WorldWideScience

Sample records for emergency management systems

  1. Emergency management information system (EMINS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desonier, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    In a time of crisis or in an emergency, a manager is required to make many decisions to facilitate the proper solution and conclusion to the emergency or crisis. In order to make these decisions, it is necessary for the manager to have correct up-to-date information on the situation, which calls for an automated information display and entry process. The information handling needs are identified in terms of data, video, and voice. Studies of existing Emergency Operations Centers and evaluations of hardware and software have been completed. The result of these studies and investigations is the design and implementation of an automated Emergency Management Information System. Not only is the system useful for Emergency Management but for any information management requirement

  2. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    -changing planet. This information can be captured, analyzed, and visualized by geographic information systems (GIS) to produce maps, charts, and other tools that can reveal information essential to a wide variety of applications including emergency management. Knowing precise, real-time information about the size, location, environmental conditions, and resulting damage of an event like a flood or wildfire as well as the location and numbers of emergency responders and other resources contributes directly to the effectiveness of disaster mitigation. The need for such information is also evident when responding to homeland security threats, such as a terrorist attack. Recognizing the value of its geospatial information resources for this and other purposes, in 1998 Stennis and the state of Mississippi partnered to form what became the Enterprise for Innovative Geospatial Solutions (EIGS) industry cluster, supporting the growth of remote sensing and GIS-based research and business. As part of EIGS, several companies partnered with NASA through dual use and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts. Among those was NVision.

  3. A Tactical Emergency Response Management System (Terms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Emergencies are incidents that threaten public safety, health ... very critical role in responding to an incident. Information systems designed for emergency response operations can provide valuable help for better planning and coordination during .... Object Modeling Technique (OMT) and. Object-Oriented ...

  4. MEMbrain. A software emergency management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drager, K.H.; Brokke, I.

    1998-01-01

    MEMbrain is the name of the EUREKA project EU904. MEM is an abbreviation for Major Emergency Management and brain refers to computer technology. MEMbrain is a strategic European project - the consortium includes partners from six countries, covering the European continent from North to South (Finland, Norway, Denmark, France, Portugal and Greece). The strategy for the project has been to develop a dynamic decision support tool based on: information, prediction, communication, on-line training. The project's results has resulted in a set of knowledge-based software tools supporting MEM activities e.g.; public protection management, man to man communication management, environment information management, resource management, as well as an implementation of an architecture to integrate such tools. (R.P.)

  5. [Development and application of emergency medical information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhu, Baofeng; Chen, Jianrong; Wang, Jian; Gu, Chaoli; Liu, Buyun

    2011-03-01

    To meet the needs of clinical practice of rescuing critical illness and develop the information management system of the emergency medicine. Microsoft Visual FoxPro, which is one of Microsoft's visual programming tool, is used to develop computer-aided system included the information management system of the emergency medicine. The system mainly consists of the module of statistic analysis, the module of quality control of emergency rescue, the module of flow path of emergency rescue, the module of nursing care in emergency rescue, and the module of rescue training. It can realize the system management of emergency medicine and,process and analyze the emergency statistical data. This system is practical. It can optimize emergency clinical pathway, and meet the needs of clinical rescue.

  6. Code orange: Towards transformational leadership of emergency management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Denis H J

    2015-09-01

    The 21(st) century calls upon health leaders to recognize and respond to emerging threats and systemic emergency management challenges through transformative processes inherent in the LEADS in a caring environment framework. Using a grounded theory approach, this qualitative study explores key informant perspectives of leaders in emergency management across Canada on pressing needs for relevant systemic transformation. The emerging model points to eight specific attributes of transformational leadership central to emergency management and suggests that contextualization of health leadership is of particular import. © 2015 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  7. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) System Administration Guide for FEMIS Version 1.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, John C.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Burnett, Robert A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Carter, Richard J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Downing, Timothy R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Homer, Brian J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Holter, Nancy A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Daniel M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Ranata L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Sharon M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Loveall, Robert M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Ramos Jr., Juan (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schulze, Stacy A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Sivaraman, Chitra (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephan, Alex J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stoops, Lamar R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wood, Blanche M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-12-01

    The Federal Emergency Management System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and response tool. The FEMIS System Administration Guide provides information on FEMIS System Administrator activities as well as the utilities that are included with FEMIS.

  8. Managing Emergent Behavior in Distributed Control Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van

    1997-01-01

    ..., and it must be managed accordingly. Drawing on experiences in the Auto Body Consortium's Intelligent Resistance Welding project, we illustrate the potential for this kind of behavior among welding robots in an automotive body shop...

  9. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Data Management Guide for FEMIS Version 1.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, John C.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Burnett, Robert A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Carter, Richard J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Holter, Nancy A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hoza, Mark (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Daniel M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Ranata L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Sharon M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Loveall, Robert M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schulze, Stacy A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephan, Alex J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wood, Blanche M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-12-01

    The Federal Emergency Management System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and response tool. The FEMIS Data Management Guide provides the information needed to manage the data used to support the administrative, user-environment, database management, and operational capabilities of FEMIS.

  10. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Installation Guide for FEMIS Version 1.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, Robert A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Carter, Richard J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Downing, Timothy R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dunkle, Julie R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Homer, Brian J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Daniel M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Ranata L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Johnson, Sharon M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Loveall, Robert M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Ramos Jr., Juan (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephan, Alex J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wood, Blanche M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-12-01

    The Federal Emergency Management System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and response tool. The FEMIS Installation Guide provides instructions for installing and configuring the FEMIS software package.

  11. A COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS IN USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasim A. KORKMAZ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transportation systems in USA are an integral part of the current infrastructure systems and involves a huge investment as part of the government and taxpayers. Therefore, transportation systems have economic, social and vital importance for the U.S. Security and safety of transportation systems and infrastructures in case of any possible future disasters and hazards are crucial for state transportation agencies. The objective of this paper is to develop and implement a comprehensive emergency management strategy for transportation systems in the U.S. in case of any disaster and hazards. In this paper, recommendations are provided to define best deployment of updated emergency response into practice. Practical issues are detailed affecting potential implementation of the strategy. Possible actions to address management issues and tools are investigated; and methods of identifying and measuring the impacts associated with implementation of the strategy are explained.

  12. Emergency response information within the National LLW Information Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paukert, J.G.; Fuchs, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, with operational assistance from EG and G Idaho, Inc., maintains the National Low-Level Waste Information Management System, a relational data base management system with extensive information collection and reporting capabilities. The system operates on an IBM 4341 main-frame computer in Idaho Falls, Idaho and is accessible through terminals in 46 states. One of the many programs available on the system is an emergency response data network, which was developed jointly by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. As a prototype, the program comprises emergency response team contacts, policies, activities and decisions; federal, state and local government contacts; facility and support center locations; and news releases for nine reactor sites in the southeast. The emergency response program provides a method for consolidating currently fragmented information into a central and user-friendly system. When the program is implemented, immediate answers to response questions will be available through a remote terminal or telephone on a 24-hour basis. In view of current hazardous and low-level waste shipment rates and future movements of high-level waste, the program can offer needed and timely information for transportation as well as site incident response

  13. MMS: An electronic message management system for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.B.; Garde, H.; Andersen, V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper outlines the main features of an electronic communication system, MMS, designed to support coordination and exchange of information in connection with emergency management (EM) efforts, The design. of the MMS has been motivated by interviews with EM decision makers and reviews of commu......This paper outlines the main features of an electronic communication system, MMS, designed to support coordination and exchange of information in connection with emergency management (EM) efforts, The design. of the MMS has been motivated by interviews with EM decision makers and reviews......, Thus, users are able to define filters that capture, for instance, "unanswered requests sent out by me today" or "requests from me that have not been answered by an unconditional 'OK.'" Last, ne describe an associated preparedness plan module, which contains, for a given Ehl organization, its...

  14. Developing an electronic system to manage and track emergency medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Mark W; Calabrese, Samuel V; Knoer, Scott J; Duty, Ashley M

    2018-03-01

    The development of a Web-based program to track and manage emergency medications with radio frequency identification (RFID) is described. At the Cleveland Clinic, medication kit restocking records and dispense locations were historically documented using a paper record-keeping system. The Cleveland Clinic investigated options to replace the paper-based tracking logs with a Web-based program that could track the real-time location and inventory of emergency medication kits. Vendor collaboration with a board of pharmacy (BOP) compliance inspector and pharmacy personnel resulted in the creation of a dual barcoding system using medication and pocket labels. The Web-based program was integrated with a Cleveland Clinic-developed asset tracking system using active RFID tags to give the real-time location of the medication kit. The Web-based program and the asset tracking system allowed identification of kits nearing expiration or containing recalled medications. Conversion from a paper-based system to a Web-based program began in October 2013. After 119 days, data were evaluated to assess the success of the conversion. Pharmacists spent an average of 27 minutes per day approving medication kits during the postimplementation period versus 102 minutes daily using the paper-based system, representing a 74% decrease in pharmacist time spent on this task. Prospective reports are generated monthly to allow the manager to assess the expected workload and adjust staffing for the next month. Implementation of a BOP-approved Web-based system for managing and tracking emergency medications with RFID integration decreased pharmacist review time, minimized compliance risk, and increased access to real-time data. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Federal Emergency Management Agency's National Incident Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NIMS provides an integrated framework defining the roles and responsibilities of federal, state and local first responders, developed with responders from different jurisdictions and disciplines, to better work together during emergency events.

  16. Risk management: application of early warning systems to emergency plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C.; Sterlacchini, S.; Pasuto, A.; de Amicis, M.

    2009-04-01

    Warning System and emergency plans are two fundamental elements of risk management and governance, but unfortunately, most of the times, they are developed independently one from the other, as sequential steps not necessary linked. The main goal of this research is to develop a methodology for applying Early Warning Systems - Community Based to the emergency plan using the results of social surveys and quantitative risk assessment, taking into account the administrative structure and the planning system of the study area, as well as the legislative obligations of each entity involved in the risk governance and emergency management. Using a integrative scientific and social approach to natural hazards the research aim to contribute to fill the gap between scientists, policy makers, stakeholders and community. Initially applied in Comunità Montana Valtellina di Tirano, Italy, the methodology involves the application of two comprehensive surveys. The first is addressed to stakeholders (including policy makers, emergency managers, emergency volunteers, consultants and scientists) in order to determine their needs, points of view, concerns and constraints. The second survey is addressed specifically to local community to assess risk perception, awareness, needs, capacity and level of trust towards stakeholders, besides asking for their willingness to participate in future risk communication activities. The Early Warning System developed includes all the stages of the early warning process (hazard evaluation and forecasting; warning and dissemination and public response) and would be based on a multidisciplinary partnership that takes into account the different actors involved in the risk management in order to accomplish a more reliable and credible result, including an emergency plan specifically designed for each study area. After evaluating the results of the surveys, information and education campaigns will be developed with the objective of reducing vulnerability

  17. Application of geographic information system for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.G.; Guber, A.L.; Kliman, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    One of the responsibilities of the DOE Nevada Operations Office, under the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) and the Aerial Measuring System (AMS) program, is the acquisition and analysis of radiological and associated environmental data. Much of the data are in the form of maps, tabular summaries, and vertical imagery. It is critical that these data be rapidly compiled into a common format in order to make accurate observations and informed decisions. This data management task is both large and complex. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. The most recent addition to this essential function has been the development and testing of a deployable Digital Image Processing (IP) / Geographic Information System (GIS). To demonstrate the potential of GIS for emergency response, the system was utilized at an interagency post-emergency table top exercise. A geographic database, consisting of 27 coregistered ''layers'' of cultural, radiological, satellite image,and environmental data was developed for the area within a 50-mile radius of the River Bend Station in Louisiana. In support of the exercise, maps and real time displays of individual layers and combinations of layers were produced to determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. 3 refs., 2 figs

  18. Federal Emergency Management Information system (FEMIS) data management guide. Version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R.; Gaustad, K.L.; Johnson, S.M.; Loveall, R.M.; Winters, C.

    1996-05-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that is being developed under the direction of the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS Data Management Guide provides the background, as well as the operations and procedures needed to generate and maintain the data resources in the system. Database administrators, system administrators, and general users can use this guide to manage the data files and database that support the administrative, user-environment, database management, and operational capabilities of FEMIS. This document provides a description of the relational and spatial information present in FEMIS. It describes how the data was assembled, how it is loaded, and how it is managed while the system is in operation.

  19. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) system administration guide. Version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burford, M.J.; Burnett, R.A.; Curtis, L.M. [and others

    1996-05-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that is being developed under the direction of the US Army Chemical biological Defense Command. The FEMIS System Administration Guide defines FEMIS hardware and software requirements and gives instructions for installing the FEMIS system package. System administrators, database administrators, and general users can use this guide to install, configure, and maintain the FEMIS client software package. This document provides a description of the FEMIS environment; distribution media; data, communications, and electronic mail servers; user workstations; and system management.

  20. Reliability of decision-support systems for nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Tudor B.

    2013-08-01

    Decision support systems for nuclear emergency management (DSNE) are currently used worldwide to assist decision makers in taking emergency response countermeasures in case of accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The present work has been motivated by the fact that, up until now, DSNE systems have not been regarded as safetycritical software systems, such as embedded software currently being used in vehicles and aircraft. The core of any DSNE system is represented by the different simulation codes linked together to form the dispersion simulation workflow. These codes require input emission and meteorological data to produce forecasts of the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants and other substances. However, the reliability of the system not only depends on the trustworthiness of the measured (or generated) input data but also on the reliability of the simulation codes used. The main goal of this work is to improve the reliability of DSNE systems by adapting current state of the art methods from the domain of software reliability engineering to the case of atmospheric dispersion simulation codes. The current approach is based on the design by diversity principle for improving the reliability of codes and the trustworthiness of results as well as on a flexible fault-tolerant workflow scheduling algorithm for ensuring the maximum availability of the system. The author's contribution is represented by (i) an acceptance test for dispersion simulation results, (ii) an adjudication algorithm (voter) based on comparing taxonomies of dispersion simulation results, and (iii) a feedback-control based fault-tolerant workflow scheduling algorithm. These tools provide means for the continuous verification of dispersion simulation codes while tolerating timing faults caused by disturbances in the underlying computational environment and will thus help increase the reliability and trustworthiness of DSNE systems in missioncritical

  1. Reliability of decision-support systems for nuclear emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionescu, Tudor B.

    2013-08-15

    Decision support systems for nuclear emergency management (DSNE) are currently used worldwide to assist decision makers in taking emergency response countermeasures in case of accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The present work has been motivated by the fact that, up until now, DSNE systems have not been regarded as safetycritical software systems, such as embedded software currently being used in vehicles and aircraft. The core of any DSNE system is represented by the different simulation codes linked together to form the dispersion simulation workflow. These codes require input emission and meteorological data to produce forecasts of the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants and other substances. However, the reliability of the system not only depends on the trustworthiness of the measured (or generated) input data but also on the reliability of the simulation codes used. The main goal of this work is to improve the reliability of DSNE systems by adapting current state of the art methods from the domain of software reliability engineering to the case of atmospheric dispersion simulation codes. The current approach is based on the design by diversity principle for improving the reliability of codes and the trustworthiness of results as well as on a flexible fault-tolerant workflow scheduling algorithm for ensuring the maximum availability of the system. The author's contribution is represented by (i) an acceptance test for dispersion simulation results, (ii) an adjudication algorithm (voter) based on comparing taxonomies of dispersion simulation results, and (iii) a feedback-control based fault-tolerant workflow scheduling algorithm. These tools provide means for the continuous verification of dispersion simulation codes while tolerating timing faults caused by disturbances in the underlying computational environment and will thus help increase the reliability and trustworthiness of DSNE systems in missioncritical

  2. Analysis and Development of Emergency Management Information System for Railway Systems in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, C.C.; TSAI, M.R.; TSAI, Y.J.; CHI, W.C.; CHIU, Y.L.; SHEU, S.K.; CHEN, I.C.

    2012-01-01

    Railway is one of the most efficient, convenient, and comfortable ways with maximum mobility to meet people. Railway accidents or disasters often cause delays and service interruptions, resulting in operational and other loss. Despite many railway systems in Taiwan having a variety of monitoring systems for natural disasters, they still need an efficient platform for the emergency management of disasters and accidents since time and efficiency are the keys to emergency management. This study ...

  3. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Data Management Guide for FEMIS Version 1.4.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, L.K.; Bower, J.C.; Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R.; Fangman, P.M.; Hoza, M.; Johnson, D.M.; Johnson, S.M.; Loveall, R.M.; Millard, W.D.; Schulze, S.A.; Wood, B.M.

    1999-06-29

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and response tool that was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the direction of the U.S. Army Chemical Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS System Administration Guide provides information necessary for the system administrator to maintain the FEMIS system. The FEMIS system is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are corrected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via a Wide Area Network (WAN). Thus, FEMIS is an integrated software product that resides on client/server computer architecture. The main body of FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Application Software, resides on the PC client(s) and is directly accessible to emergency management personnel. The remainder of the FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Support Software, resides on the UNIX server. The Support Software provides the communication data distribution and notification functionality necessary to operate FEMIS in a networked, client/server environment.

  4. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) system administration guide. Version 1.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burford, M.J.; Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that was developed by the (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) (PNNL) under the direction of the U.S. Army Chemical Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS System Administration Guide defines FEMIS hardware and software requirements and gives instructions for installing the FEMIS software package. 91 This document also contains information on the following: software installation for the FEMIS data servers, communication server, mail server, and the emergency management workstations; distribution media loading and FEMIS installation validation and troubleshooting; and system management of FEMIS users, login, privileges, and usage. The system administration utilities (tools), available in the FEMIS client software, are described for user accounts and site profile. This document also describes the installation and use of system and database administration utilities that will assist in keeping the FEMIS system running in an operational environment.

  5. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) data management guide, version 1.4.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R.; Gaustad, K.L. [and others

    1998-06-26

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) information resources are described in this FEMIS Data Management Guide. To comprehend what types of data are present, where the data is located, and how it is managed during the life span of the system, a basic understanding of the FEMIS architecture is necessary. The system is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). The capability to connect to remote CSEPP sites and share information will be present in a future release. Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are connected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide efficient EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via telecommunications links. FEMIS is a client/server system where much of the application software is located in the client PC. This client software integrates the FEMIS application, government furnished dispersion and evacuation models, and Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software tools such as the ArcView geographic information system (GIS) and Microsoft Project (electron planning). A UNIX server provides data management services, ARC/INFO GIS capabilities, evacuation (Evac) modeling, electron main (E-mail), and meteorological (Met) input processing. A PC communication utility is available to interface with external subsystems. At this time, the weather collection system (Handar Met System) is the only external subsystem.

  6. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Data Management Guide Version 1.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R.; Gaustad, K.L.; Hoza, M.; Johnson, S.M.; Loveall, R.M.; Millard, W.D.; Winters, C.; Wood, B.M.

    1996-12-01

    FEMIS is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that is being developed under the direction of the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense Command. FEMIS is designed to help civilian emergency management personnel to plan for and support their responses to a chemical-releasing event at a military chemical stockpile. This guide provides the background as well as the operations and procedures needed to generate and maintain the data resources in the system. Database administrators, system administrators, and general users can use this guide to manage the datafiles and database. This document provides a description of the relational and spatial information present in FEMIS. It describes how the data was assembled, loaded, and managed while the system is in operation.

  7. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) system administration guide. Version 1.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arp, J.A.; Burnett, R.A.; Downing, T.R. [and others

    1997-11-21

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the direction of the US Army Chemical Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS System Administration Guide defines FEMIS hardware and software requirements and gives instructions for installing the FEMIS software package. This document also contains information on the following: software installation for the FEMIS data servers, communication server, mail server, and the emergency management workstations; distribution media loading and FEMIS installation validation and troubleshooting; and system management of FEMIS users, login privileges, and usage. The system administration utilities (tools), available in the FEMIS client software, are described for user accounts and site profile. This document also describes the installation and use of system and database administration utilities that will assist in keeping the FEMIS system running in an operational environment. The FEMIS system is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are connected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via telecommunications links.

  8. Principal Experiences with Crisis Management Professional Development, Collaboration, and Implementation of the National Incident Management System Phases of Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naradko, Anthony M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative single-subject case study was to identify the elements critical to crisis management professional development for school principals; the factors influencing the implementation of the National Incident Management System Phases of Emergency Management (2010) for principals; and the necessary elements for fostering…

  9. Future Research on Cyber-Physical Emergency Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Jing Wu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyber-physical systems that include human beings and vehicles in a built environment, such as a building or a city, together with sensor networks and decision support systems have attracted much attention. In emergencies, which also include mobile searchers and rescuers, the interactions among civilians and the environment become much more diverse, and the complexity of the emergency response also becomes much greater. This paper surveys current research on sensor-assisted evacuation and rescue systems and discusses the related research issues concerning communication protocols for sensor networks, as well as several other important issues, such as the integrated asynchronous control of large-scale emergency response systems, knowledge discovery for rescue and prototyping platforms. Then, we suggest directions for further research.

  10. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) system administration guide, version 1.4.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arp, J.A.; Burnett, R.A.; Carter, R.J. [and others

    1998-06-26

    The Federal Emergency Management Information Systems (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and response tool that was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the direction of the US Army Chemical Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS System Administration Guide provides information necessary for the system administrator to maintain the FEMIS system. The FEMIS system is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are connected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via a Wide Area Network (WAN). Thus, FEMIS is an integrated software product that resides on client/server computer architecture. The main body of FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Application Software, resides on the PC client(s) and is directly accessible to emergency management personnel. The remainder of the FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Support Software, resides on the UNIX server. The Support Software provides the communication, data distribution, and notification functionality necessary to operate FEMIS in a networked, client/server environment. The UNIX server provides an Oracle relational database management system (RDBMS) services, ARC/INFO GIS (optional) capabilities, and basic file management services. PNNL developed utilities that reside on the server include the Notification Service, the Command Service that executes the evacuation model, and AutoRecovery. To operate FEMIS, the Application Software must have access to a site specific FEMIS emergency management database. Data that pertains to an individual EOC`s jurisdiction is stored on the EOC`s local server. Information that needs to be accessible to all EOCs is automatically distributed by the FEMIS

  11. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) System Administration Guide for FEMIS Version 1.4.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arp, J.A.; Bower, J.C.; Burnett, R.A.; Carter, R.J.; Downing, T.R.; Fangman, P.M.; Gerhardstein, L.H.; Homer, B.J.; Johnson, D.M.; Johnson, R.L.; Johnson, S.M.; Loveall, R.M.; Martin, T.J.; Millard, W.D.; Schulze, S.A.; Stoops, L.R.; Tzemos, S.; Wood, B.M.

    1999-06-29

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and response tool that was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the direction of the U.S. Army Chemical Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS System Administration Guide provides information necessary for the system administrator to maintain the FEMIS system. The FEMIS system is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are corrected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via a Wide Area Network (WAN). Thus, FEMIS is an integrated software product that resides on client/server computer architecture. The main body of FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Application Software, resides on the PC client(s) and is directly accessible to emergency management personnel. The remainder of the FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Support Software, resides on the UNIX server. The Support Software provides the communication data distribution and notification functionality necessary to operate FEMIS in a networked, client/server environment.

  12. Municipal Emergency Management System: a strategy towards information and managing resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Azores archipelago is located in the North Atlantic Ocean, on a complex geological setting where the North American, Eurasian and African plates meet. Throughout its history the geological and meteorological hazards have been the most significant and had cause thousands of deaths and extensive damages. To prepare and mitigate the impact of catastrophic events there are emergency plans to guide the authorities and to instruct the population. However, a key point on the effectiveness of any emergency plan is the efficiency on getting the relevant information from the existing plans and conveying quality information to the operational teams and to the population. To address this issue the Municipal Emergency Management System was designed as a modular software with a core database and two different applications; one back-office to input and manage data and one front-end to query the database. The database is installed in a server and the system runs over an Intranet or the Internet, allowing its management and query to be done anywhere. The information on the system comprises two sets of data: (a) static data, regarding guidelines from the official Municipal Emergency Plan and a broad characterization of the county that does not need to be updated frequently (geography, geomorphology, climatology and the main hazards to consider) and (b) dynamic information, concerning data that requires regular updating such as available resources, administrative officials, pertinent private organisations etc.. All dynamic data in the core database is organised in three layers: (1) administrative organisations with geographical expression (such as province or district), (2) entities with capability to provide aid on provisions, accommodations, health, infrastructures, construction, transportation and security (public services, non-governmental organisations, enterprises or individual persons) and (3) operative information (applicable laws, tasks of each operative structure of the

  13. Accident and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.; Moellenbach, K.; Heinonen, R.; Jakobsson, S.; Kukko, T.; Berg, Oe.; Larsen, J.S.; Westgaard, T.; Magnusson, B.; Andersson, H.; Holmstroem, C.; Brehmer, B.; Allard, R.

    1988-06-01

    There is an increasing potential for severe accidents as the industrial development tends towards large, centralised production units. In several industries this has led to the formation of large organisations which are prepared for accidents fighting and for emergency management. The functioning of these organisations critically depends upon efficient decision making and exchange of information. This project is aimed at securing and possibly improving the functionality and efficiency of the accident and emergency management by verifying, demonstrating, and validating the possible use of advanced information technology in the organisations mentioned above. With the nuclear industry in focus the project consists of five main activities: 1) The study and detailed analysis of accident and emergency scenarios based on records from incidents and rills in nuclear installations. 2) Development of a conceptual understanding of accident and emergency management with emphasis on distributed decision making, information flow, and control structure sthat are involved. 3) Development of a general experimental methodology for evaluating the effects of different kinds of decision aids and forms of organisation for emergency management systems with distributed decision making. 4) Development and test of a prototype system for a limited part of an accident and emergency organisation to demonstrate the potential use of computer and communication systems, data-base and knowledge base technology, and applications of expert systems and methods used in artificial intelligence. 5) Production of guidelines for the introduction of advanced information technology in the organisations based on evaluation and validation of the prototype system. (author)

  14. Unmanned Aircraft Systems for Emergency Management: A Guide for Policy Makers and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    Printing Office, 2011), 46. 92 artificial intelligence into unmanned operations continues to advance, future research should include an examination of...is unlimited UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: A GUIDE FOR POLICY MAKERS AND PRACTITIONERS by Darren E. Price March 2016...DATE March 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

  15. International Conference on Emerging Technologies for Information Systems, Computing, and Management

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Tinghuai; Emerging Technologies for Information Systems, Computing, and Management

    2013-01-01

    This book aims to examine innovation in the fields of information technology, software engineering, industrial engineering, management engineering. Topics covered in this publication include; Information System Security, Privacy, Quality Assurance, High-Performance Computing and Information System Management and Integration. The book presents papers from The Second International Conference for Emerging Technologies Information Systems, Computing, and Management (ICM2012) which was held on December 1 to 2, 2012 in Hangzhou, China.

  16. Security and Emergency Management Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Security and Emergency Management Division identifies vulnerabilities, risks, and opportunities to improve the security of transportation systems, critical...

  17. Assessment of the Temperament, Motivation, and Capability of a School System District for Emergency Management/Crisis Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    This study was a cross-sectional study of leadership and staff of a public school system in Georgia concerning their temperament type, emergency management motivation and emergency management knowledge in relation to Emergency Management/Crisis performance (ERCM). The study consisted of an inclusive questionnaire that contains questions on four…

  18. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS), Installation Guide for FEMIS 1.4.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arp, J.A.; Burnett, R.A.; Carter, R.J.; Downing, T.R.; Dunkle, J.R.; Fangman, P.M.; Gackle, P.P.; Homer, B.J.; Johnson, D.M.; Johnson, R.L.; Johnson, S.M.; Loveall, R.M.; Stephan, A.J.; Millard, W.D.; Wood, B.M.

    1999-06-29

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) is an emergency management planning and response tool that was developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the direction of the U.S. Army Chemical Biological Defense Command. The FEMIS System Administration Guide provides information necessary for the system administrator to maintain the FEMIS system. The FEMIS system is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are corrected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via a Wide Area Network (WAN). Thus, FEMIS is an integrated software product that resides on client/server computer architecture. The main body of FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Application Software, resides on the PC client(s) and is directly accessible to emergency management personnel. The remainder of the FEMIS software, referred to as the FEMIS Support Software, resides on the UNIX server. The Support Software provides the communication data distribution and notification functionality necessary to operate FEMIS in a networked, client/server environment.

  19. Assessing Roles of People, Technology and Structure in Emergency Management Systems: A Public Sector Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkyun; Sharman, Raj; Cook-Cottone, Catherine P.; Rao, H. Raghav; Upadhyaya, Shambhu J.

    2012-01-01

    Emergency management systems are a critical factor in successful mitigation of natural and man-made disasters, facilitating responder decision making in complex situations. Based on socio-technical systems, have which four components (people, technology, structure and task), this study develops a research framework of factors affecting effective…

  20. Power production operations management : due diligence and emergency planning. The due diligence - management system connection : an operating managers guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.

    1998-01-01

    Steps taken by BC Hydro in implementing a company-wide emergency management system (EMS) were described. The driving force behind the implementation of the EMS were related to the business, namely: (1) to improve business and environmental performance, (2) to provide employees with the skills and tools to make the right decisions, (3) to retain and attract customers, (4) to build relations with regulators, NGOs and the public, and (5) to prove due diligence. This presentation focused on the due diligence component of the EMS. 1 fig

  1. The Emergence of Enterprise Systems Management - A Challenge to the IS Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems curriculum. It analyzes the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage resulting...... in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). Enterprise Systems Management calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways...

  2. The Emergence of Enterprise Systems Management - A Challenge to the IS Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems curriculum. It analyzes the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage resulting...... in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). Enterprise Systems Management calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways...

  3. MANAGING THE INTERACTION OF RESOURCE DISTRIBUTION IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION AND FUNCTIONING OF EMERGENCY CALL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Дмитро Сергійович КОБИЛКІН

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There have been proposed to use a mobile module "Resources manager" and its component model – scheme for managing the distribution of resources during the project management of implementation and functioning of System 112 in Ukraine. Are described the formalized tasks of performance the processes of managing the model – scheme at all stages of the projects life cycle. Also is developed the model – scheme interaction the blocks of the mobile module of resource management at the System 112 project. It describes the step by step interaction of blocks project management with the project data for successful project implementation and obtaining a product of the project, pointing out the environmental impact of the project on each of the project blocks. The conclusions about the expediency and efficiency of implementation of model – scheme in conditions of managing the emergency call systems at a single number were made.

  4. Modified Delphi study to determine optimal data elements for inclusion in an emergency management database system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jabar

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: The use of a modified Expert Delphi study achieved consensus in aspects of hospital institutional capacity that can be translated into practical recommendations for implementation by the local emergency management database system. Additionally, areas of non-consensus have been identified where further work is required. This purpose of this study is to contribute to and aid in the development of this new system.

  5. Decision support for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.

    1989-05-01

    A short introduction will be given to the Nordic project ''NKA/INF: Information Technology for Accident and Emergency Management'', which is now in its final phase. To perform evaluation of the project, special scenarious have been developed, and experiments based on these will be fulfilled and compared with experiments without use of the decision support system. Furthermore, the succeeding European project, ''IT Support for Emergency Management - ISEM'', with the purpose of developing a decision support system for complex and distributed decision making in emergency management in full scale, will be described and the preliminary conceptual model for the system will be presented. (author)

  6. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies

  7. The emergence of enterprise systems management: a challenge to the IS curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems (IS) curriculum. It analyses the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage...... resulting in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). ESM calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways of approaching...

  8. The emergence of enterprise systems management: a challenge to the IS curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2006-01-01

    resulting in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). ESM calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways of approaching......This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems (IS) curriculum. It analyses the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage...

  9. The emergence of enterprise systems management: a challenge to the IS curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes four cornerstones of a future Information Systems (IS) curriculum. It analyses the challenges of the IS curriculum based on the development of enterprise systems, and further argues that the practice and the research into enterprise systems have progressed to a new stage...... resulting in the emergence of Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). ESM calls for new competences and consequently represents new challenges to the IS curriculum. The paper outlines potential teaching issues and discusses the impact on the IS curriculum. Finally the paper suggests ways of approaching...... the challenges...

  10. Drivers and challenges for implementing ISO 14001 environmental management systems in an emerging Gulf Arab country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxin, Marie-France; Knuteson, Sandra L; Bartholomew, Aaron

    2017-11-13

    Worldwide, ISO 14001 certification for organizations has become the norm, but the Arab world accounts for an insignificant portion of all the certified organizations. There is a dearth of research on environmental management systems (EMS) in Arab and emerging countries and in public organizations. The objectives of this research are to: (1) examine the key drivers and challenges related to implementation of ISO 14001 certified EMS in the United Arab Emirates, an emerging Arab country and (2) compare and contrast these drivers and challenges between private and public organizations. We adopt an explorative, qualitative methodology, using semi-structured interviews with environmental managers in 11 organizations (6 private and 5 public) from different industrial sectors. Drivers of EMS certification were mostly similar between private and public organizations, with some differences. Compliance with regulations and standards, and increasing environmental performance were the main drivers for ISO 14001 certification in both private and public organizations. Commitment to sustainability was more important for public organizations. Cost reduction, competitors, leadership commitment and customers' demands were shared drivers, but more stressed by private organizations. Local community and employees' pressures were reported by private organizations only. The challenges to ISO 14001 implementation were similar for private and public organizations. They were: a lack of qualified human resources, practical challenges associated with implementation, a lack of regulations, a lack of support from management, and high costs. Our findings have implications for managers, academics, consultants, and policy makers in the UAE and other emerging markets.

  11. A framework for evaluating the effectiveness of flood emergency management systems in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Kasper Gilissen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Society is faced with a range of contemporary threats to everyday life, from natural and technological hazards to accidents and terrorism. These are embodied within integrated emergency management arrangements that are designed to enhance preparedness and response to such incidents, and in turn facilitate a prompt recovery. Such arrangements must be inherently dynamic and evolve as new threats emerge or as existing threats change. An example of the latter is the changing nature of flooding, which is projected to increase in both frequency and severity with climate change. Recognizing this evolving threat, we focus on the evaluation of the effectiveness of domestic Flood Emergency Management Systems (FEMS as components of integrated emergency management arrangements. Despite the extensive body of literature that documents success conditions of so-called effective emergency management more broadly, there have been only a few attempts to construct a comprehensive evaluation framework to support objective assessment and cross-country comparison. Addressing this gap, we formulate an evaluation framework specifically tailored to the study of FEMS in Europe, which is then provisionally applied to the study of FEMS in England (UK, France, the Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Important differences are observed in how FEMS have evolved in relation to differing contextual backgrounds (political, cultural, administrative, and socio-economic and exposures to flood hazard. From this provisional assessment, a number of opportunities for, and constraints to, enhancing the effectiveness of FEMS in Europe are discerned. The evaluation framework thus serves as an important stepping stone for further indepth inquiry, and as a valuable tool for future comparative study.

  12. RODOS: decision support system for off-site emergency management in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.; Shershakov, V.; Zheleznyak, M.; Mikhalevich, A.

    1996-01-01

    The integrated and comprehensive real-time on-line decision support system, RODOS, for off-site emergency management of nuclear accidents is being developed under the auspices of the European Commission's Radiation Protection Research Action. A large number of both West and East European institutes are involved in the further development of the existing prototype versions to operational use with significant contributions coming from the partner institutes in the CIS Republics. This paper summarizes the structure, the main functions and the status of the RODOS system

  13. From Civil Protection Plan to Disaster Management. PETer evolution from GIS tool to multi-area Emergency Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Simone; Sterlacchini, Simone; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Glade, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    PETer (Protection and Emergency of the Territory) has been developed since 2006 as a tool to manage all the information available to perform a wide range of Civil Protection activities. Based on MapObjects spatial support, it was relied on capacity to manage data from different sources and at different scale, offering practical GIS-tools for a technical and practical use during crisis state. At the first stages of the development, after different assessment, critical on-field analysis and a direct proof on test area, the approach came into sight like a valid database management for the entire dataset, but quite static, not full-blown for every emergency necessity, too complicate and not enough user-friendly, considering people in charge during emergency management, the quick change of state with many parameters involved and also uncertainty, hesitation, confusion or general panic among decision makers. As a second step of research, a more down-to-earth methodology targeted to cope with the aftermath of critical events is presented here. It takes advantage of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Decision Support Systems (DSS), and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to prepare, apply and coordinate Civil Protection plans. The main aim was to set up and manage contingency plans in advance; that is, to identify and prepare people in charge to take action to define the activities to be performed, to be aware of available resources and to optimize the communication system among the people involved, in order to efficiently face a prospective crisis phase. A disaster preparedness plan should anticipate the demands for a disaster relief operation and indicate the most effective way of joining those requirements. Through scientific and technical co-operation between public and private research groups, a new platform was planned and set up, in order to test the aims of the project. The application was based on a cooperative organizational structure by which

  14. Emergency Management of Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to weakened throat muscles and accumulated secretions. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OF MG The MGFA mission is to facilitate ... fax mgfa@myasthenia.org • www.myasthenia.org EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OF MG Emergency Management Important information for the ...

  15. Information technology for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.

    1990-01-01

    Improved performance in emergency management by the use of modern information technology has been investigated. Limited parts of a preparedness system have been chosen based on analysis of drills with respect to emergency situations and real accidents. Specific functions relevant for the situation have been selected and implemented in prototype test systems. Finally, the usefulness of the prototype systems has been evaluated by experiments following specific scenarios. (author) 24 refs

  16. Geographic Information System Technology Leveraged for Crisis Planning, Emergency, Response, and Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is piloting the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology that can be leveraged for crisis planning, emergency response, and disaster management/awareness. Many different organizations currently use GIS tools and geospatial data during a disaster event. ASDC datasets have not been fully utilized by this community in the past due to incompatible data formats that ASDC holdings are archived in. Through the successful implementation of this pilot effort and continued collaboration with the larger Homeland Defense and Department of Defense emergency management community through the Homeland Infrastructure Foundation-Level Data Working Group (HIFLD WG), our data will be easily accessible to those using GIS and increase the ability to plan, respond, manage, and provide awareness during disasters. The HIFLD WG Partnership has expanded to include more than 5,900 mission partners representing the 14 executive departments, 98 agencies, 50 states (and 3 territories), and more than 700 private sector organizations to directly enhance the federal, state, and local government's ability to support domestic infrastructure data gathering, sharing and protection, visualization, and spatial knowledge management.The HIFLD WG Executive Membership is lead by representatives from the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs - OASD (HD&ASA); the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate's Office of Infrastructure Protection (NPPD IP); the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Integrated Working Group - Readiness, Response and Recovery (IWG-R3); the Department of Interior (DOI) United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP), and DHS Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  17. Emergency Management Standards and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication discusses emergency management standards for school use and lists standards recommended by FEMA's National Incident Management System (NIMS). Schools are encouraged to review these standards carefully and to adopt, where applicable, those that meet their needs. The lists of standards, resources, and references contained herein…

  18. Management of Radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo, J. C.; Gil, E.; San Nicolas, J.; Lazuen, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Spain has a system of planning and response to emergency situations that is structured and coordinated by the General Directorship of civil Defense of the Ministry of the Interior and in which all levels of the Public Administration. state, autonomous and municipal-and owners of potentially hazardous activities participate. Activities involving a nuclear or radiological risk have specific emergency plans whose general principles are based on the general emergency system and whose technical bases are consistent with international practices and recommendations. The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear actively participates in the design, implementation and activation of these plans, and for this purpose has an organization superimposed on its ordinary working organization that is activated in the event of an accident, as well as an Emergency Room specifically designed to deal with nuclear and radiological emergencies. (Author)

  19. Emergency management logistics must become emergency supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard R; Peterson, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written about how emergency management (EM) needs to look to the future regarding issues of resource management (monetary, human, and material). Constraints on budgets are ongoing and the staffing of emergency response activities is often difficult because volunteers have little to no training. The management of material resources has also been a challenge because 1) the categories of material vary by the type of emergency, 2) the necessary quantities of material are often not located near the ultimate point of need, and 3) the transportation assets are rarely available in the form and quantity required to allow timely and effective response. The logistics and resource management functions of EM (what we refer to as EM logistics) have been largely reactive, with little to no pre-event planning for potential demand. We applied the Supply Chain Operational Reference (SCOR) model to EM logistics in an effort to transform it to an integrated and scalable system of physical, information, and financial flows into which are woven the functions of sourcing, making, delivering, and returning, with an overarching planning function that transcends the organizational boundaries of participants. The result is emergency supply chain management, which embraces many more participants who share in a larger quantity of more useful information about the resources that need to be deployed when responding to and recovering from emergency events.

  20. Development of a decision support system for off-site emergency management in the early phase of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, D.; Sharma, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Experience gained after the Chernobyl accident clearly demonstrated the importance of improving administrative, organizational and technical emergency management arrangements in India. The more important areas where technical improvements were needed were early warning monitoring, communication networks for the rapid and reliable exchange of radiological and other information and decision support systems for off-site emergency management. A PC based artificial intelligent software has been developed to have a decision support system that can easily implement to manage off-site nuclear emergency and subsequently analyze the off-site consequences of the nuclear accident. A decision support tool, STEPS (source term estimate based on plant status), that provides desired input to the present software was developed. The tool STEPS facilitates meta knowledge of the system. The paper describes the details of the design of the software, functions of various modules, tuning of respective knowledge base and overall its scope in real sense in nuclear emergency preparedness and response

  1. Use of QUADRICS supercomputer as embedded simulator in emergency management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bove, R.; Di Costanzo, G.; Ziparo, A.

    1996-07-01

    The experience related to the implementation of a MRBT, atmospheric spreading model with a short duration releasing, are reported. This model was implemented on a QUADRICS-Q1 supercomputer. First is reported a description of the MRBT model. It is an analytical model to study the speadings of light gases realised in the atmosphere cause incidental releasing. The solution of diffusion equation is Gaussian like. It yield the concentration of pollutant substance released. The concentration is function of space and time. Thus the QUADRICS architecture is introduced. And the implementation of the model is described. At the end it will be consider the integration of the QUADRICS-based model as simulator in a emergency management system

  2. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Bill of Materials (BOM) for FEMIS Version 1.4.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homer, B.J., Johnson, D.M.; Wood, B.M.; Stoops, L.R.; Fangman, P.M.; Johnson, R.L.; Loveall, R.M.; Millard, W.D.; Johnson, S.M.; Downing, T.R.

    1999-03-12

    This document describes the hardware and software required for the Federal Emergency Management Information System version 1.4.6 (FEMIS{copyright} v1.4.6). FEMIS is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are connected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCS via a Wide Area Network (WAN).

  3. A framework for evaluating the effectiveness of flood emergency management systems in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Gilissen, HK; Alexander, M; Matczak, P; Pettersson, M; Bruzzone, S

    2016-01-01

    Society is faced with a range of contemporary threats to everyday life, from natural and technological hazards to accidents and terrorism. These are embodied within integrated emergency management arrangements that are designed to enhance preparedness and response to such incidents, and in turn facilitate a prompt recovery. Such arrangements must be inherently dynamic and evolve as new threats emerge or as existing threats change. An example of the latter is the changing nature of flooding, w...

  4. Managing emergency department overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshaker, Jonathan S

    2009-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding and ambulance diversion has been an increasingly significant national problem for more than a decade. More than 90% of hospital ED directors reported overcrowding as a problem resulting in patients in hallways, full occupancy of ED beds, and long waits, occurring several times a week. Overcrowding has many other potential detrimental effects including diversion of ambulances, frustration for patients and ED personnel, lesser patient satisfaction, and most importantly, greater risk for poor outcomes. This article gives a basic blueprint for successfully making hospital-wide changes using principles of operational management. It briefly covers the causes, significance, and dangers of overcrowding, and then focuses primarily on specific solutions.

  5. A framework for evaluating the effectiveness of flood emergency management systems in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, H.K.; Alexander, Meghan; Matczak, Piotr; Pettersson, Maria; Bruzzone, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Society is faced with a range of contemporary threats to everyday life, from natural and technological hazards, to accidents and terrorism. These are embodied within integrated emergency management arrangements, designed to enhance preparedness and response to such incidents, and in turn facilitate

  6. Improved nuclear emergency management system reflecting lessons learned from the emergency response at Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Shinichi; Narabayashi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Three nuclear reactors at Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station lost all their ultimate heat sinks owing to damage from the tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Water was injected into the reactors by alternate measures, damaged cooling systems were restored with promptly supplied substitute materials, and all the reactors were brought to a cold shutdown state within four days. Lessons learned from this experience were identified to improve emergency management, especially in the areas of strategic response planning, logistics, and functions supporting response activities continuing over a long period. It was found that continuous planning activities reflecting information from plant parameters and response action results were important, and that relevant functions in emergency response organizations should be integrated. Logistics were handled successfully but many difficulties were experienced. Therefore, their functions should be clearly established and improved by emergency response organizations. Supporting emergency responders in the aspects of their physical and mental conditions was important for sustaining continuous response. As a platform for improvement, the concept of the Incident Command System was applied for the first time to a nuclear emergency management system, with specific improvement ideas such as a phased approach in response planning and common operation pictures. (author)

  7. Deployment of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) in Emergency and Disaster Response Scenarios to Support Local Emergency Management Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamaio, C. L.; Walker, J.; Beck, J. M.; Graves, S. J.; Johnson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Researchers at the Information Technology and Systems Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville are working closely with the Madison County Emergency Management Agency (EMA), GeoHuntsville's UAS Working Group, and the NOAA UAS Program Office, to conduct a series of practical demonstrations testing the use of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) for emergency response activities in Madison County, Alabama. These exercises demonstrate the use of UAS to detect and visualize hazards in affected areas via the delivery of aerial imagery and associated data products to law enforcement first responders in a variety of different scenarios, for example, search and rescue, tornado track mapping, damage assessment, and situational awareness/containment during active shooter incidents. In addition to showcasing the use of UAS as a tool for emergency services, these pilot exercises provide the opportunity to engage the appropriate stakeholders from several communities including first responders, geospatial intelligence, active members of the unmanned systems industry, and academia. This presentation will showcase the challenges associated with delivering quality data products for emergency services in a timely manner as well as the related challenges in integrating the technology into local emergency management.

  8. Assisting emergency operating procedures execution with AMAS, an Accident Management Advisor System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarro, S.; Milici, T.; Wu, J.S.; Apostolakis, G.

    2004-01-01

    In an accident situation, because any decisions that the operators make will depend on how instrumentation readings are ultimately interpreted, the issue of instrument uncertainty is of paramount importance. This uncertainty exists because instrument readings may not be available in the desired form - i.e., only indirect readings for a parameter of interest may exist, with uncertainty on which physical models may be used to deduce its value from these indirect indications -, or because readings may be coming from instruments whose accuracy and reliability in the face of the severe conditions produced by the accident are far from what may be expected under normal operating conditions. In following the EOPs, the operators must rely on instrumentation whose readings may not reflect the real situation. The Accident Management Advisor System (AMAS) is a decision aid intended to supplement plant Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) by accounting for instrumentation uncertainty, and by alerting the operators if they are on the wrong procedures, or otherwise performing an action that is not optimal in terms of preventing core damage. In AMAS, the availability and reliability of certain important instrument readings is treated in probabilistic, rather than deterministic terms. This issue is discussed in greater detail later in the paper, since it relates to one of the key characteristics of the AMAS decision aid. (author)

  9. Superior mediastinal syndrome: emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Richa; Bansal, Deepak; Marwaha, R K; Singhi, Sunit

    2013-01-01

    Superior Vena Cava Syndrome (SVCS) refers to signs and symptoms caused by obstruction of the superior vena cava. Superior mediastinal syndrome (SMS) is the term used when SVCS coexists with obstruction of trachea. In children, a mediastinal pathology causing SVCS generally results in SMS as well, due to the limited chest volume. Hence, the two terms are often used interchangeably in children. SMS is a medical emergency that can be challenging, albeit often rewarding to manage. The common causes in a patient presenting to pediatric emergency room include non-Hodgkin lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Patients with SMS are at a very high risk for adverse cardio-respiratory events in case they are administered any kind of anesthetic agents, anxiolytics or sedatives. Investigations, including tissue diagnosis are desirable, though not mandatory, before initiating emergency management. The patient's clinical condition should dictate the speed, requirement and sequence of investigations and the specific treatment. The least invasive procedure should be performed to confirm the diagnosis. As the most common cause of SMS in children is lymphoma/leukemia, the administration of systemic steroids is often the front line therapy. Diagnosis, monitoring and management of SMS in relevance to the pediatric emergency room are outlined.

  10. Development of a descriptive model of an integrated information system to support complex, dynamic, distributed decision making for emergency management in large organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.; Andersen, H.B.; Axel, E.; Petersen, T.

    1990-01-01

    A short introduction will be given to the European (ESPRIT II) project, ''IT Support for Emergency Management - ISEM''. The project is aimed at the development of an integrated information system capable of supporting the complex, dynamic, distributed decision making in the management of emergencies. The basic models developed to describe and construct emergency management organisations and their preparedness have been illustrated, and it has been stated that similarities may be found even in emergency situations that originally are of quite different nature. (author)

  11. Emergency severity index triage system correlation with emergency department evaluation and management billing codes and total professional charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiler, Jennifer L; Poirier, Robert F; Farley, Heather; Zirkin, William; Griffey, Richard T

    2011-11-01

    All services provided by physicians to patients during an emergency department (ED) visit, including procedures and "cognitive work," are described by common procedural terminology (CPT) codes that are translated by coders into total professional (physician) charges for the visit. These charges do not include the technical (facility) charges. The objectives of this study were to characterize associations between Emergency Severity Index (ESI) acuity level, ED Evaluation and Management (E&M) billing codes 99281-99285 and 99291, and total ED provider charges (sum of total procedure and E&M professional charges). Secondary objectives were to identify factors that might affect these associations and to evaluate the performance of ESI and identified variables to predict E&M code and average total professional charges. The authors reviewed 276,824 patient records for calendar year 2007, of which 193,952 adult ED visits from three different ED types (community, university-based academic, and non-university-based academic) met inclusion criteria. Correlations between 1) ESI level and E&M billing code per visit by institution and 2) ESI and total professional charges were analyzed using Spearman rank correlation. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify variables that significantly affected these correlations. ESI level and E&M codes were moderately correlated (Spearman r = 0.51). ESI levels corresponded proportionately to higher E&M codes. ESI 1, 2, and 3 most frequently corresponded with E&M level 5 (50, 62, and 45%, respectively), and ESI 4 and 5 most frequently corresponded with E&M level 3 (56 and 67%, respectively). Only age by decade significantly affected the association between ESI level and E&M billing code. The mean total professional charge for all patient encounters was $421 (SD ± $204) with increasing mean charges per patient by increasing ESI acuity. Race and E&M code significantly affected the relationship between ESI level and total ED

  12. Web-of-Objects (WoO-Based Context Aware Emergency Fire Management Systems for the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Ush Shamszaman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in the Internet of Things (IoT and the Web of Things (WoT accompany a smart life where real world objects, including sensing devices, are interconnected with each other. The Web representation of smart objects empowers innovative applications and services for various domains. To accelerate this approach, Web of Objects (WoO focuses on the implementation aspects of bringing the assorted real world objects to the Web applications. In this paper; we propose an emergency fire management system in the WoO infrastructure. Consequently, we integrate the formation and management of Virtual Objects (ViO which are derived from real world physical objects and are virtually connected with each other into the semantic ontology model. The charm of using the semantic ontology is that it allows information reusability, extensibility and interoperability, which enable ViOs to uphold orchestration, federation, collaboration and harmonization. Our system is context aware, as it receives contextual environmental information from distributed sensors and detects emergency situations. To handle a fire emergency, we present a decision support tool for the emergency fire management team. The previous fire incident log is the basis of the decision support system. A log repository collects all the emergency fire incident logs from ViOs and stores them in a repository.

  13. Web-of-Objects (WoO)-based context aware emergency fire management systems for the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamszaman, Zia Ush; Ara, Safina Showkat; Chong, Ilyoung; Jeong, Youn Kwae

    2014-02-13

    Recent advancements in the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Web of Things (WoT) accompany a smart life where real world objects, including sensing devices, are interconnected with each other. The Web representation of smart objects empowers innovative applications and services for various domains. To accelerate this approach, Web of Objects (WoO) focuses on the implementation aspects of bringing the assorted real world objects to the Web applications. In this paper; we propose an emergency fire management system in the WoO infrastructure. Consequently, we integrate the formation and management of Virtual Objects (ViO) which are derived from real world physical objects and are virtually connected with each other into the semantic ontology model. The charm of using the semantic ontology is that it allows information reusability, extensibility and interoperability, which enable ViOs to uphold orchestration, federation, collaboration and harmonization. Our system is context aware, as it receives contextual environmental information from distributed sensors and detects emergency situations. To handle a fire emergency, we present a decision support tool for the emergency fire management team. The previous fire incident log is the basis of the decision support system. A log repository collects all the emergency fire incident logs from ViOs and stores them in a repository.

  14. Decision support systems for the post-emergency management of contaminated territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, M.; Higgins, N.; Dovgiy, S.; Grekov, L.; Yatsalo, B.; Likhtariov, I.; Dreicer, M.; Lochard, J.; Savkin, M.; Demin, V.; Khramtsov, P.; Utkina, T.

    1996-01-01

    , milk, and meat. A risk module has been developed which includes a database d demographic data on health protection for different territories, and which can calculate risk for any population structure. It can be used for risk estimation for different age groups in any region for which data is provided. A module on indirect countermeasures has been developed to assist in the selection of counter-measures that will improve conditions for a population that inhabits a contaminated area, in a way that is distinct from a direct reduction in the effective contamination level of the environment and its products. These types of countermeasure can be taken both as separate actions or in combination with direct countermeasures to increase the efficiency of the latter. The tools and interfaces developed within JSP2 enable the decision maker to estimate consequences and analyze the post-emergency situation according to his own criteria and in a user-friendly manner. The available analyses include: forecast calculations (concerning the estimated contamination of agricultural products, the levels of doses in the local population and the associated radiation risks); the identification of the critical factors that influence the health nf the affected population; a simulation of human intervention taking into account the countermeasures chosen or a time ordered set of countermeasures; an estimation of the influence such factors as dose, risk, cost/benefit and time, etc. have on decisions. The results can be presented in the form of maps, diagrams, and tables. In this paper, work carried out on the development of computer based decision support systems for the post-emergency management of contaminated territories is discussed, together with possibilities for further development of such systems

  15. Trajectory Management of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS in Emergency Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Majka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aircraft must be characterized by a level of safety, similar to that of manned aircraft, when performing flights over densely populated areas. Dangerous situations or emergencies are frequently connected with the necessity to change the profiles and parameters of a flight as well as the flight plans. The aim of this work is to present the methods used to determine an Unmanned Aircraft System’s (UAS flight profile after a dangerous situation or emergency occurs. The analysis was limited to the possibility of an engine system emergency and further flight continuing along a trajectory of which the shape depends on the type of the emergency. The suggested method also enables the determination of an optimal flying trajectory, based on the territory of a special protection zone (for example, large populated areas, in the case of an emergency that would disable continuation of the performed task. The method used in this work allows researchers, in a simplified way, to solve a variation task using the Ritz–Galerkin method, consisting of an approximate solution of the boundary value problem to determine the optimal flight path. The worked out method can become an element of the on-board system supporting UAS flight control.

  16. Development and Implementation of Real-Time Information Delivery Systems for Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Steve; Sullivan, Don; Ambrosia, Vince; Brass, James; Dann, R. Scott

    2000-01-01

    The disaster management community has an on-going need for real-time data and information, especially during catastrophic events. Currently, twin engine or jet aircraft with limited altitude and duration capabilities collect much of the data. Flight safety is also an issue. Clearly, much of the needed data could be delivered via over-the-horizon transfer through a uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAV) platform to mission managers at various locations on the ground. In fact, because of the ability to stay aloft for long periods of time, and to fly above dangerous situations, UAV's are ideally suited for disaster missions. There are numerous situations that can be considered disastrous for the human population. Some, such as fire or flood, can continue over a period of days. Disaster management officials rely on data from the site to respond in an optimum way with warnings, evacuations, rescue, relief, and to the extent possible, damage control. Although different types of disasters call for different types of response, most situations can be improved by having visual images and other remotely sensed data available. "Disaster Management" is actually made up of a number of activities, including: - Disaster Prevention and Mitigation - Emergency Response Planning - Disaster Management (real-time deployment of resources, during an event) - Disaster / Risk Modeling All of these activities could benefit from real-time information, but a major focus for UAV-based technology is in real-time deployment of resources (i.e., emergency response teams), based on changing conditions at the location of the event. With all these potential benefits, it is desirable to demonstrate to user agencies the ability to perform disaster management missions as described. The following demonstration project is the first in a program designed to prove the feasibility of supporting disaster missions with UAV technology and suitable communications packages on-board. A several-year program is envisioned

  17. Web-based emergency response exercise management systems and methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, John W.; Mercer, Michael B.; Heath, Zach; Yang, Lynn I.

    2014-09-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for simulating portions of an emergency response exercise includes generating situational awareness outputs associated with a simulated emergency and sending the situational awareness outputs to a plurality of output devices. Also, the method includes outputting to a user device a plurality of decisions associated with the situational awareness outputs at a decision point, receiving a selection of one of the decisions from the user device, generating new situational awareness outputs based on the selected decision, and repeating the sending, outputting and receiving steps based on the new situational awareness outputs. Other methods, systems, and computer program products are included according to other embodiments of the invention.

  18. Improving the Reliability of Decision-Support Systems for Nuclear Emergency Management by Leveraging Software Design Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor B. Ionescu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel method of continuous verification of simulation software used in decision-support systems for nuclear emergency management (DSNE. The proposed approach builds on methods from the field of software reliability engineering, such as N-Version Programming, Recovery Blocks, and Consensus Recovery Blocks. We introduce a new acceptance test for dispersion simulation results and a new voting scheme based on taxonomies of simulation results rather than individual simulation results. The acceptance test and the voter are used in a new scheme, which extends the Consensus Recovery Block method by a database of result taxonomies to support machine-learning. This enables the system to learn how to distinguish correct from incorrect results, with respect to the implemented numerical schemes. Considering that decision-support systems for nuclear emergency management are used in a safety-critical application context, the methods introduced in this paper help improve the reliability of the system and the trustworthiness of the simulation results used by emergency managers in the decision making process. The effectiveness of the approach has been assessed using the atmospheric dispersion forecasts of two test versions of the widely used RODOS DSNE system.

  19. Sensitivity of emergent sociohydrologic dynamics to internal system properties and external sociopolitical factors: Implications for water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshafei, Y.; Tonts, M.; Sivapalan, M.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that effective management of water resources requires a holistic understanding of the coevolving dynamics inherent in the coupled human-hydrology system. One of the fundamental information gaps concerns the sensitivity of coupled system feedbacks to various endogenous system properties and exogenous societal contexts. This paper takes a previously calibrated sociohydrology model and applies an idealized implementation, in order to: (i) explore the sensitivity of emergent dynamics resulting from bidirectional feedbacks to assumptions regarding (a) internal system properties that control the internal dynamics of the coupled system and (b) the external sociopolitical context; and (ii) interpret the results within the context of water resource management decision making. The analysis investigates feedback behavior in three ways, (a) via a global sensitivity analysis on key parameters and assessment of relevant model outputs, (b) through a comparative analysis based on hypothetical placement of the catchment along various points on the international sociopolitical gradient, and (c) by assessing the effects of various direct management intervention scenarios. Results indicate the presence of optimum windows that might offer the greatest positive impact per unit of management effort. Results further advocate management tools that encourage an adaptive learning, community-based approach with respect to water management, which are found to enhance centralized policy measures. This paper demonstrates that it is possible to use a place-based sociohydrology model to make abstractions as to the dynamics of bidirectional feedback behavior, and provide insights as to the efficacy of water management tools under different circumstances.

  20. Emergency management and the nuclear terrorism threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVito, D.A.; Suiter, L.

    1987-01-01

    Counterterrorism is not the province of the emergency manager. Generally law enforcement has that role. Instead, the emergency manager's role is crisis management; the responsibility is to be the focal point for the chief executive officer (mayor, governor, or national executive) regarding the protection of the population. Managers must be able to gather and synthesize sufficient information, rapidly and accurately, on which to base sound decisions. To do so, they must have a highly efficient, coordinated emergency management organization in place at the state and local levels of government, and there must be a workable plan for emergency operations that integrates all public safety forces into an effective response to all types of emergencies. A major goal of emergency management is to ensure that government is in control and that the public perceives that the system is working. All states have an emergency management organization at the state level, as do most counties and large cities. However, some states and local governments, particularly those that have nuclear power plants within their borders, are better staffed, equipped, and trained than others to deal with nuclear incidents. States with nuclear facilities have an emergency management organization, an emergency plan, and adequate communications, equipment, and trained personnel to handle a nuclear accident or incident at a plant. 21 references

  1. Management of gynecologic oncology emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood-Nuss, A.L.; Benrubi, G.I.; Nuss, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the third most common cancer among women in the United States. Because of often subtle early findings, the diagnosis may not be made before the widespread dissemination of the disease. The Emergency Department physician will commonly encounter a woman with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or a symptomatic abdominal mass. In this article, we have described the epidemiology, recognized patterns of spread, and associated findings of gynecologic tumors. The proper Emergency Department evaluation and management of these problems is emphasized with guidelines for the timing of referrals and consultation with the gynecologic oncologist. The treatment of gynecologic malignancies is often complicated and responsible for Emergency Department visits. The various modalities are addressed according to the organ systems affected and include sections on postoperative problems, gastrointestinal complaints, urologic complications of therapy, radiation therapy and its complications, with an emphasis on the most serious complications necessitating either careful outpatient management or hospital admission. As cost-containment pressure grows, we have included sections on chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition, both of which are becoming common outpatient events for the cancer patient. 28 references

  2. The role of information technology in emergency management: Expert system or cognitive instrument?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, K.J.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of the NKA/INF project is to improve the functionality and efficiency of accident and emergency planning by verifying, demonstrating, and validating the possible implementation of advanced information technology. This paper is concerned with the role that such an information system should take. It is argued that the role that has been adopted, that of a classical expert system, may not be the most appropriate, given the characteristics of the problem. An alternative role for the system is proposed, that of a cognitive instrument. This perspective should be able to effectively address the problems of the domain in a manner that will maximize the performance and reliability of the joint humancomputer system. 13 refs. (author)

  3. Emergence of nail lacquers as potential transungual delivery system in the management of onchomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Purnima; Sharma, Gajanand; Thakur, Kanika; Bansal, Vikas; Dogra, Sunil; Katare, Om Prakash

    2016-07-01

    Onchomycosis is the most common nail fungal disease afflicting toes and fingers with a high recurrence rate. The disease is caused by various types of fungi ranging from dermatophyte to non-dermatophyte, making it difficult to eradicate. The present article focuses on the emergence of nail lacquers as prospective transungual delivery systems for the treatment of mild-to-moderate onchomycosis. Updates regarding emerging nail lacquers, research progress in terms of clinical studies and patents for better understanding of the disease are provided. Finally, the characterization techniques for the assessment of drug concentration in different layers of nail are reviewed. The conventional topical delivery systems have failed to improve nail adhesion and drug absorption due to the highly keratinized hydrophilic structure of nail which obstructs the passage of drugs. The surgical therapy systems are painful and invasive while systemic therapy produces serious side effects and a high degree of relapse. These issues have led to the advent of nail lacquers. Nail lacquers have an immense potential to improve nail adhesion as well as bioavailability. However, the nail barrier is still a challenge in imparting complete cure. Several novel approaches are being developed in order to offer better therapeutic action.

  4. [Quality management in emergency medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moecke, H; Ahnefeld, F W

    1997-09-01

    Although the need for the implementation of a quality management concept for the German emergency medical system (EMS) has been discussed for more than 10 years, such a concept has not been realised on a broad scale. Standardised national data sheets were developed many years ago. They are used by many local agencies, but a data-gathering system on a state or national basis is still lacking. In times of reduced funds for health care expenditures, quality management could be a reliable way to ensure that the EMS provides safe services to the patient based on the current state of medical science in an efficient manner. Based on clear definitions, structure, process, and outcome quality can be analysed, and the results provide the basis for continuous quality-improvement strategies. As not all aspects of the system can be analysed continuously, one has to select areas of special importance. External and internal quality control are equally important. Quality control works on the basis that all EMS team members are motivated to perform on a professional level to ensure that each patient is treated adequately. It evaluates the system to create circumstances that enhance the achievement of this goal. Quality management is not only concerned with mishaps, because areas with documented good performance also provide important information.

  5. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Bill of Materials (BOM) for FEMIS version 1.4.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fangman, P.M.; Gerhardstein, L.H.; Homer, B.J. [and others

    1998-06-05

    This document describes the hardware and software required for the Federal Emergency Management Information System version 1.4.5 (FEMIS v1.4.5). The FEMIS system is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are connected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via a Wide Area Network (WAN). A UNIX server provides a platform to support the Oracle relational database management system (RDBMS) distributed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), ARC/INFO geographic information system (GIS) capabilities (optional), basic file management services, the evacuation model (ESIM), the data exchange interface (DEI), and the notification service. FEMIS is a client/server system where much of the application software is located in the client PC. This client software includes the FEMIS application, government furnished dispersion and evacuation models, and Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software applications, including the ArcView GIS and Microsoft Project (electronic planning). Several configurations are possible at a CSEPP site. In this document, a site is understood to include several installations of FEMIS, including the Depot, surrounding Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) and Protective Action Zone (PAZ) counties, and one or more state EOCs. In general, the main differences between possible configurations are the numbers of PC workstations at an installation, the location of the UNIX server(s), and the WAN links between installations.

  6. Computer managed emergency operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamun, I.; Mavko, B.; Stritar, A.

    1994-01-01

    New computer technology is a very effective tool for developing a new design of nuclear power plant control room. It allows designer possibility to create a tool for managing with large database of power plant parameters and displaying them in different graphic forms and possibility of automated execution of well known task. The structure of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) is very suitable for programming and for creating expert system. The Computerized Emergency Operating Procedures (CEOP) described in this paper can be considered as an upgrading of standard EOP approach. EmDiSY (Emergency Display System - computer code name for CEOP) main purpose is to supply the operator with necessary information, to document all operator actions and to execute well known tasks. It is a function oriented CEOP that gives operator guidance on how to verify the critical safety functions and how to restore and maintain these functions where they are degraded. All knowledge is coded and stored in database files. The knowledge base consists from stepping order for verifying plant parameters, desired values of parameters, conditions for comparison and links between procedures and actions. Graphical shell allows users to read database, to follow instruction and to find out correct task. The desired information is concentrated in one screen and allows users to focus on a task. User is supported in two ways: desired parameter values are displayed on the process picture and automated monitoring critical safety function status trees are all time in progress and available to the user. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs

  7. JRODOS system: a modern and efficient tool for the management and preparation of nuclear and radiological emergencies and rehabilitation. Implementation in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero Prieto, M.; Dvirzhark, A.; Acero, A.; Gallego Diaz, E.

    2011-01-01

    JRODOS system is revealed as an efficient, flexible and user-approved at European level to assist in the management of nuclear and radiological emergencies and the subsequent rehabilitation of contaminated environments, both at the national response in the first phase emergence as a regional / local level in emergency preparedness and recovery environment with the help of the social partners concerned.

  8. Whistland: An Augmented Reality Crowd-Mapping System for Civil Protection and Emergency Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gioele Luchetti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The prevention and correct management of natural disaster event sequences play a key role in saving human lives. The availability of embedded and mobile smart computing systems opens new roads for the management of land and infrastructures by civil protection operators. To date, research has explored the use of social networks for the management of disasters connected to meteorological/hydrogeological events or earthquakes, but without emphasis on the importance of an integrated system. The main feature of the Whistland system proposed in this paper is to make synergistic use of augmented reality (AR, crowd-mapping (CM, social networks, the Internet of Things (IoT and wireless sensor networks (WSN by exploiting technologies and frameworks of Web 2.0 and GIS 2.0 to make informed decisions about the chain of events. The Whistland system is composed of a geo-server, a mobile application with AR and an analytics dashboard. The geo-server acts as the hub of the sensor and social networks. The abstracted concept in this sense is the transformation of the user domain into “intelligent sensors” for the whole scope of crisis management. The social network integration is made through an efficient pointer-like mechanism that keeps the storage requirement low through a mobile application based on an augmented reality engine and provides qualitative information that sensors are unable to capture. Real-time analyses, geo-searches and the capability to examine event histories with an augmented reality engine all help the stakeholders to understand better the state of the resources under observation/monitoring. The system has been extensively tested in the programmed maintenance of river basins, where it is necessary to log maintenance activities in order to keep the riverbank clean: a significant use-case in many countries affected by hydro-geological instability.

  9. The current state of accounting and analytical system of economic management in emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.O. Gritsishen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article reviewed the current state of organizational and methodological regulations from the perspective of regulation and specific to domestic enterprises. It was established that the accounting system is governed by a set of regulations at different levels and different areas of law. In connection with what was presented to an approach that involves systematizing legal regulation in terms of impact on the object, the subject and the elements method of accounting. It studied the system of analytical indicators calculated on the investigated companies. The research was conducted by examining the analytical reports analysts, internal auditors and the audit report in partial use of analytical procedures. The study was conducted in the following areas: evaluation of the effectiveness of fixed assets, estimation of efficiency of current assets, assessment of the efficiency of the production process, factor analysis and consideration of the effects of emergencies, methods of economic analysis of consequences of emergency measures and the effectiveness of their prevention and elimination.

  10. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    services (EMS) response times and advanced prehospital care increase the number of critically injured patients surviving sufficiently long to reach a hospital “in extremis.” Both scenarios provide challenges in the management of traumatized patients. This article addresses the management of severely......Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  11. Applying business intelligence innovations to emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegelmilch, Jeffrey; Albanese, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The use of business intelligence (BI) is common among corporations in the private sector to improve business decision making and create insights for competitive advantage. Increasingly, emergency management agencies are using tools and processes similar to BI systems. With a more thorough understanding of the principles of BI and its supporting technologies, and a careful comparison to the business model of emergency management, this paper seeks to provide insights into how lessons from the private sector can contribute to the development of effective and efficient emergency management BI utilisation.

  12. Examining professional emergency managers in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Kyoo-Man

    2017-01-01

    Although the number of emergency managers has risen in South Korea (hereafter referred to as Korea) over the years, their role is not yet as defined and noteworthy compared to other professions because of its unidisciplinary approach. This article investigates how Korea has to improve emergency managers' disciplinary approach to ultimately contribute to the goal of effective transnational disaster management. This study uses qualitative content analysis of government policies, college curricula, nongovernmental organizations' (NGOs') emergency-manager certification, and mass media coverage to compare emergency managers' unidisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches. The key tenet is that Korea must change its emergency managers' unidisciplinary approach into a multidisciplinary approach because the former is less effective when dealing with complicated disaster management systems. To achieve this change, the stakeholders must carry out their assigned responsibilities under risk-oriented management. As for the study's international implications, developing nations may consider the enhancement of related educational curricula, collaborative learning, continuous evaluation, disaster awareness, and disaster prevention for the emergency managers' multidisciplinary approach.

  13. Management of pediatric central nervous system emergencies: a review for general radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollo Polo, M

    2016-05-01

    To review the most common and most important diseases and disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) in pediatric emergencies, discussing the indications for different imaging tests in each context. In pediatric patients, acute neurologic symptoms (seizures, deteriorating level of consciousness, focal neurologic deficits, etc.) can appear in diverse clinical situations (trauma, child abuse, meningoencephalitis, ischemia…). It is important to decide on the most appropriate neuroimaging diagnostic algorithm for each situation and age group, as well as to know the signs of the most typical lesions that help us in the etiological differential diagnosis. Pediatric patients' increased vulnerability to ionizing radiation and the possible need for sedation in studies that require more time are factors that should be taken into account when indicating an imaging test. It is essential to weigh the risks and benefits for the patient and to avoid unnecessary studies. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and management of public health education system against emerging infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Myungja; Dev, Parvati; Lee, Eun-Jung; Koo, Byung-Ki; Lee, Kyung-Oak; Ha, Kukhwa; Yang, Heesun; Kang, Gilwon; Lee, Youngsung

    2012-01-01

    With recent spread of infectious diseases, worldwide emergency strategies against them have been made. As one of such efforts we planned to develop an educational program for public health manpower using IT, and produced 4 to 8 minute-long flash animations of the following subjects selected by Education Training Expert Committee: Self-care guideline on H1N1; Instruction for medical hospital; Prevention of hospital acquired infections; Method of sampling & transporting. Demonstrative education using an online education system was conducted targeting 10 doctors working in a rural health center to evaluate the developed animations. They received good marks in the factors of credibility and accuracy, but needed to improve in that of interaction with educatees. Our suggestion is that we use the result of our study as a prototype of education contents on infectious diseases, and modify its contents accordingly when a specific disease breaks out.

  15. Development on the radiological emergency management guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khang, Byung Oui; Lee, Jong Tai; Lee, Goan Yup; Lee, Moon

    2000-01-01

    The comprehensive emergency management system in KAERI describes the requirements for emergency plan, preparedness, evaluations and readiness assurance, response and recovery activities to timely and effectively countermeasure according to the type and size of an event. The guidance of facility emergency plan and detailed response procedures for initial action, building/site evacuation, personnel accountability, search and fire fighting in the radioactive, fissionable, toxic and inflammable hazardous substances handling facilities are also developed. (author)

  16. 76 FR 8758 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency-002...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... screen activity in the National Emergency Management Information System for both call-related customer... desktop screen as they perform work in National Emergency Management Information System (NEMIS); (3) Avaya... System (QARS). Security classification: Unclassified. System location: Federal Emergency Management...

  17. Systems With Emergent Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ian

    2002-09-01

    Evolutionary biologists often reject deterministic models of evolutionary processes because they equate `deterministic' with `goal-seeking', and have learned the hard way not to trust goal-seeking explanations of evolutionary adaptations. On the other hand, the general theory of dynamical systems potentially has much to offer for evolutionary biology— for example, as a resolution of the conflict between gradualism and punctuated equilibrium. The concept of a system with emergent dynamics retains the deterministic nature of dynamical systems, while eliminating any goal-seeking interpretation. Define an emergent property of a complex system to be a property whose computation from the entity-level rules of the system is intractable (in some reasonable sense). Say that a dynamical system has emergent dynamics if the computation of trajectories is intractable. Then systems with emergent dynamics are deterministic but not goal-seeking. As such, they offer a sensible way to use dynamical systems as models for evolutionary processes in biology, and in other areas. We discuss these issues and examine a few simple aspects of emergence in dynamical systems.

  18. An integrated web system to support veterinary activities in Italy for the management of information in epidemic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, S; Savini, L; Palma, D; Calistri, P; Natale, F; Di Lorenzo, A; Cerella, A; Giovannini, A

    2014-03-01

    The management of public health emergencies is improved by quick, exhaustive and standardized flow of data on disease outbreaks, by using specific tools for data collection, registration and analysis. In this context, the National Information System for the Notification of Outbreaks of Animal Diseases (SIMAN) has been developed in Italy to collect and share data on the notifications of outbreaks of animal diseases. SIMAN is connected through web services to the national database of animals and holdings (BDN) and has been integrated with tools for the management of epidemic emergencies. The website has been updated with a section dedicated to the contingency planning in case of epidemic emergency. EpiTrace is one such useful tool also integrated in the BDN and based on the Social Network Analysis (SNA) and on network epidemiological models. This tool gives the possibility of assessing the risk associated to holdings and animals on the basis of their trade, in order to support the veterinary services in tracing back and forward the animals in case of outbreaks of infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Will a Twenty-First Century Logistics Management System Improve Federal Emergency Management Agency's Capability to Deliver Supplies to Critical Areas, during Future Catastrophic Disaster Relief Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gill, Glenda A

    2007-01-01

    The United States Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) must be prepared at all times to supplement state and local emergency personnel, or to provide logistics support during disaster relief operations...

  20. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... services (EMS) response times and advanced prehospital care increase the number of critically injured patients surviving sufficiently long to reach a hospital “in extremis.” Both scenarios provide challenges in the management of traumatized patients. This article addresses the management of severely...

  1. Emergency management of the 2010 Mt. Rotolon landslide by means of a local scale GB-InSAR monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodella, William; Pazzi, Veronica; Morelli, Stefano; Salvatici, Teresa; Fanti, Riccardo

    2017-04-01

    Between October 31st and November 2nd 2010 the whole Veneto region (north-eastern Italy) was hit by heavy and persistent rainfall, which diffusely triggered floods and slope failures. In this framework on November 4th 2010 a detrital mass, approximately 225.000 m3 in volume, detached from the lowermost sector of the Mt. Rotolon landslide cover (located in the Vicentine Pre-Alps, upper Agno River Valley), channelizing within the Rotolon Creek riverbed and evolving into a highly mobile debris flow. The latter phenomena, characterized by a 3 km travel distance, damaged many hydraulic works, putting at high risk bridges and local roads located along the creek banks, together with the population of both the town of Recoaro Terme and the villages of Maltaure, Turcati and Parlati. Starting from the beginning of the emergency phase, the Civil Protection system was activated, involving the National Civil Protection Department, Veneto Region and local administrations personnel and technicians, as well as research centers. On December 8th 2010 a local scale monitoring system, based on a ground based interferometric radar (GB-InSAR), was implemented in order to evaluate the slope deformation pattern evolution in correspondence of the debris flow detachment sector, with the final aim of assessing the landslide residual risk and manage the emergency phase. Accurate geomorphological field surveys were also carried out, in order to study the landslide morphological features as to improve the radar data interpretation. The radar system acquired in continuous GB-InSAR data, such as displacement maps and time series of 10 selected monitoring points, which were uploaded via LAN network on a dedicated Web-based interface, shared with the technical stakeholders and decision makers involved in the emergency management and allowing for a near real time data routine visualization. This paper describes the outcomes of a 2 years GB-InSAR monitoring campaign (December 2010-November 2012

  2. Effects of three management strategies on the seedbank, emergence and the need for hand weeding in an organic arable cropping system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, M.M.; Groeneveld, R.M.W.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Kropff, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of three different weed management strategies on the required input of hand weeding in an arable organic farming system, the weed seedbank in the soil and the emerging weed seedling emergence were studied from 1996 to 2003. Strategies were based on population dynamic models and aimed for

  3. Emergence in Dynamical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Collier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Emergence is a term used in many contexts in current science; it has become fashionable. It has a traditional usage in philosophy that started in 1875 and was expanded by J. S. Mill (earlier, under a different term and C. D. Broad. It is this form of emergence that I am concerned with here. I distinguish it from uses like ‘computational emergence,’ which can be reduced to combinations of program steps, or its application to merely surprising new features that appear in complex combinations of parts. I will be concerned specifically with ontological emergence that has the logical properties required by Mill and Broad (though there might be some quibbling about the details of their views. I restrict myself to dynamical systems that are embodied in processes. Everything that we can interact with through sensation or action is either dynamical or can be understood in dynamical terms, so this covers all comprehensible forms of emergence in the strong (nonreducible sense I use. I will give general dynamical conditions that underlie the logical conditions traditionally assigned to emergence in nature.The advantage of this is that, though we cannot test logical conditions directly, we can test dynamical conditions. This gives us an empirical and realistic form of emergence, contrary those who say it is a matter of perspective.

  4. Emergency Management: The Human Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    Harriet L. Tamminga, Thomas S. Kilijanek and Christopher Adams. Managing Multiorganizational Emergency Responses: D~ergent Search and Rescue Networks in...Minneapolis, Minnesota: Family Study Center, University of Minnesota, 1982. Lindy, Jacob D., Mary C. Grace, and Bonnie L. Green. "Survivors: Outreach

  5. Integrated emergency management in KKG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluegel, J.U.; Plank, H.

    2007-01-01

    The development and introduction of emergency measures in Switzerland was mainly characterized by the evaluation of international experience and by systematic analysis of beyond-design basis accidents within the framework of plant-specific probabilistic safety analyses. As early as in the mid-eighties, the Swiss regulatory authority demanded that measures be taken against severe accidents, and periodically added more detailed requirements, most recently in 2000 when the introduction of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SMAG) was demanded for power operation as well as operation in the non-power mode. The SMAG were introduced at the Goesgen nuclear power station within a project in the period between 2003 and 2005. For this purpose, a concept of integrated emergency management was developed which is based on updates of the proven emergency manual. One important aspect of this integrative concept is the distinction between preventive and mitigating procedures by defining appropriate criteria. The findings made in the implementation phase of the project include the realization that the introduction of procedures dealing with severe accidents also requires the ability to develop new ways of thinking and acting in accident management. This implies the awareness that procedures covering severe accidents must be applied much more flexibly and in the light of the situation than regulations covering fault conditions. Also possibilities to simulate severe accidents were created within the project both for the development of procedures and for training plant operators and members of the emergency staff. (orig.)

  6. Emerging trends in disaster management and the Ethiopian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging trends in disaster management and the Ethiopian experience: genesis, reform and transformation. ... Journal of Business and Administrative Studies ... Key words: disaster management, drought, pre-disaster action, post-disaster action, hazards, disaster, Ethiopian disaster management system, Ethiopia.

  7. Management Control Systems in Subsidiaries of Multinationals in the Emerging Market of Central Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gusc, J.S.; Bremmers, H.J.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2005-01-01

    Using transaction cost theory and the theory of multinational enterprise, this study examines the extent of the degree to which management of multinational companies can control over its subsidiaries' configuration and coordination abilities. Empirical results showed that the subsidiaries enjoyed a

  8. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  9. IT support for emergency management - ISEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.

    1990-11-01

    The project is aimed at the development of an integrated information system capable of supporting the complex, dynamic distributed decision making in the management of emergencies. Emphasis will be put on definition of a system architecture and on development of an application generator and tools to support the full life cycle of the system. The development will be driven by the requirements derived from emergency organisations in two different industries. Care is taken that the results are easily applicable and adaptable to other organisations. (author)

  10. Emergency response for cyber infrastructure management

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, Cynthia E.; Levin, Timothy E.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate architectural mechanisms to provide an emergency response capability for Cyber Infrastructure management through the use of distributed, highly secure, protected domains. Instead of creating a costly physically separate cyber domain, logical separation is used. This work developed an architecture and prototype demonstration in the context of an open source operating system.

  11. Cultivating stakeholder interaction in emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, W.J.; Brownell, L.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Secretary of Energy has defined the mission for the Department. Her vision for the Department of Energy (DOE) is to promote environmental excellence, economic growth, and leadership in science and technology. The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), which is responsible for implementing an emergency management system for EM facilities and the transport of non-weapons-related radioactive materials, has addressed this mission through the establishment of six goals. This paper specifically discusses efforts to accomplish the last goal: Develop a stronger partnership between the DOE and its stakeholders. EM's Emergency Management Program supports strong partnerships with all interested parties. The EM Emergency Management Program provides the capability for preparedness in the event of an operational emergency at EM facilities, and it gives DOE the capability for preparedness in the event of an operational emergency involving DOE shipments of non-weapons-related radioactive and hazardous materials in transit. The Program is committed to plan, train, and provide material resources for the protection and safety of DOE workers, the public, and the environment. A great deal of stakeholder interaction is associated with the transport of DOE radioactive materials. To assure a communication link to other DOE program areas and interested stakeholders outside the DOE, the Emergency Management Program has committed extensive resources within the transportation program to promote and support EM's commitment to stakeholder involvement. The Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) develops and enhances integrated emergency preparedness in the area of transportation. TEPP coordinates programs across the DOE complex and supplies a DOE-wide unified approach to the public

  12. Managed care and the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, D

    1999-12-01

    The growth of managed care has provided health benefits to millions of children while attempting to control the increase in health care costs. In adhering to these goals, MCOs are often at odds with emergency departments, and the emergency department physicians providing emergency care. The appropriateness or inappropriateness of emergency department visits can be disputed, but no criteria have been established. Even the definition of emergency is debated, although many states are adopting a prudent layperson standard. Emergency medicine physicians, primary care providers, and MCOs must cooperate to fully educate parents about the appropriate use of pediatric emergency services. Patients and MCOs should use facilities that can deliver pediatric emergency and critical care or provide appropriate transport systems to facilities that can. COBRA and EMTALA set the legal requirements to which emergency departments must comply when patients present for care. The basic caveats under COBRA require a medical screening examination for every patient and the stabilization of all patients with emergency medical conditions before inquiring about insurance or patients' ability to pay. A part of gatekeeping, MCOs often require authorization for treatment. MCOs authorize payment only. Evaluation and emergency treatment should not be withheld pending authorization. After the medical screening examination, recommended treatment should be in patients' best interests. All patients with potentially life-threatening conditions should be stabilized before transport, and all transfers must comply with the EMTALA. The transfer of unstable patients purely for economic reasons is a violation of the EMTALA. When stable, patients may be transferred to other facilities, but patients requiring specialty care should be taken to facilities best able to provide that care. Financial considerations should be superseded by medical necessity. Finally, improvements can be made in the way emergency

  13. [Emergency response management near the tracks of the public railway network: special aspects of missions connected with the German national railway system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, P; Aul, A; Vock, B; Frank, C

    2010-11-01

    Emergency response management and rescue operations concerning the railway network in Germany need special attention and implementation in several ways. The emergency response concerning the German national railway network managed by Deutsche Bahn AG is subject to various rules and regulations which have to be followed precisely. Only by following these rules and procedures is the safety of all emergency staff at the scene ensured. The German national railway network (Deutsche Bahn AG) provides its own emergency response control center, which specializes in managing its response to emergencies and dispatches an emergency response manager to the scene. This person serves as the primary Deutsche Bahn AG representative at the scene and is the only person who is allowed to earth the railway electrical power lines. This article will discuss different emergency situations concerning railway accidents and the emergency medical response to them based on a near collision with a high speed train during a rescue mission close to the railway track. Injury to personnel could only be avoided by chance and luck. The dangers and risks for rescue staff are specified. Furthermore, the article details practical guidelines for rescue operations around the German national railway track system.

  14. Use of the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS) for Emergency Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durling, Jr. R.L.; Price, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's expertise in weapons systems and in sparse information analysis to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented

  15. MANAGEMENT OF EMERGENCY IN DENTAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evy Eida Vitria

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentist is a specialist who must treat all types of disorder practically, involving the stomatognathic system. Unfortunately not all society has recognized the dentist’s value within “Total Health Care System. In developed societies, the dentist is required to be involved in handling the emergencies, although nor all members of the profession seem adequately prepared to deal with them without physician’s help. In other hand, we know that most patients come to the dental clinic as out patients, and therefore if emergency cases occur in a dental clinic, it requires emergency treatment immediately. This might be caused by the lack of consciousness; it is only a temporary condition where the patient usually recovers quickly after first aid has been administered. However, the dentist might also be confronted with amore serious condition, which may present a great risk for the patient’s life such as anaphylactic shock. In this condition, the dentist must know precisely which step to take if there is an emergency case. This paper discussed about emergency situation in dental practice and its management, so that the dentist can manage emergency cases in the dental practice to avoid any harmful action for the patient’s life.

  16. Medical management of radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongirwar, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    This review deals specifically with the medical management of victims, such as, the triage of exposed individuals on the basis of preliminary observations and investigations, planning priority of treatment to different groups, emergency care, and definitive care. The infrastructure for appropriate management involves first aid posts, decontamination centre, Site Hospital and Specialized Central Hospital. Medical management of life threatening radiation doses involve haematological examinations, blood component therapy, treatment with growth factors and if necessary, bone marrow transplantation as the last option. Most of the radiation accidents involving partial body and localized exposures are associated with industrial radiography sources. Such exposures are generally not life threatening but may involve serious skin injury, such as, ulceration, necrosis and gangrene. Methods have been developed to carry out decontamination of skin and decorporation of internally deposited radio nuclides. This article also provides information on the Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network and also outlines the role of media in reducing the human suffering in the event of an accident

  17. Effective emergency management: reconsidering the bureaucratic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, D M; Phillips, B D

    1995-12-01

    The command and control approach is compared with the Emergent Human Resources Model (EHRM) approach to emergency management. Four decades of systematic research shows that a rigid, bureaucratic command and control approach to emergency management generally leads to an ineffective emergency response. Previous studies and our own research suggest that flexible, malleable, loosely coupled, organizational configurations can create a more effective disaster response.

  18. Remote sensing of rivers: an emerging tool to facilitate management and restoration of fluvial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, C. J.; Overstreet, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    All phases of river restoration, from design to implementation to assessment, require spatially distributed, high-resolution data on channels and floodplains. Conventional field methods are cost prohibitive for large areas, but remote sensing presents an increasingly viable alternative for characterizing fluvial systems. For example, bathymetric maps useful for habitat assessment can be derived from readily available, free or low cost image data, provided depth measurements are available for calibration. In combination with LiDAR, spectrally-based bathymetry can be used to determine bed elevations for estimating scour and fill and/or to obtain topographic input data for morphodynamic modeling. New, water-penetrating green LiDAR systems that measure sub-aerial and submerged elevations could provide a single-sensor solution for mapping riparian environments. Our current research on the Snake River focuses on comparing optical- and LiDAR-based methods for retrieving depths and bed elevations. Multi-sensor surveys from 2012 and 2013 will allow us to evaluate each instrument's capabilities for measuring volumes of erosion and deposition in a dynamic gravel-bed river. Ongoing studies also suggest that additional river attributes, such as substrate composition and flow velocity, could be inferred from hyperspectral image data. In general, remote sensing has considerable potential to facilitate various aspects of river restoration, from site evaluation to post-project assessment. Moreover, by providing more extensive coverage, this approach favors an integrated, watershed perspective for planning, execution, and monitoring of sustainable restoration programs. To stimulate progress toward these objectives, our research group is now working to advance the remote sensing of rivers through tool development and sensor deployment. Bathymetric map of the Snake River, WY, derived from hyperspectral image data via optimal band ratio analysis. Flow direction is from right to left.

  19. The emerging land management paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    encompasses the total natural and built environment. Land Administration Systems (LAS) are institutional frameworks complicated by the tasks they must perform, by national cultural, political and judicial settings, and by technology. This paper facilitates an overall understanding of the land management......Land management is the process by which the resources of land are put into good effect. Land management encompasses all activities associated with the management of land that are required to achieve sustainable development. The concept of land includes properties and natural resources and thereby...... for comprehensive information about environmental conditions in combination with other land related data. It is argued that development of such a model is important or even necessary for facilitating a holistic approach to the management of land as the key asset of any nation or jurisdiction. Finally, the paper...

  20. Technical information management in an emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.A.; Greve, C.; Best, R.G.; Phillipson, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Through many experiences in responding to real radiation accidents and emergency response exercises, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a technical information management system that will be used in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in the event of a major radiological accident. The core of the system is the Data Center in the FRMAC, utilizing a computerized database of all off-site environmental radiological data. The information contained and managed by the Data Center will be comprehensive, accountable, and traceable, providing information to the assessors for immediate health and safety needs as well as for long-term documentation requirements. A DOE task force has been formed to develop compatibility guidelines for video, automated data processing, and communication systems. An electronic mail, information status, and bulletin board system is also being developed to assist in the dissemination of information. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offer a giant step forward in displaying and analyzing information in a geographically referenced system

  1. EURANOS. Generic handbook for assisting in the management of contaminated food production systems in Europe following a radiological emergency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Howard, B.J.; Jones, A.

    for application in the pre-release, emergency and longer term phases of an incident. Sources of contamination considered in the handbook are nuclear accidents, radiological dispersion devices and satellite accidents. Agricultural and domestic food production systems are considered, including the gathering of free...... and to develop local and regional plans. The handbook can be applied as part of the decision-aiding process to develop a recovery strategy following an incident. In addition, the handbook is useful for training purposes and during emergency exercises. The handbook for food production systems complements the two...

  2. Requirements for a multifunctional decision support system within accident and emergency management organizations exemplified by the Joint Nordic Programme: NKA/INF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, O.

    1988-01-01

    The increasing potential for severe accidents as industries develop larger centralized production units has led to the formation of large organizations prepared for accident and emergency management. One important task within these organizations will be information management. Insufficient access to information and expert knowledge, combined with a stressful working situation, may lead to incorrect or poor decisions during an emergency. The aim of the joint Nordic five year (1985-89) research programme NKA/INF is to improve the efficiency of accident and emergency management. This will be achieved by developing and evaluating a prototype decision support system for various organizations in their information retrieval and decision making tasks. Functions for both on-site and off-site organizations during an emergency situation are specified, including identification of important communication paths. The system structure must be flexible in order easily to modify or add new features. This is emphasized by choosing an object oriented programming approach and representing data and knowledge in a structure facilitating incremental system development. A variety of functions for data presentation, message passing, diagnosis and procedures in emergency situations are described. Since this type of system will not be in daily use, the man-machine interface and dialogue features should be made as self-explanatory and informative as possible for the various users. Thus the various screen layouts will be designed to match the different user categories with respect to data types and level of detail, as shown in the examples. The system will be designed to assist the user in parallel tasks. To achieve this, several windows will be visible at the same time. It is expected that this will yield a better overview as well. Experiments with the prototype system on different emergency scenarios are planned for the end of 1988. (author). Poster presentation. 5 refs, 2 figs

  3. NRPB emergency response information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, N.A.; Casey, K.

    1993-01-01

    To enhance emergency response management NRPB has introduced an advanced information handling and map display facility. The NRPB Emergency Response Information System (NERIS) provides a central resource which holds, displays and analyses the available information on an accidental release of radioactivity. The bringing together of the commercial tools of computerised map display and database technology, capable of storing geographically referenced information, provided the initial building blocks for the development of NERIS. The rapid manipulation of the large amounts of data used by NERIS is achieved by the use of complex software on powerful computers and a substantial investment of both staff time and resources. The synthesis of these products with the analysis tools under development by NRPB staff will provide a system which will greatly enhance the organisation's emergency response capability. The need to assess the consequences of an accident and give advice on countermeasure strategies and actions will inevitably place high demands on NRPB staff. NERIS will enable a more complete understanding of the situation to be gained and give staff the time and tools to cope effectively with all exigencies. (Author)

  4. The Information Management Platform on Nuclear Emergency Resources of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, L.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Chinese government has always attached great importance to nuclear emergency work, and has invested to form lots of nuclear emergency resources. Meanwhile, there also exist some management problems such as repeated investment, fragmented inventory list, inefficient management, etc. To achieve integrated management on the nuclear emergency resources of China, the Chinese government initiated the project “The Information Management Platform on Nuclear Emergency Resources of China”. The goal of the project is to support a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response while the resources managing process remains economically efficient. The project team firstly completed the nuclear emergency resources classification and encoding. Based on these, the nuclear emergency resources information management software system was developed. The pilot operation in the system was carried out both in Guangxi and Liaoning Province at the same time. Nuclear emergency resources survey was done as the relevant information was put into the database in these regions. The evaluation result on the pilot operation showed that, the information management platform on emergency resources would apparently improve efficiency of nuclear emergency preparedness and response, and it also would increase economical efficiency on inventory list, information management and invest decision. (author

  5. Analysis of Emergency Information Management Research Hotspots Based on Bibliometric and Co-occurrence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Qingyun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available [Purpose/significance] Emergency information management is an interdisciplinary field of emergency management and information management. Summarizing the major research output is helpful to strengthen the effective utilization of information resources in emergency management research, and to provide references for the follow-up development and practical exploration of emergency information management research. [Method/process] By retrieving concerned literature from CNKI, this paper used the bibliometric and co-word clustering analysis methods to analyze the domestic emergency management research output. [Result/conclusion] Domestic emergency information management research mainly focuses on five hot topics: disaster emergency information management, crisis information disclosure, emergency information management system, emergency response, wisdom emergency management. China should strengthen the emergency management information base for future theoretical research, and build the emergency information management theoretical framework.

  6. Flexible UAV Mission Management Using Emerging Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desimone, Roberto; Lee, Richard

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses recent results and proposed work in the application of emerging artificial intelligence technologies for flexible mission management, especially for unmanned (combat) airborne vehicles...

  7. Regulatory Information by Topic: Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory information about emergencies, including chemical accident prevention, risk management plans (RMPs), chemical reporting, community right to know, and oil spills and hazardous substances releases.

  8. This issue: Managing emergencies part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Mark E

    2005-12-01

    Pediatric toxicologic exposures are common, and the primary care pediatric practitioner must be prepared to handle emergencies related to poisoning and overdose in children and adolescents. Fortunately, many poisonings in children are unintentional, preventable, and benign. For both simple and complex cases, help is available to medical professionals 24/7 from multiple sources, including an improved toxic exposure database, new research, the network of Certified Specialists in Poison Information at our nation's regional poison control centers, and backup medical and clinical toxicologists. The US system of AAPCC-certified poison control centers has been appropriately labeled "a national safety net" serving the public and medical practitioners in the management of pediatric toxicologic exposures. Increased funding to this system will be critical to update its services for the future, including preparation to detect the increasing threat of new public health emergencies such as chemical and biological terrorist attacks.

  9. Emergency Notification System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The USAID ENS provides quick and effective notification messages during any emergency affecting the Ronald Reagan Building, SA-44, Potomac Yards and USAID Washington...

  10. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L.

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig

  11. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L. (UNESA, Madrid (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig.

  12. INFLUENCE OF CROPPING SYSTEM AND WEED MANAGEMENT PRACTICE ON EMERGENCE, GROWTH OF WEEDS, YIELD OF MAIZE (Zea mays L. AND COWPEA (Vigna unguiculata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Ogar Takim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cropping system and weed management practice on weed seedling emergence, weed biomass production and yield of maize and cowpea were examined at Ilorin, in the southern Guinea savanna (9°29' N, 4°35' E and 307 m ASL of Nigeria. Weed emergence occurred throughout the 3-15 weeks after planting (WAP. Forty-three weed species belonging to 38 genera within 20 families were encountered. Fimbristylis littoralis Gaudet, Tridax procumbens L and Eleusine indica Gaertn were the most prevalent weed species. Cropping system and weed management practice significantly affected weed emergence. Significantly (p≤0.05 lower number of weeds emerged in the intercropped and herbicide treated plots while higher weed densities and weed biomass were recorded in the uncropped and unweeded control plots than in the other plots. While aggregate crop yields were significantly higher in the intercropped than in the sole plots, component crop yields were higher under the sole cropping than in the intercrop. The implication of the results on weed management is discussed.

  13. Towards emergence phenomenon in business process management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koryl Maciej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A standard solution regarding business process management automation in enterprises is the use of workflow management systems working by the Rule-Based Reasoning approach. In such systems, the process model which is designed entirely before the implementation has to meet all needs deriving from business activity of the organization. In practice, it means that great limitations arise in process control abilities, especially in the dynamic business environment. Therefore, new kinds of workflow systems may help which typically work in more agile way e.g. following the Case-Based Reasoning approach. The paper shows another possible solution – the use of emergence theory which indicates among other conditions required to fulfill stimulation of the system (for example the business environment to run grass-roots processes that lead to arising of new more sophisticated organizing forms. The paper also points the using opportunity of such techniques as the processing of complex events to fulfill key conditions pointed by the emergence theory.

  14. Human Resource Development for Emergency Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Gilbert B.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a review of the literature on human behavior in disasters and gives insights about what people do with and without training, organization, and control. It also points to the need for such preparations. The nature of the milieu in which emergency management must take place is examined. An emergency management model is included. (CT)

  15. Gas emergency management - safety and reliability of supply - remote management of distribution system through computer assisted dispatching of emergency events; Gestion des urgences - securite et fiabilite de la distribution du gaz gestion des urgences a l'aide d'un systeme informatique integre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettin, B.; Clava, R.; Pisino, F. [italgas, Torino (Italy); Guerra, M. [A.M.G.A., (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Gas distribution companies have long since paid great attention to improving the quality and safety of the gas supply service to the consumer. In particular the management of gas emergencies has always been a responsibility taken seriously by all sectors of the gas industry. Over the last few years, however, the concept and practices in risk management have been changing rapidly. This has involved gas companies in an on-going attempt to successfully define and establish clear computer assisted risk management practices. Risk management is the systematic use of management policy, procedures and means, with the aim to protect employees, the public, the environment and properties at an acceptable cost. This paper has the purpose of presenting: - the computer software of gas emergency management in use at Italgas S.p.A. for testing the performance of gas distribution networks on a 'real-time' basis and therefore selecting effective action for solving any emergency that may occur; - the integrated system, implemented by A.M.G.A. (Azienda Mediterranea Gas e Acqua S.p.A. - Genova), for real-time management of gas and water network emergencies (reported by customers or by tele-alarm systems), their location, and the dispatching of operative crews. (authors)

  16. Assessment of hospital emergency management in the Beijing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantao, Xin

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the number of public health emergencies has increased. Improving hospital emergency management is an important challenge. This is a pilot study intended to assess hospital emergency management in the Beijing area, make recommendations to government health authorities and hospital managers, and offer references for similar studies. This was an observational, cross-sectional survey. Forty-five hospitals in the Beijing area were selected randomly. A self-administered questionnaire was used as a data collection tool. It comprised of three sections: (1) Section A was the introduction; (2) Section B asked for the respondent's personal information; and (3) Section C comprised the major part of the questionnaire and was intended to gather information regarding the hospital's general emergency management situation. The survey response rate was 44%, accounting for 29% of total hospitals that the study targeted. No hospital had an established emergency management department or full-time staff for emergency management. A total of 15-45% of the hospitals had established a hospital emergency management committee, performed a vulnerability analysis, or evaluated emergency management regularly. Twenty-five percent of respondents thought that the local government health authority had established an integrated hospital incident command system. A total of 40%-55% of hospitals contracted with outside institutions for supplements, backup of key functional systems and professional support. After the occurrence of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, Chinese hospital managers took many measures to improve hospital resilience. However, most of these efforts lacked the guidance of theories, concepts, principles, and methods. An integrated, standardized, operational hospital emergency management model has not been established. Although the survey response rate was relatively low, some clues for further study were discovered, and suggestions to the

  17. Emergency warning via automated distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Due to the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant accident of March 28, 1979, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Emergency Management Agency require a general upgrading of existing Emergency Preparedness Plans. NUREG-0654/FEMA REP-1, Criteria for Preparation and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of Nuclear Power Plants, dated October 1980, describes the Emergency Plans required and includes the Plant Operator's Onsite Plan, as well as the State, County, and Local Offsite Plans. As part of these Emergency Preparedness Plans, an Emergency Notification System is required to alert the general population within the Emergency Planning Zone surrounding a Nuclear Power Plant that a general emergency has occurred and that they should tune to an Emergency Broadcast Station for further information and instructions. The emergency notification system for Beaver Valley Power Station is described. The system is the capability of alerting 100% of the population with 5 mi of Beaver Valley Power Station within 15 min, and the capability of alerting 100% of the population within 10 mi of Beaver Valley Power Station within 45 min

  18. A Model of Workflow Composition for Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Chen; Bin-ge, Cui; Feng, Zhang; Xue-hui, Xu; Shan-shan, Fu

    The common-used workflow technology is not flexible enough in dealing with concurrent emergency situations. The paper proposes a novel model for defining emergency plans, in which workflow segments appear as a constituent part. A formal abstraction, which contains four operations, is defined to compose workflow segments under constraint rule. The software system of the business process resources construction and composition is implemented and integrated into Emergency Plan Management Application System.

  19. Computer technologies for industrial risk prevention and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balduccelli, C.; Bologna, S.; Di Costanzo, G.; Vicoli, G.

    1996-07-01

    This document provides an overview about problems related to the engineering of computer based systems for industrial risk prevention and emergency management. Such systems are rather complex and subject to precise reliability and safety requirements. With the evolution of informatic technologies, such systems are becoming to be the means for building protective barriers for reduction of risk associated with plant operations. For giving more generality to this document, and for not concentrating on only a specific plant, the emergency management systems will be dealt with more details than ones for accident prevention. The document is organized in six chapters. Chapter one is an introduction to the problem and to its state of art, with particular emphasis to the aspects of safety requirements definition. Chapter two is an introduction to the problems related to the emergency management and to the training of operators in charge of this task. Chapter three deals in details the topic of the Training Support Systems, in particular about MUSTER (multi-user system for training and evaluation of environmental emergency response) system. Chapter four deals in details the topic of decision support systems, in particular about ISEM (information technology support for emergency management) system. Chapter five illustrates an application of support to the operators of Civil Protection Department for the management of emergencies in the fields of industrial chemical. Chapter six is about a synthesis of the state of art and the future possibilities, identifying some research and development activities more promising for the future

  20. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-01-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS

  1. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the

  2. Nanotechnology of emerging targeting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S S

    2008-09-01

    Recent developments in the design and testing of complex nanoscale payload-carrying systems (i.e. systems with payloads that do not exceed 100 nm in size) are the focus of this brief review. Emerging systems include targeted single-walled nanotubes, viral capsids, dendrimers, gold nanoparticles, milled boron carbide nanoparticles, and protein nucleic acid assemblies. Significant advances are emerging with each of these bionanotechnological approaches to cellular targeting.

  3. NKA/INF: A project on emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsson, S.; Brehmer, B.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes the development of a prototype emergency management system for the nuclear sector (project started in 1985 by the Nordic liaison committee for atomic energy). Two prototype systems have been implemented, one for on-site and one for off-site. The intended users of the systems are the plant emergency manager on-site and the chief of staff of the county emergency centre off-site. The proto-types are implemented in Lisp on Symbolics workstations using WIMP (windows, icons, menus and pointing) interface techniques

  4. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Oikawa, Hirohide.

    1990-01-01

    The device according to this invention can ensure cooling water required for emerency core cooling upon emergence such as abnormally, for example, loss of coolant accident, without using dynamic equipments such as a centrifugal pump or large-scaled tank. The device comprises a pressure accumulation tank containing a high pressure nitrogen gas and cooling water inside, a condensate storage tank, a pressure suppression pool and a jet stream pump. In this device there are disposed a pipeline for guiding cooling water in the pressure accumulation tank as a jetting water to a jetting stream pump, a pipeline for guiding cooling water stored in the condensate storage tank and the pressure suppression pool as pumped water to the jetting pump and, further, a pipeline for guiding the discharged water from the jet stream pump which is a mixed stream of pumped water and jetting water into the reactor pressure vessel. In this constitution, a sufficient amount of water ranging from relatively high pressure to low pressure can be supplied into the reactor pressure vessel, without increasing the size of the pressure accumulation tank. (I.S.)

  5. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masaru.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable quick cooling of a core by efficiently utilizing coolant supplied in an emergency. Constitution: A feedwater nozzle and a water level detector are disposed in the gap between a partition plate for supporting the top of a fuel assembly and a lattice plate for supporting the bottom of the fuel assembly. At the time of a loss of coolant accident, coolant is injected from a sprinkling nozzle toward the reactor core, and is also injected from a feedwater nozzle. When the coolant reaches a prescribed level in the reactor core, the water level is detected by the detector, the coolant is fed by a pump to the lower plenum, and the submerging speed of the reactor core is thereby accelerated. When the water level again becomes lower than the prescribed level, the coolant is again filled from the feedwater nozzle, and similar operation is thereafter repeated. Accordingly, the coolant filled in the reactor core can be efficiently utilized to cool the reactor core. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Emerging dimensions of technology management

    CERN Document Server

    Akhilesh, K B

    2013-01-01

    Technology is the key driver of business, may it be airports, ICT , smart governance, manufacturing or plantations. This book examines technology management across many different sectors, highlighting complexities, uncertainties and risks.

  7. Emergency management of hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Anthony

    2012-07-01

    Most pregnant women experience morning sickness during the first 20 weeks of pregnancy. Often, the symptoms are mild, but recurring, nausea and vomiting; but the condition can also lead to dehydration, weight loss, electrolyte imbalance and blood volume depletion, and many women with more severe forms of the condition present to emergency departments. This article describes the presenting symptoms, causes of hyperemesis gravidarum, the associated clinical signs and complications, and the most common treatments offered.

  8. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, B.; Groenberg, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs.

  9. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, B.; Groenberg, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs

  10. Tactical training of emergency management - the MUSTER concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Verner.

    1996-08-01

    The efficiency with which complex, large-scale organisations respon d to emergencies and critical situations depends crucially on the co-ordination of actions and communication among decision makers. However, decision makers have typically few opportunities to train distributed crisis management under artificial, yet realistic conditions; and at the same time, real emergencies occur fortunately so relatively infrequently that few decision makers have a chance of establishing a useful real-life experience of crisis management. There is therefore a need for having available realistic and flexible multi-user training environments in which co-ordinated response to crises or emergencies may be trained. The objective of the MUSTER project (Multi-User System for Training and Evaluating Environmental Emergency Response) is to produce specifications for a training system supporting collaborative training and evaluation directed to the special needs of environmental emergency management. The MUSTER project was partially funced by CEC

  11. URBAN-NET: A Network-based Infrastructure Monitoring and Analysis System for Emergency Management and Public Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangkeun (Matt) [ORNL; Chen, Liangzhe [ORNL; Duan, Sisi [ORNL; Chinthavali, Supriya [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun (Arjun) [ORNL; Prakash, B. Aditya [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Critical Infrastructures (CIs) such as energy, water, and transportation are complex networks that are crucial for sustaining day-to-day commodity flows vital to national security, economic stability, and public safety. The nature of these CIs is such that failures caused by an extreme weather event or a man-made incident can trigger widespread cascading failures, sending ripple effects at regional or even national scales. To minimize such effects, it is critical for emergency responders to identify existing or potential vulnerabilities within CIs during such stressor events in a systematic and quantifiable manner and take appropriate mitigating actions. We present here a novel critical infrastructure monitoring and analysis system named URBAN-NET. The system includes a software stack and tools for monitoring CIs, pre-processing data, interconnecting multiple CI datasets as a heterogeneous network, identifying vulnerabilities through graph-based topological analysis, and predicting consequences based on what-if simulations along with visualization. As a proof-of-concept, we present several case studies to show the capabilities of our system. We also discuss remaining challenges and future work.

  12. Design and simulation of a fuel cell hybrid emergency power system for a more electric aircraft: Evaluation of energy management schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoya Motapon, Souleman

    As the aircraft industries are moving toward more electric aircraft (MEA), the electrical peak load seen by the main and emergency generators becomes higher than in conventional aircraft. Consequently, there is a major concern regarding the aircraft emergency system, which consists of a ram air turbine (RAT) or air driven generator (ADG), to fulfill the load demand during critical situations; particularly at low aircraft speed where the output power is very low. A potential solution under study by most aircraft manufacturers is to replace the air turbine by a fuel cell hybrid system, consisting of fuel cell combined with other high power density sources such as supercapacitors or lithium-ion batteries. To ensure the fuel cell hybrid system will be able to meet the load demand, it must be properly designed and an effective energy management strategy must be tested with real situations load profile. This work aims at designing a fuel cell emergency power system of a more electric aircraft and comparing different energy management schemes (EMS); with the goal to ensure the load demand is fully satisfied within the constraints of each energy source. The fuel cell hybrid system considered in this study consists of fuel cell, lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors, along with associated DC-DC and DC-AC converters. The energy management schemes addressed are state-of-the-art, most commonly used energy management techniques in fuel cell vehicle applications and include: the state machine control strategy, the rule based fuzzy logic strategy, the classical PI control strategy, the frequency decoupling/fuzzy logic control strategy and the equivalent consumption minimization strategy (ECMS). Moreover, a new optimal scheme based on maximizing the instantaneous energy of batteries/supercapacitors, to improve the fuel economy is proposed. An off-line optimization based scheme is also developed to ascertain the validity of the proposed strategy in terms of fuel consumption

  13. Emergency department management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Portal, Daniel A; Horn, Amanda E; Vilke, Gary M; Chan, Theodore C; Ufberg, Jacob W

    2014-03-01

    Precipitous obstetric deliveries can occur outside of the labor and delivery suite, often in the emergency department (ED). Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency with significant risk of adverse outcome. To review multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia in the ED. We review various techniques and approaches for achieving delivery in the setting of shoulder dystocia. These include common maneuvers, controversial interventions, and interventions of last resort. Emergency physicians should be familiar with multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia to reduce the chances of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The emerging land management paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Manchet: This paper was first presented by Professor Enemark at the RICS Christmas Lecture in December last year. It provides a cogent and detailed reference point for the current state of land management in developed countries, charts a course for the future and looks at how education must chang...... to meet the new paradigm....

  15. Managing emerging and conflicting groupware use in organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the need for management of emerging groupware use is proposed. It is argued that allowing for distributed innovation in use is needed to get the best out of a new groupware system. However, allowing for distributed and thus local innovations of groupware use necessitates management...... to support the emergent use forms and to design solutions (technical configurations and/or organizational changes) that allow for application that may otherwise be in conflict....

  16. Emergency surgical airway management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, C V; Nørskov, A K; Wetterslev, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The emergency surgical airway (ESA) is the final option in difficult airway management. We identified ESA procedures registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD) and described the performed airway management. METHODS: We extracted a cohort of 452 461 adult patients undergoing...

  17. Implementing Laboratory Quality Management Systems in Mozambique: The Becton Dickinson-US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Public-Private Partnership Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaggs, Beth; Pinto, Isabel; Masamha, Jessina; Turgeon, David; Gudo, Eduardo Samo

    2016-04-15

    Mozambique's ministry of health (MOH) recognized the need to establish a national laboratory quality assurance (NLQA) program to improve the reliability and accuracy of laboratory testing. The Becton Dickinson-US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Public-Private Partnership (PPP) was used to garner MOH commitment and train a cadre of local auditors and managers to support sustainability and country ownership of a NLQA program. From January 2011 to April 2012, the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA) checklist and the Strengthening Laboratory Management Towards Accreditation (SLMTA) curriculum were used in 6 MOH laboratories. PPP volunteers provided training and mentorship to build the capacity of local auditors and program managers to promote institutionalization and sustainability of the program within the MOH. SLIPTA was launched in 6 MOH laboratories, and final audits demonstrated improvements across the 13 quality system essentials, compared with baseline. Training and mentorship of MOH staff by PPP volunteers resulted in 18 qualified auditors and 28 managers/quality officers capacitated to manage the improvement process in their laboratories. SLIPTA helps laboratories improve the quality and reliability of their service even in the absence of full accreditation. Local capacity building ensures sustainability by creating country buy-in, reducing costs of audits, and institutionalizing program management. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Chernobyl experience of emergency data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, L.; Linge, I.; Arutyunyan, R.; Ilushkin, A.; Kanevsky, M.; Kiselev, V.; Melikhova, E.; Ossipiants, I.; Pavlovsky, O.

    1997-01-01

    The use of the Chernobyl experience in emergency data management is presented. Information technologies for the generalization of practical experience in the protection of the population after the Chernobyl accident are described. The two main components of this work are the development of the administrative information system (AIS) and the creation of the central data bank. The current state of the AIS, the data bank and the bank of models is described. Data accumulated and models are used to estimate the consequences of radiation accidents and to provide different types of prognosis. Experience of accumulated analysis data allows special software to be developed for large-scale simulation of radiation consequences of major radiation accidents and to organize practical exercises. Some examples of such activity are presented. (orig.)

  19. Prototype development and demonstration for response, emergency staging, communications, uniform management, and evacuation (R.E.S.C.U.M.E.) : R.E.S.C.U.M.E. prototype system design document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the System Design Document (SDD) for the prototype development and demonstration of the : Response, Emergency Staging, Communications, Uniform Management, and Evacuation (R.E.S.C.U.M.E.) application : bundle, with a focus on the...

  20. Medical emergency management among Iranian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khami, Mohammad Reza; Yazdani, Reza; Afzalimoghaddam, Mohammad; Razeghi, Samaneh; Moscowchi, Anahita

    2014-11-01

    More than 18,000 patients need medical emergencies management in dental offices in Iran annually. The present study investigates medical emergencies management among Iranian dentists. From the list of the cell phone numbers of the dentists practicing in the city of Tehran, 210 dentists were selected randomly. A self-administered questionnaire was used as the data collection instrument. The questionnaire requested information on personal and professional characteristics of the dentists, as well as their knowledge and self-reported practice in the field of medical emergency management, and availability of required drugs and equipments to manage medical emergencies in their offices. Totally, 177 dentists (84%) completed the questionnaire. Less than 60% of the participants were knowledgeable about characteristics of hypoglycemic patient, chest pain with cardiac origin, and true cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) practice. Regarding practice, less than one quarter of the respondents acquired acceptable scores. In regression models, higher practice scores were significantly associated with higher knowledge scores (p < 0.001). The results call for a need to further education on the subject for dentists. Continuing education and changing dental curriculum in the various forms seems to be useful in enhancement of the self-reported knowledge and practice of dentists. To successful control of medical emergencies in the dental office, dentists must be prepared to recognize and manage a variety of such conditions. In addition to dentist's knowledge and skill, availability of necessary equipments and trained staff is also of critical importance.

  1. Emergency Management of Hypertension in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic arterial hypertension in children has traditionally been thought to be secondary in origin. Increased incidence of risk factors like obesity, sedentary life-styles, and faulty dietary habits has led to increased prevalence of the primary arterial hypertension (PAH, particularly in adolescent age children. PAH has become a global epidemic worldwide imposing huge economic constraint on health care. Sudden acute increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure can lead to hypertensive crisis. While it generally pertains to secondary hypertension, occurrence of hypertensive crisis in PAH is however rare in children. Hypertensive crisis has been further subclassified depending on presence or absence of end-organ damage into hypertensive emergency or urgency. Both hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are known to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing awareness among the physicians, targeted at investigation of the pathophysiology of hypertension and its complications, better screening methods, generation, and implementation of novel treatment modalities will impact overall outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, and management of hypertensive crisis in children. An extensive database search using keywords was done to obtain the information.

  2. Emergency Management of Hypertension in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh; Akingbola, Olugbenga; Yosypiv, Ihor; El-Dahr, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension in children has traditionally been thought to be secondary in origin. Increased incidence of risk factors like obesity, sedentary life-styles, and faulty dietary habits has led to increased prevalence of the primary arterial hypertension (PAH), particularly in adolescent age children. PAH has become a global epidemic worldwide imposing huge economic constraint on health care. Sudden acute increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure can lead to hypertensive crisis. While it generally pertains to secondary hypertension, occurrence of hypertensive crisis in PAH is however rare in children. Hypertensive crisis has been further subclassified depending on presence or absence of end-organ damage into hypertensive emergency or urgency. Both hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are known to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing awareness among the physicians, targeted at investigation of the pathophysiology of hypertension and its complications, better screening methods, generation, and implementation of novel treatment modalities will impact overall outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, and management of hypertensive crisis in children. An extensive database search using keywords was done to obtain the information. PMID:22577545

  3. Transition Office Management and Accounting System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — TOMAS combined over 20 previously separate systems into one fully integrated management system covering budget, finance, procurement, travel, and emergency contact...

  4. Ground Enterprise Management System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Emergent Space Technologies Inc. proposes to develop the Ground Enterprise Management System (GEMS) for spacecraft ground systems. GEMS will provide situational...

  5. Status of the RODOS system for off-site emergency management after nuclear and radiological accidents and its enhancement under the EURANOS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Under the auspices of its Euratom Research Framework Programmes, the European Commission (EC) has supported the development of the RODOS (Real-time On-line Decision Support) system for off-site emergency management after nuclear accidents for more than a decade. Significant additional funds have been provided by many national RTD programmes, research institutes and industrial collaborators. In particular, the German Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety (BMU) financially contributed to the project with emphasis on early emergency response. As a result of these collaborative actions, a comprehensive decision support system (RODOS) has been developed which can be applied generally within and across Europe. The current version of the system has been, or is being, installed in national emergency centres in several European countries for (pre-operational) use (Germany, Finland, Spain, Portugal, Austria, the Netherlands, Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, Ukraine, Slovenia, and the Czech Republic). Installation is foreseen or under consideration in Switzerland, Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, and Russia within the next few years. RODOS provides coherent support at all stages of an accident (i.e., before, during and after a release), including the long term management and restoration of contaminated areas. The system is able to support decisions about the introduction of a wide range of potentially useful countermeasures (e.g., sheltering and evacuation of people, distribution of iodine tablets, food restrictions, agricultural countermeasures, relocation, decontamination, restoration, etc.) mitigating the consequences of an accident with respect to health, the environment, and the economy. It can be applied to accidental releases into the atmosphere and into various aquatic environments. Appropriate interfaces exist with local and national radiological monitoring data, meteorological measurements and forecasts, and for adaptation to local, regional

  6. Status of the Real-time On-line Decision Support (RODOS) system for off-site emergency management after nuclear and radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskov, W.; Ehrhardt, J.; Landman, C.; Pasler-Sauer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Under the auspices of its EURATOM Research Framework Programmes, the European Commission (EC) has supported the development of the comprehensive decision support system RODOS (Real-time On-line Decision Support) for off-site emergency management after nuclear accidents for more than a decade. Many national research programmes, research institutes and industrial collaborators contributed to the project, in particular the German Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety (B MU). The RODOS system can be applied to accidental releases into the atmosphere and various aquatic environments within and across Europe. It provides coherent support before, during and after such a release to assist analysis of the situation and decision making about short and long-term countermeasures for mitigating the consequences with respect to health, the environment, and the economy. Appropriate interfaces exist with local and national radiological monitoring data systems, meteorological measurements and forecasts, and for the adaptation to local, regional and national conditions in Europe. Within the European Integrated Project EURANOS of the sixth Framework Programme, the RODOS system is being enhanced, among others, for radiological emergencies such as dirty bombs attacks, transport accidents and satellite crashes by extensions of the nuclide list, the source term characteristics and the atmospheric dispersion model

  7. The emergence of scientific management in America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin-George Toma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A scientific approach to management was initiated for the first time in America in the late 19th century. Scientific management arose mainly from the need to increase efficiency in America, but other key factors were the spread of big businesses and the expanding application of science in industry. The aims of our paper are to present the emergence of scientific management in America and to emphasize the contribution of some of the most representatives American authors to its development. The methodological approach is literature review. Our paper shows that scientific management was essentially an American achievement that provided useful lessons for the whole human society.

  8. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FEATURES IN EMERGING ECONOMIES (IN CASE OF UZBEKISTAN)

    OpenAIRE

    Toshmurodova Buvsara

    2014-01-01

    Uzbekistan being one of the rapidly growing countries in Central Asia is characterized as emerging economy. Nowadays, Uzbekistan Government encourages entrepreneurs/companies to manufacture high value added products and become competitive players in global market. Thus, Uzbekistan needs to develop and improve contemporary management systems; including financial management. This article includes interesting information about the history of development of financial management in Uzbekistan. Aut...

  9. Highly Enhanced Risk Management Emergency Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalmeir, Michael; Gataullin, Yunir; Indrajit, Agung

    HERMES (Highly Enhanced Risk Management Emergency Satellite) is potential European satellite mission for global flood management, being implemented by Technical University Munich and European Space Agency. With its main instrument - a reliable and precise Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna...... highly effective and orbit proven hardware is used, HERMES is designed to be reliable, precise and of low cost. The project can be extended for use on other space bodies (planets) for rapid observation of the planetary surface....

  10. Wilderness Emergency Medical Services Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millin, Michael G; Hawkins, Seth C

    2017-05-01

    Wilderness emergency medical services (WEMS) are designed to provide high quality health care in wilderness environments. A WEMS program should have oversight by a qualified physician responsible for protocol development, education, and quality improvement. The director is also ideally fully trained as a member of that wilderness rescue program, supporting the team with real-time patient care. WEMS providers function with scopes of practice approved by the local medical director and regulatory authority. With a focus on providing quality patient care, it is time for the evolution of WEMS as an integrated element of a local emergency response system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Emergency Management Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Emergency Management Portal System collects cleanup site data, and personnel readiness data. Learn how this data will be collected in the system, how it will be used, access to the data, the purpose of data collection, and record retention policies.

  12. DENTAL EMERGENCIES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT AT THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    after office hours dental emergencies and their management at the casuality department of. Muhimbili Medical Centre. Of the. 94 patients who attended, the majority were adult males, Of these 38.3% had cut wounds,. 20.2% had facial bone fractures, another 20.2% had bleeding sockets, 5.3% had infections, another 5.3% ...

  13. Hanford emergency management plan - release 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARPENTER, G.A.

    1999-07-19

    The Hanford emergency management plan for the US Department of Energy Richland, WA and Office of River Protection. The program was developed in accordance with DOE Orders as well as Federal and State regulations to protect workers and public health and safety.

  14. Dermatological Emergencies: Current Trends in Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    with institution of prompt medical care can help in reducing the ... skin failure. Dermatologic emergencies are clinical conditions which lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Recognizing them and the urgency required in their management would help in ..... prostaglandins, fibrin degradation products, and substance P ...

  15. Managing a Nuclear Emergency Originating from Abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    1998-01-01

    The basic aspects of managing a nuclear emergency, which occurred in a foreign country, are considered. The most important sources of information are defined by the bilateral or multilateral conventions. The decision aiding techniques and intervention levels can substantially improve the decision making. The experiences from the INEX-2 exercises are presented after the Swiss and Finnish exercise. (author)

  16. Trauma unit emergency doctor airway management | Hardcastle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A data collection proforma was completed either at the time of intubation or from medical records. Results. Fifty-seven patients required definitive airway management. In the unit 32 patients (56%) were intubated by emergency medicine registrars or medical officers, with rapidsequence intubations (RSIs) in all 32 (100%).

  17. Hanford emergency management plan - release 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARPENTER, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Hanford emergency management plan for the US Department of Energy Richland, WA and Office of River Protection. The program was developed in accordance with DOE Orders as well as Federal and State regulations to protect workers and public health and safety

  18. Emerging tools and technologies in watershed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Phillip Guertin; Scott N. Miller; David C. Goodrich

    2000-01-01

    The field of watershed management is highly dependent on spatially distributed data. Over the past decade, significant advances have been made toward the capture, storage, and use of spatial data. Emerging tools and technologies hold great promise for improving the scientific understanding of watershed processes and are already revolutionizing watershed research....

  19. Management of information within emergencies departments in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: the management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the ...

  20. Emergency diagnosis and management of pediatric arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanash Carla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available True emergencies due to unstable arrhythmias in children are rare, as most rhythm disturbances in this age group are well-tolerated. However, presentation to an emergency department with symptoms of palpitations, fatigue and/or syncope is much more common. Sinus tachycardia is by far the most commonly reported arrhythmia, followed by supraventricular tachycardia. Emergency physicians should be prepared for diagnosis and to acutely manage various types of arrhythmias seen in children, to assess the need for further diagnostic testing, and to determine whether cardiology evaluation and follow-up are needed. This article is intended to provide diagnostic and management guidelines of the most common types of arrhythmias seen in children with structurally normal hearts as well as those associated with congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies.

  1. Emergency room management of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Emergency room management of radioactively contaminated patients who have an associated medical injury requiring immediate attention must be handled with care. Radioactive contamination of the skin of a worker is not a medical emergency and is usually dealt with at the plant. Effective preplanning and on-the-scene triage will allow the seriously injured and contaminated patients to get the medical care they need with a minimum of confusion and interference. Immediate medical and surgical priorities always take precedence over radiation injuries and radioactive contamination. Probably the most difficult aspect of emergency management is the rarity of such accidents and hence the unfamiliarity of the medical staff with the appropriate procedures. The authors discuss how the answer to these problems is preplanning, having a simple and workable procedure and finally having 24-h access to experts

  2. Using social media for disaster emergency management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. D.; Wang, T.; Ye, X. Y.; Zhu, J. Q.; Lee, J.

    2016-06-01

    Social media have become a universal phenomenon in our society (Wang et al., 2012). As a new data source, social media have been widely used in knowledge discovery in fields related to health (Jackson et al., 2014), human behaviour (Lee, 2014), social influence (Hong, 2013), and market analysis (Hanna et al., 2011). In this paper, we report a case study of the 2012 Beijing Rainstorm to investigate how emergency information was timely distributed using social media during emergency events. We present a classification and location model for social media text streams during emergency events. This model classifies social media text streams based on their topical contents. Integrated with a trend analysis, we show how Sina-Weibo fluctuated during emergency events. Using a spatial statistical analysis method, we found that the distribution patterns of Sina-Weibo were related to the emergency events but varied among different topics. This study helps us to better understand emergency events so that decision-makers can act on emergencies in a timely manner. In addition, this paper presents the tools, methods, and models developed in this study that can be used to work with text streams from social media in the context of disaster management.

  3. Quality management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mu Sung

    2009-08-01

    This book deals with ISO9001 quality management system which includes summary of this system such as classification of quality, principle of quality management, and definition, requirement and procedure of quality management system, introduction of ISO9001 system like model of ISO9001 quality management system, ISO certificate system, structure of ISO9001 standard, requirement of ISO9001 quality management system, process approach and documentation of system, propel cases of ISO9001 quality management system.

  4. A Multi Agent Based Approach for Prehospital Emergency Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Reza; Shoshtarian Malak, Jaleh; Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Danesh Shahraki, Azimeh

    2017-07-01

    To demonstrate an architecture to automate the prehospital emergency process to categorize the specialized care according to the situation at the right time for reducing the patient mortality and morbidity. Prehospital emergency process were analyzed using existing prehospital management systems, frameworks and the extracted process were modeled using sequence diagram in Rational Rose software. System main agents were identified and modeled via component diagram, considering the main system actors and by logically dividing business functionalities, finally the conceptual architecture for prehospital emergency management was proposed. The proposed architecture was simulated using Anylogic simulation software. Anylogic Agent Model, State Chart and Process Model were used to model the system. Multi agent systems (MAS) had a great success in distributed, complex and dynamic problem solving environments, and utilizing autonomous agents provides intelligent decision making capabilities.  The proposed architecture presents prehospital management operations. The main identified agents are: EMS Center, Ambulance, Traffic Station, Healthcare Provider, Patient, Consultation Center, National Medical Record System and quality of service monitoring agent. In a critical condition like prehospital emergency we are coping with sophisticated processes like ambulance navigation health care provider and service assignment, consultation, recalling patients past medical history through a centralized EHR system and monitoring healthcare quality in a real-time manner. The main advantage of our work has been the multi agent system utilization. Our Future work will include proposed architecture implementation and evaluation of its impact on patient quality care improvement.

  5. Integrated management systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg; Remmen, Arne; Mellado, M. Dolores

    2006-01-01

    of integration. The focus of the article is primarily to discuss three ambition levels of integration: from increased compatibility of system elements over coordination of generic processes to an embeddedness of an integrated management system (IMS) in a culture of learning and continuous improvements......Different approaches to integration of management systems (ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001 and SA 8000) with various levels of ambition have emerged. The tendency of increased compatibility between these standards has paved the road for discussions of, how to understand the different aspects....... At present, national IMS standards are being developed, and the IMS standards in Denmark and Spain are being analysed regarding the ambition level for integration. Should the ISO organisation decide to make a standard for IMS, then it would be necessary to consider the different levels of integration...

  6. Geographical information systems in the management of the 2009-2010 emergency oral anti-rabies vaccination of foxes in north-eastern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Mulatti

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Emergency oral fox vaccination campaigns, targeting a recent rabies epidemic in wild foxes (Vulpes vulpes in north-eastern Italy, were implemented twice, first in the winter of 2009 and then in the spring of 2010. Following on an unsuccessful manual bait distribution campaign, vaccine baits were aerially distributed by helicopters using a satellite-navigated, computer-supported, automatic bait drop system. The flight paths were traced with distance of 500-1,000 m from one another to optimise helicopter missions and guarantee homogeneous coverage of the vaccination area. The vaccine distribution was evaluated by superimposing a 1 km-step grid and weighing the number of baits per cell. The implementation of a geographical information system for the management of vaccine distribution proved to be useful, both for the planning and execution phases, of the campaigns. It supported effective management of the flights and allowed near real-time monitoring of the campaigns. In addition, it facilitated the identification of areas with suboptimal bait density that would require additional flights or supplementary, manual distribution.

  7. Handling Emergency Management in [an] Object Oriented Modeling Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokgoz, Berna Eren; Cakir, Volkan; Gheorghe, Adrian V.

    2010-01-01

    It has been understood that protection of a nation from extreme disasters is a challenging task. Impacts of extreme disasters on a nation's critical infrastructures, economy and society could be devastating. A protection plan itself would not be sufficient when a disaster strikes. Hence, there is a need for a holistic approach to establish more resilient infrastructures to withstand extreme disasters. A resilient infrastructure can be defined as a system or facility that is able to withstand damage, but if affected, can be readily and cost-effectively restored. The key issue to establish resilient infrastructures is to incorporate existing protection plans with comprehensive preparedness actions to respond, recover and restore as quickly as possible, and to minimize extreme disaster impacts. Although national organizations will respond to a disaster, extreme disasters need to be handled mostly by local emergency management departments. Since emergency management departments have to deal with complex systems, they have to have a manageable plan and efficient organizational structures to coordinate all these systems. A strong organizational structure is the key in responding fast before and during disasters, and recovering quickly after disasters. In this study, the entire emergency management is viewed as an enterprise and modelled through enterprise management approach. Managing an enterprise or a large complex system is a very challenging task. It is critical for an enterprise to respond to challenges in a timely manner with quick decision making. This study addresses the problem of handling emergency management at regional level in an object oriented modelling environment developed by use of TopEase software. Emergency Operation Plan of the City of Hampton, Virginia, has been incorporated into TopEase for analysis. The methodology used in this study has been supported by a case study on critical infrastructure resiliency in Hampton Roads.

  8. MANAGING THE LOAD SCHEDULE OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING TAKING INTO ACCOUNT EMERGING RISKS WHEN CONNECTING THE KINETIC ENERGY STORAGE TO THE POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Shevchenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the paper is to analyze load schedules of the administrative building and develop a structural scheme for connecting the kinetic energy storage in the power supply system of this building, which will allow using it as a consumer regulator, as well as a theoretical study of the risks that arise. Methodology. To conduct the research, the theory of designing internal electrical networks of buildings, the theory of plotting electric load graphs, methods of the theory of electromechanical systems and for analyzing the risk system, the T. Saati method of hierarchies were used. Results. The structure of kinetic energy storage (KES connection to the power supply system of the administrative building is developed and the structural diagram of the KES proposed for installation is given, the average daily winter and summer load schedules are presented, a set of groups and subgroups of risks and their influence on the work of the power supply system of the building are connected with the connection of the KES. Originality. For the first time, the application of the kinetic energy storage in the power supply system of the building with the analysis of emerging risks is considered, which makes it possible to improve the reliability of the developed system and the efficiency of load regulation. Practical value. The application of the proposed scheme will make it possible to use administrative buildings as load regulators of the external power supply system, and also effectively manage the load in the internal power supply system of the building.

  9. Emergency Management for Disasters in Malaysian Hotel Industry

    OpenAIRE

    AlBattat Ahmad Rasmi; Mat Som Ahmad Puad; Abukhalifeh Ala`a

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to identify major emergencies that have the potential to place Malaysian hotels in emergency and disaster situations; investigate how hotels were prepared for emergencies, how they manage and overcome emergencies when occurred; and limitations and factors influencing successful emergency planning and adoption emergency management in Malaysian hotels. Face-to-face interview with managers from three, four and five star hotels from different backgrounds: local; regional; and Inte...

  10. Methodology for coding the energy emergency management information system. [Facility ID's and energy codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Acierno, J.; Hermelee, A.; Fredrickson, C.P.; Van Valkenburg, K.

    1979-11-01

    The coding methodology for creating facility ID's and energy codes from information existing in EIA data systems currently being mapped into the EEMIS data structure is presented. A comprehensive approach is taken to facilitate implementation of EEMIS. A summary of EIA data sources which will be a part of the final system is presented in a table showing the intersection of 19 EIA data systems with the EEMIS data structure. The methodology for establishing ID codes for EIA sources and the corresponding EEMIS facilities in this table is presented. Detailed energy code translations from EIA source systems to the EEMIS energy codes are provided in order to clarify the transfer of energy data from many EIA systems which use different coding schemes. 28 tables.

  11. Hazardous Substance Release Reporting Under CERCLA, EPCR {section}304 and DOE Emergency Management System (EMS) and DOE Occurrence Reporting Requirements. Environmental Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traceski, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    Releases of various substances from DOE facilities may be subject to reporting requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), as well as DOE`s internal ``Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information`` and the ``Emergency Management System`` (EMS). CERCLA and EPCPA are Federal laws that require immediate reporting of a release of a Hazardous Substance (HS) and an Extremely Hazardous Substance (EHS), respectively, in a Reportable Quantity (RQ) or more within a 24-hour period. This guidance uses a flowchart, supplemental information, and tables to provide an overview of the process to be followed, and more detailed explanations of the actions that must be performed, when chemical releases of HSs, EHSs, pollutants, or contaminants occur at DOE facilities. This guidance should be used in conjunction with, rather than in lieu of, applicable laws, regulations, and DOE Orders. Relevant laws, regulations, and DOE Orders are referenced throughout this guidance.

  12. Emergency department management of priapism [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolej, Gregory S; Babcock, Christine; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-01-22

    Priapism is a genitourinary emergency that demands a thorough, time-sensitive evaluation. There are 3 types of priapism: ischemic, nonischemic, and recurrent ischemic priapism; ischemic priapism accounts for 95% of cases. Ischemic priapism must be treated within 4 to 6 hours to minimize morbidity, including impotence. The diagnosis of ischemic priapism relies heavily on the history and physical examination and may be facilitated by penile blood gas analysis and penile ultrasound. This issue reviews current evidence regarding emergency department treatment of ischemic priapism using a stepwise approach that begins with aspiration of cavernosal blood, cold saline irrigation, and penile injection with sympathomimetic agents. Evidence-based management and appropriate urologic follow-up of nonischemic and recurrent ischemic priapism maximizes patient outcomes and resource utilization. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  13. A Risk Management Architecture for Emergency Integrated Aircraft Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Gregory E.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Lemon, Kimberly A.; Csank, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced engine operation--operation that is beyond normal limits--has the potential to improve the adaptability and safety of aircraft in emergency situations. Intelligent use of enhanced engine operation to improve the handling qualities of the aircraft requires sophisticated risk estimation techniques and a risk management system that spans the flight and propulsion controllers. In this paper, an architecture that weighs the risks of the emergency and of possible engine performance enhancements to reduce overall risk to the aircraft is described. Two examples of emergency situations are presented to demonstrate the interaction between the flight and propulsion controllers to facilitate the enhanced operation.

  14. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R F Bosscher

    Full Text Available For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC. In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed.A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days.In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%.In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy.

  15. Emergency management of complicated jejunal diverticulosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin N; Fankhauser, Grant T; Chapital, Alyssa B; Merritt, Marianne V; Johnson, Daniel J

    2014-06-01

    Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare condition that is usually found incidentally. It is most often asymptomatic but presenting symptoms are nonspecific and include abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, malabsorption, bleeding, obstruction, and/or perforation. A retrospective review of medical records between 1999 and 2012 at a tertiary referral center was conducted to identify patients requiring emergency management of complicated jejunal diverticulosis. Complications were defined as those that presented with inflammation, bleeding, obstruction, or perforation. Eighteen patients presented to the emergency department with acute complications of jejunal diverticulosis. Ages ranged from 47 to 86 years (mean, 72 years). Seven patients presented with evidence of free bowel perforation. Six had either diverticulitis or a contained perforation. The remaining five were found to have gastrointestinal bleeding. Fourteen of the patients underwent surgical management. Four patients were successfully managed nonoperatively. As a result of the variety of presentations, complications of jejunal diverticulosis present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the acute care surgeon. Although nonoperative management can be successful, most patients should undergo surgical intervention. Traditional management dictates laparotomy and segmental jejunal resection. Diverticulectomy is not recommended as a result of the risk of staple line breakdown. The entire involved portion of jejunum should be resected when bowel length permits.

  16. 'Hidden messages' emerging from Afrocentric management perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van den Heuvel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper aims to examine how 'African management' discourse has emerged in South Africa. Altogether, it has stimulated debates - sometimes in controversial ways - on 'taboo issues', e.g. relating to 'cultural diversity' and 'ethnicity'. The stimulation of such debates within organisations is probably a more valuable contribution than a static, essentialised 'African identity' that it proclaims. Design/Methodology/Approach: The paper draws on a qualitative research project conducted in South Africa in 2003-2004. Its relevance lies in gaining in-depth insights into ('non-western' local management discourse. It seeks to contribute to the body of knowledge on political and cultural contexts in which South African organizations operate, and how they impact on local management perspectives, and vice versa. Findings: The research findings make clear how and under what circumstances 'African management' discourse has come about in South Africa, and how it could be interpreted. Implications: 'African management' advocates allegedly attempt to revise dominant management thinking and promote 'humane-ness' and participatory decision-making in South African organisations, in search of a contextualised management approach. Amongst others, it has produced new meanings of 'Africanness' and has opened up space for 'hidden messages', resentments and aspirations to become openly articulated. This throws another light on phenomena such as cultural diversity and ethnicity that usually tend to be 'neutralised'. This may turn out to be far healthier for blooming organisational cultures in South Africa than relentlessly hammering on prescribed 'corporate values'. Originality/Value: This paper informs the reader in detail about the emergence and evolvement of 'African management' discourse in South Africa. It is a unique attempt to develop an interpretative viewpoint on this intriguing phenomenon that offers a potentially valuable contribution in reading

  17. 78 FR 25282 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency-008...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... Homeland Security (DHS)/Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)-008 System name: DHS/FEMA-008 Disaster... Management Information System- Individual Assistance (NEMIS-IA), and Enterprise Data Warehouse/ Operational... 1974; Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency--008 Disaster Recovery...

  18. Bridge Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper bridge management systems are discussed with special emphasis on management systems for reinforced concrete bridges. Management systems for prestressed concrete bridges, steel bridges, or composite bridges can be developed in a similar way.......In this paper bridge management systems are discussed with special emphasis on management systems for reinforced concrete bridges. Management systems for prestressed concrete bridges, steel bridges, or composite bridges can be developed in a similar way....

  19. Development of RODOS, a comprehensive real-time on-line decision support system for nuclear emergency management in Europe. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.; Weis, A.

    1996-09-01

    The development of RODOS, a comprehensive, Real-time, On-line DecisiOn Support system for nuclear emergency management, that would be capable of finding broad application across Europe was included as a major item in the Radiation Protection Research Action of the European Commission's 3rd Framework Programme; it remains an important priority in the 4th Framework programme (1995-1998). When complete, the RODOS system is intended to be applicable from the vicinity of the release and the early phases of an accident to far distant areas and longer time periods. In this way it will be possible to achieve estimates, analyses, and prognoses of accident consequences with and without considering protective actions and countermeasures, which are consistent throughout all accident phases and distance ranges. It will also be possible to evaluate alternative combinations of measures in term of both, feasibility in the given situation, and public acceptability, socio-psychological and political implications. This Final Report summarises the results achieved by the partners of the EC contract FI3P-CT92-0036 within the time period 1992 to 1995, and more generally, gives an overview of the development status of the RODOS system and its functionalities realised by the end of the contract period. (orig.) [de

  20. CDC's Emergency Management Program activities - worldwide, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    In 2003, recognizing the increasing frequency and complexity of disease outbreaks and disasters and a greater risk for terrorism, CDC established the Emergency Operations Center (EOC), bringing together CDC staff members who respond to public health emergencies to enhance communication and coordination. To complement the physical EOC environment, CDC implemented the Incident Management System (IMS), a staffing structure and set of standard operational protocols and services to support and monitor CDC program-led responses to complex public health emergencies. The EOC and IMS are key components of CDC's Emergency Management Program (EMP), which applies emergency management principles to public health practice. To enumerate activities conducted by the EMP during 2003-2012, CDC analyzed data from daily reports and activity logs. The results of this analysis determined that, during 2003-2012, the EMP fully activated the EOC and IMS on 55 occasions to support responses to infectious disease outbreaks, natural disasters, national security events (e.g., conventions, presidential addresses, and international summits), mass gatherings (e.g., large sports and social events), and man-made disasters. On 109 other occasions, the EMP was used to support emergency responses that did not require full EOC activation, and the EMP also conducted 30 exercises and drills. This report provides an overview of those 194 EMP activities.

  1. Emergency medicine: an operations management view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soremekun, Olan A; Terwiesch, Christian; Pines, Jesse M

    2011-12-01

    Operations management (OM) is the science of understanding and improving business processes. For the emergency department (ED), OM principles can be used to reduce and alleviate the effects of crowding. A fundamental principle of OM is the waiting time formula, which has clear implications in the ED given that waiting time is fundamental to patient-centered emergency care. The waiting time formula consists of the activity time (how long it takes to complete a process), the utilization rate (the proportion of time a particular resource such a staff is working), and two measures of variation: the variation in patient interarrival times and the variation in patient processing times. Understanding the waiting time formula is important because it presents the fundamental parameters that can be managed to reduce waiting times and length of stay. An additional useful OM principle that is applicable to the ED is the efficient frontier. The efficient frontier compares the performance of EDs with respect to two dimensions: responsiveness (i.e., 1/wait time) and utilization rates. Some EDs may be "on the frontier," maximizing their responsiveness at their given utilization rates. However, most EDs likely have opportunities to move toward the frontier. Increasing capacity is a movement along the frontier and to truly move toward the frontier (i.e., improving responsiveness at a fixed capacity), we articulate three possible options: eliminating waste, reducing variability, or increasing flexibility. When conceptualizing ED crowding interventions, these are the major strategies to consider. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  2. Awareness of emergency management of dental trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Namdev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Traumatic dental injuries frequently occur in society and may occur at home. The ultimate prognosis of an avulsed tooth occurring in a child may depend on the parents′ knowledge of appropriate emergency measures. This study is aimed at evaluating the awareness level of a sample of Indian (Rohtak, Haryana parents in the management of dental trauma. Materials and Methods: A total of 1500 parents were surveyed using a self-administered structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was divided into three parts. The tabulated data were statistically analyzed using the Chi-square test. Result: This study indicated a low level of knowledge regarding tooth avulsion and replantation procedures to be followed in emergency. The residing area and age of parent did not affect the knowledge and awareness of parents. Moreover, well-educated parents also had very little or no information about dental trauma first-aid. The lack of significance in correct answers between those with and without such experience indicated that past experience did not seem to have increase the knowledge of the correct emergency procedures. Very little or no information about tooth avulsion and replantation had been given to most of them. Conclusion: Dental injury prevention and management should be recognized as a major public health issue and adequate resources to be allocated for research in this area. Educational programs to improve the knowledge and awareness among the parents have to be implemented.

  3. WebEQ: a web-GIS System to collect, display and query data for the management of the earthquake emergency in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Gianluca; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Pennica, Francesco; Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Stigliano, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    After the strong earthquakes that hit central Italy in recent months, the Center for Seismic Microzonation and its applications (CentroMS) was commissioned by the Italian Department of Civil Protection to conduct the study of seismic microzonation of the territories affected by the earthquake of August 24, 2016. As part of the activities of microzonation, IGAG CNR has created WebEQ, a management tool of the data that have been acquired by all participants (i.e., more than twenty research institutes and university departments). The data collection was organized and divided into sub-areas, assigned to working groups with multidisciplinary expertise in geology, geophysics and engineering. WebEQ is a web-GIS System that helps all the subjects involved in the data collection activities, through tools aimed at data uploading and validation, and with a simple GIS interface to display, query and download geographic data. WebEQ is contributing to the creation of a large database containing geographical data, both vector and raster, from various sources and types: - Regional Technical Map em Geological and geomorphological maps em Data location maps em Maps of microzones homogeneous in seismic perspective and seismic microzonation maps em National strong motion network location. Data loading is done through simple input masks that ensure consistency with the database structure, avoiding possible errors and helping users to interact with the map through user-friendly tools. All the data are thematized through standardized symbologies and colors (Gruppo di lavoro MS 2008), in order to allow the easy interpretation by all users. The data download tools allow data exchange between working groups and the scientific community to benefit from the activities. The seismic microzonation activities are still ongoing. WebEQ is enabling easy management of large amounts of data and will form a basis for the development of tools for the management of the upcoming seismic emergencies.

  4. 77 FR 43100 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency-009...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Information System (NEMIS)--Mitigation (MT) Electronic Grants Management System of Records,'' and retitle it... Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency is proposing changes to the following: (1) System name: (2... Information System (NEMIS)--Mitigation (MT) Electronic Grants Management System of Records (69 FR 75079...

  5. Improving Emergency Management by Modeling Ant Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    neighboring cell than on the master plan, DNA .21 Johnson describes emergence as a means of self-organizing from the bottom-up. In emergent systems...carrying undesirable goods, such as bird poop, back to the nest. In the event poop makes it back to the nest, the poop is rejected near the entrance of the...by Army Ants,” 1124–5. 26 migrating to a colony raiding.98 A daily traffic jam is not indicative of organizational efficiency. Also, as the

  6. A governor's guide to emergency management. Volume one, Natural disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-27

    With lives, infrastructure, and resources at stake, governors must become instant experts in emergency management when their states are affected by natural disaster. The purpose of A Governor's Guide to Emergency Management is to provide governors an...

  7. The Profession of Emergency Management: Educational Opportunities and Gaps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Darlington, Joanne D

    2008-01-01

    For the past several years, as the profession of emergency management has been evolving, there has been a growing interest in the need for more formalized training for the nation s hazards and emergency managers...

  8. Emergency management of acute abdomen in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Binesh; Singhi, Sunit; Lal, Sadhna

    2013-03-01

    Acute abdomen can be defined as a medical emergency in which there is sudden and severe pain in abdomen with accompanying signs and symptoms that focus on an abdominal involvement. It accounts for about 8 % of all children attending the emergency department. The goal of emergency management is to identify and treat any life-threatening medical or surgical disease condition and relief from pain. In mild cases often the cause is gastritis or gastroenteritis, colic, constipation, pharyngo-tonsilitis, viral syndromes or acute febrile illnesses. The common surgical causes are malrotation and Volvulus (in early infancy), intussusception, acute appendicitis, and typhoid and ischemic enteritis with perforation. Lower lobe pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis and acute porphyria should be considered in patients with moderate-severe pain with little localizing findings in abdomen. The approach to management in ED should include, in order of priority, a rapid cardiopulmonary assessment to ensure hemodynamic stability, focused history and examination, surgical consult and radiologic examination to exclude life threatening surgical conditions, pain relief and specific diagnosis. In a sick patient the initial steps include rapid IV access and normal saline 20 ml/kg (in the presence of shock/hypovolemia), adequate analgesia, nothing per oral/IV fluids, Ryle's tube aspiration and surgical consultation. An ultrasound abdomen is the first investigation in almost all cases with moderate and severe pain with localizing abdominal findings. In patients with significant abdominal trauma or features of pancreatitis, a Contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CECT) abdomen will be a better initial modality. Continuous monitoring and repeated physical examinations should be done in all cases. Specific management varies according to the specific etiology.

  9. A deep-learning-based emergency alert system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byungseok Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency alert systems serve as a critical link in the chain of crisis communication, and they are essential to minimize loss during emergencies. Acts of terrorism and violence, chemical spills, amber alerts, nuclear facility problems, weather-related emergencies, flu pandemics, and other emergencies all require those responsible such as government officials, building managers, and university administrators to be able to quickly and reliably distribute emergency information to the public. This paper presents our design of a deep-learning-based emergency warning system. The proposed system is considered suitable for application in existing infrastructure such as closed-circuit television and other monitoring devices. The experimental results show that in most cases, our system immediately detects emergencies such as car accidents and natural disasters.

  10. Institutional and legislative issues of emergency management policy in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfiriev, B

    2001-12-14

    The emergency management policy as an organic component of the national development policy in contemporary Russia exists only for a slight more than a decade. However, its basic trends and directions could be revealed. In the legislative area covering technological accidents involving hazardous materials these include increasing differentiation of acts in terms of issue coverage, gradual integration of legislation via enforcement of the so-called systemic (umbrella) acts and increasing incorporation of specific acts, and keeping dominance of federal emergency acts. In addition, emergency legislation and policy programs on communities' protection against major hazards drift from alleviation-oriented towards more mitigation-focused. Meanwhile, the bulk of the existing acts are still specific laws and regulations, which consider most emergency response. In institutional realms the key direction of emergency policy development involved organization and progress of the Unified State System for Emergency Prevention and Elimination of the Russian Federation (USEPE) with EMERCOM as a key coordinator and actor in handling technological hazards and accidents. The detailed analysis of USEPE organizational pattern and operation modes including institutional structure, key functions, means and forces and operation routines is provided. It is argued that the system's logic and flexible organizational framework only to some extent contribute to effective mitigation of the major emergencies and/or disasters. In no less extent it depends on the existing socioeconomic conditions, which have been for a long time unfavorable in Russia and thus seriously constrain the USEPE effectiveness. This provides for ambiguous integral evaluation of the emergency management policy in the 1990s and early 2000s.

  11. Management of syncope in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M J

    2009-08-01

    Syncope is a common presenting complaint to the emergency department (ED). Its assessment is difficult. Some serious causes of syncope are transient and patients with a potentially life threatening condition may appear well by the time they reach the ED. Accurate history taking is vital and is often diagnostic whilst identification of a cardiac cause is associated with an increased mortality. This is related to underlying cardiac disease; patients presenting with syncope who have significant cardiac disease should be investigated thoroughly to determine the nature of the underlying heart disease and the cause of syncope. Early work suggested that as many as 30% of patients with cardiac syncope died within one year of presentation. This led to physicians admitting many patients with unexplained syncope however presently there is little evidence that focussed investigation, or even admission leads to an improved prognosis. Studies looking at syncope clinical decision units have though shown these to be of some benefit. Risk stratification studies on syncope in the ED have attempted to help emergency physicians target high-risk patients once those with clearly identifiable conditions have been identified and managed. These clinical decision rules have suffered from poor external validation and in the USA where many of these tools were developed, a universal consensus approach remains lacking. Although no individual tool has yet been successfully implemented into standard practice, as a whole they have probably enabled emergency physicians to become more aware of the risk factors that are likely to lead to poor outcome. It is likely that serious outcome in syncope although significant, is not quite as common as previously thought. Presently the American College of Emergency Physician (ACEP) guidelines are the most useful guidelines written for the emergency physician. With biochemical markers showing some promise, further work may lead to incorporation of these into

  12. Telemedicine for Trauma, Emergencies, and Disaster Management

    CERN Document Server

    Latifi, Rifat

    2010-01-01

    Telemedicine has evolved to become an important field of medicine and healthcare, involving everything from simple patient care to actual performance of operations at a distance. This groundbreaking volume addresses the complex technical and clinical development in the management of trauma, disaster, and emergency situations using telemedicine. The book explains how telemedicine and related technologies can be used to effectively handle a wide range of scenarios, from a situation as small as a car crash, to major disasters such as an earthquake. Professionals find critical discussions on the p

  13. Integrating Emerging Data Sources into Operational Practice : Opportunities for Integration of Emerging Data for Traffic Management and TMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    With the emergence of data generated from connected vehicles, connected travelers, and connected infrastructure, the capabilities of traffic management systems or centers (TMCs) will need to be improved to allow agencies to compile and benefit from u...

  14. Monitoring and data management strategies for nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Since the accident at Chernobyl in 1986, many countries have intensified their efforts in nuclear emergency planning, preparedness and management. Experience from the NEA nuclear emergency exercises (INEX 1 and INEX 2) indicated a need to improve the international system of communication and information in case of a radiological emergency. To address this need, research was carried out by three NEA working groups, the findings of which are synthesised in the present report. This report defines emergency monitoring and modelling needs, and proposes strategies which will assist decision makers by improving the selection of data that is transmitted, and the way in which data and information are transmitted and received. Modern communication methods, such as the Internet, are a key part of the strategies described. (author)

  15. Emergency Management for Disasters in Malaysian Hotel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlBattat Ahmad Rasmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify major emergencies that have the potential to place Malaysian hotels in emergency and disaster situations; investigate how hotels were prepared for emergencies, how they manage and overcome emergencies when occurred; and limitations and factors influencing successful emergency planning and adoption emergency management in Malaysian hotels. Face-to-face interview with managers from three, four and five star hotels from different backgrounds: local; regional; and International in Kuala Lumpur, Subang, and Putrajaya are undertaken. The result revealed that Malaysian hotels are exposed to a wide range of natural and man-made disasters. Malaysian hotels lack proactive emergency planning and a lot of constraints which impede successful emergency planning for disasters in the hotel industry in Malaysia, with emphasizing on the relevant authority’s role to demonstrate emergency management to hotels convincing them to adopt such practices, so they can be able to cope with emergencies effectively.

  16. Emergency thoracic ultrasound and clinical risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Interrigi MC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Concetta Interrigi,1 Francesca M Trovato,2,3 Daniela Catalano,3,4 Guglielmo M Trovato3,5 1Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Cannizzaro, Catania, 2Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Civile, Ragusa, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, 4Postgraduate School of Clinical Ultrasound, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, University of Catania, 5Postgraduate School of e-Learning and ICT in Health Sciences, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy Purpose: Thoracic ultrasound (TUS has been proposed as an easy-option replacement for chest X-ray (CXR in emergency diagnosis of pneumonia, pleural effusion, and pneumothorax. We investigated CXR unforeseen diagnosis, subsequently investigated by TUS, considering its usefulness in clinical risk assessment and management and also assessing the sustainability of telementoring. Patients and methods: This observational report includes a period of 6 months with proactive concurrent adjunctive TUS diagnosis telementoring, which was done using freely available smartphone applications for transfer of images and movies. Results: Three hundred and seventy emergency TUS scans (excluding trauma patients were performed and telementored. In 310 cases, no significant chest pathology was detected either by CXR, TUS, or the subsequent work-up; in 24 patients, there was full concordance between TUS and CXR (ten isolated pleural effusion; eleven pleural effusion with lung consolidations; and three lung consolidation without pleural effusion; in ten patients with lung consolidations, abnormalities identified by CXR were not detected by TUS. In 26 patients, only TUS diagnosis criteria of disease were present: in 19 patients, CXR was not diagnostic, ie, substantially negative, but TUS detected these conditions correctly, and these were later confirmed by computed

  17. Emerging Technologies: Biosecurity and Consequence Management Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Dana; Nordmann, Brian

    The natural outbreaks of disease and pandemics are transnational threats that create international challenges when detection and containment are not timely due to scarce human and material resources. Whether the cause of those outbreaks is natural or intentional in origin, the main goal of consequence management operations is to save lives. The consequence management process is a continuum of inter-connected phases such as planning, preparation, response, and recovery. The rapid advances of life sciences and the emergence of dual-use technologies such as synthetic biology and nanotechnology pose additional challenges in terms of planning for the unknown potential threats whether they may be synthetic microorganisms with unpredictable dissemination patterns or nanoscale-manipulated biological agents evading current detection capabilities. The US National Strategy for Countering Biological Threats is emphasizing prevention while continuing to support the national preparedness goals and response/recovery capabilities. The recent policies, guidelines, and recommendations on overhauling the biological risk management in the United States are a proactive stance to a rapidly changing global environment. They include optimization of the current oversight frameworks and active engagement of the industry and academia in order to reduce the risk that individuals with ill intent may exploit the commercial application of nucleic acid synthesis technology to access genetic material derived from or by encoding Biological Select Agents or Toxins. We are also actively seeking to increase our knowledge of health effects of various types of nanomaterials, and how to assess, control, and prevent harmful exposure, taking into consideration the numerous gaps that currently exist with regard to the distinct behavior of nanoparticles compared to the same chemical or material at "macro-scale". Fundamentally, a biological incident, whether it is of natural, accidental, or deliberate origin

  18. Integrating the radioactive waste management system into other management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Ana Cristina Lourenco da; Nunes Neto, Carlos Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is to be included in the Integrated Management System (IMS) which pursues the continuous improvement of the company's quality, occupational safety and health, and environment protection processes. Radioactive waste management is based on the following aspects: optimization of human and material resources for execution of tasks, including the provision of a radiation protection supervisor to watch over the management of radioactive waste; improved documentation (management plan and procedures); optimization of operational levels for waste classification and release; maintenance of generation records and history through a database that facilitates traceability of information; implementation of radioactive waste segregation at source (source identification, monitoring and decontamination) activities intended to reduce the amount of radioactive waste; licensing of initial storage site for radioactive waste control and storage; employee awareness training on radioactive waste generation; identification and evaluation of emergency situations and response planning; implementation of preventive maintenance program for safety related items; development and application of new, advanced treatment methodologies or systems. These aspects are inherent in the concepts underlying quality management (establishment of administrative controls and performance indicators), environment protection (establishment of operational levels and controls for release), occupational health and safety (establishment of operational controls for exposure in emergency and routine situations and compliance with strict legal requirements and standards). It is noted that optimizing the addressed aspects of a radioactive waste management system further enhances the efficiency of the Integrated Management System for Quality, Environment, and Occupational Safety and Health. (author)

  19. Integrating emergency services in an urban health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radloff, D; Blouin, A S; Larsen, L; Kripp, M E

    2000-03-01

    When planning for growth and management efficiency across urban health systems, economic and market factors present significant service line challenges and opportunities. This article describes the evolutionary integration of emergency services in St John Health System, a large, religious-sponsored health care system located in Detroit, Michigan. Critical business elements, including the System's vision, mission, and economic context, are defined as the framework for site-specific and System-wide planning. The impact of managed care and market changes prompted St John's clinicians and executives to explore how integrating emergency services could create a competitive market advantage.

  20. Protecting your business: from emergency planning to crisis management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, C.G.

    1999-01-01

    The forthcoming UK Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) regulations under the European Community's Seveso II Directive will impose a new formal requirement to test emergency plans. This might be approached as an added burden on industry to demonstrate safe operation, or can be viewed alternatively as an opportunity to improve crisis management systems and thereby decrease the risks to the business. Crisis is by nature an ambiguous and complex environment, demanding endless initiative, inventiveness, communication, co-ordination and learning. Because large-scale crises threatening the entire business are not frequent, learning from experience must be replaced by competence-assurance based on systems thinking, on risk assessment, on wide scenario simulations and on rigorous training. This paper discusses the benefits from various types of testing of emergency plans and from a business approach to continuous improvement in crisis management capability. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Petascale system management experiences.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, N.; Bradshaw, R.; Lueninghoener, C.; Cherry, A.; Coghlan, S.; Scullin, W. (LCF); ( MCS)

    2008-01-01

    Petascale High-Performance Computing (HPC) systems are among the largest systems in the world. Intrepid, one such system, is a 40,000 node, 556 teraflop Blue Gene/P system that has been deployed at Argonne National Laboratory. In this paper, we provide some background about the system and our administration experiences. In particular, due to the scale of the system, we have faced a variety of issues, some surprising to us, that are not common in the commodity world. We discuss our expectations, these issues, and approaches we have used to address them. HPC systems are a bellwether for computing systems at large, in multiple regards. HPC users are motivated by the need for absolute performance; this results in two important pushes. HPC users are frequently early adopters of new technologies and techniques. Successful technologies, like Infiniband, prove their value in HPC before gaining wider adoption. Unfortunately, this early adoption alone is not sufficient to achieve the levels of performance required by HPC users; parallelism must also be harnessed. Over the last 15 years, beowulf clustering has provided amazing accessibility to non-HPC-savvy and even non-technical audiences. During this time, substantial adoption of clustering has occurred in many market segments unrelated to computational science. A simple trend has emerged: the scale and performance of high-end HPC systems are uncommon at first, but become commonplace over the course of 3-5 years. For example, in early 2003, several systems on the Top500 list consisted of either 1024 nodes or 4096-8192 cores. In 2008, such systems are commonplace. The most recent generation of high-end HPC systems, so called petascale systems, are the culmination of years of research and development in research and academia. Three such systems have been deployed thus far. In addition to the 556 TF Intrepid system at Argonne National Laboratory, a 596 TF Blue Gene/L-based system has been deployed at Lawrence Livermore

  2. The German emergency and disaster medicine and management system—history and present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Hecker

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As well for optimized emergency management in individual cases as for optimized mass medicine in disaster management, the principle of the medical doctors approaching the patient directly and timely, even close to the site of the incident, is a long-standing marker for quality of care and patient survival in Germany. Professional rescue and emergency forces, including medical services, are the “Golden Standard” of emergency management systems. Regulative laws, proper organization of resources, equipment, training and adequate delivery of medical measures are key factors in systematic approaches to manage emergencies and disasters alike and thus save lives. During disasters command, communication, coordination and cooperation are essential to cope with extreme situations, even more so in a globalized world. In this article, we describe the major historical milestones, the current state of the German system in emergency and disaster management and its integration into the broader European approach. Keywords: Emergency medical systems, Disaster medicine, Public health, Germany

  3. Emergency management of ureteral stones: Recent advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Osorio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most ureteral stones can be observed with reasonable expectation of uneventful stone passage. When an active ureteral stone treatment is warranted, the best procedure to choose is dependent on several factors, besides stone size and location, including operators′ experience, patients′ preference, available equipment and related costs. Placement of double-J stent or nephrostomy tube represents the classical procedures performed in a renal colic due to acute ureteral obstruction when the conservative drug therapy does not resolve the symptoms. These maneuvers are usually followed by ureteroscopy or extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, which currently represent the mainstay of treatment for ureteral stones. In this review paper a literature search was performed to identify reports dealing with emergency management of renal colic due to ureteral stones. The main aspects related to this debated issue are analyzed and the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option are carefully discussed.

  4. Emergency management of ureteral stones: Recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Luis; Lima, Estêvão; Autorino, Riccardo; Marcelo, Filinto

    2008-10-01

    Most ureteral stones can be observed with reasonable expectation of uneventful stone passage. When an active ureteral stone treatment is warranted, the best procedure to choose is dependent on several factors, besides stone size and location, including operators' experience, patients' preference, available equipment and related costs. Placement of double-J stent or nephrostomy tube represents the classical procedures performed in a renal colic due to acute ureteral obstruction when the conservative drug therapy does not resolve the symptoms. These maneuvers are usually followed by ureteroscopy or extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, which currently represent the mainstay of treatment for ureteral stones. In this review paper a literature search was performed to identify reports dealing with emergency management of renal colic due to ureteral stones. The main aspects related to this debated issue are analyzed and the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option are carefully discussed.

  5. Improvement of Emergency Management Mechanism of Public Health Crisis in Rural China: A Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiaxiang; Chen, Chao; Kuai, Tingting

    2018-02-01

    With the rapid development of social economy in China, various public health emergencies frequently occur. Such emergencies cause a serious threat to human health and public safety, especially in rural China. Owing to flaws in emergency management mechanism and policy, the government is not capable to effectively deal with public health emergencies. Therefore, this study aimed to discuss the path to improve the emergency management mechanism for public health emergency in rural China. This study was conducted in 2017 to detect the emergency management mechanism of public health crisis (EMMPHC) in Rural China. Data were collected using the following keywords: Rural China, public health emergency, emergency management mechanism, organization mechanism, operation mechanism in the databases of PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and CNKI. EMMPHC in rural China can be enhanced from the following three aspects. First, a permanent institution for rural emergency management with public health management function is established. Second, the entire process of emergency management mechanism, including the stages of pre-disaster, disaster, and post-disaster, is improved. Finally, investment in rural public health is increased, and an adequate reserve system for emergency resources is formed. The new path of EMMPHC in rural China can effectively help the local government accomplish the dispatch capability in public health emergency, and it has important research significance for the protection of public health and social stability of residents in rural China.

  6. Dental Emergencies: Management Strategies That Improve Outcomes [Digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedigo, Ryan Anthony; Zaurova, Milana

    2017-06-22

    Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice . Acute dental emergencies are a common chief complaint presenting to emergency departments, and they are increasing substantially in frequency. The diagnosis and management of dental emergencies is a core competency of the emergency clinician, and proper therapeutic strategies can significantly improve cosmetic and functional outcomes for patients. This issue provides a systematic review of the literature on common acute traumatic and atraumatic dental emergencies with a focus on the historical and physical examination findings that must be understood to identify life-threatening infections, relieve pain, salvage natural teeth, and communicate with specialists in the further management of patients after emergency treatment.

  7. NDMA guidelines on management of nuclear and radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abani, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), ever since it's formation as an apex policy making body for the country in the field of disaster management, has formulated a set of guidelines to assist the various ministries, states and stakeholders in preparing their plans to handle different types of disasters. The guidelines on management of nuclear and radiological emergencies assume great importance in the present context, as our country has very ambitious programme to exploit nuclear energy for peaceful uses. Though, we have an enviable and impeccable record of safety and virtually fail-safe operations in all our nuclear establishments, the possibility, however, remote it may be, of human error, systems failure, sabotage, earthquake, floods, terrorist attacks etc leading to the release of radioactive material in the public domain, cannot be entirely ruled out. With this view, it was decided to prepare the national guidelines by NDMA to manage any nuclear/radiological emergency in public domain. Through these guidelines, we aim to further strengthen our existing nuclear/radiological emergency management framework and generate public awareness, which will go a long way in allaying misapprehensions, if any, amongst the public about the country's nuclear programme. Like in all our guidelines for handling of different types of the disasters, in these Guidelines also, maximum emphasis has been laid on the prevention of nuclear and radiological emergencies, along with a detailed consideration of all other elements of the disaster management continuum. The national guidelines have been prepared and a consensus was arrived on various issues, after widespread consultations and elaborates discussions amongst experts as well as stakeholders. It is assumed that once these guidelines are implemented by the stakeholders and converted into action plans followed by SOPs that will further reduce the chances of accidents in the nuclear arena. (author)

  8. Emergency Preparedness and Response Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvarez, Maria D

    2006-01-01

    .... Natural and man-made disasters, such as earthquakes, floods, plane crashes, high-rise building collapses, or major nuclear facility malfunctions, pose an ever-present danger challenge to public emergency services...

  9. Barrett's Esophagus: Emerging Knowledge and Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Atul; Stairs, Douglas B.; Mani, Haresh; McGarrity, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased exponentially in the last 3 decades. Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor of EAC. Patients with BE have a greater than 40 folds higher risk of EAC compared with the general population. Recent years have witnessed a revolution in the clinical and molecular research related to BE. However, several aspects of this condition remain controversial. Data regarding the true prevalence of BE have varied widely. Recent studies have suggested a lower incidence of EAC in nondysplastic BE (NDBE) than previously reported. There is paucity of prospective data showing a survival benefit of screening or surveillance for BE. Furthermore, the ever-increasing emphasis on healthcare cost containment has called for reexamination of the screening and surveillance strategies for BE. There is a need for identification of reliable clinical predictors or molecular biomarkers to risk-stratify patients who might benefit the most from screening or surveillance for BE. Finally, new therapies have emerged for the management of dysplastic BE. In this paper, we highlight the key areas of controversy and uncertainty surrounding BE. The paper discusses, in detail, the current literature about the molecular pathogenesis, biomarkers, histopathological diagnosis, and management strategies for BE. PMID:22701199

  10. Human Resource Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Navaz, A. S. Syed; Fiaz, A. S. Syed; Prabhadevi, C.; Sangeetha, V.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper titled HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM is basically concerned with managing the Administrator of HUMAN RESOURCE Department in a company. A Human Resource Management System, refers to the systems and processes at the intersection between human resource management and information technology. It merges HRM as a discipline and in particular its basic HR activities and processes with the information technology field, whereas the programming of data processing systems evolved into standa...

  11. Improving emergency preparedness and crisis management capabilities in transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-30

    Despite the heightened attention disaster preparedness and emergency management have received over the past decade, serious weaknesses in the United States emergency response capabilities remain at all levels of government and across a wide range ...

  12. Avionics System Performance Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damania, Bhavesh

    1998-01-01

    .... The reasons for improved performance management include advances in processor technology and architectures, increasingly integrated systems, and the requirement of reducing costs in developing and deploying the systems...

  13. Credit Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Credit Management System. Outsourced Internet-based application. CMS stores and processes data related to USAID credit programs. The system provides information...

  14. Innovation Management in Emerging Technology Ventures – The Concept of an Integrated Idea Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Voigt, K.-I.

    2007-01-01

    For decades, suggestion systems have been used to include employees in the innovation process. However, in order to gather superior ideas, integrating external stakeholders is critical to the innovation success. Within this paper, the authors derive a sophisticated model of an integrated idea......, development and sales. Here especially, differentiating potentials are offered for emerging technology ventures. But it is important that idea and innovation management are integrated during the building-up stage while internal and external network structures are still manageable and often consist...... of the managers' and founders' personal contacts. Hence, the earlier an integrated idea management is implemented, the greater is the probability of high numbers of successful innovations....

  15. [Emergency management of acute pain in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichard, Evelyne

    2003-12-15

    Acute pains requiring emergency management in oncology can be considered as physiopathological, somatic or visceral nociceptive pains. They are linked: to the tumour, indicating a modification of the tumoural evolution (necrosis, haemorrhage, fracture, acute obstruction of hollow organs or canals, occlusion, hydronephrosis); to the treatment: (inflammation of mucosal membranes, anusitis, post PL syndromes); and to invasive investigations. They are equally neuropathic, revealing an underlying threatened or confirmed medullary compression, or induced by neurotoxic chemotherapy. They are also analysed according to their mode of apparition: mechanical, arising as acute on chronic pain (the pre-fracture pain of metastases); insufficiency of the duration of therapeutic efficacity; an acute episode of neuropathic pain that is often lancing, unpredictable and inevitable. In all cases, it needs to be quantitatively and qualitatively analysed: evaluation, flavour of the symptoms; in order to choose one or a combination of adapted molecules, true antalgics or co-antalgics, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. To counteract this pain, medications with a short onset of action and a short half-life should be used to avoid side effects. These are administered in an intercurrent manner, initially starting at a low dose, modified daily according to the utilisation of supplementary doses. It is necessary to anticipate pain provoked by physical examinations or nursing care as much in the timing as the pharmacology, in using antalgics and/or anxiolytics with a short duration of action. Acutely emerging pains, whatever be their type, arising in the context of cancer and long-term pain are sensitising elements to all further pains, as they imprint in the memory, and are very negatively conditioned by the anguishing context of the illness.

  16. Social Media's New Role in Emergency Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethan Huffman; Sara Prentice

    2008-03-01

    As technology continues to evolve, emergency management organizations must adapt to new ways of responding to the media and public. This paper examines a brief overview of social media's new role in emergency management. This includes definitions of social media, the benefits of utilizing social media, examples of social media being used and finally a discussion of how agencies, such as Department of Energy national laboratories, can begin including social media in their emergency management plans.

  17. Postpartum preeclampsia: emergency department presentation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Lynne M; Withers, Elizabeth; Bakes, Katherine; Abbott, Jean

    2011-04-01

    Postpartum preeclampsia/eclampsia is the presence of hypertension and proteinuria, with or without seizures, occurring up to 4 weeks after delivery. We describe the Emergency Department (ED) presentation, signs and symptoms, results of diagnostic studies, management, and outcome in a cohort of patients diagnosed with postpartum preeclampsia/eclampsia at our institutions, and use this to review the diagnosis and management of postpartum preeclampsia/eclampsia. A retrospective chart review was conducted at two urban teaching hospitals. Twenty-two cases were identified via ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, 9(th) revision) codes of discharge diagnoses over an 8-year period. Only those patients who initially presented to an ED in the postpartum period after hospital discharge were included. A standardized data tool was used to extract demographic data, signs and symptoms of preeclampsia/eclampsia, ancillary studies previously associated with eclamptic pathology, and outcome during admission. Of the 22 women, over half (55%) had not been diagnosed with preeclampsia in the ante- or peripartum period. Common prodromal symptoms and signs in the postpartum presentation included headache, visual changes, hypertension, edema, proteinuria, elevated uric acid, and elevated liver function tests. All 4 patients who seized had prodromal symptoms. Women presented from 3 to 10 days postpartum (median: 5 days). Only 10 women were primiparas. Nineteen women presented with diastolic blood pressures > 90 mm, and only 3 of these had diastolic blood pressures of 110 mm Hg or greater. Postpartum preeclampsia/eclampsia often presents to the ED without a history of preeclampsia during the pregnancy. Further, not all women with this diagnosis who present to the ED in the postpartum period will have each of the "classic" features of this disease, including elevated blood pressure, edema, proteinuria, and hyperreflexia. This report is intended to inform emergency physicians of the

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory emergency management plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, G.F.

    1998-07-15

    The Laboratory has developed this Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to assist in emergency planning, preparedness, and response to anticipated and actual emergencies. The Plan establishes guidance for ensuring safe Laboratory operation, protection of the environment, and safeguarding Department of Energy (DOE) property. Detailed information and specific instructions required by emergency response personnel to implement the EMP are contained in the Emergency Management Plan Implementing Procedure (EMPIP) document, which consists of individual EMPIPs. The EMP and EMPIPs may be used to assist in resolving emergencies including but not limited to fires, high-energy accidents, hazardous material releases (radioactive and nonradioactive), security incidents, transportation accidents, electrical accidents, and natural disasters.

  19. Maintenance and management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yasumasa.

    1992-01-01

    Since highly reliable operation is required in a nuclear power plant, monitoring during operation and periodical inspection are conducted carefully. The present invention provides maintenance and management systems for providing an aid so that these systems are combined effectively and operated rationally based on unified information management. That is, the system contains data bases comprising information for the design of the equipments and pipelines of a plant, information for the exchange of equipment parts, information for the history of plant operation, information for the monitoring and inspection, and information for the management of repair operation. In addition, it has an equipment part history management sub-system for managing equipment part exchange information, an operation history management sub-system for managing the operation state of the plant, an operation history management sub-system for managing equipment monitoring inspection data and operation management sub-system for managing periodical inspection/ repairing operation. These sub-systems are collectively combined to manage the maintenance and management jobs of the plant unitarily. (I.S.)

  20. An expert system for improving nuclear emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salame-Alfie, A.; Goldbogen, G.C.; Ryan, R.M.; Wallace, W.A.; Yeater, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The accidents at TMI-2 and Chernobyl have produced initiatives aimed at improving nuclear plant emergency response capabilities. Among them are the development of emergency response facilities with capabilities for the acquisition, processing, and diagnosis of data which are needed to help coordinate plant operations, engineering support and management under emergency conditions. An effort in this direction prompted the development of an expert system. EP (EMERGENCY PLANNER) is a prototype expert system that is intended to help coordinate the overall management during emergency conditions. The EP system was built using the GEN-X expert system shell. GEN-X has a variety of knowledge representation mechanisms including AND/OR trees, Decision trees, and IF/THEN tables, and runs on an IBM PC-XT or AT computer or compatible. Among the main features, EP is portable, modular, user friendly, can interact with external programs and interrogate data bases. The knowledge base is made of New York State (NYS) Procedures for Emergency Classification, NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Plan (REPP) and knowledge from experts of the NYS Radiological Emergency Preparedness Group and the Office of Radiological Health and Chemistry of the New York Power Authority (NYPA)

  1. Maintenance management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohan, M. de

    1989-01-01

    This paper is concerned principally with Maintenance Management systems and their effective introduction into organisations. Maintenance improvement is basically a problem of managing the maintenance department in the broadest sense. Improvement does not only lie in the area of special techniques, systems or procedures; although they are valuable tools, but rather in a balanced attack, carefully guided by management. Over recent years, maintenance systems have received the major emphasis and in many instances the selection of the system has become a pre-occupation, whereas the importance of each maintenance function must be recognised and good management practices applied to all maintenance activities. The ingredients for success in the implementation of maintenance management systems are summarised as: having a management committee, clear objectives, project approach using project management techniques and an enthusiastic leader, user managed and data processing supported project, realistic budget and an understanding of the financial audit requirements. (author)

  2. Emerging carbon constraints for corporate risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Timo; Hoffmann, Volker H.

    2007-01-01

    While discussions about global sustainability challenges abound, the financial risks that they incur, albeit important, have received less attention. We suggest that corporate risk assessments should include sustainability-related aspects, especially with relation to the natural environment, and encompass the flux of critical materials within a company's value chain. Such a comprehensive risk assessment takes into account input- as well as output-related factors. With this paper, we focus on the flux of carbon and define carbon constraints that emerge due to the disposition of fossil fuels in the input dimension and due to direct and indirect climate change effects in the output dimension. We review the literature regarding the financial consequences of carbon constraints on the macroeconomic, sector, and company level. We conclude that: a) financial consequences seem to be asymmetrically distributed between and within sectors, b) the individual risk exposure of companies depends on the intensity of and dependency on carbon-based materials and energy, and c) financial markets have only started to incorporate these aspects in their valuations. This paper ends with recommendations on how to incorporate our results in an integrated carbon risk management framework. (author)

  3. Special event planning for the emergency manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Peter T

    2009-11-01

    In the domain of emergency management and homeland security there is a lack of a formal planning process at the local level when it comes to special event planning. The unique nature of special event planning demands an understanding of the planning process for both traditional and non-traditional planning partners. This understanding will make certain that local governments apply due diligence when planning for the safety of the public. This paper offers a practical roadmap for planning at the local level. It will address those 'special events' that are beyond routine local events but not of a sufficient scale to be granted National Special Security Event status. Due to the infrequency of 'special events' in most communities, it is imperative that deliberate planning takes place. Upon conclusion, the reader will be able to construct a planning process tailored to the needs of their community, guide both traditional and non-traditional planning partners through the planning process, determine priorities, explore alternatives, plan for contingencies, conduct a confirmation brief, facilitate operations and assemble an after-action report and improvement plan.

  4. Food allergy: Diagnosis, management & emerging therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Glick Robison

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IgE-mediated food allergy is an important health concern with increasing prevalence worldwide. Manifestations of IgE-mediated food allergy include urticaria, angioedema, pruritus, difficulty in breathing, laryngeal oedema, vomiting, diarrhoea and/or hypotension within minutes to two hours of the offending food′s ingestion. Diagnosis requires both a careful history and supportive testing with laboratory studies and possibly oral food challenges. Current treatment of food allergy focuses on avoidance of the allergen and prompt emergency management of reactions. Epinephrine autoinjectors are provided to patients for the treatment of severe reactions. More research is needed to determine the optimal timing with which to introduce common allergens into a child′s diet to possibly prevent the development of food allergy. Novel therapies are under investigation given the difficulty of allergen avoidance and the potentially fatal nature of reactions. Both allergen specific therapies such as oral, sublingual and epicutaneous immunotherapy and allergen non-specific therapies such the Chinese herbal formula FAHF-2 and omalizumab show promise though more data on efficacy and long-term safety are needed before these therapies become mainstream.

  5. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability

  6. Role of the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries' Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) in the 2007 equine influenza emergency animal disease response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, M G; Fraser, G C; Gaul, W N

    2011-07-01

    A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) was used to manage the laboratory data and support planning and field activities as part of the response to the equine influenza outbreak in Australia in 2007. The database structure of the LIMS and the system configurations that were made to best handle the laboratory implications of the disease response are discussed. The operational aspects of the LIMS and the related procedures used at the laboratory to process the increased sample throughput are reviewed, as is the interaction of the LIMS with other corporate systems used in the management of the response. Outcomes from this tailored configuration and operation of the LIMS resulted in effective provision and control of the laboratory and laboratory information aspects of the response. The extent and immediate availability of the information provided from the LIMS was critical to some of the activities of key operatives involved in controlling the response. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2011 Australian Veterinary Association.

  7. Traffic Management for Emergency Vehicle Priority Based on Visual Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapileswar Nellore

    2016-11-01

    simulation results have shown that the PE-MAC outperforms the IEEE 802.11p in terms of average end-to-end delay, throughput and energy consumption. The performance evaluation results have proven that the proposed PE-MAC prioritizes the emergency vehicle data and delivers the emergency messages to the TMC with less delay compared to the IEEE 802.11p. The transmission delay of the proposed PE-MAC is also compared with the standard IEEE 802.15.4, and Enhanced Back-off Selection scheme for IEEE 802.15.4 protocol [EBSS, an existing protocol to ensure fast transmission of the detected events on the road towards the TMC] and the comparative results have proven the effectiveness of the PE-MAC over them. Furthermore, this research work will provide an insight into the design of an intelligent urban traffic management system for the effective management of emergency vehicles and will help to save lives and property.

  8. Traffic Management for Emergency Vehicle Priority Based on Visual Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellore, Kapileswar; Hancke, Gerhard P

    2016-11-10

    have shown that the PE-MAC outperforms the IEEE 802.11p in terms of average end-to-end delay, throughput and energy consumption. The performance evaluation results have proven that the proposed PE-MAC prioritizes the emergency vehicle data and delivers the emergency messages to the TMC with less delay compared to the IEEE 802.11p. The transmission delay of the proposed PE-MAC is also compared with the standard IEEE 802.15.4, and Enhanced Back-off Selection scheme for IEEE 802.15.4 protocol [EBSS, an existing protocol to ensure fast transmission of the detected events on the road towards the TMC] and the comparative results have proven the effectiveness of the PE-MAC over them. Furthermore, this research work will provide an insight into the design of an intelligent urban traffic management system for the effective management of emergency vehicles and will help to save lives and property.

  9. Integrated management systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bugdol, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Examining the challenges of integrated management, this book explores the importance and potential benefits of using an integrated approach as a cross-functional concept of management. It covers not only standardized management systems (e.g. International Organization for Standardization), but also models of self-assessment, as well as different types of integration. Furthermore, it demonstrates how processes and systems can be integrated, and how management efficiency can be increased. The major part of this book focuses on management concepts which use integration as a key tool of management processes (e.g. the systematic approach, supply chain management, virtual and network organizations, processes management and total quality management). Case studies, illustrations, and tables are also provided to exemplify and illuminate the content, as well as examples of successful and failed integrations. Providing a particularly useful resource to managers and specialists involved in the improvement of organization...

  10. Audit Information Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID/OIG has initiated its new Audit Information Management System (AIMS) to track OIG's audit recommendations and USAID's management decisions. OIG's in-house...

  11. Ukraine - USA partnership for peace. AEMS project on development and improving of 'Defense' automated emergency management system of the Civil Defense Department of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    AEMS project is destined for the development and improving of 'Defense' system of the Civil Defense Department of Ukraine. 'Defense' system is destined for prevention and operation prognosis of emergencies of technological and natural character on the territory of Ukraine as well as for the elaboration of the solutions on protection and rescue of the population and national economy resources. The data are processed at national, regional, district and town levels. By the results of task solutions possible losses of human and material resources as well as necessary forces and means for removal of these consequences are defined. (R.P.)

  12. Information systems project management

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, David

    2014-01-01

    Information Systems Project Management addresses project management in the context of information systems. It deals with general project management principles, with focus on the special characteristics of information systems. It is based on an earlier text, but shortened to focus on essential project management elements.This updated version presents various statistics indicating endemic problems in completing information system projects on time, within budget, at designed functionality. While successful completion of an information systems project is a challenge, there are some things that ca

  13. Emergency management of traumatic dental injuries in 42 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaggar, Doaa; Andersson, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Availability and quality of emergency services for traumatic dental injuries (TDI) are important as the prognosis of TDI is decided at the place of accident or during the first hours after the injury has occurred. To report how emergency services for TDI are provided in some places around the world. This is a preliminary observational study of descriptive character. One-hundred and three participants from 83 cities in 42 countries described the emergency services in their city by answering a questionnaire related to: (1) availability of advice per telephone at the place of the accident; (2) availability of emergency treatment resources at different times of the day; and; (3) assessment of competence level of the person carrying out the service. Answers and comments were scored with regard to availability and level of competence. 62% of the participants were not satisfied with their current emergency services. 50% reported organized emergency telephone service always available. 43% of the advice given by phone was from professionals with dental training. An organized on-call 24/7 service was available in 33%. Treatment of TDI within the first hour was available in 53%. A competent dentist was available in 40%. 56% reported compromised competency outside office hours. Places with a well-organized system built on a well-developed first-line care managed by trauma-trained general dentists, ideally on a 24/7 basis, supported by on-call specialists outside office working hours, achieved the highest scores. With all the limitations of a preliminary questionnaire study, we can conclude that there is a need to perform more comprehensive well-designed studies in this field to understand more of the varying quality of emergency services worldwide. The major problem today seems to be related to limited availability and competence, especially outside office working hours. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Challenges of measuring quality in emergency management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynette, Jennifer Elyse

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the challenges and importance of measuring quality within the field of emergency response. Using quality as a standard of measurement to evaluate response efforts of trained personnel in emergency situations is necessary to increase effectiveness in the response phase of an e...... of how it can be measured, defined, perceived, and used to benefit emergency responders and the citizens they strive to protect....

  15. Managing hybrid marketing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, R T; Moran, U

    1990-01-01

    As competition increases and costs become critical, companies that once went to market only one way are adding new channels and using new methods - creating hybrid marketing systems. These hybrid marketing systems hold the promise of greater coverage and reduced costs. But they are also hard to manage; they inevitably raise questions of conflict and control: conflict because marketing units compete for customers; control because new indirect channels are less subject to management authority. Hard as they are to manage, however, hybrid marketing systems promise to become the dominant design, replacing the "purebred" channel strategy in all kinds of businesses. The trick to managing the hybrid is to analyze tasks and channels within and across a marketing system. A map - the hybrid grid - can help managers make sense of their hybrid system. What the chart reveals is that channels are not the basic building blocks of a marketing system; marketing tasks are. The hybrid grid forces managers to consider various combinations of channels and tasks that will optimize both cost and coverage. Managing conflict is also an important element of a successful hybrid system. Managers should first acknowledge the inevitability of conflict. Then they should move to bound it by creating guidelines that spell out which customers to serve through which methods. Finally, a marketing and sales productivity (MSP) system, consisting of a central marketing database, can act as the central nervous system of a hybrid marketing system, helping managers create customized channels and service for specific customer segments.

  16. Serious Games as Experiments for Emergency Management Research : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ruijven, T.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Serious games and virtual environments are increasingly used for emergency management training and research. The development of these technologies seems to contribute to a solution to some problems in the existing literature on emergency management which is mainly based on case study research.

  17. Managing psychiatric emergencies in persons with mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing psychiatric emergencies in persons with mental health issues at a primary care clinic. ... Nigerian Journal of Family Practice ... cross-sectional study and participants were health care staff of the clinic who were attending a seminar on Management of Psychiatric emergencies in Persons with Mental Health Issues.

  18. 44 CFR 13.20 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... management systems. 13.20 Section 13.20 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT... Standards for financial management systems. (a) A State must expand and account for grant funds in accordance with State laws and procedures for expending and accounting for its own funds. Fiscal control and...

  19. Municipal resilience: A paradigm shift in emergency and continuity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Greg; Luchia, Mike

    More than a decade of emergency and continuity management vision was instrumental in providing the unprecedented level of response and recovery from the great flood of 2013. Earlier assessments, planning and validation promulgated development of corporate continuity, emergency and contingency plans along with tactical, strategic and recovery operations centres that all led to a reliable emergency management model that will continue to provide the backbone for municipal resilience.

  20. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira; Patrícia Madalena Vieira Hermida; Fernanda Hannah da Silva Copelli; José Luís Guedes dos Santos; Alacoque Lorenzini Erdmann; Selma Regina de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency se...

  1. Nurse management skills required at an emergency care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Montezeli, Juliana Helena; Peres, Aida Maris; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the management skills needed for this professional at an emergency care unit. Method: An exploratory descriptive qualitative study conducted with eight nurses in which semi-structured interviews with nonparticipating systematic observation were conducted; the data was processed by content analysis. Results: The categories which emerged from the content analysis served as a list of management skills necessary to their work at the emergency care unit: leadership, decision...

  2. Facility Environmental Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the Web site of the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) facility Environmental Management System (EMS)....

  3. NASA's Risk Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2011-01-01

    Leadership is key to success. Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks -- risk office personnel. Each group is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk reporting and communication is an essential element of risk management and will combine both qualitative and quantitative elements. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  4. 40 ANAESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF SURGICAL EMERGENCIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... ABSTRACT. Anaesthesia for surgical procedures carries some risks. These risks are accentuated when the surgical operation is performed as an emergency procedure. The value of emergency in risk stratification underscores its relevance in clinical anaesthesia. Limited time for evaluation of patient ...

  5. A System Dynamic Model of Leader Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Judge, 2004; Judge, Bono, Ilies, & Gerhardt, 2002; Eagly, Johanneses-Schmidt, & Van Engen , 2003; Taggar, Hackett, & Saha, 1999; Stogdill, 1948...System dynamics emerged from the study of electrical control systems, and when generalized found many useful applications in natural systems outside...of the electrical world (Forrester, 1992). Whereas correlations describe cause and effect relationships in a linear equation, system dynamics

  6. Learning Content Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tache JURUBESCU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explains the evolution of e-Learning and related concepts and tools and its connection with other concepts such as Knowledge Management, Human Resources Management, Enterprise Resource Planning, and Information Technology. The paper also distinguished Learning Content Management Systems from Learning Management Systems and Content Management Systems used for general web-based content. The newest Learning Content Management System, very expensive and yet very little implemented is one of the best tools that helps us to cope with the realities of the 21st Century in what learning concerns. The debates over how beneficial one or another system is for an organization, can be driven by costs involved, efficiency envisaged, and availability of the product on the market.

  7. Transient global amnesia: emergency department evaluation and management [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jeremy Samuel; Nemes, Andreea; Zaurova, Milana

    2016-08-22

    Transient global amnesia is a clinically distinct syndrome characterized by the acute inability to form new memories. It can last up to 24 hours. The diagnosis is dependent on eliminating other more serious etiologies including toxic ingestions, acute strokes, complex partial seizures, and central nervous system infections. Transient global amnesia confers no known long-term risks; however, when abnormal signs or symptoms are present, they take precedence and guide the formulation of a differential diagnosis and investigation. In witnessed transient global amnesia with classic features, a minimalist approach is reasonable, avoiding overtesting, inappropriate medication, and medical interventions in favor of observation, ensuring patient safety, and reassuring patients and their families. This review provides a detailed framework for distinguishing transient global amnesia from its dangerous mimics and managing its course in the emergency department. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  8. Addressing challenges for future strategic-level emergency management: reframing, networking, and capacity-building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosomworth, Karyn; Owen, Christine; Curnin, Steven

    2017-04-01

    The mounting frequency and intensity of natural hazards, alongside growing interdependencies between social-technical and ecological systems, are placing increased pressure on emergency management. This is particularly true at the strategic level of emergency management, which involves planning for and managing non-routine, high-consequence events. Drawing on the literature, a survey, and interviews and workshops with Australia's senior emergency managers, this paper presents an analysis of five core challenges that these pressures are creating for strategic-level emergency management. It argues that emphasising 'emergency management' as a primary adaptation strategy is a retrograde step that ignores the importance of addressing socio-political drivers of vulnerabilities. Three key suggestions are presented that could assist the country's strategic-level emergency management in tackling these challenges: (i) reframe emergency management as a component of disaster risk reduction rather than them being one and the same; (ii) adopt a network governance approach; and (iii) further develop the capacities of strategic-level emergency managers. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  9. Environmental asset management: Risk management systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naudé, Brian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available purposes until the assets are exhausted. This paper addresses elements of environmental crime and the risk management strategies as part of EAP, including risk management system functions. A unique implemented risk management system in the Kruger National...

  10. JRODOS system: a modern and efficient tool for the management and preparation of nuclear and radiological emergencies and rehabilitation. Implementation in Spain; El sistema JRODOS: una herramienta moderna y eficaz para la gestion y preparacion de emergencias nucleares y radiologicas y la rehabilitacion. Implementacion en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montero Prieto, M.; Dvirzhark, A.; Acero, A.; Gallego Diaz, E.

    2011-07-01

    JRODOS system is revealed as an efficient, flexible and user-approved at European level to assist in the management of nuclear and radiological emergencies and the subsequent rehabilitation of contaminated environments, both at the national response in the first phase emergence as a regional / local level in emergency preparedness and recovery environment with the help of the social partners concerned.

  11. Implementation of integrated management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar Junior, Joao Carlos A.; Fonseca, Victor Zidan da

    2007-01-01

    In present day exist quality assurance system, environment, occupational health and safety such as ISO9001, ISO14001 and OHSAS18001 and others standards will can create. These standards can be implemented and certified they guarantee one record system, quality assurance, documents control, operational control, responsibility definition, training, preparing and serve to emergency, monitoring, internal audit, corrective action, continual improvement, prevent of pollution, write procedure, reduce costs, impact assessment, risk assessment , standard, decree, legal requirements of municipal, state, federal and local scope. These procedure and systems when isolate applied cause many management systems and bureaucracy. Integration Management System reduce to bureaucracy, excess of documents, documents storage and conflict documents and easy to others standards implementation in future. The Integrated Management System (IMS) will be implemented in 2007. INB created a management group for implementation, this group decides planing, works, policy and advertisement. Legal requirements were surveyed, internal audits, pre-audits and audits were realized. INB is partially in accordance with ISO14001, OSHAS18001 standards. But very soon, it will be totally in accordance with this norms. Many studies and works were contracted to deal with legal requirements. This work have intention of show implementation process of ISO14001, OHSAS18001 and Integrated Management System on INB. (author)

  12. Policy-Based Approach to Emergency Bio-Data Management for Mobile Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Man Chun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In m-healthcare service, accurate detection and notification of emergency situation are critical to chronic patients' life. Since they are usually performed by a limited number of medical staff, it is difficult to simultaneously support many patients in real-time. This article presents an architecture to support the emergency bio-data management for m-healthcare service using personalized emergency policy. The salient feature of the proposed architecture is that the decision on emergency is made using personalized emergency policy. Specifically, the structure of the detailed system components has also been designed. The emergency condition of the individual bio-data collected from wireless body area network is detected automatically using personalized emergency policy. The message flow diagram based on the personalized emergency policy is described. This enables quick emergency rescue service provided to the patient both accurately and immediately. The prototype of proposed system has been built to demonstrate the design concept.

  13. Environmental compliance management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, A. [Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States); Larrinaga, L.

    1995-12-01

    A cross-functional team of environmental regulatory experts, plant managers, and plant engineers have been working since 1991 on the development, implementation and maintenance of the Environmental Compliance Management System. The Environmental Compliance Management System is a practical and accurate method of determining the applicability of the state and federal environmental regulations and of establishing standard and straightforward procedures to meet these requirements. The Environmental Compliance Management System allows individual manufacturing facilities to avoid the additional manpower that would be required to read, digest and decide on the applicability and plan of action to meet the requirements of all the environmental regulations.

  14. NASA's Risk Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Jeevan S.

    2013-01-01

    Phased-approach for implementation of risk management is necessary. Risk management system will be simple, accessible and promote communication of information to all relevant stakeholders for optimal resource allocation and risk mitigation. Risk management should be used by all team members to manage risks - not just risk office personnel. Each group/department is assigned Risk Integrators who are facilitators for effective risk management. Risks will be managed at the lowest-level feasible, elevate only those risks that require coordination or management from above. Risk informed decision making should be introduced to all levels of management. ? Provide necessary checks and balances to insure that risks are caught/identified and dealt with in a timely manner. Many supporting tools, processes & training must be deployed for effective risk management implementation. Process improvement must be included in the risk processes.

  15. Lithium battery management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Thomas J [Waukesha, WI

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  16. Emergency information systems for cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukkarasu, M.; Vani Manasa, N.; Kumar, K. Rajesh; Sundar, S.

    2017-11-01

    The main objective of this work is to create a Health Care monitoring and Guidance system for persons who are travelling in outdoor environments like cars. GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technologies are separately and combined today in many applications in our day to day life. The GSM module will send a message along with the GPS location to the end user through text, and a call is initiated to the user for further instructions. The Global Positioning System (GPS) will give the location of the interested vehicle. This system helps the doctor or anyone to monitor the accident who is outdoor and has less help. This will help the hospital to monitor the accident as well as guide the injured through difficult situations. Using a buzzer, the persons nearby will come to know that the person is in danger or in poor health conditions. This project provides a good two-way communication with the injured and the hospital to assist them to give first aid before an ambulance arrives. So, this paper devices a novel technique to assist the people who just met with accident through GPS and GSM.

  17. Mapping Best and Emerging Practices of Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Aaris Boas, Charlotte; Thorslund, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    and Planning. Of these two concepts Communication where found to be the most central to both the Emerging and Best practices. The analysis further reveals a soft side of project management that is central in the Emerging practice but absent from the Best practices. Although this soft side might be interpreted......This paper presents results of a study of the connection between Best and Emerging practices of project management. Drawing upon network mapping as an analytical strategy, cases of Best and Emerging practices is analysed and juxtaposed. The case of Best practice is represented by the newly...... published ISO 21500 standard and the case for the Emerging practices by a deconstruction of the practices of a group of experienced project managers. The network analysis reveals a substantial difference between the Best and Emerging practices. Only two central concepts where shared namely Communication...

  18. Medical Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  19. Metadata management staging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-08-01

    Django application providing a user-interface for building a file and metadata management system. An evolution of our Node.js and CouchDb metadata management system. This one focuses on server functionality and uses a well-documented, rational and REST-ful API for data access.

  20. Archival Information Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    management system named Archival Information Management System (AIMS), designed to meet the audit trail requirement for studies completed under the...are to be archived to the extent that future reproducibility and interrogation of results will exist. This report presents a prototype information

  1. Emergency Management of Maritime Accidents in the Yangtze River: Problems, Practice and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ping Yan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Maritime accidents have received considerable attentions due to the enormous property damage, casualties and serious environmental pollution. This paper first makes statistical analysis of the different types of maritime accidents in the period of 2012 to 2014 in the Yangtze River. Second, the problems of emergency management of maritime accidents are also proposed from the analysis of the major accident “Eastern Star”.. Afterwards, four practice cases, including decision support for maritime accidents, emergency resource allocation, emergency simulation system and effectiveness of emergency management, are introduced to present the insights gained from these practices. Last, in order to address these problems, this paper proposes that an artificial societies, Computational experiments, and Parallel execution (ACP approach should be introduced to establish an improved management system for maritime accidents in the future, and an ACP based maritime accident emergency management framework is proposed.

  2. Energy Management of Smart Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Bananeh

    Electric power distribution systems interface the end-users of electricity with the power grid. Traditional distribution systems are operated in a centralized fashion with the distribution system owner or operator being the only decision maker. The management and control architecture of distribution systems needs to gradually transform to accommodate the emerging smart grid technologies, distributed energy resources, and active electricity end-users or prosumers. The content of this document concerns with developing multi-task multi-objective energy management schemes for: 1) commercial/large residential prosumers, and 2) distribution system operator of a smart distribution system. The first part of this document describes a method of distributed energy management of multiple commercial/ large residential prosumers. These prosumers not only consume electricity, but also generate electricity using their roof-top solar photovoltaics systems. When photovoltaics generation is larger than local consumption, excess electricity will be fed into the distribution system, creating a voltage rise along the feeder. Distribution system operator cannot tolerate a significant voltage rise. ES can help the prosumers manage their electricity exchanges with the distribution system such that minimal voltage fluctuation occurs. The proposed distributed energy management scheme sizes and schedules each prosumer's ES to reduce the electricity bill and mitigate voltage rise along the feeder. The second part of this document focuses on emergency energy management and resilience assessment of a distribution system. The developed emergency energy management system uses available resources and redundancy to restore the distribution system's functionality fully or partially. The success of the restoration maneuver depends on how resilient the distribution system is. Engineering resilience terminology is used to evaluate the resilience of distribution system. The proposed emergency energy

  3. Mobile health systems and emergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; Graziosi, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the age distribution of the population and increased prevalence of chronic illnesses, together with a shortage of health professionals and other resources, will increasingly challenge the ability of national healthcare systems to meet rising demand for services. Large-scale use of eHealth

  4. General framework and key technologies of national nuclear emergency system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Feng; Li Xudong; Zhu Guangying; Song Yafeng; Zeng Suotian; Shen Lifeng

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear emergency is the important safeguard for the sustainable development of nuclear energy, and is the significant part of national public crisis management. The paper gives the definition of nuclear emergency system explicitly based on the analysis of the characteristics of the nuclear emergency, and through the research of the structure and general framework, the general framework of the national nuclear emergency management system (NNEMS) is obtained, which is constructed in four parts, including one integrative platform, six layers, eight applications and two systems, then the paper indicate that the architecture of national emergency system that should be laid out by three-tiers, i.e. national, provincial and organizations with nuclear facilities, and also describe the functions of the NNEMS on the nuclear emergency's workflow. Finally, the paper discuss the key technology that NNIEMS needed, such as WebGIS, auxiliary decision-making, digitalized preplan and the conformity and usage of resources, and analyze the technical principle in details. (authors)

  5. Management of information within emergencies departments in developing countries: analysis at the National Emergency Department in Benin

    OpenAIRE

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Gl?l?; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Sopoh, Ghislain; Sossa-J?r?me, Charles; Ouedraogo, Laurent; Wilmet-Dramaix, Mich?le

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the information systems evolve in emergency departments, especially in developed countries, with improved performance in terms of care quality, productivity and patient satisfact...

  6. Quality Management and Integrated Management System

    OpenAIRE

    BŘICHÁČKOVÁ, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    Graduation theses is directed on the Management System and the characteristics of the company and its development since 2003. Theses is introduced on the Integrated Management System, which consists of the Quality Management System, the Environmental Management System and the Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series. The theses is especially directed on the Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series. Management System is analyzed and steps are recommended to improve these proces...

  7. Early identification systems for emerging foodborne hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marvin, H.J.P.; Kleter, G.A.; Pradini, A.; Dekkers, S.; Bolton, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a non-exhausting overview of early warning systems for emerging foodborne hazards that are operating in the various places in the world. Special attention is given to endpoint-focussed early warning systems (i.e. ECDC, ISIS and GPHIN) and hazard-focussed early warning systems

  8. Emergency cooling system for the PHENIX reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.M.; Giudicelli, A.G.; Robert, E.A.; Crette, J.P.

    Among various engineered safeguards of the reactor plant, the authors describe the protective system designed to remove the decay heat in emergency, in case of complete loss of all normal decay heat removal systems. First the normal decay heat rejection systems are presented. Incidents leading to the loss of these normal means are then analyzed. The protective system and its constructive characteristics designed for emergency cooling and based on two independent and highly reliable circuits entirely installed outside the primary containment vessel are described

  9. Operations management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandli, A. E.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Kelly, C. M.; Mccandless, W.; Rue, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of an operations management system is to provide an orderly and efficient method to operate and maintain aerospace vehicles. Concepts are described for an operations management system and the key technologies are highlighted which will be required if this capability is brought to fruition. Without this automation and decision aiding capability, the growing complexity of avionics will result in an unmanageable workload for the operator, ultimately threatening mission success or survivability of the aircraft or space system. The key technologies include expert system application to operational tasks such as replanning, equipment diagnostics and checkout, global system management, and advanced man machine interfaces. The economical development of operations management systems, which are largely software, will require advancements in other technological areas such as software engineering and computer hardware.

  10. Management of everyday work in Emergency Departments - an exploratory study with Swedish Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Henrik; Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta; Nilsson, Kerstin; Jakobsson Ung, Eva

    2014-10-01

    Through their formal mandate, position and authority, managers are responsible for managing everyday work in Emergency Departments (EDs) as well as striving for excellence and dealing with the individual needs of practitioners and patients. The aim of the present study is to explore managers' experiences of managing everyday work in Swedish EDs. A qualitative and exploratory design has been used in this study. Seven managers were interviewed at two EDs. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis with focus on latent content. Managers experience everyday work in the ED as lifesaving work. One of the characteristics of their approach to everyday work is their capability for rapidly identifying patients with life-threatening conditions and for treating them accordingly. The practitioners are on stand-by in order to deal with unexpected situations. This implies having to spend time waiting for the physicians' decisions. Management is characterised by a command and control approach. The managers experience difficulties in meeting the expectations of their staff. They strive to be proactive but instead they become reactive since the prevailing medical, bureaucratic and production-orientated systems constrain them. The managers demonstrate full compliance with the organisational systems. This threatens to reduce their freedom of action and influences the way they perform their managerial duties within and outside the EDs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Program Management System manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Program Management System (PMS), as detailed in this manual, consists of all the plans, policies, procedure, systems, and processes that, taken together, serve as a mechanism for managing the various subprograms and program elements in a cohesive, cost-effective manner. The PMS is consistent with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and the ''Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program'' (DOE/RW-0005). It is based on, but goes beyond, the Department of Energy (DOE) management policies and procedures applicable to all DOE programs by adapting these directives to the specific needs of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management program. This PMS Manual describes the hierarchy of plans required to develop and maintain the cost, schedule, and technical baselines at the various organizational levels of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. It also establishes the management policies and procedures used in the implementation of the Program. These include requirements for internal reports, data, and other information; systems engineering management; regulatory compliance; safety; quality assurance; and institutional affairs. Although expanded versions of many of these plans, policies, and procedures are found in separate documents, they are an integral part of this manual. The PMS provides the basis for the effective management that is needed to ensure that the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program fulfills the mandate of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Using online analytical processing to manage emergency department operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Bradley D; Asplin, Brent R

    2004-11-01

    The emergency department (ED) is a unique setting in which to explore and evaluate the utility of information technology to improve health care operations. A potentially useful software tool in managing this complex environment is online analytical processing (OLAP). An OLAP system has the ability to provide managers, providers, and researchers with the necessary information to make decisions quickly and effectively by allowing them to examine patterns and trends in operations and patient flow. OLAP software quickly summarizes and processes data acquired from a variety of data sources, including computerized ED tracking systems. It allows the user to form a comprehensive picture of the ED from both system-wide and patient-specific perspectives and to interactively view the data using an approach that meets his or her needs. This article describes OLAP software tools and provides examples of potential OLAP applications for care improvement projects, primarily from the perspective of the ED. While OLAP is clearly a helpful tool in the ED, it is far more useful when integrated into the larger continuum of health information systems across a hospital or health care delivery system.

  13. Fusion Center, Emergency Managers Explore Collaborative Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2014-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security News and Stories, PRESS RELEASES Synchronizing and leveraging fusion center and emergency operations hinges on factors similar to the rest of the homeland security enterprise: communication, partnerships and flexibility. That was one of the takeaways...

  14. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosscher, Marianne R. F.; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for

  15. Systems engineering management plans.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Tamara S.

    2009-10-01

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is a comprehensive and effective tool used to assist in the management of systems engineering efforts. It is intended to guide the work of all those involved in the project. The SEMP is comprised of three main sections: technical project planning and control, systems engineering process, and engineering specialty integration. The contents of each section must be tailored to the specific effort. A model outline and example SEMP are provided. The target audience is those who are familiar with the systems engineering approach and who have an interest in employing the SEMP as a tool for systems management. The goal of this document is to provide the reader with an appreciation for the use and importance of the SEMP, as well as provide a framework that can be used to create the management plan.

  16. Basic management of medical emergencies: recognizing a patient's distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kenneth L

    2010-05-01

    Medical emergencies can happen in the dental office, possibly threatening a patient's life and hindering the delivery of dental care. Early recognition of medical emergencies begins at the first sign of symptoms. The basic algorithm for management of all medical emergencies is this: position (P), airway (A), breathing (B), circulation (C) and definitive treatment, differential diagnosis, drugs, defibrillation (D). The dentist places an unconscious patient in a supine position and comfortably positions a conscious patient. The dentist then assesses airway, breathing and circulation and, when necessary, supports the patient's vital functions. Drug therapy always is secondary to basic life support (that is, PABCD). Prompt recognition and efficient management of medical emergencies by a well-prepared dental team can increase the likelihood of a satisfactory outcome. The basic algorithm for managing medical emergencies is designed to ensure that the patient's brain receives a constant supply of blood containing oxygen.

  17. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Conclusion. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  18. Care management in nursing within emergency care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tono de Oliveira, Roberta Juliane; Vieira Hermida, Patrícia Madalena; da Silva Copelli, Fernanda Hannah; Guedes Dos Santos, José Luís; Lorenzini Erdmann, Alacoque; Regina de Andrade, Selma

    2015-12-01

    Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  19. Strategic aspects of nuclear and radiological emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2010-01-01

    Emergency situations demand that actions be taken by responsible organisations in a timely and effective manner to mitigate consequences for the population, infrastructure and the environment, and to support the return of affected areas to normal social and economic activity to the extent possible. To deliver an effective response over the emergency management time-line, it is necessary to make, maintain and exercise adequate plans and arrangements in advance of an emergency situation. These must contain appropriate elements and resources for preparedness, response and assistance to identified threats, recognize and include all implicated partners, and take account of international interfaces. Effective management of complex emergency situations that can lead to a wide range of consequences and involve multiple organisations at the local, national and international levels also requires anticipation of the range of decision-making needs, an understanding of the interactions between response organisations and a model for their co-ordination. Experience from managing emergency situations has shown that the integration of these factors into emergency preparedness and response arrangements should be based on a guiding strategic vision. Emergency response is a dynamic process that develops in time from a situation of little information to one of potentially overwhelming information. Within this context, emergency response organisations must be able to respond in an appropriate and timely manner at any point along the emergency management time-line. This will be facilitated by an overarching framework to guide the decision-making process. To contribute to work in this area, the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM) reviewed its collective experience to extract key themes that could form a strategy for improving decision-making in emergency management. This focused on the NEA International Nuclear

  20. How do emergency managers use social media platforms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, DeeDee M

    2014-01-01

    Social media platforms are increasingly becoming a useful tool for victims, humanitarians, volunteers, and the general public to communicate during disasters. Research has shown that there are multiple advantages to using social media and the applicability of these platforms crosses several different types of disasters (human-caused, natural, and terrorist) here in the United States and abroad. However, some emergency management agencies have been reluctant to use social media as one of their many communications tools. In this study, the usefulness of social media for emergency management was examined over a 30-day period following a series of tornadoes. Using an observational approach, the public posts disseminated from an emergency management agency were analyzed to determine how two social media platforms were used. The findings show how emergency management agencies could leverage the connectedness of social media to reach victims and make unlikely partnerships.

  1. Acute pain management curriculum for emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motov, Sergey M; Marshall, John P

    2011-10-01

    Pain is the most common reason people visit emergency departments (EDs); this implies that emergency physicians (EPs) should be experts in managing acute painful conditions. The current trend in the literature, however, demonstrates that EPs possess inadequate knowledge and lack formal training in acute pain management. The purpose of this article is to create a formal educational curriculum that would assist emergency medicine (EM) residents in proper assessment and treatment of acute pain, as well as in providing a solid theoretical and practical knowledge base for managing acute pain in the ED. The authors propose a series of lectures, case-oriented study groups, practical small group sessions, and class-specific didactics with the goal of enhancing the theoretical and practical knowledge of acute pain management in the ED. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  2. Automatic Emergence Detection in Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems consist of multiple interacting subsystems, whose nonlinear interactions can result in unanticipated (emergent system events. Extant systems analysis approaches fail to detect such emergent properties, since they analyze each subsystem separately and arrive at decisions typically through linear aggregations of individual analysis results. In this paper, we propose a quantitative definition of emergence for complex systems. We also propose a framework to detect emergent properties given observations of its subsystems. This framework, based on a probabilistic graphical model called Bayesian Knowledge Bases (BKBs, learns individual subsystem dynamics from data, probabilistically and structurally fuses said dynamics into a single complex system dynamics, and detects emergent properties. Fusion is the central element of our approach to account for situations when a common variable may have different probabilistic distributions in different subsystems. We evaluate our detection performance against a baseline approach (Bayesian Network ensemble on synthetic testbeds from UCI datasets. To do so, we also introduce a method to simulate and a metric to measure discrepancies that occur with shared/common variables. Experiments demonstrate that our framework outperforms the baseline. In addition, we demonstrate that this framework has uniform polynomial time complexity across all three learning, fusion, and reasoning procedures.

  3. Intelligent web data management software architectures and emerging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Kun; Yang, Bo; Sun, Runyuan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some of the emerging techniques and technologies used to handle Web data management. Authors present novel software architectures and emerging technologies and then validate using experimental data and real world applications. The contents of this book are focused on four popular thematic categories of intelligent Web data management: cloud computing, social networking, monitoring and literature management. The Volume will be a valuable reference to researchers, students and practitioners in the field of Web data management, cloud computing, social networks using advanced intelligence tools.

  4. Emergency management of Ludwig’s angina: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Huda Alimin; Endang Syamsuddin

    2016-01-01

    Ludwig’s angina is a severe diffuse sellulitis, commonly caused by odontogenic infection, acute on onset, spread rapidly, involving the submandibular, sublingual region bilaterally, and submental region. This case led to the emergency condition because it can cause airway obstruction. The aim of this case report is to describe a case report about diagnosis and management of emergencies Ludwig’s angina. A 40 years old male patient, came to Dr. Hasan Sadikin hospital emergency with pain and swe...

  5. Records Management--An Emerging Career Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, Mary

    1977-01-01

    The author suggests that colleges and universities with business education programs offer a course in records management to provide students with more than entry level training. She lists goals of such a course along with possible teaching strategies. (MF)

  6. Recommendations for Emergency Management Planning for School Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Numerous events, such as hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes, constitute a natural disaster for public schools. Human-caused disasters include hazardous-material emergencies, civil riots, fires, and nuclear accidents. This document contains emergency-management planning guidelines, developed by the Texas Education Agency, to help local school…

  7. Open and social leadership: a new paradigm in emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The world is changing and so are disasters. Citizens are leveraging emerging technology and social media communication tools to send, receive and process information. It is time for professional emergency management and disaster response to do the same. This paper presents an overview of these changing public patterns, and expectations must be met with a new leadership approach.

  8. Intranet Document Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, H. Joseph; Yen, David C.; Lin, Binshan

    1998-01-01

    Explains how intranets facilitate documentation availability within a company at substantial cost savings. Topics include intranet document management systems (IDMS); publication costs for printed materials; hardware and software specifications; performance; and security. (Author/LRW)

  9. Correspondence Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CMS is EPA's correspondence tracking and workflow management system. It scans, logs, routes, tracks, and stores incoming and outgoing correspondence in all Program...

  10. Holdings Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — This system supports the physical management of permanent, hard-copy archival Records in the custody of National Archives and Records Administration program offices.

  11. Earned Value Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — EVMS is a system for measuring project performance and progress in an objective manner by supporting earned value management. EVMS has the ability to combine...

  12. Environmental Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site on Environmental Management Systems (EMS) provides information and resources related to EMS for small businesses and private industry, as well as local, state and federal agencies, including all the EPA offices and laboratories.

  13. Portfolio Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — PfMS is an implementation of WorkLenz. WorkLenz is USAID's portfolio management system tool. It is a commercially available, off-the-shelf (COTS) package that...

  14. WHY DO COMPANIES FROM EMERGING COUNTRIES MANAGE EARNINGS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Callao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides evidence in terms of the incentives which lead managers from emerging European countries to manage earnings. In particular, we focused on four Eastern European countries: the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary and Slovakia, as the majority of studies on earnings management in developing countries were based on the Asian emerging market. The market of developing European countries is still barely explored. After we confirmed that managers from emerging European companies manage earnings, we find that within the different incentives which lead managers to earnings management, the avoidance of debt covenants violations is a strong incentive for managers. Additionally, those firms considered as poor investments (with less value have incentives to manage earnings down as a consequence to opt for market niche. Moreover, emerging Eastern European companies have incentives to flatten earnings of current periods in order to benefit in the future as the source of future nonmanipulated earnings will be insufficient, as they may expect reduced, or at least lower future performance of their companies affected by increasing global competition. Finally, we confirm that privately-owned companies tend to maximize accounting earnings more than state-owned companies because they are in a weaker position related to a specific political and historical factors.

  15. Database Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    In 1981 Wayne Erickson founded Microrim, Inc, a company originally focused on marketing a microcomputer version of RIM (Relational Information Manager). Dennis Comfort joined the firm and is now vice president, development. The team developed an advanced spinoff from the NASA system they had originally created, a microcomputer database management system known as R:BASE 4000. Microrim added many enhancements and developed a series of R:BASE products for various environments. R:BASE is now the second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software in the world.

  16. The social media manifesto: a comprehensive review of the impact of social media on emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Adam

    2011-02-01

    Over the past five years, social media have impacted emergency management and disaster response in numerous ways. The emergency management professional must begin to accept this impact not as an arbitrary consequence of an uncontrolled disaster, but rather as a tool to help coordinate, manage and facilitate a safe and expected response during emergencies and disasters. This paper will explain the power and purpose of social media as well as how social media systems have equalised capabilities for all levels and sizes of government. Moreover, this paper will also highlight the social media systems that are being used as operational tools as well as what the future holds. Lastly, common implementation challenges will be discussed through a look at systematic approaches to applying social media in emergency management as a positive and valuable tool.

  17. Emerging trends in management of propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic agents used during metabolic crises and in long-term management of patients with propionic acidemia (PA). The records of PA patients were retrospectively evaluated. The study group consisted of 30 patients with 141 admissions. During metabolic crises, hyperammonemia was found in 130 (92%) admissions and almost all patients were managed with normal saline, ≥ 10% dextrose, and restriction of protein intake. In 56 (40%) admissions, management was done in intensive care unit, 31 (22%) with mechanical ventilation, 10 (7%) with haemodialysis, 16 (11%) with vasopressor agents, and 12 (9%) with insulin. In the rescue procedure, L-carnitine was used in 135 (96%) patients, sodium bicarbonate in 116 (82%), sodium benzoate in 76 (54%), and metronidazole in 10 (7%), biotin in about one-quarter, L-arginine in one third, and antibiotics in three-quarter of the admissions. Blood/packed RBCs were used in 28 (20%) patients, platelets in 26 (18%), fresh frozen plasma in 8 (6%), and granulocyte-colony stimulating factors in 10 (7%) admissions. All patients were managed completely/partially with medical nutrition formula plus amino acid mixture, vitamins and minerals. For long-term management 24 (80%) patients were on L-carnitine, 22 (73%) on sodium benzoate, 6 (20%) on biotin, one half on alkaline therapy and 4 (13%) on regular metronidazole use. Almost all patients were on medical formula and regular follow-up. Aggressive and adequate management of acute metabolic crises with restriction of protein intake, stabilization of patient, reversal of catabolism, and removal of toxic metabolites are essential steps. Concerted efforts to ensure adequate nutrition, to minimize the risk of acute decompensation and additional therapeutic advances are imperative to improve the outcome of PA patients.

  18. Electronic medical records in humanitarian emergencies – the development of an Ebola clinical information and patient management system [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Jobanputra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available By November 2015, the West Africa Ebola epidemic had caused 28598 infections and 11299 deaths in the three countries most affected. The outbreak required rapid innovation and adaptation. Médecins sans Frontières (MSF scaled up its usual 20-30 bed Ebola management centres (EMCs to 100-300 beds with over 300 workers in some settings. This brought challenges in patient and clinical data management resulting from the difficulties of working safely with high numbers of Ebola patients. We describe a project MSF established with software developers and the Google Social Impact Team to develop context-adapted tools to address the challenges of recording Ebola clinical information. We share the outcomes and key lessons learned in innovating rapidly under pressure in difficult environmental conditions. Information on adoption, maintenance, and data quality was gathered through review of project documentation, discussions with field staff and key project stakeholders, and analysis of tablet data. In March 2015, a full prototype was deployed in Magburaka EMC, Sierra Leone. Inpatient data were captured on 204 clinical interactions with 34 patients from 5 March until 10 April 2015. Data continued to also be recorded on paper charts, creating theoretically identical record “pairs” on paper and tablet. 83 record pairs for 33 patients with 22 data items (temperature and symptoms per pair were analysed. The overall Kappa coefficient for agreement between sources was 0.62, but reduced to 0.59 when rare bleeding symptoms were excluded, indicating moderate to good agreement. The time taken to deliver the product was more than that anticipated by MSF (7 months versus 6 weeks. Deployment of the tablet coincided with a dramatic drop in patient numbers and thus had little impact on patient care. We have identified lessons specific to humanitarian-technology collaborative projects and propose a framework for emergency humanitarian innovation. Time and effort is

  19. Emergency Anaesthetic Management of Extensive Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Chandola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed vehicles, drug abuse, alcohol and easy availability of handguns are the main reasons of increasing number of trauma especially thoracic trauma. Anaesthesiologist plays an important role in the management of extensive thoracic trauma. Thoracic trauma, penetrating or blunt, may cause damage to organs suspended in thorax viz. pleura, lungs, heart, great vessels, trachea and oesophagus. It may lead to pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade or life threatening haemorrhage. With aggressive care and management of these factors, majority of patients can survive and return to normal life.

  20. Performance diagnostic system for emergency diesel generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    Diesel generators are commonly used for emergency backup power at nuclear stations. Emergency diesel generators (EDGs) are subject to both start-up and operating failures, due to infrequent and fast-start use. EDG reliability can be critical to plant safety, particularly when station blackout occurs. This paper describes an expert diagnostic system designed to consistently evaluate the operating performance of diesel generators. The prototype system is comprised of a suite of sensor monitoring, cylinder combustion analyzing, and diagnostic workstation computers. On-demand assessments of generator and auxiliary equipment performance are provided along with color trend displays comparing measured performance to reference-normal conditions

  1. Systems engineering management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, C.W.

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of this Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is to prescribe the systems engineering procedures to be implemented at the Program level and the minimum requirements for systems engineering at the Program-element level. The Program level corresponds to the Director, OCRWM, or to the organizations within OCRWM to which the Director delegates responsibility for the development of the System and for coordinating and integrating the activities at the Program-element level. The Office of Policy and Outreach (OPO) and the Office of Resource Management (ORM) support the Director at the Program level. The Program-element level corresponds to the organizations within OCRWM (i.e., the Office of Geologic Repositories (OGR) and the Office of Storage and Transportation Systems (OSTS)) with overall responsibility for developing the System elements - that is, the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS), monitored retrievable storage (MRS) (if approved by Congress), and the transportation system

  2. Emergency management, Twitter and social media evangelism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latonero, Mark; Shklovski, Irina

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers how emergency response organizations utilize available social media technologies to communicate with the public in emergencies and to potentially collect valuable information using the public as sources of information on the ground. The authors discuss the use of public social...... organizations face engaging with social media and Twitter. This article provides insights into practices and challenges of new media implementation for crisis and risk management organizations....... media tools from the emergency management professional’s viewpoint with a particular focus on the use of Twitter. Limited research has investigated Twitter usage in crisis situations from an organizational perspective. This paper contributes to the understanding of organizational innovation, risk...

  3. Pediatric wound care and management in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jennifer E; Pade, Kathryn H

    2017-10-23

    Traumatic wounds and lacerations are common pediatric presenting complaints to emergency departments. Although there is a large body of literature on wound care, many emergency clinicians base management of wounds on theories and techniques that have been passed down over time. Therefore, controversial, conflicting, and unfounded recommendations are prevalent. This issue reviews evidence-based recommendations for wound care and management, including wound cleansing and irrigation, anxiolysis/sedation techniques, closure methods, and post-repair wound care. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  4. Audit Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Alconada, Federico

    2015-01-01

    In the need of renewing their system, the Internal Audit department has given a proposal for building a new one. Taking into consideration the problems of their system they elaborated a requirement's list with the functionalities and features they were expecting from the new management system. This new system would be primarily for the use of the Internal Audit staff but it would also support the follow-up of internal audit recommendations by potentially all CERN staff members.

  5. Emerging Environmental Management Curricula in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylon, Michael J.

    1971-01-01

    Defined is the need for implementation of programs intended to restore and/or maintain wildlife populations on a self-renewing, self-sustaining basis. Development of environmental management concepts, understandings, activities, and lesson ideas is explained accompanied by schematic drawings. (BL)

  6. R and D of seismic emergency information transmission system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Katsumi; Kuno, Tetsuya; Shibata, Katsuyuki; Abe, Ichiro; Tuzuki, Kazuhisa

    2002-01-01

    The R and D Seismic Emergency Information Transmission System has been conducted involving the latest progress in earthquake engineering with regard to estimation techniques on the hypocenter, fault and earthquake motion parameters and in information technologies. This system is the disaster management system which consists of user site and disaster information center and is capable of mutual information transmission through Inter-Net and walkie-talkie. The concept of the disaster management system which is adaptable with DiMSIS (Disaster Management Spatial Information System) developed by professor Kameda et al. of Kyoto University has been established. Based on this concept, a prototype system has been developed. This system has following functions, (1) compatible application both in usual condition and emergency time, (2) the decentralized independence, and (3) the integration of space and time information. The system can estimate the earthquake motion information with 500 m square mesh in a local area and transmit in a few minutes. In the development of the system, seismometer network, surface soil database and amplification functions were prepared for the examination of system function. Demonstration against the Tokai area was carried out and the function was verified. (author)

  7. Emergency Department Management of Delirium in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn E.J. Gower, DO

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of elderly patients are presenting to the emergency department. Numerousstudies have observed that emergency physicians often fail to identify and diagnose delirium in theelderly. These studies also suggest that even when emergency physicians recognized delirium, theystill may not have fully appreciated the import of the diagnosis. Delirium is not a normal manifestation ofaging and, often, is the only sign of a serious underlying medical condition. This article will review thesignificance, definition, and principal features of delirium so that emergency physicians may betterappreciate, recognize, evaluate, and manage delirium in the elderly.

  8. Emergency management of Ludwig’s angina: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Huda Alimin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ludwig’s angina is a severe diffuse sellulitis, commonly caused by odontogenic infection, acute on onset, spread rapidly, involving the submandibular, sublingual region bilaterally, and submental region. This case led to the emergency condition because it can cause airway obstruction. The aim of this case report is to describe a case report about diagnosis and management of emergencies Ludwig’s angina. A 40 years old male patient, came to Dr. Hasan Sadikin hospital emergency with pain and swelling at lower jaw, drooling, difficulty to open his mouth and breath. Diagnosed with sepsis accompanied Ludwig’s angina. We managed the patient with close observation, tracheostomy, and source control under local anesthesia. Ludwig’s angina is a rare emergency condition which potentially life-threathening. In this case the patient experienced a significant recovery because immediately management in maintaining airway patency, prevent the spread of infection and further complications.

  9. The emergence and change of management accounting routines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamics involved in the emergence and change of management accounting routines. It seeks to provide an understanding of the ways in which these complex routines foster stability and change in management accounting practices.

  10. Prudency reviews, cash management issues emerge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Utility management is paying increasing attention to the broadening of regulatory commission prudency reviews to cover operating generating plants as well as those under construction. Utilities can expect a prudency review after a major outage, and should investigate the possibility for legal action against a third party or be prepared to defend itself. The Shoreham nuclear plant serves as a warning to utilities of the need for on-going documentation of cost-benefit analyses conducted during the construction period. Utility managers should demand a prudency standard from their regulators, and minority owners in large projects should make independent prudency findings. There is also a growing need for utilities to develop intelligent strategies for handling excess cash. Methods for handling cash flow include the financial investment, grid refurbishment, dividend payout, decapitalization, and diversification

  11. Sewer System Management Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    A Sewer System Management Plan (SSMP) is required by the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Order No. 2006-0003-DWQ Statewide General Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR) for Sanitary Sewer Systems (General Permit). DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Sandia Field Office has filed a Notice of Intent to be covered under this General Permit. The General Permit requires a proactive approach to reduce the number and frequency of sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) within the State. SSMPs must include provisions to provide proper and efficient management, operation, and maintenance of sanitary sewer systems and must contain a spill response plan.

  12. Emerging technologies in hazardous waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedder, D.W.; Pohland, F.G.

    1990-01-01

    The meeting was divided into two parts: Waste water management technologies and Soils, residues, and recycle techniques. Technologies included: photocatalytic oxidation; water treatment with hydrogen peroxide; ultraviolet destruction of pollutants; biodegradation; adsorption; affinity dialysis; and proton transfer. Other papers described evaluation of land treatment techniques; mobility of toxic metals in landfills; sorptive behavior in soils; artificial reef construction; and treatment and disposal options for radioactive metals (technetium 99, strontium, and plutonium). Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  13. Program management system manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    OCRWM has developed a program management system (PMS) to assist in organizing, planning, directing and controlling the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. A well defined management system is necessary because: (1) the Program is a complex technical undertaking with a large number of participants, (2) the disposal and storage facilities to be developed by the Program must be licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and hence are subject to rigorous quality assurance (QA) requirements, (3) the legislation mandating the Program creates a dichotomy between demanding schedules of performance and a requirement for close and continuous consultation and cooperation with external entities, (4) the various elements of the Program must be managed as parts of an integrated waste management system, (5) the Program has an estimated total system life cycle cost of over $30 billion, and (6) the Program has a unique fiduciary responsibility to the owners and generators of the nuclear waste for controlling costs and minimizing the user fees paid into the Nuclear Waste Fund. This PMS Manual is designed and structured to facilitate strong, effective Program management by providing policies and requirements for organizing, planning, directing and controlling the major Program functions

  14. A distribution management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaerventausta, P.; Verho, P.; Kaerenlampi, M.; Pitkaenen, M. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland); Partanen, J. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    The development of new distribution automation applications is considerably wide nowadays. One of the most interesting areas is the development of a distribution management system (DMS) as an expansion to the traditional SCADA system. At the power transmission level such a system is called an energy management system (EMS). The idea of these expansions is to provide supporting tools for control center operators in system analysis and operation planning. Nowadays the SCADA is the main computer system (and often the only) in the control center. However, the information displayed by the SCADA is often inadequate, and several tasks cannot be solved by a conventional SCADA system. A need for new computer applications in control center arises from the insufficiency of the SCADA and some other trends. The latter means that the overall importance of the distribution networks is increasing. The slowing down of load-growth has often made network reinforcements unprofitable. Thus the existing network must be operated more efficiently. At the same time larger distribution areas are for economical reasons being monitored at one control center and the size of the operation staff is decreasing. The quality of supply requirements are also becoming stricter. The needed data for new applications is mainly available in some existing systems. Thus the computer systems of utilities must be integrated. The main data source for the new applications in the control center are the AM/FM/GIS (i.e. the network database system), the SCADA, and the customer information system (CIS). The new functions can be embedded in some existing computer system. This means a strong dependency on the vendor of the existing system. An alternative strategy is to develop an independent system which is integrated with other computer systems using well-defined interfaces. The latter approach makes it possible to use the new applications in various computer environments, having only a weak dependency on the

  15. Emergency managers as change agents: recognizing the value of management, leadership, and strategic management in the disaster profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urby, Heriberto; McEntire, David A

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the influence of management theory, some principles of leadership, four strategic management considerations, that are applied to emergency management, allow emergency managers to transform their followers, organizations, and communities at large. The authors argue that in the past there has been little recognition of the value, or application, of these three areas of emphasis in the disaster profession. Using more of these principles, emergency managers may transform into transformational change agents who make a difference in their followers' lives, who themselves transform other people and improve emergency management.

  16. Emergency department management of smoke inhalation injury in adults [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterness, Karalynn; Ahn, Christine; Nusbaum, Jeffrey; Gupta, Nachi

    2018-03-01

    Smoke inhalation injury portends increased morbidity and mortality in fire-exposed patients. Upper airway thermal burns, inflammation from lower airway irritants, and systemic effects of carbon monoxide and cyanide can contribute to injury. A standardized diagnostic protocol for inhalation injury is lacking, and management remains mostly supportive. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for concomitant traumatic injuries. Diagnosis is mostly clinical, aided by bronchoscopy and other supplementary tests. Treatment includes airway and respiratory support, lung protective ventilation, 100% oxygen or hyperbaric oxygen therapy for carbon monoxide poisoning, and hydroxocobalamin for cyanide toxicity. Due to its progressive nature, many patients with smoke inhalation injury warrant close monitoring for development of airway compromise. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  17. REALM: an expert system for classifying emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchton, R.A.; Gunter, A.D.; Cain, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    In late 1983, EPRI began a program to encourage and stimulate the development of Artificial Intelligence Applications for the nuclear industry. As a part of that effort, EPRI has contracted Technology Applications, Inc., (TAI) to develop an artificially intelligent Emergency Classification system Prototype. This paper presents a description of and a status report on the recently completed prototype

  18. From System Complexity to Emergent Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Aziz-Alaoui, M. A

    2009-01-01

    Emergence and complexity refer to the appearance of higher-level properties and behaviours of a system that obviously comes from the collective dynamics of that system's components. These properties are not directly deductable from the lower-level motion of that system. Emergent properties are properties of the "whole'' that are not possessed by any of the individual parts making up that whole. Such phenomena exist in various domains and can be described, using complexity concepts and thematic knowledges. This book highlights complexity modelling through dynamical or behavioral systems. The pluridisciplinary purposes, developped along the chapters, are enable to design links between a wide-range of fundamental and applicative Sciences. Developing such links - instead of focusing on specific and narrow researches - is characteristic of the Science of Complexity that we try to promote by this contribution.

  19. Nuclear emergency preparedness and management the international nuclear emergency exercise Inex 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundigl, St.

    2003-01-01

    With the initiation of the first international nuclear emergency exercise INEX 1, performed as a table-top exercise in 1993, the international community tested, for the first time, approaches and policies in place to manage a nuclear or radiological emergency. INEX 1 with its related workshops led to a wealth of lessons learned and to an improvement in nuclear emergency management. The INEX 2 exercise series, initiated by the NEA and performed between 1996 and 1999, established an international nuclear emergency 'exercise culture' leading to a clear improvement of the international aspects of nuclear emergency preparedness and management. INEX 2 was a series of four command post exercises based on national nuclear emergency exercises in Switzerland, Finland, Hungary and Canada. Simulated accidents at nuclear power plants were used to test existing procedures in emergency response and management, and to analyse local, regional, national and international emergency plans under realistic conditions. In addition, the exercises allowed the participating countries to gain experience using new concepts and tools. The most significant result of INEX 2 and a major step forward in nuclear emergency management was the development of a new communication and information exchange strategy, which is currently implemented by various NEA member countries as well as by the international community in general. The objective of this new strategy is to assist the decision-maker by improving the selection of the data transmitted, by encouraging the transmission and reception of such data and information using modern communication methods, e.g. secure world wide web technologies, and by defining emergency monitoring and modelling needs. To test the validity and usefulness of the newly-developed strategy, the NEA proposed to organize an international nuclear emergency exercise, INEX 2000, similar in scope to the INEX 2 exercises. In addition, the NEA suggested to include, for the first

  20. Emergency management of pediatric burn victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlcak, R; Cortiella, J; Desai, M H; Herndon, D N

    1998-02-01

    Pediatric burn injuries present a major challenge to the health care team, but an orderly, systematic approach can simplify the initial stabilization and management. A clear understanding of the pathology of burn injuries is essential in providing quality burn care in the prehospital setting and at the referring hospital. After the patient has been rescued from the offending agent, assessment of the burn victim begins with the primary survey and life-threatening injuries initially addressed first. This is followed by a secondary survey to document and treat other injuries or problems. Intravenous access may be established in concert with the local/regional medical control and appropriate fluid resuscitation begun. Burn wounds should be covered with clean, dry sheets, and the patient kept warm with blankets to prevent hypothermia. The patient should be transported to the local hospital ED in the most appropriate mode available. At the local hospital, it should be determined if the burn patient needs burn center care, using the ABA Guidelines. In preparing for and organizing the transfer of the burn victim, consideration must be given to the continued monitoring and management of the patient during transport. In transferring burn patients the same priorities developed for the prehospital management are still operative. During the initial assessment and treatment and throughout the transport, an adequate airway, breathing, circulation, fluid resuscitation, urine output, and pain control must be assured. Ideally, transport of burn victims will occur through and organized, protocol driven plan that includes specialized transport mechanisms and personnel. Successful transport of burn victims, whether in the pre-hospital phase or during inter-hospital transfer, requires careful attention to treatment priorities, protocols, and attention to detail.

  1. Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  2. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) emergency response system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998)

  3. The link between off-site-emergency planning and plant-internal accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, H.; Goertz, R.

    1995-02-01

    A variety of accident management measures has been developed and implemented in the German nuclear power plants. They constitute a fourth level of safety in the defence-in-depth concept. The containment venting system is an important example. A functioning link with well defined lines of communication between plant-internal accident management and off-site disaster emergency planning has been established.

  4. Digital image display system for emergency room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murry, R.C.; Lane, T.J.; Miax, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a digital image display system for the emergency room (ER) in a major trauma hospital. Its objective is to reduce radiographic image delivery time to a busy ER while simultaneously providing a multimodality capability. Image storage, retrieval, and display will also be facilitated with this system. The system's backbone is a token-ring network of RISC and personal computers. The display terminals are higher- function RISC computers with 1,024 2 color or gray-scale monitors. The PCs serve as administrative terminals. Nuclear medicine, CT, MR, and digitized film images are transferred to the image display system

  5. Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, J.

    1991-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has begun implementation of the Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) to upgrade its ability to acquire data from nuclear power plants in the event of an emergency at the plant. ERDS provides a direct real-time transfer of data from licensee plant computers to the NRC Operations Center. The system has been designed to be activated by the licensee during an emergency which has been classified at an ALERT or higher level. The NRC portion of ERDS will receive the data stream, sort and file the data. The users will include the NRC Operations Center, the NRC Regional Office of the affected plant, and if requested the States which are within the ten mile EPZ of the site. The currently installed Emergency Notification System will be used to supplement ERDS data. This report provides the minimum guidance for implementation of ERDS at licensee sites. It is intended to be used for planning implementation under the current voluntary program as well as for providing the minimum standards for implementing the proposed ERDS rule. 4 refs., 3 figs

  6. Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, J.

    1990-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has begun implementation of the Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) to upgrade its ability to acquire data from nuclear power plants in the event of an emergency at the plant. ERDS provides a direct real-time transfer of data from licensee plant computers to the NRC Operations Center. The system has been designed to be activated by the licensee during an emergency which has been classified at an ALERT or higher level. The NRC portion of ERDS will receive the data stream, sort and file the data. The users will include the NRC Operations Center, the NRC Regional Office of the affected plant, and if requested the States which are within the ten mile EPZ of the site. The currently installed Emergency Notification System will be used to supplement ERDS data. This report provides the minimum guidance for implementation of ERDS at licensee sites. It is intended to be used for planning implementation under the current voluntary program as well as for providing the minimum standards for implementing the proposed ERDS rule

  7. GPS and GPRS Based Telemonitoring System for Emergency Patient Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, K.; Sarma, A. D.; Sravan, J.; Malini, M.; Venkateswarlu, G.

    2013-01-01

    Telemonitoring during the golden hour of patient transportation helps to improve medical care. Presently there are different physiological data acquisition and transmission systems using cellular network and radio communication links. Location monitoring systems and video transmission systems are also commercially available. The emergency patient transportation systems uniquely require transmission of data pertaining to the patient, vehicle, time of the call, physiological signals (like ECG, blood pressure, a body temperature, and blood oxygen saturation), location information, a snap shot of the patient, and voice. These requirements are presently met by using separate communication systems for voice, physiological data, and location that result in a lot of inconvenience to the technicians, maintenance related issues, in addition to being expensive. This paper presents design, development, and implementation of such a telemonitoring system for emergency patient transportation employing ARM 9 processor module. This system is found to be very useful for the emergency patient transportation being undertaken by organizations like the Emergency Management Research Institute (EMRI). PMID:27019844

  8. Pickering tool management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, E.H.; Green, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    Tools were being deployed in the station with no process in effect to ensure that they are maintained in good repair so as to effectively support the performance of Maintenance activities. Today's legal requirements require that all employers have a process in place to ensure that tools are maintained in a safe condition. This is specified in the Ontario Health and Safety Act. The Pickering Tool Management System has been chosen as the process at Pickering N.D to manage tools. Tools are identified by number etching and bar codes. The system is a Windows application installed on several file servers

  9. MANAGEMENT OF EXTRIMITY FRACTURE IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Sukma Parahita

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Fracture injuries in the extremities are accounted for 40% of the incidence of fractures in the United States and causes high morbidity (physical suffering, lost time, and mental stress. High-energy fractures of the lower limbs can also cause life threatening condition like major vascular injury, crush syndrome, and compartment syndrome. Initial treatment in the emergency room is essential to save lives and to save the fractured extremities. Primary survey (securing the airway, breathing and circulation and the secondary survey will be able to quickly and accurately identify dangerous early complication of fractures, such as major arterial injury, crush syndrome and compartment syndrome. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  10. Maritime emergency management capabilities in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roud, Ensieh Kheiri Pileh; Borch, Odd Jarl; Jakobsen, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Growing maritime commercial activities in the High North increase the possibility of unwanted incidents. The vulnerability related to human safety and environment and a challenging context, call for a strengthening of the maritime preparedness system, and cross-boundary and cross-institutional co......Growing maritime commercial activities in the High North increase the possibility of unwanted incidents. The vulnerability related to human safety and environment and a challenging context, call for a strengthening of the maritime preparedness system, and cross-boundary and cross...

  11. Recent trends in intelligent and emerging systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Manash; Sarma, Mousmita

    2015-01-01

    It is a compilation of research works related to intelligent and emerging system design using a range of tools including soft-computation. The book includes reviews, actual designs, research works, discussion and experimental results related to works in the areas of communication, computation, vision sciences, bio-inspired system design, social dynamic, related process design, etc. The audience of this book is expected to be researchers who deal with intelligent and emerging system design through mathematical and computational modeling and experimental designs. Specifically, audiences that are broadly involved in the domains of electronics and communication, electrical engineering, mathematics, computer science, other applied informatics domains and related areas will find the book interesting. The works included in the book broadly covers all areas of Electronics and Communication Engineering and Technology, Soft-computational Applications, Human Computer Interactive Designs and Social and Economic Dynamics....

  12. A Distributed Intelligent System for Emergency Convoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Benalla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The general problem that guides this research is the ability to design a distributed intelligent system for guiding the emergency convoys; a solution that will be based on a group of agents and on the analysis of traffic in order to generate collective functional response. It fits into the broader issue of Distributed Artificial System (DAI, which is to operate a cooperatively computer agent into multi-agents system (MAS. This article describes conceptually two fundamental questions of emergency convoys. The first question is dedicated to find a response to the traffic situation (i.e. fluid way, while the second is devoted to the convoy orientation; while putting the point on the distributed and cooperative resolution for the general problem.

  13. CRNL research reactor retrofit Emergency Filtration System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippi, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of NRX and NRU research reactor effluent air treatment systems before describing the selection and design of an appropriate retrofit Emergency Filtration System (EFS) to serve these reactors and the future MX-10 isotope production reactor. The conceptual design of the EFS began in 1984. A standby concrete shielding filter-adsorber system, sized to serve the reactor with the largest exhaust flow, was selected. The standby system, bypassed under normal operating conditions, is equipped with normal exhaust stream shutoff and diversion valves to be activated manually when an emergency is anticipated, or automatically when emergency levels of gamma radiation are detected in the exhaust stream. The first phase of the EFS installation, that is the construction of the EFS and the connection of NRU to the system, was completed in 1987. The second phase of construction, which includes the connection of NRX and provisions for the future connection of MX-10, is to be completed in 1990

  14. Maritime emergency management capabilities in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roud, Ensieh Kheiri Pileh; Borch, Odd Jarl; Jakobsen, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Growing maritime commercial activities in the High North increase the possibility of unwanted incidents. The vulnerability related to human safety and environment and a challenging context, call for a strengthening of the maritime preparedness system, and cross-boundary and cross...

  15. Emergency mental health management in bioterrorism events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, David M; Holloway, Harry C; Becker, Steven M

    2002-05-01

    The United States has not suffered significant psychosocial or medical consequences from the use of biological weapons within its territories. This has contributed to a "natural" state of denial at the community level. This denial could amplify the sense of crisis, anxiety, fear, chaos, and disorder that would accompany such a bioterrorist event. A key part of primary prevention involves counteracting this possibility before an incident occurs. Doing so will require realistic information regarding the bioterrorism threat followed by the development of a planned response and regular practice of that response. Unlike in natural disasters or other situations resulting in mass casualties, emergency department physicians or nurses and primary care physicians (working in concert with epidemiologic agencies), rather than police, firemen, or ambulance personnel, will be most likely to first identify the unfolding disaster associated with a biological attack. Like community leaders, this group of medical responders must be aware of its own susceptibility to mental health sequelae and performance decrement as the increasing demands of disaster response outpace the availability of necessary resources. A bioterrorist attack will necessitate treatment of casualties who experience neuropsychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Although symptoms may result from exposure to infection with specific biological agents, similar symptoms may result from the mere perception of exposure or arousal precipitated by fear of infection, disease, suffering, and death. Conservative use of psychotropic medications may reduce symptoms in exposed and uninfected individuals, as may cognitive-behavioral interventions. Clear, consistent, accessible, reliable, and redundant information (received from trusted sources) will diminish public uncertainty about the cause of symptoms that might otherwise prompt persons to seek unnecessary treatment. Training and preparation for contingencies experienced in an

  16. Stroke Management: An Emerging Role of Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepaneeta Sarmah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Stroke incidences and associated mortality are expected to rise to 23 million and 7.8 million, respectively, by 2030. Further, the aging population, imbalanced lifestyles, and environmental factors continue to shift the rate of stroke incidence, particularly in developing countries. There is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches for treating stroke. Nanotechnology is a growing field, offering an encouraging future prospect for medical research in the management of strokes. The world market for nanotechnology derived products is expected to rise manyfold in the coming decades. Different types of nanomaterials such as perfluorocarbon nanoparticles, iron oxide nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanospheres, etc. have been developed for the diagnosis as well as therapy of strokes. Today, nanotechnology has also been integrated with stem cell therapy for treating stroke. However several obstacles remain to be overcome when using such nanomaterials for treating stroke and other neurological diseases.

  17. Managing marine disease emergencies in an era of rapid change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Maya L; Maynard, Jeffrey; Breyta, Rachel; Carnegie, Ryan B; Dobson, Andy; Friedman, Carolyn S; Froelich, Brett; Garren, Melissa; Gulland, Frances M D; Heron, Scott F; Noble, Rachel T; Revie, Crawford W; Shields, Jeffrey D; Vanderstichel, Raphaël; Weil, Ernesto; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Harvell, C Drew

    2016-03-05

    Infectious marine diseases can decimate populations and are increasing among some taxa due to global change and our increasing reliance on marine environments. Marine diseases become emergencies when significant ecological, economic or social impacts occur. We can prepare for and manage these emergencies through improved surveillance, and the development and iterative refinement of approaches to mitigate disease and its impacts. Improving surveillance requires fast, accurate diagnoses, forecasting disease risk and real-time monitoring of disease-promoting environmental conditions. Diversifying impact mitigation involves increasing host resilience to disease, reducing pathogen abundance and managing environmental factors that facilitate disease. Disease surveillance and mitigation can be adaptive if informed by research advances and catalysed by communication among observers, researchers and decision-makers using information-sharing platforms. Recent increases in the awareness of the threats posed by marine diseases may lead to policy frameworks that facilitate the responses and management that marine disease emergencies require. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Integrated management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, N.

    2003-01-01

    A management system is developed in order to reflect the needs of the business and to ensure that the objectives of the organization will be achieved. The process model and each individual process within the system then needs to identify the drives or requirements from external customers and stakeholders, regulations, and standards such as ISO and 50-C-Q. The processes are then developed to address these drivers. Developing the process in this way makes it fully integrated and capable of incorporating any new requirements. The International Standard (ISO 9000:2000) promotes the adoption of a process approach when developing, implementing and improving the effectiveness of a quality management system to enhance customer satisfaction by meeting customer requirements. The IAEA Code recognizes that the entire work is a process which can be planned, assessed and improved. For an organization to function effectively, numerous linked activities have to be identified and managed. By definition a process is an activity that using resources and taking into account all the constraints imposed executes the necessary operations which transform the inputs in outcomes. Running a system of processes within an organization, identification of the interaction between the processes and their management can be referred to as a 'process approach'. The advantage of such an approach is the ensuring of the ongoing control over the linkage between the individual processes composing the system as well as over their combination and interaction. Developing a management system implies: identification of the process which delivers Critical Success Factor (CSFs) of the business; identifying the support processes enabling the CSFs to be accomplished; identifying the processes that deliver the business fundamentals. An integrated management system should include all activities not only those related to Quality, Health and Safety. When developing an IMS it is necessary to identify all of the drivers

  19. Anesthesia information management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feri Štivan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of anesthesia information management systems (AIMS is on the increase. This is particularly true for academic anesthesia departments. The main reasons for slow adoption of these systems in the past are financial barriers associated with implementation of these systems and their not so traditionally obvious potential to improve patient care. In addition, a major obstacle to acceptance of this technology is the concern of users over the impact of the electronic anesthesia record on malpractice exposure.Conclusions: The experience reported by departments using AIMS indicates that these systems are useful for managing malpractice risk. AIMS can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of preoperative, intraoperative, and post-operative anesthesia care. However, AIMS are able to increase the quality of care and improve operating room efficiency only with careful planning, installation, and customization. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT analysis performed for AIMS could help departments in making better decisions when implementing AIMS.

  20. DIRAC Data Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A C

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb experiment being built to utilize CERN’s flagship Large Hadron Collider will generate data to be analysed by a community of over 600 physicists worldwide. DIRAC, LHCb’s Workload and Data Management System, facilitates the use of underlying EGEE Grid resources to generate, process and analyse this data in the distributed environment. The Data Management System, presented here, provides real-time, data-driven distribution in accordance with LHCb’s Computing Model. The data volumes produced by the LHC experiments are unprecedented, rendering individual institutes and even countries, unable to provide the computing and storage resources required to make full use of the produced data. EGEE Grid resources allow the processing of LHCb data possible in a distributed fashion and LHCb’s Computing Model is based on this approach. Data Management in this environment requires reliable and high-throughput transfer of data, homogeneous access to storage resources and the cataloguing of data replicas, all of...

  1. NOAH--A mobile emergency care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schächinger, U; Kretschmer, R; Röckelein, W; Neumann, C; Maghsudi, M; Nerlich, M

    2000-01-26

    Experiencing communication problems in our emergency services, we developed an innovative communication network and system the NOAH-system (NOAH, which stands for Notfall -, Organisations - und Arbeitshilfe or Emergency-Organisation Active Aide System). In contrast with the currently established emergency services communication in Germany by radio wave, data is transferred from the scene in the form of an electronic record on a mobile computer by means of the wireless data communication network Modacom (Mobile Data Communication), which is provided by German Telekom. It is received at the dispatch-centre in mentioned format and transferred to the admitting hospital without any loss of data. - In a prospective study, the technical and conceptual suitability of this system was investigated. It was shown that an admitting hospital was informed more than 20 minutes in advance about the admittance of a patient. To assure the quality of transferred data, information was ranked by different criteria. This further demonstrated that much more precise information about a patient's condition was already available upon admittance in the hospital.

  2. Distribution management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verho, P.; Kaerenlampi, M.; Pitkaenen, M.; Jaerventausta, P.; Partanen, J.

    1997-12-31

    This report comprises a general description of the results obtained in the research projects `Information system applications of a distribution control center`, `Event analysis in primary substation`, and `Distribution management system` of the EDISON research program during the years of 1993 - 1997. The different domains of the project are presented in more detail in other reports. An operational state analysis of a distribution network has been made from the control center point of view and the functions which can not be solved by a conventional SCADA system are determined. The basis for new computer applications is shown to be integration of the computer systems. The main result of the work is a distribution management system (DMS), which is an autonomous system integrated to the existing information systems, SCADA and AM/FM/GIS. The system uses a large number of modelling and computation methods and provides an extensive group of advanced functions to support the distribution network monitoring, fault management, operations planning and optimization. The development platform of the system consists of a Visual C++ programming environment, Windows NT operating system and PC. During the development the DMS has been tested in a pilot utility and it is nowadays in practical use in several Finnish utilities. The use of a DMS improves the quality and economy of power supply in many ways; the outage times can, in particular, be reduced using the system. Based on the achieved experiences some parts of the DMS reached the commercialization phase, too. Initially the commercial products were developed by a software company, Versoft Oy. At present the research results are the basis of a worldwide software product supplied by ABB Transmit Co. (orig.) EDISON Research Programme. 28 refs.

  3. DIRAC Workload Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Garonne, V; Stokes-Rees, I

    2005-01-01

    The Workload Management System is the core component of the DIRAC distributed MC production and analysis grid environment of the CERN LHCb experiment. This paper discusses the architecture, implementation and performance of this system. The WMS is a community scheduler, realizing a pull paradigm, particulary for the high troughput computing context. It has recently been used for an intensive physics simulation production involving more than 60 sites, 65 TB of data, and over 1000-GHz processor-years.

  4. DISEASE MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Bens Pardamean; Anindito; Anjela Djoeang; Nana Tobing

    2013-01-01

    The study designed an information system model for Disease Management (DisMan) that met the specifications and needs of a consumer electronics manufacturer. The diseases monitored by this study were diabetes, hypertension and tuberculosis. Data were collected through interviews with the companyâs human resources department and occupational health provider. As for the model, literature and online research were conducted to collect health standards and information system standards on existing D...

  5. Business continuity management in emerging markets: the case of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Anchor, John R

    2012-01-01

    Despite their considerable growth in last few decades, emerging markets (EM) face numerous risks that have the potential to slow down or obstruct their development. Three main issues are discussed in this paper: first, the risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets and Jordan in particular; secondly, the role of business continuity management (BCM) in emerging markets; and thirdly, potential factors that underpin the role of BCM in emerging markets. These issues are significant, as they represent the role of BCM in highly dynamic and fast changing business environments. The paper provides a discussion of the significance of BCM in reducing or preventing risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets, especially those in Jordan.

  6. Model Based Mission Assurance: Emerging Opportunities for Robotic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John W.; DiVenti, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) in a Model Based Engineering framework has created new opportunities to improve effectiveness and efficiencies across the assurance functions. The MBSE environment supports not only system architecture development, but provides for support of Systems Safety, Reliability and Risk Analysis concurrently in the same framework. Linking to detailed design will further improve assurance capabilities to support failures avoidance and mitigation in flight systems. This also is leading new assurance functions including model assurance and management of uncertainty in the modeling environment. Further, the assurance cases, a structured hierarchal argument or model, are emerging as a basis for supporting a comprehensive viewpoint in which to support Model Based Mission Assurance (MBMA).

  7. Pollution management system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A pollution management system comprises an array of one or more inlets and at least one outlet. The one or more inlets are arranged to collect polluted air and supply said polluted air to a polluted air treatment element. The one or more inlets each comprise a respective inlet sensor for measuring...

  8. Visual management support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Anderson; Jerry Mosier; Geoffrey Chandler

    1979-01-01

    The Visual Management Support System (VMSS) is an extension of an existing computer program called VIEWIT, which has been extensively used by the U. S. Forest Service. The capabilities of this program lie in the rapid manipulation of large amounts of data, specifically opera-ting as a tool to overlay or merge one set of data with another. VMSS was conceived to...

  9. Emergency Physician Use of Cognitive Strategies to Manage Interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratwani, Raj M; Fong, Allan; Puthumana, Josh S; Hettinger, Aaron Z

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether emergency physicians use strategies to manage interruptions during clinical work. Interruption management strategies include immediately engaging the interruption by discontinuing the current task and starting the interruption, continuing the current task while engaging the interruption, rejecting the interruption, or delaying the interruption. An observational time and motion study was conducted in 3 different urban, academic emergency departments with 18 attending emergency physicians. Each physician was observed for 2 hours, and the number of interruptions, source of interruptions, type of task being interrupted, and use of interruption management strategies were documented. Participants were interrupted on average of 12.5 times per hour. The majority of interruptions were in person from other staff, including nurses, residents, and other attending physicians. When participants were interrupted, they were often working on their computer. Participants almost always immediately engaged the interruption task (75.4% of the time), followed by multitasking, in which the primary task was continued while the interrupting task was performed (22.2%). Physicians rejected or delayed interruptions less than 2% of the time. Our results suggest there is an opportunity to introduce emergency physicians to the use of interruption management strategies as a method of handling the frequent interruptions they are exposed to. Use of these strategies when high-risk primary tasks are performed may reduce the disruptiveness of some interruptions and improve patient safety. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Emergency destruction system for recovered chemical munitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepodd, T.J.; Stofleth, J.H.; Haroldsen, B.L.

    1998-04-01

    At the request of the US Army Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel, Sandia National Laboratories is developing a transportable system for destroying recovered, explosively configured, chemical warfare munitions. The system uses shaped charges to access the agent and burster followed by chemical neutralization to destroy them. The entire process takes place inside a sealed pressure vessel. In this paper, they review the design, operation, and testing of a prototype system capable of containing up to one pound of explosive.

  11. Introduction to the field of emerging technology management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Arend J.; Walsh, Steven Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Many see emerging technologies as a solution vector for the global challenges of the twenty-first century. Today's emerging technologies include: computational sciences; nanotechnology; micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS); bio-fuels; mobile technologies and a host of others. Yet an adequate

  12. Application of a geographic information system for radiologic emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.G.; Doyle, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) is a multifunctional analytical tool that can be used to compile available data and derive information. A GIS is a computerized database management system for the capture, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display of spatial data. Maps are the most common type of spatial data, but any type of data that can be referenced by an x-y location or geographic coordinate can be used in a GIS. In a radiological emergency, it is critical that data of all types be rapidly compiled into a common format in order to make accurate observations and informed decisions. Developing a baseline GIS for nuclear facilities would offer a significant incentive for all organizations to contribute to and utilize this powerful data management tool. The system being developed could integrate all elements of emergency planning, from the initial protective actions based on models through the emergency monitoring phase, and finally ending with the complex reentry and recovery phase. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. To demonstrate the potential of GIS for emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises. An interactive GIS system has been deployed and used to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. For this application, both hardcopy and real-time spatial displays were generated with the GIS. Composite maps with different sizes, scales, and themes were produced to support the exercises

  13. Management of information within emergencies departments in developing countries: analysis at the National Emergency Department in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Glèlè; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Sopoh, Ghislain; Sossa-Jérôme, Charles; Ouedraogo, Laurent; Wilmet-Dramaix, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    The management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the information systems evolve in emergency departments, especially in developed countries, with improved performance in terms of care quality, productivity and patient satisfaction. This study analyses the situation of Benin in this field, through the case of the Academic Clinic of Emergency Department of the National University Teaching Hospital of Cotonou, the national reference hospital. The study is cross-sectional and evaluative. Collection techniques are literature review and structured interviews. The components rated are resources, indicators, data sources, data management and the use-dissemination of the information through a model adapted from Health Metrics Network framework. We used quantitative and qualitative analysis. The absence of a regulatory framework restricts the operation of the system in all components and accounts for the lack and inadequacy of the dedicated resources. Dedication of more resources for this system for crucial needs such as computerization requires sensitization and greater awareness of the administrative authorities about the fact that an effective health information management system is of prime importance in this type of facility.

  14. Ready for the Future: Assessing the Collaborative Capacity of State Emergency Management Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Emerging needs of the emergency management discipline are outlined in recent presidential directives, national strategies and federal emergency...national strategies and federal emergency management strategic initiative documents. Meeting these needs requires collaboration as a core capability...local businesses and powerful private sector organizations such as McDonald’s and Walmart . What makes one state emergency management agency better at

  15. National Energy Board Emergency Management Program : annex to Natural Resources Canada Civil Emergency Plan no. 004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, G.; LeMay, R.

    2006-01-01

    As a matter of primary public interest, safety is included in the National Energy Board's (NEB) mandate. The Board is responsible for ensuring companies involved with energy development and pipelines comply with regulations concerning the safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The purpose of the NEB's Emergency Management Program is to establish a prompt and coordinated response to an emergency which occurs at any facility or operation regulated by the NEB; promote safety and security and assure compliance with regulatory requirements in order to protect the public, workers, property and the environment during the life cycle of facilities and operations; and, have a documented set of procedures that accomplish these objectives. The Board ensures that companies identify and manage the potential hazards associated with their facilities; conduct a risk analysis of those hazards; and, manage the risks in order to protect the public and personnel, the security of the facilities and the environment. All companies under the Board's jurisdiction are responsible for developing and maintaining an Emergency Response and Preparedness Program for all aspects of their operations. In the event an emergency occurs, the regulated company is responsible for responding to the emergency and coordinating emergency response activities. Typically, the NEB responds on site to incidents that result in death or serious injury; involve a significant release of hydrocarbons; could result in potential or real impact due to loss of service; pose imminent threats identified by Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada or other agencies; attract significant media attention, or on the advice of Natural Resources Canada or other federal Agencies. The first part of this document described the initial response check list while the second part outlined the Emergency response framework. 2 tabs., 3 figs., 15 appendices

  16. Smart energy management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Aniruddha; Singh, Jugdutt

    2010-04-01

    Peak and average energy usage in domestic and industrial environments is growing rapidly and absence of detailed energy consumption metrics is making systematic reduction of energy usage very difficult. Smart energy management system aims at providing a cost-effective solution for managing soaring energy consumption and its impact on green house gas emissions and climate change. The solution is based on seamless integration of existing wired and wireless communication technologies combined with smart context-aware software which offers a complete solution for automation of energy measurement and device control. The persuasive software presents users with easy-to-assimilate visual cues identifying problem areas and time periods and encourages a behavioural change to conserve energy. The system allows analysis of real-time/statistical consumption data with the ability to drill down into detailed analysis of power consumption, CO2 emissions and cost. The system generates intelligent projections and suggests potential methods (e.g. reducing standby, tuning heating/cooling temperature, etc.) of reducing energy consumption. The user interface is accessible using web enabled devices such as PDAs, PCs, etc. or using SMS, email, and instant messaging. Successful real-world trial of the system has demonstrated the potential to save 20 to 30% energy consumption on an average. Low cost of deployment and the ability to easily manage consumption from various web enabled devices offers gives this system a high penetration and impact capability offering a sustainable solution to act on climate change today.

  17. Air System Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  18. Medical management of radiation/nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, Aseem

    2014-01-01

    The medical issues in a radioactive fallout eventuality include radioprotectors, radioactivity de corporators, hemopoietic system regenerators, community and individual dosage issues, logistic and scale-up issues, regulatory issues. These issues are further compounded by the fact that published literature is (and will be) sparse and outdated, and pharma majors are unlikely to involve themselves in the R and D as well as in the supply chain. Self-developed out-of-box solutions are therefore needed. INMAS, DRDO has recently made progress on all these fronts. Many of these products have already been approved by DCGI and others are in an advanced development stage. Radioprotector has been and is an Achilles heals for the concerned scientists and a number of state agencies for a long time. However, it is a difficult area to work in for a number of reasons. New research in this area shall be highlighted. Finally, clinical trials, which are considered a norm and the final step before introduction of new drugs, are not strictly possible in case of decorporating agents and radioprotectors. Ways and means to collect safety-efficacy data shall be discussed

  19. A Review of Cyber Threats and Defence Approaches in Emergency Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Vuong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Emergency planners, first responders and relief workers increasingly rely on computational and communication systems that support all aspects of emergency management, from mitigation and preparedness to response and recovery. Failure of these systems, whether accidental or because of malicious action, can have severe implications for emergency management. Accidental failures have been extensively documented in the past and significant effort has been put into the development and introduction of more resilient technologies. At the same time researchers have been raising concerns about the potential of cyber attacks to cause physical disasters or to maximise the impact of one by intentionally impeding the work of the emergency services. Here, we provide a review of current research on the cyber threats to communication, sensing, information management and vehicular technologies used in emergency management. We emphasise on open issues for research, which are the cyber threats that have the potential to affect emergency management severely and for which solutions have not yet been proposed in the literature.

  20. Waste management in non-hospital emergency units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Milca Severino; Alves, Sergiane Bisinoto; Silva e Souza, Adenicia Custódia; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; de Rezende, Fabiana Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Erika Goulart

    2013-01-01

    to analyze waste management in urgency and emergency non-hospital health care service units. Epidemiological cross-sectional study undertaken at three Non-Hospital Emergency Units. The data were collected using systematic observation, registered daily in a spreadsheet and checklist, and analyzed through descriptive statistics. the generation of waste varied from 0.087 to 0.138 kg per patient per day. Waste management showed inadequacies in all stages, especially in the separation stage. Infectious waste was found together with common waste, preventing recycling, and piercing and cutting objects were mixed with waste from different groups, increasing the risk of occupational accidents. the study reveals the lack of an institutional waste management policy, as demonstrated by the failure of operational stages, involving problems related to management, physical structure, material and human resources at the units. This is relevant for health care units, considering the quality of patient care and its interface with sustainability.

  1. Three essays on hospitality management in emerging markets

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Esta tesis contiene artículos de investigación en anexo. This dissertation is composed of three essays on the hospitality management practices in the hotel and airline sectors of emerging markets. The three essays address the issues of loyalty programs, environmental innovations, and electronic word of mouth in hospitality management. The first essay analyzes the factors contributing to the popularity of airline and hotel companies’ loyalty programs. The results show that facto...

  2. CAMEO (Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations) Software Suite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CAMEO is the umbrella name for a system of software applications used widely to plan for and respond to chemical emergencies. All of the programs in the suite work...

  3. Challenges of Conversion from Document Management System to Data Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Siali, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore technology: Industrial asset management Issues that emerged from the use of the document management system and the desire to change to a database management system (DBMS) by many organizations is the driving force behind the ideas from this thesis. Draga AS identified the challenges arising from this shift and provided the basis for this work. The goal is to present a review of the relevant bibliographical material that illustrates those critical factors that bo...

  4. The Fort McMurray, Alberta wildfires: Emergency and recovery management of healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matear, David

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest wildfires in Canadian history raged through northern Alberta in May to July 2016, and prompted the largest emergency air evacuation in Canadian history. Central to the challenges were the evacuation of a regional hospital, and the emergency and recovery management associated with healthcare services. This paper describes multiple phases of emergency and recovery management, which employed and adapted the Incident Command System to healthcare services. There were no injuries reported throughout the medical evacuation and recovery of medical services. The leadership and management of healthcare services achieved the goals of evacuating patients and staff effectively, supporting emergency first responders and the re-entry of the population to Fort McMurray.

  5. Mastering the management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2008-01-01

    Companies have always found it hard to balance pressing operational concerns with long-term strategic priorities. The tension is critical: World-class processes won't lead to success without the right strategic direction, and the best strategy in the world will get nowhere without strong operations to execute it. In this article, Kaplan, of Harvard Business School, and Norton, founder and director of the Palladium Group, explain how to effectively manage both strategy and operations by linking them tightly in a closed-loop management system. The system comprises five stages, beginning with strategy development, which springs from a company's mission, vision, and value statements, and from an analysis of its strengths, weaknesses, and competitive environment. In the next stage, managers translate the strategy into objectives and initiatives with strategy maps, which organize objectives by themes, and balanced scorecards, which link objectives to performance metrics. Stage three involves creating an operational plan to accomplish the objectives and initiatives; it includes targeting process improvements and preparing sales, resource, and capacity plans and dynamic budgets. Managers then put plans into action, monitoring their effectiveness in stage four. They review operational, environmental, and competitive data; assess progress; and identify barriers to execution. In the final stage, they test the strategy, analyzing cost, profitability, and correlations between strategy and performance. If their underlying assumptions appear faulty, they update the strategy, beginning another loop. The authors present not only a comprehensive blueprint for successful strategy execution but also a managerial tool kit, illustrated with examples from HSBC Rail, Cigna Property and Casualty, and Store 24. The kit incorporates leading management experts' frameworks, outlining where they fit into the management cycle.

  6. Surgeons’ and Emergency Physicians’ Perceptions of Trauma Management and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemphill, Robin R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study objective was to determine whether surgeons and emergency medicine physicians (EMPs have differing opinions on trauma residency training and trauma management in clinical practice.Methods: A survey was mailed to 250 EMPs and 250 surgeons randomly selected.Results: Fifty percent of surgeons perceived that surgery exclusively managed trauma compared to 27% of EMPs. Surgeons were more likely to feel that only surgeons should manage trauma on presentation to the ED. However, only 60% of surgeons currently felt comfortable with caring for the trauma patient, compared to 84% of EMPs. Compared to EMPs, surgeons are less likely to feel that EMPs can initially manage the trauma patient (71% of surgeons vs. 92% of EMPs.Conclusion: EMPs are comfortable managing trauma while many surgeons do not feel comfortable with the complex trauma patient although the majority of surgeons responded that surgeons should manage the trauma.[WestJEM. 2009;10:144-149.

  7. Clinical Aspects and Emergent Management of Snake Bites Presented to Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedriye Sonmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evaluating the epidemiologic characteristics and management of snake bites presenting to emergency departments. Material and Method: In this retrospective study 74 cases of snakebites admitted to Emergency Department of Diyarbakir Training and Research Hospital between 2008 and 2009 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Fourty-six (62.2% of patients were male and 28 (37.8% were female. Mean age of the study population was 34.85±19.17 (min 7- max 80 years. Most of the snakebites occurred between 18.00 to 06.00 hours and at home (73%. 79.7% of snake bites occurred to upper extremities. %93 of cases had intravenous administration of antivenin (one dose. Neither none of the patients needed recurrent administration. Discussion: Snake bites are still a major public health problem especially in rural areas. Particularly emergency care physicians should be adequately capable and sophisticated in multidisciplinary management of snake bites.

  8. Characteristics of effective interventions supporting quality pain management in Australian emergency departments: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Ramon Z; Holzhauser, Kerri; Gillespie, Kerri; Huckson, Sue; Bennetts, Scott

    2012-02-01

    It is well established that pain is the most common presenting complaint in Emergency Departments. Despite great improvements in available pain management strategies, patients are left waiting for longer than 60min for pain relief on arrival to the emergency department. The aim of this study was to describe interventions that lead to successful implementation of the National Health and Medical Research Council approved guidelines Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence (2nd Edition) that include specific recommendations for best practice pain management. A two-phased, mixed-method, exploratory study of all 52 Australian hospital emergency departments participating in the National Emergency Care Pain Management Initiative incorporating interview and document analysis was undertaken. Interventions used by clinicians to improve pain management included nurse initiated analgesia, intranasal fentanyl for paediatric patients and lignocaine, and facio illiaca block. Education formed a major part of the intervention and the development of a working group of key stakeholders was critical in the successful implementation of change. Staff perceptions of patients' pain level and attitudes toward pain assessment and pain management were identified as barriers. This study highlighted how an effective framework to plan and implement practice change and tailored interventions, including education and training systems and products using the best available evidence, best equipped clinicians to manage pain in the ED. Copyright © 2011 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Some reflections on the emerging notion of personal quality management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, J.

    1999-01-01

    States that the concept of the “classical” organisation is undoubtedly in transition. As a result new organisational concepts emerge. Addresses the nature of quality management and assurance in “organisations under construction”. Starting with a brief overview of the characteristics of new

  10. 75 FR 16623 - Emergency Management for Higher Education Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.184T. AGENCY: Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools, Department of Education... Drug-Free Schools announces priorities and requirements for the Emergency Management for Higher... tragic shooting at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 2007. That and other past...

  11. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  12. Role Of Public Transportation Operations In Emergency Management: Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    This project examines the possible roles that public transit agencies can fulfill in the emergency management plans of their cities and/or counties. This report summarizes the first two phases of the project, which incorporate a review of available l...

  13. Healthcare logistics in disaster planning and emergency management: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanVactor, Jerry D

    2017-12-01

    This paper discusses the role of healthcare supply chain management in disaster mitigation and management. While there is an abundance of literature examining emergency management and disaster preparedness efforts across an array of industries, little information has been directed specifically toward the emergency interface, interoperability and unconventional relationships among civilian institutions and the US Department of Defense (US DoD) or supply chain operations involved therein. To address this imbalance, this paper provides US DoD healthcare supply chain managers with concepts related to communicating and planning more effectively. It is worth remembering, however, that all disasters are local - under the auspice of tiered response involving federal agencies, the principal responsibility for responding to domestic disasters and emergencies rests with the lowest level of government equipped and able to deal with the incident effectively. As such, the findings are equally applicable to institutions outside the military. It also bears repeating that every crisis is unique: there is no such thing as a uniform response for every incident. The role of the US DoD in emergency preparedness and disaster planning is changing and will continue to do so as the need for roles in support of a larger effort also continues to change.

  14. Intelligent computing systems emerging application areas

    CERN Document Server

    Virvou, Maria; Jain, Lakhmi

    2016-01-01

    This book at hand explores emerging scientific and technological areas in which Intelligent Computing Systems provide efficient solutions and, thus, may play a role in the years to come. It demonstrates how Intelligent Computing Systems make use of computational methodologies that mimic nature-inspired processes to address real world problems of high complexity for which exact mathematical solutions, based on physical and statistical modelling, are intractable. Common intelligent computational methodologies are presented including artificial neural networks, evolutionary computation, genetic algorithms, artificial immune systems, fuzzy logic, swarm intelligence, artificial life, virtual worlds and hybrid methodologies based on combinations of the previous. The book will be useful to researchers, practitioners and graduate students dealing with mathematically-intractable problems. It is intended for both the expert/researcher in the field of Intelligent Computing Systems, as well as for the general reader in t...

  15. Verification Account Management System (VAMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Verification Account Management System (VAMS) is the centralized location for maintaining SSA's verification and data exchange accounts. VAMS account management...

  16. HLT configuration management system

    CERN Document Server

    Daponte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The CMS High Level Trigger (HLT) is implemented running a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on thousands of CPUs. The CMS software is written mostly in C++, using Python as its configuration language through an embedded CPython interpreter. The configuration of each process is made up of hundreds of modules, organized in sequences and paths. As an example, the HLT configurations used for 2011 data taking comprised over 2200 different modules, organized in more than 400 independent trigger paths. The complexity of the HLT configurations and the large number of configuration produced require the design of a suitable data management system. The present work describes the designed solution to manage the considerable number of configurations developed and to assist the editing of new configurations. The system is required to be remotely accessible and OS-independent as well as easly maintainable easy to use. To meet these requirements a three-layers architecture has been choose...

  17. Applications of artificial intelligence and expert systems in ANGRA-I emergency preparedness - The Brazilian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, M.A.B.; Guimaraes, A.C.F.

    1991-01-01

    This study describes a system to follow a nuclear accident and points the areas where the presence of artificial intelligence could be necessary: diagnostics systems, emergency classification, accident management strategies and protective actions. Logical rules could be combined with deterministic equations to provide an expert system prototype to manage a nuclear emergency preparedness for nuclear reactors (fast or thermal) in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy National Commission. (CNEN). (author)

  18. Management of constipation in the elderly: Emerging therapeutic strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Shailendra

    2008-01-01

    A number of new, novel strategies for managing constipation in the elderly have emerged over the past few years. Prucalopride is one such new agent that is highly efficacious in managing chronic constipation. In fact, Camilleri et al in a recent study reported that the average number of bowel movements increased by at least one in nearly 47% of the patients who were administered a dose of 4 mg. Lubiprostone is another new agent recently approved by the FDA that shows efficacy in managing the ...

  19. The promises and facts of emergent strategy in public management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Peter

    Public managers are experiencing a growing demand for innovation. One of the promising approaches to instigating innovation is that of emergent strategic patterns (ESPs). According to the literature, the institutional barriers and drivers of ESPs are shaped by the two dominant public management...... models, NPM (the barriers) and governance (the drivers). However, based on an empirical case study of the institutional barriers and drivers for ESPs in the Danish Crime Prevention Council, this article concludes that ESPs are in fact enabled by a much more mixed management model....

  20. Presentation and Management of Pseudoaneurysmogastric Fistula: A Life Threatening Emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Nihar Ranjan; Kilambi, Ragini; Singh, Anand Narayan; Pal, Sujoy; Asfan, Mohammed Adil

    2017-10-01

    Pseudoaneurysmogastric fistula is a rare consequence of pseudoaneurysms occurring in the vicinity of stomach. They are the result of pseudoaneurysms eroding into the stomach, and represent a life threatening emergency. Urgent surgical intervention is often necessary to salvage the patient. Data regarding the presentation and management of this condition is sparse. Herein, we present our experience with four cases of pseudoaneurysmogastric fistula, their clinical context, presentation, management and outcomes. We attempt to outline an algorithm for the diagnosis and management of this unusual complication.

  1. Do formal management practices impact the emergence of bootlegging behavior?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Globocnik, Dietfried; Salomo, Søren

    2014-01-01

    behavior, research has barely addressed the antecedents of this deviance. Drawing on strain theory and social cognitive theory, we study whether the emergence of bootlegging behavior is influenced by formal management practices, in particular, strategic autonomy, front-end formality, rewards, and sanctions...... and promote their implementation. They work without formal legitimacy and gather their own resources until sufficient clarity allows for informed decisions. Finally, they bypass formal communication channels to convince top management of the merits of their ideas. Despite the significance of such bootlegging...... their ideas and gathering their own resources to support their bootlegging efforts. © 2014 Product Development & Management Association....

  2. FASTER (Face, Arm, Speech, Time, Emergency Response): experience of Central Coast Stroke Services implementation of a pre-hospital notification system for expedient management of acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, W; Crimmins, D; Donaldson, W; Risti, R; Clarke, T A; Whyte, S; Sturm, J

    2012-02-01

    Despite benefit in acute ischaemic stroke, less than 3% of patients receive tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in Australia. The FASTER (Face, Arm, Speech, Time, Emergency Response) protocol was constructed to reduce pre-hospital and Emergency Department (ED) delays and improve access to thrombolysis. This study aimed to determine if introduction of the FASTER protocol increases use of tPA using a prospective pre- and post-intervention cohort design in a metropolitan hospital. A pre-hospital assessment tool was used by ambulance services to screen potential tPA candidates. The acute stroke team was contacted, hospital bypass allowed, triage and CT radiology alerted, and the patient rapidly assessed on arrival to ED. Data were collected prospectively during the first 6 months of the new pathway and compared to a 6-month period 12 months prior to protocol initiation. In the 6 months following protocol introduction, 115 patients presented within 24 hours of onset of an ischaemic stroke: 22 (19%) received thrombolysis, significantly greater than five (7%) of 67 patients over the control period, p=0.03. Overall, 42 patients were referred via the FASTER pathway, with 21 of these receiving tPA (50%). One inpatient stroke was also treated. Only two referrals (patients involving the ambulance services and streamlined hospital assessment is effective and efficient in improving patient access to thrombolysis. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Using Geo-Data Corporately on the Response Phase of Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir Ozbek, E.; Ates, S.; Aydinoglu, A. C.

    2015-08-01

    Response phase of emergency management is the most complex phase in the entire cycle because it requires cooperation between various actors relating to emergency sectors. A variety of geo-data is needed at the emergency response such as; existing data provided by different institutions and dynamic data collected by different sectors at the time of the disaster. Disaster event is managed according to elaborately defined activity-actor-task-geodata cycle. In this concept, every activity of emergency response is determined with Standard Operation Procedure that enables users to understand their tasks and required data in any activity. In this study, a general conceptual approach for disaster and emergency management system is developed based on the regulations to serve applications in Istanbul Governorship Provincial Disaster and Emergency Directorate. The approach is implemented to industrial facility explosion example. In preparation phase, optimum ambulance locations are determined according to general response time of the ambulance to all injury cases in addition to areas that have industrial fire risk. Management of the industrial fire case is organized according to defined actors, activities, and working cycle that describe required geo-data. A response scenario was prepared and performed for an industrial facility explosion event to exercise effective working cycle of actors. This scenario provides using geo-data corporately between different actors while required data for each task is defined to manage the industrial facility explosion event. Following developing web technologies, this scenario based approach can be effective to use geo-data on the web corporately.

  4. Emergency responses for accounting and security systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Materials Management recognizes the need to be in a position to provide assistance to the Nuclear Industry, both private and government, in the event of a safeguards incident. In recognition of that need, the Executive Committee established an ad hoc Public Information/Response Committee. The committee was given the charter of developing ''an inventory/directory of INMM expertise and capabilities for (1) providing public information, education, consultation and expert assistance when and as requested and (2) for responding appropriately to new developments (whether abrupt, emergency or gradually evolving) within our area of expertise.'' In this paper, the development of the inventory is described and its use illustrated by postulated diversion scenarios

  5. The application of supply chain management principles to emergency management logistics: An empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Matthew R; Young, Richard R; Gordon, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Key elements of supply chain theory remain relevant to emergency management (EM) logistics activities. The Supply Chain Operations Reference model can also serve as a useful template for the planning, organizing, and execution of EM logistics. Through a series of case studies (developed through intensive survey of organizations and individuals responsible for EM), the authors identified the extent supply chain theory is being adopted and whether the theory was useful for emergency logistics managers. The authors found several drivers that influence the likelihood of an organization to implement elements of supply chain management: the frequency of events, organizational resources, population density, range of events, and severity of the disaster or emergency.

  6. [Quality management in emergency departments: Lack of uniform standards for fact-based controlling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, M; Christ, M

    2015-11-01

    The general high occupancy of emergency departments during the winter months of 2014/2015 outlined deficits in health politics. Whether on the regional, province, or federal level, verifiable and accepted figures to enable in depth analysis and fact-based controlling of emergency care systems are lacking. As the first step, reasons for the current situation are outlined in order to developed concrete recommendations for individual hospitals. This work is based on a selective literature search with focus on quality management, ratio driven management, and process management within emergency departments as well as personal experience with implementation of a key ratio system in a German maximum care hospital. The insufficient integration of emergencies into the DRG systematic, the role as gatekeeper between inpatient and outpatient care sector, the decentralized organization of emergency departments in many hospitals, and the inconsistent representation within the medical societies can be mentioned as reasons for the lack of key ratio systems. In addition to the important role within treatment procedures, emergency departments also have an immense economic importance. Consequently, the management of individual hospitals should promote implementation of key ratio systems to enable controlling of emergency care processes. Thereby the perspectives finance, employees, processes as well as partners and patients should be equally considered. Within the process perspective, milestones could be used to enable detailed controlling of treatment procedures. An implementation of key ratio systems without IT support is not feasible; thus, existing digital data should be used and future data analysis should already be considered during implementation of new IT systems.

  7. Automated data system for emergency meteorological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, C.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant (SRP) releases small amounts of radioactive nuclides to the atmosphere as a consequence of the production of radioisotopes. The potential for larger accidental releases to the atmosphere also exists, although the probability for most accidents is low. To provide for emergency meteorological response to accidental releases and to conduct research on the transport and diffusion of radioactive nuclides in the routine releases, a series of high-quality meteorological sensors have been located on towers in and about SRP. These towers are equipped with instrumentation to detect and record temperature and wind turbulence. Signals from the meterological sensors are brought by land-line to the SRL Weather Center-Analysis Laboratory (WC-AL). At the WC-AL, a Weather Information and Display (WIND) system has been installed. The WIND system consists of a minicomputer with graphical displays in the WC-AL and also in the emergency operating center (EOC) of SRP. In addition, data are available to the system from standard weat []er teletype services, which provide both routine surface weather observations and routine upper air wind and temperature observations for the southeastern United States. Should there be an accidental release to the atmosphere, available recorded data and computer codes would allow the calculation and display of the location, time, and downwind concentration of the atmospheric release. These data are made available to decision makers in near real-time to permit rapid decisive action to limit the consequences of such accidental releases. (auth)

  8. Environmental Compliance Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A.; Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy

  9. Evaluating Emergency Department Asthma Management Practices in Florida Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Carretta, Henry J; Dudley, Julie K; Forrest, Jamie R; Folsom, Abbey N

    2016-01-01

    To assess gaps in emergency department (ED) asthma management at Florida hospitals. Survey instrument with open- and closed-ended questions. Topics included availability of specific asthma management modalities, compliance with national guidelines, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and efforts toward performance improvement. Emergency departments at 10 large hospitals in the state of Florida. Clinical care providers and health administrators from participating hospitals. Compliance with national asthma care guideline standards, provision of specific recommended treatment modalities and resources, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and engagement in performance improvement efforts. Our results suggest inconsistency among sampled Florida hospitals' adherence to national standards for treatment of asthma in EDs. Several hospitals were refining their emergency care protocols to incorporate guideline recommendations. Despite a lack of formal ED protocols in some hospitals, adherence to national guidelines for emergency care nonetheless remained robust for patient education and medication prescribing, but it was weaker for formal care planning and medical follow-up. Identified deficiencies in emergency asthma care present a number of opportunities for strategic mitigation of identified gaps. We conclude with suggestions to help Florida hospitals achieve success with ED asthma care reform. Team-based learning activities may offer an optimal strategy for sharing and implementing best practices.

  10. Knowledge and Confidence of Emergency Clinicians in Managing Toxicological Presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Monteith

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute poisonings are common presentations to emergency departments (EDs worldwide and require rapid assessment. Consultant emergency physicians (EPs faced with various toxicological presentations must initiate rapid investigations and empirical management. This study aimed to determine emergency department doctors’ level of knowledge and confidence in toxicological presentations, and factors that predicted these outcomes. Methods: Target participants included members of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM and readers of the emergency medicine website, “Life in the Fast Lane”. The survey was distributed electronically via the ACEM bulletin and posted on Life in the Fast Lane. A survey was designed based on toxicology multiple choice questions (MCQs. The questionnaire comprised 59 items: 10 demographic items; 20 items about confidence; 28 MCQs assessing knowledge of common and serious toxicological presentations. Results: There were 467 consenting respondents from 31 countries, with most residing in Australia (306/467, 66%. Respondents comprised similar proportions of consultant emergency physicians (196/467, 42.0%, and trainees (197/467, 42.2%.  Almost two-thirds (292/467; 62.1% had received formal training in toxicological emergencies, while a third (166/467, 35.5% had participated in a relevant conference or workshop. A total of 284/339 (83.8% participants completing all items achieved a knowledge test score >50%. More than 65% incorrectly answered questions on pharmacology of serotonin syndrome and lithium toxicity, and more than half incorrectly answered questions on use of 12 lead ECG in toxicology, calcium channel antagonist or tricyclic antidepressant toxicities. Predictors of overall knowledge for toxicology were receipt of formal toxicology education, and clinicians’ experience and seniority. Conclusion: The knowledge and confidence of doctors working in emergency departments is varied, yet

  11. DIRAC Workload Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Paterson, S

    2007-01-01

    DIRAC (Distributed Infrastructure with Remote Agent Control) is the Workload and Data Management system (WMS) for the LHCb experiment. The DIRAC WMS offers a transparent way for LHCb users to submit jobs to the EGEE Grid as well as local clusters and individual PCs. This paper will describe workload management optimizations, which ensure high job efficiency and minimized job start times. The computing requirements of the LHCb experiment can only be fulfilled through the use of many distributed compute resources. DIRAC provides a robust platform to run data productions on all the resources available to LHCb including the EGEE Grid. More recently, user support was added to DIRAC that greatly simplifies the procedure of submitting, monitoring and retrieving output of Grid jobs for the LHCb user community. DIRAC submits Pilot Agents to the EGEE Grid via the gLite WMS as normal jobs. Pilot Agents then request jobs from the DIRAC Workload Management System after the local environment has been checked. Therefore DIR...

  12. Simulator configuration management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulent, J.; Brooks, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The proposed revisions to ANS 3.5-1985 (Section 5) require Utilities to establish a simulator Configuration Management System (CMS). The proposed CMS must be capable of: Establishing and maintaining a simulator design database. Identifying and documenting differences between the simulator and its reference plant. Tracking the resolution of identified differences. Recording data to support simulator certification, testing and maintenance. This paper discusses a CMS capable of meeting the proposed requirements contained in ANS 3.5. The system will utilize a personal computer and a relational database management software to construct a simulator design database. The database will contain records to all reference nuclear plant data used in designing the simulator, as well as records identifying all the software, hardware and documentation making up the simulator. Using the relational powers of the database management software, reports will be generated identifying the impact of reference plant changes on the operation of the simulator. These reports can then be evaluated in terms of training needs to determine if changes are required for the simulator. If a change is authorized, the CMS will track the change through to its resolution and then incorporate the change into the simulator design database

  13. Programmatic risk management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahn, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wood, C.L. [Automated Solutions of Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of the Programmatic Risk Management System (PRMS) is to evaluate and manage potential risks associated with proposed projects (i.e., new products or processes, or possible research and technological development projects). Although the PRMS considers some technical aspects of risk, the primary focus of the methodology is programmatic risk. That is, the methodology permits an assessment of risks associated with such issues as the ability to successfully produce a product that performs in accordance with all customer requirements, and the availability and allocation of resources (money, equipment, facilities, skilled personnel). The PRMS process consists of five formalized activities that are essential for effective management of risks associated with proposed projects. These activities include risk assessment, development of appropriate risk mitigation strategies, estimating strategy implementation cost, ranking of risk mitigation strategies for resource allocation, and scheduling of strategy implementing. The PRMS utilizes a ranking system that allows the user to identify the most cost-effective investment of resources of minimizing risk.

  14. [The syncope in Emergency Department: usual management vs guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A; Baldini, E; Suppa, M; Rosa, A; Coppola, A; Cavicchi, F; Contu, E; Petroni, C; Strano, S; Scarpellini, M G

    2011-01-01

    The syncope is a common cause of admission to Emergency Departments, representing around 1-3% of all admissions to the service. However, elderly age and important comorbidities often hinder a definite etiologic diagnosis, with increasing requests for diagnostic tests and longer periods of hospitalization. We analyzed the management of 1,204 patients admitted to our Emergency Department for transient loss of consciousness in the period between 1 June 2009 and 1 June 2010, evaluating the following parameters: average age, gender, triage color code at admittance, performed diagnostic tests, diagnosis at discharge from ED and destination ward. We also studied a subgroup of 93 patients admitted to emergency medicine units evaluating their OESIL score at admittance, comorbidities, performed diagnostic tests and diagnosis at discharge from the ward. In the Emergency Department, 45% of patients were discharged with a diagnosis of syncope of unknown origin; in 21% of patients syncope was excluded; 19% of patients received a diagnosis of cardiogenic syncope; 11% were diagnosed with a presyncope; 3% with orthostatic hypotension and 1% with vasovagal syncope. In emergency medicine units, 51% of patients were discharged with a diagnosis of cardiogenic syncope, 11% were diagnosed with vasovagal syncope, 11% with presyncope, 11% with TIA, 8% with loss of consciousness non-syncope and 8% with syncope of unknown origin. Management of patients with syncope, elderly people with important comorbidities in particular, is still a serious problem for the emergency physician. The creation of specialized units for the management of syncope, the so-called syncope units, through the implementation of a shared diagnostic and therapeutic protocol, aims at reducing inappropriate hospitalization and average length of stay.

  15. CRISIS: A System for Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Y. Sanchez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In a situation of an unexpected catastrophe, uncertainty and demand for information are constant. In such a disaster scenario, the CRISIS system arises as a tool to contribute to previous coordination, procedure validation, exercise execution, a good and frequent communication among organizations, and weakness and threat assessment for an appropriate risk management. It offers a wide variety of tools for online communication, consultation and collaboration that, up to this day, includes cartography, tasks, resources, news, forums, instant messaging and chat. As a complement, mathematical models for training and emergency management are being researched and developed. For Argentinean society, it is a necessity to switch from the current handcrafted, bureaucratic emergency management method to a decision-making management model. Previous coordination, exercise execution, a fluid communication among institutions, and threats and weaknesses assessment are required for a proper risk management. With that goal in mind, it is important to reduce confusion, avoid the duplication of efforts to fulfill the same tasks, and have access to a complete vision of the situation, generated from the data of all the organizations taking part. The CRISIS system is a secure web application, accessible to every node in a network formed by the organizations which have complementary responsibilities during prevention and response. It offers a wide variety of tools for online communication, consultation and collaboration that, up to this day, includes cartography, tasks, media (organization and resources, news, forums, instant messaging and chat. As a complement, mathematical models for training and emergency management are being researched and developed. Currently, there are toxicological and epidemiological emergency models available. The present paper analyses, from the perspectives related to risk management for emergencies and disasters, the strengths and weaknesses

  16. Bank Customers Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebubeogu Amarachukwu Felix

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is in partial fulfilment of the requirements of Bachelor of Science Hon in Information Technology. The Design and development of this Bank customers Management system provides a more secured approach in managing bank customers information which strengthens the relationships between banks and their customers by providing the right solutions that uses a multi-level security to improve customer satisfaction. The technology used in developing this project is ASP.NET and the programming language used to develop this project is C and the IDE used is Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 professional in designing the front end while the back end uses Microsoft SQL Server 2012.

  17. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center

  18. A knowledge based system for training radiation emergency response personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriakose, K.K.; Peter, T.U.; Natarajan, A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the important aspects of radiation emergency preparedness is to impart training to emergency handling staff. Mock exercises are generally used for this purpose. But practical considerations limit the frequency of such exercises. A suitably designed computer software can be effectively used to impart training. With the advent of low cost personal computers, the frequency with which the training programme can be conducted is unlimited. A computer software with monotonic behaviour is inadequate for such training. It is necessary to provide human like tutoring capabilities. With the advances in knowledge based computer systems, it is possible to develop such a system. These systems have the capability of providing individualized training. This paper describes the development of such a system for training and evaluation of agencies associated with the management of radiation emergency. It also discusses the utility of the software as a general purpose tutor. The details required for the preparation of data files and knowledge base files are included. It uses a student model based on performance measures. The software is developed in C under MS-DOS. It uses a rule based expert system shell developed in C. The features of this shell are briefly described. (author). 5 refs

  19. Management of constipation in the elderly: emerging therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Shailendra

    2008-09-07

    A number of new, novel strategies for managing constipation in the elderly have emerged over the past few years. Prucalopride is one such new agent that is highly efficacious in managing chronic constipation. In fact, Camilleri et al in a recent study reported that the average number of bowel movements increased by at least one in nearly 47% of the patients who were administered a dose of 4 mg. Lubiprostone is another new agent recently approved by the FDA that shows efficacy in managing the symptoms of constipation. Neostigmine has also been successfully used for the management of recalcitrant constipation. Most of these studies have used subcutaneous neostigmine. Symbiotic yogurt containing components, such as Bifidobacterium and fructoligosaccharide, have also been recently shown to be highly effective in improving symptoms of constipation. Elderly patients especially those in hospices and nursing homes are often on opioids for pain management. Constipation secondary to opioid use is extremely common in nursing homes. Subcutaneous methylnaltrexone has recently been shown to be highly effective in the management of opioid-related constipation, and was recently approved by the FDA. Sacral nerve stimulation is another emerging strategy. A recent analysis by Mowatt et al supports the efficacy of this technique. Botulinum toxin is another agent that has already been successfully used for the management of chronic, refractory constipation in children and may be very effective for elderly constipation. Further larger studies are needed to confirm the findings noted in these studies. Constipation is clearly a major issue in the elderly and these new, emerging strategies will hopefully improve the quality of life and relieve the symptoms of constipation in this population.

  20. Policies for managing emergency medical services in mass casualty incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adini, B; Bodas, M; Nilsson, H; Peleg, K

    2017-09-01

    Diverse decision-making is needed in managing mass casualty incidents (MCIs), by emergency medical services (EMS). The aim of the study was to review consensus among international experts concerning policies of EMS management during MCIs. Applicability of 21 EMS policies was tested through a 2-cycle modified e-Delphi process, in which 38 multi-disciplinary experts from 10 countries participated. Threshold for approving proposed solutions was defined as consensus of >80%. Policies that did not achieve the targeted consensus were reviewed to detect variability according to respondents' origin country. 16 policies were endorsed in the first cycle including collaboration between ambulance service providers; implementing a unified mode of operation; preparing criteria for ground versus aerial evacuation; and, developing support systems for caregivers exposed to violence. An additional policy which proposed that senior EMS officers should not necessarily act as on-site MCI commanders was endorsed in the second cycle. Demographic breakdown of views concerning non-consensual policies revealed differences according to countries of origin. Assigning ambulances to off-duty team members was highly endorsed by experts from Israel and South Africa and strongly rejected by European respondents. Avoiding entry to risk areas until declared safe was endorsed by European, Asian and Oceanic experts, but rejected by Israeli, South African and North American experts. Despite uniqueness of countries and EMS agencies, solutions to most dilemmas were applicable to all organizations, regardless of location or affiliation. Cultural diversity was found concerning readiness to implement military-civilian collaboration in MCIs and a rigid separation between work-leisure responsibilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Management Information Systems at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, J

    1986-01-01

    The specific areas addressed in the study are 1.Management decision support (data presentation, data base management systems â" DBMS, modeling) 2.Text processing, 3.Electronic communication for management purposes, 4.Office automation, 5.Administrative use of Management Information Systems (MIS) and in particular Administrative Data Processing (ADP).

  2. Health information systems in humanitarian emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieren, Michel

    2005-08-01

    Health information systems (HIS) in emergencies face a double dilemma: the information necessary to understand and respond to humanitarian crises must be timely and detailed, whereas the circumstances of these crises makes it challenging to collect it. Building on the technical work of the Health Metrics Network on HIS and starting with a systemic definition of HIS in emergencies, this paper reviews the various data-collection platforms in these contexts, looking at their respective contributions to providing what humanitarian actors need to know to target their intervention to where the needs really are. Although reporting or sampling errors are unavoidable, it is important to identify them and acknowledge the limitations inherent in generalizing data that were collected in highly heterogeneous environments. To perform well in emergencies, HIS require integration and participation. In spite of notable efforts to coordinate data collection and dissemination practices among humanitarian agencies, it is noted that coordination on the ground depends on the strengths and presence of a lead agency, often WHO, and on the commitment of humanitarian agencies to investing resources in data production. Poorly integrated HIS generate fragmented, incomplete and often contradictory statistics, a situation that leads to a misuse of numbers with negative consequences on humanitarian interventions. As a means to avoid confusion regarding humanitarian health statistics, this paper stresses the importance of submitting statistics to a rigorous and coordinated auditing process prior to their publication. The audit trail should describe the various steps of the data production chains both technically and operationally, and indicate the limits and assumptions under which each number can be used. Finally emphasis is placed on the ethical obligation for humanitarian agencies to ensure that the necessary safeguards on data are in place to protect the confidentiality of victims and

  3. Profiling wound management in the emergency department: A descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rachel; Jennings, Natasha; McGuiness, William; Miller, Charne

    2016-08-01

    The service profile of wound, skin and ulcer presentations to emergency departments is an area that lacks an existing published commentary. Knowledge of these presentations would inform the allocation of resources, staff training, and, in turn, patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe the discharge and referral status of adult patients presenting to one Australian emergency department with a wound, skin or ulcer condition. A retrospective descriptive review was conducted of all emergency presentations including discharge and referral statuses for skin, wound and ulcer related conditions from 1st January 2014 until 31st December 2014. A total of 4231 wound, skin and ulcer conditions were managed, accounting for 7% of the total emergency presentations. Wound conditions were the most prevalent (n=3658; 86%). Males were more likely to present for all three conditions. For all conditions, discharge to home was the most common destination. Following discharge to home, over half all patients were referred to the local medical officer. Nursing workforce models, education and training needs to reflect the skill set required to respond to wound, skin and ulcer conditions to ensure that high quality skin and wound care continues outside of the emergency department. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Major alternatives for government policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify and assess major alternatives for governmental policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management in the United States. The National Academy of Public Administration agreed to identify and evaluate alternatives for governmental policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management. It agreed to review present policies and practices in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management, to review selected experiences and practices of governmental agencies other than the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and industries other than the nuclear power industry, and to identify alternatives to the present nuclear emergency system

  5. FEMME- post-Fire Emergency ManageMEnt tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Diana; Serpa, Dalila; Rocha, João; Nunes, João; Keizer, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Wildfires can have important impacts on hydrological and soil erosion processes in forest catchments, due to the destruction of vegetation cover and changes to soil properties. The involved processes however, are non-linear and not fully understood. This has severely limited the understanding on the impacts of wildfires, and, as a consequence, current runoff-erosion models are poorly adapted to recently burned forest conditions. Furthermore, while post-fire forestry operations and, to a lesser extent, post-fire soil conservation measures are commonly applied, their hydrological and erosion impacts continue poorly known, hampering decision-making by land owners and managers. Past post-wildfire research in Portugal has involved simple adaptations of plot-scale runoff-erosion models to post-fire conditions. This follow-up study focusses on model adaptation to selected post-fire soil conservation measures. To this end, full stock is taken of various datasets collected by several (past and ongoing research projects. The selected model is the Morgan-Morgan-Finney model (MMF, Morgan,2001), which already proved its suitability for post-fire conditions in Portugal (Vieira et al, 2010, 2014) as well as NW-Spain ( Fernández et al., 2010). The present results concerned runoff and erosion different burn severities and various post-fire mitigation treatments (mulch, hydromulch, needle cast, barriers), focussing on the plot and field scale. The results for both the first and the second year following the wildfire revealed good model efficiency, not only for burned and untreated conditions but also for burned and treated conditions. These results thus reinforced earlier findings that MMF is a suitable model for the envisaged post-fire soil erosion assessment tool, coined "FEMME". The data used for post-fire soil erosion calibration with the MMF already allows the delineation of the post-fire management FEMME tool. Nevertheless, further model assessment will address additional

  6. Remedial action graphics management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the Graphics Management System is to provide a visual display of the Grand Junction vicinities properties status as a cost effective management tool. Capabilities of the system are listed and a series of sample displays are presented

  7. IT Project Management from a Systems Thinking Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, Pascal; Ponisio, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We proposes a Systems Thinking approach to the study of IT project management and show how this approach helps project managers in controlling their projects. Systems Thinking is a holistic problem solving method in which system behaviour emerges from the interaction of system components.

  8. Social Networking for Emergency Management and Public Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Godinez, Melanie A.

    2010-08-31

    On March 10, 2010 the workshop titled Social Networking for Emergency Management and Public Safety was held in Seattle, WA. The objective of this workshop was to showcase ways social media networking technologies can be used to support emergency management and public safety operations. The workshop highlighted the current state of social networking and where this dynamic engagement is heading, demonstrated some of the more commonly used technologies, highlighted case studies on how these tools have been used in a variety of jurisdictions and engaged the private sector on how these tools might serve as a conduit for two way communication between with the public sector to address regional recovery issues and decision making.

  9. Recognizing and managing adrenal disorders in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Amy; Ducey, Stephen; Barthold, Claudia L; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-09-22

    Primary and secondary adrenal insufficiency are underrecognized conditions among emergency department patients, affecting an estimated 10% to 20% of critically ill patients. The signs and symptoms of cortisol deficit can be nonspecific and wide-ranging, and identification and swift treatment with stress-dosing of hydrocortisone is vital to avoid life-threatening adrenal crisis. Laboratory evaluation focuses on identification of electrolyte abnormalities typical of adrenal insufficiency, and while additional testing may depend on the type and severity of symptoms, it should not delay corticosteroid replacement. This issue provides recommendations on effective management of patients presenting with adrenal insufficiency, with particular attention to the management of critically ill and septic patients, pregnant patients, and children. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  10. Syncope: a review of emergency department management and disposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pranjal R; Quinn, James V

    2015-01-01

    Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness due to cerebral hypoperfusion with spontaneous return to baseline function without intervention. It is a common chief complaint of patients presenting to the emergency department. The differential diagnosis for syncope is broad and the management varies significantly depending on the underlying etiology. In the emergency department, determining the cause of a syncopal episode can be difficult. However, a thorough history and certain physical exam findings can assist in evaluating for life-threatening diagnoses. Risk-stratifying patients into low, moderate and high-risk groups can assist in medical decision making and help determine the patient’s disposition. Advancements in ambulatory monitoring have made it possible to obtain prolonged cardiac evaluations of patients in the outpatient setting. This review will focus on the diagnosis and management of the various types of syncope. PMID:27752576

  11. Combining internet technology and mobile phones for emergency response management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsson, S.E.

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended for persons involved in radiological emergency response management. An introduction is given to the technical basis of the mobile Internet and ongoing development summarised. Examples are given describing how mobile Internet technology has been used to improve monitoring media coverage of incidents and events, and a test is described where web based information was selectively processed and made available to WAP enabled mobile phones. The report concludes with recommendations stressing the need for following mobile Internet developments and taking them into account when designing web applications for radiological response management. Doing so can make web based material accessible to mobile devices at minimal additional cost. (au)

  12. Management of angioedema without urticaria in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Maria; Prieto-García, Alicia; Sala-Cunill, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Angioedema refers to a localized, transient swelling of the deep skin layers or the upper respiratory or gastrointestinal mucosa. It develops as a result of mainly two different vasoactive peptides, histamine or bradykinin. Pathophysiology, as well as treatment, is different in each case; nevertheless, the resulting signs and symptoms may be similar and difficult to distinguish. Angioedema may occur at any location. When the affected area involves the upper respiratory tract, both forms of angioedema can lead to an imminent upper airway obstruction and a life-threatening emergency. Emergency physicians must have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology underlying this process. Angioedema evaluation in the emergency department (ED) should aim to distinguish between histamine- and bradykinin-induced angioedema, in order to provide appropriate treatment to patients. However, diagnostic methods are not available at the ED setting, neither to confirm one mechanism or the other, nor to identify a cause. For this reason, the management of angioedema should rely on clinical data depending on the particular features of the episode and the patient in each case. The history-taking should be addressed to identify a possible etiology or triggering agent, recording complete information for an ulterior diagnostic study in the outpatient clinic. It is mandatory quickly to recognize and treat a potential life-threatening upper airway obstruction or anaphylaxis. This review focuses on the underlying mechanisms and management of histamine- and bradykinin-induced angioedema at the emergency department and provides an update on the currently available treatments.

  13. 30 CFR 57.18013 - Emergency communications system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency communications system. 57.18013... Programs Surface and Underground § 57.18013 Emergency communications system. A suitable communication system shall be provided at the mine to obtain assistance in the event of an emergency. ...

  14. 78 FR 36278 - Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... COMMISSION Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.137, ``Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies.'' Revision 2 of RG 1.137 endorses ANSI/ANS- 59.51-1997, ``Fuel Oil Systems for Safety-Related Emergency Diesel Generators...

  15. Emerging fluconazole resistance: Implications for the management of cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpoza, Edward; Rhein, Joshua; Abassi, Mahsa

    2018-03-01

    We present the case of an HIV-seropositive individual with cryptococcal meningitis who was found to have a fluconazole resistant strain of Cryptococcus neoformans . The individual required multiple rounds of amphotericin and fluconazole 800-1200 mg after several episodes of clinical relapse. Cerebrospinal fluid sterilization was achieved and maintained with high doses of fluconazole. This case demonstrates the emerging dilemma of increasing rates of fluconazole resistance in Cryptococcus and the clinical difficulties in meningitis management.

  16. Emerging fluconazole resistance: Implications for the management of cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Mpoza

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of an HIV-seropositive individual with cryptococcal meningitis who was found to have a fluconazole resistant strain of Cryptococcus neoformans. The individual required multiple rounds of amphotericin and fluconazole 800–1200 mg after several episodes of clinical relapse. Cerebrospinal fluid sterilization was achieved and maintained with high doses of fluconazole. This case demonstrates the emerging dilemma of increasing rates of fluconazole resistance in Cryptococcus and the clinical difficulties in meningitis management.

  17. The Emerging Role of Governance, Risk Management and Compliance (GRC)

    OpenAIRE

    Nahum Goldmann

    2012-01-01

    In the emerging ‘post High-tech’ economic paradigm, eFinance, as well as Governance, Risk Management and Compliance (GRC) are often seen as the strategic engines of industrial and commercial growth, innovation and social renewal. Moreover, in the current financial environment, the attention of investors and stakeholders focuses on the corporate ability to maintain a strong capital position that protects it from financial crises. All these factors imply the critical impor...

  18. Management Improvements Needed in Commander’s Emergency Response Program in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    SIGIR Report No. SIGIR-09-026, “Commander’s Emergency Response Program: Hotel Construction Completed, But Project Management Issues Remain,” July 26...stations, bus stations, and seaports ). The operations deal with the control of the system, such as traffic signals and ramp meters, railroad switches, air

  19. Conceptualization of actors’ emerging-object-of-activities as hidden exploitative resource for managing organizational change

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Mohammed-Aminu

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an “actor’s emerging-object-of-activity” and its potential use towards increased understanding and learning of the complexity of organizational change management in organizations. The argument that organizations, as activity systems, offers managers of organizational change an antidote to simplistic interpretations of the nature of individual knowledge and action, and organizational cultures and competencies was critically appraised. Paths for understanding...

  20. Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) / Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS Evaluation of Risk-Informed Margins Management Strategies for a Representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) toolkit and methodology are proposed for investigating nuclear power plant core, fuels design and safety analysis, including postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. This toolkit, under an integrated evaluation model framework, is name LOCA toolkit for the US (LOTUS). This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermal hydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results.

  1. Demonstration of an Emergency Containment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, T.M.; Rogers, M.L.; Wilkes, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    A system called an Emergency Containment System (ECS) to be used for tertiary containment of tritium was reported at the 13th Air Cleaning Conference. This system was part of the Tritium Effluent Control Laboratory then under construction at Mound Facility. A series of experiments has recently been conducted to evaluate the performance of an ECS in capturing tritium accidentally released into an operating laboratory. The ECS is an automatically actuated laboratory air detritiation system utilizing a catalytic oxidation reactor and presaturated oxide adsorption/exchange columns. In the event of an accidental release of tritium into the laboratory, the ECS is automatically activated, and quick-acting pneumatic dampers divert the laboratory air supply and exhaust through the ECS until room concentrations are returned to safe operating levels. The results of the experiments have shown that a tertiary containment of tritium is feasible. In the event of a catastrophic accident, the ECS is capable of preventing the release of a large quantity of tritium to the environment

  2. Managing climate change risk : emerging financial sector expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.

    2004-01-01

    Engagement of the financial sector in the climate change debate is apparent, with social investors and advocacy groups launching 32 climate change related shareholder resolutions with American and Canadian energy companies in 2003. Eos Research and Consulting Ltd. recently conducted a study to examine emerging standards for how energy companies manage climate change related risks. A survey was conducted in the first part of the study to determine the environmental awareness of energy companies. Financial firms were asked whether they sought information concerning GHG inventories; projections of future emissions; action plans for addressing climate change and energy efficiency; evaluation of relative risk; estimation of cost of carbon; assessment of financial impact; evaluation of future regulations; and emissions trading activity. The second part of the study compared the response of 11 leading energy companies. The result was 2 opposing views on how climate change risks should be managed. The survey revealed that while most mainstream financial institutions are not paying much attention to climate change issues, socially responsible investment (SRI) investors are aware and working to factor climate change risk management information into their activities. In addition, SRI is growing at a faster pace than other investment segments, which may lead to greater future expectations for energy companies' climate change risk management efforts. It was concluded that the financial sector may emerge as an important source of direction that will guide energy companies in their future efforts to manage climate change risks. The five trends that contribute to the sector's emerging role are the continuing influence of advocacy groups; evolution of socially responsible approaches to investment; growing concerns for reputation; development of financial risk assessment approaches in terms of climate change; and, increase focus on corporate governance issues. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 1

  3. The Evolution of Public Health Emergency Management as a Field of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Dale A; Murthy, Shivani; Brooks, Jennifer; Bryant, Jeffrey

    2017-09-01

    The health impacts of recent global infectious disease outbreaks and other disasters have demonstrated the importance of strengthening public health systems to better protect communities from naturally occurring and human-caused threats. Public health emergency management (PHEM) is an emergent field of practice that draws on specific sets of knowledge, techniques, and organizing principles necessary for the effective management of complex health events. We highlight how the nascent field of PHEM has evolved in recent years. We explore this development by first examining multiple sites of intersection between the fields of public health and emergency management. We then analyze 2 of the principal pillars on which PHEM was built: organizational and programmatic (i.e., industry) standards and the incident management system. This is followed by a sketch of the key domains, or functional areas, of PHEM and their application to the emergency management cycle. We conclude with some observations about PHEM in a global context and discuss how the field might continue to evolve.

  4. Web Based Project Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Aadamsoo, Anne-Mai

    2010-01-01

    To increase an efficiency of a product, nowadays many web development companies are using different project management systems. A company may run a number of projects at a time, and requires input from a number of individuals, or teams for a multi level development plan, whereby a good project management system is needed. Project management systems represent a rapidly growing technology in IT industry. As the number of users, who utilize project management applications continues to grow, w...

  5. A Multiagent System for Distributed Systems Management

    OpenAIRE

    H. M. Kelash; H. M. Faheem; M. Amoon

    2007-01-01

    The demand for autonomous resource management for distributed systems has increased in recent years. Distributed systems require an efficient and powerful communication mechanism between applications running on different hosts and networks. The use of mobile agent technology to distribute and delegate management tasks promises to overcome the scalability and flexibility limitations of the currently used centralized management approach. This work proposes a multiagent s...

  6. Emergent supersymmetry in local equilibrium systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ping; Liu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Many physical processes we observe in nature involve variations of macroscopic quantities over spatial and temporal scales much larger than microscopic molecular collision scales and can be considered as in local thermal equilibrium. In this paper we show that any classical statistical system in local thermal equilibrium has an emergent supersymmetry at low energies. We use the framework of non-equilibrium effective field theory for quantum many-body systems defined on a closed time path contour and consider its classical limit. Unitarity of time evolution requires introducing anti-commuting degrees of freedom and BRST symmetry which survive in the classical limit. The local equilibrium is realized through a Z 2 dynamical KMS symmetry. We show that supersymmetry is equivalent to the combination of BRST and a specific consequence of the dynamical KMS symmetry, to which we refer as the special dynamical KMS condition. In particular, we prove a theorem stating that a system satisfying the special dynamical KMS condition is always supersymmetrizable. We discuss a number of examples explicitly, including model A for dynamical critical phenomena, a hydrodynamic theory of nonlinear diffusion, and fluctuating hydrodynamics for relativistic charged fluids.

  7. Successful customer value management : Key lessons and emerging trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, P.C.; Lemon, Katherine

    In the past decade, firms have paid increasing attention to customer value management (CVM). Through customer-centric management systems, firms aim to maximize customer value. In this article, we put forth six important lessons that firms can employ for successful CVM, integrating available research

  8. System Study: Emergency Power System 1998-2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the emergency power system (EPS) at 104 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. An extremely statistically significant increasing trend was observed for EPS system unreliability for an 8-hour mission. A statistically significant increasing trend was observed for EPS system start-only unreliability.

  9. Cryptographic Key Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS CERTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniko Miler-Virc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ISO 14001 prescribes the requirements for a system, not environmental performance itself. Similarly, certification is of the management system itself, not environmental performance. An audit is not conducted to ascertain whether your flue gas emissions are less than X part per million nitrous oxide or that your wastewater effluent contains less that Y milligrams of bacteria per litre. Consequently, the procces of auditing the system for compliance to the standard entails checking to see that all of the necessary components of a functioning system are present and working properly.           A company can have a complete and fully functional EMS as prescribed by ISO 14001 without being certified. As certification can add to the time and expense of EMS development, it is important for you to establish, in advance, whether certification is of net benefit to you. Although most companies that develop an EMS do in fact certify, there are cases where certification does not add immediate value. Certification is not always beneficial to small and medium sized companies. Certification is not always necessary for companies with one or two large clients with environmental demands who are satisfied that you have a functional EMS (second-party declaration. Whatever decision you make, it is important to remember that just as a driver′s licence does not automatically make you a good driver, ISO 14001 certification does not automatically make your company environmentally benign or ensure that you will continually improve environmental performance. The system is only as good as the people who operate it.

  11. Supplier Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Eric; Gutheinz, Sandy; Brison, James; Ho, Anita; Allen, James; Ceritelli, Olga; Tobar, Claudia; Nguyen, Thuykien; Crenshaw, Harrel; Santos, Roxann

    2008-01-01

    Supplier Management System (SMS) allows for a consistent, agency-wide performance rating system for suppliers used by NASA. This version (2.0) combines separate databases into one central database that allows for the sharing of supplier data. Information extracted from the NBS/Oracle database can be used to generate ratings. Also, supplier ratings can now be generated in the areas of cost, product quality, delivery, and audit data. Supplier data can be charted based on real-time user input. Based on these individual ratings, an overall rating can be generated. Data that normally would be stored in multiple databases, each requiring its own log-in, is now readily available and easily accessible with only one log-in required. Additionally, the database can accommodate the storage and display of quality-related data that can be analyzed and used in the supplier procurement decision-making process. Moreover, the software allows for a Closed-Loop System (supplier feedback), as well as the capability to communicate with other federal agencies.

  12. Computerized training management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, Harold B. (Franklin Furnace, OH); McNair, Robert C. (East Setauket, NY); White, Kenneth (Shirley, NY); Maugeri, Terry (Wading River, NY)

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  13. Computerized training management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  14. Management of Hepatic Rupture Diagnosed after an Emergency Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Raffaello Damiani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A careful management of hepatic capsular rupture, with massive hemoperitoneum which occurred 14 hours after an emergency cesarean section at 36 weeks of gestation, is meticulously reported. The grade of hepatic involvement varies from minor capsular laceration to extensive parenchymal rupture. Our management involved a combination of surgical interventions and aggressive supportive care. The patient was discharged after 53 days and 4 laparotomies and an unsuccessful attempt of superselective artery embolization. Ultrasound after 40 days from the last surgery showed uniform hepatic parenchyma free of focal lesions. Due to the rarity and the unpredictability nature of this devastating event we believe necessary to report our experience, reinforcing the importance of the postsurgery management.

  15. Reverse quality management: developing evidence-based best practices in health emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Tim; Cox, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Health's Framework for Core Functions in Public Health was the catalyst that inspired this review of best practices in health emergency management. The fieldwork was conducted in the fall of 2005 between hurricane Katrina and the South Asia earthquake. These tragedies, shown on 24/7 television news channels, provided an eyewitness account of disaster management, or lack of it, in our global village world. It is not enough to just have best practices in place. There has to be a governance structure that can be held accountable. This review of best practices lists actions in support of an emergency preparedness culture at the management, executive, and corporate/governance levels of the organization. The methodology adopted a future quality management approach of the emergency management process to identify the corresponding performance indictors that correlated with practices or sets of practices. Identifying best practice performance indictors needed to conduct a future quality management audit is described as reverse quality management. Best practices cannot be assessed as stand-alone criteria; they are influenced by organizational culture. The defining of best practices was influenced by doubt about defining a practice it is hoped will never be performed, medical staff involvement, leadership, and an appreciation of the resources required and how they need to be managed. Best practice benchmarks are seen as being related more to "measures" of performance defined locally and agreed on by 2 or more parties rather than to achieving industrial standards. Relating practices to performance indicators and then to benchmarks resulted in the development of a Health Emergency Management Best Practices Matrix that lists specific practice in the different phases of emergency management.

  16. Pain management: association with patient satisfaction among emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Hemangini C; Marco, Catherine A

    2014-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with emergency care is associated with timeliness of care, empathy, technical competence, and information delivery. Previous studies have demonstrated inconsistent findings regarding the association between pain management and patient satisfaction. This study was undertaken to determine the association between pain management and patient satisfaction among Emergency Department (ED) patients presenting with acute painful conditions. In this survey study, a standardized interview was conducted at the Emergency Department at the University of Toledo Medical Center in May-July 2011. Participants were asked to answer 18 questions pertaining to patient satisfaction. Additional data collected included demographic information, pain scores, and clinical management. Among 328 eligible participants, 289 (88%) participated. The mean triage pain score on the verbal numeric rating scale was 8.2 and the mean discharge score was 6.0. The majority of patients (52%) experienced a reduction in pain of 2 or more points. Participants received one pain medication dose (44%), two medication doses (14%), three medication doses (5%), or four medication doses (2%). Reduction in pain scores of 2 or more points was associated with a higher number of medications administered. Reduction in pain scores was associated with higher satisfaction as scored on questions of patient perceptions of adequate assessment and response to pain, and treatment of pain. There was a significant association between patient satisfaction and a reduction in pain of 2 or more points and number of medications administered. Effective pain management is associated with improved patient satisfaction among ED patients with painful conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Delayed complications of emergency airway management: a study of 533 emergency department intubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakles, John C; Deacon, John M; Bair, Aaron E; Keim, Samuel M; Panacek, Edward A

    2008-11-01

    Airway management is a critical procedure performed frequently in emergency departments (EDs). Previous studies have evaluated the complications associated with this procedure but have focused only on the immediate complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence and nature of delayed complications of tracheal intubation performed in the ED at an academic center where intubations are performed by emergency physicians (EPs). All tracheal intubations performed in the ED over a one-year period were identified; 540 tracheal intubations were performed during the study period. Of these, 523 charts (96.9%) were available for review and were retrospectively examined. Using a structured datasheet, delayed complications occurring within seven days of intubation were abstracted from the medical record. Charts were scrutinized for the following complications: acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, airway trauma from the intubation, and new respiratory infections. An additional 30 consecutive intubations were examined for the same complications in a prospective arm over a 29-day period. The overall success rate for tracheal intubation in the entire study group was 99.3% (549/553). Three patients who could not be orally intubated underwent emergent cricothyrotomy. Thus, the airway was successfully secured in 99.8% (552/553) of the patients requiring intubation. One patient, a seven-month-old infant, had unanticipated subglottic stenosis and could not be intubated by the emergency medicine attending or the anesthesiology attending. The patient was mask ventilated and was transported to the operating room for an emergent tracheotomy. Thirty-four patients (6.2% [95% CI 4.3 - 8.5%]) developed a new respiratory infection within seven days of intubation. Only 18 patients (3.3% [95% CI 1.9 - 5.1%]) had evidence of a new respiratory infection within 48 hours, indicating possible aspiration pneumonia secondary to airway management. Three patients (0.5% [95% CI 0

  18. Delayed Complications of Emergency Airway Management: A Study of 533 Emergency Department Intubations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keim, Samuel M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Airway management is a critical procedure performed frequently in emergency departments (EDs. Previous studies have evaluated the complications associated with this procedure but have focused only on the immediate complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence and nature of delayed complications of tracheal intubation performed in the ED at an academic center where intubations are performed by emergency physicians (EPs.METHODS: All tracheal intubations performed in the ED over a one-year period were identified; 540 tracheal intubations were performed during the study period. Of these, 523 charts (96.9% were available for review and were retrospectively examined. Using a structured datasheet, delayed complications occurring within seven days of intubation were abstracted from the medical record. Charts were scrutinized for the following complications: acute myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, airway trauma from the intubation, and new respiratory infections. An additional 30 consecutive intubations were examined for the same complications in a prospective arm over a 29-day period.RESULTS: The overall success rate for tracheal intubation in the entire study group was 99.3% (549/553. Three patients who could not be orally intubated underwent emergent cricothyrotomy. Thus, the airway was successfully secured in 99.8% (552/553 of the patients requiring intubation. One patient, a seven-month-old infant, had unanticipated subglottic stenosis and could not be intubated by the emergency medicine attending or the anesthesiology attending. The patient was mask ventilated and was transported to the operating room for an emergent tracheotomy. Thirty-four patients (6.2% [95% CI 4.3 - 8.5%] developed a new respiratory infection within seven days of intubation. Only 18 patients (3.3% [95% CI 1.9 - 5.1%] had evidence of a new respiratory infection within 48 hours, indicating possible aspiration pneumonia secondary to airway

  19. Farm management systems and the Future Internet era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaloxylos, A.; Eigenmann, R.; Teye, F.; Wolfert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Smart/precision farming systems are expected to play an important role in improving farming activities. During the past years, sophisticated farm management systems have emerged to replace outdated complex and monolithic farm systems and software tools. The latest trend is to enable these management

  20. Changeability of production management systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenraad, M. S.; Wortmann, J. C.; Olhager, J; Persson, F

    2007-01-01

    Modem production management systems consist of transaction processing systems and decision enhancement systems. A clear example of two such components are an ERP systems and APS systems. These systems are often standard software systems, and therefore suitable for many different situations. This

  1. Manpower management information system /MIS/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravette, M. C.; King, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    System of programs capable of building and maintaining data bank provides all levels of management with regular manpower evaluation reports and data source for special management exercises on manpower.

  2. System management and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the principles of system management and shows the relationship to quality assurance. It discusses the need for balanced attention to all the project management controls required for project success

  3. Informational system. Documents management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladut Iacob

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Productivity growing, as well as reducing of operational costs in a company can be achieved by adopting a document management solutions. Such application will allow management and structured and efficient transmission of information within the organization.

  4. Advances in software development for intelligent interfaces for alarm and emergency management consoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, M.R.; Olson, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in technology allow features like voice synthesis, voice and speech recognition, image understanding, and intelligent data base management to be incorporated in computer driven alarm and emergency management information systems. New software development environments make it possible to do rapid prototyping of custom applications. Three examples using these technologies are discussed. 1) Maximum use is made of high-speed graphics and voice synthesis to implement a state-of-the-art alarm processing and display system with features that make the operator-machine interface efficient and accurate. 2) An application generator which has the capability of ''building'' a specific alarm processing and display application in a matter of a few hours, using the site definition developed in the security planning phase to produce the custom application. 3) A software tool, is described which permits rapid prototyping of human-machine interfaces for a variety of applications including emergency management, alarm display and process information display

  5. Interprofessional team dynamics and information flow management in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardi, Silvia; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2014-06-01

    In Emergency Departments, fragmentation and breakdown in information exchange can be important factors leading to adverse events. This article aims to consider the critical aspects of collaborative teamwork in Emergency Departments that may have an impact on the information flow. On the basis of Distributed Cognition Theory, we have assumed that cognitive outcomes in critical-care settings are not confined to the thoughts of isolated individuals; rather, they are better understood as properties of a distributed cognitive system across the minds of the clinical team members and across the technological artefacts. We report on an exploratory ethnographic study of two Emergency Departments. Data were collected over a period of four months in 2008 via observation and interviews. The results highlight a specific distribution of cognitive work between physicians and nurses. The nurse's roles as information highlighter, memory keeper and process organizer helped to ensure the information flow and to overcome some of the problems identified with the computer-assisted communication process. Such distribution of cognitive work improved care quality, but it crossed established professional boundaries. As cross-boundary distribution of cognitive work in Emergency Departments can be perceived as role substitution, building an interprofessional working system is needed to avoid information breakdown in fast-moving contexts. To realize an interprofessional working system, practice-based training is required, aimed at developing a deep understanding of team cognition. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Difficult airway response team: a novel quality improvement program for managing hospital-wide airway emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J; Herzer, Kurt R; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I; Berkow, Lauren C; Haut, Elliott R; Hillel, Alexander T; Miller, Christina R; Feller-Kopman, David J; Schiavi, Adam J; Xie, Yanjun J; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W; Mirski, Marek A

    2015-07-01

    Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. We developed a quality improvement program-the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)-to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had 3 core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a Web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index >40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous or current tracheostomy. Twenty

  7. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  8. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  9. ASCOT data base management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, J.; Nyholm, R.; Castro, C.; Hill, K.

    1980-07-01

    The ASCOT data base management system is designed to handle the data produced by both the experimental and theoretical efforts of the DOE Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) project. The data base envisioned is hierarchically structured, sparse, and compact. Information concerning any given data file is stored in a directory file. The data base management system uses a relational data management approach. Presently three management schema are being developed for use with the data base. 5 figures.

  10. Management of novel oral anticoagulants in emergency and trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana-Catarina; Hague, Adam; Ghosh, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The compelling safety, efficacy and predictable effect of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) is driving a rapid expansion in their therapeutic indications. Management of the increasing number of patients on those new agents in the setting of emergency or trauma surgery can be challenging and the absence of specific reversal agents has been a matter of concern. This review summarises the key principles that underpin the management of those patients with a particular emphasis on the recent development of specific antidotes. As of 2015, a new line of antidotes, specific for these drugs, are at different stages of their development with their release imminent. However, as NOACs are innately reversible due to their short half-life, the use of reversal agents will probably be restricted to a few exceptional cases. Post-marketing surveillance will be paramount to better clarify the role of these promising drugs. Management of patients on NOACs in the context of emergency or trauma surgery relies on best supportive care in combination with the blood products and/or specific antidotes as required. Familiarity with the new reversal agents is essential but further evidence on their indications, safety and efficacy as well as consensus guidelines are warranted prior to widespread adoption. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. New type radiation management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogi, Kenichi; Uranaka, Yasuo; Fujita, Kazuhiko

    2001-01-01

    The radiation management system is a system to carry out entrance and leaving room management of peoples into radiation management area, information management on radiation obtained from a radiation testing apparatus, and so on. New type radiation management system developed by the Mitsubishi Electric Corp. is designed by concepts of superior maintenance and system practice by using apparatus and its interface with standard specification, upgrading of processing response by separating exposure management processing from radiation monitoring processing on a computer, and a backup system not so as to lose its function by a single accident of the constructed computer. Therefore, the system is applied by the newest hardware, package software, and general use LAN, and can carry out a total system filled with requirements and functions for various radiation management of customers by preparing a basic system from radiation testing apparatus to entrance and leaving room management system. Here were described on outline of the new type management system, concept of the system, and functions of every testing apparatus. (G.K.)

  12. Medical sports injuries in the youth athlete: emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Donna L; Molony, Joseph T

    2012-04-01

    As the number of youth sports participants continues to rise over the past decade, so too have sports related injuries and emergency department visits. With low levels of oversight and regulation observed in youth sports, the responsibility for safety education of coaches, parents, law makers, organizations and institutions falls largely on the sports medicine practitioner. The highly publicized catastrophic events of concussion, sudden cardiac death, and heat related illness have moved these topics to the forefront of sports medicine discussions. Updated guidelines for concussion in youth athletes call for a more conservative approach to management in both the acute and return to sport phases. Athletes younger than eighteen suspected of having a concussion are no longer allowed to return to play on the same day. Reducing the risk of sudden cardiac death in the young athlete is a multi-factorial process encompassing pre-participation screenings, proper use of safety equipment, proper rules and regulations, and immediate access to Automated External Defibrillators (AED) as corner stones. Susceptibility to heat related illness for youth athletes is no longer viewed as rooted in physiologic variations from adults, but instead, as the result of various situations and conditions in which participation takes place. Hydration before, during and after strenuous exercise in a high heat stress environment is of significant importance. Knowledge of identification, management and risk reduction in emergency medical conditions of the young athlete positions the sports physical therapist as an effective provider, advocate and resource for safety in youth sports participation. This manuscript provides the basis for management of 3 major youth emergency sports medicine conditions.

  13. DESIGN OF AUTOMATED CONTROL SYSTEM EVACUATION IN AN EMERGENCY ON THE PRINCIPLE OF SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Valeev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of the management of infrastructure facilities is to ensure efficient evacuation in an emergency. The problem of the evacuation is related to the heterogeneity of data, its’ large volume, the loss of part of the information infrastructure under the influence of destructive factors. The concept design of the automated evacuation control system based on system engineering is considered. It involves the use of a systematic approach, modern information technologies, as well as simulation. The actuality of the use of technology solutions for big data management tasks in real time is proved. As a tool for distributed processing, cluster prototype with low power consumption computers is proposed.

  14. Emergency Status Management in Energetic Field . Risk Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gherasim Solovestru DOMIDE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of emergency in the energy sector generates technical problems such as: disruption in the operation of machinery and equipment, replacement of equipment or others needs. Besides the technical problems which appear, also intervene economic and financial issues that generate costs for the replacement of machines, equipment and installations and expenses of compensation to third parties who have suffered losses by disconnecting the power supply or lack of electricity over a longer or shorter period. Modern methods of risk management include also economic solutions. Some of these solutions will be treated in this paper.

  15. Corticosteroid use in management of pediatric emergency conditions [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Asalim; Greenfield, Tyler; Cantor, Richard M; Wilson, Bryan

    2018-03-01

    Corticosteroids have been used for over half a century to treat various inflammatory disorders; however, their use in many pediatric conditions remains controversial. This issue reviews evidence on corticosteroid treatment in acute asthma exacerbations, croup, acute pharyngitis, anaphylaxis, acute spinal injury, and bacterial meningitis. While corticosteroids are clearly indicated for management of asthma exacerbations and croup, they are not universally recommended for potential spinal cord injury. Due to insufficient data or conflicting data, corticosteroids may be considered in children with acute pharyngitis, anaphylaxis, and bacterial meningitis. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  16. Hybrid Decision-making Method for Emergency Response System of Unattended Train Operation Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suitable selection of the emergency alternatives is a critical issue in emergency response system of Unattended Train Operation (UTO metro system of China. However, there is no available method for dispatcher group in Operating Control Center (OCC to evaluate the decision under emergency situation. It was found that the emergency decision making in UTO metro system is relative with the preferences and the importance of multi-dispatcher in emergency. Regarding these factors, this paper presents a hybrid method to determinate the priority weights of emergency alternatives, which aggregates the preference matrix by constructing the emergency response task model based on the Weighted Ordered Weighted Averaging (WOWA operator. This calculation approach derives the importance weights depending on the dispatcher emergency tasks and integrates it into the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA operator weights based on a fuzzy membership relation. A case from train fire is given to demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of the proposed methods for Group Multi-Criteria Decision Making (GMCDM in emergency management of UTO metro system. The innovation of this research is paving the way for a systematic emergency decision-making solution which connects the automatic metro emergency response system with the GMCDM theory.

  17. Managing threats from emerging technologies: can safeguards show the way?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leffer, Teri N.

    2014-01-01

    The system of international nuclear safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is primarily a means of verification of states’ commitments under various legal instruments, principally the Nuclear Non‑Proliferation Treaty (NPT), to utilize controlled nuclear fission for peaceful purposes only. However, the safeguards system can also be seen as a mechanism through which states acted to reduce the threat posed by a new technology that had a transformative impact on existing national security paradigms when it emerged in the twentieth century. In the twenty‑first century, new technologies with equally profound national security implications are emerging. These include biotechnology and synthetic biology, nano technology, information technology, cognitive science, robotics and artificial intelligence. Throughout its history, the safeguards system has evolved to accommodate new technologies, new undertakings and new threats. Because multiple emerging technologies now constitute potential national security threats, it is appropriate to consider whether and how the lessons and successes of the safeguards system, including its capacity to evolve in response to changing requirements, could be leveraged to mitigate the threat posed by these new technologies. This paper addresses the possibility of re‑imagining safeguards in a way that makes them applicable to a broader range of technology‑based threats without compromising their effectiveness for their original purpose.

  18. Systems Assurance, Complexity and Emergence: The Need for a Systems Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessami, Ali; Karcanias, Nicos

    The complexity of modern products, systems and processes makes the task to identify, characterise and provide sufficient assurance about the desirable properties a major challenge. Stakeholders also, demand a degree of enhanced confidence about the absence of undesirable properties with a potential to cause harm or loss. The paper develops a framework of seven fundamental facets of performance as an ontology for emergent behavioural properties and a separate framework for the emergent structural properties of complex systems. The emergent behavioural aspects are explored and we develop a systems framework for assurance based on an Assessment and Management paradigm each comprising a number of principles and processes. The key argument advanced is that in the face of complexity and incessant change, enhanced confidence in the achievement of desirable and avoidance of undesirable properties requires a systems approach empowered by suitable modelling and relevant diagnostic tools explaining the nature of emergent properties. The principal focus of this paper is on safety, security and sustainability emergent behavioural (performance) aspects of complex products, systems and processes.

  19. Education and training of physicians for radiation emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Rita

    2012-01-01

    The project orders implied the development, testing, and evaluation of a curriculum for educating and training physicians in prehospital radiation accident management and the development of a master curriculum. Objectives were to develop, preserve, and enlarge medical competence concerning prehospital care of radiation accident patients. The project is expected to contribute to qualify emergency physicians challenged by scenarios related to radiological and nuclear hazards. The development and the content of the curriculum for educating and training physicians in prehospital radiation accident management are being described. The conduction and evaluation of two pilot training courses with a total of 40 participating physicians are being presented. Successful testing of the pilot courses proves the value of the curriculum developed. Self-contained courses can be performed according to the master curriculum and the respective master presentations. Moreover, single modules can be integrated in existing education and training programmes. Suggestions for the implementation and accreditation of the curriculum are being made. (orig.)

  20. Factors relating to the perceived management of emergency situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkvad Rasmussen, Maria; Tolsgaard, Martin G; Dieckmann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    well". In general, the responders' confidence in being ALS providers was high, mean 4.3 (SD 0.8), scale 1-5. Significant differences between the perceived "well" and "not well" managed situations were found for all questions, p... to apply ALS principles, the team atmosphere and communication. Responders' ratings of quality of management of emergency situations increased with intensity of setting. However, the 'clinical setting' was rated significantly lower as attributor to ability to apply ALS principles compared to 'co......-workers familiarity with ALS principles', 'own confidence as ALS-provider' and 'own social/inter-personal skills'. CONCLUSION: The results of this survey emphasise that ALS providers' perceived ability to apply ALS skills were substantially affected by teamwork skills and co-workers' skills. Team related factors...

  1. Benefit Analysis of Emergency Standby System Promoted to Cogeneration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyi-Wen Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Benefit analysis of emergency standby system combined with absorption chiller promoted to cogeneration system is introduced. Economic evaluations of such upgraded projects play a major part in the decisions made by investors. Time-of-use rate structure, fuel cost and system constraints are taken into account in the evaluation. Therefore, the problem is formulated as a mixed-integer programming problem. Using two-stage methodology and modified mixed-integer programming technique, a novel algorithm is developed and introduced here to solve the nonlinear optimization problem. The net present value (NPV method is used to evaluate the annual benefits and years of payback for the cogeneration system. The results indicate that upgrading standby generators to cogeneration systems is profitable and should be encouraged, especially for those utilities with insufficient spinning reserves, and moreover, for those having difficulty constructing new power plants.

  2. 4GL ward management system.

    OpenAIRE

    Brandejs, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of extensive research of computerized information systems for nursing, inpatient care, clinics and HMOs, laboratories, diagnostic imaging, pharmacy and other services, an integrated Ward Patient Management system was developed. A mature, relational data base management system (RDBMS) ORACLE was selected as the design tool. The system is running under VMS, DOS and UNIX operating systems and ORACLE version 6 on nearly all computer platforms, although multiprocessors are preferr...

  3. Pediatric crisis resource management training improves emergency medicine trainees' perceived ability to manage emergencies and ability to identify teamwork errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Ilana; Snell, Linda; Bhanji, Farhan

    2014-12-01

    Improved pediatric crisis resource management (CRM) training is needed in emergency medicine residencies because of the variable nature of exposure to critically ill pediatric patients during training. We created a short, needs-based pediatric CRM simulation workshop with postactivity follow-up to determine retention of CRM knowledge. Our aims were to provide a realistic learning experience for residents and to help the learners recognize common errors in teamwork and improve their perceived abilities to manage ill pediatric patients. Residents participated in a 4-hour objectives-based workshop derived from a formal needs assessment. To quantify their subjective abilities to manage pediatric cases, the residents completed a postworkshop survey (with a retrospective precomponent to assess perceived change). Ability to identify CRM errors was determined via a written assessment of scripted errors in a prerecorded video observed before and 1 month after completion of the workshop. Fifteen of the 16 eligible emergency medicine residents (postgraduate year 1-5) attended the workshop and completed the surveys. There were significant differences in 15 of 16 retrospective pre to post survey items using the Wilcoxon rank sum test for non-parametric data. These included ability to be an effective team leader in general (P CRM errors through the use of the video assessment from 3 of the 12 CRM errors to 7 of the 12 CRM errors (P CRM simulation-based workshop improved the residents' self-perceptions of their pediatric CRM abilities and improved their performance on a video assessment task.

  4. Design of nuclear emergency decision-making support system based on the results of radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Qiyan; Zhang Lijun; Huang Weiqi; Chen Lin

    2010-01-01

    For nuclear emergency decision-making support system based on the results of radiation monitoring, its main assignment is receiving radiation monitoring data and analyzing them, to accomplish some works such as environment influence evaluation, dose assessment for emergency responder, decision-making analyzing and effectiveness evaluation for emergency actions, etc.. This system is made up of server, communication terminal, data-analyzing terminal, GPRS modules, printer, and so on. The whole system make of a LAN. The system's software is made up of six subsystems: data-analyzing subsystem, reporting subsystem, GIS subsystem, communication subsystem, user-managing subsystem and data-base. (authors)

  5. Lighting system with thermal management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  6. Managing Temporal Knowledge in Port Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Gudelj

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Large ports need to deal with a number of disparate activities:the movement of ships, containers and other cargo, theloading and unloading of ships and containers, customs activities.As well as human resources, anchorages, channels, lighters,tugs, berths, warehouse and other storage spaces have to beallocated and released. The efficient management of a port involvesmanaging these activities and resources, managing theflows of money involved between the agents providing and usingthese resources, and providing management information.Many information systems will be involved.Many applications have to deal with a large amount of datawhich not only represent the perceived state of the real world atpresent, but also past and/or future states. These applicationsare not served adequately by today's computer managementand database systems. In particular, deletions and updates insuch systems have destructive semantics. This means that previousdatabase contents (representing previous perceived statesof the real world cannot be accessed anymore.A review of how define temporal data models, based ongeneralizing a non-temporal data model in to a temporal one toimprove port management is presented. This paper describes apractical experiment which supports managing temporal dataalong with the corresponding prototype implementations.

  7. System for prediction of environmental emergency dose information network system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Makoto; Nagamori, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    In cases when an accident happens to arise with some risk for emission of a large amount radioactivity from the nuclear facilities, the environmental emergency due to this accident should be predicted rapidly and be informed immediately. The SPEEDI network system for such purpose was completed and now operated by Nuclear Safety Technology Center (NUSTEC) commissioned to do by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. Fujitsu has been contributing to this project by developing the principal parts of the network performance, by introducing necessary servers, and also by keeping the network in good condition, such as with construction of the system followed by continuous operation and maintenance of the system. Real-time prediction of atmospheric diffusion of radionuclides for nuclear accidents in the world is now available with experimental verification for the real-time emergency response system. Improvement of worldwide version of the SPEEDI network system, accidental discharge of radionuclides with the function of simultaneous prediction for multiple domains and its evaluation is possible. (S. Ohno)

  8. Emergency department management of early sepsis: a national survey of emergency medicine and intensive care consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwaji, Zoeb; Brady, Shirin; McIntyre, Lauralyn A; Gray, Alasdair; Walsh, Timothy S

    2014-12-01

    Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) is recommended for sepsis management in current guidelines, but the underpinning evidence is controversial. Clinician beliefs and the capacity to implement all recommended elements of EGDT in emergency departments (EDs) are uncertain. Our study aimed to explore self-reported management of early sepsis by Scottish emergency medicine (EM) and intensive care medicine (ICM) consultants, delineate important differences and determine the guideline recommendations rated most important and deliverable within the ED. A postal survey using a hypothetical patient with septic shock was sent to all EM and ICM consultants practising in Scotland. 67% (76/114) EM and 61% (96/157) ICM consultants responded. Normal saline was preferred by EM respondents ('always/often used': EM 86%, ICM 23%, pmanagement of sepsis exist between Scottish ICM and EM consultants. Transfusion practice is highly variable, suggesting clinical uncertainty. Lactate is considered more important than ScVO2 measurement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Abdominal emergencies after liver transplantation: Presentation and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, Manuela; Dioguardi Burgio, Marco; Zarzavadjian Le Bian, Alban

    2017-11-01

    With an increasing number of liver transplantation (LT) and an enhanced overall survival, LT recipients are more likely to be admitted in emergency departments of general hospitals. Yet, in LT recipients, common but also benign symptoms may reveal a LT-related (or not) severe condition. To improve management of LT recipients by emergency physicians and general surgeons and potentially improve long-term outcomes, a clinical review was performed. Overall, CT scan and blood tests should be systematically performed. Immunosuppressive side effects should be excluded using blood tests. LT-related complications are more likely to occur during the first three months after LT, including mainly bile leak, arterial aneurysm, and pseudoaneurysm. Patients should be referred in emergency to tertiary centers. Non-LT-related complications and common abdominal conditions may also be diagnosed in LT recipients. Except in case of diffuse peritonitis or in hemodynamically unstable patients when surgical procedure should be performed, most conditions should be reassessed regarding the immunosuppressive treatment and the adhesive abdominal cavity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Managing organizational culture within a management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comeau, L.; Watts, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS) is currently undergoing a major refurbishment of its nuclear reactor. At the same time, a small team is designing the organization that will operate the plant after refurbishment. This paper offers a high level overview of the Post-Refurbishment Organization (PRO) project and will focus primarily on the approach used to address organizational culture and human system dynamics. We will describe how various tools, used to assess organization culture, team performance, and individual self-understanding, are used collectively to place the right person in the right position. We will explain how the career system, Pathfinder, is used to integrate these tools to support a comprehensive model for organization design and development. Finally, we demonstrate how the management of organizational cultural and human system dynamics are integrated into the PLGS Integrated Management System. (author)

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Systems Management is the management of environmental problems at the systems level fully accounting for the multi-dimensional nature of the environment. This includes socio-economic dimensions as well as the usual physical and life science aspects. This is importa...

  12. 77 FR 153 - Passenger Train Emergency Systems II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... emergency exit path markings to assist occupants in reaching and operating primary emergency exits... Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001. Hand Delivery or Courier: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building...

  13. Emergency information management needs and practices of older adults: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anne M; Osterhage, Katie; Loughran, Julie; Painter, Ian; Demiris, George; Hartzler, Andrea L; Phelan, Elizabeth A

    2018-03-01

    To better understand how older adults currently manage emergency information, the barriers and facilitators to planning and management of emergency information, as well as the potential role of information technology to facilitate emergency planning and management. Older adults face a much higher risk of sudden illness/injury and are the age group with the largest percentages of emergent and urgent healthcare visits. Emergency information (health information needed in an emergency situation such as emergency contact information, diagnoses, and advance directives) needs to be maintained and easily accessible to ensure older adults get appropriate care and treatment consistent with their wishes in emergency situations. Current health information technologies rarely take into consideration the emergency information needs of older adults, their caregivers, and emergency responders. As part of a larger study we performed in-depth interviews with 90 older adults living in a variety of residential settings (independent living, retirement communities, assisted living) regarding how they manage information about their health. Interview sessions included photos of important health information artifacts. Interviews were transcribed and coded. Analysis of in-depth interviews revealed that emergency information is a type of health information that older adults frequently manage. Participants differed in whether they practice emergency planning (e.g. the preparation and continued management of emergency information), and in whether they involve others in emergency information and emergency planning. Despite its importance, emergency information was often not up-to-date and not always kept in locations readily apparent to emergency responders. Emergency information, such as emergency contact information, diagnoses, and advance directives, is a type of health information that older adults manage. Considering emergency information in the design of health information technologies

  14. Assessment and Management of Bullied Children in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Muhammad; Ryan, Mary; Foster, Carla Boutin; Peterson, Janey

    2015-01-01

    Bullying is an important public health issue in the United States. Up to 30% of children report exposure to such victimization. Not only does it hurt bully victim, but it also negatively impacts the bully, other children, parents, school staff, and health care providers. Because bullying often presents with accompanying serious emotional and behavioral symptoms, there has been an increase in psychiatric referrals to emergency departments. Emergency physicians may be the first responders in the health care system for bullying episodes. Victims of bullying may present with nonspecific symptoms and be reluctant to disclose being victimized, contributing to the underdiagnosis and underreporting of bully victimization. Emergency physicians therefore need to have heightened awareness of physical and psychosocial symptoms related to bullying. They should rapidly screen for bullying, assess for injuries and acute psychiatric issues that require immediate attention, and provide appropriate referrals such as psychiatry and social services. This review defines bullying, examines its presentations and epidemiology, and provides recommendations for the assessment and evaluation of victims of bullying in the emergency department. PMID:23462401

  15. Towards an integrated approach to emergency management: interdisciplinary challenges for research and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Webersik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an interdisciplinary vision for large-scale integrated emergency management that has been inspired by the transition from platform centric to inte-grated operations in the oil and gas fields, which uses remote emergency control centres collaborating virtually with local responders. The article discusses some of the most salient research challenges for integrated emergency management, including the role of mobile technology, human-centred sensing, citizen participation and social media, and the socio-cultural determinants of disaster management. The purpose of this article is to frame an integrated emergency management approach that adopts a multi-disciplinary approach, including human computer interaction, information systems, computer science, development studies and organization science employing different methodologies.Most importantly, we need to better understand the socio-cultural determinants of how people prepare to, respond and perceive disasters, in order to evaluate whether and what kind of information and communication technology (ICT support is appropriate. There is need for more research as to why in some regions local people ignore official orders to evacuate, and rather follow the advice of local leaders, elders or religious leaders. In other instances, disasters are seen as 'acts of God' thus shaping disaster preparedness and response.

  16. Emergency management: does it have a sufficiently comprehensive understanding of decision-making, process and context?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niculae, C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: It is now widely recognized in the social and management sciences that the effective support of decision-making requires a multi-disciplinary perspective, with businesses increasingly using inter-disciplinary teams. This trend is also seen in nuclear emergency management, for example in the UK inter-disciplinary groups are formed to focus on specific topics such as remediation where their recommendations are feed to the decision makers. The necessity of taking a multi-disciplinary perspective is particularly important for contexts in which the decision makers are likely to be under high stress and so could revert to instinctive patterns of behaviour and modes of communication found in their core disciplines. Yet when we look at the design of the information systems produced to support emergency management, we find a very partial set of disciplinary perspectives providing a strongly rationalistic, technocratic view. These systems have been developed by the technical community with little consultation with non-expert decision makers and limited understanding of emergency management processes across Europe and the social systems with which they interact. In this paper we have considered the Cynefin model, developed by IBM, which draws together much of the work on decision making and decision context over the past 30-40 years, describing the possible contexts in which decision-making may take place, the known, the knowable, the complex and the chaotic space. The known space is the realm of scientific knowledge where the cause and effect are understood. Next, there is the knowable space the realm of scientific enquiry where the cause and effect can be determined with sufficient data. In the complex space there are many interacting cause and effects, to the extent that we do not have sufficiently refined models to predict what will happen as a consequence of any particular actions and the cause and effect may only be explained after the event. In the chaotic

  17. 30 CFR 56.18013 - Emergency communications system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency communications system. 56.18013 Section 56.18013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Programs § 56.18013 Emergency communications system. A suitable communication system shall be provided at...

  18. 77 FR 48177 - Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... ] requirements regarding fuel oil systems for safety-related emergency diesel generators and oil-fueled gas... COMMISSION Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft... Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) issued Draft Regulatory Guide, DG- 1282, ``Fuel Oil Systems for...

  19. Cargo Data Management Demonstration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-02-01

    Delays in receipt and creation of cargo documents are a problem in international trade. The work described demonstrates some of the advantages and capabilities of a computer-based cargo data management system. A demonstration system for data manageme...

  20. REAL-TIME high-resolution urban surface water flood mapping to support flood emergency management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, M.; Yu, D.; Wilby, R.

    2016-12-01

    Strong evidence has shown that urban flood risks will substantially increase because of urbanisation, economic growth, and more frequent weather extremes. To effectively manage these risks require not only traditional grey engineering solutions, but also a green management solution. Surface water flood risk maps based on return period are useful for planning purposes, but are limited for application in flood emergencies, because of the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of rainfall and complex urban topography. Therefore, a REAL-TIME urban surface water mapping system is highly beneficial to increasing urban resilience to surface water flooding. This study integrated numerical weather forecast and high-resolution urban surface water modelling into a real-time multi-level surface water mapping system for Leicester City in the UK. For rainfall forecast, the 1km composite rain radar from the Met Office was used, and we used the advanced rainfall-runoff model - FloodMap to predict urban surface water at both city-level (10m-20m) and street-level (2m-5m). The system is capable of projecting 3-hour urban surface water flood, driven by rainfall derived from UK Met Office radar. Moreover, this system includes real-time accessibility mapping to assist the decision-making of emergency responders. This will allow accessibility (e.g. time to travel) from individual emergency service stations (e.g. Fire & Rescue; Ambulance) to vulnerable places to be evaluated. The mapping results will support contingency planning by emergency responders ahead of potential flood events.