WorldWideScience

Sample records for emergency response community

  1. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  2. Exploring mHealth Participation for Emergency Response Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Schwartz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the challenges of participation by members of emergency response communities who share a similar condition and treatment, and are called upon to participate in emergency events experienced by fellow members. Smartphones and location-based social networking technologies present an opportunity to re-engineer certain aspects of emergency medical response. Life-saving prescription medication extended in an emergency by one individual to another occurs on a micro level, anecdotally documented. We illustrate the issues and our approach through the example of an app to support patients prone to anaphylaxis and prescribed to carry epinephrine auto-injectors. We address unique participation challenges in an mHealth environment in which interventions are primarily short-term interactions which require clear and precise decision-making and constant tracking of potential participants in responding to an emergency medical event. The conflicting effects of diffused responsibility and shared identity are identified as key factors in modeling participation.

  3. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All water services systems, irrespective of size, location etc., should have emergency response plans (ERPs) to guide officials, stakeholders and consumers through emergencies, as part of managing risks in the water supply system. Emergencies in the water supply system may result from, among other causes, natural ...

  4. Development of emergency response plans for community water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cape), were visited to (i) identify the water service delivery status, methods and possible shared threats/vulnerabilities and risks (ii) identify water services ... Following site visits, an ERP guideline document with associated templates will be developed and workshopped with the selected communities, which will include:.

  5. Community-Based Disaster Management: A Lesson Learned From Community Emergency Response Management in Banyumas, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, A. Y.; Sariffuddin, S.

    2018-02-01

    This article aimed to review community-based disaster management in terms of its independent coordination and disaster management. Community resilience was tested during disaster emergency. While panic, the community is required to be viable and able to evacuate, manage logistic, collect data on damage and the victim, and coordinate with outsiders independently. The community in Gununglurah Village, Banyumas Regency which was hit by a landslide in 2015 provides a lesson learned about community based disaster management. This research used qualitative descriptive methodology with in-depth interview with 23 informants from the community, donor institution, village officers, and government officers. Through traditional and informal methods, the community implemented disaster management that was categorized into 3 mechanisms that were social, functional, and sequential mechanism. These mechanisms controlled different portion in which social mechanism holds the most important role in disaster management, then functional mechanism and sequential mechanism. Various community activities in the village equipped the community with organizational experience to manage logistic, human resource and other coordination. In 2007, in fact, there was vulnerability risk assessment done by the local government, which recommended efforts to be done by the community to reduce the disaster risk, yet it was not implemented. It was interesting to note that in spite of the independent disaster management there was a scientific assessment neglected. Based on this research, a new discussion on how to synchronize the endogenous knowledge with scientific modern knowledge was opened.

  6. Assessing the integration of health center and community emergency preparedness and response planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineman, Nicole V; Braun, Barbara I; Barbera, Joseph A; Loeb, Jerod M

    2007-11-01

    To assess the state of health center integration into community preparedness, we undertook a national study of linkages between health centers and the emergency preparedness and response planning initiatives in their communities. The key objectives of this project were to gain a better understanding of existing linkages in a nationally representative sample of health centers, and identify health center demographic and experience factors that were associated with strong linkages. The objectives of the study were to gain a baseline understanding of existing health center linkages to community emergency preparedness and response systems and to identify factors that were associated with strong linkages. A 60-item questionnaire was mailed to the population of health centers supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Bureau of Primary Health Care in February 2005. Results were aggregated and a chi square analysis identified factors associated with stronger linkages. Overall performance on study-defined indicators of strong linkages was low: 34% had completed a hazard vulnerability analysis in collaboration with the community emergency management agency, 30% had their role documented in the community plan, and 24% participated in community-wide exercises. Stronger linkages were associated with experience responding to a disaster and a perception of high risk for experiencing a disaster. The potential for health centers to participate in an integrated response is not fully realized, and their absence from community-based planning leaves an already vulnerable population at greater risk. Community planners should be encouraged to include health centers in planning and response and centers should receive more targeted resources for community integration.

  7. Chemical Safety: Emergency Response Community Views on the Adequacy of Federally Required Chemical Information

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... To help protect communities from incidents involving hazardous chemicals, local emergency responders need information such as the types of chemicals used or stored at facilities in their communities...

  8. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant's operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ''onsite'' response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world's collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously

  9. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

  10. [Consciousness and abilities on health emergency and the roles of emergency response among public at the communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Dong, Xao-mei; Wang, Sheng-yong; Tian, Jun-zhang; Ye, Ze-bing; Yang, Jian; Li, Guan-ming; Peng, Lin; Zhang, Si-heng

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the consciousness of health emergency and the abilities on self- and mutual medical aids among the public at the community level, as well as the community responses on health-related emergencies and other factors. Random equidistant sampling method was used to extract 617 households before choosing a family member sampled by Kish Grid method. All the members were investigated face to face on a questionnaire-"Health emergency and related ability regarding self and mutual medical aids of the residents". Data were entered into computer database by using software Epi Data 3.1 and were analyzed by SPSS 21.0. Among the 617 households under survey, 47.84% of the public had general awareness on health-related emergencies. Regarding the following items as:prevention and isolation strategies of infectious disease, on safely procedures of earthquake and fires, on prevention of food poisoning, on prevention and first aid of emerging infectious diseases etc., the rates of awareness were 65.04%, 62.92%, 43.62% and 18.79% respectively. Proportions of households which had the first aid supplies were:first aid medicine box as 56.08%; fire extinguisher as 43.60%; spare water and food as 39.40%; having facilities as ropes, whistles and smoke masks for escape were all less than 15%. Rates of awareness on the following items as: correct use of gas switch as 81.52%, knowing the location of the circuit with gear and the fire hydrant as 74.39% and 35.98% , respectively. The correct disposal rates of the residents on the following items were:electric shock and falls (89.63%), patients of infectious diseases (83.31%), gas poisoning (82.98%), suspected symptoms on infectious diseases(82.66%), explosion and burns (66.78%), scald (62.72%)and sprain (57.05%). Scores on the related abilities were as follows: emergency(7.65, out of 10 points), escape(3.55, out of 5 points), self- and mutual medical aids (10.71, out of 16 points). Proportions of having learned and applied of first aid

  11. Evaluation of the Emergency Education Response for Syrian Refugee Children and Host Communities in Jordan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Culbertson, S.; Ling, T.; Henham, M.L.; Corbett, J.; Karam, R.; Pankowska, P.K.P.; Saunders, C.L.; Bellasio, J.; Baruch, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Emergency Education Response Programme (EER), launched by UNICEF, the Government of Jordan and partners in 2012, aims to provide free public formal education, as well as safe and appropriate supportive educational services, for Syrian refugee children living in Jordan. RAND's evaluation

  12. Emerging Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Communities of practice are emerging as an innovative approach to faculty development. While collaborative learning is becoming popular in the classroom, autonomy and individualism continue to dominate the culture of higher education for faculty. However, as we begin to recognize that old solutions to new problems are no longer effective, there is…

  13. Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training of High-Risk Teens in the Community of Watts, South Los Angeles, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossey, Shamika; Sylvers, Sharon; Oksuzyan, Sona; Smith, Lisa V; Frye, Douglas; Family, Leila; Scott, Jannah; King, Jan B

    2017-10-01

    The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) concept was initially developed for adult members of the community to help prepare for disasters and minimize damage when disasters occur. CERTs also served as a tool for building community capacity and self-sufficiency by supporting a diverse group of people working together in dealing with challenges affecting their communities. The novel approach to CERTs described here sought to involve high-risk youth from low-socioeconomic status communities in CERTs and first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to help them build ties with communities, stay off the streets, and become leaders in the community. It also helped to provide different perspectives on life, while building more resilient communities better prepared to minimize damage when a disaster strikes. After the successful launch of the first high-risk teen CERT cohort in Watts (27 CERT-trained and 14 first aid/CPR-trained), the project was expanded to other community groups and organizations. Seven additional cohorts underwent CERT and first aid/CPR training in 2013 through 2014. This initiative increased CERT visibility within South Los Angeles. New partnerships were developed between governmental, nongovernmental, and community-based organizations and groups. This model can be used to expand CERT programs to other communities and organizations by involving high-risk teens or other high-risk groups in CERT training. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:605-609).

  14. The complexities of elder homelessness, a shifting political landscape and emerging community responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyea, Judith G; Mills-Dick, Kelly; Bachman, Sara S

    2010-10-01

    Despite their growing numbers, homeless older adults remain largely invisible in society and there has been a pervasive lack of public focus on elder homelessness. In this article, we seek to shine light on this forgotten population and deepen understanding of difficult challenges they confront in regaining housing security. We also examine the shifting political climate regarding homelessness, particularly the enactment and subsequent reauthorizations of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, and how these shifts are influencing community responses to elder homelessness. Finally, future challenges and policy directions for breaking the cycle of elder homelessness in the U.S. are discussed.

  15. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.

    1996-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, it became painfully obvious to the international community that there was an urgent need to establish a system for the coordination of international disaster assistance. It became the task of the United Nations Office for Disaster Relief (UNDRO) to develop such a system. The former UNDRO was subsumed into the Department of Humanitarian Affairs (DHA), established in January 1992 on the basis of UN General Assembly Resolution 46/182 adopted in December 1991, and the disaster relief system presently found in DHA is a further evolution of the system established by UNDRO. One particular importance in relation to nuclear accidents is the fact that UNDRO and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) signed a Memorandum of Understanding defining their respective responsibilities and the need for cooperation in case of accidents involving the unintentional release of nuclear radiation. In essence, the MOU makes it clear that the responsibilities of the IAEA, in connection with accidents at Nuclear Power Plants, related to the technical and radiological aspects, in particular to accident prevention, to the on-site preparedness, and to remedial measures within the 30-km zone outside the NPP. DHA's responsibilities, on the other hand, relate to the general preparedness and the rescue efforts outside the 30 km zone. In this respect, the preparedness and emergency response system is no different from the system employed in any other type of sudden-onset emergency

  16. The Tokyo subway sarin attack: disaster management, Part 1: Community emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, T; Suzuki, K; Fukuda, A; Kohama, A; Takasu, N; Ishimatsu, S; Hinohara, S

    1998-06-01

    The Tokyo subway sarin attack was the second documented incident of nerve gas poisoning in Japan. Prior to the Tokyo subway sarin attack, there had never been such a large-scale disaster caused by nerve gas in peacetime history. This article provides details related to how the community emergency medical services (EMS) system responded from the viewpoint of disaster management, the problems encountered, and how they were addressed. The authors' assessment was that if EMTs, under Japanese law, had been allowed to maintain an airway with an endotracheal tube or use a laryngeal mask airway without physician oversight, more patients might have been saved during this chemical exposure disaster. Given current legal restrictions, advanced airway control at the scene will require that doctors become more actively involved in out-of-hospital treatment. Other recommendations are: 1) that integration and cooperation of concerned organizations be established through disaster drills; 2) that poison information centers act as regional mediators of all toxicologic information; 3) that a real-time, multidirectional communication system be established; 4) that multiple channels of communication be available for disaster care; 5) that public organizations have access to mobile decontamination facilities; and 6) that respiratory protection and chemical-resistant suits with gloves and boots be available for out-of-hospital providers during chemical disasters.

  17. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  18. Emergence in pelagic communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Reynolds

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Pelagic systems, those based on the open waters of large lakes and seas, provide excellent opportunities for ecological study. This is because, the vastness of the oceans apart, pelagic ecosystems operate on short space and time scales. This affords important opportunities to study the emergence of ecosystems and the basis of striking high-order patterns of ecosystem behaviour. The essay seeks an outline of the processes by which the biologies of individual organisms - the largest functional, controlled units in the ecosystem - interact and bias the outcomes in favour of particular network structures recognised by ecologists. Populations build, communities assemble, ecosystems function but always in ways that relate to the match between the adaptations and performances of individual species and the capacities of the environments in which they find themselves. The paper attempts to discern the linkages between the biology of individual and the ways that ecosystems are put together, between organisms and organisation. Drawing on the advantages of absolutely short generation times among the producers, consumers and heterotrophs of the pelagic, I seek to sample the ascendant pathways of ecosystem synthesis, noting the energetic decisions which select for particular outcomes. However, the simple organisational state of many pelagic communities reminds us that ascendancy is frequently restrained by a scarcity of resources and tempered by the frequent intervention of abiotic factors. The presentation does not seek to prove any point about systems: it attempts to re-affirm what is known about organisational hierarchies; then, using approximate quantities, the points of bifurcation between alternative organisational structures are nominated; drawing upon suppositions about the dissipation of energy, the organisational underpinning of function at the level of the whole ecosystem is proposed. Corroboration from observations from the real world is sought

  19. OEM Emergency Response Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management retains records of all incident responses in which it participates. This data asset includes three major sources of information:...

  20. Evaluating Community Pharmacy Responses About Levonorgestrel Emergency Contraception by Mystery Caller Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Tracey A; Rafie, Sally; Clark, Porsche D; Carroll, Aaron E; Miller, Elizabeth

    2018-02-21

    Since restrictions on nonprescription sales were removed in 2013, levonorgestrel emergency contraception (EC) should be available without a prescription at pharmacies for consumers of all genders and ages. Using mystery callers, we assessed variations in availability of and access to EC. In 2015-2016, three sets of mystery callers (two female physicians, two adolescent females, and two adolescent males) each called all licensed retail pharmacies in five U.S. cities using standardized call scripts. Scripts assessed same-day availability and subsequent access to EC for 17-year-olds. Data on various characteristics of calls were collected and compared by caller type. Among the 993 pharmacies called, same-day availability for EC was approximately 80%, with no differences by caller types (p = .34). However, 10.7% of calls made by the adolescent male caller and 8.3% made by the adolescent female caller resulted in incorrectly being told they could not obtain EC based on age, compared to only 1.6% of calls made by the physician (p < .01). Pharmacy staff stated correctly that EC was available over-the-counter more often to adolescent male callers (62.0%) than adolescent females (51.6%) or female physicians (57%) (p < .01). Physicians were more likely to be placed on hold, talk to a pharmacist, or be transferred to a pharmacist (p < .01) than adolescents. Persistent barriers to accessing EC exist for adolescents despite regulatory changes to make EC available over-the-counter, especially for females. Additional work to remove these barriers is needed to assure timely access for those who require effective pregnancy prevention. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Emergency response strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrilo, D.; Dias de la Cruz, F.

    1984-01-01

    In the present study is estimated, on the basis of a release category (PWR4) and several accident scenarios previously set up, the emergency response efficacy obtained in the application of different response strategies on each of the above mentioned scenarios. The studied strategies contemplate the following protective measures: evacuation, shelter and relocation. The radiological response has been obtained by means of CRAC2 (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) code, and calculated in terms of absorbed dose equivalent (Whole body and thyroid), as well as early and latent biological effects. (author)

  2. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures

  3. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

  4. Evaluating Emergency Response Solutions for Sustainable Community Development by Using Fuzzy Multi-Criteria Group Decision Making Approaches: IVDHF-TOPSIS and IVDHF-VIKOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junling Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emergency management is vital in implementing sustainable community development, for which community planning must include emergency response solutions to potential natural and manmade hazards. To help maintain such solution repository, we investigate effective fuzzy multi-criteria group decision making (FMCGDM approaches for the complex problems of evaluating alternative emergency response solutions, where weights for decision makers and criteria are unknown due to problem complexity. We employ interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy (IVDHF set to address decision hesitancy more effectively. Based on IVDHF assessments, we develop a deviation maximizing model to compute criteria weights and another compatibility maximizing model to calculate weights for decision makers. Then, two ideal-solution-based FMCGDM approaches are proposed: (i by introducing a synthesized IVDHF group decision matrix into TOPSIS, we develop an IVDHF-TOPSIS approach for fuzzy group settings; (ii when emphasizing both maximum group utility and minimum individual regret, we extend VIKOR to develop an IVDHF-VIKOR approach, where the derived decision makers’ weights are utilized to obtain group decision matrix and the determined criteria weights are integrated to reflect the relative importance of distances from the compromised ideal solution. Compared with aggregation-operators-based approach, IVDHF-TOPSIS and IVDHF-VIKOR can alleviate information loss and computational complexity. Numerical examples have validated the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  5. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  6. NOAA Emergency Response Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is in response to natural disasters. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The majority...

  7. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L.

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig

  8. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L. (UNESA, Madrid (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig.

  9. First Response to Medical Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manisah Saedon; Sarimah Mahat; Muhamad Nurfalah Karoji; Hasnul Nizam Osman

    2015-01-01

    Accident or medical emergencies, both minor and critical, occurs each day and can happen in any workplace. In any medical emergencies, time is a critical factor because the first person to arrive at the scene of an accident has a key role in the rescue of a victim. With the knowledge of some common medical procedures and emergency actions, this first responder can make a positive contribution to the welfare of the accident victim. In some cases, this contribution can make difference between life and death. Improper response to medical emergencies by an untrained person can result in worsen injuries or death. Therefore, first aids training are necessary to provide the information. (author)

  10. Community response to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  11. Coordinating International Response to Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bice, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    Pandemic disease, natural disasters and terrorism can affect thousands of people in a relatively short period of time anywhere in the world. Our recent international experience with hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis and infectious diseases (AIDS, TB and highly pathogenic avian influenza) show us that we must respond with a coordinated approach or we will fail the very people we intend to help. Nations from around the world are often eager to send assistance to the site of a disaster, but coordinating the incoming aid is more often flawed and imprecise than it must be in order to save lives and mitigate suffering. How can any one country, suffering from a horrendous calamity coordinate the incoming aid from around the world? Can any one agency hope to coordinate the myriad nation's response let alone that of the hundreds of non-governmental organizations? Currently, the answer is sadly, no. The purpose of this presentation is not to recommend one over the many international bodies which claim to oversee humanitarian assistance; the purpose of this presentation is to discuss the elements of only one aspect of the overall response effort: public health and medical response coordination. Public health response is of course different than a purely medical response. Traditionally, in a natural disaster, immediate public health concerns center around water, sewerage/waste disposal, potential for disease outbreaks, etc, whereas medical response concentrates on triage, saving those who can be saved, patching up the injured, and to a lesser extent, primary care to the survivors. In order to avoid political controversy, this presentation will use the example of Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii, September 1992, to illustrate key concepts. The State of Hawaii is no stranger to natural disasters. Their emergency response mechanisms are well honed, exercised and quite capable. However, the local community leaders on Kauai Island went thru each of the following phases before they

  12. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  13. Radiological emergency response planning in Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The most important aspect of emergency preparedness is to recognize and accept the fact that there exists a potential for a problem or a condition and that it requires some attention. Emergency plans should be sufficiently flexible so as to accommodate the emergency situation as it unfolds. Of the several emergency responses that may be taken following a nuclear power plant accident evacuation evokes the greatest attention and discussion as to whether it is truly a feasible option. Movements of people confined to mass care facilities or on life support systems involve special requirements. The Three Mile Island accident has been the most studied nuclear incident in the history of the nuclear power reactor industry. The findings of these reports will have a major influence on nuclear power issues as they are addressed in the future. The question remains as to whether the political leadership will be willing to provide the resources required by the emergency plan. Future safety and emergency response to nuclear accidents depend upon Government and industry acting responsibly and not merely responding to regulations. The Three Mile Island accident has had some beneficial side effects for the emergency management community. It has: increased the level of awareness and importance of emergency planning; served as a catalyst for the sharing of experiences and information; encouraged standardization of procedures; and emphasized the need for identifying and assigning responsibilities. The Emergency Management Organization in responding to a disaster situation does not enjoy the luxury of time. It needs to act decisively and correctly. It does not often get a second chance. Governments, at all levels, and the nuclear power industry have been put on notice as a result of Three Mile Island. The future of nuclear energy may well hang in the balance, based upon the public's perception of the adequacy of preparedness and safety measures being taken. (author)

  14. Towards accurate emergency response behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reactor operator emergency response behavior has persisted as a training problem through lack of information. The industry needs an accurate definition of operator behavior in adverse stress conditions, and training methods which will produce the desired behavior. Newly assembled information from fifty years of research into human behavior in both high and low stress provides a more accurate definition of appropriate operator response, and supports training methods which will produce the needed control room behavior. The research indicates that operator response in emergencies is divided into two modes, conditioned behavior and knowledge based behavior. Methods which assure accurate conditioned behavior, and provide for the recovery of knowledge based behavior, are described in detail

  15. Emerging practices in community development agreements | Loutit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging practices in community development agreements. ... Journal of Sustainable Development Law and Policy (The) ... Community Development Agreements (CDAs) have the potential to facilitate the delivery of tangible benefits from large-scale investment projects, such as mines or forestry concessions, to affected ...

  16. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  17. Emergent biosynthetic capacity in simple microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Chao Chiu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbes have an astonishing capacity to transform their environments. Yet, the metabolic capacity of a single species is limited and the vast majority of microorganisms form complex communities and join forces to exhibit capabilities far exceeding those achieved by any single species. Such enhanced metabolic capacities represent a promising route to many medical, environmental, and industrial applications and call for the development of a predictive, systems-level understanding of synergistic microbial capacity. Here we present a comprehensive computational framework, integrating high-quality metabolic models of multiple species, temporal dynamics, and flux variability analysis, to study the metabolic capacity and dynamics of simple two-species microbial ecosystems. We specifically focus on detecting emergent biosynthetic capacity--instances in which a community growing on some medium produces and secretes metabolites that are not secreted by any member species when growing in isolation on that same medium. Using this framework to model a large collection of two-species communities on multiple media, we demonstrate that emergent biosynthetic capacity is highly prevalent. We identify commonly observed emergent metabolites and metabolic reprogramming patterns, characterizing typical mechanisms of emergent capacity. We further find that emergent secretion tends to occur in two waves, the first as soon as the two organisms are introduced, and the second when the medium is depleted and nutrients become limited. Finally, aiming to identify global community determinants of emergent capacity, we find a marked association between the level of emergent biosynthetic capacity and the functional/phylogenetic distance between community members. Specifically, we demonstrate a "Goldilocks" principle, where high levels of emergent capacity are observed when the species comprising the community are functionally neither too close, nor too distant. Taken together

  18. NRPB emergency response information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, N.A.; Casey, K.

    1993-01-01

    To enhance emergency response management NRPB has introduced an advanced information handling and map display facility. The NRPB Emergency Response Information System (NERIS) provides a central resource which holds, displays and analyses the available information on an accidental release of radioactivity. The bringing together of the commercial tools of computerised map display and database technology, capable of storing geographically referenced information, provided the initial building blocks for the development of NERIS. The rapid manipulation of the large amounts of data used by NERIS is achieved by the use of complex software on powerful computers and a substantial investment of both staff time and resources. The synthesis of these products with the analysis tools under development by NRPB staff will provide a system which will greatly enhance the organisation's emergency response capability. The need to assess the consequences of an accident and give advice on countermeasure strategies and actions will inevitably place high demands on NRPB staff. NERIS will enable a more complete understanding of the situation to be gained and give staff the time and tools to cope effectively with all exigencies. (Author)

  19. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT-CHE

    2011-04-14

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

  20. Urological Emergency Admissions to a Community Hospital: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Sam O.

    1983-01-01

    A one-year study was conducted on the impact of emergency admissions to the 125-bed Southwest Community Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. During the study in 1979, 70 urological emergency room admissions were made, of which 44 (62.8 percent) were males and 26 (37.2 percent) were females. In comparison, 93 admissions were made directly from the private office. The study considered the timeliness of diagnosis and treatment, surgical procedures performed, impact on urological emergency room nursing and medical personnel, physician response to notification, cost containment, and implied legal ramifications and organization structure. Thus, an immediate close scrutiny of urological emergency admission at the nonuniversity affiliated Southwest Community Hospital was permitted. PMID:6876189

  1. The Student Volunteer Army: a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Sally; Mills, Colleen E

    2017-10-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to understanding of the factors associated with an effective emergent emergency response organisation and to provide new insights into this understudied area. It examines, through an analysis of a range of textual resources, the emergence and re-emergence of the Student Volunteer Army (SVA) during the devastating earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand, in 2010-11. This evaluation is conducted in relation to the four key features of an effective emergency response organisation: adaptability; direction; leadership; and communication. In addition, the paper aims to further understanding of 'emergency entrepreneurship' and thus of the values and strategies that underpin social entrepreneur organisations in times of normalcy. The paper concludes that the unique position of the SVA as a 'repeat emergent' emergency response organisation enabled it to innovate continually and to improve repeatedly its systems, relationships, and image, such that it exhibited features common to emergent and established emergency response organisations. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  2. Emergency planning and response preparedness in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martincic, R.; Frlin-Lubi, A.; Usenicnik, B.

    2000-01-01

    Disasters do occur and so do nuclear or radiological accidents. Experience has shown that advance emergency response preparedness is essential in order to mitigate the consequences of an accident. In Slovenia, the Civil Protection Organization is the responsible authority for emergency preparedness and response to any kind of disasters. The Krko Nuclear Power Plant is the only nuclear power plant in Slovenia. To date the plant has operated safely and no serious incidents have been recorded. Slovenia nevertheless, maintains a high level of emergency preparedness, which is reflected in the area of prevention and safety and in the area of emergency response preparedness. The emergency management system for nuclear emergencies is incorporated into an overall preparedness and response system. The paper presents an overview of nuclear or radiological emergency response preparedness in Slovenia and its harmonization with the international guidelines. (author)

  3. LGBT communities are emerging across Africa in 2012. Many are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LGBT communities are emerging across Africa in 2012. Many are emerging in the context of the continents severe HIV epidemic. Homophobia is a barrier to social acceptance and to health and other social services, but African communities are showing reliance.

  4. The IAEA safety standards on emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; McKenna, T.

    1997-01-01

    During the past decade considerable progress has been made in developing internationally recognized principles for decisions on protective measures following accidents involving radioactive materials. Efforts have involved the IAEA, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), World Health Organization (WHO), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Commission of the European Communities (CEC), and Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). Prior to the Chernobyl accident, the Agency had published Safety Series No. 72, which set out guidance on the principles for establishing intervention levels for the protection of the public in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. That guidance was aimed at assisting national and regional authorities having responsibility for emergency response planning. A range of values were given within which it was expected that intervention levels would be specified. It recognized a need for practical quantities that could be readily compared with the results of measurements made in environmental materials and in food stuffs, so-called Derived Intervention Levels (DILs). Shortly after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986, the Agency published Safety Series No. 81, which addressed the principles, procedures, and data needed to establish these DILs

  5. Radiation Emergency Preparedness Tools: Virtual Community Reception Center

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-28

    This podcast is an overview of resources from the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Practical Tools for Radiation Emergency Preparedness. A specialist working with CDC's Radiation Studies Branch describes a web-based training tool known as a Virtual Community Reception Center (vCRC).  Created: 2/28/2011 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Radiation Studies Branch and Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC); Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 2/28/2011.

  6. Emergency Preparedness and Response Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvarez, Maria D

    2006-01-01

    .... Natural and man-made disasters, such as earthquakes, floods, plane crashes, high-rise building collapses, or major nuclear facility malfunctions, pose an ever-present danger challenge to public emergency services...

  7. Adaptive workflow simulation of emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Guido Wybe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Recent incidents and major training exercises in and outside the Netherlands have persistently shown that not having or not sharing information during emergency response are major sources of emergency response inefficiency and error, and affect incident mitigation outcomes through workflow planning

  8. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  9. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  10. Basic data of emergency response centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenieek, O.

    1995-01-01

    Emergency Response Centre (ERC) of Czech Republic is a highly specialized institution belonging to Nuclear Safety State Administration (SONS), which assures its activities both organizationally and technically. Main function of the ERC in the case of nuclear emergency is to fulfil the needs of SONS, Governmental Committee for Nuclear Emergencies in ER (GCNE ER) and the regional organs of State Authorities concerning the emergency planning and preparedness, evaluation of nuclear emergency consequences, including the emergency management and response. In the case of major failure or accident on NPP, the ERC carries out the performance analysis and review of a given NPP. It also monitors the dosimetric situation and transfers the recommendation to GCNE ER, Regional Emergency Management Committees and to NPP

  11. Use of Emergency Ultrasound in Arizona Community Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Richard; Wyman, Michael T; Hernandez, Nicholas C; Guisto, John A; Adhikari, Srikar

    2017-05-01

    Despite the increased educational exposure to point-of-care ultrasound (US) at all levels of medical training, there are utilization gaps between academic and nonacademic emergency department (ED) settings. The purpose of this study was to assess the current practices and potential barriers to the use of point-of-care US in nonacademic EDs throughout the state of Arizona. We conducted a cross-sectional study. An online questionnaire was electronically sent to all nonacademic EDs in Arizona. The survey consisted of questions regarding demographics, current practice patterns, policies, interdepartmental agreements, and perceptions regarding the use of point-of-care US. Seventy nonacademic EDs were identified for inclusion in our study, and 58 EDs completed the survey, which represented an 83% response rate. Seventy-eight percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 67%-89%) perform or interpret point-of-care US examinations for patient care. The 3 most common applications of point-of-care US reported by respondents were focused assessment with sonography for trauma, cardiac US examinations, and line placement, and 36% (95% CI, 22%-50%) bill for point-of-care US examinations. At 75% (95% CI, 62%-88%) of EDs, no one is specifically responsible for reviewing point-of-care US examinations for quality assurance, and at 50% (95% CI, 35%-65%), no mechanism exists to archive images. Eighty-three percent (95% CI, 72%-94%) of EDs think that their groups will benefit from the American College of Emergency Physicians Clinical Ultrasound Accreditation Program. Ultrasound equipment is available in nearly all nonacademic EDs in Arizona. However, it appears that most providers lack US training, credentialing, quality assurance, and reimbursement mechanisms. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

    2011-04-14

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  13. A Tactical Emergency Response Management System (Terms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Emergencies are incidents that threaten public safety, health ... very critical role in responding to an incident. Information systems designed for emergency response operations can provide valuable help for better planning and coordination during .... Object Modeling Technique (OMT) and. Object-Oriented ...

  14. Understanding Public Responses to Emerging Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macnaghten, Philip; Davies, S.R.; Kearnes, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies aimed at understanding public responses to emerging technologies have given limited attention to the social and cultural processes through which public concerns emerge. When probed, these have tended to be explained either in cognitive social psychological terms, typically in the

  15. Humanitarian Intervention: Is it an Emerging Responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    consideration to act independently when there is a threat to national security. Early intervention with diplomatic and economic means should be the first...St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION : IS IT AN EMERGING RESPONSIBILITY? BY COMMANDER KARLYNA L. ANDERSEN...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Humanitarian Intervention : Is it an Emerging Responsibility? 5a

  16. Radiological emergency response - a functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, P.

    1998-01-01

    The state of Louisiana's radiological emergency response programme is based on the federal guidance 'Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants' (NUREG-0654, FEMA-REP-1 Rev. 1). Over the past 14 years, the planning and implementation of response capabilities became more organized and efficient; the training programme has strengthened considerably; co-ordination with all participating agencies has assumed a more co-operative role, and as a result, a fairly well integrated response planning has evolved. Recently, a more 'functional' approach is being adopted to maximize the programme's efficiency not only for nuclear power plant emergency response, but radiological emergency response as a whole. First, several broad-based 'components' are identified; clusters of 'nodes' are generated for each component; these 'nodes' may be divided into 'sub-nodes' which will contain some 'attributes'; 'relational bonds' among the 'attributes' will exist. When executed, the process begins and continues with the 'nodes' assuming a functional and dynamic role based on the nature and characteristics of the 'attributes'. The typical response based on stand-alone elements is thus eliminated, the overlapping of functions is avoided, and a well structured and efficient organization is produced, that is essential for today's complex nature of emergency response. (author)

  17. Emergency Response Resources guide for nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience was this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly from those organizations within the Federal Government. This first revision of that guide broadens the focus of the original document. Also, new information defines the major Federal response facilities. This guide should assist State and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when their resources have been exhausted

  18. Off-site response for radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, J.S.; Oakes, T.W.; Hubbard, H.M.; Hibbitts, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Environmental radiological surveillance under emergency conditions at off-site locations is one of the advisory functions provided by DOE within the ORO jurisdiction. The Department of Environmental Management of ORNL has been requested to provide sampling and analytical assistance at such emergency response activities. We have assembled and identified specific individuals and equipment to provide a rapid response force to perform field measurements for environmental radioactivity releases as a consequence of nuclear accidents. Survey teams for sample collection and field measurements are provided along with analytical assistance to operate the radioactivity measuring equipment in the DOE emergency van

  19. Emergency Response to Radioactive Material Transport Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-shinawy, R.M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Although transport regulations issued by IAEA is providing a high degree of safety during transport opertions,transport accidents involving packages containing radioactive material have occurred and will occur at any time. Whenever a transport accident involving radioactive material accurs, and many will pose no radiation safety problems, emergency respnose actioms are meeded to ensure that radiation safety is maintained. In case of transport accident that result in a significant relesae of radioactive material , loss of shielding or loss of criticality control , that consequences should be controlled or mitigated by proper emergency response actions safety guide, Emergency Response Plamming and Prepardness for transport accidents involving radioactive material, was published by IAEA. This guide reflected all requirememts of IAEA, regulations for safe transport of radioactive material this guide provide guidance to the publicauthorites and other interested organziation who are responsible for establishing such emergency arrangements

  20. 76 FR 72431 - Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... ability of the ORO communities to implement radiological emergency response plans. Lastly, this manual... Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program Manual AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION...-REP- 1, Revision 1 (NUREG-0654), and the Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program Manual (the REP...

  1. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  2. Emergency response in the Newfoundland offshore industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation reviewed current offshore oil activities with respect to safety issues regarding year-round marine operations in a harsh environment. Considerable logistics support is required for all offshore activities, including seismic and geotechnical surveys; exploration and production drilling; well testing; subsea construction; on-site production; and, delivery to market. Response to an offshore emergency must address the urgency of the incident along with stakeholder concerns. This presentation described the different types of emergencies and addressed issues regarding contingency planning; preventative measures; response philosophy; response scope; response at site; emergency management; communications links; and, oil spill response. The following current operations were highlighted: ExxonMobil's production drilling from the gravity-based concrete platform at Hibernia; Petro-Canada's production drilling at the Terra Nova FPSO; Husky Energy's production drilling at White Rose; and Chevron Canada's exploration drilling at the Orphan Basin. It was noted that in an emergency situation, the focus is on the welfare of offshore personnel. On an average day, the total offshore population is in the order of 1000 workers, all registered in the Personnel Logistics System which is updated with the departure of every helicopter from St. John's, Newfoundland or from the offshore platform. It is possible to prepare for foreseeable emergency incidents such as fire, explosion or gas leaks; spills to the marine environment; structural damage or collisions; persons lost at sea; helicopter or support vessel accidents; vessel sinking; sabotage; serious injuries or loss of life; severe ice events; and, loss of well control. The establishment of permanent safety zones at the Hibernia, White Rose and Terra Nova production fields are among the preventative measures, along with standby vessels that provide a rescue service for offshore installations. Supply vessels are also

  3. Post-emergency response resources guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience is this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly those organizations within the federal government. This guide should assist state and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when theirs have been exhausted

  4. Engaging TBR Faculty in Online Research Communities and Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Jasmine

    2017-01-01

    The growing impact of online research communities and emerging technologies is creating a significant paradigm shift and consequently changing the current research landscape of higher education. The rise of online research communities exemplifies a shift from traditional research engagements, to online research communities using "Web…

  5. Integrated simulation of emergency response in disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Taro; Furuta, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    An integrated simulation system of emergency response in disasters is under development that can consider various factors of disasters, such as disaster phenomena, activities of response organizations, resident behavior, and their environment. The aim of this system is to provide support for design and assessment of disaster management systems. This paper introduces the conceptual design of the entire system and presents simulators of organizational behavior in nuclear and earthquake disasters. (author)

  6. Radioactive materials transportation emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmali, N.

    1987-05-01

    Ontario Hydro transports radioactive material between its nuclear facilities, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at Chalk River Laboratories and Radiochemical Company in Kanata, on a regular basis. Ontario Hydro also occasionally transports to Whiteshell Laboratories, Hydro-Quebec and New Brunswick Electric Power Commission. Although there are stringent packaging and procedural requirements for these shipments, Ontario Hydro has developed a Radioactive Materials Transportation Emergency Response Plan in the event that there is an accident. The Transportation Emergency Response plan is based on six concepts: 1) the Province id divided into three response areas with each station (Pickering, Darlington, Bruce) having identified response areas; 2) response is activated via a toll-free number. A shift supervisor at Pickering will answer the call, determine the hazards involved from the central shipment log and provide on-line advice to the emergency worker. At the same time he will notify the nearest Ontario Hydro area office to provide initial corporate response, and will request the nearest nuclear station to provide response assistance; 3) all stations have capability in terms of trained personnel and equipment to respond to an accident; 4) all Ontario Hydro shipments are logged with Pickering NGS. Present capability is based on computerized logging with the computer located in the shift office at Pickering to allow quick access to information on the shipment; 5) there is a three tier structure for emergency public information. The local Area Manager is the first Ontario Hydro person at the scene of the accident. The responding facility technical spokesperson is the second line of Corporate presence and the Ontario Hydro Corporate spokesperson is notified in case the accident is a media event; and 6) Ontario Hydro will respond to non-Hydro shipments of radioactive materials in terms of providing assistance, guidance and capability. However, the shipper is responsible

  7. Emergency response for cyber infrastructure management

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, Cynthia E.; Levin, Timothy E.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate architectural mechanisms to provide an emergency response capability for Cyber Infrastructure management through the use of distributed, highly secure, protected domains. Instead of creating a costly physically separate cyber domain, logical separation is used. This work developed an architecture and prototype demonstration in the context of an open source operating system.

  8. L-007: Objectives preparation and Emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This lecture explains the preparation and response in a nuclear and radiological emergency. Must be taken into consideration a program of preparedness, the public health and environment protection, propagation of contamination limit, first aid and treatment radiation damage, the stochastic, psychological and physical effects reduction

  9. A methodology to respond to emergency situations - emergency response guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierard, A.; Contratto, R.J.; Prokopovich, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The world-wide operating record of nuclear power plants, including the accident at Three Mile Island, has demonstrated the adequacy of inherent design features. At the same time, experience has led to the development of emergency response guidelines adequately structured to the needs of operating staff. An uniquevocal indication of an actual or potential emergency condition, i.e. reactor trip or emergency safety injection actuation, is used to enter the diagnostic procedure. Pertinent plant conditions are evaluated systematically. If an event can be diagnosed, the operator is directed to the appropriate optimal recovery guideline. These guidelines enable the operator to bring the plant to a stable and safe status (e.g. cold shutdown). Independently of the course of events, the operating staff proceeds with the monitoring of the critical safety functions. These are defined as that set of functions which protect the integrity of the physical barriers against radiation release. A systematic review of the plant condition is efficiently and accurately accomplished by use of critical safety function status trees. Challenges to critical safety functions identified with the status trees are treated in accordance with a series of function restoration guidelines. They are written to restore a lost function (requiring prompt, possibly drastic action) or to minimize the effects of a minor challenge. (author)

  10. Emerging Challenges for Community Colleges. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Pam

    This digest is drawn from the spring 2002 issue of New Directions for Community Colleges, titled "Next Steps for the Community College." It summarizes three overlapping challenges facing colleges in the coming decade: educating a more diverse student body, assessing student outcomes, and maintaining the educated workforce needed to meet…

  11. Short radiological emergency response training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.D.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of a radiological emergency response training program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the health physics and safety training staff. This course is given to groups from local, county, state, and federal agencies and industrial organizations. It is normally three days in length, although the structure is flexible to accommodate individual needs and prior training. An important feature of the course is an emergency exercise utilizing a short lived radionuclide to better simulate real accident conditions. Groups are encouraged to use their own instruments to gain better familiarity with their operating characteristics under field conditions. Immediately following the exercise, a critical review of the students' performance is conducted

  12. Emergency response in the Newfoundland offshore industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dempsey, J. [Cormorant Ltd., St. John' s, NL (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This presentation reviewed current offshore oil activities with respect to safety issues regarding year-round marine operations in a harsh environment. Considerable logistics support is required for all offshore activities, including seismic and geotechnical surveys; exploration and production drilling; well testing; subsea construction; on-site production; and, delivery to market. Response to an offshore emergency must address the urgency of the incident along with stakeholder concerns. This presentation described the different types of emergencies and addressed issues regarding contingency planning; preventative measures; response philosophy; response scope; response at site; emergency management; communications links; and, oil spill response. The following current operations were highlighted: ExxonMobil's production drilling from the gravity-based concrete platform at Hibernia; Petro-Canada's production drilling at the Terra Nova FPSO; Husky Energy's production drilling at White Rose; and Chevron Canada's exploration drilling at the Orphan Basin. It was noted that in an emergency situation, the focus is on the welfare of offshore personnel. On an average day, the total offshore population is in the order of 1000 workers, all registered in the Personnel Logistics System which is updated with the departure of every helicopter from St. John's, Newfoundland or from the offshore platform. It is possible to prepare for foreseeable emergency incidents such as fire, explosion or gas leaks; spills to the marine environment; structural damage or collisions; persons lost at sea; helicopter or support vessel accidents; vessel sinking; sabotage; serious injuries or loss of life; severe ice events; and, loss of well control. The establishment of permanent safety zones at the Hibernia, White Rose and Terra Nova production fields are among the preventative measures, along with standby vessels that provide a rescue service for offshore installations

  13. Generic procedures for medical response during a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical resource for planning the medical response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. Effective medical response is a necessary component of the overall response to nuclear or radiological (radiation) emergencies. In general, the medical response may represent a difficult challenge for the authorities due to the complexity of the situation, often requiring specialized expertise, and special organizational arrangements and materials. To be effective, adequate planning and preparedness are needed. This manual, if implemented, should help to contribute to coherent international response. The manual provides the practical tools and generic procedures for use by emergency medical personnel during an emergency situation. It also provides guidance to be used at the stage of preparedness for development of medical response capabilities. The manual also addresses mass casualty emergencies resulting from malicious acts involving radioactive material. This part was supported by the Nuclear Security Fund. The manual was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, it must be reviewed and revised as part of the planning process to match the potential accidents, threats, local conditions and other unique characteristics of the facility where it may be used

  14. Siren system installed to alert campus community to emergency events

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Tech is installing a system of warning sirens to alert the campus community to emergency events. The first test of the siren system is scheduled to occur on Wednesday, April 19, at 12:10 p.m.

  15. Measures of Rehospitalization, Emergency Room Visit, and Community Discharge

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Measures of the Rate of Rehospitalization, Emergency Room Visit, and Community Discharge for Medicare Beneficiaries. These rates are based on Medicare claims data.

  16. USGS Emergency Response and the Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. K.; Lamb, R.

    2013-12-01

    Remotely sensed datasets such as satellite imagery and aerial photography can be an invaluable resource to support the response and recovery from many types of emergency events such as floods, earthquakes, landslides, wildfires, and other natural or human-induced disasters. When disaster strikes there is often an urgent need and high demand for rapid acquisition and coordinated distribution of pre- and post-event geospatial products and remotely sensed imagery. These products and images are necessary to record change, analyze impacts, and facilitate response to the rapidly changing conditions on the ground. The coordinated and timely provision of relevant imagery and other datasets is one important component of the USGS support for domestic and international emergency response activities. The USGS Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) serves as a single, consolidated point-of-access for relevant satellite and aerial image datasets during an emergency event response. The HDDS provides data visibility and immediate download services through a complementary pair of graphical map-based and traditional directory-based interfaces. This system allows emergency response personnel to rapidly select and obtain pre-event ('baseline') and post-event emergency response imagery from many different sources. These datasets will typically include images that are acquired directly by USGS, but may also include many other types of images that are collected and contributed by partner agencies and organizations during the course of an emergency event response. Over the past decade, USGS Emergency Response and HDDS have supported hundreds of domestic and international disaster events by providing critically needed pre- and post-event remotely sensed imagery and other related geospatial products as required by the emergency response community. Some of the larger national events supported by HDDS have included Hurricane Sandy (2012), the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (2010), and Hurricane

  17. Value of the internet in emergency response.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzenberg, C. L.; Newsom, D. E.; Swietlik, C. E.

    1999-05-26

    Can the Internet be of value in emergency response? The answer is yes, judging by its use in the Kobe earthquake in Japan in 1995, ice storms in the US and Canada in 1998, and other disasters. Current and future areas of application are numerous, including exchanging messages, documents, and data files via e-mail; accessing operational data on-line; visualizing events via photos and maps; providing backup communications in lieu of broadcast media, exchanging information between crisis managers and responders; and providing information to media and the public. However, the Internet has some drawbacks, such as hardware/software requirements, computer literacy requirements, traffic jams, dependence on power and communication networks, and risks to information integrity and security. This paper examines some of the advantages, drawbacks, concerns, and potential uses of the Internet for emergency response.

  18. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site

  19. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) emergency response system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998)

  20. Responsibility modelling for civil emergency planning

    OpenAIRE

    Sommerville, Ian; Storer, Timothy; Lock, Russell

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to analysing and understanding civil emergency planning based on the notion of responsibility modelling combined with HAZOPS-style analysis of information requirements. Our goal is to represent complex contingency plans so that they can be more readily understood, so that inconsistencies can be highlighted and vulnerabilities discovered. In this paper, we outline the framework for contingency planning in the United Kingdom and introduce the notion of respons...

  1. Emergency response packaging: A conceptual outline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, R.E.; McClure, J.D.; Bennett, P.C.; Wheeler, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Packaging and Transportation Needs in the 1990's (PATN) component of the Transportation Assessment and Integration (TRAIN) program (DOE Nov. 1991) was designed to survey United States Department of Energy programs, both ongoing and planned, to identify needs for packaging and transportation services over the next decade. PATN also identified transportation elements that should be developed by the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (DOE EM) Transportation Management Program (TMP). As a result of the predominant involvement of the TMP in radioactive material shipment issues and DOE EM's involvement with waste management issues, the primary focus of PATN was on waste packaging issues. Pending DOE regulations will formalize federal guidelines and regulations for transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials within the boundaries of DOE reservations and facilities and reflect a growing awareness of concern regarding safety environmental responsibility activities on DOE reservations. Future practices involving the transportation of radioactive material within DOE reservations will closely parallel those used for commercial and governmental transportation across the United States. This has added to the perceived need for emergency recovery packaging and emergency response features on primary packaging, for both on-site shipments and shipments between DOE facilities (off-site). Historically, emergency response and recovery functions of packaging have not been adequately considered in packaging design and construction concepts. This paper develops the rationale for emergency response packaging, including both overpack concepts for repackaging compromised packaging and primary packaging redesign to facilitate the recovery of packages via mobile remote handling equipment. The rationale will examine concepts for determination of likely use patterns to identify types of shipments where recovery packaging may have the most favorable payoff

  2. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-04-08

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site.

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility Agreements Model for Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate Social Responsibility Agreements Model for Community Development: The Case of Golden Star (Bogoso/Prestea) Limited and its Mine Local Community. ... of making voluntary contributions towards community development to making sustainable community development an integral part of the mining business.

  4. Challenges During a Chlorine Gas Emergency Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bryan E; Duncan, Mary Anne; King, Sallyann C; Hunter, Candis; Ruckart, Perri; Orr, Maureen F

    2016-08-01

    A chlorine gas release occurred at a poultry processing plant as a result of an accidental mixing of sodium hypochlorite and an acidic antimicrobial treatment. We evaluated the public health and emergency medical services response and developed and disseminated public health recommendations to limit the impact of future incidents. We conducted key informant interviews with the state health department; local fire, emergency medical services, and police departments; county emergency management; and representatives from area hospitals to understand the response mechanisms employed for this incident. After being exposed to an estimated 40-pound chlorine gas release, 170 workers were triaged on the scene and sent to 5 area hospitals. Each hospital redistributed staff or called in extra staff (eg, physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists) in response to the event. Interviews with hospital staff emphasized the need for improved communication with responders at the scene of a chemical incident. While responding, hospitals handled the patient surge without outside assistance because of effective planning, training, and drilling. The investigation highlighted that greater interagency communication can play an important role in ensuring that chemical incident patients are managed and treated in a timely manner. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:553-556).

  5. An emergency response centre (ERC) for the preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Abani, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the requirement for a state of the art Emergency Response Centre (ERC) to be developed and kept in readiness for the quick response to any nuclear or radiological emergencies. For an effective response to any major nuclear emergency an ERC having the facilities of i) environmental dose rate monitoring network established using both mobile and fixed units ii) on-line meteorological data collection and information station iii) on-line computation and prediction of isodose curves in real time and iv) properly developed and tested monitoring methodologies are essential. Vehicles with on-line data transfer facility to the ERC and equipped with different type of monitoring systems can function as Mobile Monitoring Laboratories (MMLs) and can help in quick decision making even during a radiological emergency far away from the ERC. (author)

  6. Emergence of communities and diversity in social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Cao, Shinan; Shen, Zhesi; Zhang, Boyu; Wang, Wen-Xu; Cressman, Ross; Stanley, H Eugene

    2017-03-14

    Communities are common in complex networks and play a significant role in the functioning of social, biological, economic, and technological systems. Despite widespread interest in detecting community structures in complex networks and exploring the effect of communities on collective dynamics, a deep understanding of the emergence and prevalence of communities in social networks is still lacking. Addressing this fundamental problem is of paramount importance in understanding, predicting, and controlling a variety of collective behaviors in society. An elusive question is how communities with common internal properties arise in social networks with great individual diversity. Here, we answer this question using the ultimatum game, which has been a paradigm for characterizing altruism and fairness. We experimentally show that stable local communities with different internal agreements emerge spontaneously and induce social diversity into networks, which is in sharp contrast to populations with random interactions. Diverse communities and social norms come from the interaction between responders with inherent heterogeneous demands and rational proposers via local connections, where the former eventually become the community leaders. This result indicates that networks are significant in the emergence and stabilization of communities and social diversity. Our experimental results also provide valuable information about strategies for developing network models and theories of evolutionary games and social dynamics.

  7. Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response - IPLER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodacek, A.; Boyd, D. L.; van Aardt, J.; Renschler, C. S.; McKeown, D. M.; Collins, H.; Duvvuri, S.; Pillai, A. H.

    2009-12-01

    The three-tiered disaster management approach, disaster planning, disaster response and disaster recovery, is ripe for innovation through integrated knowledge and technology transfer efforts between university researchers, technology companies, and public sector responders. We have formed a partnership, the Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response or IPLER, dedicated to innovation in disaster management by the appropriate application of remote sensing and geospatial technologies. The mission of the IPLER is to create a technology, policy, and business development incubator to facilitate interaction and innovation among university researchers, private sector service and product providers, and public sector emergency response decision makers. Our initial demonstration projects involve flood and wildland fire mapping. The initial results highlight the utility of integrated multispectral imaging and lidar sensing with terrain and hydrologic modeling for managing areas affected by the 2009 flooding of Cattaraugus Creek, NY, USA. Additionally, our processing flow for multispectral (mid- and longwave IR) remote sensing data of wildfire is an example of near realtime transformation of imaging data into simplified information products for use in wildland fire response.

  8. Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, J.

    1991-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has begun implementation of the Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) to upgrade its ability to acquire data from nuclear power plants in the event of an emergency at the plant. ERDS provides a direct real-time transfer of data from licensee plant computers to the NRC Operations Center. The system has been designed to be activated by the licensee during an emergency which has been classified at an ALERT or higher level. The NRC portion of ERDS will receive the data stream, sort and file the data. The users will include the NRC Operations Center, the NRC Regional Office of the affected plant, and if requested the States which are within the ten mile EPZ of the site. The currently installed Emergency Notification System will be used to supplement ERDS data. This report provides the minimum guidance for implementation of ERDS at licensee sites. It is intended to be used for planning implementation under the current voluntary program as well as for providing the minimum standards for implementing the proposed ERDS rule. 4 refs., 3 figs

  9. Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, J.

    1990-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has begun implementation of the Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) to upgrade its ability to acquire data from nuclear power plants in the event of an emergency at the plant. ERDS provides a direct real-time transfer of data from licensee plant computers to the NRC Operations Center. The system has been designed to be activated by the licensee during an emergency which has been classified at an ALERT or higher level. The NRC portion of ERDS will receive the data stream, sort and file the data. The users will include the NRC Operations Center, the NRC Regional Office of the affected plant, and if requested the States which are within the ten mile EPZ of the site. The currently installed Emergency Notification System will be used to supplement ERDS data. This report provides the minimum guidance for implementation of ERDS at licensee sites. It is intended to be used for planning implementation under the current voluntary program as well as for providing the minimum standards for implementing the proposed ERDS rule

  10. Chemical toxicity approach for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the event of an airborne release of chemical agent or toxic industrial chemical by accidental or intentional means, emergency responders must have a reasonable estimate of the location and size of the resulting hazard area. Emergency responders are responsible for warning persons downwind of the hazard to evacuate or shelter-in-place and must know where to look for casualties after the hazard has passed or dissipated. Given the same source characterization, modern hazard assessment models provide comparable concentration versus location and time estimates. Even urban hazard assessment models often provide similar predictions. There is a major shortcoming, though, in applying model output to estimating human toxicity effects. There exist a variety of toxicity values for non-lethal effects ranging from short-term to occupational to lifetime exposures. For health and safety purposes, these estimates are all safe-sided in converting animal data to human effects and in addressing the most sensitive subset of the population. In addition, these values are usually based on an assumed 1 hour exposure duration at constant concentration and do not reflect either a passing clouds concentration profile or duration. Emergency responders need expected value toxicity parameters rather than the existing safe-sided ones. This presentation will specify the types of toxicity values needed to provide appropriate chemical hazard estimates to emergency responders and will demonstrate how dramatically their use changes the hazard area.(author)

  11. Achieving reliable communication in dynamic emergency responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipara, Octav; Plymoth, Anders N; Liu, Fang; Huang, Ricky; Evans, Brian; Johansson, Per; Rao, Ramesh; Griswold, William G

    2011-01-01

    Emergency responses require the coordination of first responders to assess the condition of victims, stabilize their condition, and transport them to hospitals based on the severity of their injuries. WIISARD is a system designed to facilitate the collection of medical information and its reliable dissemination during emergency responses. A key challenge in WIISARD is to deliver data with high reliability as first responders move and operate in a dynamic radio environment fraught with frequent network disconnections. The initial WIISARD system employed a client-server architecture and an ad-hoc routing protocol was used to exchange data. The system had low reliability when deployed during emergency drills. In this paper, we identify the underlying causes of unreliability and propose a novel peer-to-peer architecture that in combination with a gossip-based communication protocol achieves high reliability. Empirical studies show that compared to the initial WIISARD system, the redesigned system improves reliability by as much as 37% while reducing the number of transmitted packets by 23%.

  12. Global approach of emergency response, reflection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco Garcia, E.; Garcia Ahumada, F.; Albaladejo Vidal, S.

    1998-01-01

    The emergency response management approach must be dealt with adequately within company strategy, since a badly managed emergency situation can adversely affect a company, not only in terms of asset, but also in terms of the negative impact on its credibility, profitability and image. Thereby, it can be said that there are three main supports to manage the response in an emergency situation. a) Diagnosis b) Prognosis. c) Communications. To reach these capabilities it is necessary a co-ordination of different actions at the following levels. i. Facility Operation implies Local level. ii. Facility Property implies National level iii. Local Authority implies Local level iv. National Authority implies National level Taking into account all the last, these following functions must be covered: a) Management: incorporating communication, diagnosis and prognosis areas. b) Decision: incorporating communication and information means. c) Services: in order to facilitate the decision, as well as the execution of this decision. d) Analysis: in order to facilitate the situations that make easier to decide. e) Documentation: to seek the information for the analysts and decision makers. (Author)

  13. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  14. IAEA emergency response network ERNET. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-04-01

    The Parties to the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have undertaken to co-operate among themselves and with the IAEA in facilitating the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, and in minimizing the consequences and in protecting life, property and the environment from the effects of any radioactive releases. As part of the IAEA strategy for supporting such co-operation, the Secretariat of the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. This manual sets out the criteria and requirements to be met by ERNET teams. It is intended for use by institutions in Member States in developing, applying and maintaining their emergency response capabilities and in implementing quality assurance programmes within the context of ERNET. The manual is worded on the assumption that a State Competent Authority designated as the body responsible for reacting to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies which occur outside the jurisdiction of that State will be the State Contact Point for receiving requests for assistance from the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency

  15. Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.A.; Bowman, D.R.; Tighe, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situations often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use or non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with the instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air monitoring are discussed

  16. Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.A.; Bowman, D.R.; Tighe, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situation often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use of non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air conditioning are discussed

  17. Emergence of community doubts at Plymouth, Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island affected the attitudes not only of residents in the immediate vicinity of Middletown, Pennsylvania, but also of citizens in other communities that hosted nuclear plants. This chapter describes the evolution of public attitudes toward nuclear power in the town of Plymouth, Massachusetts, from the time plans for the construction of the Pilgrim-1 plant were announced in 1967 until after the accident at Three Mile Island in March 1979. The ideas developed here arose from three summers of anthropological fieldwork in Plymouth. This study includes a review of the social science literature on nuclear-power plant sitings, interviews with town officials and utility-company representatives, a content analysis of articles in the local newspaper, collection of demographic and other social statistics, attendance at public hearings and town meetings, and interviews with Plymouth citizens

  18. Cyberspace Versus Citizenship: IT and emerging non space communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Little

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1964 Melvin Webber challenged the notions of community and centrality used in urban studies by demonstrating that "community without propinquity" was emerging within certain social networks. He argued that individuals were enmeshed in an overlapping range of groups, and that increasingly these social networks were not limited by physical or geographical location. His definition of community acknowledges a differentiated range of "non-place" cultures. It reflects a change to a process, rather than product oriented view of urban form, triggered in part by the influence of general systems theory. Webber influenced and was influenced by the emergence of an orientation towards non-physical aspects of community, and a participatory approach to design which emerged strongly during the seventies. Reexamination of Webber's work in the light of current information technology offers some insight into the nature of the globalisation of the world economy, and consequent impacts on nationality and sovereignty. The technologies that will be commonplace by the end of the century can both empower and disempower and it will be necessary to reconsider our current notions of both citizenship and of access to and control of such crucial resources. Opportunities offered by IT for marginalised or peripheral groups, whether at the level of nation, region or local community, will challenge existing definitions of centre and periphery. The moral panics surrounding such activities as "hacking" and its supporting "cyberpunk" sub culture demonstrate a growing awareness of the importance of emerging non-space communities.

  19. Medical Response in Radiation Emergency in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, M.A.; Tadic, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    According to the Nuclear Federal Law No. 24804, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. ARN has a system for intervention in radiological -and nuclear emergencies with a primary intervention group, which is on duty in weekly shifts all year round. This paper aims at describing the system as implemented at present. The Emergency Medical System has been developed into three levels: Level I: local emergency services. This level includes triage (conventional and radiological), first-aid care, and first management of contaminated victims Level II: emergency departments of local general hospitals that are in charge of performing a second triage by a biomedical approach, the treatment of conventional and/or radiocombined injuries and completing decontamination as necessary. In this way the initial triage is completed by a physical examination, timing and severity of prodromal signs and symptoms, sequential blood counts and serum enzymatic levels that allow a first-stage dosimetric approach at this level. Victims requiring higher complexity assistance shall be transferred to third-level hospitals. Level III: three central reference hospitals (Hospital Naval 'Pedro Mallo', Hospital de Quemados from Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires and Hospital Britanico de Ciudad de Buenos Aires) capable of providing healthcare for diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination constitute this level. An educational program for medical and paramedical responders is regularly carried out at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been drawn up. Research and development of new strategies for first medical response, diagnosis and treatment of radiation

  20. Medical response in radiation emergency in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Marina A.; Tadic, Maria M.

    2008-01-01

    According to the Nuclear Federal Law Nr. 24804, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. ARN has a system for intervention in radiological -and nuclear emergencies with a primary intervention group, which is on duty in weekly shifts all year round. This paper aims at describing the system as implemented at present. The Emergency Medical System has been developed into three levels: Level I: local emergency services. This level includes triage (conventional and radiological), first-aid care, and first management of contaminated victims. Level II: Emergency departments of local general hospitals that are in charge of performing a second triage by a biomedical approach, the treatment of conventional and/or radio-combined injuries and completing decontamination as necessary. In this way the initial triage is completed by a physical examination, timing and severity of prodromal signs and symptoms, sequential blood counts and serum enzymatic levels that allow a first-stage dosimetric approach at this level. Victims requiring higher complexity assistance shall be transferred to third-level hospitals. Level III: three central reference hospitals (Hospital Naval 'Pedro Mallo', Hospital de Quemados from Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires and Hospital Britanico de Ciudad de Buenos Aires) capable of providing health care for diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination constitute this level. An educational program for medical and paramedical responders is regularly carried out at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been drawn up. Research and development of new strategies for first medical response, diagnosis and treatment of radiation

  1. Contraceptive availability during an emergency response in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Sascha R; Kourtis, Athena P; Curtis, Kathryn M; Tepper, Naomi; Gorman, Susan; Jamieson, Denise J; Zotti, Marianne; Barfield, Wanda

    2013-03-01

    This article provides the evidence for contraceptive need to prevent unintended pregnancy during an emergency response, discusses the most appropriate types of contraceptives for disaster situations, and details the current provisions in place to provide contraceptives during an emergency response.

  2. Updating Dosimetry for Emergency Response Dose Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCair, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an update to the 1992 Protective Action Guides (PAG) Manual. The PAG Manual provides guidance to state and local officials planning for radiological emergencies. EPA requested public comment on the proposed revisions, while making them available for interim use by officials faced with an emergency situation. Developed with interagency partners, EPA's proposal incorporates newer dosimetric methods, identifies tools and guidelines developed since the current document was issued, and extends the scope of the PAGs to all significant radiological incidents, including radiological dispersal devices or improvised nuclear devices. In order to best serve the emergency management community, scientific policy direction had to be set on how to use International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60 age groups in dose assessment when implementing emergency guidelines. Certain guidelines that lend themselves to different PAGs for different subpopulations are the PAGs for potassium iodide (KI), food, and water. These guidelines provide age-specific recommendations because of the radiosensitivity of the thyroid and young children with respect to ingestion and inhalation doses in particular. Taking protective actions like using KI, avoiding certain foods or using alternative sources of drinking water can be relatively simple to implement by the parents of young children. Clear public messages can convey which age groups should take which action, unlike how an evacuation or relocation order should apply to entire households or neighborhoods. New in the PAG Manual is planning guidance for the late phase of an incident, after the situation is stabilized and efforts turn toward recovery. Because the late phase can take years to complete, decision makers are faced with managing public exposures in areas not fully remediated. The proposal includes quick-reference operational guidelines to inform re-entry to

  3. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the emergency response laws and regulations in place in the various states within the southern region for use by legislators, emergency response planners, the general public and all persons concerned about the existing legal framework for emergency response. SSEB expects to periodically update the report as necessary. Radiation protection regulations without emergency response provisions are not included in the summary

  4. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.K.; Chester, R.O.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response

  5. Some Qualitative Requirements for Testing of Nuclear Emergency Response Robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Heungseop; Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Youngsoo; Jeong, Kyungmin

    2014-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is carrying out the project 'Development of Core Technology for Remote Response in Nuclear Emergency Situation', and as a part of the project, we are studying the reliability and performance requirements of nuclear emergency response robots. In this paper, we described some qualitative requirements for testing of nuclear emergency response robots which are different to general emergency response robots. We briefly introduced test requirements of general emergency response robots and described some qualitative aspects of test requirements for nuclear emergency response robots. When considering an immature field-robot technology and variety of nuclear emergency situations, it seems hard to establish quantitative test requirements of these robots at this time. However, based on studies of nuclear severe accidents and the experience of Fukushima NPP accident, we can expect some test requirements including quantitative ones for nuclear emergency response robots

  6. FirstAED emergency dispatch, global positioning of community first responders with distinct roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Finn Lund; Schorling, Per; Hansen, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    their roles in a team structure to reduce response times, ensure citizens' safety and offer equal possibility of early defibrillation. First aid is provided by community first responders who use their smartphone. FirstAED global positioning system (GPS)-tracks the nine nearby first responders and enables......FirstAED is a supplement to the existing emergency response systems. The aim is to shorten the community first responder response times at emergency calls to below five minutes in a bridge connected island area. FirstAED defines a way to dispatch the nearby three first responders and organise...... the emergency dispatcher to send an organised team of three first responders with distinct roles to the scene automatically. During the first 24 months the FirstAED system was used 718 times. Three first responders arrived in ∼89% of the cases, and they arrived before the ambulance in ∼94% of the cases. First...

  7. Automated data system for emergency meteorological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, C.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant (SRP) releases small amounts of radioactive nuclides to the atmosphere as a consequence of the production of radioisotopes. The potential for larger accidental releases to the atmosphere also exists, although the probability for most accidents is low. To provide for emergency meteorological response to accidental releases and to conduct research on the transport and diffusion of radioactive nuclides in the routine releases, a series of high-quality meteorological sensors have been located on towers in and about SRP. These towers are equipped with instrumentation to detect and record temperature and wind turbulence. Signals from the meterological sensors are brought by land-line to the SRL Weather Center-Analysis Laboratory (WC-AL). At the WC-AL, a Weather Information and Display (WIND) system has been installed. The WIND system consists of a minicomputer with graphical displays in the WC-AL and also in the emergency operating center (EOC) of SRP. In addition, data are available to the system from standard weat []er teletype services, which provide both routine surface weather observations and routine upper air wind and temperature observations for the southeastern United States. Should there be an accidental release to the atmosphere, available recorded data and computer codes would allow the calculation and display of the location, time, and downwind concentration of the atmospheric release. These data are made available to decision makers in near real-time to permit rapid decisive action to limit the consequences of such accidental releases. (auth)

  8. Emergency responses for accounting and security systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Materials Management recognizes the need to be in a position to provide assistance to the Nuclear Industry, both private and government, in the event of a safeguards incident. In recognition of that need, the Executive Committee established an ad hoc Public Information/Response Committee. The committee was given the charter of developing ''an inventory/directory of INMM expertise and capabilities for (1) providing public information, education, consultation and expert assistance when and as requested and (2) for responding appropriately to new developments (whether abrupt, emergency or gradually evolving) within our area of expertise.'' In this paper, the development of the inventory is described and its use illustrated by postulated diversion scenarios

  9. Technical information management in an emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.; Greve, C.; Best, R.G.; Phillipson, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Through many experiences in responding to real radiation accidents and emergency response exercises, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a technical information management system that will be used in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in the event of a major radiological accident. The core of the system is the Data Center in the FRMAC, utilizing a computerized database of all off-site environmental radiological data. The information contained and managed by the Data Center will be comprehensive, accountable, and traceable, providing information to the assessors for immediate health and safety needs as well as for long-term documentation requirements. A DOE task force has been formed to develop compatibility guidelines for video, automated data processing, and communication systems. An electronic mail, information status, and bulletin board system is also being developed to assist in the dissemination of information. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offer a giant step forward in displaying and analyzing information in a geographically referenced system

  10. Community intervention for the emerging epidemic of non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community intervention for the emerging epidemic of non-communicable diseases. Thandi Puoane, Hazel Bradley, Gail Hughes. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition Vol. 19(2) 2006: 56-62. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  11. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.; Aaltonen, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A large number of different national plans and procedures have been established and substantial resources allocated world wide with varying comprehensiveness and quality depending an the national requirements and the possible threat scenarios considered. These national plans are only to a small degree harmonized. It is clear that it is the responsibility of the authorities in the respective countries or utilities under their jurisdiction, to decide upon and implement appropriate response actions to a nuclear emergency. The basic needs for responding properly are: infrastructure in terms of plans, procedures etc.; information regarding the accident, its development and consequences; resources in terms of expertise, man power and tools for acquiring and processing information, making assessments and decisions and carry out the actions. When a large number of countries are making assessments and decisions for their own country and providing the public with information, it is important that assessments, decisions and public information become correct, complete and consistent across boarders. In order to achieve this, they should all have access to the same information as basis for their actions. Lack of information or wrong information could easily lead to wrong assessments, wrong decisions and misleading information to the public. If there is a serious nuclear emergency somewhere that could potentially affect several or many States in one way or another, 'everyone' would like to know 'everything' that happens 'everywhere'. In this case, all States should have the obligation to share with the international community the relevant information they have available themselves and that could be of interest for other States responding to the situation. During a serious nuclear or radiological emergency, the demand for different kinds of resources is huge and could, in many countries, probably exceed national capabilities. Looking at the situation in a global

  12. Emergency response guide for Point Lepreau area residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The design, construction and operating procedures of CANDU nuclear generating stations ensure that an accident causing a significant risk to people living near these stations is extremely unlikely. However, despite the excellent safety record of nuclear stations, it is common practice to prepare an emergency plan for such facilities. In this regard, The New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization is responsible for developing and implementing the Off-Site Emergency Plan for the Point Lepreau Generating Station. Work for the Off-Site Emergency Plan began in 1976 and, under the leadership of N.B.E.M.O., a number of government agencies co-operated in this project. The completed plan thus represents agreement among a number of Province of New Brunswick departments, various community groups, NB Power, and representatives of the Government of Canada. Also, information gathered in the annual door-to-door survey of the Lepreau area enabled government planners to make specialized arrangements such as an extensive warden service, a siren system, and evacuation assistance for the disabled

  13. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the emergency response laws and regulations in place in the various states within the southern region for use by legislators, emergency response planners, the general public and all persons concerned about the existing legal framework for emergency response. SSEB expects to periodically update the report as necessary. Radiation protection regulations without emergency response provisions are not included in the summary. The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ''natural disasters.'' Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic, others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms. State-by-state breakdowns are given for specific states

  14. The Responsive Community (I & We).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzioni, Amitai

    1987-01-01

    Contends that the movement toward individualism in the United States has undercut the legitimacy of the community and public realm. Examines the extreme historical positions of individualists (Whigs) and collectivists (Tories) and argues for a synthesis between the two that invests rights in both the person and society and views individuals and…

  15. Emergency response technical centre of the IPSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallendre, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN), the technical support of the French nuclear safety authority, provides the technical support needed for protect the surrounding population from the consequences of radioactive releases. In the event of an accident arising at a nuclear facility, the IPSN would set up an Emergency Response Technical Centre (CTC) at Fontenay-aux-Roses. The IPSN's objectives are: (a) to diagnose the state of the nuclear facility and monitor its development, (b) to prepare prognosis for the evolution of the accident and to give an estimation of the associated consequences according to the situation evolution, (c) to estimate the risk of radioactive releases and the consequences on man and on the environment, mainly on the basis of weather forecasts and on the prognosis. This diagnosis-prognosis approach is build-up with the information on the state of the installation given by: the concerned site via audio-conference system and telescope, the security panels of the nuclear plant via networks. To perform its missions, the CTC, which has to be both safe and secure, uses multiple telecommunication resources to dialogue with partners and also mapping computer systems, data bases and software tools: (a) the SESAME system, which gives, during an accident of a PWR, a calculation method for the diagnosis-prognosis aforesaid, (b) the CONRAD system, which calculates the atmospheric dispersal of radioactive substances and consequences in the environment in the early phase of an accident, (c) the ASTRAL code, which allows to cope with long lasting situations. In order to be operational, the IPSN expert regularly undergo training in emergency situation management and participate in exercises organised by the government authorities. (author)

  16. Building a year 2000 emergency response plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riopel, P.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation emphasized the importance of developing an emergency plan to minimize any impacts in the event that something may go wrong when the clock changes over at midnight on December 31, 1999. It is usually impossible to anticipate what kinds of emergencies will happen. Planning for emergencies does not have to be an intimidating task. Hazard analysis is a subjective way to investigate what can go wrong, the likelihood of it happening relative to some other potential emergency, and the seriousness of the event. In general, emergency planning for Y2K should not be significantly different from planning for any other type of emergency. Y2K is not the emergency. The events that occur as a consequence of Y2K are. It is these events that should be the focus of a Year 2000 emergency plan

  17. Oil supply security: the emergency response potential of IEA countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This work deals with the oil supply security and more particularly with the emergency response potential of International Energy Agency (IEA) countries. The first part describes the changing pattern of IEA emergency response requirements. It begins with the experience from the past, then gives the energy outlook to 2010 and ends with the emergency response policy issues for the future. The second part is an overview on the IEA emergency response potential which includes the organisation, the emergency reserves, the demand restraint and the other response mechanisms. The third part gives the response potential of individual IEA countries. The last part deals with IEA emergency response in practice and more particularly with the gulf crisis of 1990-1991. It includes the initial problems raised by the gulf crisis, the adjustment and preparation and the onset of military action with the IEA response.(O.L.). 7 figs., 85 tabs

  18. Numerical models and their role in emergency response: a perspective on dispersion modeling for emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenly, G.D.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1983-03-01

    Numerical models on several levels of complexity should be available to the emergency response planner. They are a basic tool but must be used in conjunction with both measurements and experience. When these tools are used in a complimentary fashion they greatly enhance the capability of the consequence manager to respond in an emergency situation. Because each accident or incident develops it's own characteristics and requirements the system must be capable of a flexible response. Interaction and feedback between model results from a suite of models and measurements (including airborne measurements) serve the emergency response planner's spectrum of needs, ranging from planning exercises and emergency precalculations to a real-time emergency response

  19. Community Reaction to Corporate Social Responsibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multinational companies in Zimbabwe initiate and finance community projects through private partnership but the active involvement of beneficiaries in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programmes projects so that the felt needs of local communities are met has been queried. The study sought to analyse school ...

  20. Gender Responsive Community Based Planning and Budgeting ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Gender Responsive Community Based Planning and Budgeting Tool for Local Governance. During the early 1990s, IDRC supported the development and testing of a reliable and cost-efficient tool for monitoring poverty and facilitating local level budgeting: the community-based (poverty) monitoring system (CBMS).

  1. Strengthening Community Land Rights and Responses to ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Strengthening Community Land Rights and Responses to Involuntary Displacement Caused by Development Projects in Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe's economic development blueprint aims to revive the country's economy by attracting greater investment in agriculture, infrastructure, and mining. Development projects in those ...

  2. Medical response guide for the initial phase of a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Marina A.; Perez, Maria del R.

    2007-01-01

    In case of a sanitary emergency, the local community and its health care system are the first aid providers. Therefore, preparedness through education and training programs would allow emergency systems to provide an appropriate first medical response. The main objective of this guide is to give basic guidelines for the medical response management after situations involving radioactive materials, in an easy and simple way. The information contained in this guide is addressed to health care personnel of any local assistance center. (author) [es

  3. Optimal network solution for proactive risk assessment and emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tianxing

    communities on facing unexpected events such as natural disasters, serious accidents, environmental hazards, breakdown of manufacturing network. to set up comprehensive emergency management system including early warning and rescue security system. The optimization model and simulation will also help to validate the feasibility of integrated and coordinated response and full preparedness with the mutual support within the operation network.

  4. Neutron Energy Measurements in Emergency Response Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

    2009-09-11

    We present significant results in recent advances in the measurement of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of importance. At the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) of National Security Technologies, LLC, a series of materials, viz., liquid organic scintillator (LOS), Lithium Gadolinium Borate (LGB) or Li6Gd(BO3)3 in a plastic matrix, a recently developed crystal of Cesium Lithium Yttrium Chloride, Cs2LiYCl6: Ce (called CLYC)[1], and normal plastic scintillator (BC-408) with 3He tubes have been used to study their effectiveness as a portable neutron energy spectrometer. Comparisons illustrating the strengths of the various materials will be provided. Of these materials, LGB offers the ability to tailor its response to the neutron spectrum by varying the isotopic composition of the key constituents (Lithium, Gadolinium [Yttrium], and Boron). All three of the constituent elements possess large neutron capture cross section isotopes for highly exothermic reactions. These compounds of composition Li6Gd(Y)(BO3)3 can be activated by Cerium ions Ce3+. CLYC, on the other hand, has a remarkable gamma response in addition to superb neutron discrimination, comparable to that of Europium-doped Lithium Iodide (6LiI: Eu). Comparing these two materials, CLYC has higher light output (4500 phe/MeV) than that from 6LiI: Eu and shows better energy resolution for both gamma and neutron pulse heights. Using CLYC, gamma energy pulses can be discriminated from the neutron signals by simple pulse height separation. For the cases of both LGB and LOS, careful pulse shape discrimination is needed to separate the gamma energy signals from neutron pulses. Both analog and digital

  5. Community and ecosystem responses to elevational gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Maja K.; Sanders, Nate; Wardle, David A.

    2013-01-01

    elevational gradients for understanding community and ecosystem responses to global climate change at much larger spatial and temporal scales than is possible through conventional ecological experiments. However, future studies that integrate elevational gradient approaches with experimental manipulations...... will provide powerful information that can improve predictions of climate change impacts within and across ecosystems.......Community structure and ecosystem processes often vary along elevational gradients. Their responses to elevation are commonly driven by changes in temperature, and many community- and ecosystem-level variables therefore frequently respond similarly to elevation across contrasting gradients...

  6. Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response: There's An App for That.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Daniel J; Jamison, Nathan K; Martin, Andrew; Delgado, Jose; Kman, Nicholas E

    2015-10-01

    Smartphone applications (or apps) are becoming increasingly popular with emergency responders and health care providers, as well as the public as a whole. There are thousands of medical apps available for Smartphones and tablet computers, with more added each day. These include apps to view textbooks, guidelines, medication databases, medical calculators, and radiology images. Hypothesis/Problem With an ever expanding catalog of apps that relate to disaster medicine, it is hard for both the lay public and responders to know where to turn for effective Smartphone apps. A systematic review of these apps was conducted. A search of the Apple iTunes store (Version 12; Apple Inc.; Cupertino, California USA) was performed using the following terms obtained from the PubMed Medical Subject Headings Database: Emergency Preparedness, Emergency Responders, Disaster, Disaster Planning, Disaster Medicine, Bioterrorism, Chemical Terrorism, Hazardous Materials (HazMat), and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). After excluding any unrelated apps, a working list of apps was formed and categorized based on topics. Apps were grouped based on applicability to responders, the lay public, or regional preparedness, and were then ranked based on iTunes user reviews, value, relevance to audience, and user interface. This search revealed 683 applications and was narrowed to 219 based on relevance to the field. After grouping the apps as described above, and subsequently ranking them, the highest quality apps were determined from each group. The Community Emergency Response Teams and FEMA had the best apps for National Disaster Medical System responders. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had high-quality apps for emergency responders in a variety of fields. The National Library of Medicine's Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER) app was an excellent app for HazMat responders. The American Red Cross had the most useful apps for natural

  7. A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The IAEA has supported several projects for the development of a national response plan for radiological emergencies. As a results, the IAEA has developed a model National Emergency Response Plan for Radiological Accidents (RAD PLAN), particularly for countries that have no nuclear power plants. This plan can be adapted for use by countries interested in developing their own national radiological emergency response plan, and the IAEA will supply the latest version of the RAD PLAN on computer diskette upon request. 2 tabs

  8. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ''natural disasters.'' Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic; others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms

  9. Reducing Flood Impacts for Wellbeing of Arctic Communities through Collaboration among Community and Tribal Leaders, Scientists, and Emergency Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    In Alaska and the Sakha Republic (Siberia), multiple communities are exposed to flooding every spring. A bilateral and multidisciplinary team was established, as part of the U.S. State Department FY2015-16 U.S.-Russia Peer-to-Peer Dialogue Initiative, to conduct the project Reducing Spring Flood Impacts for Wellbeing of Communities of the North. The project comprised community-based participatory research, education, and cultural activities that used flood sites in Alaska and Siberia as case studies. A diverse and bilateral team (community leaders, scientists, students, and emergency managers) was established to share experiences and identify best practices in mitigating the risk of and improving response to floods.This science-community collaboration has inspired a dialogue between present and future decision makers and community residents. Preliminary analysis revealed that community members in both regions are interested in collaborations with scientists to reduce flood risks and impacts. They are eager to share their experiences. However, scientists have to earn the trust of and develop a rapport with local leaders beforehand. Conflicts arise when communities perceive scientists as governmental representatives due to the fact that most scientific funds come from federal and state grants. Scientists are also held responsible for disasters, due to their roles in disaster forecasting and warnings. In both regions, impacted populations often blame the government for flood impacts; not unreasonably. Originally nomadic, native populations were forced to settle in floodplains by governments. Now, exposed to floods, they regard damage reimbursement as a predominantly governmental responsibility. Scientists can offer long-term solutions that would benefit communities at risk and governmental entities. However, it is important for scientists not to impose solutions, but instead initiate and maintain a dialogue about alternatives, especially as sensitive as relocation.

  10. AECB emergency response plan - in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The AECB's mission is to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment. The mission applies before, during and after emergencies

  11. More efficient response to nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    Three documents related to the first volume of this report are presented here. These are a description of the emergency provisions organisation, an analysis of the weaknesses in the present organisation and proposed improvements (with appendices on the information problem in excercises with the emergency provisions at Ringhals and attitudes to tasks connected with evacuation following a power reactor accident) and agreements with Denmark, Finland, Norway and the IAEA for mutual assistance. (JIW)

  12. The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the eThekwini district of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. PR Newton, R Naidoo, P Brysiewicz. Abstract. Introduction. Emergency medical services (EMS) are sometimes required to respond to cases that are later found not to be emergencies, resulting in high ...

  13. Evaluation criteria for emergency response plans in radiological transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, M.K.; Perry, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper identifies a set of general criteria which can be used as guides for evaluating emergency response plans prepared in connection with the transportation of radiological materials. The development of criteria takes the form of examining the meaning and role of emergency plans in general, reviewing the process as it is used in connection with natural disasters and other nonnuclear disasters, and explicitly considering unique aspects of the radiological transportation setting. Eight areas of critical importance for such response plans are isolated: notification procedures; accident assessment; public information; protection of the public at risk; other protective responses; radiological exposure control; responsibility for planning and operations; and emergency response training and exercises. (Auth.)

  14. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, K.E.

    1994-01-01

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel

  15. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  16. Emergency department security programs, community crime, and employee assaults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blando, James D; McGreevy, Katharine; O'Hagan, Emily; Worthington, Karen; Valiante, David; Nocera, Maryalice; Casteel, Carri; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2012-03-01

    Violence against health care workers is a serious occupational health hazard, especially for emergency department (ED) employees. A significant degree of variability in security programs among hospital EDs is present in part due to the absence of federal legislation requiring baseline security features. Nationally, only voluntary guidelines from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for the protection of health care workers exist. The purpose of this study was to examine ED security programs and employee assault rates among EDs with different financial resources, size, and background community crime rates. This cross-sectional survey was conducted among large and small hospitals located in communities with low or high rates of community crime. Hospital financial data were collected through the state health department, and employee assault data were abstracted from hospital OSHA logs. Comparisons were made using a chi-squared or Wilcoxon test. Small hospitals located in towns with low community crime rates implemented the fewest security program features despite having the second highest rate of assault-related OSHA-recordable injuries among ED employees (0.66 per 100,000 staff hours). Due to the highly stressful workplace characteristics of EDs, the risk of employee assault is universal among all hospital sizes in all types of communities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Emergency response training with the BNL plant analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H.S.; Guppy, J.G.; Mallen, A.N.; Wulff, W.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the experience in the use of the BNL Plant Analyzer for NRC emergency response training to simulated accidents in a BWR. The unique features of the BNL Plant Analyzer that are important for the emergency response training are summarized. A closed-loop simulation of all the key systems of a power plant in question was found essential to the realism of the emergency drills conducted at NRC. The faster than real-time simulation speeds afforded by the BNL Plant Analyzer have demonstrated its usefulness for the timely conduct of the emergency response training.

  18. Contraceptive Availability During an Emergency Response in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Sascha R; Kourtis, Athena P; Curtis, Kathryn M; Tepper, Naomi; Gorman, Susan; Jamieson, Denise J; Zotti, Marianne; Barfield, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    This article provides the evidence for contraceptive need to prevent unintended pregnancy during an emergency response, discusses the most appropriate types of contraceptives for disaster situations, and details the current provisions in place to provide contraceptives during an emergency response. PMID:23421580

  19. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies (2012 update)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  20. Development of effective emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    It has been discussed that there were many differences to international standards and the delay for prior planning implementation of unclear emergency preparedness. Therefore, it was necessary to promote the study to take the concept of the international standard to the Guide 'Emergency Preparedness for Nuclear Facilities', and to apply the Precautionary Action Zone (PAZ) etc. as the protective actions procedure. This study was started since the fiscal year 2010 to enhance the effectiveness of the protective actions, which are corresponding to these requirements based on international aspects in the nuclear disaster occurrence. And the study was conducted to introduce the emergency action level (EAL) as decision criteria and to apply urgent protective action considering PAZ, and the results from this study will be used as the basic data necessary to modify and improve the Guide. In order to fulfill the purposes described above, in fiscal year 2011, followings are executed, (1) analysis and verification for basic evacuation area such as the PAZ, (2) analysis with regard to the EAL and prototype of protective actions for public, and (3) analysis with regard to prototype of protective actions for public including evacuation plan. However, taking account of the significance of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, Japanese emergency preparedness strategy should be studied and reconstructed in logically, systematically, and with international standard, but also being based on the reflection of individual lessons from this accident. (author)

  1. Should pediatric emergency physicians be decentralized in the medical community?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Benjamin, Lee; Soriano, Annie R; Ponce, Marie Grace; Baren, Jill

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric emergency physicians (PEPs) are well established as primary emergency department (ED) providers in dedicated pediatric centers and university settings. However, the optimum role of these subspecialists is less well defined in the community hospital environment. This study examined the impact on the ED care of children after the introduction of 10 PEPs into a simulated medical community. A computer-generated community was created, containing 10 community hospitals treating 250,000 pediatric ED patients. Children requiring ED treatment received their care at the closest ED to their location. Ten PEPs were introduced into the community, and their impact on patient care was examined under 2 different models. In a restrictive model, the PEPs established 2 full-time pediatric EDs within the 2 busiest hospitals, whereas, in a distributive model, the PEPs were distributed throughout the 8 busiest hospitals. In the 8-hospital model, the PEPs provided direct patient care along with the general emergency physicians in that facility and also provided educational, administrative, and performance improvement support for the department. In the restrictive model, the PEPs impacted the care of 100% of the children presenting for treatment at their 2 practice sites. In the distributive model, impact included the direct patient care by the PEP but also included changes produced in the care provided by the general emergency physicians at the site. Three different levels of impact were considered for the presence of the PEPs: a low-impact version in which the PEPs' presence only impacted 25% of the children at that site, a moderate-impact version in which the impact affected 50% of the children, and a high-impact version in which the impact affected 75% of the children. A secondary analysis was performed to account for the possibility of patients self-diverting from the closest ED to 1 of the pediatric EDs in the restrictive model. In the restrictive model, the addition of 10

  2. Building communities through performance: emerging approaches to interculturality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Roger

    2009-08-01

    Changing definitions of culture are modifying approaches to intercultural education and training. This paper outlines the principal features of these emerging models for innovation and capacity building in communities. Semiotics provides a theoretical frame for the interdisciplinary analysis of research on cultural competency, especially regarding recent studies on "cultural intelligence", performance and creativity. Interdisciplinary research on cultural literacy is shifting from cultural knowledge to intercultural know-how. This know-how translates into the individual's capacity to innovate and illustrates the influence of culture on individual and group performance. Research on cultural intelligence, performance and creativity provides promising new models for capacity building in communities. These approaches constitute a synthesis of previous research on cultural competency and provide new avenues for innovative social action through intercultural exchange.

  3. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Bagrow

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  4. Community Reaction to Corporate Social Responsibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    Abstract. Multinational companies in Zimbabwe initiate and finance community projects through .... Social responsibility is at present so important that the resources of an ... culture. Right now, under the schools' capacity building programme we are about to finish a classroom block at Tashinga primary school in Macheke.

  5. Identification of the Bacterial Community Responsible for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of bacteria community responsible for decontaminating Eleme petrochemical industrial effluent using 16S PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was determined. Gene profiles were determined by extracting DNA from bacterial isolates and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using ...

  6. Early emergency prognosis and response centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An emergency early warning system for the fourteen nuclear generating units in the country has been developed at the Nuclear Research Institute of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences. All units are connected to the host computer in the emergency center of the State Nuclear Power Authority in Kiew and interconnected with each other. The early warning system is to make another reactor accident of the magnitude of Chernobyl impossible. Installation of the hardware is to begin at the South Ukraine 3 nuclear generating unit in 1997; the costs of the pilot project are estimated at U.S. Dollar 40 million. After subsequent feasibility studies, the software and the hardware may be modified; the early warning system could be in operation countrywide by 1999. (orig.) [de

  7. Generic procedures for assessment and response during a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. Radiological accident assessment must take account of all critical information available at any time and must be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at reviewing the response as more detailed and complete information becomes available. This manual provides the tools, generic procedures and data needed for an initial response to a non-reactor radiological accident. This manual is one out of a set of IAEA publications on emergency preparedness and response, including Method for the Development of Emergency Response Preparedness for Nuclear or Radiological Accidents (IAEA-TECDOC-953), Generic Assessment Procedures for Determining Protective Actions During a Reactor Accident (IAEA-TECDOC-955) and Intervention Criteria in a Nuclear or Radiation Emergency (Safety Series No. 109)

  8. Emergency response and radiation monitoring systems in Russian regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, R.; Osipiyants, I.; Kiselev, V.; Ogar, K; Gavrilov, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Preparedness of the emergency response system to elimination of radiation incidents and accidents is one of the most important elements of ensuring safe operation of nuclear power facilities. Routine activities on prevention of emergency situations along with adequate, efficient and opportune response actions are the key factors reducing the risks of adverse effects on population and environment. Both high engineering level and multiformity of the nuclear branch facilities make special demands on establishment of response system activities to eventual emergency situations. First and foremost, while resolving sophisticated engineering and scientific problems emerging during the emergency response process, one needs a powerful scientific and technical support system.The emergency response system established in the past decade in Russian nuclear branch provides a high efficiency of response activities due to the use of scientific and engineering potential and experience of the involved institutions. In Russia the responsibility for population protection is imposed on regional authority. So regional emergence response system should include up-to-date tools of radiation monitoring and infrastructure. That's why new activities on development of radiation monitoring and emergency response system were started in the regions of Russia. The main directions of these activities are: 1) Modernization of the existing and setting-up new facility and territorial automatic radiation monitoring systems, including mobile radiation surveillance kits; 2) Establishment of the Regional Crisis Centres and Crisis Centres of nuclear and radiation hazardous facilities; 3) Setting up communication systems for transfer, acquisition, processing, storage and presentation of data for participants of emergency response at the facility, regional and federal levels; 4) Development of software and hardware systems for expert support of decision-making on protection of personnel, population

  9. Value Chain Responsibility in Emerging Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Colette; van Lente, Harro

    2014-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) and value chain responsibility (VCR) have gained increasing importance for firms. The literature on these topics reports on CSR practices for established firms with existing technologies and stable value chains. This raises questions about the viability of CSR

  10. Science in Emergency Response at CDC: Structure and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, John; Rose, Dale A; Ghiya, Neelam D

    2017-09-01

    Recent high-profile activations of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) include responses to the West African Ebola and Zika virus epidemics. Within the EOC, emergency responses are organized according to the Incident Management System, which provides a standardized structure and chain of command, regardless of whether the EOC activation occurs in response to an outbreak, natural disaster, or other type of public health emergency. By embedding key scientific roles, such as the associate director for science, and functions within a Scientific Response Section, the current CDC emergency response structure ensures that both urgent and important science issues receive needed attention. Key functions during emergency responses include internal coordination of scientific work, data management, information dissemination, and scientific publication. We describe a case example involving the ongoing Zika virus response that demonstrates how the scientific response structure can be used to rapidly produce high-quality science needed to answer urgent public health questions and guide policy. Within the context of emergency response, longer-term priorities at CDC include both streamlining administrative requirements and funding mechanisms for scientific research.

  11. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  12. More efficient response to nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    A working group was appointed in 1978 to consider the problems which would face the local authorities in the unlikely event of a reactor accident considerably more severe than that foreseen as the basis of the emergency provisions as defined in the parliamentary bill of 1960. The group's report is here presented, together with appendices containing population and meteorological data. This report has been used by the Radiation protection Institute in its evaluations, which are presented in vol. 2 of this report. The views expressed in this report are those of the working group. (JIW)

  13. Emergency response planning for transport accidents involving radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The document presents a basic discussion of the various aspects and philosophies of emergency planning and preparedness along with a consideration of the problems which might be encountered in a transportation accident involving a release of radioactive materials. Readers who are responsible for preparing emergency plans and procedures will have to decide on how best to apply this guidance to their own organizational structures and will also have to decide on an emergency planning and preparedness philosophy suitable to their own situations

  14. Nuclear accident/radiological emergency assistance plan. NAREAP - edition 2000. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Nuclear Accident/Radiological Emergency Assistance Plan (NAREAP) is to describe the framework for systematic, integrated, co-ordinated, and effective preparedness and response for a nuclear accident or radiological emergency involving facilities or practices that may give rise to a threat to health, the environment or property. The purpose of the NAREAP is: to define the emergency response objectives of the Agency's staff in a nuclear accident or a radiological emergency; to assign responsibilities for performing the tasks and authorities for making the decisions that comprise the Agency staff's response to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency; to guide the Agency managers who must ensure that all necessary tasks are given the necessary support in discharging the Agency staff responsibilities and fulfilling its obligations in response to an emergency; to ensure that the development and maintenance of detailed and coherent response procedures are well founded; to act as a point of reference for individual Agency staff members on their responsibilities (as an individual or a team member) throughout a response; to identify interrelationships with other international intergovernmental Organizations; and to serve as a training aid to maintain readiness of personnel. The NAREAP refers to the arrangements of the International Atomic Energy Agency and of the United Nations Security and Safety Section at the Vienna International Centre (UNSSS-VIC) that may be necessary for the IAEA to respond to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, as defined in the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions. It covers response arrangements for any situation that may have actual, potential or perceived radiological consequences and that could require a response from the IAEA, as well as the arrangements for developing, maintaining and exercising preparedness. The implementing procedures themselves are not included in the NAREAP, but they are required

  15. Simulation of Operators' Response in Emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    For the simulation of the accidental course of events in industrial process plants, a model is needed of operators' response to the cues presented by the system. A model is proposed, based on the simplifications which can be made when restricting attention to the operator functions having...... significants for a probabilistic risk analysis, and to only skill and rule based performance, i.e., to responses in the early phase of an accident. The model is based on Brunswik's lens model, a model of the normal task repertoire, and on a taxonomy of human errors. To bring the model in perspective, a review...

  16. Report of the emergency preparedness and response task force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynes, R.R.; Purcell, A.H.; Wenger, D.E.; Stern, P.S.; Stallings, R.A.; Johnson, Q.T.

    1979-10-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) marked the first time in the US when traditional planning for emergencies was applied to a possible radiological emergency. This report examines the planning that existed in the counties surrounding the plant and at the state and federal levels. It also examines the responses of the various governmental units following the initial accident

  17. Report of the Emergency Preparedness and Response Task Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynes, R.R.; Purcell, A.H.; Wenger, D.E.; Stern, P.S.; Stallings, R.A.; Johnson, Q.T.

    1979-10-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) marked the first time in the US when traditional planning for emergencies was applied to a possible radiological emergency. This report examines the planning that existed in the counties surrounding the plant and at the state and federal levels. It also examines the responses of the various governmental units following the initial accident

  18. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2016-10-04

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head James Colson. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only addresses emergency response.

  19. 45 CFR 673.5 - Emergency response plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the event of an emergency, taking into account considerations of risk to human life and safety. ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency response plan. 673.5 Section 673.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANTARCTIC...

  20. Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.; Sinclair, J. [Elon University, Elon, NC (United States). School Community

    2009-07-01

    Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

  1. Simulation of operators' response in emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.

    1986-09-01

    For the simulation of the accidential course of events in industrial process plants, a model is needed of operators' response to the cues presented by the system. A model is proposed, based on the simplifications which can be made when restricting attention to the operator functions having significants for a probabilistic risk analysis, and to anly skill and rule based performance, i.e., to responses in the early phase of an accident. The model is based on Brunswik's lens model, a model of the normal task repertoire, and on a taxonomy of human errors. To bring the model in perspective, a review of the state of the art of cognitive models of human behaviour is included. (author)

  2. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  3. ANS-8.23: Criticality accident emergency planning and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruvost, N.L.

    1991-01-01

    A study group has been formed under the auspices of ANS-8 to examine the need for a standard on nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response. This standard would be ANS-8.23. ANSI/ANS-8.19-1984, Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety, provides some guidance on the subject in Section 10 titled -- Planned Response to Nuclear Criticality Accidents. However, the study group has formed a consensus that Section 10 is inadequate in that technical guidance in addition to administrative guidance is needed. The group believes that a new standard which specifically addresses emergency planning and response to a perceived criticality accident is needed. Plans for underway to request the study group be designated a writing group to create a draft of such a new standard. The proposed standard will divide responsibility between management and technical staff. Generally, management will be charged with providing the necessary elements of emergency planning such as a criticality detection and alarm system, training, safe evacuation routes and assembly areas, a system for timely accountability of personnel, and an effective emergency response organization. The technical staff, on the other hand, will be made responsible for establishing specific items such as safe and clearly posted evacuation evacuation routes and dose criteria for personnel assembly areas. The key to the question of responsibilities is that management must provide the resources for the technical staff to establish the elements of an emergency response effort

  4. The social accountability of doctors: a relationship based framework for understanding emergent community concepts of caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Thompson, Lionel P; McInerney, Patricia; Woollard, Bob

    2017-04-12

    Social accountability is defined as the responsibility of institutions to respond to the health priorities of a community. There is an international movement towards the education of health professionals who are accountable to communities. There is little evidence of how communities experience or articulate this accountability. In this grounded theory study eight community based focus group discussions were conducted in rural and urban South Africa to explore community members' perceptions of the social accountability of doctors. The discussions were conducted across one urban and two rural provinces. Group discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Initial coding was done and three main themes emerged following data analysis: the consultation as a place of love and respect (participants have an expectation of care yet are often engaged with disregard); relationships of people and systems (participants reflect on their health priorities and the links with the social determinants of health) and Ubuntu as engagement of the community (reflected in their expectation of Ubuntu based relationships as well as part of the education system). These themes were related through a framework which integrates three levels of relationship: a central community of reciprocal relationships with the doctor-patient relationship as core; a level in which the systems of health and education interact and together with social determinants of health mediate the insertion of communities into a broader discourse. An ubuntu framing in which the tensions between vulnerability and power interact and reflect rights and responsibility. The space between these concepts is important for social accountability. Social accountability has been a concept better articulated by academics and centralized agencies. Communities bring a richer dimension to social accountability through their understanding of being human and caring. This study also creates the connection between ubuntu and social

  5. Emergency response preparedness analysis for radioactive materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parentela, E.M.; Burli, S.S.; Sathisan, S.K.; Vodrazka, W.C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper evaluates the emergency response capabilities of first responders, specifically fire services, within the state of Nevada. It addresses issues relating to the available emergency responders such as general capabilities, jurisdictions, and response times. Graphical displays of the response units and attribute tables were created using GIS ARC/INFO. These coverages, plus the existing Census Bureau TIGER Files and highway network for the state of Nevada, were utilized to determine approximate service areas of each response unit, population density served by each response unit, population density served by each response unit and the areas that can be served by a response unit for 3, 5, 10, and 30 minutes response times. Results of the analysis enabled identification of the critical areas along the proposed highway route corridor

  6. Community Resilience Education: Lessons Learned from an Emerging Community of Practice - NOAA's Environmental Literacy Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoedinger, S. E.; McDougall, C.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA supports community resilience to extreme weather events, climate change and other environmental hazards by preparing communities through Weather Ready Nation and through programs addressing coastal community needs. These programs primarily target adult decisions makers in a professional capacity (emergency managers, city planners, et al.), leaving non-professional audiences without opportunities to understand and develop the skills to prepare for the threats and vulnerabilities that their communities face. As a result, resilience became the focus of NOAA's Environmental Literacy Grants in 2015. The goal of these investments is to strengthen the public's and/or K-12 students' environmental literacy to enable informed decision-making necessary for community resilience to extreme weather events and other environmental hazards. Funded projects build an understanding of Earth systems and the threats and vulnerabilities that are associated with a community's location, are aligned with existing adaptation/resilience plans, and connect audiences to relevant tools and resources to prepare for and respond to these hazards. These first few years of investment will create new models for how education can improve community resilience. Although these projects incorporate a variety of approaches, a few common themes stand out: empowering youth and adults to increase their understanding of locally relevant natural hazards and stresses; giving youth a voice in resilience planning; and student-led vulnerability assessments of their schools and communities. In this session we will report on the first convening of the principal investigators of our 13 funded projects, which represents the beginning of a new community of practice focused on resilience education. We will specifically share lessons learned about: engaging youth and adults about climate change and resiliency; working with local resilience/adaptation planners; and case studies on the use of NOAA's Digital Coast and

  7. Challenges in designing interactive systems for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten; Nielsen, Esben Toftdahl

    2007-01-01

    and visions as ways to bridge between fieldwork and literature studies on the one hand and the emerging computer based prototypes on the other. Our case concerns design of innovative interactive systems for support in emergency response, including patient identification and monitoring as well as construction......This paper presents research on participatory design of interactive systems for emergency response. We present the work by going through the design method with a focus on the new elements that we developed for the participatory design toolkit, in particular we emphasize the use of challenges...... and maintenance of a situational overview....

  8. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications.

  9. Enabling Communication in Emergency Response Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriel Herrera

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective communication among first responders during response to natural and human-made large-scale catastrophes has increased tremendously during the last decade. However, most efforts to achieve a higher degree of effectiveness in communication lack synergy between the environment and the technology involved to support first responders operations. This article presents a natural and intuitive interface to support Stigmergy; or communication through the environment, based on intuitively marking and retrieving information from the environment with a pointer. A prototype of the system was built and tested in the field, however the pointing activity revealed challenges regarding accuracy due to limitations of the sensors used. The results obtained from these field tests were the basis for this research effort and will have the potential to enable communication through the environment for first responders operating in highly dynamical and inhospitable disaster relief environments.

  10. Emergency Medical Services Professionals’ Attitudes About Community Paramedic Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Steeps

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The number of community paramedic (CP programs has expanded to mitigate the impact of increased patient usage on emergency services. However, it has not been determined to what extent emergency medical services (EMS professionals would be willing to participate in this model of care. With this project, we sought to evaluate the perceptions of EMS professionals toward the concept of a CP program. Methods: We used a cross-sectional study method to evaluate the perceptions of participating EMS professionals with regard to their understanding of and willingness to participate in a CP program. Approximately 350 licensed EMS professionals currently working for an EMS service that provides coverage to four states (Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma were invited to participate in an electronic survey regarding their perceptions toward a CP program. We analyzed interval data using the Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson correlation as appropriate. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to examine the impact of participant characteristics on their willingness to perform CP duties. Statistical significance was established at p ≤ 0.05. Results: Of the 350 EMS professionals receiving an invitation, 283 (81% participated. Of those participants, 165 (70% indicated that they understood what a CP program entails. One hundred thirty-five (58% stated they were likely to attend additional education in order to become a CP, 152 (66% were willing to perform CP duties, and 175 (75% felt that their respective communities would be in favor of a local CP program. Using logistic regression with regard to willingness to perform CP duties, we found that females were more willing than males (OR = 4.65; p = 0.03 and that those participants without any perceived time on shift to commit to CP duties were less willing than those who believed their work shifts could accommodate additional duties (OR = 0.20; p

  11. Spatial data requirements for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time assessments of the consequences resulting from an atmospheric radioactive material. In support of this operation, a system has been created which integrates numerical models, data acquisition systems, data analysis techniques, and professional staff. Components of this system rely to large degree on spatial data of various kinds. Of particular importance is the rapid generation of digital terrain models for any area in the continental U.S. The digital terrain models are used as input to atmospheric models and serve to familiarize assessors to new areas by presenting the terrain surface as a graphical image. In addition, base map data (roads, rivers, political boundaries) must also be supplied as an overlay to ARAC graphical products. A terrain data base and an associated acquisition system have been developed that provide the required terrain data within ten minutes. This terrain data base was derived from the Defense Mapping Ageny's planar data. A digital base map data base is currently being developed from the U.S. Geographical Survey's 1:2,000,000 Digital Line Graph data as well as their Geographic Names Information System. This base map data base improves ARAC's response to its mapping needs anywhere in the continental U.S

  12. IAEA's role in international emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buglova, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this presentation the role of the IAEA in international emergency preparedness and response is reviewed. Experience gained in response to Fukushima accident at all levels (facility, local, national and international) provides valuable input for further enhancing and harmonizing EPR framework.

  13. Analysis of emergency response procedures and air traffic accidents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incessant air transport accidents have been a source of concern to stakeholders and aviation experts in Nigeria, yet the response and process has not been adequately appraised. This study attempts an evaluation of the emergency response procedures in the aviation industry with particular focus on Murtala Muhammed ...

  14. An expert system for improving nuclear emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salame-Alfie, A.; Goldbogen, G.C.; Ryan, R.M.; Wallace, W.A.; Yeater, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The accidents at TMI-2 and Chernobyl have produced initiatives aimed at improving nuclear plant emergency response capabilities. Among them are the development of emergency response facilities with capabilities for the acquisition, processing, and diagnosis of data which are needed to help coordinate plant operations, engineering support and management under emergency conditions. An effort in this direction prompted the development of an expert system. EP (EMERGENCY PLANNER) is a prototype expert system that is intended to help coordinate the overall management during emergency conditions. The EP system was built using the GEN-X expert system shell. GEN-X has a variety of knowledge representation mechanisms including AND/OR trees, Decision trees, and IF/THEN tables, and runs on an IBM PC-XT or AT computer or compatible. Among the main features, EP is portable, modular, user friendly, can interact with external programs and interrogate data bases. The knowledge base is made of New York State (NYS) Procedures for Emergency Classification, NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Plan (REPP) and knowledge from experts of the NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Group and the Office of Radiological Health and Chemistry of the New York Power Authority (NYPA)

  15. Employer Requirements to Work during Emergency Responses: Key Ethics Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Lainie; Taylor, Holly A; Powell, Tia

    2017-03-01

    Local health departments and their employees are at the forefront of emergency preparedness and response. Yet, recent studies have found that some local public health workers are unwilling to report to work in a variety of disaster scenarios. This can greatly compromise a response, as many local health departments need "all hands on deck" to effectively meet increased demands. To address these concerns, local health departments have employed varied policy strategies to ensure that employees do report to work. After describing different approaches taken by local health departments throughout the United States, we briefly identify and explore key ethics considerations that arise for local health departments when employees are required to report to work for emergency responses. We then discuss how these ethics considerations may inform local health department practices intended to promote a robust emergency response.

  16. Wetland Microbial Community Response to Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been proposed as a potential long-term carbon storage solution, with a goal of engineering geochemical dynamics to accelerate peat accretion and encourage greenhouse gas (GHG) sequestration. However, wetland microbial community composition and metabolic rates are poorly understood and their predicted response to wetland restoration is a veritable unknown. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors that shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater tidal marshes to hypersaline ponds in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun metagenomics, coupled with greenhouse gas measurements, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range in salinity and restoration status. Seawater delivers sulfate to wetland ecosystems, encouraging sulfate reduction and discouraging methane production. As expected, we observed the highest rates of methane production in the freshwater wetlands. Recently restored wetlands had significantly higher rates of methane production compared to their historic counterparts that could be attributed to variations in trace metal and organic carbon content in younger wetlands. In contrast, our sequencing results revealed an almost immediate return of the indigenous microbial communities following seasonal flooding and full tidal restoration in saline and hypersaline wetlands and managed ponds. Notably, we found elevated methane production rates in hypersaline ponds, the result of methylotrophic methane production confirmed by sequence data and lab incubations. Our study links belowground microbial communities and their aboveground greenhouse gas production and highlights the inherent complexity in predicting wetland microbial response in the face of both natural and unnatural disturbances.

  17. Medical Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    In almost all nuclear and radiological emergencies, local emergency services (e.g. local medical, law enforcement, and fire brigades) will have the most important role in the early response. Within hours, hospitals may also have an important role to play in the response at the local level. Since nuclear and radiological emergencies are rare, medical responders often have little or no experience in dealing with this type of emergency and inexperience may lead to an inadequate response. For this reason, training in medical preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency is an important aspect of preparedness and response activities. These materials are designed for use at a training course on medical preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency. They contain a wide range of lectures and supporting materials, which cover the basic topics and more specific areas of medical preparedness and response. Therefore, in planning their specific courses, organizers are encouraged to choose those lectures and supportive materials from the CD-ROM that best match their training priorities. Materials on the CD-ROM address the following areas: • Terrorism in Perspective; • Malicious Act Scenarios; • Providing Information to the Medical Community and the Public; • Medical Response to a Radiation Mass Casualty Event; • Handling of Contaminated Persons in Malicious Events; • Planning and Preparedness for Medical Response to Malicious Events with Radioactive Material; • Handling the Bodies of Decedents Contaminated with Radioactive Material; • Radiation Emergencies: Scope of the Problem; • Common Sources of Radiation; • Basic Concepts of Ionizing Radiation; • Basic Concepts of Radiation Protection; • Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation – Basic Notions; • Basics of Radiopathology; • External Radioactive Contamination; • Internal Radioactive Contamination; • Acute Radiation Syndrome; • Cutaneous Radiation

  18. Review on emergency medical response against terrorist attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Wen; Liu, Yao; Jiang, Ming-Min

    2014-01-01

    Terrorism is a global issue and a constant international threat. As a result, anti-terrorism and emergency response strategies are tasks of critical importance that have a direct impact on the national security of every country in the world. This paper reviews new characteristics of international anti-terrorism measures and offers an in-depth reflection on emergency medical response countermeasures; additionally, this paper presents the goals of related research, which include: 1) to present a model of a highly efficient medical response command; 2) to introduce the pre-planning phases of the emergency medical response; 3) to establish a response system capable of handling various types of terror attacks; 4) to promote anti-terrorism awareness to the general public and emphasize its prevention; and 5) to continue basic investigations into emergency medical responses for various types of terrorist attacks (for example, the classifications and characteristics of new injuries, pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of the resultant stress disorders, improved high-efficiency medical response measures and equipment, etc.).

  19. SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

    2006-01-01

    Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release

  20. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  1. Emergency response preparedness: the French experience of large scale exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanson, D.; Desnoyers, B.; Chabane, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In compliance with the IAEA regulations for the transport of radioactive material in the event of accidents during transport of radioactive material, emergency provisions to protect persons, property and environment have to be established and developed by the relevant national organisations. In France, the prefect of the department where the accident occurs is responsible for decisions and measures required to ensure the protection of both population and property at risk owing to the accident. During an accident, the ministers concerned provide the prefect with recommendations and information, in order to help him take the requisite decisions. On their side, the nuclear industry and transport companies also have to be prepared to intervene and to support the authorities at their request, depending on their capacities and their specialities. To prepare the emergency teams properly and acquire effective emergency plans, training exercises have to be conducted regularly with every ministerial department involved, the nuclear industry and transport companies, members of the public and the media. Then, the feedback from such exercises shall be taken into account to improve the emergency procedures. This paper will introduce: - emergency response preparedness: what is required by the relevant regulations? - emergency response preparedness: how is France organised? - the French experience of conducting large training exercises simulating accidents involving the transport of radioactive material; - the main difficulties and lessons learned; - the perspectives

  2. Divergent ecosystem responses within a benthic marine community to ocean acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Kroeker Kristy J; Micheli Florenza; Gambi Maria Cristina; Martz Todd R

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to impact all areas of the oceans and affect a diversity of marine organisms. However, the diversity of responses among species prevents clear predictions about the impact of acidification at the ecosystem level. Here, we used shallow water CO2 vents in the Mediterranean Sea as a model system to examine emergent ecosystem responses to ocean acidification in rocky reef communities. We assessed in situ benthic invertebrate communities in three distinct pH zones ...

  3. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  4. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  5. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  6. Manual for first responders to a radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: June 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, 'first responders shall take all practicable and appropriate actions to minimize the consequences of a nuclear or radiological emergency'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(49)/RES/9, continues to encourage Member States 'to adopt the relevant Agency standards, procedures and practical tools' and underlines 'the need for first responders to have appropriate training for dealing with ionizing radiation during nuclear and radiological emergencies'. This publication is intended to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. Its aim is to provide practical guidance for those who will respond during the first few hours to a radiological emergency (referred to here as 'first responders') and for national officials who would support this early response. It provides guidance in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This report, published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, replaces and builds on IAEA-TECDOC-1162 in the area of early response and first responders' actions. It takes account of the

  7. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  8. Manual for first responders to a radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: October 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, 'first responders shall take all practicable and appropriate actions to minimize the consequences of a nuclear or radiological emergency'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(49)/RES/9, continues to encourage Member States 'to adopt the relevant Agency standards, procedures and practical tools' and underlines 'the need for first responders to have appropriate training for dealing with ionizing radiation during nuclear and radiological emergencies'. This publication is intended to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. Its aim is to provide practical guidance for those who will respond during the first few hours to a radiological emergency (referred to here as 'first responders') and for national officials who would support this early response. It provides guidance in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This report, published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, replaces and builds on IAEA-TECDOC-1162 in the area of early response and first responders' actions. It takes account of the

  9. Communication with the Public in a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide practical guidance for public information officers on the preparation for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency, and to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles, and in IAEA Safety Standards No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, and specifies that 'All practicable steps shall be taken to provide the public with useful, timely, truthful, consistent and appropriate information throughout a nuclear or radiological emergency' in the response phase. It also requires 'responding to incorrect information and rumours; and responding to requests for information from the public and from the news and information media'. This publication provides guidance in the form of action guides and information sheets that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This publication is published as part of the IAEA's Emergency Preparedness and Response series and complements the Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency in the parts related to the tasks of public information officers. It takes

  10. Emerging Infectious Diseases-Global Alert-Global Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASIFUZZAMAN KHAN

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available "Emerging Infectious Diseases-Global Alert-Global Response". When the term 'alert' is used it indicates an emergency and if we do not respond adeptly, catastrophe becomes imminent. The World Health Day theme of 1997 very aptly draws the attention of both, the providers as well as the consumers of health care facilities, to gear up and engage the entire health machinary to combat these emerging infectious diseases. The problem with which we are confronted is not only the emergence of nearly 30 or more infectious diseases, which have surfaced in the recent past but also the resurfacing or re-emergence of certain diseases, which were believed to have declined or been eliminated.Some of these new diseases, which have emerged in many parts of the world can be short listed as: --     Fatal respiratory viral disease-A variant of Creutzfeldt Jacob Disease (CJD resembling Bovine Spongioform Encephalopathy (BSE-HIV infections/AIDS-     Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever-     Legionnaires' disease-Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome by E. Coli 0157 - H7-     Lyme disease-     Hepatitis C and E-     New form of Cholera by Vibrio Cholera 0139-     Emerging food borne diseases-     Emerging zoonosesOther sexually transmitted diseases.'

  11. Emergency planning and response - role nad responsibilities of the regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizamska, M.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a emergency plan and organisation of adequate emergency preparedness in case of radiological accident in NPP cannot be effective without the appropriate preparatory work. In most countries, also in Republic of Bulgaria, several organisations are identified to have a potential role to play in a radiological emergency. For these reason is very important to have a national organisation, with a mandate to organise, inspect and co-ordinate the possibility of ministries and institution to react in case of radiological emergency, i.e. to quarantine the possibility for implementation of adequate counter measure for protection of the population and environment in case of radiological emergency in NPP. For the purposes of the emergency planning and response the NPP operator, ministries and the institutions developed an Emergency plan - NPP Emergency Plan and National Emergency Plan. The development of the emergency plans will be impossible without the good co-operation of the organisations which have a responsibilities in a radiological emergency. Once emergency plans are adopted, each individual organisation, also the NPP operator, must ensure that in can carry out its role effectively in accordance with the emergency plan and can develop the appropriate organisation for action and implementation of protection counter measures. For testing the emergency plans a regular exercise must be organised. Periodic reviews of the plan and modifications, based on actual events and exercise experience must be performed. The main aim of these report is to present the Bulgarian emergency planning organisation and response by explaining the national emergency panning and response legislation, implementation of IAEA recommendations and exercise experience

  12. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response computer models are used to estimate dose following releases of radioactive materials to the environment. Downwind air and ground concentrations and their associated doses from inhalation and ground shine pathways are estimated. The emergency response model (PUFF-PLUME) uses real-time data to track either instantaneous (puff) or continuous (plume) releases. A site-specific ingestion dose model was developed for use with PUFF-PLUME that includes the following ingestion dose pathways pertinent to the surrounding SRS area: milk, beef, water, and fish. The model is simplistic and can be used with existing code output

  13. New Jersey's EMS response to Superstorm Sandy: a case study of the emergency management assistance compact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Terry; Christensen, Kenneth; Cortacans, Henry P

    2014-06-01

    In the United States, understanding the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) is critical to responding to a natural disaster or manmade event. Recently, the State of New Jersey responded to Superstorm Sandy and implemented the EMAC system by requesting ambulances to aid in the Emergency Medical Services response. New Jersey's response to Superstorm Sandy was unprecedented in that this storm affected the entire state and EMS community. New Jersey's EMS community and infrastructure were impacted greatly, despite years of planning and preparation for such an event. Once received, out-of-state EMS resources were integrated into New Jersey's emergency management and EMS systems. In this report, each phase of the EMAC in New Jersey is explored, from how the response was coordinated to how it ultimately was executed. The state coordinated its response on multiple levels and, as such, tested the practical applicability of the EMAC process and employed best practices and solutions to issues that arose. These best practices and solutions may prove invaluable for any state or territory that may activate the EMAC system for emergency medical service resources.

  14. Emergency response information within the National LLW Information Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paukert, J.G.; Fuchs, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, with operational assistance from EG and G Idaho, Inc., maintains the National Low-Level Waste Information Management System, a relational data base management system with extensive information collection and reporting capabilities. The system operates on an IBM 4341 main-frame computer in Idaho Falls, Idaho and is accessible through terminals in 46 states. One of the many programs available on the system is an emergency response data network, which was developed jointly by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. As a prototype, the program comprises emergency response team contacts, policies, activities and decisions; federal, state and local government contacts; facility and support center locations; and news releases for nine reactor sites in the southeast. The emergency response program provides a method for consolidating currently fragmented information into a central and user-friendly system. When the program is implemented, immediate answers to response questions will be available through a remote terminal or telephone on a 24-hour basis. In view of current hazardous and low-level waste shipment rates and future movements of high-level waste, the program can offer needed and timely information for transportation as well as site incident response

  15. Nuclear emergency response planning and preparedness for the HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, J.; Wu, Z.

    2002-01-01

    The 10 MWth high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor (termed HTR-10) went into criticality at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in December 2000. As required by China nuclear safety authorities, we had developed nuclear emergency response plan and relevant technical procedures for the implementation of protective actions should an accident occur. This paper presents the technical basis for the development of the HTR-10 nuclear emergency plan. Firstly, it describes briefly the requirements of the China nuclear safety authorities about the nuclear emergency planning and preparedness for research reactors. Then, the paper focuses on the technical development of initiating conditions (ICs) and emergency action levels (EALs) for HTR-10. The ICs and EALs developed are tabulated in this paper. Finally, a brief presentation about the on-site emergency response exercise carried out before the first fuel loading on HTR-10 and other emergency preparedness activities conducted or being planned are given in this paper. (author)

  16. Oil supply security -- Emergency response of IEA countries 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-29

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf of Mexico in 2005, the region's oil production and refining infrastructure was devastated and world energy markets were disrupted. The International Energy Agency decided in a matter of days to bring 60 million barrels of additional oil to the market. The emergency response system worked - the collective action helped to stabilise global markets. Since its founding in 1974, oil supply security has been a core mission of the IEA and the Agency has improved its mechanisms to respond to short-term oil supply disruptions. Nevertheless, numerous factors will continue to test the delicate balance of supply and demand. Oil demand growth will continue to accelerate in Asia; oil will be increasingly produced by a shrinking number of countries; and capacities in the supply chain will need to expand. These are just a few of the challenges facing an already tight market. What are the emergency response systems of IEA countries? How are their emergency structures organised? How prepared is the IEA to deal with an oil supply disruption? This publication addresses these questions. It presents another cycle of rigorous reviews of the emergency response mechanisms of IEA member countries. The goal of these reviews is to ensure that the IEA stays ready to respond effectively to oil supply disruptions. This publication also includes overviews of how China, India and countries of Southeast Asia are progressing with domestic policies to improve oil supply security, based on emergency stocks.

  17. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head, James Colson. This document is the second of a two-part analysis on Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2016 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2016 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. The 2013 BNA was approved by NNSA’s Livermore Field Office on January 22, 2014.

  18. Emergency response capability for pollutant releases to streams and rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckner, M.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Watts, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Stream-river models have been developed which provide an accurate prediction of normal and accidental pollutant releases to streams and rivers. Stream parameters are being developed for the Savannah River Plant streams and the Savannah River to allow quick response in case of an accidental release of radioactive material. These data are stored on permanent disk storage for quick access via the JOSHUA operating system. This system provides an efficient and flexible emergency response capability for pollutant releases to streams and rivers

  19. 78 FR 44523 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of interim directive; Correction and extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Forest Service is correcting a notice of interim directive that appeared in...

  20. Dose projection for nuclear emergency response on a microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, E.; Mauro, J.; Michlewicz, D.

    1984-01-01

    A set of microcomputer programs were developed to implement the offsite steady-state dose projection calculations given in the Standard Operating Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Response of the Radiologic Health Branch, California Department of Health Services. The dose projection system is intended for training, education and drill exercises for offsite nuclear emergency response staff. The simplicity of use and accuracy would be adequate for use as a back-up calculation to assist in determining emergency response in the event of an actual nuclear emergency. Nuclide release data and current meteorology is input by the user in response to program prompting. The output is specified from the options: (1) doses, dose rates and duration until the Protective Action Guides (PAGs) are exceeded at 2, 5 and 10 miles downwind; (2) dose and dose rates at any specified location; (3) isopleuths plotted on a site map; (4) user-specified isodoses plotted on a site map; (5) isodoses plotted equal to the PAGs. Six site maps to characterize the three current nuclear reactor sites in California can be displayed in full color for the plotting programs. Additional site maps can be added with an available low-cost digitizing tablet. Five separate dose pathways which cover the expected range in critical exposure pathways during a nuclear power plant accident can be calculated or plotted on a selected site map. Some dose projection results are presented, discussed and compared to other simple dose projection methods

  1. The effect of emergency medical services response on outcome of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of emergency medical services response on outcome of trauma laparotomy at a Level 1 Trauma Centre in South Africa. ... Results: A total of 118 patients were admitted to the trauma surgery ward following abdominal trauma. The mechanism was penetrating 101 (85.6%) [stab wounds in 67 (56.8%) and gunshot in ...

  2. Correlates of emergency response interval and mortality from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study to determine the influence of blood transfusion emergency response interval on Mortality from childhood severe anemia was carried out. An admission record of all children with severe anemia over a 5-year period was reviewed. Those who either died before transfusion or got discharged against ...

  3. 47 CFR 0.192 - Emergency Response Interoperability Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency Response Interoperability Center. 0.192 Section 0.192 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION..., industry representatives, and service providers. [75 FR 28207, May 20, 2010] ...

  4. Alaska GRIN project : development of geospatial data management interface for oil spill and emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, S. [Cook Inlet Regional Citizens Advisory Council, Kenai, AK (United States); Robertson, T.L. [Nuka Research and Planning Group LLC, Seldovia, AK (United States); DeCola, E. [Nuka Research and Planning Group LLC, Plymouth, MA (United States)

    2009-07-01

    A geographic response network (GRIN) project was conducted in 2005 to develop a computer-based tool for organizing maps and data related to oil spill and emergency response logistics and community resources. Originally conceived as an html-based website where information was organized based on incident command system divisions of responsibility, open source mapping applications are also being added to crate an interactive map interface with geospatially referenced information. GRIN information is organized by community. A locator map is embedded in the lower right-hand corner of each map. GRIN includes categories of information related to emergency management, air logistics, law enforcement, marine logistics, and shore-side logistics. A project is now being conducted by the Cook Inlet Regional Citizens' Advisory Council to convert the html-based GRIN into a geospatial data management tool. A prototype has now been populated with data for several Cook Inlet communities. GRIN can also be accessed on only computer with an Internet browser. It was concluded that the use of open source programming will make GRIN an easy tool for planners and emergency responders. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Macrophyte Community Response to Nitrogen Loading and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empirical determination of nutrient loading thresholds that negatively impact seagrass communities have been elusive due to the multitude of factors involved. Using a mesocosm system that simulated Pacific Northwest estuaries, we evaluated macrophyte metrics across gradients of NO3 loading (0, 1.5, 3 and 6x ambient) and temperature (10 and 20 °C). Macroalgal growth, biomass, and C:N responded positively to increased NO3 load and floating algal mats developed at 20 ºC. Zostera japonica metrics, including C:N, responded more to temperature than to NO3 loading. Z. marina biomass exhibited a negative temperature effect and in some cases a negative NO3 effect, while growth rate increased with temperature. Shoot survival decreased at 20 ºC but was not influenced by NO3 loading. Wasting disease index exhibited a significant temperature by NO3 interaction consistent with increased disease susceptibility. Community shifts observed were consistent with the nutrient loading hypothesis at 20 ºC, but there was no evidence of other eutrophication symptoms due to the short residence time. The Nutrient Pollution Index tracked the NO3 gradient at 10 ºC but exhibited no response at 20 ºC. We suggest that systems characterized by cool temperatures, high NO3 loads, and short residence time may be resilient to many symptoms of eutrophication. Estuarine systems characterized by cool temperatures, high nutrient loads and rapid flushing may be resilient to some symptoms

  6. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management in rural areas: a case of Rukungiri district, Western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwang, Simon; Najjemba, Robinah; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Orach, Christopher Garimoi

    2012-03-29

    Maternal mortality is a major public health problem worldwide especially in low income countries. Most causes of maternal deaths are due to direct obstetric complications. Maternal mortality ratio remains high in Rukungiri district, western Uganda estimated at 475 per 100,000 live births. The objectives were to identify types of community involvement and examine factors influencing the level of community involvement in the management of obstetric emergencies. We conducted a descriptive study during 2nd to 28th February 2009 in rural Rukungiri district, western Uganda. A total of 448 heads of households, randomly selected from 6/11 (54.5%) of sub-counties, 21/42 (50.0%) parishes and 32/212 (15.1%) villages (clusters), were interviewed. Data were analysed using STATA version 10.0. Community pre-emergency support interventions available included community awareness creation (sensitization) while interventions undertaken when emergency had occurred included transportation and referring women to health facility. Community support programmes towards health care (obstetric emergencies) included establishment of community savings and credit schemes, and insurance schemes. The factors associated with community involvement in obstetric emergency management were community members being employed (AOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.02 - 3.54) and rating the quality of maternal health care as good (AOR = 2.22, 95% CI: 1.19 - 4.14). Types of community involvement in obstetric emergency management include practices and support programmes. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management is influenced by employment status and perceived quality of health care services. Policies to promote community networks and resource mobilization strategies for health care should be implemented. There is need for promotion of community support initiatives including health insurance schemes and self help associations; further community sensitization by empowered community based resource persons rather

  7. The Significance of Community to Business Social Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Terry L.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with 1008 business owners and managers in 30 small Iowa communities found that the majority were committed to their community and provided support to youth programs, local schools, or community development activities. Business social responsibility was related to operator age, education, success, and perceptions of community collective…

  8. The IAEAs incident and emergency centre: the global focal point for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buglova, E.

    2016-01-01

    The continuous use of nuclear power to generate electricity and the continued threat of radioactive materials being used for nefarious reasons reminds us of the importance to stay prepared to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies. Stringent nuclear safety and nuclear security requirements, the training of personnel, operational checks and legal frameworks cannot always prevent radiation-related emergencies. Though these events can range in severity, each has the potential to cause harm to the public, employees, patients, property and the environment. Until the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, there was no international information exchange system. Immediately following that accident, the international community negotiated the so-called Emergency Conventions to ensure that the country suffering an accident with an international transboundary release of radioactive material would issue timely, authenticated information, while the States that could field technical support, would do so in a coordinated fashion. The Conventions also place specific legal obligations on the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) with regard to emergency preparedness and response. (Author)

  9. The IAEAs incident and emergency centre: the global focal point for nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buglova, E.

    2016-08-01

    The continuous use of nuclear power to generate electricity and the continued threat of radioactive materials being used for nefarious reasons reminds us of the importance to stay prepared to respond to nuclear or radiological emergencies. Stringent nuclear safety and nuclear security requirements, the training of personnel, operational checks and legal frameworks cannot always prevent radiation-related emergencies. Though these events can range in severity, each has the potential to cause harm to the public, employees, patients, property and the environment. Until the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, there was no international information exchange system. Immediately following that accident, the international community negotiated the so-called Emergency Conventions to ensure that the country suffering an accident with an international transboundary release of radioactive material would issue timely, authenticated information, while the States that could field technical support, would do so in a coordinated fashion. The Conventions also place specific legal obligations on the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) with regard to emergency preparedness and response. (Author)

  10. Psycho-Social Issues in Mine Emergencies: The Impact on the Individual, the Organization and the Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M. Kowalski-Trakofler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on research conducted in the past two decades examining issues related to the human element in mine disasters. While much of the emergency response community employs a systems approach that takes into account psychosocial issues as they impact all aspects of an emergency, the mining industry has lagged behind in integrating this critical element. It is only within the past few years that behavioral interventions have begun to be seen as a part of disaster readiness and resiliency in the industry. The authors discuss the potential applications of psychosocial studies and suggest ways to improve mine emergency planning, psychological support, and decision-making during a response, as well as actions in the aftermath of incidents. Topics covered, among others, include an economic rationale for including such studies in planning a mine emergency response, sociological issues as they impact such things as leadership and rescue team dynamics, and psychological issues that have an effect on individual capacity to function under stress such as during escape, in refuge alternatives, and in body recovery. This information is intended to influence the mine emergency escape curriculum and impact actions and decision-making during and after a mine emergency. The ultimate goal is to mitigate the trauma experienced by individuals, the organization, and the community.

  11. Confined space emergency response: assessing employer and fire department practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael P; Madison, Heather N; Healy, Stephen B

    2012-01-01

    An emergency response plan for industrial permit-required confined space entry is essential for employee safety and is legally required. Maintaining a trained confined space rescue team, however, is costly and technically challenging. Some employers turn to public fire departments to meet their emergency response requirements. The confined space emergency response practices of employers and fire departments have not been previously assessed. We present (1) federal data on the U.S. occurrence between 1992 and 2005 of confined space fatal incidents involving toxic and/or oxygen-deficient atmospheres; (2) survey data from 21 large companies on permit-required confined space emergency response practices; (3) data on fire department arrival times; and (4) estimates by 10 senior fire officers of fire department rescue times for confined space incidents. Between 1992 and 2005, 431 confined space incidents that met the case definition claimed 530 lives, or about 0.63% of the 84,446 all-cause U.S. occupational fatal injuries that occurred during this period. Eighty-seven (20%) incidents resulted in multiple fatalities. Twelve (57%) of 21 surveyed companies reported that they relied on the fire department for permit-required confined space emergency response. Median fire department arrival times were about 5 min for engines and 7 min for technical rescue units. Fire department confined space rescue time estimates ranged from 48 to 123 min and increased to 70 and 173 min when hazardous materials were present. The study illustrates that (1) confined space incidents represent a small but continuing source of fatal occupational injuries in the United States; (2) a sizeable portion of employers may be relying on public fire departments for permit-required confined space emergency response; and (3) in the event of a life-threatening emergency, fire departments usually are not able to effect a confined space rescue in a timely manner. We propose that the appropriate role for the

  12. Northern Territory Emergency Response: criticism, support and redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Brendon W

    2012-06-01

    The recent Federal Government Report and Media release, Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory: Report on Consultations and its claim of 'widespread Indigenous Support' has brought the topic of the Northern Territory Emergency Response (the Intervention) back into the public mind. This article provides a synthesis of four years of debate around the Northern Territory Emergency Response, at a time when the program is nearing the end of its time frame. It outlines the main arguments supporting the Intervention, the central criticisms and the government's response to these evaluations, with the aim of providing a primer or summary for health professionals to the discussion around this important public issue. © 2012 The Author. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  13. Emergency preparedness: a responsibility of the medical profession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammons, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    There are a series of things that we might do with regard to emergency planning. Some are clearly obvious, some perhaps are less so. Obviously, we should try to prevent a disaster from occurring. But we know that disasters are going to happen. Second, we should attempt to minimize the number of casualties in the event of an emergency. A part of planning is traffic control, with the traffic control designed to prevent that particular difficulty. Clearly we need to prevent additional casualties once the natural or man-made disaster has occurred. Without question, we have to rescue the injured, we have to be able to provide first aid, and we have to make value judgments instantly on who needs aid and who does not. Obviously, the medical community has to supply the leaders in terms of the care of the injured. Equally obvious is that other people in the community, such as the governor, the mayor, the city manager, the chief of police, and the fire chief, have to be involved. When you become involved in emergency planning, remember that there are other people in the health care family. It is not just physicians who are important; the Red Cross, nurses, public health agencies, those in state radiation control programs, and many others also are important. And let us not forget the people with specialized training in nuclear medicine, as well as radiologists and radiation oncologists

  14. Emerging opportunities between the Aboriginal communities and the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowfoot, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    The management of oil and gas resources from Indian Reserve lands across Canada is the responsibility of Indian Oil and Gas Canada (IOGC). The IOGC issues and executes all agreements relating to exploration and development of oil and gas on Indian lands. Band Council signs all agreements as consenters. In the last two years, activity levels at the IOGC have exceeded average normal levels. In 1997-98, a total of 116 new wells were drilled on First Nation Lands; in 1996-97 the number of new wells drilled was 130. Currently, there are a total of 800 wells administered by the IOGC. A total of 179 oil and gas companies operate on 76 First Nation reserves in Alberta, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Manitoba. There are 14 First Nation-owned oil and gas companies holding leases on reserve lands. This paper reviews the changes in the structuring of joint ventures and resource development arrangement with Aboriginal communities in light of the recent Delgamuukw decision

  15. Intelligent Emergency Response System for Police Vehicles in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganeshan, Ishan; Memon, Nasrullah

    2015-01-01

    When faced with emergency situations there might be several critical factors that could preclude the possibility for the victims to call for the help. In situations like kidnapping, rape, robbery making use of the traditional voice based methods to call for the help might alert the offenders...... and put the victim’s life at a greater risk. This paper proposes an Emergency Response System (ERS), which focuses on developing an alternate mechanism through human computer interaction whereby the help can be called through a single press of a button and the locations of the callers are tracked in real...

  16. Arctic shipping and risks: Emergency categories and response capacities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchenko, Nataly A.; Andreassen, Natalia; Borch, Odd Jarl

    2018-01-01

    . In this paper, we look into the risk of accidents in Atlantic Arctic based on previous ship accidents and the changes in maritime activity. The risk has to be assessed to ensure a proper level of emergency response. The consequences of incidents depend on the incident type, scale and location. As accidents...... are rare, there are limited statistics available for Arctic maritime accidents. Hence, this study offers a qualitative analysis and an expert-based risk assessment. Implications for the emergency preparedness system of the Arctic region are discussed....

  17. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center

  18. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  19. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability

  20. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    nuclear accident or radiological emergency even if there is no direct transboundary impact, primarily for the purposes of minimizing the consequences of the accident or emergency e.g. for trade and tourism and providing advice to their nationals living, working and travelling in the Accident State. The provision of such information would also help to avoid unnecessary international rumours and concerns. In order to be able to provide such information in an emergency, States need to be prepared in advance. Moreover, States are encouraged to provide warning messages and other relevant information within the ENATOM framework even in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency that does not trigger the Early Notification Convention but is of international concern. Recent work on clarifying emergency classification schemes for nuclear facilities and on identifying the key information to be transmitted for technical assessment purposes, the development of emergency preparedness and response standards and improvements in communications technology (e-mail and Web servers) have been reflected in the arrangements described in this new edition of ENATOM. ENATOM addresses the issue of requesting and providing assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. For the provision of assistance, the IAEA is establishing a global Emergency Response Network (ERNET) of teams suitably qualified to respond rapidly, on a regional basis, to nuclear accidents or radiological emergencies. ENATOM states the Secretariat's expectations rather than prescribing arrangements. Nevertheless, all States, including States which are neither Member States of the IAEA nor party to either Convention, and the relevant International Intergovernmental Organisations are invited to adopt the arrangements described in it for providing and receiving information about nuclear accidents and radiological emergencies. In the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, the

  1. Reflection on pastoral care in Africa: Towards discerning emerging pragmatic pastoral ministerial responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhumani Magezi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pastoral care takes different forms in responding to people’s needs in their context. Accordingly, over the centuries it has evolved in response to emerging needs. Historical developments in pastoral care are well-documented. However, pastoral care in Africa has a short and unsystematically documented history. Scholarly discussions on pastoral care concerning the continent tend to be considered under African theological frameworks. Notwithstanding the already existing weaknesses in African theological discussion, pastoral care in Africa has remained fragmented with diverse and seemingly knee-jerk approaches in guiding individuals who provide pastoral care. In view of this, this article firstly aims to provide a broad overview and initiate a discussion on the current challenges in pastoral care in Africa. Secondly, it aims to reveal some gaps worth pursuing by scholars in the discipline. Thirdly, it sheds some light on approaches employed by pastoral practitioners in pastoral ministry practice. In doing so, this article opens the lid on some perspectives adopted in ministry work on the frontlines, that is, providing pastoral care to people in their communities – particularly church communities. This article first outlines the problem to be addressed followed by an overview of pastoral care in Africa. It then proceeds to address potential research opportunities within the discipline. Finally, it highlights some emerging approaches in providing pastoral care in the communities. This article does not focus on one particular pastoral care issue, but gives an overview of the situation relative to pastoral care in Africa and the emerging responses.

  2. International IAEA Emergency Response Workshop in Fukushima Concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA workshop aimed at further strengthening nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response capabilities concluded today in Fukushima, Japan. More than 40 participants from 18 countries took part in the four-day Response and Assistance Network (RANET) workshop, which included a field exercise in areas affected following the March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. During the exercise, participants conducted radiation monitoring and environmental sampling and analysis. They measured the contamination level of the ground surface and conducted gamma spectrum analysis and vehicle-based monitoring - activities that are conducted following any nuclear or radiological incident or emergency. Results were then compared amongst participants. RANET is a network currently comprising 22 countries through which the IAEA can facilitate the provision of expert support and equipment on request under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. Pat Kenny, IAEA RANET Officer, said the workshop provided an opportunity to practice cooperation between international teams that would be deployed through RANET following an emergency. 'By bringing together so many experts from different countries in one place, the workshop helped us learn how international teams can work together to provide assistance in a nuclear or radiological emergency situation,' he said. 'It also enabled us to improve the coordination of such assistance, and it gave participants the opportunity to learn from each other.' The workshop was the first activity conducted from the IAEA RANET Capacity Building Centre, a new training centre based in the city of Fukushima that was designated earlier this week with the support of the Japanese Foreign Ministry and Fukushima Prefecture. The Centre will host RANET and other training courses, workshops and exercises aimed at enhancing nuclear emergency preparedness and response

  3. A simulator-based nuclear reactor emergency response training exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Edward; Bereznai, George; Shaw, John; Chaput, Joseph; Lafortune, Jean-Francois

    Training offsite emergency response personnel basic awareness of onsite control room operations during nuclear power plant emergency conditions was the primary objective of a week-long workshop conducted on a CANDU® virtual nuclear reactor simulator available at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Canada. The workshop was designed to examine both normal and abnormal reactor operating conditions, and to observe the conditions in the control room that may have impact on the subsequent offsite emergency response. The workshop was attended by participants from a number of countries encompassing diverse job functions related to nuclear emergency response. Objectives of the workshop were to provide opportunities for participants to act in the roles of control room personnel under different reactor operating scenarios, providing a unique experience for participants to interact with the simulator in real-time, and providing increased awareness of control room operations during accident conditions. The ability to "pause" the simulator during exercises allowed the instructors to evaluate and critique the performance of participants, and to provide context with respect to potential offsite emergency actions. Feedback from the participants highlighted (i) advantages of observing and participating "hands-on" with operational exercises, (ii) their general unfamiliarity with control room operational procedures and arrangements prior to the workshop, (iii) awareness of the vast quantity of detailed control room procedures for both normal and transient conditions, and (iv) appreciation of the increased workload for the operators in the control room during a transient from normal operations. Based upon participant feedback, it was determined that the objectives of the training had been met, and that future workshops should be conducted.

  4. The Emergence of the Dose–Response Concept in Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Calabrese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A historical assessment of the origin of the dose–response in modern toxicology and its integration as a central concept in biology and medicine is presented. This article provides an overview of how the threshold, linear and biphasic (i.e., hormetic dose–response models emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and competed for acceptance and dominance. Particular attention is directed to the hormetic model for which a general description and evaluation is provided, including its historical basis, and how it was marginalized by the medical and pharmacology communities in the early decades of the 20th century.

  5. Roles that numerical models can play in emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Four points are presented with regard to a perspective on modeling for emergency preparedness. First, and probably foremost, modeling should be considered a tool, along with measurements and experience when used for emergency preparedness. The second point is that the potential for large errors associated with knowing the source term during an accident should not be used as a guide for determining the level of the model development and application. There are many other uses for models than estimating consequences, given the source term. These uses range from estimating the source term to bracketing the problem at hand. The third point is that several levels of model complexity should be considered when addressing emergency response. These levels can vary from the simple Gaussian calculation to the more complex three-dimensional transport and diffusion calculations where terrain and vertical and horizontal shears in the wind fields can be modeled. Lastly, proper interaction and feedback between model results and measurements enhances the capabilities of each if they were applied independently for emergency response purposes

  6. The Community College Perspective in the Emerging Green Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Leith

    2011-01-01

    Almost half of all students entering higher education now do so through the community college sector. These institutions are a trusted and vital source of education, training, and information for their communities. They are also at the front-line in the society's never ending battle to provide the skills and capacities necessary to ensure…

  7. Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

    2009-04-30

    We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

  8. Emergency preparedness and response for the non-reactor countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buglova, E.

    2000-01-01

    Preparedness and response for nuclear and radiological accidents in the countries without nuclear power plants (NPP) have some peculiarities. Accident at the Chernobyl NPP clearly showed the necessity of effective response for non-reactor countries in the case of transboundary release. Experience obtained in Belarus is providing evidence for the necessity of changing some aspects of emergency preparedness. The results of analysis made of some protective actions taken during the early stage of the accident form the basis for recommendations provided this paper. Real experience is supported by model predictions of the consequences for the hypothetical accident at a NPP close to the Belarus. (author)

  9. Combining internet technology and mobile phones for emergency response management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsson, S.E.

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended for persons involved in radiological emergency response management. An introduction is given to the technical basis of the mobile Internet and ongoing development summarised. Examples are given describing how mobile Internet technology has been used to improve monitoring media coverage of incidents and events, and a test is described where web based information was selectively processed and made available to WAP enabled mobile phones. The report concludes with recommendations stressing the need for following mobile Internet developments and taking them into account when designing web applications for radiological response management. Doing so can make web based material accessible to mobile devices at minimal additional cost. (au)

  10. The Southwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center and the Oklahoma inter tribal emergency management coalition: a unique partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chief, Vicki Tall; Burton, Tracey P; Campbell, Janis; Boatright, Daniel T; Wendelboe, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Oklahoma is home to 39 Native American tribes, so the issue of tribal sovereignty had to be addressed before tribes, local, and state preparedness officials could work together successfully. We describe the unique partnership that was established when the Southwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (SWPERLC) began working with tribes which led to the development of a tribal emergency management coalition. The SWPERLC established a formal partnership with tribal emergency managers and a 501(c)3 coalition was formed. The SWPERLC sponsors annual summits and attends and/or hosts monthly meetings, offering education and training opportunities year-round. One example of a lesson learned resulted from a pandemic influenza survey administered to Oklahoma tribes. We learned that 40% of those Native Americans surveyed who chose not be vaccinated were concerned with side effects. Our evidence showed that improved public health conversations regarding the safety of vaccines must be had with the Native American community. Because of all the activities that were completed we now better understand how state and local preparedness officials can more successfully and beneficially work with tribes. Persistence, patience, and dedication were key factors highlighted during the formation of the coalition. Mutual respect and trust have allowed and will allow this partnership to continue.

  11. Rural Responses to H1N1: A Flexible Model for Community Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Denise; Aubrey, Debra Larsen

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines a regional 2009 H1N1 rural response model, which utilises community partnerships with local government, county emergency management, public health, private healthcare, Medical Reserve Corps volunteers, and other organisations in rural Southeast Idaho. Unique aspects of the collaborative use of federal, state, county, and…

  12. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 February 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a large number of States, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full parties. The arrangements provided between the IAEA, States that are IAEA Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations, and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions - specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). ENATOM was first issued on 18 January 1989. Member States, Parties to the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, relevant international organizations and other States have since then regularly received updates to the manual. In 2000, a complete revision of ENATOM was reissued as EPR-ENATOM (2000) to reflect technological developments, changes in operational concepts, views on standards in the area of emergency preparedness and response, and Member States' expectations. Since then ENATOM has been reviewed and reissued biennially in line with the review cycle of the Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (the 'Joint Plan'). Since the last edition of ENATOM in 2004, several factors have warranted some modifications to

  13. A community response to the food environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyzman, Denise; Wierenga, Janet; Sielawa, Julie

    2009-04-01

    In 2005, the Pioneering Healthier Communities initiative prompted the creation of the Activate West Michigan coalition. One of its earliest objectives was to increase fruit and vegetable consumption for people who lived in low-income, African American, and Latino communities in urban Grand Rapids. Because the existing food environment created barriers to this objective, the coalition created community and schoolyard gardens and farmers' markets. By 2008, the Activate West Michigan coalition had begun to improve the food environment by establishing nine community and schoolyard gardens and five farmers' markets.

  14. Defining Roles for Pharmacy Personnel in Disaster Response and Emergency Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalili, Mohammad; Ma, Janice; Grenier, Sylvain

    2017-08-01

    Ongoing provision of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies is of key importance during and following a disaster or other emergency event. An effectively coordinated response involving locally available pharmacy personnel-drawing upon the efforts of licensed pharmacists and unlicensed support staff-can help to mitigate harms and alleviate hardship in a community after emergency events. However, pharmacists and their counterparts generally receive limited training in disaster medicine and emergency preparedness as part of their initial qualifications, even in countries with well-developed professional education programs. Pharmacy efforts have also traditionally focused on medical supply activities, more so than on general emergency preparedness. To facilitate future work between pharmacy personnel on an international level, our team undertook an extensive review of the published literature describing pharmacists' experiences in responding to or preparing for both natural and manmade disasters. In addition to identifying key activities that must be performed, we have developed a classification scheme for pharmacy personnel. We believe that this framework will enable pharmacy personnel working in diverse practice settings to identify and undertake essential actions that are necessary to ensure an effective emergency response and will promote better collaboration between pharmacy team members during actual disaster situations. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:496-504).

  15. Optimization of emergency response to major nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, I.A.; Christou, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for the optimization of the short-term emergency response in the event of a nuclear accident has been developed. The method aims at an optimum combination of protective actions in the presence of a multitude of conflicting objectives and under uncertainty. Conflicting objectives arise when the minimization of the potential adverse effects of an accident and the simultaneous minimization of the associated socioeconomic impacts is attempted. Additional conflicting objectives appear whenever an emergency plan tends to decrease a particular health effect (e.g. acute deaths) while at the same time it increases another (e.g. latent deaths). The uncertainty is due to the multitude of the possible accident scenarios and their respective probability of occurrence, the stochastic variability in the weather conditions and in the variability and/or lack of knowledge in the parameters of the risk assessment models. A multiobjective optimization approach is adopted in a dynamic programming scheme. An emergency protective plan consists of defining a protective action (e.g. evacuation, sheltering) at each spatial cell around the plant. Three criteria (evaluators) are used as the objective functions of the problem, namely, acute fatalities, latent effects and socioeconomic cost. The optimization procedure defines the efficient frontier, i.e. all emergency plans that are not dominated by another in all three criteria. No value trade-offs are necessary up to this point

  16. How the Nuclear Applications Laboratories Help in Strengthening Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Safety is one of the most important considerations when engaging in highly advanced scientific and technological activities. In this respect, utilizing the potential of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes also involves risks, and nuclear techniques themselves can be useful in strengthening emergency response measures related to the use of nuclear technology. In the case of a nuclear incident, the rapid measurement and subsequent monitoring of radiation levels are top priorities as they help to determine the degree of risk faced by emergency responders and the general public. Instruments for the remote measurement of radioactivity are particularly important when there are potential health risks associated with entering areas with elevated radiation levels. The Nuclear Science and Instrumentation Laboratory (NSIL) — one of the eight laboratories of the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications (NA) in Seibersdorf, Austria — focuses on developing a variety of specialized analytical and diagnostic instruments and methods, and transferring knowledge to IAEA Member States. These include instruments capable of carrying out remote measurements. This emergency response work carried out by the NA laboratories supports health and safety in Member States and supports the IAEA’s mandate to promote the safe and peaceful use of nuclear energy

  17. Emergency Response Imagery Related to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthem, A. V.; Madore, B.; Imahori, G.; Woolard, J.; Sellars, J.; Halbach, A.; Helmricks, D.; Quarrick, J.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Remote Sensing Division acquired and rapidly disseminated emergency response imagery related to the three recent hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. Aerial imagery was collected using a Trimble Digital Sensor System, a high-resolution digital camera, by means of NOAA's King Air 350ER and DeHavilland Twin Otter (DHC-6) Aircraft. The emergency response images are used to assess the before and after effects of the hurricanes' damage. The imagery aids emergency responders, such as FEMA, Coast Guard, and other state and local governments, in developing recovery strategies and efforts by prioritizing areas most affected and distributing appropriate resources. Collected imagery is also used to provide damage assessment for use in long-term recovery and rebuilding efforts. Additionally, the imagery allows for those evacuated persons to see images of their homes and neighborhoods remotely. Each of the individual images are processed through ortho-rectification and merged into a uniform mosaic image. These remotely sensed datasets are publically available, and often used by web-based map servers as well as, federal, state, and local government agencies. This poster will show the imagery collected for these three hurricanes and the processes involved in getting data quickly into the hands of those that need it most.

  18. Emergency response team: Hurricane Georges in Key West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, T; Cheanvechai, D; Seaberg, D

    2000-01-01

    Hurricane Georges (category 2) struck Key West, Florida, on September 25, 1998. Lower Florida Keys Hospital, which serves Key West and the Lower Keys, had previously been evacuated of inpatients and staff. An emergency response team composed of three emergency medicine (EM) physicians and four EM nurses was sent at the request of the state to maintain emergency department (ED) operations at the hospital. Eighty-six patients presented to the ED during the 72-hour period. Medical problems accounted for the majority of visits (52.3%), with minor trauma next (41.9%). Initially, patients requiring hospitalization were evacuated, but as the storm neared, this was stopped. Six patients required hospitalization at Lower Florida Keys Hospital during the period that evacuations were unavailable. Four deaths occurred during the 24-hour period. Complicating factors included environmental conditions, limited laboratory and radiologic studies, limited medication stocks, and closure of local pharmacies before and after the hurricane. More than 300 nursing home patients were housed at the nearby jail shelter. Knowledge of such high-risk groups that remain in the vicinity is crucial to planning a response plan.

  19. Timing criteria for supplemental BWR emergency response equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickel, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The Great Tohuku Earthquake and subsequent Tsunami represented a double failure event which destroyed offsite power connections to Fukushima-Daiichi site and then destroyed on-site electrical systems needed to run decay heat removal systems. The accident could have been mitigated had there been supplemental portable battery chargers, supplemental pumps, and in-place piping connections to provide alternate decay heat removal. In response to this event in the USA, two national response centers, one in Memphis, Tennessee, and another in Phoenix, Arizona, will begin operation. They will be able to dispatch supplemental emergency response equipment to any nuclear plant in the U.S. within 24 hours. In order to define requirements for supplemental nuclear power plant emergency response equipment maintained onsite vs. in a regional support center it is necessary to confirm: (a) the earliest time such equipment might be needed depending on the specific scenario, (b) the nominal time to move the equipment from a storage location either on-site or within the region of a nuclear power plant, and (c) the time required to connect in the supplemental equipment to use it. This paper describes an evaluation process for a BWR-4 with a Mark I Containment starting with: (a) severe accident simulation to define best estimate times available for recovery based on the specific scenario, (b) identify the key supplemental response equipment needed at specific times to accomplish recovery of key safety functions, and (c) evaluate what types of equipment should be warehoused on-site vs. in regional response centers. (authors)

  20. Response of human populations to large-scale emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrow, James; Wang, Dashun; Barabási, Albert-László

    2010-03-01

    Until recently, little quantitative data regarding collective human behavior during dangerous events such as bombings and riots have been available, despite its importance for emergency management, safety and urban planning. Understanding how populations react to danger is critical for prediction, detection and intervention strategies. Using a large telecommunications dataset, we study for the first time the spatiotemporal, social and demographic response properties of people during several disasters, including a bombing, a city-wide power outage, and an earthquake. Call activity rapidly increases after an event and we find that, when faced with a truly life-threatening emergency, information rapidly propagates through a population's social network. Other events, such as sports games, do not exhibit this propagation.

  1. Towards Location-Based Access Control in Healthcare Emergency Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Carmen Ruiz; Kirkpatrick, Michael; Ghinita, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in positioning and tracking technologies have led to the emergence of novel location-based applications that allow participants to access information relevant to their spatio-temporal context. Traditional access control models, such as role-based access control (RBAC...... of complex access control decisions based on spatio-temporal relationships among subjects and objects. Furthermore, such relationships change frequently in dynamic environments, requiring efficient mechanisms to monitor and re-evaluate access control decisions. In this position paper, we present a healthcare...... emergency response scenario which highlights the novel challenges that arise when enforcing access control in an environment with moving subjects and objects. To address a realistic application scenario, we consider movement on road networks, and we identify complex access control decisions relevant...

  2. Exploring fish microbial communities to mitigate emerging diseases in aquaculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Irene; Liu, Yiying; Wiegertjes, Geert F.; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2018-01-01

    Aquaculture is the fastest growing animal food sector worldwide and expected to further increase to feed the growing human population. However, existing and (re-)emerging diseases are hampering fish and shellfish cultivation and yield. For many diseases, vaccination protocols are not in place and

  3. Community responses to extreme climatic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric JIGUET, Lluis BROTONS, Vincent DEVICTOR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Species assemblages and natural communities are increasingly impacted by changes in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events. Here we propose a brief overview of expected and demonstrated direct and indirect impacts of extreme events on animal communities. We show that differential impacts on basic biological parameters of individual species can lead to strong changes in community composition and structure with the potential to considerably modify the functional traits of the community. Sudden disequilibria have even been shown to induce irreversible shifts in marine ecosystems, while cascade effects on various taxonomic groups have been highlighted in Mediterranean forests. Indirect effects of extreme climatic events are expected when event-induced habitat changes (e.g. soil stability, vegetation composition, water flows altered by droughts, floods or hurricanes have differential consequences on species assembled within the communities. Moreover, in increasing the amplitude of trophic mismatches, extreme events are likely to turn many systems into ecological traps under climate change. Finally, we propose a focus on the potential impacts of an extreme heat wave on local assemblages as an empirical case study, analysing monitoring data on breeding birds collected in France. In this example, we show that despite specific populations were differently affected by local temperature anomalies, communities seem to be unaffected by a sudden heat wave. These results suggest that communities are tracking climate change at the highest possible rate [Current Zoology 57 (3: 406–413, 2011].

  4. Emergent Complex Behavior in Social Networks: Examples from the Ktunaxa Speech Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsethief, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Language serves as a primary tool for structuring identity and loss of language represents the loss of that identity. This study utilizes a social network analysis of Ktunaxa speech community activities for evidence of internally generated revitalization efforts. These behaviors include instances of self-organized emergence. Such emergent behavior…

  5. Bird community responses to the edge between suburbs and reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikin, Karen; Barton, Philip S; Knight, Emma; Lindenmayer, David B; Fischer, Joern; Manning, Adrian D

    2014-02-01

    New insights into community-level responses at the urban fringe, and the mechanisms underlying them, are needed. In our study, we investigated the compositional distinctiveness and variability of a breeding bird community at both sides of established edges between suburban residential areas and woodland reserves in Canberra, Australia. Our goals were to determine if: (1) community-level responses were direct (differed with distance from the edge, independent of vegetation) or indirect (differed in response to edge-related changes in vegetation), and (2) if guild-level responses provided the mechanism underpinning community-level responses. We found that suburbs and reserves supported significantly distinct bird communities. The suburban bird community, characterised by urban-adapted native and exotic species, had a weak direct edge response, with decreasing compositional variability with distance from the edge. In comparison, the reserve bird community, characterised by woodland-dependent species, was related to local tree and shrub cover. This was not an indirect response, however, as tree and shrub cover was not related to edge distance. We found that the relative richness of nesting, foraging and body size guilds also displayed similar edge responses, indicating that they underpinned the observed community-level responses. Our study illustrates how community-level responses provide valuable insights into how communities respond to differences in resources between two contrasting habitats. Further, the effects of the suburban matrix penetrate into reserves for greater distances than previously thought. Suburbs and adjacent reserves, however, provided important habitat resources for many native species and the conservation of these areas should not be discounted from continued management strategies.

  6. Changing the paradigm of emergency response: The need for first-care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobko, Joshua P; Kamin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    There is a major gap in the security of the critical infrastructure - civilian medical response to atypical emergencies. Clear evidence demonstrates that, despite ongoing improvements to the first-responder system, there exists an inherent delay in the immediate medical care at the scene of an emergency. This delay can only be reduced through a societal shift in reliance on police and fire response and by extending the medical system into all communities. Additionally, through analysis of military data, it is known that immediately addressing the common injury patterns following a traumatic event will save lives. The predictable nature of these injuries, coupled with an unavoidable delay in the arrival of first responders, necessitates the need for immediate care on scene. Initial care is often rendered by bystanders, typically armed only with basic first-aid training based on medical emergencies and does not adequately address the traumatic injury patterns seen in disasters. Implementing an approach similar to the American Cardiac Arrest Act can improve outcomes to traumatic events. This paper analyses the latest data on active shooter incidents and proposes that the creation of a network of trauma-trained medic extenders would improve all communities' resilience to catastrophic disaster.

  7. Community Survey Q4: Public safety - Fire & emergency management services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — This question is from the 2015 Chapel Hill Community Survey. Using a scale of 1 to 5 where 5 means “Very Satisfied” and 1 means “Very Dissatisfied,” residents were...

  8. Blended-Format Professional Development and the Emergence of Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Thomas E.; Cady, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we draw on Wenger's (1998) conception of communities of practice to observe the emergence of a community of practice among middle grades mathematics teachers who participated in a two-year blended-format (online synchronous, online asynchronous, and face to face) professional development program designed to increase middle-grades…

  9. Service-Learning and Emergent Communities of Practice: A Teacher Education Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschak, Jennifer Cutsforth; Letwinsky, Karim Medico

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the unexpected emergence of a community of practice in a middle level mathematics and science methods course. The authors describe how preservice teacher participation in a collaborative, project-based service-learning experience resulted in the formation of a community of practice characterized by teamwork, meaningful…

  10. Addams, Day, and Dewey: The Emergence of Community Service in American Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Keith; Saltmarsh, John

    1997-01-01

    Chronicles the emergence of community service in the United States, beginning with the turn-of-the-century collision of capitalism and democracy which generated a crisis of community and profound rethinking of the meaning and practice of charity. Three service "paths" are identified: nonprofit human services organizations; active…

  11. Soil fungal community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugwitz, Merian Skouw

    Global change will affect the functioning and structure of terrestrial ecosystems and since soil fungi are key players in organic matter decomposition and nutrient turnover, shifts in fungal community composition might have a strong impact on soil functioning. The main focus of this thesis...... was therefore to investigate the impact of global environmental changes on soil fungal communities in a temperate and subartic heath ecosystem. The objective was further to determine global change effects on major functional groups of fungi and analyze the influence of fungal community changes on soil carbon...... and nutrient availability and storage. By combining molecular methods such as 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of fungal ITS amplicons with analyses of soil enzymes, nutrient pools of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus we were able to characterize soil fungal communities as well as their impact on nutrient...

  12. Consumer response to food labels in an emerging market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Festila, Alexandra Florina; Chrysochou, Polymeros; Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates consumer response to food labels in an emerging market. More specifically, it measures the levels of awareness, objective and perceived understanding, perceived usefulness and perceived trustworthiness of the most prominent food labels found in the Romanian market. An online...... towards food labels was relatively high, especially towards those food labels that included a clear text element. Perceived understanding, perceived usefulness and perceived trustworthiness were found to be consistently high with regard to the GDA and the national organic food labels, while the European...

  13. Regional training course on medical response on radiological emergencies. Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This short information is an annex of the documentation distributed to the participants to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Regional Training Course on Medical Response on Radiological Emergencies, organised by the IAEA in co-operation with the Government of Argentina thought the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 16-20 October 2000. The course was intended to people from IAEA Member State in the Latin American and Caribbean region, and to professionals and workers on medicine related with the radiation protection. This annex present information about: Radioactive materials transport; Internal and external contamination; Radiation accidents; Physical dosimetry

  14. Community responses to CBG experiences in BC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, M. [British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Coalbed gas (CBG) is expected to play a prominent role in British Columbia in the future, and the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines is looking to generate $20 billion of cumulative investment in the oil and gas sector by 2008 through the identification, stimulation, and facilitation of development opportunities for under-developed and unconventional resources. A brief overview of CBG potential in the province was provided. The common concerns that have been expressed by diverse communities throughout the province include jobs, economic growth opportunities, and environmental impact. These communities are composed of landowners, business people, other resource owners, municipal and regional governments, general public, environmental interest groups, and First Nations. The government's approach to communities involves consultation with First Nations, which are key to resource development and have very diverse interests and approaches. The approach includes real communication, real information, and real issues. Good community relations should lead to reduced uncertainty for development, better resource development through the identification of issues, and increased confidence in government, regulators and industry by communities. The roles of the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines and the Oil and Gas Commission were described, as they relate to community relations in the province. Lessons learned on topics such as water, land disturbance, and baseline studies while working with First Nations were reviewed, . figs.

  15. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing their consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a large number of States (Section 1.7), the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full parties. The arrangements between the IAEA, States that are IAEA Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations, and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). In 2000, a complete revision of ENATOM, with all relevant sections updated, withdrawn or replaced with new material, was reissued as EPR-ENATOM (2000) to reflect new technological developments, operational concepts, views on standards in the area of emergency preparedness and response, and Member States' expectations. A separate publication, EPR-JPLAN (2000), the Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (Joint Plan'), described a common understanding of how each of six co-sponsoring international organizations will act during a response and in making preparedness arrangements. It is intended that the ENATOM is reviewed and reissued biennially in line with the review cycle of the Joint Plan. Since the

  16. Immune responses of wild birds to emerging infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, M; Bonneaud, C

    2015-05-01

    Over the past several decades, outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) in wild birds have attracted worldwide media attention, either because of their extreme virulence or because of alarming spillovers into agricultural animals or humans. The pathogens involved have been found to infect a variety of bird hosts ranging from relatively few species (e.g. Trichomonas gallinae) to hundreds of species (e.g. West Nile Virus). Here we review and contrast the immune responses that wild birds are able to mount against these novel pathogens. We discuss the extent to which these responses are associated with reduced clinical symptoms, pathogen load and mortality, or conversely, how they can be linked to worsened pathology and reduced survival. We then investigate how immune responses to EIDs can evolve over time in response to pathogen-driven selection using the illustrative case study of the epizootic outbreak of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in wild North American house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus). We highlight the need for future work to take advantage of the substantial inter- and intraspecific variation in disease progression and outcome following infections with EID to elucidate the extent to which immune responses confer increased resistance through pathogen clearance or may instead heighten pathogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Antiviral strategies for emerging influenza viruses in remote communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Laskowski

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of timely access to resources for critical care, strategic use of antiviral drugs is crucial for mitigating the impact of novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential in remote and isolated communities. We sought to evaluate the effect of antiviral treatment and prophylaxis of close contacts in a Canadian remote northern community.We used an agent-based, discrete-time simulation model for disease spread in a remote community, which was developed as an in-silico population using population census data. Relative and cumulative age-specific attack rates, and the total number of infections in simulated model scenarios were obtained.We found that early initiation of antiviral treatment is more critical for lowering attack rates in a remote setting with a low population-average age compared to an urban population. Our results show that a significant reduction in the relative, age-specific attack rates due to increasing treatment coverage does not necessarily translate to a significant reduction in the overall arrack rate. When treatment coverage varies from low to moderate, targeted prophylaxis has a very limited impact in reducing attack rates and should be offered at a low level (below 10% to avoid excessive waste of drugs.In contrast to previous work, for conservative treatment coverages, our results do not provide any convincing evidence for the implementation of targeted prophylaxis. The findings suggest that public health strategies in remote communities should focus on the wider availability (higher coverage and timely distribution of antiviral drugs for treatment of clinically ill individuals.

  18. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state's emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor's designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments

  19. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state's emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor's designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  20. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state`s emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor`s designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  1. Increasing Diversity in Emerging Non-religious Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Hassall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary growth in non-religious populations has given rise to novel communities with unique perspectives on social issues. We describe a study of diversity within speakers at conferences organised by and attended by the atheist community. We analyse trends in diversity of 630 speakers, corresponding to 1223 speaking slots at 48 conferences conducted for the purpose of discussing or espousing non-religious views over the period 2003–2014. Diversity among speakers (defined using multivariate statistics in terms of the representation of women and non-white people increased significantly over time during the period studied. This broadening participation may have arisen from interventions to address issues of representation or may simply reflect a generational shift in the demographics of the community. However, on-going problems with data collection and the imbalance in the social cost of identifying as non-religious between different social groups continue to impede efforts to reduce barriers to equality within this growing movement.

  2. aLicante sUrgical Community Emergencies New Tool for the enUmeration of Morbidities: a simplified auditing tool for community-acquired gastrointestinal surgical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villodre, Celia; Rebasa, Pere; Estrada, José Luís; Zaragoza, Carmen; Zapater, Pedro; Mena, Luís; Lluís, Félix

    2016-11-01

    In a previous study, we found that Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) overpredicts morbidity risk in emergency gastrointestinal surgery. Our aim was to find a POSSUM equation adjustment. A prospective observational study was performed on 2,361 patients presenting with a community-acquired gastrointestinal surgical emergency. The first 1,000 surgeries constituted the development cohort, the second 1,000 events were the first validation intramural cohort, and the remaining 361 cases belonged to a second validation extramural cohort. (1) A modified POSSUM equation was obtained. (2) Logistic regression was used to yield a statistically significant equation that included age, hemoglobin, white cell count, sodium and operative severity. (3) A chi-square automatic interaction detector decision tree analysis yielded a statistically significant equation with 4 variables, namely cardiac failure, sodium, operative severity, and peritoneal soiling. A modified POSSUM equation and a simplified scoring system (aLicante sUrgical Community Emergencies New Tool for the enUmeration of Morbidities [LUCENTUM]) are described. Both tools significantly improve prediction of surgical morbidity in community-acquired gastrointestinal surgical emergencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of a geographic information system for radiologic emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.G.; Doyle, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) is a multifunctional analytical tool that can be used to compile available data and derive information. A GIS is a computerized database management system for the capture, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display of spatial data. Maps are the most common type of spatial data, but any type of data that can be referenced by an x-y location or geographic coordinate can be used in a GIS. In a radiological emergency, it is critical that data of all types be rapidly compiled into a common format in order to make accurate observations and informed decisions. Developing a baseline GIS for nuclear facilities would offer a significant incentive for all organizations to contribute to and utilize this powerful data management tool. The system being developed could integrate all elements of emergency planning, from the initial protective actions based on models through the emergency monitoring phase, and finally ending with the complex reentry and recovery phase. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. To demonstrate the potential of GIS for emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises. An interactive GIS system has been deployed and used to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. For this application, both hardcopy and real-time spatial displays were generated with the GIS. Composite maps with different sizes, scales, and themes were produced to support the exercises

  4. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  5. Initial operations in local nuclear emergency response headquarter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the Fukushima nuclear accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake and the tsunami that occurred thereafter, local nuclear emergency response headquarters (local headquarters) was set up at off-site center (OFC). However, several obstacles such as the collapse of means of communication resulting from severed communication lines, food and fuel shortage resulting from stagnant physical distribution, and increasing radiation dose around the center significantly restricted originally intended operation of local headquarters. In such severe situation, the personnel gathered at the OFC from the government, local public bodies and electric companies from March 11 to 15 acted without sufficient food, sleep or rest and did all they could against successively occurring unexpected challenges by using limited means of communication. However, issues requiring further consideration were activities of each functional group, location of OFC and the functions of equipment, machines and materials and reflecting the consideration results into future protective measures and revision of the manual for nuclear emergency response were greatly important. This report described investigated results on initial operations in local headquarters such as situation of activities conducted by local headquarters and operations at functional groups. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Southern State Radiological Transportation Emergency Response Training Course Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is an interstate compact organization that serves 16 states and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico with information and analysis in energy and environmental matters. Nuclear waste management is a topic that has garnered considerable attention in the SSEB region in the last several years. Since 1985, SSEB has received support from the US Department of Energy for the regional analysis of high-level radioactive waste transportation issues. In the performance of its work in this area, SSEB formed the Advisory Committee on High-Level Radioactive Materials Transportation, which comprises representatives from impacted states and tribes. SSEB meets with the committee semi-annually to provide issue updates to members and to solicit their views on activities impacting their respective states. Among the waste transportation issues considered by SSEB and the committee are shipment routing, the impacts of monitored retrievable storage, state liability in the event of an accident and emergency preparedness and response. This document addresses the latter by describing the radiological emergency response training courses and programs of the southern states, as well as federal courses available outside the southern region

  7. A new emergency response model for MACCS. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanin, D.I.

    1992-01-01

    Under DOE sponsorship, as directed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the MACCS code (version 1.5.11.1) [Ch92] was modified to implement a series of improvements in its modeling of emergency response actions. The purpose of this effort has been to aid the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) in its performance of the Level III analysis for the Savannah River Site (SRS) probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) of K Reactor [Wo90]. To ensure its usefulness to WSRC, and facilitate the new model's eventual merger with other MACCS enhancements, close cooperation with WSRC and the MACCS development team at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was maintained throughout the project. These improvements are intended to allow a greater degree of flexibility in modeling the mitigative actions of evacuation and sheltering. The emergency response model in MACCS version 1.5.11.1 was developed to support NRC analyses of consequences from severe accidents at commercial nuclear power plants. The NRC code imposes unnecessary constraints on DOE safety analyses, particularly for consequences to onsite worker populations, and it has therefore been revamped. The changes to the code have been implemented in a manner that preserves previous modeling capabilities and therefore prior analyses can be repeated with the new code

  8. Incidence of emergency contacts (red responses to Norwegian emergency primary healthcare services in 2007 – a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Elisabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The municipalities are responsible for the emergency primary health care services in Norway. These services include casualty clinics, primary doctors on-call and local emergency medical communication centres (LEMC. The National centre for emergency primary health care has initiated an enterprise called "The Watchtowers", comprising emergency primary health care districts, to provide routine information (patients' way of contact, level of urgency and first action taken by the out-of-hours services over several years based on a minimal dataset. This will enable monitoring, evaluation and comparison of the respective activities in the emergency primary health care services. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of emergency contacts (potential life-threatening situations, red responses to the emergency primary health care service. Methods A representative sample of Norwegian emergency primary health care districts, "The Watchtowers" recorded all contacts and first action taken during the year of 2007. All the variables were continuously registered in a data program by the attending nurses and sent by email to the National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care at a monthly basis. Results During 2007 the Watchtowers registered 85 288 contacts, of which 1 946 (2.3% were defined as emergency contacts (red responses, corresponding to a rate of 9 per 1 000 inhabitants per year. 65% of the instances were initiated by patient, next of kin or health personnel by calling local emergency medical communication centres or meeting directly at the casualty clinics. In 48% of the red responses, the first action taken was a call-out of doctor and ambulance. On a national basis we can estimate approximately 42 500 red responses per year in the EPH in Norway. Conclusion The emergency primary health care services constitute an important part of the emergency system in Norway. Patients call the LEMC or meet directly at casualty clinics

  9. Evaluating the success of an emergency response medical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petter, Stacie; Fruhling, Ann

    2011-07-01

    STATPack™ is an information system used to aid in the diagnosis of pathogens in hospitals and state public health laboratories. STATPack™ is used as a communication and telemedicine diagnosis tool during emergencies. This paper explores the success of this emergency response medical information system (ERMIS) using a well-known framework of information systems success developed by DeLone and McLean. Using an online survey, the entire population of STATPack™ users evaluated the success of the information system by considering system quality, information quality, system use, intention to use, user satisfaction, individual impact, and organizational impact. The results indicate that the overall quality of this ERMIS (i.e., system quality, information quality, and service quality) has a positive impact on both user satisfaction and intention to use the system. However, given the nature of ERMIS, overall quality does not necessarily predict use of the system. Moreover, the user's satisfaction with the information system positively affected the intention to use the system. User satisfaction, intention to use, and system use had a positive influence on the system's impact on the individual. Finally, the organizational impacts of the system were positively influenced by use of the system and the system's individual impact on the user. The results of the study demonstrate how to evaluate the success of an ERMIS as well as introduce potential changes in how one applies the DeLone and McLean success model in an emergency response medical information system context. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Community-centered responses to Ebola in urban Liberia: the view from below.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Alane Abramowitz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The West African Ebola epidemic has demonstrated that the existing range of medical and epidemiological responses to emerging disease outbreaks is insufficient, especially in post-conflict contexts with exceedingly poor healthcare infrastructures. In this context, community-based responses have proven vital for containing Ebola virus disease (EVD and shifting the epidemic curve. Despite a surge in interest in local innovations that effectively contained the epidemic, the mechanisms for community-based response remain unclear. This study provides baseline information on community-based epidemic control priorities and identifies innovative local strategies for containing EVD in Liberia.This study was conducted in September 2014 in 15 communities in Monrovia and Montserrado County, Liberia--one of the epicenters of the Ebola outbreak. Findings from 15 focus group discussions with 386 community leaders identified strategies being undertaken and recommendations for what a community-based response to Ebola should look like under then-existing conditions. Data were collected on the following topics: prevention, surveillance, care-giving, community-based treatment and support, networks and hotlines, response teams, Ebola treatment units (ETUs and hospitals, the management of corpses, quarantine and isolation, orphans, memorialization, and the need for community-based training and education. Findings have been presented as community-based strategies and recommendations for (1 prevention, (2 treatment and response, and (3 community sequelae and recovery. Several models for community-based management of the current Ebola outbreak were proposed. Additional findings indicate positive attitudes towards early Ebola survivors, and the need for community-based psychosocial support.Local communities' strategies and recommendations give insight into how urban Liberian communities contained the EVD outbreak while navigating the systemic failures of the initial

  11. IAEA response assistance network. Incident and Emergency Centre. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 May 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    This publication is intended to serve as a tool for supporting the provision of international assistance in the case of nuclear or radiological incident or emergency, cooperation between States, their Competent Authorities and the IAEA, and harmonization of response capabilities of States offering assistance. The publication is issued under the authority of the Director General of the IAEA: (1) under the auspices of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the Assistance Convention) [1], to promote, facilitate and support cooperation between States Parties to coordinate and/or provide assistance to a State Party and/or Member State; and (2) in the case of an incident or emergency, as statutory functions, to provide for the application of its safety standards, upon request by a Member State, and to act as an intermediary for the purposes of securing the performance of services or the supplying of materials, equipment or facilities by one Member State for another. The publication sets out the following: a) the RANET concept and the organizational structure for providing assistance; b) functions, responsibilities and activities within the RANET; c) the RANET response operations and arrangements needed for preparedness; and d) the prerequisites for RANET membership and conditions of registration. The RANET is divided into four sections. After the introduction in Section 1, the RANET concept, objectives and scope are described in Section 2. Section 3 presents the concept of operations of the RANET and Section 4 describes expected tasks, capabilities and resources. In addition, EPR-RANET (2006) has three supporting documents, which are issued separately, as follows: 1. Assistance Action Plans with samples of Assistance Action Plans for providing international assistance. 2. Registry with the details of the registry and instructions on how to register national assistance capabilities for the RANET. 3. Technical Guidelines

  12. Soil fungal community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugwitz, Merian Skouw

    and nutrient availability and storage. By combining molecular methods such as 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of fungal ITS amplicons with analyses of soil enzymes, nutrient pools of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus we were able to characterize soil fungal communities as well as their impact on nutrient...... storage in both a shorter and longer term global change experiment. Extended drought at the dry, temperate heath showed that soil fungi were well adapted to dry conditions. Furthermore, soil fungal communities responded significantly to seasonal fluctuations at the temperate heath, but despite large......Global change will affect the functioning and structure of terrestrial ecosystems and since soil fungi are key players in organic matter decomposition and nutrient turnover, shifts in fungal community composition might have a strong impact on soil functioning. The main focus of this thesis...

  13. Strategic Community Investment : A Good Practice Handbook for Companies Doing Business in Emerging Markets

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2010-01-01

    This handbook updates and expands upon the learning in IFC's 2000 community development resource guide entitled, Investing in People: Sustaining Communities through Improved Business Practice. It was produced in response to demand from companies for updated how-to guidance and current good practice approaches. Companies around the world engage in community investment efforts as a way to pr...

  14. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  15. Special Education in Mexico: One Community's Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Terry L.; Contreras, Diana; Brown, Randel

    2002-01-01

    This article looks at the history of special education in Mexico, discusses the emergence of special education programs, and examines a school for special education in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas. The school provides vocational training for students with a variety of disabilities and has a partnership with the local maquiladora industry. (Contains 5…

  16. A special purpose vehicle for radiological emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeck, K.

    1995-01-01

    The scope of this paper encompasses the design and application of a Contamination Control Station (CCS) Response Vehicle. The vehicle is part of emergency response assets at the Department of Energy Pantex Plant, the nation's final assembly and disassembly point for nuclear weapons. The CCS Response Vehicle was designed to satisfy the need for a rapid deployment of equipment for the setup of a Contamination Control Station. This deployment may be either on the Pantex Plant site, or, if directed by the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office, to any location in the US or worldwide to a site having radioactive contamination and needing response assets of this type. Based on the specialized nature of the vehicle and its mission, certain design criteria must be considered. The vehicle must be air transportable. This criteria alone poses size, weight, and material restrictions due to the transporting aircraft and temperature/pressure variations. This paper first focuses on the overall mission of the vehicle, then highlights some of the design considerations

  17. Emergence of Virtual Communities as Means of Communication: A Case Study on Virtual Health Care Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argan, Mehpare Tokay; Argan, Metin; Suher, Idil K.

    2011-01-01

    Like in all areas, virtual communities make their presence felt in the area of healthcare too. Virtual communities play an important role in healthcare in terms of gathering information on healthcare, sharing of personal interests and providing social support. Virtual communities provide a way for a group of peers to communicate with each other.…

  18. Medical emergency team: transitioning from an external response team to an internal response team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, Elizabeth A; Prestwich, Suzanne; Swearingen, Tami

    2014-01-01

    To outline the process and thoroughly discuss the methods used to transition from an external rapid response team to an internal rapid response team. The medical complexities of the patient population at Kennedy Krieger Institute, coupled with a retrospective data review of past "code calls," revealed a rapid response team was essential. The anticipated loss of the current external rapid response team indicated that an alternative solution would need to be designed. Over a 2-year period, an internal medical response team was developed and implemented to address the potential medical emergency needs of our acute care rehabilitation patients. The outcome from all "code calls" since the implementation of the internal rapid response team has been markedly positive. Comprehensive planning involving many team members, detailed communication with external resources, and extensive education resulted in a seamless transition from an external rapid response team to an internal response team. Freestanding rehabilitation centers do not have the in-house rapid response team resources that an acute care hospital utilizes to address potential medical emergencies. The development and implementation of an internal rapid response team can meet these needs. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  19. Community awareness, preparedness and response towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Disasters have been disrupting the functioning of the community and causing many losses. The victims have been forced to search for basic needs including a place to settle down. This article summarizes evaluation results from a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted in Kilosa, Morogoro to evaluate levels of ...

  20. Propofol for procedural sedation and analgesia reduced dedicated emergency nursing time while maintaining safety in a community emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Joshua C; Abraham, Michael K; Barrueto, Fermin F; Lemkin, Daniel L; Hirshon, Jon M

    2013-09-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia is a core competency in emergency medicine. Propofol is replacing midazolam in many emergency departments. Barriers to performing procedural sedation include resource utilization. We hypothesized that emergency nursing time is shorter with propofol than midazolam, without increasing complications. Retrospective analysis of a procedural sedation registry for two community emergency departments with combined census of 100,000 patients/year. Demographics, procedure, and ASA physical classification status of adult patients receiving procedural sedation between 2007-2010 with midazolam or propofol were analyzed. Primary outcome was dedicated emergency nursing time. Secondary outcomes were procedural success, ED length of stay, and complication rate. Comparative statistics were performed with Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square, or Fisher's exact test. Linear regression was performed with log-transformed procedural sedation time to define predictors. Of 328 procedural sedation and analgesia, 316 met inclusion criteria, of which 60 received midazolam and 256 propofol. Sex distribution varied between groups (midazolam 3% male; propofol 55% male; P = 0.04). Age, procedure, and ASA status were not significantly different. Propofol had shorter procedural sedation time (propofol 32.5 ± 24.2 minutes; midazolam 78.7 ± 51.5 minutes; P procedural success (propofol 98%; midazolam 92%; P = 0.02). There were no significant differences between complication rates (propofol 14%; midazolam 13%; P = 0.88) or emergency department length of stay (propofol 262.5 ± 132.8 minutes; midazolam 288.6 ± 130.6 minutes; P = 0.09). Use of propofol resulted in shorter emergency nursing time and higher procedural success rate than midazolam with a comparable safety profile. Copyright © 2013 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation and response to radiation and nuclear emergencies in case of natural disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegueria, Pablo Jerez; Lafortune, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of natural disasters in cities and communities has grown by different causes in different parts of the world. There are several examples of the impact that have caused extreme natural events in facilities and activities in which ionizing radiation are used. The recent example of the accident at the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daichi with release of radioactive substances to the environment caused by an earthquake and a tsunami show the need of the increasing improvement in the safety of facilities and activities that use ionizing radiation and radioactive materials in general. Planning and response to events of this nature is another aspect that is important and needs attention. The IAEA documents offer a comprehensive and effective guide to achieve an appropriate degree of readiness to respond to nuclear and radiological emergencies in any situation. However, there are specific challenges for planning and response posed a radiological emergency caused by an extreme natural event or occurring simultaneously with this. The present work deals with essential aspects to take into account by the authorities who coordinate the planning and response to radiological emergencies to deal with extreme natural events

  2. Quantitative approach of organizational resilience for a Dutch Emergency Response Safety Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Trijp, J. M P; Ulieru, Mihaela; Van Gelder, Pieter H A J M

    2012-01-01

    Resilience of an Emergency Response Organization is an important concept to determine how well a Dutch Emergency Response Safety Region behaves under stress. The main objective of this study is to determine the intrinsic value "Resilience" in case of a Dutch Emergency Response Safety Region. In this

  3. Emergency Response and the International Charter Space and Major Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.; Lamb, R.

    2011-12-01

    Responding to catastrophic natural disasters requires information. When the flow of information on the ground is interrupted by crises such as earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes, hurricanes, and floods, satellite imagery and aerial photographs become invaluable tools in revealing post-disaster conditions and in aiding disaster response and recovery efforts. USGS is a global clearinghouse for remotely sensed disaster imagery. It is also a source of innovative products derived from satellite imagery that can provide unique overviews as well as important details about the impacts of disasters. Repeatedly, USGS and its resources have proven their worth in assisting with disaster recovery activities in the United States and abroad. USGS has a well-established role in emergency response in the United States. It works closely with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) by providing first responders with satellite and aerial images of disaster-impacted sites and products developed from those images. The combination of the USGS image archive, coupled with its global data transfer capability and on-site science staff, was instrumental in the USGS becoming a participating agency in the International Charter Space and Major Disasters. This participation provides the USGS with access to international members and their space agencies, to information on European and other global member methodology in disaster response, and to data from satellites operated by Charter member countries. Such access enhances the USGS' ability to respond to global emergencies and to disasters that occur in the United States (US). As one example, the Charter agencies provided imagery to the US for over 4 months in response to the Gulf oil spill. The International Charter mission is to provide a unified system of space data acquisition and delivery to those affected by natural or man-made disasters. Each member space agency has committed resources to support the provisions of the Charter and

  4. Culturally Responsive Leadership for Community Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lauri

    2014-01-01

    Culturally responsive leadership, derived from the concept of culturally responsive pedagogy, incorporates those leadership philosophies, practices, and policies that create inclusive schooling environments for students and families from ethnically and culturally diverse backgrounds. In this essay I extend the tenets of culturally responsive…

  5. Perceived Facilitators and Barriers to Local Health Department Workers' Participation in Infectious Disease Emergency Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Lainie; Paul, Amy; Taylor, Holly A; Barnett, Daniel J

    Local health departments play a key role in emergency preparedness and respond to a wide range of threats including infectious diseases such as seasonal influenza, tuberculosis, H1N1, Ebola virus disease, and Zika virus disease. To successfully respond to an infectious disease outbreak, local health departments depend upon the participation of their workforce; yet, studies indicate that sizable numbers of workers would not participate in such a response. The reasons why local health department workers participate, or fail to participate, in infectious disease responses are not well understood. To understand why local health department workers are willing, or not willing, to report to work during an infectious disease response. From April 2015 to January 2016, we conducted 28 semistructured interviews with local health department directors, preparedness staff, and nonpreparedness staff. Interviews were conducted with individuals throughout the United States. We interviewed 28 individuals across 3 groups: local health department directors (n = 8), preparedness staff (n = 10), and nonpreparedness staff (n = 10). Individuals' descriptions of why local health department workers are willing, or not willing, to report to work during an infectious disease response. Factors that facilitate willingness to respond to an infectious disease emergency included availability of vaccines and personal protective equipment; flexible work schedule and childcare arrangements; information sharing via local health department trainings; and perceived commitments to one's job and community. Factors that hinder willingness to respond to an infectious disease emergency included potential disease exposure for oneself and one's family; logistical considerations for care of children, the elderly, and pets; and perceptions about one's role during an infectious disease response. Our findings highlight opportunities for local health departments to revisit their internal policies and engage in

  6. Soil bacterial community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmark, Lasse

    -pyrosequencing and qPCR with a range of soil measurements and analyses to provide a better understanding of the drivers in soil microbial communities. The thesis contains a brief introduction where the most important concepts of global change, soil as a habitat, the nitrogen cycle and nitrification are being...... overall importance for ecosystem function in soil is poorly understood. Global change factors may affect the diversity and functioning of soil prokaryotes and thereby ecosystem functioning. To gain a better understanding of the effects of global changes it is of fundamental importance to classify...... the bacterial soil population. The thesis addresses the effects of different global change manipulations on the soil microbial community composition (climate change in Manuscript 1-4 and unconventional urban fertilizers in Manuscript 5-6). A special emphasis was put on combining molecular techniques like 454...

  7. Nuclear emergency response planning based on participatory decision analytic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkko, K.

    2004-10-01

    This work was undertaken in order to develop methods and techniques for evaluating systematically and comprehensively protective action strategies in the case of a nuclear or radiation emergency. This was done in a way that the concerns and issues of all key players related to decisions on protective actions could be aggregated into decision- making transparently and in an equal manner. An approach called facilitated workshop, based on the theory of Decision Analysis, was tailored and tested in the planning of actions to be taken. The work builds on case studies in which it was assumed that a hypothetical accident in a nuclear power plant had led to a release of considerable amounts of radionuclides and therefore different types of protective actions should be considered. Altogether six workshops were organised in which all key players were represented, i.e., the authorities, expert organisations, industry and agricultural producers. The participants were those responsible for preparing advice or presenting matters for those responsible for the formal decision-making. Many preparatory meetings were held with various experts to prepare information for the workshops. It was considered essential that the set-up strictly follow the decision- making process to which the key players are accustomed. Key players or stakeholders comprise responsible administrators and organisations, politicians as well as representatives of the citizens affected and other persons who will and are likely to take part in decision-making in nuclear emergencies. The realistic nature and the disciplined process of a facilitated workshop and commitment to decision-making yielded up insight in many radiation protection issues. The objectives and attributes which are considered in a decision on protective actions were discussed in many occasions and were defined for different accident scenario to come. In the workshops intervention levels were derived according justification and optimisation

  8. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile: Epidemiology, Ribotype, Risk Factors, Hospital and Intensive Care Unit Outcomes, and Current and Emerging Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Emmanuel; Ramai, Daryl; Dhawan, Monica; Mustafa, Fareeza; Gasperino, James; Reddy, Madhavi

    2018-01-30

    The epidemiological landscape of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed over the past 30 years. To review studies of CDI in the community setting. Electronic databases including PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Google Scholar, Scopus, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Cochrane Databases were searched for human studies performed between 2000 and 2017 that assessed the epidemiology, risk factors, ribotypes, hospital and intensive care unit outcomes, and management of community-acquired CDI. We also manually searched references to identify additional relevant studies. In total, 39 articles met our inclusion criteria. The incidence of community acquired CDI has almost doubled in the past decade. Approximately half of all cases of CDI are attributed to community origin. Individuals who are younger, female, in the presence of infants, frequently use proton pump inhibitors or specific classes of antibiotics, or live near farms and livestock are at higher risk for community-acquired CDI. Additionally, about 40% of all community-acquired cases require hospitalization, where severity has been linked to hypervirulent ribotypes 027 and 078 with poor outcomes. Emerging data on treatment paradigms have led to the revision of clinical guidelines and two potential vaccines in phase three clinical trials. However, ribotype specific response to current treatment strategies is lacking. Community-acquired CDI represents a growing public health threat and burden on healthcare systems. A multidisciplinary approach will be required to stem the tides. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Method for the development of emergency response preparedness for nuclear or radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    This report supplements IAEA emergency preparedness guidance published in the 1980s, and is consistent with the new international guidance. It provides practical advice for the development of an emergency response capability based on the potential nature and magnitude of the risk. In order to apply this method, emergency planners should have a good understanding of the basic radiological emergency response principles. Therefore, other applicable international guidance should be reviewed before using this report. This report provides a practical step-by-step method for developing integrated user, local and national emergency response capabilities. It can also be used as the basis for conducting an audit of an existing emergency response capability

  10. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  11. Response of potential fish community indicators to fishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piet, G.J.; Jennings, S.

    2005-01-01

    Fish community metrics and diversity indices have often been proposed as indicators to support an Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management. The response of eight fish community indicators to spatio-temporal changes in fishing effort was studied by comparing the rate of change in (i) areas subject

  12. Emergency preparedness and response in Israel during the Gulf War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barach, P; Rivkind, A; Israeli, A; Berdugo, M; Richter, E D

    1998-08-01

    We examined the effect of the emergency response on medical and public health problems during the 1991 Gulf War in Israel. On the first day of the conflict, the number of deaths from suffocation, asphyxiation, aspiration, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, and cerebrovascular accident increased abruptly, as did the number of sudden deaths associated with the use of tight-fitting masks with filters in sealed rooms. Much of the excess risk for death from cardiorespiratory complications during the first alert may have been a consequence of its duration (140 minutes). Mass evacuation and concrete buildings are believed to have kept the death toll from trauma down, and mask use may have protected against facial and upper-airway injuries. Falls and hip fractures, airway irritation from exposure to bleach, carbon monoxide intoxication from open kerosene heaters in sealed rooms, and self-injection with atropine syringes were also noted. A measles epidemic and increased death rates from automobile crashes were other preventable causes of death. Protection against biological warfare was limited to surveillance of trends for pneumonia and gastroenteritis. Emergency planners failed to anticipate the need for better mask fit, hands-on training in the use of masks, and special guidelines for older persons to prevent deaths from suffocation and other cardiovascular-respiratory problems in the first minutes of use. If masks are to be distributed as a protection against chemical warfare, a simpler model including the use of shrouds for whole-body skin protection might help avoid cardiorespiratory complications. Public health problems not adequately dealt with in the predisaster period are apt to emerge with greater severity during a crisis.

  13. Preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for a nuclear or radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this publication is to serve as a practical tool for the preparation, conduct and evaluation of exercises to test preparedness for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. It fulfils in part the functions assigned to the IAEA under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), namely, to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning the methodologies, techniques and available results of research on such emergencies. To ensure effective response to radiation emergencies when needed, provisions should be made for regular training of emergency response personnel. As stated in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Safety Requirements, Safety Standard Series No. GS-R-2), 'The operator and the response organizations shall make arrangements for the selection of personnel and training to ensure that the personnel have the requisite knowledge, skills, abilities, equipment, procedures and other arrangements to perform their assigned response functions'. A further requirement is that 'Exercise programmes shall be conducted to ensure that all specified functions required to be performed for emergency response and all organizational interfaces for facilities in threat category I, II or III and the national level programmes for threat category IV or V are tested at suitable intervals'. In 2004 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(48)/RES/10 encouraged Member States to 'implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency'. This document is published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. It was developed based on a number of assumptions about national and local capabilities. Therefore, the exercise structure, terms and scenarios must be

  14. Assessment of community healthcare providers ability and willingness to respond to emergencies resulting from bioterrorist attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crane Jeffery

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous findings have demonstrated that preparedness and planning within the public health system are inadequately developed to respond to an act of biological or chemical terrorism. Methods:This investigation used Internet-based surveys to assess the level of preparedness (PL and willingness to respond (WTR to a bioterrorism attack, and identify factors that predict PL and WTR among Florida community healthcare providers. Invitations were sent to 22,800 healthcare providers in Florida, which resulted in 2,279 respondents. Results: Respondents included physicians (n=604, nurses (n=1,152, and pharmacists (n=486. The results indicated that only 32% of Florida healthcare providers were competent and willing to respond to a bioterrorism attack, 82.7% of providers were willing to respond in their local community, and 53.6% within the State. Respondents were more competent in administrative skills than clinical knowledge (62.8% vs. 45%. Areas in which respondents had the highest competency were the initiation of treatment and recognition of their clinical and administrative roles. Areas in which respondents showed the lowest competency were the ability to identify cases and the ability to communicate risk to others. About 55% of the subjects had previous bioterrorism training and 31.5% had conducted emergency drills. Gender, race, previous training and drills, perceived threats of bioterrorism attack, perceived benefits of training and drills, and feeling prepared were all predictors of overall preparedness. Conclusions: The findings suggest that only one-third of Florida community healthcare providers were prepared for a bioterrorism attack, which is an insufficient response rate to effectively respond to a bioterrorism incident.

  15. Emergency response plan for accidents in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Solaiman, K.M.; Al-Arfaj, A.M.; Farouk, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the general emergency plan for accidents involving radioactive materials in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Uses of radioactive materials and radiation sources and their associated potential accident are specified. Most general accident scenarios of various levels have been determined. Protective measures have been specified to reduce individual and collective doses arising during accident situations. Intervention levels for temporary exposure situations, as established in the IAEA's basic safety standards for protection against ionising radiation and for the safety of radiation sources, are adopted as national intervention levels. General procedures for implementation of the response plan, including notification and radiological monitoring instrumentation and equipment, are described and radiation monitoring teams are nominated. Training programs for the different parties which may be called upon to respond are studied and will be started. (author)

  16. The emergency response guidelines for the Westinghouse pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekens, J.P.; Bastien, R.; Prokopovich, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident has demonstrated that the guidance provided for mitigating the consequences of design basis accidents could be inadequate when multiple incidents, failures or errors occur during or after the accident. Westinghouse and the Westinghouse Owners Group have developed new Emergency Response Guidelines (E.R.G.). The E.R.G. are composed of two independent sets of procedures and of a systematic tool to continuously evaluate the plant safety throughout the response to an accident. a) The Optimal Recovery Guidelines are entered each time the reactor is tripped or the Emergency Core Cooling System is actuated. An immediate verification of the automatic protective actuations is performed and the accident diagnosis process is initiated. When nature of the accident is identified, the operator is transferred to the applicable recovery procedure and subprocedures. A permanent rediagnosis is performed throughout the application of the optimal Recovery Guidelines and cross connections are provided to the adequate procedure if an error in diagnosis is identified. b) Early in the course of the accident, the operating staff initiates monitoring of the Critical Safety Functions. These are defined as the set of functions ensuring the integrity of the physical barriers against radioactivity release. The review of these functions is peformed continuously through a cyclic application of the status trees. c) The Function Restoration Guidelines are entered when the Critical Safety Function monitoring identifies a challenge to one of the functions. Depending on the severity of the challenge, the transfer to a Function Restoration Guideline can be immediate for a severe challenge or delayed for a minor challenge. Those guidelines are independent of the scenario of the accident, but only based on plant parameters and equipment availability

  17. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardo, Piero; Chiabrando, Filiberto; Dutto, Furio; Tonolo, Fabio Giulio; Lingua, Andrea

    2015-07-02

    Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author's group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

  18. UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Boccardo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author’s group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

  19. Community-based oil spill response in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banta, J. [Prince William Sound Regional Citizen' s Advisory Council, Anchorage, AK (United States); Munger, M. [Cook Inlet Regional Citizen' s Advisory Council, Kenai, AK (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The Prince William Sound Regional Citizen's Advisory Council and the Cook Inlet Regional Citizen's Advisory Council are independent, non profit organizations formed in 1989 following the Exxon Valdez oil spill to promote the concept of community-based oil spill response (COSR) in their respective regions. COSR involves local citizens in responding to oil spilled in waters they rely upon for income, recreation and subsistence. The 2 advisory councils recently held a Community Oil Spill Response Forum to review the status of existing COSR teams and to share information about past and future COSR-related efforts. The meeting served as an information exchange process about regulatory programs, COSR variations in communities and harbors, training, and personnel issues. Key groups attending the forum were harbor masters, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, United States Coast Guard, existing COSR teams, oil response organizations, local community governments, and volunteers from the advisory councils. This paper was based on the notes taken from the forum. It was agreed that the current system is inadequate in its response to small spills that are frequently associated with non-tank vessels. It was suggested that improved capacity for community-based response could address the situation. It was also suggested that work groups should meet on an annual or biannual basis to continue to educate responders and communities about oil spill response. 7 refs.

  20. Emergency Response Damage Assessment using Satellite Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clandillon, Stephen; Yésou, Hervé; Schneiderhan, Tobias; de Boissezon, Hélène; de Fraipont, Paul

    2013-04-01

    During disasters rescue and relief organisations need quick access to reliable and accurate information to be better equipped to do their job. It is increasingly felt that satellites offer a unique near real time (NRT) tool to aid disaster management. A short introduction to the International Charter 'Space and Major Disasters', in operation since 2000 promoting worldwide cooperation among member space agencies, will be given as it is the foundation on which satellite-based, emergency response, damage assessment has been built. Other complementary mechanisms will also be discussed. The user access, triggering mechanism, an essential component for this user-driven service, will be highlighted with its 24/7 single access point. Then, a clear distinction will be made between data provision and geo-information delivery mechanisms to underline the user need for geo-information that is easily integrated into their working environments. Briefly, the path to assured emergency response product quality will be presented beginning with user requirements, expressed early-on, for emergency response value-adding services. Initiatives were then established, supported by national and European institutions, to develop the sector, with SERTIT and DLR being key players, providing support to decision makers in headquarters and relief teams in the field. To consistently meet the high quality levels demanded by users, rapid mapping has been transformed via workflow and quality control standardisation to improve both speed and quality. As such, SERTIT located in Alsace, France, and DLR/ZKI from Bavaria, Germany, join their knowledge in this presentation to report about recent standards as both have ISO certified their rapid mapping services based on experienced, well-trained, 24/7 on-call teams and established systems providing the first crisis analysis product in 6 hours after satellite data reception. The three main product types provided are then outlined: up-to-date pre

  1. Preparedness of hazardous materials emergencies in railyards: Guidance for railroads and adjacent communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Railroads are a key part of the distribution system for hazardous materials and, thus, much hazardous material passes through railyards en route to intermediate or final consumers. While the vast majority of these materials are shipped without incident, both the number of shipments and the nature of the materials themselves dictate that railyards and surrounding communities be prepared to respond quickly and effectively to emergencies. This report contains information on 11 emergency preparedness functions and 150 guidance recommendations.

  2. The national radiological emergency preparedness and response plan in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdezco, Eulinia Mendoza

    2007-01-01

    The use of radiation sources of various types and activities is now widespread in the fields of industry, medicine, research and education in the Philippines. These radiation sources have been under the regulatory control of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) to ensure that these materials are used in a safe manner and stored in a safe and secure location, and that those which have exceeded their useful life are appropriately disposed of. And while the safety record of the nuclear industry remains admirable compared to other industries, the occurrence of an accident affecting members of the public is always a possibility but with very low probability. In 2001, the National Disaster Coordinating Council (NDCC) approved the revised National Radiological Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan (RADPLAN). This plan outlines the activities and organizations necessary to mitigate the effects of nuclear emergencies or radiation related accidents. An important component of this plan is the education of the public as well as the emergency responders such as the police authorities fire emergency personnel, medical responders, community leaders and the general public. The threat of nuclear terrorism as an aftermath of the September 11 incident in the United States has also been considered in the latest revision of this document. (author)

  3. Maximizing participation of Hispanic community-based/non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in emergency preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Unger, Jennifer; Portugal, Cecilia; Delgado, Jane L; Falcon, Adolph; Gaitan, Marcela

    To better understand social and structural changes needed to maximize community-based participation in emergency preparedness, 27 organizations, representing 12 states, participated in a study of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health. The study assessed social change needs (social will, community readiness, assets, and barriers) and structural needs (organizational capacity to integrate services into emergency management efforts locally). Results show high social will but little community readiness. Most non-governmental organizations (NGOs; 96%) were willing, but ill-prepared (65%) to face large-scale emergencies. Assets include bilingual/bicultural personnel, cultural competency, local knowledge, and public trust. Barriers include lack of culturally appropriate training and resources. Structurally, most NGOs want to link with voluntary organizations (79%) and public health departments (74%), but lack integration and coordination. Maximizing timely participation of these underutilized stakeholders in emergency planning can ensure culturally-proficient, community-tailored emergency plans, increased public confidence, and timely compliance with evacuation orders, thus helping to save lives.

  4. Restorative justice: a changing community response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose herein is to demonstrate how restorative justice continues to unfold globally and we explain how the use of a restorative justice ideology and intervention leads to a common alternative, not only in criminal justice institutions, but also within social agencies, such as elementary schools, and the related social support systems. We draw attention to this emerging trend via current research and resources that enable us to put forward a definition, theoretical background and list the characteristic traits of this alternative mode of life consequence. Finally, we argue that the use of restorative justice in schools is a focus that is really a paradigm shift within the landscape of the educational enterprise.

  5. Emergency Department Utilization and Self-Reported Symptoms in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Patricia; Kennedy, Richard; Williams, Courtney; Brown, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The rise in emergency department (ED) utilization among older adults is a nursing concern, because emergency nurses are uniquely positioned to positively impact the care of older adults. Symptoms have been associated with ED utilization, however, it remains unclear if symptoms are the primary reason for ED utilization. Purpose Describe the self-reported symptoms of community-dwelling older adults prior to accessing the emergency department. Examine the differences in self-reported symptoms among those who utilized the emergency department, and those who did not. Procedures A prospective longitudinal design was used. The sample included 403 community-dwelling older adults 75 years and older. Baseline in-home interviews were conducted followed by monthly telephone interviews over 15 months. Main Findings Commonly reported symptoms at baseline included pain, feeling tired, and having shortness of breath. In univariate analysis, pain, shortness of breath, fair/poor well-being, and feeling tired were significantly correlated with ED utilization. In multivariable models, problems with balance, and fair/poor well-being were significantly associated with ED utilization. Conclusions Several symptoms were common among this cohort of older adults. However, there were no significant differences in the types of symptoms reported by older adults who utilized the emergency department compared to those who did not use the emergency department. Based on these findings, symptoms among community-dwelling older adults may not be the primary reason for ED utilization. PMID:28131350

  6. Penerapan Corporate Social Responsibility dengan Konsep Community Based Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Suriany

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Business is not only economic institution, but social institution too. As social institution, business has responsibility to help society in solving social problem. This responsibility called Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR. CSR pays attention about social problem and environment, so CSR support continuous development to help government role. Nowadays, our government has national development’s agenda. One of them is tourism sector (Visit Indonesia Year 2008 programmed. But tourism sector has challenge in human resources. In this case, business role in practice CSR is needed to help tourism sector. With CSR activities, the quality of local community will increase to participate in tourism activities. CSR activities include training that based on research. When the quality of local community increase, local community can practice the concept of community based tourism (CBT. In the future, Indonesia has a power to compete with other countries.

  7. Perceptions about Homeless Elders and Community Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael N.; Green, Diane; Jacobs, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Human service students were surveyed ("N" = 207) to determine their perceptions about homeless elders and communal responsibility for their well-being. Using a backward regression analysis, a final model ("F" = 15.617, "df" = 7, "p" Homeless Persons and Community…

  8. Perceptions about Homeless Elders and Community Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael N.; Green, Diane; Jacobs, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Human service students were surveyed ("N" = 207) to determine their perceptions about homeless elders and communal responsibility for their well-being. Using a backward regression analysis, a final model ("F" = 15.617, "df" = 7, "p" < 0.001) for Perceptions about Homeless Persons and Community…

  9. Understanding the Value of a Computer Emergency Response Capability for Nuclear Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasper, Peter Donald [Idaho National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-06-01

    The international nuclear community has a great understanding of the physical security needs relating to the prevention, detection, and response of malicious acts associated with nuclear facilities and radioactive material. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Recommendations (INFCIRC_225_Rev 5) outlines specific guidelines and recommendations for implementing and maintaining an organization’s nuclear security posture. An important element for inclusion into supporting revision 5 is the establishment of a “Cyber Emergency Response Team (CERT)” focused on the international communities cybersecurity needs to maintain a comprehensive nuclear security posture. Cybersecurity and the importance of nuclear cybersecurity require that there be a specific focus on developing an International Nuclear CERT (NS-CERT). States establishing contingency plans should have an understanding of the cyber threat landscape and the potential impacts to systems in place to protect and mitigate malicious activities. This paper will outline the necessary components, discuss the relationships needed within the international community, and outline a process by which the NS-CERT identifies, collects, processes, and reports critical information in order to establish situational awareness (SA) and support decision-making

  10. Emergency response during the radiological control of scraps in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Viltre, Enma O.; Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Dominguez Ley, Orlando; Capote Ferrera, Eduardo; Fernandez Gomez, Isis M.; Caveda Ramos, Celia; Carrazana, Jorge; Barroso Perez, Idelisa

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years, in the international scene, incidents have been reported due to the presence of radioactive materials in the scrap. This reality has motivated the adoption of measures of radiological security, due to the implications that these incidents have for the public and the environment, as well as for the international trade. Among theses actions is the implementation of the radiological control of scrap, with the additional requirement that this control has to be implemented in the framework of a Quality Management Program.Taking into account the international experience, our institution designed and organized in 2002 a national service for the radiological monitoring of scrap, being the clients the main exporting and trading enterprises of this material in the country. During these years, several contaminated materials have been detected, causing incidents that activated the radiological emergency response system. In this sense, since some years ago, our country has been working in the implementation of a national and ministerial system for facing and mitigating the consequences of accidental radiological situations, conjugating efforts and wills from different national institutions with the leadership of the Center of Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) and the Center of Nuclear Security (CNSN) in correspondence with the social responsibility assigned to the them. These incidents propitiate to have not only a system of capacity and quick response oriented to limit the exposure of people, to control the sources, to mitigate the consequences of the accident and to reestablish the conditions of normality, but also a previous adequate planning that guarantees the speed and effectiveness of it. In these work the experiences reached by the specialists of the CPHR from Cuba during the occurrence of an incident in the execution of the service of radiological monitoring of scraps are exposed. (author)

  11. 44 CFR 352.27 - Federal role in the emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal role in the emergency response. 352.27 Section 352.27 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... those governments, and only as a last resort after appropriate consultation with the Governors and...

  12. Radioactive source recovery program responses to neutron source emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinehart, S.M.; Hatler, V.A.; Gray, D.W.; Guillen, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Recovery of neutron sources containing Pu 239 and Be is currently taking place at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program was initiated in 1979 by the Department of Energy (DOE) to dismantle and recover sources owned primarily by universities and the Department of Defense. Since the inception of this program, Los Alamos has dismantled and recovered more than 1000 sources. The dismantlement and recovery process involves the removal of source cladding and the chemical separation of the source materials to eliminate neutron emissions. While this program continues for the disposal of 239 Pu/Be sources, there is currently no avenue for the disposition of any sources other than those containing Pu 239 . Increasingly, there have been demands from agencies both inside and outside the Federal Government and from the public to dispose of unwanted sources containing 238 Pu/Be and 241 Am/Be. DOE is attempting to establish a formal program to recover these sources and is working closely with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on a proposed Memorandum of Understanding to formalize an Acceptance Program. In the absence of a formal program to handle 238 Pu/Be and 241 Am/Be neutron sources, Los Alamos has responded to several emergency requests to receive and recover sources that have been determined to be a threat to public health and safety. This presentation will: (1) review the established 239 Pu neutron source recovery program at Los Alamos, (2) detail plans for a more extensive neutron source disposal program, and (3) focus on recent emergency responses

  13. UTILIZING SAR AND MULTISPECTRAL INTEGRATED DATA FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Havivi

    2016-06-01

    complete scene for the emergency response following an event.

  14. Informal Learning in Online Knowledge Communities: Predicting Community Response to Visitor Inquiries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nistor, Nicolae; Dascalu, Mihai; Stavarache, Lucia Larise; Serafin, Yvonne; Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Nistor, N., Dascalu, M., Stavarache, L.L., Serafin, Y., & Trausan-Matu, S. (2015). Informal Learning in Online Knowledge Communities: Predicting Community Response to Visitor Inquiries. In G. Conole, T. Klobucar, C. Rensing, J. Konert & É. Lavoué (Eds.), 10th European Conf. on Technology Enhanced

  15. Engaging with communities, engaging with patients: amendment to the NAPCRG 1998 Policy Statement on Responsible Research With Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michele L; Salsberg, Jon; Knot, Michaela; LeMaster, Joseph W; Felzien, Maret; Westfall, John M; Herbert, Carol P; Vickery, Katherine; Culhane-Pera, Kathleen A; Ramsden, Vivian R; Zittleman, Linda; Martin, Ruth Elwood; Macaulay, Ann C

    2017-06-01

    In 1998, the North American Primary Care Research Group (NAPCRG) adopted a groundbreaking Policy Statement endorsing responsible participatory research (PR) with communities. Since that time, PR gained prominence in primary care research. To reconsider the original 1998 Policy Statement in light of increased uptake of PR, and suggest future directions and applications for PR in primary care. This work contributed to an updated Policy Statement endorsed by NAPCRG in 2015. 32 university and 30 community NAPCRG-affiliated research partners, convened a workshop to document lessons learned about implementing processes and principles of PR. This document emerged from that session and reflection and discussion regarding the original Policy Statement, the emerging PR literature, and our own experiences. The foundational principles articulated in the 1998 Policy Statement remain relevant to the current PR environment. Lessons learned since its publication include that the maturation of partnerships is facilitated by participatory processes that support increased community responsibility for research projects, and benefits generated through PR extend beyond research outcomes. Future directions that will move forward the field of PR in primary care include: (i) improve assessment of PR processes to better delineate the links between how PR teams work together and diverse PR outcomes, (ii) increase the number of models incorporating PR into translational research from project inception to dissemination, and (iii) increase application of PR approaches that support patient engagement in clinical settings to patient-provider relationship and practice change research. PR has markedly altered the manner in which primary care research is undertaken in partnership with communities and its principles and philosophies continue to offer means to assure that research results and processes improve the health of all communities. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All

  16. A Novel Emergency Department-based Community Notification Method for Clinical Research Without Consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Gerald F; Giraldo, Patricia; Deitch, Kenneth; Aguilera, Elizabeth Andrea; Cadar, Sorin; Lares, Claudia; O'Malley, Rika Nagakuni; Oqroshidze, Nino; Verma, Manisha; Chudnofsky, Carl

    2017-06-01

    We used an emergency department (ED)-based method to provide targeted, individualized consultation; community notification; and public disclosure and collect data regarding willingness to participate in prospective resuscitation research requiring waiver of consent. We conducted a prospective survey of convenience cohort in an urban ED. We targeted the community of ED patients with pulmonary disease for individualized notification and public disclosure using a 1) large poster, 2) scripted oral presentation describing an emergency intubation clinical trial, and 3) video demonstration. Approximately 10% of our annual ED census, 6,936 subjects, enrolled. Of that total, 29 were also subjects in a prospective coincident endotracheal resuscitation intubation study, which enrolled a total of 262 subjects. ED community notification was provided to 22 of the 29 (75.9%) subjects prior to the visit during which they were intubated (13 agreed to participate, six declined, and three undecided) and seven of the 29 subjects subsequent to enrollment in the intubation study (five agreed to participate and two undecided). Fourteen of the 29 patients who participated in both projects had undergone endotracheal intubation at least once prior to community notification: 10 agreed to participate in the study, two declined, and two were undecided. Emergency department-based community notification and public disclosure is a viable way to provide information to a target population and collect data about the success of the notification. Feedback data collection is critical to an ethical understanding of the success of community notification for the institutional review board and investigators. Collection of feedback data should be required as a subject protection for exception from informed consent in emergency settings. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. A FTA-based method for risk decision-making in emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Decision-making problems in emergency response are usually risky and uncertain due to the limited decision data and possible evolvement of emergency scenarios. This paper focuses on a risk decisionmaking problem in emergency response with several distinct characteristics including dynamic...

  18. The social responsibility commitment to the community and care environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elena López Regalado

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of csr has evolved in recent years, currently the main objective of the Company cannot lie only meet the monetary needs of the shareholders, but to seek the participation of all stakeholders in the company, with the different stakeholders that interact with the environment either customers, suppliers, employees and society at large, impacting the community with socially responsible actions. Because the concept has acquired new shades as social, economic and environmental responsibility among others, being on the great responsibility of the actions of companies to make social or common good acts to achieve their objectives without harming their economies community, the next job is presented focusing especially on two major indicators of social responsibility such as environmental care, and welfare of the community.

  19. Geographic Information System Technology Leveraged for Crisis Planning, Emergency, Response, and Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is piloting the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology that can be leveraged for crisis planning, emergency response, and disaster management/awareness. Many different organizations currently use GIS tools and geospatial data during a disaster event. ASDC datasets have not been fully utilized by this community in the past due to incompatible data formats that ASDC holdings are archived in. Through the successful implementation of this pilot effort and continued collaboration with the larger Homeland Defense and Department of Defense emergency management community through the Homeland Infrastructure Foundation-Level Data Working Group (HIFLD WG), our data will be easily accessible to those using GIS and increase the ability to plan, respond, manage, and provide awareness during disasters. The HIFLD WG Partnership has expanded to include more than 5,900 mission partners representing the 14 executive departments, 98 agencies, 50 states (and 3 territories), and more than 700 private sector organizations to directly enhance the federal, state, and local government's ability to support domestic infrastructure data gathering, sharing and protection, visualization, and spatial knowledge management.The HIFLD WG Executive Membership is lead by representatives from the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs - OASD (HD&ASA); the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate's Office of Infrastructure Protection (NPPD IP); the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Integrated Working Group - Readiness, Response and Recovery (IWG-R3); the Department of Interior (DOI) United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP), and DHS Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  20. Response in the late phase to a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: This paper will look at the key issues that need to be addressed during the transition from the emergency phase to the recovery phase, and the development of the initial recovery strategy. It will then discuss the extent to which current national plans and international advice address the needs of decision makers following contamination of inhabited areas and food production systems. Since the events of September 11 th 2001, attention is becoming increasingly focussed on the response to the deliberate dispersal of radioactive material, eg so called 'dirty bombs' or deliberate contamination of the food supply. Whilst some aspects of the response to a dirty bomb will be similar to those for a nuclear accident, in other respects such deliberate dispersal will pose additional challenges (e.g. identification of the radionuclide(s) involved, likely dispersion from within an urban area for dirty bombs, identification of the geographical spread of foods contaminated). This papers also considers the extent to which existing arrangements and assessments underpinning nuclear accident response would need modification/upgrading for response to deliberate dispersal. In the transition from the emergency phase to the recovery phase, decision makers will be under pressure to make rapid decisions concerning the lifting of countermeasures implemented during the emergency phase and the need for further measures. A failure to respond promptly will leave an information void in which other, self-styled, experts will advertise their solutions, thereby adding to the pressure. This may then lead to a loss of confidence by the public, and make it more difficult to develop a practicable recovery strategy that is also acceptable to those affected. However, if decisions are made without a full understanding of the contamination pattern and its likely future impact, then it is possible that promises or actions taken early on will need to be reversed as a fuller understanding of the

  1. ANSI/ANS-8.23-1997: nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    American National Standard ANSUANS-8.23 was developed to expand upon the basic emergency response guidance given in American National Standard, 'Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety' ANSI/ANS-8.19-1996 (Ref. 1). This standard provides guidance for minimizing risks to personnel during emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident outside reactors. This standard is intended to apply to those facilities for which a criticality accident alarm system, as specified in American National Standard, 'Criticality Accident Alarm System', ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 (Ref. 2) is in use. The Working Group was established in 1990, with Norman L. Pruvost as chairman. The Working Group had up to twenty-three members representing a broad range of the nuclear industry, and has included members from Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom. The initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23 was approved by the American National Standards Institute on December 30, 1997. It provides guidance for the following topics: (1) Management and technical staff responsibilities; (2) Evaluation of a potential criticality accident; (3) Emergency plan provisions; (4) Evacuation; (5) Re-entry, rescue and stabilization; and (6) Classroom training, exercises and evacuation drills. This guidance is not for generic emergency planning issues, but is specific to nuclear criticality accidents. For example, it assumes that an Emergency Plan is already established at facilities that implement the standard. During the development of the initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23, each Working Group member evaluated potential use of the standard at a facility with which the member was familiar. This revealed areas where a facility could have difficulty complying with the standard. These reviews helped identify and eliminate many potential problems and ambiguities with the guidance. The Working Group has received very limited feedback from the user community since the first edition of the standard was published. Suggestions

  2. Religiosity, Discrimination, and Community Engagement: Gendered Pathways of Muslim American Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Selcuk R.; Katsiaficas, Dalal

    2011-01-01

    The attacks on September 11, 2001, changed the lives of all Americans. For many immigrant Muslims in the United States this meant dealing with an elevated amount of discrimination. This study investigated how perceived discrimination influenced levels of community engagement among Muslim American emerging adults and whether it varied by gender.…

  3. The Emerging Landscape of School-Based Professional Learning Communities in South Korean Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moosung; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, school-based professional learning communities (PLCs) have emerged as a key feature of the education system in South Korea. To understand this relatively new phenomenon in the context of South Korea, we provide a review of research on school-based PLCs in South Korea and an empirical analysis of the Teaching and Learning…

  4. Markers of infectious disease emergencies: Focus on patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, C.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we explore the potential of several biomarkers of infection in infectious disease emergencies in general with a specific focus on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), risk factors in the development of CAP and markers of infection in CAP as well as in specific etiologic forms of CAP,

  5. Identifying Effective Methods of Instruction for Adult Emergent Readers through Community-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer, Rachel; Hayes-Harb, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    We present a community-based research project aimed at identifying effective methods and materials for teaching English literacy skills to adult English as a second language emergent readers. We conducted a quasi-experimental study whereby we evaluated the efficacy of two approaches, one based on current practices at the English Skills Learning…

  6. Unveiling the Mirror: Afro-Brazilian Identity and the Emergence of the Community School Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones de Almeida, Adjoa Florencia

    2003-01-01

    Afro-Brazilian residents of urban favelas (outlying, unincorporated slums) have established community schools in response to lack of public schools. A study of three such community schools in Salvador, Bahia, focused on social justice issues, school efforts to rescue a Black identity denied by Brazil's official "racial democracy"…

  7. Lessons from the Ebola Outbreak: Action Items for Emerging Infectious Disease Preparedness and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Aguirre, A Alonso; Bailey, Charles L; Baranova, Ancha V; Crooks, Andrew T; Croitoru, Arie; Delamater, Paul L; Gupta, Jhumka; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Narayanan, Aarthi; Pierobon, Mariaelena; Rowan, Katherine E; Schwebach, J Reid; Seshaiyer, Padmanabhan; Sklarew, Dann M; Stefanidis, Anthony; Agouris, Peggy

    2016-03-01

    As the Ebola outbreak in West Africa wanes, it is time for the international scientific community to reflect on how to improve the detection of and coordinated response to future epidemics. Our interdisciplinary team identified key lessons learned from the Ebola outbreak that can be clustered into three areas: environmental conditions related to early warning systems, host characteristics related to public health, and agent issues that can be addressed through the laboratory sciences. In particular, we need to increase zoonotic surveillance activities, implement more effective ecological health interventions, expand prediction modeling, support medical and public health systems in order to improve local and international responses to epidemics, improve risk communication, better understand the role of social media in outbreak awareness and response, produce better diagnostic tools, create better therapeutic medications, and design better vaccines. This list highlights research priorities and policy actions the global community can take now to be better prepared for future emerging infectious disease outbreaks that threaten global public health and security.

  8. Joint radiation emergency management plan of the international organizations. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions allocated to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a number of States, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full Parties. Since 1989, the arrangements between these organizations for facilitating the practical implementation of those articles of the two Conventions that are operational in nature have been documented by the IAEA in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). The manual is intended for use primarily by Contact Points as identified in the Conventions. Pursuant to the obligations placed on it by the Conventions, the IAEA regularly convenes the Inter-Agency Committee on Response to Nuclear Accidents (lACRNA), whose purpose is to co-ordinate the arrangements of the relevant international intergovernmental organizations ('international organizations') for preparing for and responding to nuclear or radiological emergencies. Although the Conventions assign specific response functions and responsibilities to the IAEA and the Parties, various international organizations have - by virtue of their statutory functions or of related legal instruments - general functions and responsibilities that encompass aspects of preparedness and response. Moreover, some regional organizations (e.g. the European Union) are party to legally binding treaties and have

  9. Emergency response to landslide using GNSS measurements and UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Koukouvelas, Ioannis K.

    2017-10-01

    Landslide monitoring can be performed using many different methods: Classical geotechnical measurements like inclinometer, topographical survey measurements with total stations or GNSS sensors and photogrammetric techniques using airphotos or high resolution satellite images. However all these methods are expensive or difficult to be developed immediately after the landslide triggering. In contrast airborne technology and especially the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) make response to landslide disaster easier as UAVs can be launched quickly in dangerous terrains and send data about the sliding areas to responders on the ground either as RGB images or as videos. In addition, the emergency response to landslide is critical for the further monitoring. For proper displacement identification all the above mentioned monitoring methods need a high resolution and a very accurate representation of the relief. The ideal solution for the accurate and quick mapping of a landslide is the combined use of UAV's photogrammetry and GNSS measurements. UAVs have started their development as expensive toys but they currently became a very valuable tool in large scale mapping of sliding areas. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an effective solution for the initial landslide mapping immediately after the occurrence of the phenomenon and the possibility of the periodical assessment of the landslide. Three different landslide cases from Greece are presented in the current study. All three landslides have different characteristics: occurred in different geomorphologic environments, triggered by different causes and had different geologic bedrock. In all three cases we performed detailed GNSS measurements of the landslide area, we generated orthophotos as well as Digital Surface Models (DSMs) at an accuracy of less than +/-10 cm. Slide direction and velocity, mass balances as well as protection and mitigation measurements can be derived from the application of the UAVs

  10. EMERGENCE OF VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES AS MEANS OF COMMUNICATION: A Case Study On Virtual Health Care Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehpare Tokay ARGAN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, like in all areas, the Internet has had an important effect in the area of health as well. With the development of the Internet many new and different applications have developed and one of the most important of these are probably virtual communities. Virtual communities, which are used as a tool for providing information and word of mouth communication, have become a widely used marketing tool in the area of healthcare services in recent years. A virtual community is a group that does not depend on space and time to maintain ties or participation in the group whose members share the same interest and to maintain closeness, that is based on internet communications and whose membership is based on free will. In these kinds of communities whose services are provided on a membership basis, health services of various kinds are offered to the members. In virtual communities, virtual interactive communications established between the members can be an important determining factor when choosing a product, service or doctor.

  11. Ocular responses and visual performance after emergent acceleration stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Ling; Horng, Chi-Ting; Liu, Chun-Cheng; Shieh, Pochuen; Hung, Chun-Ling; Lu, Da-Wen; Chiang, Shang-Yi; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chiou, Wen-Yaw

    2011-11-07

    To evaluate visual function after emergent acceleration stress. Sixteen subjects were enrolled in this study. Human ejection seat trainer was used to induce six times gravitational force in the head-to-toe (z-axis) direction (+6 Gz). Visual performance was evaluated using the visual chart and contrast sensitivity (CS) at indicated times. Ocular reactions were assessed with biomicroscopy and topographic mapping. Temporary visual acuity reduction (0.02 ± 0.05 vs. 0.18 ± 0.08 logMAR visual acuity [VA]; P gravitational stress (5.42 ± 0.54 mm, P acceleration force induces significant ocular responses and visual fluctuation. Prolonged ACD deepening (>15 minutes) and PD (>30 minutes) were noted, but cornea and refraction remain stable. CS at all spatial frequencies revealed remarkable reduction immediately after ejection, and recovered to baseline levels within 30 minutes only at high spatial frequency. Neuroretinal function may involve visual fluctuation after acceleration stress, because visual fluctuation corresponds with the characters of neuroretinal function. However, further studies are necessary.

  12. Hanford Site emergency response needs, Volumes 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive third party needs assessment of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD), conducted by Hughes Associates Inc. The assessment was commissioned with the intent of obtaining an unbiased report which could be used as a basis for identifying needed changes/modifications to the fire department and its services. This report serves several functions: (1) it documents current and future site operations and associated hazards and risks identified as a result of document review, site and facility surveys, and interviews with knowledgeable personnel; (2) describes the HFD in terms of organization, existing resources and response capabilities; (3) identifies regulatory and other requirements that are applicable to the HFD and includes a discussion of associated legal liabilities; and (4) provides recommendations based on applicable requirements and existing conditions. Each recommendation is followed by a supporting statement to clarify the intent or justification of the recommendation. This report will be followed by a Master Plan document which will present an implementation method for the recommendations (with associated costs) considered to be essential to maintaining adequate, cost effective emergency services at the Hanford site in the next five to seven years

  13. New Structure of Emergency Response Plan in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcic, I.; Subasic, D.; Cavlina, N.

    1998-01-01

    The new structure of a national emergency response plan in the case of nuclear accident is based on general requirements of modernization according to international recommendations, with a new Technical Support Center as a so-called lead technical agency, with the plan adapted to the organization of the Civil Protection, with all necessary elements of preparedness for the event of a nuclear accident in Krsko NPP and Paks NPP and with such a plan of procedures that will, to greatest possible extent, be compatible with the existing plan in neighboring countries Slovenia and Hungary. The main requirement that direct s a new organization scheme for taking protective actions in the event of a nuclear accident, is the requirement of introducing a Technical Support Center. The basic role of TSC is collecting data and information on nuclear accident, analyzing and estimating development of an accident, and preparing proposals for taking protective actions and for informing the public. TSC is required to forward those proposals to the Civil Protection, which on the basis of evaluation of proposals makes decisions on implementation and surveillance of implementation of protective measures. (author)

  14. Hanford Site emergency response needs, Volumes 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, D.E.

    1996-04-16

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive third party needs assessment of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD), conducted by Hughes Associates Inc. The assessment was commissioned with the intent of obtaining an unbiased report which could be used as a basis for identifying needed changes/modifications to the fire department and its services. This report serves several functions: (1) it documents current and future site operations and associated hazards and risks identified as a result of document review, site and facility surveys, and interviews with knowledgeable personnel; (2) describes the HFD in terms of organization, existing resources and response capabilities; (3) identifies regulatory and other requirements that are applicable to the HFD and includes a discussion of associated legal liabilities; and (4) provides recommendations based on applicable requirements and existing conditions. Each recommendation is followed by a supporting statement to clarify the intent or justification of the recommendation. This report will be followed by a Master Plan document which will present an implementation method for the recommendations (with associated costs) considered to be essential to maintaining adequate, cost effective emergency services at the Hanford site in the next five to seven years.

  15. Rapid screening of radioactivity in food for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.; Khan, A.J.; Semkow, T.M.; Syed, U.-F.; Roselan, A.; Haines, D.K.; Roth, G.; West, L.; Arndt, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of methods for the rapid screening of gross alpha (GA) and gross beta (GB) radioactivity in liquid foods, specifically, Tang drink mix, apple juice, and milk, as well as screening of GA, GB, and gamma radioactivity from surface deposition on apples. Detailed procedures were developed for spiking of matrices with 241 Am (alpha radioactivity), 90 Sr/ 90 Y (beta radioactivity), and 60 Co, 137 Cs, and 241 Am (gamma radioactivity). Matrix stability studies were performed for 43 days after spiking. The method for liquid foods is based upon rapid digestion, evaporation, and flaming, followed by gas proportional (GP) counting. For the apple matrix, surface radioactivity was acid-leached, followed by GP counting and/or gamma spectrometry. The average leaching recoveries from four different apple brands were between 63% and 96%, and have been interpreted on the basis of ion transport through the apple cuticle. The minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs) were calculated from either the background or method-blank (MB) measurements. They were found to satisfy the required U.S. FDA's Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) in all but one case. The newly developed methods can perform radioactivity screening in foods within a few hours and have the potential to capacity with further automation. They are especially applicable to emergency response following accidental or intentional contamination of food with radioactivity.

  16. Rapid screening of radioactivity in food for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, A; Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Syed, U-F; Roselan, A; Haines, D K; Roth, G; West, L; Arndt, M

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the development of methods for the rapid screening of gross alpha (GA) and gross beta (GB) radioactivity in liquid foods, specifically, Tang drink mix, apple juice, and milk, as well as screening of GA, GB, and gamma radioactivity from surface deposition on apples. Detailed procedures were developed for spiking of matrices with (241)Am (alpha radioactivity), (90)Sr/(90)Y (beta radioactivity), and (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (241)Am (gamma radioactivity). Matrix stability studies were performed for 43 days after spiking. The method for liquid foods is based upon rapid digestion, evaporation, and flaming, followed by gas proportional (GP) counting. For the apple matrix, surface radioactivity was acid-leached, followed by GP counting and/or gamma spectrometry. The average leaching recoveries from four different apple brands were between 63% and 96%, and have been interpreted on the basis of ion transport through the apple cuticle. The minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs) were calculated from either the background or method-blank (MB) measurements. They were found to satisfy the required U.S. FDA's Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) in all but one case. The newly developed methods can perform radioactivity screening in foods within a few hours and have the potential to capacity with further automation. They are especially applicable to emergency response following accidental or intentional contamination of food with radioactivity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. EPA’s Role in Emergency Response - Special Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Response Team; Radiological Response Team; Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Consequence Management Advisory Division; and National Criminal Enforcement Response Team provide specialized support.

  18. Assessment of emergency response planning and implementation in the aftermath of major natural disasters and technological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligan, Patricia A.; Jones, Joseph; Walton, F.; Smith, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency planning around nuclear power plants represents some of the most mature and well developed emergency planning in the United States. Since the implementation of NUREG-0654 / FEMA-REP-1, Rev. 1, A Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants (NRC, 1980a) the licensees, local, and State agencies have developed detailed Radiological Emergency Response Programs. An important component of these plans is the evacuation of the population in the event of a general emergency condition at the plant. In January 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the landmark report, 'Identification and Analysis of Factors Affecting Emergency Evacuations' (NUREG/CR 6864/), which represented the most comprehensive investigation of public evacuations in the United States in more than 15 years. Since the completion of this research, several high profile evacuations have occurred, including Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Hurricane Rita in Houston, as well as major wildfires across the western U.S. The NRC commissioned an update to its 2005 evacuation case study publication to evaluate the evacuation experience of the selected communities (e.g., timeliness, related injuries, hazard avoidance); the level of preplanning that was in place for the affected areas and extent that the pre planned requirements were implemented during the emergency response; the critical factors contributing to the efficiency of or impediments to the evacuations (e.g., training, drills, preparedness, experience, resources, facilities, and organizational structure); and additional factors that may have contributed to less than satisfactory public response (i.e., availability of personal transportation, use of public transportation, lack of availability of shelters, etc.). The comprehensive report will be published in fall of 2008 as NUREG/CR-6981, Assessment of Emergency Response Planning and

  19. Emergent macrophytes modify the abundance and community composition of ammonia oxidizers in their rhizosphere sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dayong; He, Xiaowei; Huang, Rui; Yan, Wenming; Yu, Zhongbo

    2017-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation is a crucial process in global nitrogen cycling, which is catalyzed by the ammonia oxidizers. Emergent plants play important roles in the freshwater ecosystem. Therefore, it is meaningful to investigate the effects of emergent macrophytes on the abundance and community composition of ammonia oxidizers. In the present study, two commonly found emergent macrophytes (Zizania caduciflora and Phragmitas communis) were obtained from freshwater lakes and the abundance and community composition of the ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in the rhizosphere sediments of these emergent macrophytes were investigated. The abundance of the bacterial amoA gene was higher in the rhizosphere sediments of the emergent macrophytes than those of bulk sediments. Significant positive correlation was found between the potential nitrification rates (PNRs) and the abundance of bacterial amoA gene, suggesting that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) might play an important role in the nitrification process of the rhizosphere sediments of emergent macrophytes. The Nitrosotalea cluster is the dominant ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) group in all the sediment samples. Analysis of AOB group showed that the N. europaeal cluster dominated the rhizosphere sediments of Z. caduciflora and the bulk sediments, whereas the Nitrosospira cluster was the dominant AOB group in the rhizosphere sediments of P. communis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Individual and community responsibility for population policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, J M

    1985-01-01

    The Government of Canada acknowledges its shared responsibility with individuals for controlling population growth. This stance is reflected in support to family planning programs, access to birth control devices, free availability of information on family planning procedures, and access to facilities for abortion. These issues have important ethical aspects, especially abortion. The question of when human life begins is theological or philosophical, not biological, and can never be resolved by scientists. In the opinion of the author, it is inappropriate for anti-abortion forces to insist that all others in society adhere to their belief that the fetus is a human person from the moment of conception. Moreover, it is improper to argue for making abortion a crime without taking every possible step to prevent unwanted pregnancies, especially among school children. Among devout supporters of the rights of the fetus, there is an unfortunate reluctance to permit effective sex education outside the home. However, only good education, combined with access to reliable contraception, can protect young people from unwanted pregnancy. It is ethical conduct for social planners and policy makers, public health specialists, and school teachers to collaborate in providing effective sex education. This education should begin no later than 10 years of age and be continued through high school. It should include discussion of sexually related emotional and social aspects of relationships, as well as basic facts about reproduction. Early in high school, information should be provided about contraceptive methods.

  1. Global implications of the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Steven Y C; McDonald, Malcolm I; Holt, Deborah C; Currie, Bart J

    2008-06-15

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Australia may have been facilitated by conditions in socially disadvantaged populations--particularly, remote Australian Aboriginal communities. The appearance of community-associated MRSA was first noticed in Australia during the early 1980s; subsequently, several genetically diverse strains have independently emerged from geographically distinct regions. Molecular and epidemiological studies support the role of genetic transfer of resistance determinants (SCCmecIV) in this process. Conditions in Aboriginal communities--namely, domestic crowding, poor hygiene, and high rates of scabies, pyoderma, and antibiotic use--have facilitated both the clonal expansion and de novo emergence of strains of community-associated MRSA. Combating the worldwide emergence and spread of community-associated MRSA may require novel community-level control strategies targeted at specific groups, such as remote Indigenous populations.

  2. Responsibilities and tasks of the Emergency planning organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, B.

    1983-10-01

    In order to strengthen the emergency preparedness of the most essential agencies so that all types of nuclear accidents can be mastered, the following measures will be taken: - special training for decision-makers and other personnel - introduction of continuously operating staff emergency organization - introduction of a prompt radiation measurement organization - introduction of reliable telecommunications links. (author)

  3. The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-10

    Oct 10, 2015 ... P R Newton,1 MTech (Emergency Medical Care); R Naidoo,1 MSc (Cardiology); P Brysiewicz,2 PhD (Health Science). 1 Department of Emergency Medical Care and Rescue, Faculty of Health Sciences, Durban University of Technology, South Africa ..... tation, may include a straightforward refusal.

  4. Lessons Learned from Emergency Response Vaccination Efforts for Cholera, Typhoid, Yellow Fever, and Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walldorf, Jenny A; Date, Kashmira A; Sreenivasan, Nandini; Harris, Jennifer B; Hyde, Terri B

    2017-12-01

    Countries must be prepared to respond to public health threats associated with emergencies, such as natural disasters, sociopolitical conflicts, or uncontrolled disease outbreaks. Rapid vaccination of populations vulnerable to epidemic-prone vaccine-preventable diseases is a major component of emergency response. Emergency vaccination planning presents challenges, including how to predict resource needs, expand vaccine availability during global shortages, and address regulatory barriers to deliver new products. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention supports countries to plan, implement, and evaluate emergency vaccination response. We describe work of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in collaboration with global partners to support emergency vaccination against cholera, typhoid, yellow fever, and Ebola, diseases for which a new vaccine or vaccine formulation has played a major role in response. Lessons learned will help countries prepare for future emergencies. Integration of vaccination with emergency response augments global health security through reducing disease burden, saving lives, and preventing spread across international borders.

  5. High-Performing Local Health Departments Relate Their Experiences at Community Engagement in Emergency Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch-Spana, Monica; Ravi, Sanjana; Meyer, Diane; Biesiadecki, Laura; Mwaungulu, Geoffrey

    2017-10-27

    Local health departments (LHDs) are implementing a national mandate to engage community partners, including individuals, businesses, and community- and faith-based organizations in the larger public health emergency preparedness (PHEP) enterprise. Investigate how LHDs of varying size and resource levels successfully engage the community in PHEP to help uncover "best practices" that aspiring agencies can replicate, particularly in low-resource environments. In-depth, semistructured qualitative interviews with practitioners from 9 highly performing LHDs. Participating agencies comprised equal amounts of small (serving 500 000 residents) LHDs and were diverse in terms of geographic region, rural-urban environment, and governance structure. A cross section of LHD staff (n = 34) including agency leaders, preparedness coordinators, public information officers, and health educators/promoters. Local health department performance at community engagement as determined by top scores in 2 national LHD surveys (2012, 2015) regarding community engagement in PHEP. Based on key informant accounts, high-performing LHDs show a holistic, organization-wide commitment to, rather than discrete focus on, community engagement. Best practices clustered around 5 domains: administration (eg, top executive who models collaborative behavior), organizational culture (eg, solicitous rather than prescriptive posture regarding community needs), social capital (eg, mining preexisting community connections held by other LHD programs), workforce skills (eg, cultural competence), and methods/tactics (eg, visibility in community events unrelated to PHEP). For LHDs that wish to enhance their performance at community engagement in PHEP, change will entail adoption of evidence-based interventions (the technical "what") as well as evidence-based administrative approaches (the managerial "how"). Smaller, rural LHDs should be encouraged that, in the case of PHEP community engagement, they have unique social

  6. Understanding and supporting emergent and temporary collaboration across and beyond community and organizational boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou Amsha, Khuloud; Grönvall, Erik; Saad-Sulonen, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The way the Computer Supported Cooperative work (CSCW) community talks about, defines and investigates ‘work’ has changed since the early workplace studies. In the current literature, work has been described as being distributed, cross-organizational and multi-actor dependent, volunteer......-based, fleeting, opportunistic, inbetween and community-based. Collaborative work has also been examined in the formation of Publics, as Infrastructuring or as Knotworking. Work and collaborative work is indeed something that can be unforeseen by most or all of the involved actors. It can emerge and take place......, temporary communities of action, at the boundaries of established communities or organizations, to address issue that challenges current organization of work. The aim of the workshop is to open a space of reflection on relevant concepts, through the discussion of concrete examples and cases....

  7. Corporate social responsibility along pipelines: communities and corporations working together

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Edison D.R.; Lopes, Luciano E.; Danciguer, Lucilene; Macarini, Samuel; Souza, Maira de [Grupo de Aplicacao Interdisciplinar a Aprendizagem (GAIA), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we present GAIA's findings in three corporate social responsibility projects along pipelines owned by three Brazilian companies in gas, oil and mining sectors. The projects had as the main goal to improve the relationship with communities in the companies' direct influence areas. Clearly, the relationship with communities along pipelines is essential to prevent and reduce industrial hazards. The damage in pipelines due to agriculture, buildings, intentional perforations and traffic of heavy vehicles may cause fatal accidents, environmental and material losses. Such accidents have negative consequences with regard to economy, image and relationship with communities and environmental agencies. From communities' perspective, pipelines deteriorate their life quality due to risk of industrial hazards nearby their houses. The lack of proper information about the pipelines remarkably increases insecurity feelings and discourses against the companies among community leaders. The methodology developed by GAIA comprises companies' and communities' interests and encompasses nine stages. 1. Socio-environmental appraisal or inventory, mapping main risks, communities' needs and their leaders. 2. Communication plan, defining strategies, languages and communication vehicles for each stakeholder group. 3. Inter-institutional meetings to include other institutions in the program. 4. Launching seminar in partnership with local authorities, divulging companies' actions in the cities with pipelines. 5. Multiplier agents formation, enabling teachers, local leaders and government representatives to disseminate correct information about the pipelines such as their functioning, hazard prevention, maintenance actions, and restrictions of activities over the pipelines. 6. Formation on project management, enabling teachers, local leaders and government representatives to elaborate, fund raise and manage socio environmental projects aimed at

  8. Deployment of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) in Emergency and Disaster Response Scenarios to Support Local Emergency Management Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamaio, C. L.; Walker, J.; Beck, J. M.; Graves, S. J.; Johnson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Researchers at the Information Technology and Systems Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville are working closely with the Madison County Emergency Management Agency (EMA), GeoHuntsville's UAS Working Group, and the NOAA UAS Program Office, to conduct a series of practical demonstrations testing the use of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) for emergency response activities in Madison County, Alabama. These exercises demonstrate the use of UAS to detect and visualize hazards in affected areas via the delivery of aerial imagery and associated data products to law enforcement first responders in a variety of different scenarios, for example, search and rescue, tornado track mapping, damage assessment, and situational awareness/containment during active shooter incidents. In addition to showcasing the use of UAS as a tool for emergency services, these pilot exercises provide the opportunity to engage the appropriate stakeholders from several communities including first responders, geospatial intelligence, active members of the unmanned systems industry, and academia. This presentation will showcase the challenges associated with delivering quality data products for emergency services in a timely manner as well as the related challenges in integrating the technology into local emergency management.

  9. Consulting Communities When Patients Cannot Consent: A Multi-Center Study of Community Consultation for Research in Emergency Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickert, Neal W; Mah, Victoria A; Biros, Michelle H; Harney, Deneil M; Silbergleit, Robert; Sugarman, Jeremy; Veledar, Emir; Weinfurt, Kevin P; Wright, David W; Pentz, Rebecca D

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the range of responses to community consultation efforts conducted within a large network and the impact of different consultation methods on acceptance of exception from informed consent (EFIC) research and understanding of the proposed study. Design A cognitively pre-tested survey instrument was administered to 2,612 community consultation participants at 12 US centers participating in a multi-center trial of treatment for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). Setting Survey nested within community consultation for a Phase III, randomized controlled trial of treatment for acute TBI conducted within a multi-center trial network and using EFIC. Subjects Adult participants in community consultation events. Interventions Community consultation efforts at participating sites. Measurements and Main Results Acceptance of EFIC in general, attitude toward personal EFIC enrollment, and understanding of the study content were assessed. 54% of participants agreed EFIC was acceptable in the proposed study; 71% were accepting of personal EFIC enrollment. Participants in interactive versus non-interactive community consultation events were more accepting of EFIC in general (63% vs. 49%) and personal EFIC inclusion (77% vs. 67%). Interactive community consultation participants had high-level recall of study content significantly more often than non-interactive consultation participants (77% vs. 67%). Participants of interactive consultation were more likely to recall possible study benefits (61% vs. 45%) but less likely to recall potential risks (56% vs. 69%). Conclusions Interactive community consultation methods were associated with increased acceptance of EFIC and greater overall recall of study information but lower recall of risks. There was also significant variability in EFIC acceptance among different interactive consultation events. These findings have important implications for IRBs and investigators conducting EFIC research and for community

  10. Direct Response Marketing. Educational Approaches for an Emerging Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    Examines factors leading to the growth in direct response marketing; elements that differentiate direct response marketing from marketing as a whole; and workshops designed for educators to develop curriculum in direct response marketing. (CT)

  11. Community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: an emerging infection in Ireland and Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, R

    2013-02-05

    INTRODUCTION: Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as a predominant cause of community-acquired mono-microbial pyogenic liver abscess. This was first described in Taiwan and has been widely reported in Asia. This infectious entity has been described in Europe, with single case reports predominating. METHODS: We present three cases in one year from our institution in Ireland and review the European literature to date. RESULTS\\/CONCLUSION: Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome is now emerging in Europe and notably is not restricted to individuals of Asian descent.

  12. Identifying and Prioritizing Information Needs and Research Priorities of Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, Alexa L; Carbone, Eric G; Meit, Michael B; Kennedy, Mallory J; Yusuf, Hussain; Kahn, Emily B

    2017-10-01

    This study describes findings from an assessment conducted to identify perceived knowledge gaps, information needs, and research priorities among state, territorial, and local public health preparedness directors and coordinators related to public health emergency preparedness and response (PHPR). The goal of the study was to gather information that would be useful for ensuring that future funding for research and evaluation targets areas most critical for advancing public health practice. We implemented a mixed-methods approach to identify and prioritize PHPR research questions. A web survey was sent to all state, city, and territorial health agencies funded through the Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) Cooperative Agreement program and a sample of local health departments (LHDs). Three focus groups of state and local practitioners and subject matter experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were subsequently conducted, followed by 3 meetings of an expert panel of PHPR practitioners and CDC experts to prioritize and refine the research questions. We identified a final list of 44 research questions that were deemed by study participants as priority topics where future research can inform PHPR programs and practice. We identified differences in perceived research priorities between PHEP awardees and LHD survey respondents; the number of research questions rated as important was greater among LHDs than among PHEP awardees (75%, n=33, compared to 24%, n=15). The research questions identified provide insight into public health practitioners' perceived knowledge gaps and the types of information that would be most useful for informing and advancing PHPR practice. The study also points to a higher level of information need among LHDs than among PHEP awardees. These findings are important for CDC and the PHPR research community to ensure that future research studies are responsive to practitioners' needs and provide the information

  13. Service learning as a response to community/school engagement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The promulgation of the White Paper on Higher Education (1997) necessitated Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in South Africa to avail their expertise in their human resources and physical infrastructure for service learning and community engagement initiatives, in the interest of demonstrating social responsibility, ...

  14. Soil microbial community response to land use and various soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil microbial community response to land use and various soil elements in a city landscape of north China. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Legumes played an important role in stimulating the growth and reproduction of various soil microbial populations, accordingly promoting the microbial catabolic activity.

  15. Facilitating Student Engagement: Social Responsibility and Freshmen Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Lindsey N.; MacCartney, Danielle; Miller, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Human rights education is advanced as a method for promoting social responsibility, with an emphasis on promoting ideals of "global citizenship" among undergraduate students. At the same time, the practice of learning communities is widespread on college campuses for retaining freshmen and promoting student success. However, there is…

  16. Evacuation emergency response model coupling atmospheric release advisory capability output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.C.; Lawver, B.S.; Buckley, D.W.; Finn, S.P.; Swenson, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) sponsored project to develop a coupled set of models between those of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) system and candidate evacuation models is discussed herein. This report describes the ARAC system and discusses the rapid computer code developed and the coupling with ARAC output. The computer code is adapted to the use of color graphics as a means to display and convey the dynamics of an emergency evacuation. The model is applied to a specific case of an emergency evacuation of individuals surrounding the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant, located approximately 25 miles southeast of Sacramento, California. The graphics available to the model user for the Rancho Seco example are displayed and noted in detail. Suggestions for future, potential improvements to the emergency evacuation model are presented

  17. Coastal bacterioplankton community dynamics in response to a natural disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara K Yeo

    Full Text Available In order to characterize how disturbances to microbial communities are propagated over temporal and spatial scales in aquatic environments, the dynamics of bacterial assemblages throughout a subtropical coastal embayment were investigated via SSU rRNA gene analyses over an 8-month period, which encompassed a large storm event. During non-perturbed conditions, sampling sites clustered into three groups based on their microbial community composition: an offshore oceanic group, a freshwater group, and a distinct and persistent coastal group. Significant differences in measured environmental parameters or in the bacterial community due to the storm event were found only within the coastal cluster of sampling sites, and only at 5 of 12 locations; three of these sites showed a significant response in both environmental and bacterial community characteristics. These responses were most pronounced at sites close to the shoreline. During the storm event, otherwise common bacterioplankton community members such as marine Synechococcus sp. and members of the SAR11 clade of Alphaproteobacteria decreased in relative abundance in the affected coastal zone, whereas several lineages of Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and members of the Roseobacter clade of Alphaproteobacteria increased. The complex spatial patterns in both environmental conditions and microbial community structure related to freshwater runoff and wind convection during the perturbation event leads us to conclude that spatial heterogeneity was an important factor influencing both the dynamics and the resistance of the bacterioplankton communities to disturbances throughout this complex subtropical coastal system. This heterogeneity may play a role in facilitating a rapid rebound of regions harboring distinctly coastal bacterioplankton communities to their pre-disturbed taxonomic composition.

  18. MAppERS: a peer-produced community for emergency support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Simone; Schenato, Luca; Bianchizza, Chiara; Del Bianco, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    A general trend in European governance tends to shift responsibilities in territorial management from national central authorities to local/regional levels and to the citizens as first actors of Civil Protection. Prevention is a long term goal that rests not only on the capacities of professional operators and volunteers, but that has to necessarily imply the involvement and awareness of the citizens over the territory they inhabit. In fact people often do not have chance to interact in the surveillance of the territory and only face risks when they have to bear impacts on their lives. Involvement of population creates more cost-effective and context-specific strategies of territorial surveillance and management. A collaborative user environment is useful for emergency response and support in the wake of disasters, feeding updated information on the ground directly to on-site responders. MAppERS (Mobile Application for Emergency Response and Support) is a EU project (funded under programme 2013-2015 Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection, ECHO A5) which empowers citizens as "crowd-sourced mappers" through the development of a smart phone application able to collect GPS-localised and detailed parameters, that can then be sent from citizens to civil protection operators in a contest of geospatial response. The process of app design includes feedback from citizens, involving them in training courses on the monitoring of the territory as long term objective of raising public awareness and participation from the citizens, as actors in a networked disaster response community. The project proceeds from the design and testing of the smart phone applications (module MAppERS-V for volunteers, module MAppERS-C for citizens) according to software engineering environment (Android and Iphone SDK). Information exchange and data transfer need clearness and efficiency; thus a previous research is conducted on the cost-effectiveness of already existing practices for territorial

  19. Emergency response system upgrade with a dose assessment block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrakov, D.; Veleva, B.; Prodanova, M.; Popova, T.; Kolarova, M.

    2006-01-01

    The need of fast and reliable estimation of the possible impacts of hazardous substances transferred from long range air pollution over the Bulgarian territory requires development and implementation of an adequate diagnostic and prognostic modeling systems - so called Emergency Response System (ERS) based on real and forecast meteorological information and numerical models accounting for the transport, dispersion, chemical and radioactive transformations of pollutants as well as removal processes. In Bulgarian NIMH, an Early Warning System for transport of radioactive pollutants was developed by D.Syrakov and M.Prodanova in mid 90's of the last century, tested during the ETEX experiments and a number of international and national exercises, like INEX-1 (1995), INEX-2-CH-'Fortuna' (1996), INEX-2-FIN (1997), JINEX 1 (2001), AXIOPOLIS'2001, CONVEX-3 (2005). The system was adopted also for operational calculations and visualization of trajectories over Europe and the North hemisphere originating from part of the most potential sources of accidental radioactive releases - the Nuclear Power Plants. For realistic evaluation of the pollution levels and human health effects in case of nuclear accident, this EWS was upgraded further in several main directions: 1) a mixture of radioactive pollutants is considered instead of one pollutant arbitrary called radioactivity with parameters of a weightless gas; 2) the different radionuclides are grouped based on their dispersion properties; 3) new source term is created being able to account for the evolution of the release; 4) a small data base of possible release scenarios is a supplement to the source term; 5) the EMAP model is upgraded with a 'dose calculation block' where the output of the dispersion model is transformed into fields of doses thus presenting the information in a form much more appropriate for decision making. The effective dose from external irradiation from cloud and ground shinning, effective dose from

  20. Transportation for maternal emergencies in Tanzania: empowering communities through participatory problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, T; Kanenda, O; Ahluwalia, I; Kouletio, M

    2001-10-01

    Inadequate health care and long delays in obtaining care during obstetric emergencies are major contributors to high maternal death rates in Tanzania. Formative research conducted in the Mwanza region identified several transportation-related reasons for delays in receiving assistance. In 1996, the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) began an effort to build community capacity for problem-solving through participatory development of community-based plans for emergency transportation in 50 villages. An April 2001 assessment showed that 19 villages had begun collecting funds for transportation systems; of 13 villages with systems available, 10 had used the system within the last 3 months. Increased support for village health workers and greater participation of women in decision making were also observed.

  1. Australasian respiratory and emergency physicians do not use the pneumonia severity index in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serisier, David J; Williams, Sophie; Bowler, Simon D

    2013-02-01

    The value of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) severity scoring tools is almost exclusively reliant upon regular and accurate application in clinical practice. Until recently, the Australasian Therapeutic Guidelines has recommended the use of the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) in spite of poor user-friendliness. Electronic and postal survey of respiratory and emergency medicine physician and specialist registrar members of the Royal Australasian College was undertaken to assess the use of the PSI and the accuracy of its application to hypothetical clinical CAP scenarios. The confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age 65 or older (CURB-65) score was also assessed as a simpler alternative. Five hundred thirty-six (228 respiratory, 308 emergency) responses were received. Only 12% of respiratory and 35% of emergency physicians reported using the PSI always or frequently. The majority were unable to accurately approximate PSI scores, with significantly fewer respiratory than emergency physicians recording accurate severity classes (11.8% vs 21%, OR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.37-0.68, P Australasian specialist physicians primarily responsible for the acute management of CAP report infrequent use of the PSI and are unable to accurately apply its use to hypothetical scenarios. Furthermore, respiratory and emergency physicians contrasted distinctly in their use and application of the two commonest severity scoring systems--the recent recommendation of two further alternative scoring tools by Australian guidelines may add to this confusion. A simple, coordinated approach to pneumonia severity assessment across specialties in Australasia is needed. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Method for developing arrangements for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. Updating IAEA-TECDOC-953. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: October 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    In 1997 the IAEA compiled, consolidated and organized existing information, and published the TECDOC-953 'Method for Development of Emergency Response Preparedness for Nuclear or Radiological Accidents'. Subsequently this publication was used extensively by the IAEA for training and for evaluation of emergency response programmes. In November 1999 a technical committee meeting (TCM) with representatives of over 20 States reviewed and provided feedback on IAEA-TECDOC-953. In March 2002, the IAEA's Board of Governors approved a Safety Requirements publication, 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', jointly sponsored by seven international organizations, which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. The IAEA General Conference in resolution GC(46)/RES/9 encouraged Member States to implement, if necessary, instruments for improving their own preparedness and response capabilities for nuclear and radiological incidents and accidents, including their arrangements for responding to acts involving the malicious use of nuclear or radioactive material and to threats of such acts, and has further encouraged them to implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. The obligations, responsibilities and requirements for preparedness and response for radiation emergencies are set out in the safety standards, in particular the 1996 'International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources'. Consensus information on relevant radiation protection criteria was established in 1994 and published in 'Intervention Criteria in a Nuclear or Radiation Emergency'. Several other guides and publications in the area of emergency preparedness and response had previously been issued. The present publication now being issued in the Emergency Preparedness and

  3. Health care delivery, access and utilisation in emerging communities and urban slums of south west Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Lawal, Saheed Akinmayọwa

    2014-01-01

    In Nigeria, over 60 percent of the population lack access to modern health care facilities. Low access and effective utilisation even where available, are affected by inadequate health workforce, low quality of care, distance, and poor policy implementation. This research examines the nature of health care in emerging communities and urban slums of south west Nigeria. The study synthesises Giddens’ Structuration theory, Dahlgren and Whitehead’s Social model of health, and Andersen and Newman’...

  4. Development of urban planning guidelines for improving emergency response capacities in seismic areas of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Kambod Amini; Jafari, Mohammad Kazem; Hosseini, Maziar; Mansouri, Babak; Hosseinioon, Solmaz

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of research carried out to improve emergency response activities in earthquake-prone areas of Iran. The research concentrated on emergency response operations, emergency medical care, emergency transportation, and evacuation-the most important issues after an earthquake with regard to saving the lives of victims. For each topic, some guidelines and criteria are presented for enhancing emergency response activities, based on evaluations of experience of strong earthquakes that have occurred over the past two decades in Iran, notably Manjil (1990), Bam (2003), Firouz Abad-Kojour (2004), Zarand (2005) and Broujerd (2006). These guidelines and criteria are applicable to other national contexts, especially countries with similar seismic and social conditions as Iran. The results of this study should be incorporated into comprehensive plans to ensure sustainable development or reconstruction of cities as well as to augment the efficiency of emergency response after an earthquake.

  5. Method for the development of emergency response preparedness for nuclear or radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    This report supplements IAEA emergency preparedness guidance published in the 1980s, and is consistent with the new international guidance. It provides practical advice for the development of an emergency response capability based on the potential nature and magnitude of the risk. In order to apply this method, emergency planners should have a good understanding of the basic radiological emergency response principles. Therefore, other applicable international guidance should be reviewed before using this report. This report provides a practical step-by-step method for developing integrated user, local and national emergency response capabilities. It can also be used as the basis for conducting an audit of an existing emergency response capability. 14 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  6. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-02-15

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  7. Acute gastrointestinal illness following a prolonged community-wide water emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, J W; Freeland, A L; Morrison, M A; Stevens, K; Zajac, L; Wolkon, A; Hightower, A; Miller, M D; Brunkard, J M

    2015-10-01

    The drinking water infrastructure in the United States is ageing; extreme weather events place additional stress on water systems that can lead to interruptions in the delivery of safe drinking water. We investigated the association between household exposures to water service problems and acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) and acute respiratory illness (ARI) in Alabama communities that experienced a freeze-related community-wide water emergency. Following the water emergency, investigators conducted a household survey. Logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for self-reported AGI and ARI by water exposures. AGI was higher in households that lost water service for ⩾7 days (aPR 2·4, 95% CI 1·1-5·2) and experienced low water pressure for ⩾7 days (aPR 3·6, 95% CI 1·4-9·0) compared to households that experienced normal service and pressure; prevalence of AGI increased with increasing duration of water service interruptions. Investments in the ageing drinking water infrastructure are needed to prevent future low-pressure events and to maintain uninterrupted access to the fundamental public health protection provided by safe water supplies. Households and communities need to increase their awareness of and preparedness for water emergencies to mitigate adverse health impacts.

  8. Compassion Fatigue among Healthcare, Emergency and Community Service Workers: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Cocker

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Compassion fatigue (CF is stress resulting from exposure to a traumatized individual. CF has been described as the convergence of secondary traumatic stress (STS and cumulative burnout (BO, a state of physical and mental exhaustion caused by a depleted ability to cope with one’s everyday environment. Professionals regularly exposed to the traumatic experiences of the people they service, such as healthcare, emergency and community service workers, are particularly susceptible to developing CF. This can impact standards of patient care, relationships with colleagues, or lead to more serious mental health conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, anxiety or depression. A systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions to reduce CF in healthcare, emergency and community service workers was conducted. Thirteen relevant studies were identified, the majority of which were conducted on nurses (n = 10. Three included studies focused on community service workers (social workers, disability sector workers, while no studies targeting emergency service workers were identified. Seven studies reported a significant difference post-intervention in BO (n = 4 or STS (n = 3. This review revealed that evidence of the effectiveness of CF interventions in at-risk health and social care professions is relatively recent. Therefore, we recommend more research to determine how best to protect vulnerable workers at work to prevent not only CF, but also the health and economic consequences related to the ensuing, and more disabling, physical and mental health outcomes.

  9. Emergency planning, response and assessment: a concept for a center of excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses a general concept for a center of excellence devoted to emergency planning, response and assessment. A plan is presented to implement the concept, based on experience gained from emergency response as it relates to the nuclear and toxic chemical industries. The role of the World Laboratory in this endeavor would complement and enhance other organizations than are involved in related activities

  10. Community emergency department utilization following a natural disaster (the Goderich Tornado).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appavoo, Samuel D; Khemlin, Alexander; Appavoo, Donna M; Flynn, Candi J

    2016-01-01

    On 21 August 2011 an F3 tornado hit the Canadian town of Goderich, Ontario, leaving 40 people injured and one dead. Specific medium-term changes in utilization of health care following a disaster have not been analyzed in medical literature. Documenting the emergency department utilization through this subacute period would be helpful to enable institutions and healthcare practitioners to be better prepared for future events. A medical chart review was conducted at the Alexandra Marine and General Hospital in Goderich. All emergency department visits made during the 30 days after the Tornado in 2011 (intervention group), 30 days prior to the tornado in 2011 (primary control group), and during the similar calendar period of 30 days after the tornado in 2010 (seasonal control group) were reviewed. Medical diagnoses of all patients who presented at the emergency department were collected and compared. Fewer people presented to the emergency department following the tornado than during the control periods, and those who did were significantly older than those who presented in the control periods (pptornado in a rural Ontario community. This information serves to inform the medical community and other hospitals how to increase their level of preparedness should a comparable disaster occur again in the future.

  11. Development of procedure for emergency response in the combined disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Lessons learned from operating experience at the emergency after a East Japan Great Earthquake, have shown that development of decision making procedure and criteria for protective action implementation would be important at the emergency in the combined disaster such as nuclear accidents caused by natural disasters (including tsunami, flood, heavy snow, fire, etc.). In this study, the problemdefinition, the concept of operation and the data development were planned for three years since fiscal year 2011. In tins year, trial calculation of evacuation time estimate (ETE) for the wide area was performed. Moreover, the basic concept and procedure for carrying out ETE condidering the combined emergency were developed based on the last year results. (author)

  12. Technical support and preparations for the response to radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas H, J.; Ramos V, E.O.; Fernandez G, I.M.; Capote F, E.; Zerquera J, T.; Garcia L, O.; Lopez B, G.; Molina P, D.; Lamdrid B, A.I.; Benitez N, J.C.; Salgado M, M.; Lopez F, Y.; Jerez V, P.

    2006-01-01

    The work picks up the efforts directed to elevate the technical capacity of the answer in front of the radiological emergencies. Expressing them by means of the actions carried out as for teaching, research and development and intervention before accidental radiological events. The same one reflects the leading role of the participant institutions in those marks of the answer system to radiological emergencies that for its technical level it satisfies the national and international demands in the matter. In execution of the mentioned goals research projects guided to endow to the national system of methodologies and procedures for the administration of radiological emergencies have been executed that favor the improvement of its technical and organizational capacities. As well as the postulates of the National Plan of Measures for Case of Catastrophes in the corresponding to radiological accidents. (Author)

  13. Workforce diversity and community-responsive health-care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivet, Marc A; Berlin, Anne

    2014-01-01

    While the levers for the social determinants of health reside largely outside institutional walls, this does not absolve health professional schools from exercising their influence to improve the communities in which they are located. Fulfilling this charge will require a departure from conventional thinking, particularly when it comes to educating future health professionals. We describe efforts within medical education to transform recruitment, admissions, and classroom environments to emphasize diversity and inclusion. The aim is to cultivate a workforce with the perspectives, aptitudes, and skills needed to fuel community-responsive health-care institutions.

  14. Emergency rabies control in a community of two high-density hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rabies is a fatal viral disease that potentially can affect all mammals. Terrestrial rabies is not present in the United Kingdom and has been eliminated from Western Europe. Nevertheless the possibility remains that rabies could be introduced to England, where it would find two potentially suitable hosts, red foxes and badgers. With the aim to analyse the spread and emergency control of rabies in this two species host community, a simulation model was constructed. Different control strategies involving anti-rabies vaccination and population culling were developed, considering control application rates, spatial extent and timing. These strategies were evaluated for efficacy and feasibility to control rabies in hypothetical rural areas in the South of England immediately after a disease outbreak. Results The model confirmed that both fox and badger populations, separately, were competent hosts for the spread of rabies. Realistic vaccination levels were not sufficient to control rabies in high-density badger populations. The combined species community was a very strong rabies host. However, disease spread within species appeared to be more important than cross-species infection. Thus, the drivers of epidemiology depend on the potential of separate host species to sustain the disease. To control a rabies outbreak in the two species, both species had to be targeted. Realistic and robust control strategies involved vaccination of foxes and badgers, but also required badger culling. Although fox and badger populations in the UK are exceptionally dense, an outbreak of rabies can be controlled with a higher than 90% chance, if control response is quick and follows a strict regime. This requires surveillance and forceful and repeated control campaigns. In contrast, an uncontrolled rabies outbreak in the South of England would quickly develop into a strong epizootic involving tens of thousands of rabid foxes and badgers. Conclusions If

  15. Epidemiology of emergency medical service responses to older people who have fallen: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Paul M; Bendall, Jason C; Tiedemann, Anne; Lord, Stephen R; Close, Jacqueline C T

    2014-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of older people who fall and call an emergency ambulance, and the operational and clinical impact of the ambulance responses they receive. A prospective cohort study of people aged ≥65 who had fallen and called for an ambulance was conducted between October 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. Fall-related data were collected using a project-specific data collection tool. These data were then linked to routinely collected ambulance service clinical records and dispatch data, providing a sequential description of fall-related cases from time of ambulance dispatch through to the end of the prehospital episode of care. There were 1,610 cases eligible for analysis. The median response time was 15 minutes (IQR 10-24) and "long-lies" (>60 minutes on the ground) occurred in 13% of cases. Patients were predominantly female (61%) and community dwelling (82%). Forty-four percent had never previously called an ambulance for a fall, whereas 248 (15%) had called within the past month. The most common patient-reported reasons for falling were loss of balance (30%) and "simple trips" (25%). New injury and/or pain was documented for 1,172 (73%) of patients, and 656 (41%) presented with "abnormal" physiology; only 238 (15%) presented with no new injury/pain and normal physiology. The nontransport rate was 28%. In this population, ambulance services appear to provide timely responses to older people who have fallen, and "long-lies" are relatively uncommon. More than one-quarter of patients were not transported to an emergency department, and repeat use of ambulance resources appears to be common. Opportunities exist to explore alternate pathways and models of care that maximize outcomes for nontransport patients as well as improving operational efficiency of the ambulance service.

  16. Planning and Preparing for Emergency Response to Transport Accidents Involving Radioactive Material. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides guidance on various aspects of emergency planning and preparedness for dealing effectively and safely with transport accidents involving radioactive material, including the assignment of responsibilities. It reflects the requirements specified in Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, and those of Safety Series No. 115, International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Framework for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 3. Responsibilities for planning and preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 4. Planning for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; 5. Preparing for response to accidents in the transport of radioactive material; Appendix I: Features of the transport regulations influencing emergency response to transport accidents; Appendix II: Preliminary emergency response reference matrix; Appendix III: Guide to suitable instrumentation; Appendix IV: Overview of emergency management for a transport accident involving radioactive material; Appendix V: Examples of response to transport accidents; Appendix VI: Example equipment kit for a radiation protection team; Annex I: Example of guidance on emergency response to carriers; Annex II: Emergency response guide.

  17. 30 CFR 75.1507 - Emergency Response Plan; refuge alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... accident at a mine. (3) Permissions to cross properties, build roads, and construct drill sites. (4.... 75.1507 Section 75.1507 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Mine Emergencies § 75...

  18. Massive Open Online Librarianship: Emerging Practices in Response to MOOCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mune, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs, have recently emerged as a disruptive pedagogy gaining rapid momentum in higher education. In some states, proposed legislations would accredit MOOCs to provide college-credit courses in the name of cost saving, efficiency and access. While debates rage regarding the place of MOOCs in higher education, some…

  19. Divergent ecosystem responses within a benthic marine community to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Kristy J; Micheli, Fiorenza; Gambi, Maria Cristina; Martz, Todd R

    2011-08-30

    Ocean acidification is predicted to impact all areas of the oceans and affect a diversity of marine organisms. However, the diversity of responses among species prevents clear predictions about the impact of acidification at the ecosystem level. Here, we used shallow water CO(2) vents in the Mediterranean Sea as a model system to examine emergent ecosystem responses to ocean acidification in rocky reef communities. We assessed in situ benthic invertebrate communities in three distinct pH zones (ambient, low, and extreme low), which differed in both the mean and variability of seawater pH along a continuous gradient. We found fewer taxa, reduced taxonomic evenness, and lower biomass in the extreme low pH zones. However, the number of individuals did not differ among pH zones, suggesting that there is density compensation through population blooms of small acidification-tolerant taxa. Furthermore, the trophic structure of the invertebrate community shifted to fewer trophic groups and dominance by generalists in extreme low pH, suggesting that there may be a simplification of food webs with ocean acidification. Despite high variation in individual species' responses, our findings indicate that ocean acidification decreases the diversity, biomass, and trophic complexity of benthic marine communities. These results suggest that a loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function is expected under extreme acidification scenarios.

  20. Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312 Tier Two Report Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    The report contains forms for the chemical description, physical and health hazards, inventory volumes, and storage codes and locations for all hazardous chemicals located at the Y-12 Plant. These can be used by local emergency response teams in case of an accident

  1. Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act Section 312 Tier Two Report Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    The report contains forms for the chemical description, physical and health hazards, inventory volumes, and storage codes and locations for all hazardous chemicals located at the Y-12 Plant. These can be used by local emergency response teams in case of an accident

  2. Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act Section 312 Tier Two report forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.A.

    2000-02-01

    The report contains forms for the chemical description, physical and health hazards, inventory volumes, and storage codes and locations for all hazardous chemicals located at the Y-12 Plant. These can be used by local emergency response teams in case of an accident.

  3. A systematic review of community-based interventions for emerging zoonotic infectious diseases in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halton, Kate; Sarna, Mohinder; Barnett, Adrian; Leonardo, Lydia; Graves, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Executive Summary Background Southeast Asia has been at the epicentre of recent epidemics of emerging and re-emerging zoonotic diseases. Community-based surveillance and control interventions have been heavily promoted but the most effective interventions have not been identified. Objectives This review evaluated evidence for the effectiveness of community-based surveillance interventions at monitoring and identifying emerging infectious disease; the effectiveness of community-based control interventions at reducing rates of emerging infectious disease; and contextual factors that influence intervention effectiveness. Inclusion criteria Participants Communities in Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. Types of intervention(s) Non-pharmaceutical, non-vaccine, and community-based surveillance or prevention and control interventions targeting rabies, Nipah virus, dengue, SARS or avian influenza. Types of outcomes Primary outcomes: measures: of infection or disease; secondary outcomes: measures of intervention function. Types of studies Original quantitative studies published in English. Search strategy Databases searched (1980 to 2011): PubMed, CINAHL, ProQuest, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, Science Direct, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, WHOLIS, British Development Library, LILACS, World Bank (East Asia), Asian Development Bank. Methodological quality Two independent reviewers critically appraised studies using standard Joanna Briggs Institute instruments. Disagreements were resolved through discussion. Data extraction A customised tool was used to extract quantitative data on intervention(s), populations, study methods, and primary and secondary outcomes; and qualitative contextual information or narrative evidence about interventions. Data synthesis Data was synthesised in a narrative summary with the aid of tables. Meta-analysis was used to statistically pool quantitative results. Results

  4. Microbial Community Responses to Glycine Addition in Kansas Prairie Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottos, E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; White, R. A., III; Brislawn, C.; Fansler, S.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; McCue, L. A.; Jansson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies are rapidly expanding our abilities to unravel aspects of microbial community structure and function in complex systems like soil; however, characterizing the highly diverse communities is problematic, due primarily to challenges in data analysis. To tackle this problem, we aimed to constrain the microbial diversity in a soil by enriching for particular functional groups within a community through addition of "trigger substrates". Such trigger substrates, characterized by low molecular weight, readily soluble and diffusible in soil solution, representative of soil organic matter derivatives, would also be rapidly degradable. A relatively small energy investment to maintain the cell in a state of metabolic alertness for such substrates would be a better evolutionary strategy and presumably select for a cohort of microorganisms with the energetics and cellular machinery for utilization and growth. We chose glycine, a free amino acid (AA) known to have short turnover times (in the range of hours) in soil. As such, AAs are a good source of nitrogen and easily degradable, and can serve as building blocks for microbial proteins and other biomass components. We hypothesized that the addition of glycine as a trigger substrate will decrease microbial diversity and evenness, as taxa capable of metabolizing it are enriched in relation to those that are not. We tested this hypothesis by incubating three Kansas native prairie soils with glycine for 24 hours at 21 degree Celsius, and measured community level responses by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, metagenomics, and metatranscriptomics. Preliminary evaluation of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed minor changes in bacterial community composition in response to glycine addition. We will also present data on functional gene abundance and expression. The results of these analyses will be useful in designing sequencing strategies aimed at dissecting and deciphering complex microbial communities.

  5. The emergence of community health worker programmes in the late apartheid era in South Africa: An historical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginneken, Nadja; Lewin, Simon; Berridge, Virginia

    2010-09-01

    There is re-emerging interest in community health workers (CHWs) as part of wider policies regarding task-shifting within human resources for health. This paper examines the history of CHW programmes established in South Africa in the later apartheid years (1970s-1994) - a time of innovative initiatives. After 1994, the new democratic government embraced primary healthcare (PHC), however CHW initiatives were not included in their health plan and most of these programmes subsequently collapsed. Since then a wide array of disease-focused CHW projects have emerged, particularly within HIV care. Thirteen oral history interviews and eight witness seminars were conducted in South Africa in April 2008 with founders and CHWs from these earlier programmes. These data were triangulated with written primary sources and analysed using thematic content analysis. The study suggests that 1970s-1990s CHW programmes were seen as innovative, responsive, comprehensive and empowering for staff and communities, a focus which respondents felt was lost within current programmes. The growth of these earlier projects was underpinned by the struggle against apartheid. Respondents felt that the more technical focus of current CHW programmes under-utilise a valuable human resource which previously had a much wider social and health impact. These prior experiences and lessons learned could usefully inform policy-making frameworks for CHWs in South Africa today. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hybrid Decision-making Method for Emergency Response System of Unattended Train Operation Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suitable selection of the emergency alternatives is a critical issue in emergency response system of Unattended Train Operation (UTO metro system of China. However, there is no available method for dispatcher group in Operating Control Center (OCC to evaluate the decision under emergency situation. It was found that the emergency decision making in UTO metro system is relative with the preferences and the importance of multi-dispatcher in emergency. Regarding these factors, this paper presents a hybrid method to determinate the priority weights of emergency alternatives, which aggregates the preference matrix by constructing the emergency response task model based on the Weighted Ordered Weighted Averaging (WOWA operator. This calculation approach derives the importance weights depending on the dispatcher emergency tasks and integrates it into the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA operator weights based on a fuzzy membership relation. A case from train fire is given to demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of the proposed methods for Group Multi-Criteria Decision Making (GMCDM in emergency management of UTO metro system. The innovation of this research is paving the way for a systematic emergency decision-making solution which connects the automatic metro emergency response system with the GMCDM theory.

  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Response to Humanitarian Emergencies, 2007-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Andrew T; Cookson, Susan T; Anderson, Mark; Bilukha, Oleg O; Brennan, Muireann; Handzel, Thomas; Hardy, Colleen; Husain, Farah; Cardozo, Barbara Lopes; Colorado, Carlos Navarro; Shahpar, Cyrus; Talley, Leisel; Toole, Michael; Gerber, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Humanitarian emergencies, including complex emergencies associated with fragile states or areas of conflict, affect millions of persons worldwide. Such emergencies threaten global health security and have complicated but predictable effects on public health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Emergency Response and Recovery Branch (ERRB) (Division of Global Health Protection, Center for Global Health) contributes to public health emergency responses by providing epidemiologic support for humanitarian health interventions. To capture the extent of this emergency response work for the past decade, we conducted a retrospective review of ERRB's responses during 2007-2016. Responses were conducted across the world and in collaboration with national and international partners. Lessons from this work include the need to develop epidemiologic tools for use in resource-limited contexts, build local capacity for response and health systems recovery, and adapt responses to changing public health threats in fragile states. Through ERRB's multisector expertise and ability to respond quickly, CDC guides humanitarian response to protect emergency-affected populations.

  8. Emergency response planning and preparedness for transport accidents involving radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this Guide is to provide assistance to public authorities and others (including consignors and carriers of radioactive materials) who are responsible for ensuring safety in establishing and developing emergency response arrangements for responding effectively to transport accidents involving radioactive materials. This Guide is concerned mainly with the preparation of emergency response plans. It provides information which will assist those countries whose involvement with radioactive materials is just beginning and those which have already developed their industries involving radioactive materials and attendant emergency plans, but may need to review and improve these plans. The need for emergency response plans and the ways in which they are implemented vary from country to country. In each country, the responsible authorities must decide how best to apply this Guide, taking into account the actual shipments and associated hazards. In this Guide the emergency response planning and response philosophy are outlined, including identification of emergency response organizations and emergency services that would be required during a transport accident. General consequences which could prevail during an accident are described taking into account the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 43 refs, figs and tabs

  9. MMS: An electronic message management system for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.B.; Garde, H.; Andersen, V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper outlines the main features of an electronic communication system, MMS, designed to support coordination and exchange of information in connection with emergency management (EM) efforts, The design. of the MMS has been motivated by interviews with EM decision makers and reviews of commu......This paper outlines the main features of an electronic communication system, MMS, designed to support coordination and exchange of information in connection with emergency management (EM) efforts, The design. of the MMS has been motivated by interviews with EM decision makers and reviews......, Thus, users are able to define filters that capture, for instance, "unanswered requests sent out by me today" or "requests from me that have not been answered by an unconditional 'OK.'" Last, ne describe an associated preparedness plan module, which contains, for a given Ehl organization, its...

  10. Radioecology teaching: response to a nuclear or radiological emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, R. M.

    2006-03-01

    The study of environmental radioactivity is a topic not usually included in physics courses in Brazilian and Latin American universities. Consequently, high-school teachers rarely have the opportunity to discuss with their students the effects of radioactive contamination in forest and agricultural ecosystems following a nuclear or radiological emergency, or to conduct experiments to illustrate the methodology employed to assess the consequences of such an event. This paper presents a laboratory experiment which could be included as part of a teaching programme on ionizing radiation physics, addressing some of the aspects related to the fate and effects of anthropogenic radionuclides following a radiation emergency, and the possible physical countermeasures that could be adopted in order to reduce their impact on the environment.

  11. Radioecology teaching: response to a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R M

    2006-01-01

    The study of environmental radioactivity is a topic not usually included in physics courses in Brazilian and Latin American universities. Consequently, high-school teachers rarely have the opportunity to discuss with their students the effects of radioactive contamination in forest and agricultural ecosystems following a nuclear or radiological emergency, or to conduct experiments to illustrate the methodology employed to assess the consequences of such an event. This paper presents a laboratory experiment which could be included as part of a teaching programme on ionizing radiation physics, addressing some of the aspects related to the fate and effects of anthropogenic radionuclides following a radiation emergency, and the possible physical countermeasures that could be adopted in order to reduce their impact on the environment

  12. Making sense of climate change risks and responses at the community level: A cultural-political lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainka A. Granderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to better assess, communicate and respond to risks from climate change at the community level have emerged as key questions within climate risk management. Recent research to address these questions centres largely on psychological factors, exploring how cognition and emotion lead to biases in risk assessment. Yet, making sense of climate change and its responses at the community level demands attention to the cultural and political processes that shape how risk is conceived, prioritized and managed. I review the emergent literature on risk perceptions and responses to climate change using a cultural-political lens. This lens highlights how knowledge, meaning and power are produced and negotiated across multiple stakeholders at the community level. It draws attention to the different ways of constructing climate change risks and suggests an array of responses at the community level. It further illustrates how different constructions of risk intersect with agency and power to shape the capacity for response and collective action. What matters are whose constructions of risk, and whose responses, count in decision-making. I argue for greater engagement with the interpretive social sciences in research, practice and policy. The interpretive social sciences offer theories and tools for capturing and problematising the ways of knowing, sense-making and mobilising around risks from climate change. I also highlight the importance of participatory approaches in incorporating the multiplicity of interests at the community level into climate risk management in fair, transparent and culturally appropriate ways.

  13. Species interactions determine the spatial mortality patterns emerging in plant communities after extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jinbao; Bogaert, Jan; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Gap disturbance is assumed to maintain species diversity by creating environmental heterogeneity. However, little is known about how interactions with neighbours, such as competition and facilitation, alter the emerging gap patterns after extreme events. Using a spatially explicit community model we demonstrate that negative interactions, especially intraspecific competition, greatly promote both average gap size and gap-size diversity relative to positive interspecific interaction. This suggests that competition would promote diversity maintenance but also increase community invasibility, as large gaps with a wide size variety provide more diverse niches for both local and exotic species. Under interspecific competition, both gap metrics interestingly increased with species richness, while they were reduced under intraspecific competition. Having a wider range of species interaction strengths led to a smaller average gap size only under intraspecific competition. Increasing conspecific clumping induced larger gaps with more variable sizes under intraspecific competition, in contrast to interspecific competition. Given the range of intraspecific clumping in real communities, models or experiments based on randomly synthesized communities may yield biased estimates of the opportunities for potential colonizers to fill gaps. Overall, our “static” model on gap formation offers perspectives to better predict recolonization opportunity and thus community secondary succession under extreme event regimes. PMID:26054061

  14. Introduction of an Emergency Response Plan for flood loading of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, N. F. Md; Sidek, L. M.; Basri, H.; Muda, R. S.; Razad, A. Z. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Sultan Abu Bakar Dam Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is designed to assist employees for identifying, monitoring, responding and mitigation dam safety emergencies. This paper is outlined to identification of an organization chart, responsibility for emergency management team and triggering level in Sultan Abu Bakar Dam ERP. ERP is a plan that guides responsibilities for proper operation of Sultan Abu Bakar Dam in respond to emergency incidents affecting the dam. Based on this study four major responsibilities are needed for Abu Bakar Dam owing to protect any probable risk for downstream which they can be Incident Commander, Deputy Incident Commander, On-Scene Commander, Civil Engineer. In conclusion, having organization charts based on ERP studies can be helpful for decreasing the probable risks in any projects such as Abu Bakar Dam and it is a way to identify and suspected and actual dam safety emergencies.

  15. Severe deterministic effects of external exposure and intake of radioactive material: basis for emergency response criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutkov, V; Buglova, E; McKenna, T

    2011-01-01

    Lessons learned from responses to past events have shown that more guidance is needed for the response to radiation emergencies (in this context, a 'radiation emergency' means the same as a 'nuclear or radiological emergency') which could lead to severe deterministic effects. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) requirements for preparedness and response for a radiation emergency, inter alia, require that arrangements shall be made to prevent, to a practicable extent, severe deterministic effects and to provide the appropriate specialised treatment for these effects. These requirements apply to all exposure pathways, both internal and external, and all reasonable scenarios, to include those resulting from malicious acts (e.g. dirty bombs). This paper briefly describes the approach used to develop the basis for emergency response criteria for protective actions to prevent severe deterministic effects in the case of external exposure and intake of radioactive material.

  16. A knowledge based system for training radiation emergency response personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriakose, K.K.; Peter, T.U.; Natarajan, A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the important aspects of radiation emergency preparedness is to impart training to emergency handling staff. Mock exercises are generally used for this purpose. But practical considerations limit the frequency of such exercises. A suitably designed computer software can be effectively used to impart training. With the advent of low cost personal computers, the frequency with which the training programme can be conducted is unlimited. A computer software with monotonic behaviour is inadequate for such training. It is necessary to provide human like tutoring capabilities. With the advances in knowledge based computer systems, it is possible to develop such a system. These systems have the capability of providing individualized training. This paper describes the development of such a system for training and evaluation of agencies associated with the management of radiation emergency. It also discusses the utility of the software as a general purpose tutor. The details required for the preparation of data files and knowledge base files are included. It uses a student model based on performance measures. The software is developed in C under MS-DOS. It uses a rule based expert system shell developed in C. The features of this shell are briefly described. (author). 5 refs

  17. Improvement of the Cuban Regulatory Framework for preparedness and response to radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Guerra, Pedro; Lopez Corteza, Yamil; Jerez Vegueria, Pablo; Quevedo Garcia, Jose; Dumenigo Gonzalez, Cruz

    2004-01-01

    Taking into account the national experience in managing radiological emergencies situations and the recommendations documents on the preparedness and response to radiological emergencies recently published by the IAEA, the Cuban regulatory authority had improved the regulatory framework relate to the management of radiological emergencies. The Cuban regulatory framework was characterized by the lack of regulations and technical guides ruling the planning and the establishment of the response to radiological emergencies by the holders of authorizations and intervening forces. This paper presents a technical proposal of the authors in order to improve the existing regulatory framework

  18. Community response to noise in Vietnam: exposure-response relationships based on the community tolerance level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjestland, Truls; Nguyen, Thu Lan; Yano, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Social surveys on noise annoyance have been conducted in five different cities in Vietnam. The surveys included both aircraft noise (three airports) and road traffic noise (five cities). The main objective for these studies was to establish dose-response functions that were representative for Vietnam. The results have been compared with results from similar surveys from other regions. Dose-response functions for aircraft noise in Vietnam showing the percentage of highly annoyed people versus the noise level are nearly identical to those presented in the European Noise Directive [European Commission (2002). http://ec.europa.eu/environment/noise/directive.htm]. For road traffic noise, however, the results indicate that people in Vietnam are more tolerant. The noise levels can be increased by 5-10 dB in order to have a response similar to the curve recommended by the European Commission.

  19. Cell‐to‐cell heterogeneity emerges as consequence of metabolic cooperation in a synthetic yeast community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cells that grow together respond heterogeneously to stress even when they are genetically similar. Metabolism, a key determinant of cellular stress tolerance, may be one source of this phenotypic heterogeneity, however, this relationship is largely unclear. We used self‐establishing metabolically cooperating (SeMeCo) yeast communities, in which metabolic cooperation can be followed on the basis of genotype, as a model to dissect the role of metabolic cooperation in single‐cell heterogeneity. Cells within SeMeCo communities showed to be highly heterogeneous in their stress tolerance, while the survival of each cell under heat or oxidative stress, was strongly determined by its metabolic specialization. This heterogeneity emerged for all metabolite exchange interactions studied (histidine, leucine, uracil, and methionine) as well as oxidant (H2O2, diamide) and heat stress treatments. In contrast, the SeMeCo community collectively showed to be similarly tolerant to stress as wild‐type populations. Moreover, stress heterogeneity did not establish as sole consequence of metabolic genotype (auxotrophic background) of the single cell, but was observed only for cells that cooperated according to their metabolic capacity. We therefore conclude that phenotypic heterogeneity and cell to cell differences in stress tolerance are emergent properties when cells cooperate in metabolism. PMID:27312776

  20. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)

  1. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)

  2. Joint radiation emergency management plan of the international organizations. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a number of States, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full Parties. Since 1989, the arrangements between these organizations for facilitating the practical implementation of those articles of the two Conventions that are operational in nature have been documented by the IAEA in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). The manual is intended for use primarily by contact points as identified in the Conventions. Pursuant to the obligations placed on it by the Conventions, the IAEA regularly convenes the Inter-Agency Committee on Response to Nuclear Accidents (IACRNA)2, whose purpose is to co-ordinate the arrangements of the relevant international intergovernmental organizations ('international organizations') for preparing for and responding to nuclear or radiological emergencies. Although the Conventions assign specific response functions and responsibilities to the IAEA and the Parties, various international organizations have - by virtue of their statutory functions or of related legal instruments - general functions and responsibilities that encompass aspects of preparedness and response. Moreover, some regional organizations (e.g. the European Union) are party to legally binding treaties and have

  3. Emerging applications of stimuli-responsive polymer materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuart, M.A.C.; Genzer, J.; Muller, M.; Ober, C.; Stamm, M.; Sukhorukov, G.B.; Szleifer, I.; Tsukruk, V.V.; Urban, M.; Winnik, F.; Zauscher, S.; Luzinov, I.; Minko, S.

    2010-01-01

    Responsive polymer materials can adapt to surrounding environments, regulate transport of ions and molecules, change wettability and adhesion of different species on external stimuli, or convert chemical and biochemical signals into optical, electrical, thermal and mechanical signals, and vice

  4. State mediation in market emergence : Socially responsible investing in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, S.; Ferraro, Fabrizio; Gehman, J.; Lounsbury, M.; Greenwood, R.

    2016-01-01

    Socially responsible investing (SRI) funds depart from mainstream finance by incorporating environmental, social, and governance considerations, but their success varies across regions. By using a historical comparative case design, we identify an empirically puzzling phenomenon in China: despite an

  5. Hospital emergency preparedness and response during Superstorm Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a report by the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) on the performance of 172 Medicare-certified hospitals in the New York Metropolitan Area before, during, and after Sandy. It makes recommendations on how to close gaps that were found in emergency planning and execution for a disaster of this magnitude. To download the complete 40-page report and a Podcast based on it, go to http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/ reports/oei-06-13-00260. asp.

  6. Scalability of Knowledge Transfer in Complex Systems of Emergent "living" Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu Nousala

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Communities are emergent, holistic living systems. Understanding the impact of social complex systems through spatial interactions via the lens of scalability requires the development of new methodological behavioural approaches. The evolution of social complex systems of cities and their regions can be investigated through the evolution of spatial structures. The clustering of entities within cities, regions and beyond presents behavioural elements for which methodological approaches need to be considered. The emergent aspect of complex entities by their very nature requires an understanding that can embrace unpredictability through emergence. Qualitative methodological approaches can be holistic with the ability to embrace bottom up and top down methods for analysis. Social complex systems develop structures by connecting "like minded" behaviour through scalability. How "mobile" these interactions are, is a concept that can be understood via "inter-organizational" and "interstructural" comparative approaches. How do we indeed convey this adequately or appropriately? Just as a geographical area may contain characteristics that can help to support the formation of an emergent industry cluster, similar behaviours occur through emergent characteristics of complex systems that underpin the sustainability of an organization. The idea that complex systems have tacit structures, capable of displaying emergent behaviour, is not a common concept. These tacit structures can in turn, impact the structural sustainability of physical entities. More often than not, there is a focus on how these concepts of complex systems work, but the "why" questions depends upon scalability. Until recently, social complex adaptive systems were largely over looked due to the tacit nature of these network structures.

  7. Joint radiation emergency management plan of the international organizations. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 January 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a number of States, the European Union (EURATOM), the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full Parties. Since 1989, the arrangements between these organizations for facilitating the practical implementation of those articles of the two Conventions that are operational in nature have been documented by the IAEA in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM)1. The manual is intended for use primarily by contact points as identified in the Conventions. Pursuant to the obligations placed on it by the Conventions, the IAEA regularly convenes the Inter-Agency Committee on Response to Nuclear Accidents (IACRNA)2, whose purpose is to co-ordinate the arrangements of the relevant international intergovernmental organizations ('international organizations') for preparing for and responding to nuclear or radiological emergencies. Although the Conventions assign specific response functions and responsibilities to the IAEA and the Parties, various international organizations have - by virtue of their statutory functions or of related legal instruments - general functions and responsibilities that encompass aspects of preparedness and response. Moreover, some regional organizations (e.g. the European Union) are party to legally

  8. Coastal bacterioplankton community response to diatom-derived polysaccharide microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joe D; Cunliffe, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Phytoplankton-derived polysaccharide microgels, including transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), are a major component of the marine organic carbon pool. Previous studies have made correlative links between phytoplankton material and bacterioplankton, and performed experiments that assess general responses to phytoplankton, yet there is a lack of direct empirical evidence of specific bacterioplankton responses to natural phytoplankton polysaccharide microgels. In this study, we used diatom produced TEP in controlled incubation experiments to determine the impact of polysaccharide microgels on a coastal bacterioplankton community. Quantification of bacterial 16S rRNA gene transcripts showed that the addition of TEP caused an increase in bacterioplankton activity. Similarly, high-throughput sequencing of RT-PCR amplified bacterial 16S rRNA gene transcripts showed that active bacterioplankton community structure and diversity also changed in response to microgels. Alteromonadales and Rhodobacterales increased in abundance in response to TEP, suggesting that both bacterioplankton taxa utilize diatom-derived microgels. However, through assessing 13 C-labelled TEP uptake via RNA Stable Isotope Probing, we show that only the Alteromonadales (genus Alteromonas) assimilated the TEP carbon. This study adds utilization of diatom-derived TEP to the metabolic repertoire of the archetypal copiotrophic bacterioplankton Alteromonas, and indicates that the Rhodobacterales may utilize TEP for other purposes (e.g. attachment sites). © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Analyses of transient plant response under emergency situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Kazuya [Advanced Reactor Technology, Co. Ltd., Engineering Department, Tokyo (Japan); Shimakawa, Yoshio; Hishida, Masahiko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd., Reactor Core Engineering and Safety Engineering Department, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    In order to support development of the dynamic reliability analysis program DYANA, analyses were made on the event sequences anticipated under emergency situations using the plant dynamics simulation computer code Super-COPD. The analytical models were developed for Super-COPD such as the guard vessel, the maintenance cooling system, the sodium overflow and makeup system, etc. in order to apply the code to the simulation of the emergency situations. The input data were prepared for the analyses. About 70 sequences were analyzed, which are categorized into the following events: (1) PLOHS (Protected Loss of Heat Sink), (2) LORL (Loss of Reactor Level)-J: failure of sodium makeup by the primary sodium overflow and makeup system, (3) LORL-G : failure of primary coolant pump trip, (4) LORL-I: failure of the argon cover gas isolation, and (5) heat removal only using the ventilation system of the primary cooling system rooms. The results were integrated into an input file for preparing the functions for the neural network simulation. (author)

  10. Networking of TSOs in Emergency Preparedness and Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, F.P.; Maqua, M.; Kerner, A.; Scott-de-Martinville, E.

    2012-01-01

    On its 2011 General Conference, the IAEA announced the foundation of a forum of technical safety organizations (TSO), the TSO forum, to promote the international cooperation and networking among the TSOs worldwide and to complement the existing network of the regulators. In the light of the Fukushima accident it appears that in case of a large accident, every national crisis organization of the country immediately impacted needs the full access to its technical and human resources to face the situation and obviously the communication and collaboration with other crisis centers will suffer from such challenging conditions. Such a limiting issue can only be resolved by making the international collaboration of the technical crisis centers an official part of their work. Therefore, a new framework has to be settled to establish a worldwide network of technical emergency centers. This, certainly will require state negotiations at top level. The feedback experience from the collaboration between the technical emergency centers during the Fukushima accident could be very fruitful for the new framework. (A.C.)

  11. Conceptual framework and quantification of population vulnerability for effective emergency response planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Mikler, Armin R; O'Neill, Martin; Komatz, Jared

    2015-01-01

    The study focused on the methodological advancement and analytical approach of using multilevel data to define population vulnerability and risk in bioemergency disaster planning. The authors considered two types of vulnerabilities, transportation vulnerability that stems from lack of access to transportation (public or private) and communication vulnerability that stems from unavailability of needed language-specific communication resources. The authors used Transit Authority general transit feed data and the American Community Survey 5-year estimate data (2006-2010 summary files) to quantify these vulnerabilities. These data were integrated with Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) data for spatial analysis. A response plan was generated for Tarrant County, TX, and deemed feasible before consideration of vulnerable populations. The results point to the importance of integrating geographical and population demographic features that represent potential barriers to the optimum distribution and utilization of resources into the analysis of response plans. An examination of transportation vulnerabilities indicate that, of those vulnerable in Tarrant County, nearly 23,000 individuals will be at-risk of not being able to reach the Point Of Dispensing (POD) to obtain services as they are beyond walking distance to the POD and lack access to transportation resources. The analysis of language vulnerability depicts an uneven distribution resulting in nonuniform demand at PODs for translation resources. There are more than 11,000 at-risk households in the South East region of Tarrant County alone that are truly in need of translation services. The authors demonstrated that multiple vulnerabilities at each POD can be quantified by aggregating the vulnerability at the available granularity (ie, all blocks or block groups) in a given service area. The quantification of vulnerability at each service area facilitates a POD-based at-risk analysis

  12. Mapping climatic mechanisms likely to favour the emergence of novel communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Alejandro; Williams, John W.; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-12-01

    Climatic conditions are changing at different rates and in different directions, potentially causing the emergence of novel species assemblages. Here we identify areas where recent (1901-2013) changes in temperature and precipitation are likely to be producing novel species assemblages through three distinct mechanisms: emergence of novel climatic combinations, rapid displacement of climatic isoclines and local divergences between temperature and precipitation vectors. Novel climates appear in the tropics, while displacement is faster at higher latitudes and divergence is high in the subtropics and mountainous regions. Globally, novel climate combinations so far are rare (3.4% of evaluated cells), mean displacement is 3.7 km decade-1 and divergence is high (>60°) for 67% of evaluated cells. Via at least one of the proposed mechanisms, novel species assemblages are likely to be forming in the North American Great Plains and temperate forests, Amazon, South American grasslands, Australia, boreal Asia and Africa. In these areas, temperature- and moisture-sensitive species may be affected by new climates emerging, differential biotic lags to rapidly changing climates or by being pulled in opposite directions along local spatial gradients. These results provide spatially explicit hypotheses about where and why novel communities are likely to emerge due to recent climate change.

  13. Factors influencing ceftriaxone use in community-acquired pneumonia: Emergency doctors' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatar, Maher Ali; Peterson, Gregory M; Thompson, Angus; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R

    2014-12-01

    To explore the perceptions of ED doctors regarding the use of ceftriaxone in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Face-to-face interviews were conducted with ED doctors in an Australian tertiary public hospital. A semi-structured interview method was used for collecting data and a framework analysis approach utilised to identify emerging themes regarding the influences on ED prescribers when using ceftriaxone for CAP. Eight interviews were performed (two consultants, four registrars and two residents). Five main themes emerged as influencing decisions regarding the selection of ceftriaxone for patients with CAP: (i) clinical intuition versus structured evaluation of severity; (ii) clinical uncertainty; (iii) prior experience; (iv) source of guidance; and (v) prescribing etiquette. As most cases of CAP are initially diagnosed and treated empirically in the ED, any interventions that aim to decrease inappropriate use of ceftriaxone for CAP should address the factors identified here that influence ED doctors' prescribing decisions. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  14. Generic Procedures for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency at Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The IAEA publishes the Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to fulfil that function. This publication is part of that series. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, contains the following requirement: 'To ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene...'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(53)/RES/10, continues to encourage Member States '...to enhance, where necessary, their own preparedness and response capabilities for nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies, by improving capabilities to prevent accidents, to respond to emergencies and to mitigate any harmful consequences...'. This publication is intended to assist Member States meet the requirements of GS-R-2 and enhance their preparedness by providing guidance on the response by facility personnel to emergencies at research reactor facilities.

  15. Mutual emergency assistance in the event of accident during transport of radioactive materials within the member states of the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selling, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    The study consist of a compilation of information on the relevant emergency response plans that are at present in existence in the ten countries of the European Community. Consideration is given to the development of proposals for facilitating co-operation between the emergency services in different countries, particularly with regard to accidents that might occur near national boundaries or in countries in which all the necessary resources might not be available. The particular items of interest covered in this study are: compilation of information on existing organizational emergency response arrangements within each Member State relating to accidents in the transport of radioactive materials by all modes, including road, rail, inland waterways, air and compilation of information on existing arrangements for receiving or providing assistance from or to other Member States. Identification of any avoidable incompatibilities on an international scale. Recommendations for improving the existing arrangements and for encouraging the development of adequate systems of mutual emergency notification, liaison and assistance as required by the circumstances, recommendations should be compatible with the broader framework of emergency response for all types of accidents developed within Member States and envisaged in the IAEA system for mutual emergency assistance

  16. Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, Section 311

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.A.; Martin, K.J.

    1996-03-01

    The following information reflects changes in the lists of hazardous chemicals present at this facility in amounts equal to or greater than 10,000 pounds and extremely hazardous substances present in amounts equal to or greater than 500 pounds or its Threshold Planning Quantity, whichever was lowest. These lists represent the following: list of materials last reported in February 1995; materials to be deleted from list; materials to be added to list; and revised list of materials. The revised list of materials is a composite of the Y-12 Plant Emergency Planing and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312 report prepared and submitted for calendar year 1995

  17. Responses of Coral-Associated Bacterial Communities to Local and Global Stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie M. McDevitt-Irwin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The microbial contribution to ecological resilience is still largely overlooked in coral reef ecology. Coral-associated bacteria serve a wide variety of functional roles with reference to the coral host, and thus, the composition of the overall microbiome community can strongly influence coral health and survival. Here, we synthesize the findings of recent studies (n = 45 that evaluated the impacts of the top three stressors facing coral reefs (climate change, water pollution and overfishing on coral microbiome community structure and diversity. Contrary to the species losses that are typical of many ecological communities under stress, here we show that microbial richness tends to be higher rather than lower for stressed corals (i.e., in ~60% of cases, regardless of the stressor. Microbial responses to stress were taxonomically consistent across stressors, with specific taxa typically increasing in abundance (e.g., Vibrionales, Flavobacteriales, Rhodobacterales, Alteromonadales, Rhizobiales, Rhodospirillales, and Desulfovibrionales and others declining (e.g., Oceanosprillales. Emerging evidence also suggests that stress may increase the microbial beta diversity amongst coral colonies, potentially reflecting a reduced ability of the coral host to regulate its microbiome. Moving forward, studies will need to discern the implications of stress-induced shifts in microbiome diversity for the coral hosts and may be able to use microbiome community structure to identify resilient corals. The evidence we present here supports the hypothesis that microbial communities play important roles in ecological resilience, and we encourage a focus on the microbial contributions to resilience for future research.

  18. Lessons learned from the second Federal Radiology Emergency Response Plan Field Exercise (FFE-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.; Weiss, B.H.; Wolff, W.F.; Adler, V.

    1988-01-01

    The FFE-2, held in 1987 at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, provided a large-scale, multiagency, field test of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). The FRERP provided workable guidance for coordinating the federal response efforts and effectively supplementing the states' resources. Needs for more training for responders and clarification in portions of the response were identified

  19. Drug resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections: role for an emerging antibacterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Aguilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Aguilar1, María-José Giménez1, José Barberán21Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid; 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The nasopharynx is the ecological niche where evolution towards resistance occurs in respiratory tract isolates. Dynamics of different bacterial populations in antibiotic-free multibacterial niches are the baseline that antibiotic treatments can alter by shifting the competitive balance in favor of resistant populations. For this reason, antibiotic resistance is increasingly being considered to be an ecological problem. Traditionally, resistance has implied the need for development of new antibiotics for which basic efficacy and safety data are required prior to licensing. Antibiotic development is mainly focused on demonstrating clinical efficacy and setting susceptibility breakpoints for efficacy prediction. However, additional information on pharmacodynamic data predicting absence of selection of resistance and of resistant subpopulations, and specific surveillance on resistance to core antibiotics (to detect emerging resistances and its link with antibiotic consumption in the community are valuable data in defining the role of a new antibiotic, not only from the perspective of its therapeutic potential but also from the ecologic perspective (countering resistances to core antibiotics in the community. The documented information on cefditoren gleaned from published studies in recent years is an example of the role for an emerging oral antibacterial facing current antibiotic resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.Keywords: respiratory tract infection, antibiotic resistance, cefditoren, community

  20. The hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum: An emerging public health risk in Australian tropical rainforests and Indigenous communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity A. Smout

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ancylostoma ceylanicum is the common hookworm of domestic dogs and cats throughout Asia, and is an emerging but little understood public health risk in tropical northern Australia. We investigated the prevalence of A. ceylanicum in soil and free-ranging domestic dogs at six rainforest locations in Far North Queensland that are Indigenous Australian communities and popular tourist attractions within the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. By combining PCR-based techniques with traditional methods of hookworm species identification, we found the prevalence of hookworm in Indigenous community dogs was high (96.3% and 91.9% from necropsy and faecal samples, respectively. The majority of these infections were A. caninum. We also observed, for the first time, the presence of A. ceylanicum infection in domestic dogs (21.7% and soil (55.6% in an Indigenous community. A. ceylanicum was present in soil samples from two out of the three popular tourist locations sampled. Our results contribute to the understanding of dogs as a public health risk to Indigenous communities and tourists in the Wet Tropics. Dog health needs to be more fully addressed as part of the Australian Government's commitments to “closing the gap” in chronic disease between Indigenous and other Australians, and encouraging tourism in similar locations.

  1. Social Support, Health, and Health Care Access Among Latino Immigrant Men in an Emerging Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documet, Patricia Isabel; Troyer, Mark M; Macia, Laura

    2018-03-01

    To determine the association of social support with alcohol abuse, depression, and health care access among Latino immigrant men in an emerging Latino community (an area with a small yet growing Latino population). Cross-sectional baseline data of 140 men prior to a participatory male-to-male community health worker intervention among Latino immigrants were analyzed using logistic regression. Community health workers recruited community participants in Western Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2013. Participants constituted a vulnerable group: 47% had not finished high school, 36% had moderate to severe depression, and 30% reported binge drinking in the past month. Health care access was low (insurance = 6%, usual source = 20%). In multivariable logistic regression high social support was associated with less binge drinking (odds ratio [OR] = 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.20, 0.98]) and lower depression (OR = 0.22; 95% CI [0.09-0.54]). Social support was associated with having a dentist visit but not with other health care access measures. Results indicate that the role of social support seems important for drinking and depression but remains controversial for health care access. It raises the hypothesis that low social support may be one of the mechanisms for the increase in drinking that happens after immigration.

  2. Emergency control center of the nuclear Regulatory Authority: a national, regional and international tool to coordinate the response to radiological and nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, Osvaldo; Hernandez, Daniel; Telleria, Diego; Bruno, Hector; Boutet, Luis; Kunst, Juan; Sadaniowski, Ivana; Rey, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the year 1998, with the regulation of the Nuclear Law, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is constituted as the national coordinator of the response in case of nuclear or radiological emergencies. The ARN builds his first operative center installed in his Head quarter in Buenos Aires. Likewise, from the obligations that come with the Convention of Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, the ARN is the National Warning Point and the National Competent Authority. Therefore, the operative capacity of the center needs to be expanded to cover not only the national territory but also its link with the region and the IAEA, as an access point to the International community, as the conventions demand. For the purpose of giving ARN capacities which reflect the state of art at the international level on Nuclear Emergency Centers and warrant that its equipment and technology will be compatible with those abroad (mainly with IAEA), the ARN made an arrangements with Department of Energy of United States, in the framework of an existing bilateral Argentine Foreign Office/US Government agreement (Joint Standing Committee on Nuclear Cooperation). This agreement allows a deep experience exchange, high level specialists support and last generation equipment access. As a result, the center of ARN can be considerate as the most advanced civil nuclear emergency center in the region. This work describes the implementation process of the emergency center and the technical features, like the physical distribution, hardware and software resources, communication equipment, Geographic Information Systems, etc. (author)

  3. Business Responses to Climate Change. Identifying Emergent Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J.

    2005-01-01

    Companies face much uncertainty about the competitive effects of the recently adopted Kyoto Protocol on global climate change and the current and future regulations that may emerge from it. Companies have considerable discretion to explore different market strategies to address global warming and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This article examines these strategic options by reviewing the market-oriented actions that are currently being taken by 136 large companies that are part of the Global 500. There are six different market strategies that companies use to address climate change and that consist of different combinations of the market components available to managers. Managers can choose between more emphasis on improvements in their business activities through innovation or employ compensatory approaches such as emissions trading. They can either act by themselves or work with other companies, NGOs, or (local) governments

  4. Are archetypes transmitted or emergent? A response to Christian Roesler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Vallas, François

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the author argues that Jung's concept of archetype should not be reduced to an univocal definition. Jung himself proposed many definitions of this concept, some of them being partially or totally contradictory to others. A univocal and logical way of thinking can lead us to refute and reject part of those definitions, but a complex way of thinking, as proposed by Edgar Morin or Roy Bhaskar for example, can allow us to consider that those apparent contradictions in Jung's definitions of archetype reflect the complexity of the psychic reality. The main argument of the author is that Jung was missing the epistemological concept of emergence (which appeared in science at the time of his death) and that he tried to express it with the epistemological concepts of his time. © 2013, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  5. Association between neuroticism and amygdala responsivity emerges under stressful conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaerd, Daphne; Klumpers, Floris; van Wingen, Guido; Tendolkar, Indira; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-01-01

    Increased amygdala reactivity in response to salient stimuli is seen in patients with affective disorders, in healthy subjects at risk for these disorders, and in stressed individuals, making it a prime target for mechanistic studies into the pathophysiology of affective disorders. However, whereas

  6. Emerging strategic corporate social responsibility partnership initiatives in agribusiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pötz, Katharina Anna; Haas, Rainer; Balzarova, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has gained momentum in business practices and strategies. In the agribusiness sector, the need for CSR integration has recently triggered a number of private sector led initiatives that should contribute to sustainable...

  7. Citizen Response in Crisis: Individual and Collective Efforts to Enhance Community Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Linnell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the process and findings of an extensive research project with the aim of investigating present initiatives and approaches within the area of community resilience and citizen involvement. The paper specifically addresses which emerging sociotechnical approaches can be discerned within these initiatives. The discussion is structured within three categories of potential voluntary engagement; organized volunteers, semiorganized individuals, and “nonorganized” individuals. The empirical material assembled in the research project is contrasted with contemporary international research literature regarding sociotechnical means for enhancing community resilience. Swedish approaches, as is noted in the Conclusion of the paper, are primarily focused on consuming information in the pre-event phase, rather than on producing information and engaging in collaboration in the response phase.

  8. Resolution no. 18/2012 Guide for the preparation and emergency response radiological

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This guide aims to establish requirements to ensure an adequate level of entities, for the preparation and response to radiological emergencies and to prepare the Radiation Emergency Plan (PER), asset out in the Basic Safety Standards radiological and authorizations Regulations in force. This guide applies to organizations providing employment practices associated with sources of ionizing radiation, hereinafter sources.

  9. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Duan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to property damage and loss of lives, environment pollution, such as water pollution and air pollution caused by accidents in chemical industrial parks (CIPs is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study. Using a scenario analysis, the stages of emergency response were divided into three levels, after introducing the domino effect, and fundamental requirements of ERS design were confirmed. The framework of ERS was composed mainly of a monitoring system, an emergency command center, an action system, and a supporting system. On this basis, six main emergency rescue steps containing alarm receipt, emergency evaluation, launched corresponding emergency plans, emergency rescue actions, emergency recovery, and result evaluation and feedback were determined. Finally, an example from the XiaoHu Chemical Industrial Park (XHCIP was presented to check on the integrality, reliability, and maneuverability of the ERS, and the result of the first emergency drill with this ERS indicated that the developed ERS can reduce delays, improve usage efficiency of resources, and raise emergency rescue efficiency.

  10. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weili; He, Bin

    2015-07-10

    In addition to property damage and loss of lives, environment pollution, such as water pollution and air pollution caused by accidents in chemical industrial parks (CIPs) is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS) was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study. Using a scenario analysis, the stages of emergency response were divided into three levels, after introducing the domino effect, and fundamental requirements of ERS design were confirmed. The framework of ERS was composed mainly of a monitoring system, an emergency command center, an action system, and a supporting system. On this basis, six main emergency rescue steps containing alarm receipt, emergency evaluation, launched corresponding emergency plans, emergency rescue actions, emergency recovery, and result evaluation and feedback were determined. Finally, an example from the XiaoHu Chemical Industrial Park (XHCIP) was presented to check on the integrality, reliability, and maneuverability of the ERS, and the result of the first emergency drill with this ERS indicated that the developed ERS can reduce delays, improve usage efficiency of resources, and raise emergency rescue efficiency.

  11. 76 FR 23810 - Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau; Federal Advisory Committee Act; Emergency Response...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau; Federal Advisory Committee Act; Emergency Response Interoperability Center Public Safety Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY... Fullano, Associate Chief, Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, Federal Communications Commission...

  12. 78 FR 8691 - Notice of Availability of Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... through a recipient. II. Emergency Relief Program Information for Hurricane Sandy Relief A. Description... Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION... impacted by Hurricane Sandy, which [[Page 8692

  13. Training and exercises of the Emergency Response Team at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yearwood, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility has an active Emergency Response Team. The Emergency Response Team is composed of members of the operating and support groups within the Plutonium Facility. In addition to their initial indoctrination, the members are trained and certified in first-aid, CPR, fire and rescue, and the use of self-contained-breathing-apparatus. Training exercises, drills, are conducted once a month. The drills consist of scenarios which require the Emergency Response Team to apply CPR and/or first aid. The drills are performed in the Plutonium Facility, they are video taped, then reviewed and critiqued by site personnel. Through training and effective drills and the Emergency Response Team can efficiently respond to any credible accident which may occur at the Plutonium Facility. 3 tabs

  14. Emergency Response Program Designing Based On Case Study ERP Regulations In Ilam Gas Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Tahmasbi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Emergency response plan designing is one of the most important prevention approaches in crisis management. This study aims to design emergency response plan based on case study ERP regulations in Ilam gas refinery. On the basis of risk assessment and identification techniques such as HAZOP and FMEA in Ilam gas refinery the risks have been prioritized and then according to this prioritization the design of possible scenarios which have the highest rate of occurrence and the highest level of damage has been separated. Possible scenarios were simulated with PHAST software. Then emergency response program has been designed for the special mode or similar cases. According to the internal emergency response plan for Ilam gas refinery and predictable conditions of the process special instructions should be considered at the time of the incident to suffer the least damage on people and environment in the shortest time possible.

  15. Indian Point Nuclear Power Station: verification analysis of County Radiological Emergency-Response Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, J.; Whitfield, R.

    1983-05-01

    This report was developed as a management tool for use by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region II staff. The analysis summarized in this report was undertaken to verify the extent to which procedures, training programs, and resources set forth in the County Radiological Emergency Response Plans (CRERPs) for Orange, Putnam, and Westchester counties in New York had been realized prior to the March 9, 1983, exercise of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Station near Buchanan, New York. To this end, a telephone survey of county emergency response organizations was conducted between January 19 and February 22, 1983. This report presents the results of responses obtained from this survey of county emergency response organizations

  16. Emergency First Response to a Crisis Event: A Multi-Agent Simulation Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roginski, Jonathan W

    2006-01-01

    .... This process led to the development of a multi-agent simulation methodology for emergency first response specifically applied to analyze a notional vehicle bomb attack during a festival in the Baltimore Inner Harbor...

  17. Post-Project Assessment of Community-Supported Emergency Transport Systems for Health Care Services in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Indu B.; Robinson, Dorcas; Vallely, Lisa; Myeya, Juliana; Ngitoria, Lukumay; Kitambi, Victor; Kabakama, Alfreda

    2012-01-01

    We examined the continuation of community-organized and financed emergency transport systems implemented by the Community-Based Reproductive Health Project (CBRHP) from 1998 to 2000 in two rural districts in Tanzania. The CBRHP was a multipronged program, one component of which focused on affordable transport to health facilities from the…

  18. Development of an extended framework for emergency response criteria. Interim report for comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Experience from response to recent nuclear and radiological emergencies has clearly demonstrated the importance of an efficient response system that includes, among other components, emergency plans, procedures, and internally consistent operational criteria. An analysis of lessons identified from recent responses has shown that a lack of crucial components in the emergency response system could result in major radiological and nonradiological consequences at the national level. One of the reasons for the overwhelming psychological consequences of the Chernobyl and Goiania emergencies was public mistrust of decision-makers, who lost their credibility by frequently changing the criteria for taking action. Moreover, national response arrangements that are incompatible among countries can result in major mistrust by the public. It is considered important to have internationally agreed criteria and guidance for emergency response established in advance of an emergency. Currently there are several IAEA safety standards that contain recommendations for response to radiation emergencies, addressing principles and response criteria. Mindful of the lessons identified from recent emergencies, the IAEA convened in November 2001 a technical committee meeting (TCM) to develop aspects of the technical basis for emergency response to radiation emergencies. At this meeting, the lessons from response to the Chernobyl, Goiania and other emergencies over the past years were examined to identify where revisions were needed to the existing international guidance for response. In particular, the existing international criteria and guidance for taking protective and other actions were examined in the light of these lessons. The objectives of this document are: (1) to propose an extension of existing criteria for undertaking protective and other actions during or following a nuclear or radiological emergency that: addresses the lessons from past emergencies, addresses the recently

  19. Promoting social responsibility for health: health impact assessment and healthy public policy at the community level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmark, M B

    2001-09-01

    The 1997 Jakarta Declaration on Health Promotion into the 21st Century called for new responses to address the emerging threats to health. The declaration placed a high priority on promoting social responsibility for health, and it identified equity-focused health impact assessment as a high priority for action. This theme was among the foci at the 2000 Fifth Global Conference on Health Promotion held in Mexico. This paper, which is an abbreviation of a technical report prepared for the Mexico conference, advances arguments for focusing on health impact assessment at the local level. Health impact assessment identifies negative health impacts that call for policy responses, and identifies and encourages practices and policies that promote health. Health impact assessment may be highly technical and require sophisticated technology and expertise. But it can also be a simple, highly practical process, accessible to ordinary people, and one that helps a community come to grips with local circumstances that need changing for better health. To illustrate the possibilities, this paper presents a case study, the People Assessing Their Health (PATH) project from Eastern Nova Scotia, Canada. It places ordinary citizens, rather than community elites, at the very heart of local decision-making. Evidence from PATH demonstrates that low technology health impact assessment, done by and for local people, can shift thinking beyond the illness problems of individuals. It can bring into consideration, instead, how programmes and policies support or weaken community health, and illuminate a community's capacity to improve local circumstances for better health. This stands in contrast to evidence that highly technological approaches to community-level health impact assessment can be self-defeating. Further development of simple, people-centred, low technology approaches to health impact assessment at the local level is called for.

  20. Emergency preparedness and response in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania - the Three Mile Island incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper addresses the emergency response mechanism and legal basis in effect in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania at the time of the Three Mile Island incident. It reviews the sequence of events as they directly affected the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency and examines the method used by the Agency to discharge its responsibilities. Finally, the paper lists some of the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island experience. (author)

  1. Overview and issues to be solved on emergency response of robots to Fukushima NPP accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawatsuma, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    Many Robots have been deployed in emergency response to Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accidents occurred by the Great East Japan Earthquake and the sequent huge Tsunami, like as unmanned heavy construction machines, PackBOT robots, BROKK robots, TALON robot, BobCAT robot, Quince robot, JAEA-3 robot, Quince-2 and 2 robots and survey runner robot. It has been unveiled, that robots' operation organization, systemization, optimization and mobility are important during emergency response by these robots. (author)

  2. Uses of the Internet in post-emergency response: Some issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzenberg, C.L.

    1998-09-01

    Can the Internet be of value in post-emergency response? The answer is yes, to judge by its use following the Kobe earthquake in Japan and the ice storms in the US and Canada last winter. This will not be a technical account of the Internet, but rather a quick look at some advantages, disadvantages, promising applications, and issues that may arise in using the Internet for post-emergency response.

  3. TU-D-201-07: Severity Indication in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Emergency Response Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K [Associates in Medical Physics, Hagerstown, MD (United States); Rustad, F [Associates In Medical Physics, Lanham, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the corresponding dose to different staff during the High Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy emergency response procedure could help to develop a strategy in efficiency and effective action. In this study, the variation and risk analysis methodology was developed to simulation the HDR emergency response procedure based on severity indicator. Methods: A GammaMedplus iX HDR unit from Varian Medical System was used for this simulation. The emergency response procedure was decomposed based on risk management methods. Severity indexes were used to identify the impact of a risk occurrence on the step including dose to patient and dose to operation staff by varying the time, HDR source activity, distance from the source to patient and staff and the actions. These actions in 7 steps were to press the interrupt button, press emergency shutoff switch, press emergency button on the afterloader keypad, turn emergency hand-crank, remove applicator from the patient, disconnect transfer tube and move afterloader from the patient, and execute emergency surgical recovery. Results: Given the accumulated time in second at the assumed 7 steps were 15, 5, 30, 15, 180, 120, 1800, and the dose rate of HDR source is 10 Ci, the accumulated dose in cGy to patient at 1cm distance were 188, 250, 625, 813, 3063, 4563 and 27063, and the accumulated exposure in rem to operator at outside the vault, 1m and 10cm distance were 0.0, 0.0, 0.1, 0.1, 22.6, 37.6 and 262.6. The variation was determined by the operators in action at different time and distance from the HDR source. Conclusion: The time and dose were estimated for a HDR unit emergency response procedure. It provided information in making optimal decision during the emergency procedure. Further investigation would be to optimize and standardize the responses for other emergency procedure by time-spatial-dose severity function.

  4. Survey on current status of international organizations and foreign countries for emergency preparedness and response and consider technical issues on guideline for nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masanori; Ishikawa, Jun; Homma, Toshimitsu; Sato, Sohei

    2010-06-01

    This review report describes survey results on current status of nuclear emergency preparedness and response in international organizations such as ICRP and IAEA, and consideration results of technical issues on the 'Guideline for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness' issued by the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan (NSC). First, we summarized the following points. The principle of intervention for protection of the public in radiological emergency indicated by ICRP recommendations. The basic concept on nuclear emergency preparedness and response shown by IAEA Safety Standard Series. Next, we considered technical issues on the guideline, such as basic requirements for nuclear emergency preparedness and response, development of EPZ, intervention level for protective measurement, decision criteria for selecting the proper protective action measurement and concept for the support system of experts, based on these survey results. In order to respond to nuclear emergency more effectively in Japan, the guideline should show the basic concept of nuclear emergency preparedness and response for the period between the beginning of the nuclear emergency and the termination of early protective actions. Then, it is important to develop the method of the threat assessment for nuclear facilities, emergency action level (EAL) for the emergency classification, the range of precautionary action zone (PAZ) and urgent protective action planning zone (UPZ) in emergency planning phase, and the basic concept on the implement of protective measurements and operational intervention level (OIL) in emergency response phase. (author)

  5. Financial and economic considerations for emergency response providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liong, Anne S; Liong, Samuel U

    2010-12-01

    Catastrophic events often threaten or cause depletion of resources. It is generally accepted that changes inherent to disasters are stressful. The Conservation of Resources Theory predicts that positive and negative changes in resources will have markedly different effects.28 This theory proposes that resource losses are psychologically stressful, whereas resource gains buffer against the effects of resource loss. For first responders, the level of preparedness is crucial. Investments in planning, training, and logistics are necessary to mitigate the stress associated with a crisis. Stress is also related to not knowing the future of their loved ones if death or permanent incapacity occurs, hence specific laws and financial resources provide a safety net to dependents of first responders and survivors. This kind of safety gives the first responders peace of mind and assurance that the future of their dependents will not be jeopardized. Incentives that are offered let the first responders know that they are valued and appreciated. Indeed, financial support considerably helps first responders before, during, and after catastrophic events. It assists them to cope with stress at the individual level and allows them to become more resilient; this resonates to the community and country in which they serve and enhances their potential to save lives and prevent disabilities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Local emergency medical response after a terrorist attack in Norway: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandrud, Aleidis S; Bretthauer, Michael; Brattebø, Guttorm; Pedersen, May Jb; Håpnes, Kent; Møller, Karin; Bjorge, Trond; Nyen, Bjørnar; Strauman, Lars; Schreiner, Ada; Haldorsen, Gro S; Bergli, Maria; Nelson, Eugene; Morgan, Tamara S; Hjortdahl, Per

    2017-10-01

    On 22 July 2011, Norway suffered a devastating terrorist attack targeting a political youth camp on a remote island. Within a few hours, 35 injured terrorist victims were admitted to the local Ringerike community hospital. All victims survived. The local emergency medical service (EMS), despite limited resources, was evaluated by three external bodies as successful in handling this crisis. This study investigates the determinants for the success of that EMS as a model for quality improvement in healthcare. We performed focus group interviews using the critical incident technique with 30 healthcare professionals involved in the care of the attack victims to establish determinants of the EMS' success. Two independent teams of professional experts classified and validated the identified determinants. Our findings suggest a combination of four elements essential for the success of the EMS: (1) major emergency preparedness and competence based on continuous planning, training and learning; (2) crisis management based on knowledge, trust and data collection; (3) empowerment through multiprofessional networks; and (4) the ability to improvise based on acquired structure and competence. The informants reported the successful response was specifically based on multiprofessional trauma education, team training, and prehospital and in-hospital networking including mental healthcare. The powerful combination of preparedness, competence and crisis management built on empowerment enabled the healthcare workers to trust themselves and each other to make professional decisions and creative improvisations in an unpredictable situation. The determinants for success derived from this qualitative study (preparedness, management, networking, ability to improvise) may be universally applicable to understanding the conditions for resilient and safe healthcare services, and of general interest for quality improvement in healthcare. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless

  7. A radioactive waste transportation package monitoring system for normal transport and accident emergency response conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.S.; Cashwell, J.W.; Apple, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses spent fuel and high level waste transportation history and prospects, discusses accident histories of radioactive material transport, discusses emergency responder needs and provides a general description of the Transportation Intelligent Monitoring System (TRANSIMS) design. The key objectives of the monitoring system are twofold: (1) to facilitate effective emergency response to accidents involving a radioactive waste transportation package, while minimizing risk to the public and emergency first-response personnel, and (2) to allow remote monitoring of transportation vehicle and payload conditions to enable research into radioactive material transportation for normal and accident conditions. (J.P.N.)

  8. Development of supporting system for emergency response to maritime transport accidents involving radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odano, N.; Matsuoka, T.; Suzuki, H.

    2004-01-01

    National Maritime Research Institute has developed a supporting system for emergency response of competent authority to maritime transport accidents involving radioactive material. The supporting system for emergency response has functions of radiation shielding calculation, marine diffusion simulation, air diffusion simulation and radiological impact evaluation to grasp potential hazard of radiation. Loss of shielding performance accident and loss of sealing ability accident were postulated and impact of the accidents was evaluated based on the postulated accident scenario. Procedures for responding to emergency were examined by the present simulation results

  9. A case of timely satellite image acquisitions in support of coastal emergency environmental response management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Werle, Dirk; Lu, Zhong; Rangoonwala, Amina; Suzuoki, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    The synergistic application of optical and radar satellite imagery improves emergency response and advance coastal monitoring from the realm of “opportunistic” to that of “strategic.” As illustrated by the Hurricane Ike example, synthetic aperture radar imaging capabilities are clearly applicable for emergency response operations, but they are also relevant to emergency environmental management. Integrated with optical monitoring, the nearly real-time availability of synthetic aperture radar provides superior consistency in status and trends monitoring and enhanced information concerning causal forces of change that are critical to coastal resource sustainability, including flooding extent, depth, and frequency.

  10. Analysis of Jordan's Proposed Emergency Communication Interoperability Plan (JECIP) for Disaster Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alzaghal, Mohamad H

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the world has been affected by man-made and natural disasters of a level not shown before which depicts the importance of communication for an efficient and rapid response of First Responder Community (FRC...

  11. Uncertainties in modeling hazardous gas releases for emergency response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Baumann-Stanzer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In case of an accidental release of toxic gases the emergency responders need fast information about the affected area and the maximum impact. Hazard distances calculated with the models MET, ALOHA, BREEZE, TRACE and SAMS for scenarios with chlorine, ammoniac and butane releases are compared in this study. The variations of the model results are measures for uncertainties in source estimation and dispersion calculation. Model runs for different wind speeds, atmospheric stability and roughness lengths indicate the model sensitivity to these input parameters. In-situ measurements at two urban near-traffic sites are compared to results of the Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA in order to quantify uncertainties in the meteorological input. The hazard zone estimates from the models vary up to a factor of 4 due to different input requirements as well as due to different internal model assumptions. None of the models is found to be 'more conservative' than the others in all scenarios. INCA wind-speeds are correlated to in-situ observations at two urban sites in Vienna with a factor of 0.89. The standard deviations of the normal error distribution are 0.8 ms-1 in wind speed, on the scale of 50 degrees in wind direction, up to 4°C in air temperature and up to 10 % in relative humidity. The observed air temperature and humidity are well reproduced by INCA with correlation coefficients of 0.96 to 0.99. INCA is therefore found to give a good representation of the local meteorological conditions. Besides of real-time data, the INCA-short range forecast for the following hours may support the action planning of the first responders.

  12. Uncertainties in modeling hazardous gas releases for emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann-Stanzer, Kathrin; Stenzel, Sirma [Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geodynamik, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    In case of an accidental release of toxic gases the emergency responders need fast information about the affected area and the maximum impact. Hazard distances calculated with the models MET, ALOHA, BREEZE, TRACE and SAMS for scenarios with chlorine, ammoniac and butane releases are compared in this study. The variations of the model results are measures for uncertainties in source estimation and dispersion calculation. Model runs for different wind speeds, atmospheric stability and roughness lengths indicate the model sensitivity to these input parameters. In-situ measurements at two urban near-traffic sites are compared to results of the Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA) in order to quantify uncertainties in the meteorological input. The hazard zone estimates from the models vary up to a factor of 4 due to different input requirements as well as due to different internal model assumptions. None of the models is found to be 'more conservative' than the others in all scenarios. INCA wind-speeds are correlated to in-situ observations at two urban sites in Vienna with a factor of 0.89. The standard deviations of the normal error distribution are 0.8 ms{sup -1} in wind speed, on the scale of 50 degrees in wind direction, up to 4 C in air temperature and up to 10 % in relative humidity. The observed air temperature and humidity are well reproduced by INCA with correlation coefficients of 0.96 to 0.99. INCA is therefore found to give a good representation of the local meteorological conditions. Besides of real-time data, the INCA-short range forecast for the following hours may support the action planning of the first responders. (orig.)

  13. The Computer Clubhouse Village: A virtual meeting place for an emerging community of learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Diaz

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The Computer Clubhouse Network is an international affiliation of organizations that all have a common purpose: providing opportunities for youth from underserved communities to explore their own ideas and become more capable, creative and confident learners through the use of state-of-the-art technology. Clubhouse community members actively engage in learning-bydesigning in an environment created to promote informal coalescing of groups around common interests. Having grown, with the support of Intel corporation, from a few to close to a hundred Clubhouses, spontaneously formed design teams no longer need to share the same physical space. The Computer Clubhouse Village provides a virtual extension of the Clubhouse and takes to a new level the emerging community of learners. Becoming a virtual community with members from around the world brings new opportunities, as well as new challenges. As of 2004, there are Clubhouses in 20 different countries where more than a dozen languages are spoken. Even though the Network language is English, the Village strives to be a multilingual community where members are welcome to participate in a language they feel comfortable using. As we move to a third phase of development of the intranet, we will facilitate this interchange by providing an interface in languages other than English, whenever it is permitted. Translation is not only time consuming but also complex, considering regional variations in popular languages like Chinese and Spanish, and the lack of terminology in other languages for new technology and ideas. Bilingual members have become crucial to enable communication among those who speak only one language as they spontaneously translate for others, but there is a need for a concerted effort with professional translators as we move forward. Adapting to the local culture and needs while preserving the Clubhouse guiding principles, is both a challenge and an opportunity. The Clubhouse learning

  14. Resilience and Brittleness in a Nuclear Emergency Response Simulation: Focusing on Team Coordination Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Wagner Schenkel; Buarque, Lia; Voshell, Martin; Branlat, Matthieu; Woods, David D.; Gomes, Jose Orlando

    2008-01-01

    The current work presents results from a cognitive task analysis (CTA) of a nuclear disaster simulation. Audio-visual records were collected from an emergency room team composed of individuals from 26 different agencies as they responded to multiple scenarios in a simulated nuclear disaster. This simulation was part of a national emergency response training activity for a nuclear power plant located in a developing country. The objectives of this paper are to describe sources of resilience and brittleness in these activities, identify cues of potential improvements for future emergency simulations, and leveraging the resilience of the emergency response System in case of a real disaster. Multiple CTA techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the cognitive dimensions of the activity and to identify team coordination and crisis management patterns that emerged from the simulation training. (authors)

  15. Increased US emergency department visits for skin and soft tissue infections, and changes in antibiotic choices, during the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallin, Daniel J; Egan, Daniel J; Pelletier, Andrea J; Espinola, Janice A; Hooper, David C; Camargo, Carlos A

    2008-03-01

    Test the hypotheses that emergency department (ED) visits for skin and soft tissue infections became more frequent during the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and that antibiotics typically active against community-associated MRSA were chosen increasingly. From merged National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data for 1993-2005, we identified ED visits with diagnosis of cellulitis, abscess, felon, impetigo, hidradenitis, folliculitis, infective mastitis, nonpurulent mastitis, breast abscess, or carbuncle and furuncle. Main outcomes were change over time in rate of ED visits with such a diagnosis and proportion of antibiotic regimens including an agent typically active against community-associated MRSA. We report national estimates derived from sample weights. We tested trends with least squares linear regression. In 1993, infections of interest were diagnosed at 1.2 million visits (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96 to 1.5 million) versus 3.4 million in 2005 (95% CI 2.8 to 4.1 million; P for trend trend trend skin and soft tissue infections increased markedly from 1993 to 2005, contemporaneously with the emergence of community-associated MRSA. ED clinicians prescribed more antibiotics typically active against community-associated MRSA, especially trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Possible confounders are discussed, such as increasing diabetes or shifts in locus of care.

  16. The community response to aircraft noise around six Spanish airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Faus, L. J.; Garcia, A. M.

    1993-06-01

    The community response to aircraft noise has been studied through a social survey. A total of 1800 persons living in the vicinity of six major Spanish airports have been interviewed at their homes concerning the environmental quality of the area, dissatisfaction with road traffic noise and aircraft noise, activities interfered with by noise, most disturbing aircraft types, and subjective evaluation of airport impact. All the responses obtained in this survey have been compared with aircraft noise levels corresponding to the residence locations of the people interviewed (values of NEF levels were calculated with the INM model). The results obtained in this work allow one to evaluate the impact of aircraft noise under a wide range of different situations.

  17. The evaluation of time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Nasiripour, Amir Ashkan; Fakhri, Mahmood; Bakhtiari, Ahad; Azari, Samad; Akbarzadeh, Arash; Goli, Ali; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2014-09-28

    This study evaluated the time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah. This study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study 500 cases of patients from Shahrivar (September) 2012 to the end of Shahrivar (September) 2013 were selected and studied by the non-probability quota method. The measuring tool included a preset cases record sheet and sampling method was completing the cases record sheet by referring to the patients' cases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test, benchmark Eta (Eta), Games-Howell post hoc test). The results showed that the interval mean between receiving the mission to reaching the scene, between reaching the scene to moving from the scene, and between moving from the scene to a health center was 7.28, 16.73 and 7.28 minutes. The overall mean of time performance from the scene to the health center was 11.34 minutes. Any intervention in order to speed up service delivery, reduce response times, ambulance equipment and facilities required for accuracy, validity and reliability of the data recorded in the emergency dispatch department, Continuing Education of ambulance staffs, the use of manpower with higher specialize levels such as nurses, supply the job satisfaction, and increase the coordination with other departments that are somehow involved in this process can provide the ground for reducing the loss and disability resulting from traffic accidents.

  18. Risk Communication Emergency Response Preparedness: Contextual Assessment of the Protective Action Decision Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Robert L; Lee, Jaesub; Palenchar, Michael J; Lemon, Laura L

    2018-02-01

    Studies are continuously performed to improve risk communication campaign designs to better prepare residents to act in the safest manner during an emergency. To that end, this article investigates the predictive ability of the protective action decision model (PADM), which links environmental and social cues, predecision processes (attention, exposure, and comprehension), and risk decision perceptions (threat, alternative protective actions, and stakeholder norms) with protective action decision making. This current quasi-longitudinal study of residents (N = 400 for each year) in a high-risk (chemical release) petrochemical manufacturing community investigated whether PADM core risk perceptions predict protective action decision making. Telephone survey data collected at four intervals (1995, 1998, 2002, 2012) reveal that perceptions of protective actions and stakeholder norms, but not of threat, currently predict protective action decision making (intention to shelter in place). Of significance, rather than threat perceptions, perception of Wally Wise Guy (a spokes-character who advocates shelter in place) correlates with perceptions of protective action, stakeholder norms, and protective action decision making. Wally's response-efficacy advice predicts residents' behavioral intentions to shelter in place, thereby offering contextually sensitive support and refinement for PADM. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  19. Preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Samah Alzebair.

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to find out what is ionizing radiation and its users in various medical and industrial fields and extent of the risk resulting from it as a result of inappropriate use. Examples have been mentioned so (the Chernobyl accident and San Salvador) and caused problems. Due to the non-use of nuclear and ionizing radiation in industrial areas in Sudan. There are no radiological incidents remember. Current and universally agreed-upon court plants have been developed by the organization and the competent authorities at the regional and local level and global and who is responsible because of the dangers caused to humans and the environment and all around him. (Author)

  20. Protective response to technological emergency: risk perception and behavioral intention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, M.K.; Barnes, V.E.

    1986-01-01

    This article examines why, as suggested by the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station (TMI) event, the public is more inclined to evacuate in response to a radiation release than to a natural hazard. During the TMI incident, for example, did authorities present confusing or conflicting information or did the public have an exaggerated perception of radiation risk. Behavioral intention studies are combined with risk perception analyses to ascertain (1) the extent to which intentions to evacuate can be generalized from one sample to another and from one hazard to another, (2) the degree to which behavioral intentions are related to specific dimensions of risk perception, and (3) how public perceptions of risk compare with estimates of risk produced by reactor accident consequence analyses

  1. Sustainability Ethics Emergency and Media Responsibility in the Consumption Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Bianchi de Araujo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is discussed the sustainable development and the importance of the environmental cause, in order to create models of development that consider the sustainability and environmental preservation for the future generations. The participation of all society is essential in this debate. The establishment of new habits that do not compromise the subsistence and the conscience of the real self-destruction possibility must be studied and analysed; they consist in challenging intentions, which detach the relevance and the moral duty of the media to restore a new ethics and a new way to understand the reality, as well as to divulge the impact of this different perception in the human life. Therefore occurs the requirement of a responsible compromise relating to the development, by way of understanding the biosphere as the social life basis, considering that, in these ecosystems, the human being is only one of the many species that live in an interdependence relationship.

  2. Do You Know Whats In Your Community A Strategic Risk Management Approach to Better Prepare for Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    affect business through indirect economic losses. Social impacts to a community can extend from distrust and anger toward the responsible business ...Mitigative safeguards directly affect safety, business , community, and environmental impacts resulting from a... toward making their communities more resilient to chemical disasters in order to diminish preventable hazards and lessen inevitable impacts . vi THIS

  3. Using Geo-Data Corporately on the Response Phase of Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir Ozbek, E.; Ates, S.; Aydinoglu, A. C.

    2015-08-01

    Response phase of emergency management is the most complex phase in the entire cycle because it requires cooperation between various actors relating to emergency sectors. A variety of geo-data is needed at the emergency response such as; existing data provided by different institutions and dynamic data collected by different sectors at the time of the disaster. Disaster event is managed according to elaborately defined activity-actor-task-geodata cycle. In this concept, every activity of emergency response is determined with Standard Operation Procedure that enables users to understand their tasks and required data in any activity. In this study, a general conceptual approach for disaster and emergency management system is developed based on the regulations to serve applications in Istanbul Governorship Provincial Disaster and Emergency Directorate. The approach is implemented to industrial facility explosion example. In preparation phase, optimum ambulance locations are determined according to general response time of the ambulance to all injury cases in addition to areas that have industrial fire risk. Management of the industrial fire case is organized according to defined actors, activities, and working cycle that describe required geo-data. A response scenario was prepared and performed for an industrial facility explosion event to exercise effective working cycle of actors. This scenario provides using geo-data corporately between different actors while required data for each task is defined to manage the industrial facility explosion event. Following developing web technologies, this scenario based approach can be effective to use geo-data on the web corporately.

  4. Community-based assessment of human rights in a complex humanitarian emergency: the Emergency Assistance Teams-Burma and Cyclone Nargis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahn Mahn

    2010-04-01

    reconstruction efforts. Such issues remain unaddressed in official assessments conducted in partnership with the SPDC. Private, community-based relief organizations like EAT are well positioned and able to independently assess human rights conditions in response to complex humanitarian emergencies such as Cyclone Nargis; efforts of this nature must be encouraged, particularly in settings where human rights abuses have been documented and censorship is widespread.

  5. Community-based assessment of human rights in a complex humanitarian emergency: the Emergency Assistance Teams-Burma and Cyclone Nargis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanvanichkij, Voravit; Murakami, Noriyuki; Lee, Catherine I; Leigh, Jen; Wirtz, Andrea L; Daniels, Brock; Mahn, Mahn; Maung, Cynthia; Beyrer, Chris

    2010-04-19

    conducted in partnership with the SPDC. Private, community-based relief organizations like EAT are well positioned and able to independently assess human rights conditions in response to complex humanitarian emergencies such as Cyclone Nargis; efforts of this nature must be encouraged, particularly in settings where human rights abuses have been documented and censorship is widespread.

  6. Avian community responses to variability in river hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royan, Alexander; Hannah, David M; Reynolds, S James; Noble, David G; Sadler, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    River flow is a major driver of morphological structure and community dynamics in riverine-floodplain ecosystems. Flow influences in-stream communities through changes in water velocity, depth, temperature, turbidity and nutrient fluxes, and perturbations in the organisation of lower trophic levels are cascaded through the food web, resulting in shifts in food availability for consumer species. River birds are sensitive to spatial and phenological mismatches with aquatic prey following flow disturbances; however, the role of flow as a determinant of riparian ecological structure remains poorly known. This knowledge is crucial to help to predict if, and how, riparian communities will be influenced by climate-induced changes in river flow characterised by more extreme high (i.e. flood) and/or low (i.e. drought) flow events. Here, we combine national-scale datasets of river bird surveys and river flow archives to understand how hydrological disturbance has affected the distribution of riparian species at higher trophic levels. Data were analysed for 71 river locations using a Generalized Additive Model framework and a model averaging procedure. Species had complex but biologically interpretable associations with hydrological indices, with species' responses consistent with their ecology, indicating that hydrological-disturbance has implications for higher trophic levels in riparian food webs. Our quantitative analysis of river flow-bird relationships demonstrates the potential vulnerability of riparian species to the impacts of changing flow variability and represents an important contribution in helping to understand how bird communities might respond to a climate change-induced increase in the intensity of floods and droughts. Moreover, the success in relating parameters of river flow variability to species' distributions highlights the need to include river flow data in climate change impact models of species' distributions.

  7. Avian community responses to variability in river hydrology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Royan

    Full Text Available River flow is a major driver of morphological structure and community dynamics in riverine-floodplain ecosystems. Flow influences in-stream communities through changes in water velocity, depth, temperature, turbidity and nutrient fluxes, and perturbations in the organisation of lower trophic levels are cascaded through the food web, resulting in shifts in food availability for consumer species. River birds are sensitive to spatial and phenological mismatches with aquatic prey following flow disturbances; however, the role of flow as a determinant of riparian ecological structure remains poorly known. This knowledge is crucial to help to predict if, and how, riparian communities will be influenced by climate-induced changes in river flow characterised by more extreme high (i.e. flood and/or low (i.e. drought flow events. Here, we combine national-scale datasets of river bird surveys and river flow archives to understand how hydrological disturbance has affected the distribution of riparian species at higher trophic levels. Data were analysed for 71 river locations using a Generalized Additive Model framework and a model averaging procedure. Species had complex but biologically interpretable associations with hydrological indices, with species' responses consistent with their ecology, indicating that hydrological-disturbance has implications for higher trophic levels in riparian food webs. Our quantitative analysis of river flow-bird relationships demonstrates the potential vulnerability of riparian species to the impacts of changing flow variability and represents an important contribution in helping to understand how bird communities might respond to a climate change-induced increase in the intensity of floods and droughts. Moreover, the success in relating parameters of river flow variability to species' distributions highlights the need to include river flow data in climate change impact models of species' distributions.

  8. Emergency preparedness: community-based short-term eruption forecasting at Campi Flegrei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Jacopo; Marzocchi, Warner; Civetta, Lucia; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Papale, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    A key element in emergency preparedness is to define advance tools to assist decision makers and emergency management groups during crises. Such tools must be prepared in advance, accounting for all of expertise and scientific knowledge accumulated through time. During a pre-eruptive phase, the key for sound short-term eruption forecasting is the analysis of the monitoring signals. This involves the capability (i) to recognize anomalous signals and to relate single or combined anomalies to physical processes, assigning them probability values, and (ii) to quickly provide an answer to the observed phenomena even when unexpected. Here we present a > 4 years long process devoted to define the pre-eruptive Event Tree (ET) for Campi Flegrei. A community of about 40 experts in volcanology and volcano monitoring participating to two Italian Projects on Campi Flegrei funded by the Italian Civil Protection, has been constituted and trained during periodic meetings on the statistical methods and the model BET_EF (Marzocchi et al., 2008) that forms the statistical package tool for ET definition. Model calibration has been carried out through public elicitation sessions, preceded and followed by devoted meetings and web forum discussion on the monitoring parameters, their accuracy and relevance, and their potential meanings. The calibrated ET allows anomalies in the monitored parameters to be recognized and interpreted, assigning probability values to each set of data. This process de-personalizes the difficult task of interpreting multi-parametric sets of data during on-going emergencies, and provides a view of the observed variations that accounts for the averaged, weighted opinion of the scientific community. An additional positive outcome of the described ET calibration process is that of providing a picture of the degree of confidence by the expert community on the capability of the many different monitored quantities of recognizing significant variations in the state of

  9. An Ontology-Underpinned Emergency Response System for Water Pollution Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Meng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the unceasing development and maturation of environment geographic information system, the response to water pollution accidents has been digitalized through the combination of monitoring sensors, management servers, and application software. However, most of these systems only achieve the basic and general geospatial data management and functional process tasks by adopting mechanistic water-quality models. To satisfy the sustainable monitoring and real-time emergency response application demand of the government and public users, it is a hotspot to study how to make the water pollution information being semantic and make the referred applications intelligent. Thus, the architecture of the ontology-underpinned emergency response system for water pollution accidents is proposed in this paper. This paper also makes a case study for usability testing of the water ontology models, and emergency response rules through an online water pollution emergency response system. The system contributes scientifically to the safety and sustainability of drinking water by providing emergency response and decision-making to the government and public in a timely manner.

  10. Lessons Learned from the Response to Radiation Emergencies (1945-2010) (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    An underlying concept in the safety standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is that prevention is better than cure. This is achieved through the application of appropriate standards in design and operation. Nevertheless, radiation incidents and emergencies do occur and safety standards are necessary that define the approaches to be used in mitigating the consequences. The IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, GS-R-2, establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. They take account of several other Safety Standards at the Safety Requirements level, namely: the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS); Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety, GSR Part 1; Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, NS-R-1; and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, NS-R-2. Implementation of the requirements is intended to minimize the consequences for people, property and the environment of any nuclear or radiological emergency. Although developed before the publication of the Fundamental Safety Principles, they define the requirements that must be satisfied in order to achieve the overall objective and apply the principles that are presented in publications relating to emergencies. An emergency is defined in the Agency's glossary as 'a non-routine situation or event that necessitates prompt action, primarily to mitigate a hazard or adverse consequences for human health and safety, quality of life, property or the environment. This includes nuclear and radiological emergencies and conventional emergencies such as fires, release of hazardous chemicals, storms or earthquakes. It includes situations for which prompt action is warranted to mitigate the effects of a perceived hazard'. Several nuclear emergencies have

  11. Lessons Learned from the Response to Radiation Emergencies (1945-2010) (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    An underlying concept in the safety standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is that prevention is better than cure. This is achieved through the application of appropriate standards in design and operation. Nevertheless, radiation incidents and emergencies do occur and safety standards are necessary that define the approaches to be used in mitigating the consequences. The IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, GS-R-2, establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. They take account of several other Safety Standards at the Safety Requirements level, namely: the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS); Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety, GSR Part 1; Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, NS-R-1; and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, NS-R-2. Implementation of the requirements is intended to minimize the consequences for people, property and the environment of any nuclear or radiological emergency. Although developed before the publication of the Fundamental Safety Principles, they define the requirements that must be satisfied in order to achieve the overall objective and apply the principles that are presented in publications relating to emergencies. An emergency is defined in the Agency's glossary as 'a non-routine situation or event that necessitates prompt action, primarily to mitigate a hazard or adverse consequences for human health and safety, quality of life, property or the environment. This includes nuclear and radiological emergencies and conventional emergencies such as fires, release of hazardous chemicals, storms or earthquakes. It includes situations for which prompt action is warranted to mitigate the effects of a perceived hazard'. Several nuclear

  12. Lessons Learned from the Response to Radiation Emergencies (1945-2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    An underlying concept in the safety standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is that prevention is better than cure. This is achieved through the application of appropriate standards in design and operation. Nevertheless, radiation incidents and emergencies do occur and safety standards are necessary that define the approaches to be used in mitigating the consequences. The IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, GS-R-2, establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. They take account of several other Safety Standards at the Safety Requirements level, namely: the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS); Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety, GSR Part 1; Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, NS-R-1; and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, NS-R-2. Implementation of the requirements is intended to minimize the consequences for people, property and the environment of any nuclear or radiological emergency. Although developed before the publication of the Fundamental Safety Principles, they define the requirements that must be satisfied in order to achieve the overall objective and apply the principles that are presented in publications relating to emergencies. An emergency is defined in the Agency's glossary as 'a non-routine situation or event that necessitates prompt action, primarily to mitigate a hazard or adverse consequences for human health and safety, quality of life, property or the environment. This includes nuclear and radiological emergencies and conventional emergencies such as fires, release of hazardous chemicals, storms or earthquakes. It includes situations for which prompt action is warranted to mitigate the effects of a perceived hazard'. Several nuclear emergencies have

  13. Lessons Learned from the Response to Radiation Emergencies (1945-2010) (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    An underlying concept in the safety standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is that prevention is better than cure. This is achieved through the … application of appropriate standards in design and operation. Nevertheless, radiation incidents and emergencies do occur and safety standards are necessary that define the approaches to be used in mitigating the consequences. The IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, GS-R-2, establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. They take account of several other Safety Standards at the Safety Requirements level, namely: the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS); Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety, GSR Part 1; Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, NS-R-1; and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, NS-R-2. Implementation of the requirements is intended to minimize the consequences for people, property and the environment of any nuclear or radiological emergency. Although developed before the publication of the Fundamental Safety Principles, they define the requirements that must be satisfied in order to achieve the overall objective and apply the principles that are presented in publications relating to emergencies. An emergency is defined in the Agency's glossary as 'a non-routine situation or event that necessitates prompt action, primarily to mitigate a hazard or adverse consequences for human health and safety, quality of life, property or the environment. This includes nuclear and radiological emergencies and conventional emergencies such as fires, release of hazardous chemicals, storms or earthquakes. It includes situations for which prompt action is warranted to mitigate the effects of a perceived hazard'. Several nuclear emergencies have

  14. Lessons Learned from the Response to Radiation Emergencies (1945-2010) (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    An underlying concept in the safety standards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is that prevention is better than cure. This is achieved through the application of appropriate standards in design and operation. Nevertheless, radiation incidents and emergencies do occur and safety standards are necessary that define the approaches to be used in mitigating the consequences. The IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, GS-R-2, establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. They take account of several other Safety Standards at the Safety Requirements level, namely: the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS); Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety, GSR Part 1; Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, NS-R-1; and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, NS-R-2. Implementation of the requirements is intended to minimize the consequences for people, property and the environment of any nuclear or radiological emergency. Although developed before the publication of the Fundamental Safety Principles, they define the requirements that must be satisfied in order to achieve the overall objective and apply the principles that are presented in publications relating to emergencies. An emergency is defined in the Agency's glossary as 'a non-routine situation or event that necessitates prompt action, primarily to mitigate a hazard or adverse consequences for human health and safety, quality of life, property or the environment. This includes nuclear and radiological emergencies and conventional emergencies such as fires, release of hazardous chemicals, storms or earthquakes. It includes situations for which prompt action is warranted to mitigate the effects of a perceived hazard'. Several nuclear emergencies have

  15. Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses ''lessons learned'' from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made

  16. Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses ``lessons learned`` from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

  17. Emergency response to a highway accident in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    On December 16, 1991, a truck carrying unirradiated (fresh) nuclear fuel was involved in an accident on US Interstate 91, in Springfield, Massachusetts. This report describes the emergency response measures undertaken by local, State, Federal, and private parties. The report also discusses lessons learned'' from the response to the accident and suggests areas where improvements might be made.

  18. Problems related to public perceptions of radiological emergency planning and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, Margaret A.

    1989-01-01

    Beyond the scientific, the administrative and procedural issues of radiological emergency planning and response there is the issue of public perception. This paper emphasises that, radiation crises being a rare occurrence there is no enough database for generating scholarly quantitative reports. It suggests the need for disseminating timely and accurate information through a single spokesman from a responsible public agency

  19. Growth response of soda lake bacterial communities to simulated rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, M; Velimirov, B; Fischer, U; Farnleitner, A H; Herzig, A; Kirschner, A K T

    2008-02-01

    Moderately saline soda lakes harbor extremely abundant and fast growing bacterial communities. An interesting phenomenon of an explosive bacterial growth in shallow soda lakes in Eastern Austria after dilution with rainwater, concomitantly with a significant decrease in temperature was observed in a former study. In the present study, we tried to identify the factors being responsible for this enhanced bacterial growth in laboratory batch cultures. Three experiments were performed with water taken from two different lakes at different seasons. Natural soda lake water was diluted with distilled water, artificial lake water, sterile filtered soda lake water, and grazer-free water to test (1) for the influence of compatible solutes released to the environment and reduced salt stress after osmotic down-shock, (2) for the influence of nutrients, which may be washed in from the dry areas of the lake bottom after rainfall and (3) for the decrease of grazing pressure due to dilution. The potential influence of (4) viruses was indirectly deduced. The response of the bacterial community to the manipulations was measured by changes in bacterial numbers, the incorporation of (3)H-leucine and the concomitant determination of the amount of (3)H-leucine uptaking bacteria by microautoradiography. The influence of the environmental factors enhancing bacterial growth after a simulated rainfall event showed variations between the lakes and over the seasons. The addition of nutrients was, in all experiments, the main factor triggering bacterial growth. The decrease in grazing pressure and viral lysis after dilution was of significant importance in two of three experiments. In the experiment with the highest salinity, we could show that either compatible solutes released after osmotic down-shock and used as a source of nutrients for the soda lake bacterial populations or reduced salt stress were most probably responsible for the observed marked enhancement of bacterial growth.

  20. Modernisation of Radiation Monitoring Room as a Part of Slovenian Emergency Response Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvari, A.; Mitic, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the year 2002 the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) moved to the new premises therefore it had to rearrange some of its rooms for the emergency situation. SNSA does not operate with a dedicated Emergency Response Centre (ERC), instead of it the SNSA has to rearrange the existing rooms in case of an emergency. Modernisation of the equipment, with the help of government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, for the emergency situation was carried out, especially in the monitoring room. The radiation monitoring system, which is placed in the monitoring room, continuously collects, processes and archives the incoming data of exposure to radiation and meteorological parameters on the Slovenian territory (A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents, IAEA, Vienna, 1993. IAEA-TECDOC-718). In the emergency situation the monitoring room transforms into the room for the Dose Assessment Group (DAG), which is part of ERC (IAEA emergency response network, IAEA, Vienna, 2000, EPR-ERNET (2000)). The modernisation of monitoring room and within the DAG room with new equipment and its purpose is described in this article. Modernisation of the monitoring room and the room for DAG showed to be inevitably needed. Modernisation of the monitoring room has brought the SNSA a sophisticated and reliable system of controlling the external exposure to radiation on the Slovenian territory. The equipment, especially the equipment for the use in the emergency situation, brought novelties for the Dose Assessment Group. The group has now better and easier control of radiation situation in case of an accident. In overall this modernisation has put the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration a step forward in having a dedicated Emergency Response Centre, since it does not need to rearrange the room for the Dose Assessment Group. (author)

  1. Identifying and training non-technical skills of nuclear emergency response teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crichton, M.T.; Flin, R.

    2004-01-01

    Training of the non-technical (social and cognitive) skills that are crucial to safe and effective management by teams in emergency situations is an issue that is receiving increasing emphasis in many organisations, particularly in the nuclear power industry. As teams play a major role in emergency response organisations (ERO), effective functioning and interactions within, between and across teams is crucial, particularly as the management of an emergency situation often requires that teams are extended by members from various other sections and strategic groups throughout the company, as well as members of external agencies. A series of interviews was recently conducted with members of a UK nuclear emergency response organisation to identify the non-technical skills required by team members that would be required for managing an emergency. Critical skills have been identified as decision making and situation assessment, as well as communication, teamwork, and stress management. A number of training strategies are discussed which can be tailored to the roles and responsibilities of the team members and the team leader, based on the roles within the team being defined as either Decision Maker, Evaluator, or Implementor, according to Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) classifications. It is anticipated that enhanced learning of the necessary non-technical skills, through experience and directed practice, will improve the skills of members of emergency response teams

  2. Utilizing Big Data and Twitter to Discover Emergent Online Communities of Cannabis Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Peter; Peiper, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Large shifts in medical, recreational, and illicit cannabis consumption in the United States have implications for personalizing treatment and prevention programs to a wide variety of populations. As such, considerable research has investigated clinical presentations of cannabis users in clinical and population-based samples. Studies leveraging big data, social media, and social network analysis have emerged as a promising mechanism to generate timely insights that can inform treatment and prevention research. This study extends a novel method called stochastic block modeling to derive communities of cannabis consumers as part of a complex social network on Twitter. A set of examples illustrate how this method can ascertain candidate samples of medical, recreational, and illicit cannabis users. Implications for research planning, intervention design, and public health surveillance are discussed. PMID:28615950

  3. Utilizing Big Data and Twitter to Discover Emergent Online Communities of Cannabis Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Baumgartner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Large shifts in medical, recreational, and illicit cannabis consumption in the United States have implications for personalizing treatment and prevention programs to a wide variety of populations. As such, considerable research has investigated clinical presentations of cannabis users in clinical and population-based samples. Studies leveraging big data, social media, and social network analysis have emerged as a promising mechanism to generate timely insights that can inform treatment and prevention research. This study extends a novel method called stochastic block modeling to derive communities of cannabis consumers as part of a complex social network on Twitter. A set of examples illustrate how this method can ascertain candidate samples of medical, recreational, and illicit cannabis users. Implications for research planning, intervention design, and public health surveillance are discussed.

  4. Utilizing Big Data and Twitter to Discover Emergent Online Communities of Cannabis Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Peter; Peiper, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Large shifts in medical, recreational, and illicit cannabis consumption in the United States have implications for personalizing treatment and prevention programs to a wide variety of populations. As such, considerable research has investigated clinical presentations of cannabis users in clinical and population-based samples. Studies leveraging big data, social media, and social network analysis have emerged as a promising mechanism to generate timely insights that can inform treatment and prevention research. This study extends a novel method called stochastic block modeling to derive communities of cannabis consumers as part of a complex social network on Twitter. A set of examples illustrate how this method can ascertain candidate samples of medical, recreational, and illicit cannabis users. Implications for research planning, intervention design, and public health surveillance are discussed.

  5. 2001 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act SEC 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZALOUDEK, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    Pursuant to section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA), and Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government Through Leadership in Environmental Management, the US Department of Energy has prepared and submitted a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory for the Hanford Site covering activities performed during calendar year 2001. EPCRA Section 313 requires facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use listed toxic chemicals in quantities exceeding established threshold levels to report total annual releases of those chemicals. During calendar year 2001, Hanford Site activities resulted in one chemical used in amounts exceeding an activity threshold. Accordingly, the Hanford Site 2001 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory, DOE/RL-2002-37, includes total annual amount of lead released to the environment, transferred to offsite locations, and otherwise managed as waste

  6. Gendered academic adjustment among Asian American adolescents in an emerging immigrant community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Lisa; Supple, Andrew J; Stein, Gabriela L; Gonzalez, Laura M

    2012-03-01

    Research on the academic adjustment of immigrant adolescents has been predominately conducted in large cities among established migration areas. To broaden the field's restricted focus, data from 172 (58% female) Asian American adolescents who reside within a non-traditional or emerging immigrant community in the Southeastern US were used to examine gender differences in academic adjustment as well as school, family, and cultural variables as potential mediators of gender differences found. Results suggest that girls report significantly higher educational goals, intrinsic academic motivation, and utility value of school compared to boys. These gender differences are statistically mediated by ethnic exploration and family processes, most prominently, family respect. School connectedness and perceived discrimination are also associated with academic adjustment at the bivariate level, suggesting that academic success may be best promoted if multiple domains of influence can be targeted.

  7. A Multi-Element Approach to Location Inference of Twitter: A Case for Emergency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Laylavi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception, Twitter has played a major role in real-world events—especially in the aftermath of disasters and catastrophic incidents, and has been increasingly becoming the first point of contact for users wishing to provide or seek information about such situations. The use of Twitter in emergency response and disaster management opens up avenues of research concerning different aspects of Twitter data quality, usefulness and credibility. A real challenge that has attracted substantial attention in the Twitter research community exists in the location inference of twitter data. Considering that less than 2% of tweets are geotagged, finding location inference methods that can go beyond the geotagging capability is undoubtedly the priority research area. This is especially true in terms of emergency response, where spatial aspects of information play an important role. This paper introduces a multi-elemental location inference method that puts the geotagging aside and tries to predict the location of tweets by exploiting the other inherently attached data elements. In this regard, textual content, users’ profile location and place labelling, as the main location-related elements, are taken into account. Location-name classes in three granularity levels are defined and employed to look up the location references from the location-associated elements. The inferred location of the finest granular level is assigned to a tweet, based on a novel location assignment rule. The location assigned by the location inference process is considered to be the inferred location of a tweet, and is compared with the geotagged coordinates as the ground truth of the study. The results show that this method is able to successfully infer the location of 87% of the tweets at the average distance error of 12.2 km and the median distance error of 4.5 km, which is a significant improvement compared with that of the current methods that can predict the location

  8. The social construction of risk in a rural community: Responses of local residents to the 1990 Hagersville (Ontario) tire fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyles, J.; Taylor, S.M.; Baxter, J.; Sider, D.; Willms, D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of research relating to the 1990 Hagersville (Ontario) tire fire. After reviewing the literature on risk and risk perception, it begins by describing the event as well as the community in which it occurred. The reasons for adopting a qualitative research design are then established practical, conceptual, and methodological. The residents' accounts of the fire, evacuation, and aftermath in terms of concerns, anxieties, and responses are described. Five themes emerge: economic, community, health, environmental, and governance. The paper concludes by putting forward a case study-derived model of risk appraisal and management, and by relating the findings to policy issues. 48 refs., 1 fig

  9. Climate forcing of an emerging pathogenic fungus across a montane multi-host community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Frances C; Halder, Julia B; Daniel, Olivia; Bielby, Jon; Semenov, Mikhail A; Jombart, Thibaut; Loyau, Adeline; Schmeller, Dirk S; Cunningham, Andrew A; Rowcliffe, Marcus; Garner, Trenton W J; Bosch, Jaime; Fisher, Matthew C

    2016-12-05

    Changes in the timings of seasonality as a result of anthropogenic climate change are predicted to occur over the coming decades. While this is expected to have widespread impacts on the dynamics of infectious disease through environmental forcing, empirical data are lacking. Here, we investigated whether seasonality, specifically the timing of spring ice-thaw, affected susceptibility to infection by the emerging pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) across a montane community of amphibians that are suffering declines and extirpations as a consequence of this infection. We found a robust temporal association between the timing of the spring thaw and Bd infection in two host species, where we show that an early onset of spring forced high prevalences of infection. A third highly susceptible species (the midwife toad, Alytes obstetricans) maintained a high prevalence of infection independent of time of spring thaw. Our data show that perennially overwintering midwife toad larvae may act as a year-round reservoir of infection with variation in time of spring thaw determining the extent to which infection spills over into sympatric species. We used future temperature projections based on global climate models to demonstrate that the timing of spring thaw in this region will advance markedly by the 2050s, indicating that climate change will further force the severity of infection. Our findings on the effect of annual variability on multi-host infection dynamics show that the community-level impact of fungal infectious disease on biodiversity will need to be re-evaluated in the face of climate change.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Emergency Preparedness and Response. Working to Protect People, Society and the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The IEC develops safety standards and guidelines relating to preparedness for, and response to, nuclear or radiological incidents and emergencies, independently of the cause, and technical documents and training materials for the application of those standards. The IEC also provides training and services to assist Member States in strengthening and maintaining their regional, national, local and on-site response capabilities. An extra resource to the IAEA's response system is foreseen through the Response and Assistance Network (RANET), which represents a network of registered national capabilities in different EPR areas. Its objectives are the provision of requested international assistance, the harmonization of emergency assistance capabilities and the relevant exchange of information and feedback of experience. Important components of the global emergency response system are the notification and reporting arrangements and secure and reliable communication systems operated around the clock by the IEC. States and international organizations report events and submit requests for assistance to the IAEA through the Unified System for Information Exchange on Incidents and Emergencies (USIE) web site, by phone or by fax. Member States (and a few non-Member States) have nominated competent authorities and National Warning Points who are able to receive, convey and quickly provide authoritative information on incidents and emergencies

  11. Medical and radiological aspects of emergency preparedness and response at SevRAO facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savkin, M N; Sneve, M K; Grachev, M I; Frolov, G P; Shinkarev, S M; Jaworska, A

    2008-12-01

    Regulatory cooperation between the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Federal Medical Biological Agency (FMBA) of the Russian Federation has the overall goal of promoting improvements in radiation protection in Northwest Russia. One of the projects in this programme has the objectives to review and improve the existing medical emergency preparedness capabilities at the sites for temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. These are operated by SevRAO at Andreeva Bay and in Gremikha village on the Kola Peninsula. The work is also intended to provide a better basis for regulation of emergency response and medical emergency preparedness at similar facilities elsewhere in Russia. The purpose of this paper is to present the main results of that project, implemented by the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre. The first task was an analysis of the regulatory requirements and the current state of preparedness for medical emergency response at the SevRAO facilities. Although Russian regulatory documents are mostly consistent with international recommendations, some distinctions lead to numerical differences in operational intervention criteria under otherwise similar conditions. Radiological threats relating to possible accidents, and related gaps in the regulation of SevRAO facilities, were also identified. As part of the project, a special exercise on emergency medical response on-site at Andreeva Bay was prepared and carried out, and recommendations were proposed after the exercise. Following fruitful dialogue among regulators, designers and operators, special regulatory guidance has been issued by FMBA to account for the specific and unusual features of the SevRAO facilities. Detailed sections relate to the prevention of accidents, and emergency preparedness and response, supplementing the basic Russian regulatory requirements. Overall it is concluded that (a) the provision of medical and sanitary components of emergency

  12. Response surface model predictions of emergence and response to pain in the recovery room: an evaluation of patients emerging from an isoflurane and fentanyl anesthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syroid, Noah D.; Johnson, Ken B.; Pace, Nathan L.; Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Tyler, Diane; Brühschwein, Frederike; Albert, Robert W.; Roalstad, Shelly; Costy-Bennett, Samuel; Egan, Talmage D.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Sevoflurane - remifentanil interaction models that predict responsiveness and response to painful stimuli have been evaluated in patients undergoing elective surgery. Preliminary evaluations of model predictions were found to be consistent with observations in patients anesthetized with sevoflurane, remifentanil and fentanyl. The present study explored the feasibility of adapting the predictions of sevoflurane-remifentanil interaction models to an isoflurane-fentanyl anesthetic. We hypothesized that model predictions adapted for isoflurane and fentanyl are consistent with observed patient responses and are similar to the predictions observed in our prior work with sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetics. Methods Twenty-five patients scheduled for elective surgery received a fentanyl-isoflurane anesthetic. Model predictions of unresponsiveness were recorded at emergence and predictions of a response to noxious stimulus were recorded when patients first required analgesics in the recovery room. Model predictions were compared to observations with graphical and temporal analyses. Results were also compared to our prior predictions following a sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetic. Results While patients were anesthetized, model predictions indicated a high likelihood that patients would be unresponsive (≥ 99%). Following termination of the anesthetic, model predictions of responsiveness well described the actual fraction of patients observed to be responsive during emergence. Half of the patients awoke within 2 minutes of the 50% model predicted probability of unresponsiveness; 70% awoke within 4 minutes. Similarly, predictions of a response to a noxious stimulus were consistent with the number of patients who required fentanyl in the recovery room. Model predictions following an isoflurane-fentanyl anesthetic were similar to model predictions following a sevoflurane-remifentanil/fentanyl anesthetic. Discussion Results confirmed our study

  13. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations

  14. Involving Youth in Community Emergency Preparedness: Impacts of a Multistate Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Powell

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Preparedness Guidelines (2007 state, “as uniformed responders account for less than 1% of the total U.S. population, it is clear that citizens must be better prepared, trained, and practiced on how best to take care of themselves and assist others in those first crucial hours during and after a catastrophic incident.” This is increasingly more evident due to recent disasters such as hurricane Katrina. The Alert, Evacuate and Shelter (AES program identified and trained youth/adult teams to use geospatial technology to map shelter locations and evacuation routes. Training began with team building activities to strengthen and build youth/adult preparedness partnerships. Program evaluations revealed a major shift in thinking about the positive potential level of involvement of youth in emergencies. Survey results immediately following trainings revealed statistically significant increases in participant knowledge gain regarding emergency preparedness. Follow-up evaluations indicate the success of this project in meeting community preparedness goals.

  15. Strategic Models and the Response of Government Agencies to Extreme Emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casler, Catherine; Pierides, Dean

    Government agencies that are tasked with responding to extreme emergencies are constantly battling with the tensions and trade-offs of centralized control versus decentralized decision-making. Many of today’s emergency management organizations are a product of World War II and as such they have...... and address how military and strategic management models organize the response of government agencies to extreme emergencies whilst also failing to address their core organizational problems. We are interested in the relatively recent creation of centralized organizations like the US Federal Emergency...... to emergency management in the Australian State of Victoria after the catastrophic 2009 ‘Black Saturday’ bushfires. In the public inquiry into the disaster, centralization became an important antidote for previous shortcomings in ‘command, control and coordination’, eventually leading to the creation...

  16. Quantifying human response capabilities towards tsunami threats at community level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J.; Mück, M.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Taubenböck, H.; Strunz, G.; Muhari, A.; Anwar, H. Z.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.

    2009-04-01

    Decision makers at the community level need detailed information on tsunami risks in their area. Knowledge on potential hazard impact, exposed elements such as people, critical facilities and lifelines, people's coping capacity and recovery potential are crucial to plan precautionary measures for adaptation and to mitigate potential impacts of tsunamis on society and the environment. A crucial point within a people-centred tsunami risk assessment is to quantify the human response capabilities towards tsunami threats. Based on this quantification and spatial representation in maps tsunami affected and safe areas, difficult-to-evacuate areas, evacuation target points and evacuation routes can be assigned and used as an important contribution to e.g. community level evacuation planning. Major component in the quantification of human response capabilities towards tsunami impacts is the factor time. The human response capabilities depend on the estimated time of arrival (ETA) of a tsunami, the time until technical or natural warning signs (ToNW) can be received, the reaction time (RT) of the population (human understanding of a tsunami warning and the decision to take appropriate action), the evacuation time (ET, time people need to reach a safe area) and the actual available response time (RsT = ETA - ToNW - RT). If RsT is larger than ET, people in the respective areas are able to reach a safe area and rescue themselves. Critical areas possess RsT values equal or even smaller ET and hence people whin these areas will be directly affected by a tsunami. Quantifying the factor time is challenging and an attempt to this is presented here. The ETA can be derived by analyzing pre-computed tsunami scenarios for a respective area. For ToNW we assume that the early warning center is able to fulfil the Indonesian presidential decree to issue a warning within 5 minutes. RT is difficult as here human intrinsic factors as educational level, believe, tsunami knowledge and experience

  17. 44 CFR 352.26 - Arrangements for Federal response in the licensee offsite emergency response plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... notification of the emergency to the public; (2) Assisting in any necessary evacuation; (3) Providing reception... services at Federal hospitals; and (5) Ensuring the creation and maintenance of channels of communication...

  18. Coordinating a Team Response to Behavioral Emergencies in the Emergency Department: A Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrose H. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While treating potentially violent patients in the emergency department (ED, both patients and staff may be subject to unintentional injury. Emergency healthcare providers are at the greatest risk of experiencing physical and verbal assault from patients. Preliminary studies have shown that a teambased approach with targeted staff training has significant positive outcomes in mitigating violence in healthcare settings. Staff attitudes toward patient aggression have also been linked to workplace safety, but current literature suggests that providers experience fear and anxiety while caring for potentially violent patients. The objectives of the study were (1 to develop an interprofessional curriculum focusing on improving teamwork and staff attitudes toward patient violence using simulation-enhanced education for ED staff, and (2 to assess attitudes towards patient aggression both at pre- and post-curriculum implementation stages using a survey-based study design. Methods: Formal roles and responsibilities for each member of the care team, including positioning during restraint placement, were predefined in conjunction with ED leadership. Emergency medicine residents, nurses and hospital police officers were assigned to interprofessional teams. The curriculum started with an introductory lecture discussing de-escalation techniques and restraint placement as well as core tenets of interprofessional collaboration. Next, we conducted two simulation scenarios using standardized participants (SPs and structured debriefing. The study consisted of a survey-based design comparing pre- and post-intervention responses via a paired Student t-test to assess changes in staff attitudes. We used the validated Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale (MAVAS consisting of 30 Likert-scale questions grouped into four themed constructs. Results: One hundred sixty-two ED staff members completed the course with >95% staff participation

  19. Corporate Social Responsibility, social contract, corporate personhood and human rights law: Understanding the emerging responsibilities of modern corporations

    OpenAIRE

    Amao, O

    2008-01-01

    Copyright @ 2008 Olufemi Amao. The social contract theory has been advanced as a theoretical basis for explaining the emerging practice of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) by corporations. Since the 17th century the social contract concept has also been used to justify human rights. The concept is the constitutional foundation of many western states starting with England, US and France. Business ethicists and philosophers have tried to construct and analyse the social responsibility o...

  20. Effects of contaminants of emerging concern on Megaselia scalaris (Lowe, Diptera: Phoridae) and its microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Marcus J; Rothman, Jason A; Jones, Michael B; McFrederick, Quinn S; Gan, Jay; Trumble, John T

    2017-08-15

    Drought, rising temperatures, and expanding human populations are increasing water demands. Many countries are extending potable water supplies by irrigating crops with wastewater. Unfortunately, wastewater contains biologically active, long-lived pharmaceuticals, even after treatment. Run-off from farms and wastewater treatment plant overflows contribute high concentrations of pharmaceuticals to the environment. This study assessed the effects of common pharmaceuticals on a cosmopolitan saprophagous insect, Megaselia scalaris (Diptera: Phoridae). Larvae were reared on artificial diets spiked with contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) at environmentally relevant concentrations. Female flies showed no oviposition preference for treated or untreated diets. Larvae exposed to caffeine in diets showed increased mortality, and larvae fed antibiotics and hormones showed signs of slowed development, especially in females. The normal sex ratio observed in M. scalaris from control diets was affected by exposure to caffeine and pharmaceutical mixture treatments. There was an overall effect of treatment on the flies' microbial communities; notably, caffeine fed insects displayed higher microbial variability. Eight bacterial families accounted for approximately 95% of the total microbes in diet and insects. Our results suggest that CECs at environmentally relevant concentrations can affect the biology and microbial communities of an insect of ecological and medical importance.