In 2002, the IAEA issued Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), jointly sponsored by the FAO, the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and WHO. The requirements established therein imply additional expectations with regard to operational emergency preparedness and response arrangements. It is recognized by the participating organizations, and reflected in the above requirements, that good planning in advance of an emergency can substantially improve the response. With this in mind, international organizations that participate in the IACRNE develop, maintain and co-sponsor this Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (the 'Joint Plan'). The IAEA is the main coordinating body for the development and maintenance of the Joint Plan. The Joint Plan does not prescribe arrangements between the participating organizations, but describes a common understanding of how each organization acts during a response and in making preparedness arrangements. Nothing in the Joint Plan should be construed as superseding the arrangements in place in the international organizations (or States). However, all international organizations (and States), irrespective of whether they are members of IACRNE, are invited to consider these arrangements in their own emergency management plans. This publication is the sixth edition of the Joint Plan. It includes new arrangements/initiatives which were introduced after

  17. Work-Family Planning Attitudes among Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuil, Dynah A.; Casper, Wendy J.

    2012-01-01

    Using social learning theory as a framework, we explore two sets of antecedents to work and family role planning attitudes among emerging adults: their work-family balance self-efficacy and their perceptions of their parents' work-to-family conflict. A total of 187 college students completed a questionnaire concerning their work-family balance…

  18. 76 FR 75771 - Emergency Planning Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Issuance of NUREG... Support of Nuclear Power Plants;'' NSIR/DPR-ISG-01, ``Interim Staff Guidance Emergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants;'' and NUREG/CR-7002, ``Criteria for Development of Evacuation Time Estimate Studies...

  19. Knowledge-based emergency planning for storage tank farms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nevrlý, Václav; Bitala, P.; Nevrlá, P.; Střižík, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2008), s. 10-15 ISSN 1335-4205 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : emergency * preparedness * modeling tank fire boilover Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine http://www.utc.sk/komunikacie

  20. 29 CFR 1917.30 - Emergency action plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... action plans—(1) Scope and application. This paragraph (a) requires all employers to develop and... departments that can be contacted for further information or explanation of duties under the plan. (3) Alarm... emergency action and for reaction time for safe escape of employees from the workplace or the immediate work...

  1. Guide for Developing High-Quality School Emergency Operations Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Safe and Healthy Students, US Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Each school day, our nation's schools are entrusted to provide a safe and healthy learning environment for approximately 55 million elementary and secondary school students in public and nonpublic schools. In collaboration with their local government and community partners, schools can take steps to plan for these potential emergencies through the…

  2. Continuity of operations planning in college athletic programs: The case for incorporating Federal Emergency Management Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey A; Allen, Brandon L; Phillips, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    College athletic departments have a responsibility to provide a safe environment for student-athletes; however, most colleges do not have a crisis management plan that includes procedures for displaced student-athletes or alternate facilities to perform athletic events. Continuity of operations planning ensures athletic programs are equipped to maintain essential functions during, or shortly after, a disruption of operations due to possible hazards. Previous studies have identified a lack of emergency preparedness and continuity planning in college athletic departments. The purpose of this article is to illustrate in detail one approach to disaster planning for college athletic departments, namely the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) continuity of operations framework. By adhering to FEMA guidelines and promoting a best practices model, athletic programs can effectively plan to address potential hazards, as well as protect the organization's brand, image, and financial sustainability after a crisis event.

  3. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-04-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  4. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  5. 76 FR 21299 - Emergency Planning and Notification; Emergency Planning and List of Extremely Hazardous...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... planning quantities (TPQs) for those extremely hazardous substances (EHSs) that are non-reactive solid... need for the community to undertake a program to investigate and evaluate the potential for accidental... the Calculated Index Value''; ``Reactive Solids Whose Threshold Planning Quantities Should Be Less...

  6. Emergency team and action plan; Brigada de emergencia y plan de accion de emergencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Gorgerino, Ruben Dario [Central Hidroelectrica Itaipu, Hernandarias (Paraguay)]. E-mail: jimenez@itaipu.gov.br

    1998-07-01

    This work reports the various activities developed by a commission designated for the investigation of the fire occurred in the excitation panel of the generator unit 16, for the execution of two tasks: short term creation of plant emergency team, and a long term implementation of emergency action plan.

  7. RE-PLAN: An Extensible Software Architecture to Facilitate Disaster Response Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Neill, Martin; Mikler, Armin R.; Indrakanti, Saratchandra; Tiwari, Chetan; Jimenez, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Computational tools are needed to make data-driven disaster mitigation planning accessible to planners and policymakers without the need for programming or GIS expertise. To address this problem, we have created modules to facilitate quantitative analyses pertinent to a variety of different disaster scenarios. These modules, which comprise the REsponse PLan ANalyzer (RE-PLAN) framework, may be used to create tools for specific disaster scenarios that allow planners to harness large amounts of disparate data and execute computational models through a point-and-click interface. Bio-E, a user-friendly tool built using this framework, was designed to develop and analyze the feasibility of ad hoc clinics for treating populations following a biological emergency event. In this article, the design and implementation of the RE-PLAN framework are described, and the functionality of the modules used in the Bio-E biological emergency mitigation tool are demonstrated. PMID:25419503

  8. Explanation of procedure on site medical emergency response for nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yulong; Jiang Zhong

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Procedure on Site Medical Emergency Response for Nuclear Accident has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. This standard is formulated according to the Emergency Response Law of the People's Republic of China, Law of the People 's Republic of China on Prevention and Control of Occupational Diseases, Regulations on Emergency Measures for Nuclear Accidents at Nuclear Power Plants, and Health Emergency Plans for Nuclear and Radiological Accidents of Ministry of Health, supporting the use of On-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents and Off-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents. Nuclear accident on-site medical response procedure is a part of the on-site emergency plan. The standard specifies the basic content and requirements of the nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response procedures of nuclear facilities operating units to guide and regulate the work of nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response of nuclear facilities operating units. The criteria-related contents were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  9. The emergency plan of the ININ; El plan de emergencia del ININ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz C, M A [ININ, Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1991-07-01

    The emergency plan of the ININ, it was elaborated in 1988 and revised by the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (CNSNS) in 1989. At the beginning of 1990 and with the support of the IAEA it was practiced the first revision to the text of this plan, for what the proposal revision is what constitutes the development of this report.

  10. Ectopic Pregnancy After Plan B Emergency Contraceptive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Brianne Jo; Layman, Kerri

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancy outcomes after emergency contraceptive use has been debated over time, but review of the literature includes mechanisms by which these medications may increase the chance of an ectopic pregnancy. Such cases are infrequently reported, and many emergency providers may not readily consider this possibility when treating patients. This is a case presentation of ectopic pregnancy in a patient who had recently used Plan B (levonorgestrel) emergency contraceptive. She presented with abdominal pain and vaginal spotting, and was evaluated by serum testing and pelvic ultrasound. She was discovered to have a right adnexal pregnancy. She was treated initially with methotrexate, though she ultimately required surgery for definitive treatment. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: This case report aims to bring a unique clinical case to the attention of emergency providers. The goal is to review research on the topic of levonorgestrel use and the incidence of ectopic pregnancies. The mechanism of action of this emergency contraceptive is addressed, and though no definite causal relationship is known between levonorgestrel and ectopic pregnancies, there is a pharmacologic explanation for how this event may occur after use of this medication. Ultimately, the emergency provider will be reminded of the importance of educating the patient on the possible outcomes after its use, including failure of an emergency contraceptive and the potential of ectopic pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-nuclear radiological emergencies. Special plan for radiological risk of the Valencian Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez Rodrigo, I.; Piles Alepuz, I.; Peiró Juan, J.; Calvet Rodríguez, D.

    2015-01-01

    After the publication of the Radiological Hazard Basic Directive, Generalitat (the regional government in Valencian Community) initiated the edition of the pertinent Special Plan, with the objective to assemble the response of all the Security and Emergency Agencies, including the Armed Forces, in a radiological emergency affecting the territory of the Valencian Community, under a single hierarchy command. Being approved and homologated the Radiological Hazard Special Plan, Generalitat has undertaken the implementation process planned to finish in June 2015. Following the same process as other Plans, implementation is organized in a first informative stage, followed of a formative and training stage, and finishing with an activation exercise of the Plan. At the end of the process, is expected that every Agency will know their functions, the structure and organization in which the intervention takes place, the resources needed, and adapt their protocols to the Plan requirements. From the beginning, it has been essential working together with the Nuclear Safety Council, as is established in the agreement signed in order to collaborate in Planning, Preparedness and Response in Radiological Emergencies. [es

  12. The current status and reinforcement plan for radiation emergency medicine in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Ki; Lee, Youngmin; Lee, Jai Ki

    2011-01-01

    Korea operating twenty nuclear power plants was ranked 6th in nuclear power generation in the world. The potential risk for radiological emergency also increases along with the growing use of radiation and radioisotopes and a constant expansion of the nuclear industry in neighboring countries, Japan and China. This paper is intended for finding ways to strengthen medical planning and response preparedness from achievements in radiation emergency medicine over the years. 'Integrated Medical Preparedness System' for a radiological disaster is proposed as a practical way to enhance mobilization of existing human and material resources in the health care. It is based on the collaborative response among the related medical institutes : radiation emergency medical institutes around the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, emergency medical centers around the National Emergency Medical Center and other hospitals available. (author)

  13. Medical Response in Radiation Emergency in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, M.A.; Tadic, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    According to the Nuclear Federal Law No. 24804, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. ARN has a system for intervention in radiological -and nuclear emergencies with a primary intervention group, which is on duty in weekly shifts all year round. This paper aims at describing the system as implemented at present. The Emergency Medical System has been developed into three levels: Level I: local emergency services. This level includes triage (conventional and radiological), first-aid care, and first management of contaminated victims Level II: emergency departments of local general hospitals that are in charge of performing a second triage by a biomedical approach, the treatment of conventional and/or radiocombined injuries and completing decontamination as necessary. In this way the initial triage is completed by a physical examination, timing and severity of prodromal signs and symptoms, sequential blood counts and serum enzymatic levels that allow a first-stage dosimetric approach at this level. Victims requiring higher complexity assistance shall be transferred to third-level hospitals. Level III: three central reference hospitals (Hospital Naval 'Pedro Mallo', Hospital de Quemados from Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires and Hospital Britanico de Ciudad de Buenos Aires) capable of providing healthcare for diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination constitute this level. An educational program for medical and paramedical responders is regularly carried out at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been drawn up. Research and development of new strategies for first medical response, diagnosis and treatment of radiation

  14. Medical response in radiation emergency in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Marina A.; Tadic, Maria M.

    2008-01-01

    According to the Nuclear Federal Law Nr. 24804, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. ARN has a system for intervention in radiological -and nuclear emergencies with a primary intervention group, which is on duty in weekly shifts all year round. This paper aims at describing the system as implemented at present. The Emergency Medical System has been developed into three levels: Level I: local emergency services. This level includes triage (conventional and radiological), first-aid care, and first management of contaminated victims. Level II: Emergency departments of local general hospitals that are in charge of performing a second triage by a biomedical approach, the treatment of conventional and/or radio-combined injuries and completing decontamination as necessary. In this way the initial triage is completed by a physical examination, timing and severity of prodromal signs and symptoms, sequential blood counts and serum enzymatic levels that allow a first-stage dosimetric approach at this level. Victims requiring higher complexity assistance shall be transferred to third-level hospitals. Level III: three central reference hospitals (Hospital Naval 'Pedro Mallo', Hospital de Quemados from Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires and Hospital Britanico de Ciudad de Buenos Aires) capable of providing health care for diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination constitute this level. An educational program for medical and paramedical responders is regularly carried out at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been drawn up. Research and development of new strategies for first medical response, diagnosis and treatment of radiation

  15. Survey of emergency medicine resident debt status and financial planning preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaspy, Jeffrey N; Ma, O John; Steele, Mark T; Hall, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Most resident physicians accrue significant financial debt throughout their medical and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to analyze emergency medicine resident debt status, financial planning actions, and educational experiences for financial planning and debt management. A 22-item questionnaire was sent to all 123 Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited emergency medicine residency programs in July 2001. Two follow-up mailings were made to increase the response rate. The survey addressed four areas of resident debt and financial planning: 1) accrued debt, 2) moonlighting activity, 3) financial planning/debt management education, and 4) financial planning actions. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Survey responses were obtained from 67.4% (1,707/2,532) of emergency medicine residents in 89 of 123 (72.4%) residency programs. Nearly one half (768/1,707) of respondents have accrued more than 100,000 dollars of debt. Fifty-eight percent (990/1,707) of all residents reported that moonlighting would be necessary to meet their financial needs, and more than 33% (640/1,707) presently moonlight to supplement their income. Nearly one half (832/1,707) of residents actively invested money, of which online trading was the most common method (23.3%). Most residents reported that they received no debt management education during residency (82.1%) or medical school (63.7%). Furthermore, 79.1% (1,351/1,707) of residents reported that they received no financial planning lectures during residency, although 84.2% (1,438/1,707) reported that debt management and financial planning education should be available during residency. Most emergency medicine residency programs do not provide their residents with financial planning education. Most residents have accrued significant debt and believe that more financial planning and debt management education is needed during residency.

  16. Contraceptive availability during an emergency response in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Sascha R; Kourtis, Athena P; Curtis, Kathryn M; Tepper, Naomi; Gorman, Susan; Jamieson, Denise J; Zotti, Marianne; Barfield, Wanda

    2013-03-01

    This article provides the evidence for contraceptive need to prevent unintended pregnancy during an emergency response, discusses the most appropriate types of contraceptives for disaster situations, and details the current provisions in place to provide contraceptives during an emergency response.

  17. Selected approaches to determining the purpose of emergency planning zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobeš, Pavel; Baudišová, Barbora; Sluka, Vilém; Skřínský, Jan; Danihelka, Pavel; Dlabka, Jakub; Řeháček, Jakub

    2013-04-01

    One of the major accident hazards (hereinafter referred to as "MAH") tools to determine the range of effects of a major accident and consequent protection of the public is the determination of the emergency planning zone (hereinafter referred to as "zone"). In the Czech Republic, the determination of the zone is regulated by the Decree No. 103/2006 Coll. laying down the principles for determination of the emergency planning zone and the extent and manner of elaborating the external emergency plan (hereinafter referred to as "Decree") 3. The Decree is based on the principles of the IAEA-TECDOC-727 method - Manual for the Classification and Prioritization of Risks Due to Major Accidents in Process and Related Industries (hereinafter referred to as "method" and "manual", respectively)3. In the manual, it is pointed out that the method used is not suitable for making emergency plans for special situations (industrial activities in an inhabited area). Nonetheless, its principles and procedures are still used for such purposes in the Czech Republic. The expert scientific community dealing with MAH issues in the Czech Republic, however, realizes that the procedure of the zone boundary delineation should be modified to reflect up-to-date knowledge in protection of the public and its enhancement. Therefore, the OPTIZON Project (Optimization of the Emergency Planning Zone Designation and Elaboration of Emergency Plans Based on Threatening Effects of Dangerous Chemical Substances at Operational Accidents with Respect to Inhabitant Protection Enhancement) was developed and approved for the Program of Security Research of the Czech Republic 2010 - 2015 (BV II/2-VS). One of the main project's objectives is to define clearly the purpose of the zone because at present it is not quite apparent. From the general view, this step may seem insignificant or trivial, but the reverse is true. It represents one of the most important stages in seeking the approach to the zone designation as

  18. Emergency Response Program Designing Based On Case Study ERP Regulations In Ilam Gas Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Tahmasbi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Emergency response plan designing is one of the most important prevention approaches in crisis management. This study aims to design emergency response plan based on case study ERP regulations in Ilam gas refinery. On the basis of risk assessment and identification techniques such as HAZOP and FMEA in Ilam gas refinery the risks have been prioritized and then according to this prioritization the design of possible scenarios which have the highest rate of occurrence and the highest level of damage has been separated. Possible scenarios were simulated with PHAST software. Then emergency response program has been designed for the special mode or similar cases. According to the internal emergency response plan for Ilam gas refinery and predictable conditions of the process special instructions should be considered at the time of the incident to suffer the least damage on people and environment in the shortest time possible.

  19. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the emergency response laws and regulations in place in the various states within the southern region for use by legislators, emergency response planners, the general public and all persons concerned about the existing legal framework for emergency response. SSEB expects to periodically update the report as necessary. Radiation protection regulations without emergency response provisions are not included in the summary

  20. Disaster Response and Planning for Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Miriam B.

    Providing a customized disaster response plan to assist libraries in quick recovery, this resource also outlines step to minimize damage and protect materials before trouble strikes. The first section of the book, "Response," contains information how to handle small jobs in-house and suggestions for working with contractors--with an…

  1. National Energy Board Emergency Management Program : annex to Natural Resources Canada Civil Emergency Plan no. 004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, G.; LeMay, R.

    2006-01-01

    As a matter of primary public interest, safety is included in the National Energy Board's (NEB) mandate. The Board is responsible for ensuring companies involved with energy development and pipelines comply with regulations concerning the safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The purpose of the NEB's Emergency Management Program is to establish a prompt and coordinated response to an emergency which occurs at any facility or operation regulated by the NEB; promote safety and security and assure compliance with regulatory requirements in order to protect the public, workers, property and the environment during the life cycle of facilities and operations; and, have a documented set of procedures that accomplish these objectives. The Board ensures that companies identify and manage the potential hazards associated with their facilities; conduct a risk analysis of those hazards; and, manage the risks in order to protect the public and personnel, the security of the facilities and the environment. All companies under the Board's jurisdiction are responsible for developing and maintaining an Emergency Response and Preparedness Program for all aspects of their operations. In the event an emergency occurs, the regulated company is responsible for responding to the emergency and coordinating emergency response activities. Typically, the NEB responds on site to incidents that result in death or serious injury; involve a significant release of hydrocarbons; could result in potential or real impact due to loss of service; pose imminent threats identified by Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada or other agencies; attract significant media attention, or on the advice of Natural Resources Canada or other federal Agencies. The first part of this document described the initial response check list while the second part outlined the Emergency response framework. 2 tabs., 3 figs., 15 appendices

  2. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.; Aaltonen, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A large number of different national plans and procedures have been established and substantial resources allocated world wide with varying comprehensiveness and quality depending an the national requirements and the possible threat scenarios considered. These national plans are only to a small degree harmonized. It is clear that it is the responsibility of the authorities in the respective countries or utilities under their jurisdiction, to decide upon and implement appropriate response actions to a nuclear emergency. The basic needs for responding properly are: infrastructure in terms of plans, procedures etc.; information regarding the accident, its development and consequences; resources in terms of expertise, man power and tools for acquiring and processing information, making assessments and decisions and carry out the actions. When a large number of countries are making assessments and decisions for their own country and providing the public with information, it is important that assessments, decisions and public information become correct, complete and consistent across boarders. In order to achieve this, they should all have access to the same information as basis for their actions. Lack of information or wrong information could easily lead to wrong assessments, wrong decisions and misleading information to the public. If there is a serious nuclear emergency somewhere that could potentially affect several or many States in one way or another, 'everyone' would like to know 'everything' that happens 'everywhere'. In this case, all States should have the obligation to share with the international community the relevant information they have available themselves and that could be of interest for other States responding to the situation. During a serious nuclear or radiological emergency, the demand for different kinds of resources is huge and could, in many countries, probably exceed national capabilities. Looking at the situation in a global

  3. The importance of socially responsible strategic planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štrukelj, Tjaša

    2017-10-01

    This paper researches the importance of social responsible strategic planning regardless of the sector and shows research results on the case example of the selected tourism sector, which has economic and employment potential and social and environmental implications. Tourism sector is closely interdependent with transport sector and influences it. Therefore, the more we develop the tourism sector, the more the transport sector is developing as well. Based on Mulej’s Dialectical Systems Theory (DST) we found out that enterprises should integrate sustainability and social responsibility into their strategic planning if they want the Earth to survive. This urged the European Union, ISO International Standards Organization, many other organisations and many researchers. To make strategic planning socially responsible, enterprise’s governors should request social responsibility in business policy, which represents their governance guidelines and is implemented through the strategies set up by top managers and realised in the basic realisation process - their business operations.

  4. 48 CFR 452.236-77 - Emergency Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contracts: Emergency Response (NOV 1996) (a) Contractor's Responsibility for Fire Fighting. (1) The... emergency work (anticipated to be restricted to fire fighting). An equitable adjustment for the temporary... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency Response. 452...

  5. Response of human populations to large-scale emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrow, James; Wang, Dashun; Barabási, Albert-László

    2010-03-01

    Until recently, little quantitative data regarding collective human behavior during dangerous events such as bombings and riots have been available, despite its importance for emergency management, safety and urban planning. Understanding how populations react to danger is critical for prediction, detection and intervention strategies. Using a large telecommunications dataset, we study for the first time the spatiotemporal, social and demographic response properties of people during several disasters, including a bombing, a city-wide power outage, and an earthquake. Call activity rapidly increases after an event and we find that, when faced with a truly life-threatening emergency, information rapidly propagates through a population's social network. Other events, such as sports games, do not exhibit this propagation.

  6. Management and training aspects of the emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The main objectives of an emergency management system are to prevent or reduce the likelihood of consequential loss in the event of an emergency occurring. In the event of a nuclear accident the effectiveness of measures for the protection of the public will depend on the advance preparation especially in education and training. This paper reviews two recent initiatives and concludes with comments on the future development of this subject. There is an increasing requirement in legal and moral terms for industry to inform the population of health hazards to which they are exposed. In a report published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA/OECD) radiation protection was described as a subject which is impenetrable to the layman and as wide as it is complex. For this and other reasons radiation hazards are perceived to exceed all others and the public appear to have a poor image of the radiation protection specialists. Communication with the public and the media is widely recognized as a key pan of an emergency plan. This view is supported in the European Union which has sponsored the book on 'Radiation and Radiation Protection - a course for primary and secondary schools' which is described in this paper. The training of emergency teams includes the use of drills and exercises to maintain skills and can also be used to test the adequacy of plans. Every effort should be made to simulate the pressure on time and resources which would occur in a real event. Radiation emergencies are fortunately rare and so there is little practical experience of these events. The emergency worker must gain some radiation protection skills and must be able to use some technical language when communicating with specialist advisors. For this reason the European Union has sponsored the book 'Radiation Protection for Emergency Workers' which is also described in this paper. (author)

  7. The regulatory approach to ensuring the adequacy of emergency planning for nuclear power stations in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    The first nuclear power station in South Africa became operational in 1984. The paper describes the basis on which emergency planning was required from a regulatory point of view. The extent of planning required and the associated facilities are described, together with the structure of the emergency response organization and associated responsibilities. The provisions in place to ensure ongoing readiness of the emergency response organization are discussed. These include training and retraining of operational staff, equipment and inventory checks and the conducting of an annual full-scale demonstration exercise. (author)

  8. Some Qualitative Requirements for Testing of Nuclear Emergency Response Robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Heungseop; Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Youngsoo; Jeong, Kyungmin

    2014-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is carrying out the project 'Development of Core Technology for Remote Response in Nuclear Emergency Situation', and as a part of the project, we are studying the reliability and performance requirements of nuclear emergency response robots. In this paper, we described some qualitative requirements for testing of nuclear emergency response robots which are different to general emergency response robots. We briefly introduced test requirements of general emergency response robots and described some qualitative aspects of test requirements for nuclear emergency response robots. When considering an immature field-robot technology and variety of nuclear emergency situations, it seems hard to establish quantitative test requirements of these robots at this time. However, based on studies of nuclear severe accidents and the experience of Fukushima NPP accident, we can expect some test requirements including quantitative ones for nuclear emergency response robots

  9. Radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and response. How well are we prepared?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, Gunther H.G.; Herrmann, Andre R.; Koch, Doris; Meisenberg, Oliver; Rauber, Dominique; Stuerm, Rolf P.; Weiss, Wolfgang; Miska, Horst; Schoenhacker, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The contributions to this topic are dealing, in a broad overview, with important aspects of Nuclear Emergency Preparedness and Response, like the influence of the new ICRP recommendations number 103 and number 109 on emergency preparedness and on planning for response, possible problems in installing and operating emergency care centres, experience from exercises as well as the training of response personnel in Austria and Germany. Finally, measures in emergency preparedness with regard to a dirty bomb attack are reported by means of an INEX-4-exercise in Switzerland. (orig.)

  10. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 February 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a large number of States, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full parties. The arrangements provided between the IAEA, States that are IAEA Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations, and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions - specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). ENATOM was first issued on 18 January 1989. Member States, Parties to the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, relevant international organizations and other States have since then regularly received updates to the manual. In 2000, a complete revision of ENATOM was reissued as EPR-ENATOM (2000) to reflect technological developments, changes in operational concepts, views on standards in the area of emergency preparedness and response, and Member States' expectations. Since then ENATOM has been reviewed and reissued biennially in line with the review cycle of the Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (the 'Joint Plan'). Since the last edition of ENATOM in 2004, several factors have warranted some modifications to

  11. Off-site emergency planning in Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prouza, Z.; Drabova, D.

    1996-01-01

    In the Czech Republic, the NPP Dukovany - PWR 440/213-type (4 blocks) is currently in operation (from 1985) and NPP Temelin - PWR 1000 (2 blocks) is under construction. Radiation accident on the NPP is defined as an unexpected or unintentional event in a facility with a potential of off-site consequences. The principles of emergency planning in Czech Republic now are based on the philosophy and principles described in the ICRP Publication 40 and the IAEA Safety Series No. 55, 72, and includes already the post Chernobyl experiences. Nevertheless, Czech Republic legislation experiences an extensive reconstruction. The Atomic Act, which will be based from point of view the structure, philosophy and principles on new International Basic Safety Standards, already being elaborated. That acts and related laws should solve our legislative problems on field of emergency planning and preparedness

  12. Protecting your business: from emergency planning to crisis management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, C.G.

    1999-01-01

    The forthcoming UK Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) regulations under the European Community's Seveso II Directive will impose a new formal requirement to test emergency plans. This might be approached as an added burden on industry to demonstrate safe operation, or can be viewed alternatively as an opportunity to improve crisis management systems and thereby decrease the risks to the business. Crisis is by nature an ambiguous and complex environment, demanding endless initiative, inventiveness, communication, co-ordination and learning. Because large-scale crises threatening the entire business are not frequent, learning from experience must be replaced by competence-assurance based on systems thinking, on risk assessment, on wide scenario simulations and on rigorous training. This paper discusses the benefits from various types of testing of emergency plans and from a business approach to continuous improvement in crisis management capability. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Integrated surgical emergency training plan in the internship: A step toward improving the quality of training and emergency center management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Mohammad Reza; Vafamehr, Vajiheh; Dadgostarnia, Mohammad; Dehghani, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    In this study, by using a problem-oriented approach in the needs assessment, identifying the defects and deficiencies in emergency health training centers has been determined as the basis for the requirements. The main objective of the study was the implementation of surgical emergencies integration of the five surgical groups (general surgery, urology, orthopedics, neurosurgery, and ENT) to meet the needs and determining its efficacy. THIS INTERVENTIONAL STUDY WAS CONDUCTED IN THREE PHASES: (1) Phase I (design and planning): Needs assessment, recognition of implementation barriers and providing the objectives and training program for integrated emergencies. (2) Phase II (implementation): Justification of the main stakeholders of the project, preparation of students' duties in the emergency department, preparation of on-duty plans, supervising the implementation of the program, and reviewing the plan in parallel with the implementation based on the problems. (3) Phase III (evaluation): Reviewing the evidences based on the amount of efficiency of the plan and justification for its continuation. In the first and the second phase, the data were collected through holding focus group meetings and interviews. In the third phase, the opened-reply and closed-reply researcher-made questionnaires were used. The questionnaire face and content validity were confirmed by experts and the reliability was assessed by calculating the Cronbach's alpha. ACCORDING TO THE VIEWS OF THE INTERNS, ASSISTANTS, TEACHERS, AND EMERGENCY PERSONNEL, THE POSITIVE FEATURES OF THE PLAN INCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: Increasing the patients' satisfaction, reducing the patients' stay in the Emergency Department, increasing the speed of handling the patients, balancing the workloads of the interns, direct training of interns by young teachers of emergency medicine, giving the direct responsibility of the patient to the intern, practical and operational training of emergency issues, increasing the teamwork

  14. Planning and exercise experiences related to an off-site nuclear emergency in Canada: the federal component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Canadian Government's Federal Nuclear Emergency Response Plan (off-site) (FNERP) was issued in 1984. In this plan, a nuclear emergency is defined as an emergency involving the release of radionuclides but does not include the use of nuclear weapons against North America. Because of the federal nature of Canada and its large area, special considerations are required for the plan to cover both the response to nuclear emergencies where the national government has primary responsibility and to provincial requests for assistance where the federal response becomes secondary to the provincial. The nuclear emergencies requiring the implementation of this plan are: (a) an accident in the nuclear energy cycle in Canada with off-site implications; (b) an accident in the nuclear energy cycle in another country which may affect Canada; (c) nuclear weapons testing with off-site implications which may affect Canada; and (d) nuclear-powered devices impacting on Canadian territory. Each emergency requires a separate sub-plan and usually requires different organizations to respond. Some scenarios are described. The Department of National Health and Welfare has established a Federal Nuclear Emergency Control Centre (FNECC). The FNECC participated in September 1985 in an exercise involving a nuclear reactor facility in the Province of Ontario and the experience gained from this activity is presented. The FNECC co-operates with its counterparts in the United States of America through a nuclear emergency information system and this network is also described. (author)

  15. Automated data system for emergency meteorological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, C.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant (SRP) releases small amounts of radioactive nuclides to the atmosphere as a consequence of the production of radioisotopes. The potential for larger accidental releases to the atmosphere also exists, although the probability for most accidents is low. To provide for emergency meteorological response to accidental releases and to conduct research on the transport and diffusion of radioactive nuclides in the routine releases, a series of high-quality meteorological sensors have been located on towers in and about SRP. These towers are equipped with instrumentation to detect and record temperature and wind turbulence. Signals from the meterological sensors are brought by land-line to the SRL Weather Center-Analysis Laboratory (WC-AL). At the WC-AL, a Weather Information and Display (WIND) system has been installed. The WIND system consists of a minicomputer with graphical displays in the WC-AL and also in the emergency operating center (EOC) of SRP. In addition, data are available to the system from standard weat []er teletype services, which provide both routine surface weather observations and routine upper air wind and temperature observations for the southeastern United States. Should there be an accidental release to the atmosphere, available recorded data and computer codes would allow the calculation and display of the location, time, and downwind concentration of the atmospheric release. These data are made available to decision makers in near real-time to permit rapid decisive action to limit the consequences of such accidental releases. (auth)

  16. The Emergency Action Plan of the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin Cuarteto, M.; Camarma, J. R.; Martin Calvarro, J. M

    2007-01-01

    The Spanish Nuclear safety Council (CSN) has assigned by law among others the function to coordinate the measures of support and answer to nuclear emergency situations for all the aspects related with nuclear safety and radiological protection. Integrating and coordinating the different organisations public and private companies whose aid is necessary for the fulfilment of the functions attributed to the Regulatory Body. In order to suitable perform this function, CSN has equipped itself with an Emergency Action Plan that structures the response organization, establishes responsibility levels, incorporates basic performance procedures and includes capabilities to face the nuclear and radiological emergencies considering the external supports, resulting from the collaboration agreements with public institutions and private companies. To accomplish the above mentioned Emergency Action Plan, CSN has established and implanted a formation and training and re-training program for the organization response for emergencies and has update an operative centre (Emergency Room called Salem), equipped with infrastructures, tools and communication and operative systems that incorporate the more advanced technologies available to date. (Author)

  17. Technical information management in an emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.; Greve, C.; Best, R.G.; Phillipson, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Through many experiences in responding to real radiation accidents and emergency response exercises, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a technical information management system that will be used in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in the event of a major radiological accident. The core of the system is the Data Center in the FRMAC, utilizing a computerized database of all off-site environmental radiological data. The information contained and managed by the Data Center will be comprehensive, accountable, and traceable, providing information to the assessors for immediate health and safety needs as well as for long-term documentation requirements. A DOE task force has been formed to develop compatibility guidelines for video, automated data processing, and communication systems. An electronic mail, information status, and bulletin board system is also being developed to assist in the dissemination of information. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offer a giant step forward in displaying and analyzing information in a geographically referenced system

  18. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  19. Resolution no. 18/2012 Guide for the preparation and emergency response radiological

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This guide aims to establish requirements to ensure an adequate level of entities, for the preparation and response to radiological emergencies and to prepare the Radiation Emergency Plan (PER), asset out in the Basic Safety Standards radiological and authorizations Regulations in force. This guide applies to organizations providing employment practices associated with sources of ionizing radiation, hereinafter sources.

  20. Incorporation of IAEA recommendations in the Spanish nuclear emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, D.; Diaz de la Cruz, F.; Murtra, J.; Ruiz del Arbol, E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the way in which the Spanish authorities have incorporated the IAEA recommendations on the planning of action to be taken in the event of a nuclear accident, taking into account the national organization's own approach to the problem of dealing with a radiation emergency. First, the criteria and principles applied in devising the emergency plans are described. The criteria are concerned with the radiation problem as such and the principles take into account the sum total of problems associated with an emergency. Organizational and operational aspects of the plan are then discussed. The extent to which these arrangements are brought into play is determined by the type of abnormal event which occurs in the facility; since the evolution of this event cannot be exactly predicted, there must be enough flexibility in the operational plan so that it can be adapted rapidly and effectively to the circumstances. Another section deals with protection measures as a function of intervention (or reference) levels. Although non-radiological considerations may affect the measures adopted, a knowledge of the risks associated with the various intervention levels gives the authority a better understanding of the situation. The Nuclear Safety Board has had to inform the civil protection authorities of the distances at which specific protection measures should be taken. Considerations and hypotheses are described which, when applied, lead to general evacuation for distances of up to 3 km from the plant, partial evacuation for up to 5 km, containment and prophylactic measures up to 10 km and water and food monitoring up to 30 km. Finally, details are given of the Training and Information Plan which is being applied at present in Spain. (author)

  1. International IAEA Emergency Response Workshop in Fukushima Concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    , both in Japan and worldwide, in light of the March 2011 accident. The workshop and the Centre's activities are part of the IAEA's work to further strengthen international emergency preparedness and response, as guided by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety that was unanimously endorsed by IAEA Member States in September 2011. (IAEA)

  2. Planning the medical response to radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive substances and other sources of ionizing radiation are used to assist in diagnosing and treating diseases, improving agricultural yields, producing electricity and expanding scientific knowledge. The application of sources of radiation is growing daily, and consequently the need to plan for radiological accidents is growing. While the risk of such accidents cannot be entirely eliminated, experience shows that most of the rare cases that have occurred could have been prevented, as they are often caused by human error. Recent radiological accidents such as those at Chernobyl (Ukraine 1986), Goiania (Brazil 1987), San Salvador (El Salvador 1989), Sor-Van (Israel 1990), Hanoi (Viet Nam 1992) and Tammiku (Estonia 1994) have demonstrated the importance of adequate preparation for dealing with such emergencies. Medical preparedness for radiological accidents must be considered an integral part of general emergency planning and preparedness and established within the national framework for radiation protection and safety. An IAEA Technical Committee meeting held in Istanbul in 1988 produced some initial guidance on the subject, which was subsequently developed, reviewed and updated by groups of consultants in 1989, 1992 and 1996. Special comments were provided by WHO, as co-sponsor of this publication, in 1997. This Safety Report outlines the roles and tasks of health authorities and hospital administrators in emergency preparedness for radiological accidents. Health authorities may use this document as the basis for their medical management in a radiological emergency, bearing in mind that adaptations will almost certainly be necessary to take into account the local conditions. This publication also provides information relevant to the integration of medical preparedness into emergency plans

  3. A Universal Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan: Introducing the New Allergy and Anaphylaxis Care Plan From the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistiner, Michael; Mattey, Beth

    2017-09-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening emergency. In the school setting, school nurses prepare plans to prevent an emergency, educating staff and students on life-threatening allergies. A critical component of any emergency plan is a plan of care in the event of accidental ingestion or exposure to an antigen to prevent the sequelae of untreated anaphylaxis. A universal anaphylaxis emergency care plan developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and reviewed by NASN offers an opportunity for schools, family, and health care providers to use one standard plan and avoid confusion. The plan and benefits of use are described in this article.

  4. Emergency response to mass casualty incidents in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen J

    2013-08-01

    The emergency response to mass casualty incidents in Lebanon lacks uniformity. Three recent large-scale incidents have challenged the existing emergency response process and have raised the need to improve and develop incident management for better resilience in times of crisis. We describe some simple emergency management principles that are currently applied in the United States. These principles can be easily adopted by Lebanon and other developing countries to standardize and improve their emergency response systems using existing infrastructure.

  5. Book Abstract: How to Write an Emergency Plan by David Alexander; Reproduced by Permission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Contents: Foreword. 1. Introduction. Scope and objectives of this book; 2. What are emergencies? 3. What is an emergency plan? 4. The emergency planning process; 5. First step: background research; 6. Second step: scenario building; 7. Third Step: from scenarios to actions; 8. A note on the structure of the plan; 9. Fourth step: using the plan; 10. Planning to maintain the continuity of normal activities; 11. Specialized emergency planning; 12. Conclusion: the future of emergency planning. Afterword. Appendix 1: Glossary of working definitions by key terms. Appendix 2: Bibliography of selected references. Index.

  6. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the emergency response laws and regulations in place in the various states within the southern region for use by legislators, emergency response planners, the general public and all persons concerned about the existing legal framework for emergency response. SSEB expects to periodically update the report as necessary. Radiation protection regulations without emergency response provisions are not included in the summary. The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ''natural disasters.'' Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic, others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms. State-by-state breakdowns are given for specific states

  7. Arkansas pharmacists’ perceptions toward emergency contraception and nonprescription Plan B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopkins D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study describes Arkansas pharmacists’ knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding emergency contraception. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a convenience sample of pharmacists prior to a continuing education lecture. The 16-item survey included multiple choice and true/false questions to assess knowledge in addition to Likert-type scale questions regarding attitudes and beliefs. Frequency and descriptive statistics were calculated for all variables.Results: Eighty-eight pharmacists completed the survey. A majority (73% knew that Plan B had been FDA-approved for nonprescription use yet 42% believed that it works by disrupting a newly implanted ovum. On a scale from 1-5 where 5=strongly agree, the mean item score was 3.2 for whether emergency contraception should be available for nonprescription use with counseling and 1.6 for nonprescription use without counseling. When asked what they would do if presented with a request for emergency contraception, 45.8% indicated they would dispense the drug, 22.9% would refer the patient to another pharmacist or pharmacy, 3.6% would refuse to dispense, and 27.7% were not sure. Almost half (48.6% did not believe they were competent instructing patients on the use of emergency contraception. Conclusions: The results show that pharmacists could benefit from additional training on emergency contraception.

  8. IAEA response assistance network. Incident and Emergency Centre. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 May 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    This publication is intended to serve as a tool for supporting the provision of international assistance in the case of nuclear or radiological incident or emergency, cooperation between States, their Competent Authorities and the IAEA, and harmonization of response capabilities of States offering assistance. The publication is issued under the authority of the Director General of the IAEA: (1) under the auspices of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the Assistance Convention) [1], to promote, facilitate and support cooperation between States Parties to coordinate and/or provide assistance to a State Party and/or Member State; and (2) in the case of an incident or emergency, as statutory functions, to provide for the application of its safety standards, upon request by a Member State, and to act as an intermediary for the purposes of securing the performance of services or the supplying of materials, equipment or facilities by one Member State for another. The publication sets out the following: a) the RANET concept and the organizational structure for providing assistance; b) functions, responsibilities and activities within the RANET; c) the RANET response operations and arrangements needed for preparedness; and d) the prerequisites for RANET membership and conditions of registration. The RANET is divided into four sections. After the introduction in Section 1, the RANET concept, objectives and scope are described in Section 2. Section 3 presents the concept of operations of the RANET and Section 4 describes expected tasks, capabilities and resources. In addition, EPR-RANET (2006) has three supporting documents, which are issued separately, as follows: 1. Assistance Action Plans with samples of Assistance Action Plans for providing international assistance. 2. Registry with the details of the registry and instructions on how to register national assistance capabilities for the RANET. 3. Technical Guidelines

  9. Emergency response technical centre of the IPSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallendre, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN), the technical support of the French nuclear safety authority, provides the technical support needed for protect the surrounding population from the consequences of radioactive releases. In the event of an accident arising at a nuclear facility, the IPSN would set up an Emergency Response Technical Centre (CTC) at Fontenay-aux-Roses. The IPSN's objectives are: (a) to diagnose the state of the nuclear facility and monitor its development, (b) to prepare prognosis for the evolution of the accident and to give an estimation of the associated consequences according to the situation evolution, (c) to estimate the risk of radioactive releases and the consequences on man and on the environment, mainly on the basis of weather forecasts and on the prognosis. This diagnosis-prognosis approach is build-up with the information on the state of the installation given by: the concerned site via audio-conference system and telescope, the security panels of the nuclear plant via networks. To perform its missions, the CTC, which has to be both safe and secure, uses multiple telecommunication resources to dialogue with partners and also mapping computer systems, data bases and software tools: (a) the SESAME system, which gives, during an accident of a PWR, a calculation method for the diagnosis-prognosis aforesaid, (b) the CONRAD system, which calculates the atmospheric dispersal of radioactive substances and consequences in the environment in the early phase of an accident, (c) the ASTRAL code, which allows to cope with long lasting situations. In order to be operational, the IPSN expert regularly undergo training in emergency situation management and participate in exercises organised by the government authorities. (author)

  10. Oil supply security: the emergency response potential of IEA countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This work deals with the oil supply security and more particularly with the emergency response potential of International Energy Agency (IEA) countries. The first part describes the changing pattern of IEA emergency response requirements. It begins with the experience from the past, then gives the energy outlook to 2010 and ends with the emergency response policy issues for the future. The second part is an overview on the IEA emergency response potential which includes the organisation, the emergency reserves, the demand restraint and the other response mechanisms. The third part gives the response potential of individual IEA countries. The last part deals with IEA emergency response in practice and more particularly with the gulf crisis of 1990-1991. It includes the initial problems raised by the gulf crisis, the adjustment and preparation and the onset of military action with the IEA response.(O.L.). 7 figs., 85 tabs

  11. Studies of planning behavior of aircraft pilots in normal, abnormal, and emergency situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, G.; Rouse, W. B.; Hillmann, K.

    1981-01-01

    A methodology for the study of human planning behavior in complex dynamic systems is presented and applied to the study of aircraft pilot behavior in normal, abnormal and emergency situations. The method measures the depth of planning, that is the level of detail employed with respect to a specific task, according to responses to a verbal questionnaire, and compares planning depth with variables relating to time, task criticality and the probability of increased task difficulty. In two series of experiments, depth of planning was measured on a five- or ten-point scale during various phases of flight in a HFB-320 simulator under normal flight conditions, abnormal scenarios involving temporary runway closure due to snow removal or temporary CAT-III conditions due to a dense fog, and emergency scenarios involving engine shut-down or hydraulic pressure loss. Results reveal a dichotomy between event-driven and time-driven planning, different effects of automation in abnormal and emergency scenarios and a low correlation between depth of planning and workload or flight performance.

  12. Application of a geographic information system for radiologic emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.G.; Doyle, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) is a multifunctional analytical tool that can be used to compile available data and derive information. A GIS is a computerized database management system for the capture, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display of spatial data. Maps are the most common type of spatial data, but any type of data that can be referenced by an x-y location or geographic coordinate can be used in a GIS. In a radiological emergency, it is critical that data of all types be rapidly compiled into a common format in order to make accurate observations and informed decisions. Developing a baseline GIS for nuclear facilities would offer a significant incentive for all organizations to contribute to and utilize this powerful data management tool. The system being developed could integrate all elements of emergency planning, from the initial protective actions based on models through the emergency monitoring phase, and finally ending with the complex reentry and recovery phase. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. To demonstrate the potential of GIS for emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises. An interactive GIS system has been deployed and used to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. For this application, both hardcopy and real-time spatial displays were generated with the GIS. Composite maps with different sizes, scales, and themes were produced to support the exercises

  13. Emergency response arrangements for the transport of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan-Warren, E. [Radioactive Materials Transport Div., Dept. for Transport, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Response arrangements are required for the transport of radioactive materials, under both transport and health and safety legislation, to safeguard persons, property and the environment in the event of incidents and emergencies. Responsibilities fall on both government and industry: government is responsible for ensuring public safety and providing information and reassurance. This responsibility is discharged for each type of incident by a nominated ''lead department'', supported as appropriate by other government departments and agencies; for their part, operators are obliged to have arrangements in place for dealing with the practicalities of any reasonably foreseeable incident, including recovery and onward transport of a package, and any required clean-up or restoration of the environment. This paper outlines both the government and industry arrangements in Great Britain. The principles of response and intervention are discussed, together with the lead department concept, regulatory requirements, and the plans developed by the transport industry to ensure a nation-wide response capability.

  14. State planning for winter energy emergencies: workshop materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    Workshops were conducted in 5 cities to improve communications between the states and the Federal government so that both might be better prepared to avoid or mitigate the impacts of energy emergencies during the winter; to provide a forum for the exchange of technical information regarding selected energy demand restraint measures which could be implemented by individual states or regions in an energy emergency; and to promote the concept of pre-crisis contingency planning and strategy development, with particuliar emphasis on the need for interstate coordination of emergency plans. The major topics addressed by the discussion guide involved net energy use impact, implementation procedures and problems, and social and economic effects. The Task Force performed extensive research into the technical considerations and prior experience in implementing each of the demand restraint measures selected for discussion. Results and conclusions are summarized for reduction of thermostat setting for space conditioning and water heating; reduction in hours of operation and lighting in commercial establishments; reduction in hours of operation in school, and industrial fuel substitution. (MCW)

  15. Oil Notifications: Emergency Response Notification System (ERNS) fact sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The Emergency Response Notification System (ERNS) is a national computer database which provides the only centralized mechanism for documenting and verifying incident notification information as initially reported to the National Response Center (NRC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and to a limited extent, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). The initial notification data may be followed up with updated information from various Federal, State and local response authorities, as appropriate. ERNS contains data that can be used to analyze release notifications, support emergency planning efforts, and assist decision makers in developing spill prevention programs. The fact sheet provides summary information on notifications of releases of oil reported in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA). Under Section 311 of the CWA, discharges of oil which: (1) cause a sheen to appear on the surface of the water; (2) violate applicable water quality standards; or (3) cause sludge or emulsion to be deposited beneath the surface of the water or adjoining shoreline, must be reported to the NRC

  16. Severe accident management at nuclear power plants - emergency preparedness and response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, S.K.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the current level of emergency planning and preparedness and also improvement in the emergency management programme over the years including lessons learned from Fukushima accident, hazard analysis and categorization of nuclear facilities into hazard category for establishing the emergency preparedness class, classification of emergencies based on the Emergency Action Levels (EAL), development of EAL’s for PHWR, Generic Criteria in terms of projected dose for initiating protective actions (precautionary urgent protective actions, urgent protective actions, early protective actions), operational intervention levels (OIL), Emergency planning zones and distances, protection strategy and reference levels, use of residual dose for establishing reference levels for optimization of protection strategy, criteria for termination of emergency, transition of emergency exposure situation to existing exposure situation or planned exposure situation, criteria for medical managements of exposed persons and guidance for controlling the dose of emergency workers. This paper also highlights the EALs for typical PHWR type reactors for all types of emergencies (plant, site and offsite), transition from emergency operating procedures (EOP) to accident management guidelines (AMG) to emergency response actions and proposed implementation of guidelines

  17. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public inquiry: proof of evidence on emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    A public inquiry has been set up to examine the planning application made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the construction of a 1200 MW Pressurized Water Reactor power station at Hinkley Point (Hinkley Point ''C'') in the United Kingdom, adjacent to an existing nuclear power station incorporating Magnox and Advanced Gas Cooled reactors. The CEGB evidence to the Inquiry presented here introduces the concept of the Reference Accident as the basis for emergency arrangements. The description which follows of the emergency arrangements at the Hinkley Point site include: the respective responsibilities and their co-ordination of bodies such as the CEGB, external emergency services and government departments; the site emergency organization; practical aspects of the emergency arrangements; and consideration of the extension of the arrangements to a PWR on the same site. Recent developments in emergency planning, such as those arising out of post Chernobyl reviews and the Sizewell ''B'' PWR Inquiry, are taken into account. The conclusion is reached that soundly based emergency arrangements already exist at Hinkley Point which would require relatively minor changes should the proposed PWR be constructed. (UK)

  18. Emergency Response of Iranian Hospitals Against Disasters: A Practical Framework for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janati, Ali; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Hasanpoor, Edris; Sokhanvar, Mobin; HaghGoshyie, Elaheh; Salehi, Abdollah

    2018-04-01

    Hospital emergency management is a continuous process that requires monolithic integration of planning and response attempts with local and national schemes. The aim of the current study is to evaluate emergency response by hospitals against potential disasters in Tabriz, north-west Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the city of Tabriz, in Iran, in 2016. The study population included all hospitals in Tabriz. A total of 18 hospitals were assessed. The hospital emergency response checklist was used to collect data. Tool components included command and control, communication, safety and security, triage, surge capacity, continuity of essential services, human resources, logistics and supply management, and post-disaster recovery. Data entry and analysis were carried out using SPSS software (version 20). The results showed that the emergency response rate of hospitals was 54.26% in Tabriz. The lowest response rates were for Shafaa hospital (18.89%) and the highest response rates were for Razi Hospital (91.67%). The components of hospital emergency response were assessed to be between 48.07% (surge capacity) and 58.95% (communication). On the basis of the World Health Organization checklist, the emergency response rate for hospitals in Tabriz was only 54.26%. Therefore, hospital emergency responses against disasters have to be improved and must be made to reach 100%. It is essential to design a comprehensive framework for hospital emergency response. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018;12:166-171).

  19. National response plan - Major nuclear or radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    France has been implementing stringent radiation protection and nuclear safety and security measures for many years. However, this does not mean that the country is exempt from having to be prepared to deal with an emergency. Changes in France, Europe and other parts of the globe have made it necessary for France to reconsider how it responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies. As the potential impact of a nuclear or radiological accident can affect a wide range of activities, the plan described herein is based on a cross-sector and inter-ministerial approach to emergency response. The Chernobyl and Fukushima-Daiichi disasters are proof that the consequences of a major nuclear or radiological accident can affect all levels of society. These challenges are substantial and relate to: public health: An uncontrolled nuclear accident can have immediate consequences (death, injury, irradiation) as well as long-term consequences that can lead to increased risk of developing radiation-induced diseases (such as certain types of cancer); environmental quality: Radiation contamination can last for several decades and, in some cases, can result in an area being closed off permanently to the public; economic and social continuity: Nuclear accidents bring human activity to a halt in contaminated areas, disrupting the economic and social order of the entire country. It may therefore be necessary to adapt economic and social systems and carry out clean-up operations if people and businesses have been displaced; quality of international relations: Related to fulfillment of obligations to alert and inform European and international partners. This international dimension also covers the protection of French nationals present in countries stricken by a nuclear accident. This national plan provides reference information on how to prepare for a nuclear or radiological emergency and make the appropriate decisions in the event of an emergency. It covers the emergency phase (including

  20. Study on IAEA international emergency response exercise convEx-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2007-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) carried out a large-scale international emergency response exercise in 2005 under the designated name of ConvEx-3(2005), at Romania. This review report summarizes a study about ConvEx-3(2005) based on several related open literature. The ConvEx-3 was conducted in accordance with Agency's safety standard series and requirements in the field of Emergency Preparedness and Response. The study on the preparation, conduct and evaluation of ConvEx-3(2005) exercise is expected to provide very useful knowledge for development of drills and educational programs conducted by Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT). Especially, study on the exercise evaluations is instrumental in improving evaluations of drills planned by the national government and local governments. As international cooperation among Asian countries in the field of nuclear emergency preparedness and response is going to realize, it is very useful to survey and consider scheme and methodology about international emergency preparedness, response and exercise referring the knowledge of this ConvEx-3 study. The lessons learned from this study of ConvEx-3(2005) are summarized in four chapters; methodology of exercises and educational programs, exercise evaluation process, amendments/verification of the emergency response plan of NEAT, and technical issues of systems for emergency response and assistance of NEAT relevant to interface for international emergency communication. (author)

  1. Public health response to radiation emergencies and the role of the Helsinki Project Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, Keith F.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on the public health element of nuclear emergency preparedness, defined as the mitigation of the long-term effects of radiation on exposed populations, as opposed to dealing with the health consequences of an exposure in an individual (termed medical aspects). The paper also approaches to the role of the Helsinki Project Office which is concerned with the protection of public health through effective response to nuclear emergencies, and falling into two categories, namely contingency planning or preparedness, and response

  2. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing their consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a large number of States (Section 1.7), the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full parties. The arrangements between the IAEA, States that are IAEA Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations, and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). In 2000, a complete revision of ENATOM, with all relevant sections updated, withdrawn or replaced with new material, was reissued as EPR-ENATOM (2000) to reflect new technological developments, operational concepts, views on standards in the area of emergency preparedness and response, and Member States' expectations. A separate publication, EPR-JPLAN (2000), the Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (Joint Plan'), described a common understanding of how each of six co-sponsoring international organizations will act during a response and in making preparedness arrangements. It is intended that the ENATOM is reviewed and reissued biennially in line with the review cycle of the Joint Plan. Since the

  3. 40 CFR 355.12 - What quantities of extremely hazardous substances trigger emergency planning requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EMERGENCY PLANNING AND NOTIFICATION Emergency Planning Who Must Comply § 355.12 What quantities of extremely... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What quantities of extremely hazardous substances trigger emergency planning requirements? 355.12 Section 355.12 Protection of Environment...

  4. Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response: There's An App for That.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Daniel J; Jamison, Nathan K; Martin, Andrew; Delgado, Jose; Kman, Nicholas E

    2015-10-01

    Smartphone applications (or apps) are becoming increasingly popular with emergency responders and health care providers, as well as the public as a whole. There are thousands of medical apps available for Smartphones and tablet computers, with more added each day. These include apps to view textbooks, guidelines, medication databases, medical calculators, and radiology images. Hypothesis/Problem With an ever expanding catalog of apps that relate to disaster medicine, it is hard for both the lay public and responders to know where to turn for effective Smartphone apps. A systematic review of these apps was conducted. A search of the Apple iTunes store (Version 12; Apple Inc.; Cupertino, California USA) was performed using the following terms obtained from the PubMed Medical Subject Headings Database: Emergency Preparedness, Emergency Responders, Disaster, Disaster Planning, Disaster Medicine, Bioterrorism, Chemical Terrorism, Hazardous Materials (HazMat), and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). After excluding any unrelated apps, a working list of apps was formed and categorized based on topics. Apps were grouped based on applicability to responders, the lay public, or regional preparedness, and were then ranked based on iTunes user reviews, value, relevance to audience, and user interface. This search revealed 683 applications and was narrowed to 219 based on relevance to the field. After grouping the apps as described above, and subsequently ranking them, the highest quality apps were determined from each group. The Community Emergency Response Teams and FEMA had the best apps for National Disaster Medical System responders. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had high-quality apps for emergency responders in a variety of fields. The National Library of Medicine's Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER) app was an excellent app for HazMat responders. The American Red Cross had the most useful apps for natural

  5. The implementation of the IAEA accident response plan in Yugoslav practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlic, M.; Pavlovic, R.; Markovic, S.; Pavlovic, S.

    1996-01-01

    One of the important lessons from the Chernobyl accident is the necessity of existence of operational national emergency response plan. Summarizing consequences and experiences after Chernobyl accident, expert groups from IAEA, ICRP and other international scientific organizations, have been extensively worked on reviewing old ones, and preparing new radiation protection and nuclear safety principals and codes. One of the important issue is national emergency response plan for radiological accident. The nuclear accident response plan in Yugoslavia is presented in this paper. It is essentially based on IAEA model national response plan for radiological accident. This model has to be adjusted to the specificity of member states. The optimum society organization for emergency management in the case of accidents in ionizing radiation sources practices is suggested in this paper. Specific characteriztics of Yugoslav state organization relating to accident response are emphasised. (author)

  6. Contingency planning for nuclear emergencies in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M. C.

    2002-01-01

    Two nuclear power stations on the coast of southern China are situated some 50 kilometers to the northeast of Hong Kong. Although the stations are far away from Hong Kong, the construction and operation of the nuclear power stations have generated public anxiety locally, in particular, after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A comprehensive contingency plan which takes into account such concerns of the public has been implemented in Hong Kong. This plan not only aims to ensure a quick and timely response to mitigate the health impact of any accidental release but also targets to re-assure the public that the territory is not contaminated when appropriate. This paper describes the principal elements of the nuclear contingency plan in Hong Kong, namely, an extensive environmental radiation monitoring programme and a proactive public communication programme

  7. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ''natural disasters.'' Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic; others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms

  8. A prototype nuclear emergency response decision making expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Shih, C.; Hong, M.; Yu, W.; Su, M.; Wang, S.

    1990-01-01

    A prototype of emergency response expert system developed for nuclear power plants, has been fulfilled by Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. Key elements that have been implemented for emergency response include radioactive material dispersion assessment, dynamic transportation evacuation assessment, and meteorological parametric forecasting. A network system consists of five 80386 Personal Computers (PCs) has been installed to perform the system functions above. A further project is still continuing to achieve a more complicated and fanciful computer aid integral emergency response expert system

  9. Meteorological considerations in emergency response capability at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairobent, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Meteorological considerations in emergency response at nuclear power plants are discussed through examination of current regulations and guidance documents, including discussion of the rationale for current regulatory requirements related to meteorological information for emergency response. Areas discussed include: major meteorological features important to emergency response; onsite meteorological measurements programs, including redundant and backup measurements; access to offsite sources of meteorological information; consideration of real-time and forecast conditions and atmospheric dispersion modeling

  10. Planning for off-site response to radiation accidents in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to give guidance to those who are responsible for the protection of the public in the event of an accident occurring at a land-based nuclear facility. This guidance should assist in the advance preparation of emergency response plans and implementing procedures. Basic principles of protective measures along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Other principles related to emergency planning and the operational response to an emergency are outlined. Although the guidance is primarily oriented towards land-based nuclear power facilities, the guidance does have general application to other types of nuclear facility

  11. Planning for off-site response to radiation accidents in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to give guidance to those who are responsible for the protection of the public in the event of an accident occurring at a land-based nuclear facility. This guidance should assist in the advance preparation of emergency response plans and implementing procedures. Basic principles of protective measures along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Other principles related to emergency planning and the operational response to an emergency are outlined. Although the guidance is primarily oriented toward land-based nuclear power facilities, the guidance does have general application to other types of nuclear facilities

  12. The Reference Scenarios for the Swiss Emergency Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanspeter Isaak; Navert, Stephan B.; Ralph Schulz

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of emergency planning and preparedness, realistic reference scenarios and corresponding accident source terms have been defined on the basis of common plant features. Three types of representative reference scenarios encompass the accident sequences expected to be the most probable. Accident source terms are assumed to be identical for all Swiss nuclear power plants, although the plants differ in reactor type and power. Plant-specific probabilistic safety analyses were used to justify the reference scenarios and the postulated accident source terms. From the full spectrum of release categories available, those categories were selected which would be covered by the releases and time frames assumed in the reference scenarios. For each nuclear power plant, the cumulative frequency of accident sequences not covered by the reference scenarios was determined. It was found that the cumulative frequency for such accident sequences does not exceed about 1 x 10 -6 per year. The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate concludes that the postulated accident source terms for the reference scenarios are consistent with the current international approach in emergency planning, where one should concentrate on the most probable accident sequences. (N.C.)

  13. Emergency planning and management in health care: priority research topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Alan; Chambers, Naomi; French, Simon; Shaw, Duncan; King, Russell; Whitehead, Alison

    2014-06-01

    Many major incidents have significant impacts on people's health, placing additional demands on health-care organisations. The main aim of this paper is to suggest a prioritised agenda for organisational and management research on emergency planning and management relevant to U.K. health care, based on a scoping study. A secondary aim is to enhance knowledge and understanding of health-care emergency planning among the wider research community, by highlighting key issues and perspectives on the subject and presenting a conceptual model. The study findings have much in common with those of previous U.S.-focused scoping reviews, and with a recent U.K.-based review, confirming the relative paucity of U.K.-based research. No individual research topic scored highly on all of the key measures identified, with communities and organisations appearing to differ about which topics are the most important. Four broad research priorities are suggested: the affected public; inter- and intra-organisational collaboration; preparing responders and their organisations; and prioritisation and decision making.

  14. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  15. The nuclear medicine department in the emergency management plan: a referent structure for the nuclear and radiological risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, J.L.; Ducassou, D.; Lesgourgues, P.; Zamaron, S.; Boulard, G.

    2006-01-01

    Each french public or private hospital has to establish guidelines for an immediate response to mass casualties (Emergency Management Plan or 'White' Plan). For a nuclear accident or terrorist attack, the staff of the Nuclear Medicine Department may be adequately prepared and equipped. This paper presents the nuclear and radiological risks section of the final draft of the White Plan developed at Bordeaux University Hospital. (author)

  16. Response in the late phase to a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, M.; Nisbet, A.; Thome, D.; Savkin, M.; Hoe, S.; Brynildsen, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper looks at the key issues that need to be addressed during the transition from the emergency phase to the late phase of a radioactive release, and the development of the initial late phase strategy. It discusses the extent to which current national plans and international advice address the needs of decision makers following contamination of inhabited areas and food production systems. Based on this the following recommendations are made: (1) the issues that will arise at the start of the late phase response to a radioactive release require preparation work in advance of any release; (2) this preparation should consider the adequacy of legislation, technical data and modelling, options for waste storage and disposal, resources for monitoring and implementing clean up; (3) late phase preparedness requires regular exercising and (4) the possibility of terrorist releases adds further emphasis to the need for preparedness for the late phase. (authors)

  17. Analysis of the area in which arrangements for emergency preparedness and response should be intensively made

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    In Japan, the local governments have been developing introduction of new concept for the emergency planning zone, in which arrangements for emergency preparedness and response should be intensively made, such as Precautionary Action Zone (PAZ) and Urgent Protective Action Planning Zone (UPZ). This study was planned in order to prepare the reference data for the local governments to determine the zone distances. In this study, examination of the methods for estimating the distance used as reference of these zones in the case where a severe accident would occur in a nuclear power plant was performed, and the calculated results under typical conditions were shown. (author)

  18. Learning, innovation and communication: evolving dynamics of a nuclear emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadros, Andre Luiz Lopes

    2014-01-01

    The technological development inherent to modern societies has placed human beings in situations of choice from a wide variety of possible risks. As a way to protect people and the environment, actions need to be developed in order to reduce possible consequences of the materialisation of these risks. The thermonuclear power generation demand planning in order to prepare answers to possible emergency situations, as even being considered of low probability of occurrence, when they happen have a significant impact on populations and regions of its surroundings. Considering the relevance of this issue, this thesis aimed to identify and analyze the dynamics of preparedness and response to emergency situations in a Nuclear Power Plant, trying to understand its evolution over the time and systematizing it, considering the actors involved, processes of organizational learning, innovation and risk communication, considered as crucial for the development and improvement of emergency plans. Concerning preparedness and response to possible emergency situations in this nuclear plant, it was possible not only to confirm the importance of the three processes studied, but also observe that they can be treated and evaluated in an integrated and systematic way. So, it was presented a model that aims to facilitate the understanding of this perspective and enhance the importance of participation and cooperation between all stakeholders (organizations and the local population) within a socio-participatory perspective. To this end, this exploratory research sought for evidences in documents, participation in planning meetings, direct observation of the general exercises of the CNAAA External Emergency Plan of 2013, interviews with some of the actors involved and through the application of a questionnaire among the population of the Praia Vermelha, in Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro. (author)

  19. Federal, provincial and territorial public health response plan for biological events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, R; Topping, J

    2018-01-04

    The Federal/Provincial/Territorial (FPT) Public Health Response Plan for Biological Events was developed for the Public Health Network Council (PHNC). This plan outlines how the national response to public health events caused by biological agents will be conducted and coordinated, with a focus on implementation of responses led by senior-level FPT public health decision-makers. The plan was developed by an expert task group and was approved by PHNC in October, 2017. The plan describes roles, responsibilities and authorities of FPT governments for public health and emergency management, a concept of operations outlining four scalable response levels and a governance structure that aims to facilitate an efficient, timely, evidence-informed and consistent approach across jurisdictions. Improving effective engagement amongst public health, health care delivery and health emergency management authorities is a key objective of the plan.

  20. Reinforcement of planning and response to emergencies inside nuclear power plants; Refuerzo de la planificación y respuesta ante emergencias en el interior de las centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortés, M.A.; Garcés, J.M.; Bolaños, J.; Fernández, J.; Gutiérrez, C.; Pontejo, A.; Rosell, B.

    2015-07-01

    Fukushima Daichi nuclear accident (11th march of 2011) required a rapid and effective response of nuclear industry, in order to guarantee that current safety margins were enough to cope with events like this or even worse. In Europe, stress tests were carried out to comply with that objective, evaluating if every nuclear plant was able to succeed managing design basis accidents or even beyond. Stress-test results were satisfactory, although several areas for improvement where identified. Improvements in emergency response and management have been developed in several phases. First, increasing emergency response capacity by implementing modifications in existing equipment. Later, installing new equipment (generally portable) which would be used in even more degraded conditions. This must be held by the revision of emergency response personnel and their training. Finally, external support has been reinforced to help in longstanding emergencies, with the establishment of CAE (Regional Center), and collaboration protocols with the Army. These actions, supervised and approved by the Regulator Body (CSN) will lead to increase plants safety margins and their emergency response capacities in order to reduce probability and consequences of a nuclear accident to the minimum. [Spanish] El accidente nuclear ocurrido el 11 de marzo de 2011 en Fukushima Daichi requirió de una pronta y efectiva respuesta de la industria nuclear, que garantizase que los márgenes de seguridad eran los adecuados para hacer frente a sucesos de estas características o incluso peores. Con ese objetivo se planteó, a nivel europeo, la realización de unas pruebas de resistencia que valorasen si las centrales podían hacer frente con garantías a una serie de accidentes dentro y más allá de las bases de diseño. Los resultados fueron satisfactorios, si bien se identificaron varios aspectos de mejora. La mejora en la respuesta y gestión de emergencias de las centrales nucleares se ha planteado en

  1. British Columbia inland oil spill response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of the organization, procedures and duties of the provincial government in response to inland oil spills stemming from pipeline or tank-farm rupture, train derailment and vehicle accidents in British Columbia. Provincial response strategies were reviewed, along with their relationships to various policies and standards. Public, infrastructure and environmental protection were identified as key factors. Incident notification procedures were detailed, including outlines of roles, event criteria and call for incident management teams. Agreements and cost recovery issues were examined. The characteristics of site response were reviewed, including details of communications, tactical planning, and unified command among local and federal governments. The role of First Nations and responsible parties was also addressed. Details of shore cleanup, wildlife rescue, decontamination, and waste handling strategies were presented. The organization, missions and duties for an incident management team were outlined, along with a summary of operational guidelines and information on team positions and the establishment of joint information centres. The involvement of cooperating agencies was examined. An incident command system was also presented, including details of planning, operations, logistics, and organization. A checklist of individual duties was provided, with details of responsibilities, safety issues and general instructions for all team members. tabs., figs

  2. More efficient response to nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    Three documents related to the first volume of this report are presented here. These are a description of the emergency provisions organisation, an analysis of the weaknesses in the present organisation and proposed improvements (with appendices on the information problem in excercises with the emergency provisions at Ringhals and attitudes to tasks connected with evacuation following a power reactor accident) and agreements with Denmark, Finland, Norway and the IAEA for mutual assistance. (JIW)

  3. The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the eThekwini district of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. PR Newton, R Naidoo, P Brysiewicz. Abstract. Introduction. Emergency medical services (EMS) are sometimes required to respond to cases that are later found not to be emergencies, resulting in high ...

  4. Establishing a mobile automatic monitoring station for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hsin-Fa

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A radiological/nuclear emergency event may cause environmental contamination. The emergency response works always need to plan an environmental survey programme incorporating the assessment results to see what is happening. The places where are assessed to have the highest radioactive contamination/radiation dose will catch more concern and need continuous monitoring. It will cause unnecessary dangers and dose to command that personnel conduct surveying in such places when the radiological/nuclear accident become more severe. A mobile automatic monitoring station has been established for emergency response by INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research) to solve the problem practically. The monitoring station involves a HPIC to monitor radiation dose, an anemometer to monitor wind speed and direction, a GPS to get position data, a GPRS/3G communication module to send monitoring and positioning data to the monitoring centre where can show the monitoring result directly on a map shown on the computer. These instruments are integrated in a trailer easy to be towed to the place need to be monitored. The electric power of the station is supplied by s a solar power energy system. It can supply the station working at least 10 days without extra electric power supply designed based on the expected time length of a nuclear power plant event. The HPIC is very sensitive and stable that can discriminate a 10 nSv/hr increasing of dose rate with the monitoring time period every ten seconds. Where the radiological dispersion device events happened is not predictable, it is difficult to get suitable wind monitoring data to assess the result of radiological dispersion device events. The anemometer added on the station can provide the real time wind monitoring data to help assessment works. (author)

  5. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Duan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to property damage and loss of lives, environment pollution, such as water pollution and air pollution caused by accidents in chemical industrial parks (CIPs is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study. Using a scenario analysis, the stages of emergency response were divided into three levels, after introducing the domino effect, and fundamental requirements of ERS design were confirmed. The framework of ERS was composed mainly of a monitoring system, an emergency command center, an action system, and a supporting system. On this basis, six main emergency rescue steps containing alarm receipt, emergency evaluation, launched corresponding emergency plans, emergency rescue actions, emergency recovery, and result evaluation and feedback were determined. Finally, an example from the XiaoHu Chemical Industrial Park (XHCIP was presented to check on the integrality, reliability, and maneuverability of the ERS, and the result of the first emergency drill with this ERS indicated that the developed ERS can reduce delays, improve usage efficiency of resources, and raise emergency rescue efficiency.

  6. Dispatching Plan Based on Route Optimization Model Considering Random Wind for Aviation Emergency Rescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aviation emergency rescue is an effective means of nature disaster relief that is widely used in many countries. The dispatching plan of aviation emergency rescue guarantees the efficient implementation of this relief measure. The conventional dispatching plan that does not consider random wind factors leads to a nonprecise quick-responsive scheme and serious safety issues. In this study, an aviation emergency rescue framework that considers the influence of random wind at flight trajectory is proposed. In this framework, the predicted wind information for a disaster area is updated by using unscented Kalman filtering technology. Then, considering the practical scheduling problem of aircraft emergency rescue at present, a multiobjective model is established in this study. An optimization model aimed at maximizing the relief supply satisfaction, rescue priority satisfaction, and minimizing total rescue flight distance is formulated. Finally, the transport times of aircraft with and without the influence of random wind are analyzed on the basis of the data of an earthquake disaster area. Results show that the proposed dispatching plan that considers the constraints of updated wind speed and direction is highly applicable in real operations.

  7. Functional criteria for emergency response facilities. Technical report (final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This report describes the facilities and systems to be used by nuclear power plant licensees to improve responses to emergency situations. The facilities include the Technical Support Center (TSC), Onsite Operational Support Center (OSC), and Nearsite Emergency Operations Facility (EOF), as well as a brief discussion of the emergency response function of the control room. The data systems described are the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) and Nuclear Data Link (NDL). Together, these facilities and systems make up the total Emergency Response Facilities (ERFs). Licensees should follow the guidance provided both in this report and in NUREG-0654 (FEMA-REP-1), Revision 1, for design and implementation of the ERFs

  8. Emergency response training with the BNL plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Guppy, J.G.; Mallen, A.N.; Wulff, W.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the experience in the use of the BNL Plant Analyzer for NRC emergency response training to simulated accidents in a BWR. The unique features of the BNL Plant Analyzer that are important for the emergency response training are summarized. A closed-loop simulation of all the key systems of a power plant in question was found essential to the realism of the emergency drills conducted at NRC. The faster than real-time simulation speeds afforded by the BNL Plant Analyzer have demonstrated its usefulness for the timely conduct of the emergency response training

  9. Scaling-up Support for Emergency Response Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomes, A.H.J.; Neef, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the design of an information system that supports the process of scaling-up of emergency response organizations. This process is vital for effective emergency response but tends to go awry in practice. Our proposed system consists of multiple distributed agents that are capable of

  10. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies (2012 update)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  11. Strategic Aspects of Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Management. Planning for Effective Decision Making; Consequence Management and Transition to Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The collective experience of the NEA Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM), and in particular, the experience from the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX) series, has shown that it is important to plan and to implement emergency response actions based on a guiding strategic vision. Within this context, Strategic Aspects of Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Management presents a framework of strategic planning elements to be considered by national emergency management authorities when establishing or enhancing processes for decision making, and when developing or implementing protection strategies. The focus is on nuclear or radiological emergency situations leading to complex preparedness and response conditions, involving multiple jurisdictions and significant international interfaces. The report is aimed at national emergency management authorities, international organisations and those who are seeking to improve the effectiveness of emergency management. Its goal is to provide insights into decision-making processes within existing emergency planning arrangements. It also highlights common areas of good practice in decision making. Specific areas for improvement, identified during the INEX-3 consequence management exercise, are included, particularly in support of decision making for countermeasures for consequence management and the transition to recovery. (authors)

  12. Estimation of Source terms for Emergency Planning and Preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Chul Un; Chung, Bag Soon; Ahn, Jae Hyun; Yoon, Duk Ho; Jeong, Chul Young; Lim, Jong Dae [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sun Gu; Suk, Ho; Park, Sung Kyu; Lim, Hac Kyu; Lee, Kwang Nam [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In this study the severe accident sequences for each plant of concern, which represent accident sequences with a high core damage frequency and significant accident consequences, were selected based on the results of probabilistic safety assessments and source term and time-histories of various safety parameters under severe accidents. Accidents progression analysis for each selected accident sequence was performed by MAAP code. It was determined that the measured values, dose rate and radioisotope concentration, could provide information to the operators on occurrence and timing of core damage, reactor vessel failure, and containment failure during severe accidents. Radioactive concentration in the containment atmosphere, which may be measured by PASS, was estimated. Radioisotope concentration in emergency planning, evaluation of source term behavior in the containment, estimation of core damage degree, analysis of severe accident phenomena, core damage timing, and the amount of radioisotope released to the environment. (author). 50 refs., 60 figs.

  13. Emergency planning simplification: Why ALWR designs shall support this goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripputi, I.

    2004-01-01

    Emergency Plan simplification, could be achieved only if it can proved, in a context of balanced national health protection policies, that there is a reduced or no technical need for some elements of it and that public protection is assured in all considered situations regardless of protective actions outside the plant. These objectives may be technically supported if one or more of the following conditions are complied with: 1. Accidents potentially releasing large amounts of fission products can be ruled out by characteristics of the designs 2. Plant engineered features (and the containment system in particular) are able to drastically mitigate the radioactive releases under all conceivable scenarios. 3. A realistic approach to the consequence evaluation can reduce the expected consequences to effects below any concern. Unfortunately no one single approach is either technically feasible or justified in a perspective of defense in depth and only a mix of them may provide the necessary conditions. It appears that most or all proposed ALWR designs address the technical issues, whose solutions are the bases to eliminate the need for a number of protective actions (evacuation, relocation, sheltering, iodine tablets administration, etc.) even in the case of a severe accident. Some designs are mainly oriented to prevent the need for short term protective actions; they credit simplified Emergency Plans or the capabilities of existing civil protection organizations for public relocation in the long term, if needed. Others take also into account the overall releases to exclude or minimize public relocation and land contamination. Design targets for population individual doses and for land contamination proposed in Italy are discussed in the paper. It is also shown that these limits, while challenging, appear to be within the reach of the next generation proposed designs currently studied in Italy. (author)

  14. Guidance for emergency planning in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, Tommy; Ekdahl, Maria

    2008-06-01

    Ringhals has been a model for this study, but the purpose has been to make the report applicable at all nuclear power plants in Sweden. The work has been done in close co-operation with the Swedish nuclear power plants and Rescue Services in the nuclear power municipalities Oesthammar, Oskarshamn, and Varberg. The internal fire brigade at the nuclear power plants has also been involved. A document will also be published as a further guidance at efforts of the type fires, which are mentioned in the enclosed document. After a fire in a switchgear room in 2005 the need of making the existing effort planning more effective at nuclear power plants was observed. The idea with the planning is to plan the effort in order to give the operational and emergency staff a good and actual support to come to a decision and to start the mission without delay. The risk information is showed by planning layouts, symbols and drawings as basis, give risk information and effort information. The effort information shows outer arrangements, manual action points, fire installations, passive fire safety etc. The risk information is shown by risk symbols. Their purpose is to give a fast overview of the existing risks. Reactor safety effects is the ruling influence if an effort has to be done in order to secure safety for a third person. In order to make an effort in an area personal risks for rescue staff, such as electricity risks, radiological risks, chemicals and gas bottles with compressed gases, has to be eliminated. For complicated missions detailed instructions are needed in order to handle specific risks. In a group discussion different people with pertinent knowledge has to value which problematic efforts need detailed instruction. Missions that have to be analyzed in a work group as above are: fire may affect the reactor safety, fire that may threaten the structural integrity, chemical discharge with big consequence on environment/third person and handling of gas system (compressed

  15. Intelligent Pilot Aids for Flight Re-Planning in Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Ockerman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    an immediately understandable manner, and in a manner that would allow the pilot to modify an automatically-generated route and/or detect any inappropriate elements in an automatically-generated route. Likewise, a flight simulator study examined different cockpit systems for the relative merits of providing pilots with any of a variety of automated functions for emergency flight planning. The results provide specific guidance for the design of such systems.

  16. Selection of bioaccumulation criteria for environmental emergency (E2) planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketcheson, K.; Hradecky, K.; Gagne, M.; St-Amant-Verret, M.

    2006-01-01

    Environment Canada's Environmental Emergency regulations require the evaluation of a substance by a Risk Evaluation Framework (REF). Bioaccumulation criteria are used within the environmental hazard ratings section of the REF to determine the risk of a substance to organisms and are obtained from 3 types of measurements depending on data reliability: (1) bioaccumulation factors (BAF); (2) bioconcentration factors (BCF); and (3) an octanol-water partition coefficient (log K ow ). This paper presented details of a study of international and regional bioaccumulation criteria conducted to aid in determining appropriate criteria for E2 regulations and plans, with specific reference to substances toxic to aquatic organisms. An E2 plan is required if a substance has a bioconcentration factor of more than 500 in conjunction with aquatic toxicity. Bioaccumulation criteria from several sources for 745 substances were obtained to aid in choosing the most important parameters. Various international and regional criteria were examined and corresponding sources were summarized, and different source criteria was compared with empirical chemical data. The criteria chosen included both log K ow values and BCF values, although it was suggested that BCF and BAF are more realistic measures of bioaccumulation than log K ow , as they are derived from animal studies. The chosen values agreed with the virtual elimination criteria set out by the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) 1999 as well as United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. It was concluded that the bioaccumulation criteria for E2 planning will help Environment Canada ensure the protection of the environment from hazardous substances. 11 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  17. Incorporating emergency evacuation planning, through human reliability analysis, in the risk management of industrial installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Grecco, Claudio H.S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], Email: luquetti@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    An industrial installation presents many risks in the form of the process hazards, such as fire, explosion, gas and radiation release. In these situations, workers may need to evacuate from the work environment as soon as possible. In this case, the emergency evacuation planning is a key element that involves an iterative process to identify the best evacuation routes and to estimate the time required to evacuate the area at risk. The mean aspects for a successful emergency evacuation are influenced by the type of human error and the severity of the initiator event. The aim of this paper is to present a methodological framework for the identification of the performance shaping factors and prediction of human error probabilities of the responsible by the emergency evacuation of the workers in an industrial installation, providing a proactive approach for the allocation of the human factors in the risk assessment of the industrial installation. (author)

  18. Guide for prepare the plan for radiological emergency by the users of ionizing radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Radiological Emergency Plan foresees all the possible radiological accidents with the ionizing sources the entity is using. The measures should be adopted by every factor is supped to take part in the emergencies created. The effectiveness of the guaranteed. THis guide establishes the model for elaborating the radiological Emergency Plans

  19. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)

  20. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)